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Sample records for 3d excited configurations

  1. Reproducibility of 3D chromatin configuration reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Mark R.; Xiong, Hao; Capurso, Daniel; Vazquez, Mariel; Arsuaga, Javier

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of eukaryotic chromatin plays an important role in processes such as gene regulation and cancer-driving gene fusions. Observing or inferring this 3D structure at even modest resolutions had been problematic, since genomes are highly condensed and traditional assays are coarse. However, recently devised high-throughput molecular techniques have changed this situation. Notably, the development of a suite of chromatin conformation capture (CCC) assays has enabled elicitation of contacts—spatially close chromosomal loci—which have provided insights into chromatin architecture. Most analysis of CCC data has focused on the contact level, with less effort directed toward obtaining 3D reconstructions and evaluating the accuracy and reproducibility thereof. While questions of accuracy must be addressed experimentally, questions of reproducibility can be addressed statistically—the purpose of this paper. We use a constrained optimization technique to reconstruct chromatin configurations for a number of closely related yeast datasets and assess reproducibility using four metrics that measure the distance between 3D configurations. The first of these, Procrustes fitting, measures configuration closeness after applying reflection, rotation, translation, and scaling-based alignment of the structures. The others base comparisons on the within-configuration inter-point distance matrix. Inferential results for these metrics rely on suitable permutation approaches. Results indicate that distance matrix-based approaches are preferable to Procrustes analysis, not because of the metrics per se but rather on account of the ability to customize permutation schemes to handle within-chromosome contiguity. It has recently been emphasized that the use of constrained optimization approaches to 3D architecture reconstruction are prone to being trapped in local minima. Our methods of reproducibility assessment provide a

  2. 3-D Force-balanced Magnetospheric Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Sorin Zaharia; C.Z. Cheng; K. Maezawa

    2003-02-10

    The knowledge of plasma pressure is essential for many physics applications in the magnetosphere, such as computing magnetospheric currents and deriving magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. A thorough knowledge of the 3-D pressure distribution has however eluded the community, as most in-situ pressure observations are either in the ionosphere or the equatorial region of the magnetosphere. With the assumption of pressure isotropy there have been attempts to obtain the pressure at different locations by either (a) mapping observed data (e.g., in the ionosphere) along the field lines of an empirical magnetospheric field model or (b) computing a pressure profile in the equatorial plane (in 2-D) or along the Sun-Earth axis (in 1-D) that is in force balance with the magnetic stresses of an empirical model. However, the pressure distributions obtained through these methods are not in force balance with the empirical magnetic field at all locations. In order to find a global 3-D plasma pressure distribution in force balance with the magnetospheric magnetic field, we have developed the MAG-3D code, that solves the 3-D force balance equation J x B = (upside-down delta) P computationally. Our calculation is performed in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials as B = (upside-down delta) psi x (upside-down delta) alpha. The pressure distribution, P = P(psi,alpha), is prescribed in the equatorial plane and is based on satellite measurements. In addition, computational boundary conditions for y surfaces are imposed using empirical field models. Our results provide 3-D distributions of magnetic field and plasma pressure as well as parallel and transverse currents for both quiet-time and disturbed magnetospheric conditions.

  3. 3D surface configuration modulates 2D symmetry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Sio, Lok-Teng

    2015-02-01

    We investigated whether three-dimensional (3D) information in a scene can affect symmetry detection. The stimuli were random dot patterns with 15% dot density. We measured the coherence threshold, or the proportion of dots that were the mirror reflection of the other dots in the other half of the image about a central vertical axis, at 75% accuracy with a 2AFC paradigm under various 3D configurations produced by the disparity between the left and right eye images. The results showed that symmetry detection was difficult when the corresponding dots across the symmetry axis were on different frontoparallel or inclined planes. However, this effect was not due to a difference in distance, as the observers could detect symmetry on a slanted surface, where the depth of the two sides of the symmetric axis was different. The threshold was reduced for a hinge configuration where the join of two slanted surfaces coincided with the axis of symmetry. Our result suggests that the detection of two-dimensional (2D) symmetry patterns is subject to the 3D configuration of the scene; and that coplanarity across the symmetry axis and consistency between the 2D pattern and 3D structure are important factors for symmetry detection.

  4. USM3D Analysis of Low Boom Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years considerable improvement was made in NASA's in house boom prediction capability. As part of this improved capability, the USM3D Navier-Stokes flow solver, when combined with a suitable unstructured grid, went from accurately predicting boom signatures at 1 body length to 10 body lengths. Since that time, the research emphasis has shifted from analysis to the design of supersonic configurations with boom signature mitigation In order to design an aircraft, the techniques for accurately predicting boom and drag need to be determined. This paper compares CFD results with the wind tunnel experimental results conducted on a Gulfstream reduced boom and drag configuration. Two different wind-tunnel models were designed and tested for drag and boom data. The goal of this study was to assess USM3D capability for predicting both boom and drag characteristics. Overall, USM3D coupled with a grid that was sheared and stretched was able to reasonably predict boom signature. The computational drag polar matched the experimental results for a lift coefficient above 0.1 despite some mismatch in the predicted lift-curve slope.

  5. Recovering 3D human body configurations using shape contexts.

    PubMed

    Mori, Greg; Malik, Jitendra

    2006-07-01

    The problem we consider in this paper is to take a single two-dimensional image containing a human figure, locate the joint positions, and use these to estimate the body configuration and pose in three-dimensional space. The basic approach is to store a number of exemplar 2D views of the human body in a variety of different configurations and viewpoints with respect to the camera. On each of these stored views, the locations of the body joints (left elbow, right knee, etc.) are manually marked and labeled for future use. The input image is then matched to each stored view, using the technique of shape context matching in conjunction with a kinematic chain-based deformation model. Assuming that there is a stored view sufficiently similar in configuration and pose, the correspondence process will succeed. The locations of the body joints are then transferred from the exemplar view to the test shape. Given the 2D joint locations, the 3D body configuration and pose are then estimated using an existing algorithm. We can apply this technique to video by treating each frame independently--tracking just becomes repeated recognition. We present results on a variety of data sets.

  6. Measuring 3D point configurations in pictorial space

    PubMed Central

    Wagemans, Johan; van Doorn, Andrea J; Koenderink, Jan J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel method to probe the depth structure of the pictorial space evoked by paintings. The method involves an exocentric pointing paradigm that allows one to find the slope of the geodesic connection between any pair of points in pictorial space. Since the locations of the points in the picture plane are known, this immediately yields the depth difference between the points. A set of depth differences between all pairs of points from an N-point (N > 2) configuration then yields the configuration in depth up to an arbitrary depth offset. Since an N-point configuration implies N(N−1) (ordered) pairs, the number of observations typically far exceeds the number of inferred depths. This yields a powerful check on the geometrical consistency of the results. We report that the remaining inconsistencies are fully accounted for by the spread encountered in repeated observations. This implies that the concept of ‘pictorial space’ indeed has an empirical significance. The method is analyzed and empirically verified in considerable detail. We report large quantitative interobserver differences, though the results of all observers agree modulo a certain affine transformation that describes the basic cue ambiguities. This is expected on the basis of a formal analysis of monocular optical structure. The method will prove useful in a variety of potential applications. PMID:23145227

  7. Unstructured grid solutions to a wing/pylon/store configuration using VGRID3D/USM3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Frink, Neal T.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to validate an inviscid flow solution package based on a new unstructured grid methodology using experimental data on a wing/pylon/store configuration. The solution package consists of an advancing front unstructured grid generator, VGRID3D, and an efficient Euler equation solver, USM3D. Comparisons of computed data versus experimental data are made for two free-stream Mach numbers at five store locations relative to the wing. Both rigid body aerodynamics and mutual interference effects are explored. A very good agreement is observed between computed and wind tunnel data.

  8. 3D Modeling of Antenna Driven Slow Waves Excited by Antennas Near the Plasma Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David; Jenkins, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Prior work with the 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) plasma and sheath model used to model ICRF antennas in fusion plasmas has highlighted the possibility of slow wave excitation at the very low end of the SOL density range, and thus the prudent need for a slow-time evolution model to treat SOL density modifications due to the RF itself. At higher frequency, the DIII-D helicon antenna has much easier access to a parasitic slow wave excitation, and in this case the Faraday screen provides the dominant means of controlling the content of the launched mode, with antenna end-effects remaining a concern. In both cases, the danger is the same, with the slow-wave propagating into a lower-hybrid resonance layer a short distance ( cm) away from the antenna, which would parasitically absorb power, transferring energy to the SOL edge plasma, primarily through electron-neutral collisions. We will present 3D modeling of antennas at both ICRF and helicon frequencies. We've added a slow-time evolution capability for the SOL plasma density to include ponderomotive force driven rarefaction from the strong fields in the vicinity of the antenna, and show initial application to NSTX antenna geometry and plasma configurations. The model is based on a Scalar Ponderomotive Potential method, using self-consistently computed local field amplitudes from the 3D simulation.

  9. Effects of point configuration on the accuracy in 3D reconstruction from biplane images

    SciTech Connect

    Dmochowski, Jacek; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Singh, Vikas; Xu Jinhui; Nazareth, Daryl P.

    2005-09-15

    Two or more angiograms are being used frequently in medical imaging to reconstruct locations in three-dimensional (3D) space, e.g., for reconstruction of 3D vascular trees, implanted electrodes, or patient positioning. A number of techniques have been proposed for this task. In this simulation study, we investigate the effect of the shape of the configuration of the points in 3D (the 'cloud' of points) on reconstruction errors for one of these techniques developed in our laboratory. Five types of configurations (a ball, an elongated ellipsoid (cigar), flattened ball (pancake), flattened cigar, and a flattened ball with a single distant point) are used in the evaluations. For each shape, 100 random configurations were generated, with point coordinates chosen from Gaussian distributions having a covariance matrix corresponding to the desired shape. The 3D data were projected into the image planes using a known imaging geometry. Gaussian distributed errors were introduced in the x and y coordinates of these projected points. Gaussian distributed errors were also introduced into the gantry information used to calculate the initial imaging geometry. The imaging geometries and 3D positions were iteratively refined using the enhanced-Metz-Fencil technique. The image data were also used to evaluate the feasible R-t solution volume. The 3D errors between the calculated and true positions were determined. The effects of the shape of the configuration, the number of points, the initial geometry error, and the input image error were evaluated. The results for the number of points, initial geometry error, and image error are in agreement with previously reported results, i.e., increasing the number of points and reducing initial geometry and/or image error, improves the accuracy of the reconstructed data. The shape of the 3D configuration of points also affects the error of reconstructed 3D configuration; specifically, errors decrease as the 'volume' of the 3D configuration

  10. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing--complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Høyum, Per; Pettersen, Fred-Johan; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Martinsen, Ørjan Grøttem; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-01-15

    A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within the tested biomimetic environment, paving the way to further developments in bioimpedance tracking of 3D cell cultures and tissue engineering.

  11. Atomic origin of 3d(9)4 f(1) configuration in La(3+) solids.

    PubMed

    Yu, S-W; Carpenter, M H; Ponce, F; Friedrich, S; Lee, J-S

    2015-10-14

    We have studied the excited electronic structure of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator by soft x-ray spectroscopy such as x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). The La 3d XAS and XES spectra of LaBr3(Ce) are compared with those of other La(3+) solids (LaF3, La2O3, and La metal). From this comparison, it turns out that the La 3d XAS and XES spectra from all the La(3+) solids considered here appear at almost the same energy, even though the corresponding binding energies of the 3d core holes determined by XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) are very different. As a result, we argue that the atomic nature of the 3d⁹4f¹ configuration created by 3d¹⁰4f⁰ → 3d⁹4f¹ x-ray absorption process in La(3+) solids is maintained via the localized 4 f (1) state, which screens the 3d core holes differently from one La(3+) solid to another.

  12. Optimal projector configuration design for 300-Mpixel multi-projection 3D display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Park, Juyong; Nam, Dongkyung; Choi, Seo Young; Park, Du-Sik; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2013-11-04

    To achieve an immersive natural 3D experience on a large screen, a 300-Mpixel multi-projection 3D display that has a 100-inch screen and a 40° viewing angle has been developed. To increase the number of rays emanating from each pixel to 300 in the horizontal direction, three hundred projectors were used. The projector configuration is an important issue in generating a high-quality 3D image, the luminance characteristics were analyzed and the design was optimized to minimize the variation in the brightness of projected images. The rows of the projector arrays were repeatedly changed according to a predetermined row interval and the projectors were arranged in an equi-angular pitch toward the constant central point. As a result, we acquired very smooth motion parallax images without discontinuity. There is no limit of viewing distance, so natural 3D images can be viewed from 2 m to over 20 m.

  13. Electron impact excitation of Fe-peak elements: forbidden transitions in the 3d5 manifold of Fe IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Hibbert, A.; Scott, M. P.; Noble, C. J.; Burke, V. M.; Burke, P. G.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-impact excitation collision strengths of the Fe-peak element Fe IV are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the R-matrix suite of codes PRMAT designed for parallel processors. One hundred and eight LS-coupled states arising from the 3d5, 3d44s and 3d44p configurations of Fe IV, are retained in the present calculations. Detailed multi-configuration interaction target wavefunctions are used with the aid of 3p2 → 3d2 electron promotions and a \\rm 4\\overline{d} correlation orbital in the present calculations. Effective collision strengths for optically forbidden transitions, which are extremely important in the analysis of lines in the Fe IV spectra, are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths for a wide range of incident electron energies, over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities. Results are presented for electron temperatures (Te in Kelvin) in the range 3.3 <= Log Te<= 6.0 applicable to many laboratory and astrophysical plasmas for transitions within the 3d5 manifold. The present results compared to previous investigations provide improved results for important lines in the Fe IV spectrum.

  14. Application of FUN3D Solver for Aeroacoustics Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a nose landing gear configuration corresponding to the experimental tests conducted in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A widely used unstructured grid code, FUN3D, is examined for solving the unsteady flow field associated with this configuration. A series of successively finer unstructured grids has been generated to assess the effect of grid refinement. Solutions have been obtained on purely tetrahedral grids as well as mixed element grids using hybrid RANS/LES turbulence models. The agreement of FUN3D solutions with experimental data on the same size mesh is better on mixed element grids compared to pure tetrahedral grids, and in general improves with grid refinement.

  15. In vivo verification of particle therapy: how Compton camera configurations affect 3D image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackin, D.; Draeger, E.; Peterson, S.; Polf, J.; Beddar, S.

    2017-05-01

    The steep dose gradients enabled by the Bragg peaks of particle therapy beams are a double edged sword. They enable highly conformal dose distributions, but even small deviations from the planned beam range can cause overdosing of healthy tissue or under-dosing of the tumour. To reduce this risk, particle therapy treatment plans include margins large enough to account for all the sources of range uncertainty, which include patient setup errors, patient anatomy changes, and CT number to stopping power ratios. Any system that could verify the beam range in vivo, would allow reduced margins and more conformal dose distributions. Toward our goal developing such a system based on Compton camera (CC) imaging, we studied how three configurations (single camera, parallel opposed, and orthogonal) affect the quality of the 3D images. We found that single CC and parallel opposed configurations produced superior images in 2D. The increase in parallax produced by an orthogonal CC configuration was shown to be beneficial in producing artefact free 3D images.

  16. Benchmarks of 3D Laplace Equation Solvers in a Cubic Configuration for Streamer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph-Marie, Plewa; Olivier, Ducasse; Philippe, Dessante; Carolyn, Jacobs; Olivier, Eichwald; Nicolas, Renon; Mohammed, Yousfi

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to test a developed SOR R&B method using the Chebyshev accelerator algorithm to solve the Laplace equation in a cubic 3D configuration. Comparisons are made in terms of precision and computing time with other elliptic equation solvers proposed in the open source LIS library. The first results, obtained by using a single core on a HPC, show that the developed SOR R&B method is efficient when the spectral radius needed for the Chebyshev acceleration is carefully pre-estimated. Preliminary results obtained with a parallelized code using the MPI library are also discussed when the calculation is distributed over one hundred cores.

  17. Excitation of anti-symmetric coupled spoof SPPs in 3D SIS waveguides based on coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-li, Tian; Yang, Chen; Jian-long, Liu; Kai, Guo; Ke-ya, Zhou; Yang, Gao; Shu-tian, Liu

    2016-07-01

    According to the electromagnetic field distributions, there exist two kinds of coupled spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs), the symmetric and anti-symmetric modes, in the three-dimensional (3D) subwavelength spoof-insulator-spoof (SIS) waveguide. We study the dispersion and excitation of the two kinds of coupled SSPPs supported by the 3D SIS waveguide. The evolution of the dispersion with the thickness and gap width of the waveguide is numerically investigated, and we give a theoretical analysis according to the coupling mechanism. Specially, based on the coupling mechanism, we design a zipper structure, through which the excitation and propagation of the anti-symmetric coupled modes can be realized effectively. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01702) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61377016, 61575055, 10974039, 61307072, 61308017, and 61405056).

  18. Holographic 3D multi-spot two-photon excitation for fast optical stimulation in brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Yu; Toyoda, Haruyoshi

    2017-04-01

    We report here a holographic high speed accessing microscope of sensory-driven synaptic activity across all inputs to single living neurons in the context of the intact cerebral cortex. This system is based on holographic multiple beam generation with spatial light modulator, we have demonstrated performance of the holographic excitation efficiency in several in vitro prototype system. 3D weighted iterative Fourier Transform method using the Ewald sphere in consideration of calculation speed has been adopted; multiple locations can be patterned in 3D with single hologram. Standard deviation of intensities of spots are still large due to the aberration of the system and/or hologram calculation, we successfully excited multiple locations of neurons in living mouse brain to monitor the calcium signals.

  19. Excitation of Fe and Cu sputtered from compounds holding different electronic core configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, D.; Larsen, K. B.; Palle, K. T.; Veje, E.

    Some chemical compounds of either copper or iron have been bombarded with 80 keV Ar + ions, and the excitation of sputtered particles has been studied with the use of optical spectrometry. The scope was primarily to study whether the initial charge state (i.e. valence) of the metal element in the undisturbed compound influences the excitation process. All data have been taken at dynamic equilibrium conditions. It is found that the relative line intensities of different core configurations depend only weakly on the valence of the metal in the undisturbed compound. As an example, for sputtering of excited, neutral Cu, the relative distribution of excitation among levels of core configurations 3d 9 and 3d 10 does not depend on whether the copper atoms initially have core configuration 3d 9 (i.e. divalent as e.g. in CuCl 2) or 3d 10 (monovalent as in CuCl). Actually, for both cases the relative line intensitive are very close to those obtained with a pure, elemental Cu target. The results are compatible with previous findings, that when a composite targe is bombarded for such a long time that steady-state conditions are reached, the surface region of the target will be so depleted in the electronegative element that it is almost metallic.

  20. 3D Monte-Carlo study of toroidally discontinuous limiter SOL configurations of Aditya tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Bibhu Prasad; Sharma, Devendra; Jha, Ratneshwar; Feng, Yühe

    2017-08-01

    The plasma-neutral transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) region formed by toroidally discontinuous limiters deviates from usual uniform SOL approximations when 3D effects caused by limiter discreteness begin to dominate. In an upgrade version of the Aditya tokamak, originally having a toroidally localized poloidal ring-like limiter, the newer outboard block and inboard belt limiters are expected to have smaller connection lengths and a multiple fold toroidal periodicity. The characteristics of plasma discharges may accordingly vary from the original observations of large diffusivity, and a net improvement and the stability of the discharges are desired. The estimations related to 3D effects in the ring limiter plasma transport are also expected to be modified and are updated by predictive simulations of transport in the new block limiter configuration. A comparison between the ring limiter results and those from new simulations with block limiter SOL shows that for the grids produced using same core plasma equilibrium, the modified SOL plasma flows and flux components have enhanced poloidal periodicity in the block limiter case. These SOL modifications result in a reduced net recycling for the equivalent edge density values. Predictions are also made about the relative level of the diffusive transport and its impact on the factors limiting the operational regime.

  1. On Diversity of Configurations Generated by Excitable Cellular Automata with Dynamical Excitation Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Excitable cellular automata with dynamical excitation interval exhibit a wide range of space-time dynamics based on an interplay between propagating excitation patterns which modify excitability of the automaton cells. Such interactions leads to formation of standing domains of excitation, stationary waves and localized excitations. We analyzed morphological and generative diversities of the functions studied and characterized the functions with highest values of the diversities. Amongst other intriguing discoveries we found that upper boundary of excitation interval more significantly affects morphological diversity of configurations generated than lower boundary of the interval does and there is no match between functions which produce configurations of excitation with highest morphological diversity and configurations of interval boundaries with highest morphological diversity. Potential directions of future studies of excitable media with dynamically changing excitability may focus on relations of the automaton model with living excitable media, e.g. neural tissue and muscles, novel materials with memristive properties and networks of conductive polymers.

  2. Mimicking liver sinusoidal structures and functions using a 3D-configured microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu; Li, Ning; Yang, Hao; Luo, Chunhua; Gong, Yixin; Tong, Chunfang; Gao, Yuxin; Lü, Shouqin; Long, Mian

    2017-02-28

    Physiologically, four major types of hepatic cells - the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, and hepatocytes - reside inside liver sinusoids and interact with flowing peripheral cells under blood flow. It is hard to mimic an in vivo liver sinusoid due to its complex multiple cell-cell interactions, spatiotemporal construction, and mechanical microenvironment. Here we developed an in vitro liver sinusoid chip by integrating the four types of primary murine hepatic cells into two adjacent fluid channels separated by a porous permeable membrane, replicating liver's key structures and configurations. Each type of cells was identified with its respective markers, and the assembled chip presented the liver-specific unique morphology of fenestration. The flow field in the liver chip was quantitatively analyzed by computational fluid dynamics simulations and particle tracking visualization tests. Intriguingly, co-culture and shear flow enhance albumin secretion independently or cooperatively, while shear flow alone enhances HGF production and CYP450 metabolism. Under lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulations, the hepatic cell co-culture facilitated neutrophil recruitment in the liver chip. Thus, this 3D-configured in vitro liver chip integrates the two key factors of shear flow and the four types of primary hepatic cells to replicate key structures, hepatic functions, and primary immune responses and provides a new in vitro model to investigate the short-duration hepatic cellular interactions under a microenvironment mimicking the physiology of a liver.

  3. High-Quality-Factor Mid-Infrared Toroidal Excitation in Folded 3D Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Du, Shuo; Cui, Ajuan; Li, Zhancheng; Fan, Yuancheng; Chen, Shuqi; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2017-02-22

    With unusual electromagnetic radiation properties and great application potentials, optical toroidal moments have received increasing interest in recent years. 3D metamaterials composed of split ring resonators with specific orientations in micro-/nanoscale are a perfect choice for toroidal moment realization in optical frequency considering the excellent magnetic confinement and quality factor, which, unfortunately, are currently beyond the reach of existing micro-/nanofabrication techniques. Here, a 3D toroidal metamaterial operating in mid-infrared region constructed by metal patterns and dielectric frameworks is designed, by which high-quality-factor toroidal resonance is observed experimentally. The toroidal dipole excitation is confirmed numerically and further demonstrated by phase analysis. Furthermore, the far-field radiation intensity of the excited toroidal dipoles can be adjusted to be predominant among other multipoles by just tuning the incident angle. The related processing method expands the capability of focused ion beam folding technologies greatly, especially in 3D metamaterial fabrication, showing great flexibility and nanoscale controllability on structure size, position, and orientation.

  4. 3D van der Waals σ-model and its topological excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgadaev, S. A.

    2001-09-01

    It is shown that the 3D vector van der Waals nonlinear σ-model (NSM) on a sphere S2 has two types of topological excitations: reminiscent vortices and instantons of 2D NSM. The first ones, the hedgehogs, are described by the homotopic group π2(S2) = Z and have logarithmic energies. They are an analog of 2D vortices. The second ones, corresponding to 2D instantons, are the hopfions. They are described by the homotopic group π3(S2) = Z, or the Hopf invariant HinZ, and have finite energy. The possibility of a topological phase transition in this model and its applications are briefly discussed.

  5. Two-Photon Excitation and Relaxation of the 3d-4d Resonance in Atomic Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.; Cubaynes, D.; Richardson, V.; Costello, J. T.; Radcliffe, P.; Li, W. B.; Duesterer, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Mihelic, A.; Papamihail, K. G.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2010-05-28

    Two-photon excitation of a single-photon forbidden Auger resonance has been observed and investigated using the intense extreme ultraviolet radiation from the free electron laser in Hamburg. At the wavelength 26.9 nm (46 eV) two photons promoted a 3d core electron to the outer 4d shell. The subsequent Auger decay, as well as several nonlinear above threshold ionization processes, were studied by electron spectroscopy. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and analysis of the underlying multiphoton processes.

  6. 3D Numerical Simulation on the Sloshing Waves Excited by the Seismic Shacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Wu, Tso-Ren

    2016-04-01

    In the event of 2015 Nepal earthquake, a video clip broadcasted worldwide showed a violent water spilling in a hotel swimming pool. This sloshing phenomenon indicates a potential water loss in the sensitive facilities, e.g. the spent fuel pools in nuclear power plant, has to be taken into account carefully under the consideration of seismic-induced ground acceleration. In the previous studies, the simulation of sloshing mainly focused on the pressure force on the structure by using a simplified Spring-Mass Method developed in the field of solid mechanics. However, restricted by the assumptions of plane water surface and limited wave height, significant error will be made in evaluating the amount of water loss in the tank. In this paper, the computational fluid dynamical model, Splash3D, was adopted for studying the sloshing problem accurately. Splash3D solved 3D Navier-Stokes Equation directly with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulent closure. The Volume-of-fluid (VOF) method with piecewise linear interface calculation (PLIC) was used to track the complex breaking water surface. The time series acceleration of a design seismic was loaded to excite the water. With few restrictions from the assumptions, the accuracy of the simulation results were improved dramatically. A series model validations were conducted by compared to a 2D theoretical solution, and a 3D experimental data. Good comparisons can be seen. After the validation, we performed the simulation for considering a sloshing case in a rectangular water tank with a dimension of 12 m long, 8 m wide, 8 m deep, which contained water with 7 m in depth. The seismic movement was imported by considering time-series acceleration in three dimensions, which were about 0.5 g to 1.2 g in the horizontal directions, and 0.3 g to 1 g in the vertical direction. We focused the discussions on the kinematics of the water surface, wave breaking, velocity field, pressure field, water force on the side walls, and, most

  7. Configuration interaction study of the ground and excited states of TiO2 ring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takashi; Whitten, Jerry L.

    2011-03-01

    Theoretical studies of the ground and lowest excited singlet and triplet states of a series of titanium dioxide ring structures, (TiO2)2n, n = 3-9, are reported. Calculations are based on many-electron configuration theory, where energies of states and geometrical structures are determined by variational energy minimization. The lowest energy excited states correspond to excitations from oxygen 2p levels to unoccupied 3d orbitals on titanium. For each ring system, two types of excited state solutions are investigated: those that maintain periodic symmetry for individual orbitals and solutions that allow the symmetry to be broken. The latter solutions which correspond to localized states or excitons are found to be significantly lower in energy than the symmetric solutions. We compare the vertical excitation energy of these well-defined geometrical structures with size effects reported in experimental studies.

  8. A study of the excitation and radiative decay of the 3s-prime 3D-0 and 3d 3D-0 levels of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, E. C.; Mclaughlin, R. W.; Gorman, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    The absolute cross-sections for the excitation of the 989 A, 1027 A, 7990 A, 8446 A, 1.1287 micron and 1.3164 micron multiplets of atomic oxygen by electron impact dissociation of O2 are reported. The radiative branching ratios for these transitions are calculated from these results and compared with the NBS compilation of Wiese et al. (1966) and the recent theoretical calculations of Pradhan and Saraph (1977). The cascade models of O(+) radiative recombination and of electron-impact excitation of the O I(3S) state in the terrestrial airglow are discussed in the light of the laboratory measurements, and the effects of the resonant absorption of components of the lambda 989 A and lambda 1027 A multiplets by the Birge-Hopfield band system of N2 are investigated. This process is shown to depend sensitively on the N2 vibrational temperature and to cause characteristic changes in the OI EUV emission spectrum in auroras and in the sunlit F-region at high exospheric temperatures.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell interactions with 3D ECM modules fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Tran, Quyen A; Fong, Jimmy J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ogle, Brenda M; Campagnola, Paul J

    2012-09-10

    To understand complex micro/nanoscale ECM stem cell interactions, reproducible in vitro models are needed that can strictly recapitulate the relative content and spatial arrangement of native tissue. Additionally, whole ECM proteins are required to most accurately reflect native binding dynamics. To address this need, we use multiphoton excited photochemistry to create 3D whole protein constructs or "modules" to study how the ECM governs stem cell migration. The constructs were created from mixtures of BSA/laminin (LN) and BSA alone, whose comparison afforded studying how the migration dynamics are governed from the combination of morphological and ECM cues. We found that mesenchymal stem cells interacted for significantly longer durations with the BSA/LN constructs than pure BSA, pointing to the importance of binding cues of the LN. Critical to this work was the development of an automated system with feedback based on fluorescence imaging to provide quality control when synthesizing multiple identical constructs.

  10. Characterising a configuration interaction excited state using natural transition geminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, J. P.; Paterson, M. J.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce natural transition geminals as a means to qualitatively understand a transition where double excitations are important. The first two A1 singlet states of the CH cation are used as an initial example. We calculate these states with configuration interaction singles and state-averaged Monte Carlo configuration interaction (SA-MCCI). For each method, we compare the important natural transition geminals with the dominant natural transition orbitals. We then compare SA-MCCI and full configuration interaction with regards to the natural transition geminals using the beryllium atom. We compare using the natural transition geminals with analysing the important configurations in the CI expansion to give the dominant transition for the beryllium atom and the carbon dimer. Finally, we calculate the natural transition geminals for two electronic excitations of formamide.

  11. The lithospheric-scale 3D structural configuration of the North Alpine Foreland Basin constrained by gravity modelling and the calculation of the 3D load distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schneider, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The North Alpine Foreland Basin is situated in the northern front of the European Alps and extends over parts of France, Switzerland, Germany and Austria. It formed as a wedge shaped depression since the Tertiary in consequence of the Euro - Adriatic continental collision and the Alpine orogeny. The basin is filled with clastic sediments, the Molasse, originating from erosional processes of the Alps and underlain by Mesozoic sedimentary successions and a Paleozoic crystalline crust. For our study we have focused on the German part of the basin. To investigate the deep structure, the isostatic state and the load distribution of this region we have constructed a 3D structural model of the basin and the Alpine area using available depth and thickness maps, regional scale 3D structural models as well as seismic and well data for the sedimentary part. The crust (from the top Paleozoic down to the Moho (Grad et al. 2008)) has been considered as two-parted with a lighter upper crust and a denser lower crust; the partition has been calculated following the approach of isostatic equilibrium of Pratt (1855). By implementing a seismic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere-Boundary (LAB) (Tesauro 2009) the crustal scale model has been extended to the lithospheric-scale. The layer geometry and the assigned bulk densities of this starting model have been constrained by means of 3D gravity modelling (BGI, 2012). Afterwards the 3D load distribution has been calculated using a 3D finite element method. Our results show that the North Alpine Foreland Basin is not isostatically balanced and that the configuration of the crystalline crust strongly controls the gravity field in this area. Furthermore, our results show that the basin area is influenced by varying lateral load differences down to a depth of more than 150 km what allows a first order statement of the required compensating horizontal stress needed to prevent gravitational collapse of the system. BGI (2012). The International

  12. Discovering hotspots in functional genomic data superposed on 3D chromatin configuration reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Capurso, Daniel; Bengtsson, Henrik; Segal, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome influences cellular function, notably gene regulation. Recent studies have assessed the three-dimensional (3D) co-localization of functional annotations (e.g. centromeres, long terminal repeats) using 3D genome reconstructions from Hi-C (genome-wide chromosome conformation capture) data; however, corresponding assessments for continuous functional genomic data (e.g. chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) peak height) are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that applying bump hunting via the patient rule induction method (PRIM) to ChIP-seq data superposed on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 3D genome reconstruction can discover ‘functional 3D hotspots’, regions in 3-space for which the mean ChIP-seq peak height is significantly elevated. For the transcription factor Swi6, the top hotspot by P-value contains MSB2 and ERG11 – known Swi6 target genes on different chromosomes. We verify this finding in a number of ways. First, this top hotspot is relatively stable under PRIM across parameter settings. Second, this hotspot is among the top hotspots by mean outcome identified by an alternative algorithm, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) regression. Third, the distance between MSB2 and ERG11 is smaller than expected (by resampling) in two other 3D reconstructions generated via different normalization and reconstruction algorithms. This analytic approach can discover functional 3D hotspots and potentially reveal novel regulatory interactions. PMID:26869583

  13. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-01

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  14. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-15

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  15. A semi-automatic image-based close range 3D modeling pipeline using a multi-camera configuration.

    PubMed

    Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Yeh, Po-Chia

    2012-01-01

    The generation of photo-realistic 3D models is an important task for digital recording of cultural heritage objects. This study proposes an image-based 3D modeling pipeline which takes advantage of a multi-camera configuration and multi-image matching technique that does not require any markers on or around the object. Multiple digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras are adopted and fixed with invariant relative orientations. Instead of photo-triangulation after image acquisition, calibration is performed to estimate the exterior orientation parameters of the multi-camera configuration which can be processed fully automatically using coded targets. The calibrated orientation parameters of all cameras are applied to images taken using the same camera configuration. This means that when performing multi-image matching for surface point cloud generation, the orientation parameters will remain the same as the calibrated results, even when the target has changed. Base on this invariant character, the whole 3D modeling pipeline can be performed completely automatically, once the whole system has been calibrated and the software was seamlessly integrated. Several experiments were conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed system. Images observed include that of a human being, eight Buddhist statues, and a stone sculpture. The results for the stone sculpture, obtained with several multi-camera configurations were compared with a reference model acquired by an ATOS-I 2M active scanner. The best result has an absolute accuracy of 0.26 mm and a relative accuracy of 1:17,333. It demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed low-cost image-based 3D modeling pipeline and its applicability to a large quantity of antiques stored in a museum.

  16. A Semi-Automatic Image-Based Close Range 3D Modeling Pipeline Using a Multi-Camera Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Yeh, Po-Chia

    2012-01-01

    The generation of photo-realistic 3D models is an important task for digital recording of cultural heritage objects. This study proposes an image-based 3D modeling pipeline which takes advantage of a multi-camera configuration and multi-image matching technique that does not require any markers on or around the object. Multiple digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras are adopted and fixed with invariant relative orientations. Instead of photo-triangulation after image acquisition, calibration is performed to estimate the exterior orientation parameters of the multi-camera configuration which can be processed fully automatically using coded targets. The calibrated orientation parameters of all cameras are applied to images taken using the same camera configuration. This means that when performing multi-image matching for surface point cloud generation, the orientation parameters will remain the same as the calibrated results, even when the target has changed. Base on this invariant character, the whole 3D modeling pipeline can be performed completely automatically, once the whole system has been calibrated and the software was seamlessly integrated. Several experiments were conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed system. Images observed include that of a human being, eight Buddhist statues, and a stone sculpture. The results for the stone sculpture, obtained with several multi-camera configurations were compared with a reference model acquired by an ATOS-I 2M active scanner. The best result has an absolute accuracy of 0.26 mm and a relative accuracy of 1:17,333. It demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed low-cost image-based 3D modeling pipeline and its applicability to a large quantity of antiques stored in a museum. PMID:23112656

  17. Using FUN3D for Aeroelastic, Sonic Boom, and AeroPropulsoServoElastic (APSE) Analyses of a Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph; Kopasakis, George

    2016-01-01

    An overview of recent applications of the FUN3D CFD code to computational aeroelastic, sonic boom, and aeropropulsoservoelasticity (APSE) analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration is presented. The overview includes details of the computational models developed including multiple unstructured CFD grids suitable for aeroelastic and sonic boom analyses. In addition, aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models (ROMs) are generated and used to rapidly compute the aeroelastic response and utter boundaries at multiple flight conditions.

  18. Dynamic magnetic excitations in 3d and 4f atoms and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, Timofey; Miyamachi, Toshio; Schuh, Tobias; Märkl, Tobias; Bresch, Christopher; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2014-12-01

    Spins in magnetic nanostructures can be excited by an electric current. In the inelastic scattering events, the spin of a tunneling electron provided by a scanning tunneling microscope may be flipped and angular momentum is transferred to the magnetic system. We used this technique to determine magnetic anisotropies and exchange couplings in 3d transition and 4f rare earth metal atoms and clusters on surfaces. Further, we discuss that the magnetic anisotropy, i.e. the zero field splitting, in rare earth atoms requires a fully relativistic description, in which not only the spin of the atoms but also their orbital angular momentum is taken into account. When describing the magnetic anisotropy with the Hamiltonian including all Stevens operators and combining it with spin flip scattering by conduction and tunneling electrons, we find that long spin lifetimes are theoretically expected for specific total angular momenta and crystal field symmetries and show experimental evidence that such a situation is realized in Ho on Pt(111).

  19. Parallel computing simulation of electrical excitation and conduction in the 3D human heart.

    PubMed

    Di Yu; Dongping Du; Hui Yang; Yicheng Tu

    2014-01-01

    A correctly beating heart is important to ensure adequate circulation of blood throughout the body. Normal heart rhythm is produced by the orchestrated conduction of electrical signals throughout the heart. Cardiac electrical activity is the resulted function of a series of complex biochemical-mechanical reactions, which involves transportation and bio-distribution of ionic flows through a variety of biological ion channels. Cardiac arrhythmias are caused by the direct alteration of ion channel activity that results in changes in the AP waveform. In this work, we developed a whole-heart simulation model with the use of massive parallel computing with GPGPU and OpenGL. The simulation algorithm was implemented under several different versions for the purpose of comparisons, including one conventional CPU version and two GPU versions based on Nvidia CUDA platform. OpenGL was utilized for the visualization / interaction platform because it is open source, light weight and universally supported by various operating systems. The experimental results show that the GPU-based simulation outperforms the conventional CPU-based approach and significantly improves the speed of simulation. By adopting modern computer architecture, this present investigation enables real-time simulation and visualization of electrical excitation and conduction in the large and complicated 3D geometry of a real-world human heart.

  20. Optical oscillator strengths for valence-shell and Br-3d inner-shell excitations of HCl and HBr.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Bin; Zhu, Lin-Fan; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Xu, Ke-Zun

    2006-10-21

    Absolute optical oscillator strength density spectra for valence-shell excitations of HCl and HBr, as well as for Br-3d inner-shell excitations of HBr, have been determined by high-resolution electron-energy-loss-spectroscopy method in the dipole limit. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the discrete transitions of HCl and HBr are reported and compared with the previous results determined by the photoabsorption method.

  1. Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex 3D High-Lift Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    The application of an unstructured grid methodology on a three-dimensional high-lift configuration is presented. The focus of this paper is on the grid generation aspect of an integrated effort for the development of an unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) capability at the NASA Langley Research Center. The meshing approach is based on tetrahedral grids generated by the advancing-front and the advancing-layers procedures. The capability of the method for solving high-lift problems is demonstrated on an aircraft model referred to as the energy efficient transport configuration. The grid generation issues, including the pros and cons of the present approach, are discussed in relation to the high-lift problems. Limited viscous flow results are presented to demonstrate the viability of the generated grids. A corresponding Navier-Stokes solution capability, along with further computations on the present grid, is presented in a companion SAE paper.

  2. Shear Alfv'en spectrum and mode structures for 3D configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, D. A.; Todo, Y.

    2007-11-01

    Energetic particle destabilized Alfv'en modes are observed in a wide range of stellarator experiments. We have developed a code (AE3D) to calculate the full shear Alfv'en frequency spectrum and associated mode structures for arbitrary stellarator equilibria. This is based on a Galerkin approach using a combined Fourier mode (poloidal/toroidal angle) finite element (radial) representation. It has been applied to an LHD case where Alfv'en activity and enhanced ion losses were seen. Applications also are underway to other experiments, such as HSX, where ECH-driven Alfv'en modes were observed. This model can form the basis for stellarator optimization targets, synthetic diagnostics, and reduced linear/nonlinear stability models. It is also applicable to tokamaks with symmetry-breaking effects. By matching observed frequencies with calculated mode structures, improved understanding of the physics mechanisms of AE modes, such as sideband coupling, damping, and enhanced fast particle losses can be developed.

  3. Human lymphocytes cultured in 3-D bioreactors: influence of configuration on metabolite transport and reactions.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Efrem; Piscioneri, Antonella; Salerno, Simona; Tasselli, Franco; Morelli, Sabrina; Drioli, Enrico; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2012-11-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from healthy human donors' buffy coat were cultured in membrane bio-reactors (MBR) designed in two different configurations: a conventional hollow-fiber (HF) bundle of modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK-WC) arranged in parallel, and a cross-assembled PEEK-WC and polyethersulfone (PES) HF membranes having different structural properties. Both bioreactors were experimentally compared in terms of metabolic activity of cultured cells, monitored over 8 days with respect to glucose uptake rate (GUR) and lactate production rate (LPR), and mathematically modelled by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method in order to investigate the impact of geometrical configuration and transport properties of biomaterials. The almost uniform trend of GUR from day 2 to day 7 (average of 0.0497 ± 0.0076 ng/h cell) and the low LPR (that decreased from an initial value of 2.92 ± 0.0055 pg/h cell to practically zero at day 8) provided evidence for superior performance of crossed-HFMBR in reproducing an optimal in vitro physiological environment with quite uniform concentration distribution of species in the extracellular space of the bioreactor and able to maintain lymphocyte viability and functions. The crossed HFMBR also resulted in an enhanced production of interleukin IL-2 over 8 days (average of 0.995 ± 0.25 pg/h/Mcell) and IL-10 in the first 3 days (average of 6.46 ± 0.28 pg/h/Mcell) which were up to one order of magnitude higher with respect to values measured in the parallel configuration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electric current variations and 3D magnetic configuration of coronal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Harra, Louise K.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Guo, Yang; Demoulin, Pascal; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando, , Prof

    Coronal jets (EUV) were observed by SDO/AIA on September 17, 2010. HMI and THEMIS measured the vector magnetic field from which we derived the magnetic flux, the phostospheric velocity and the vertical electric current. The magnetic configuration was computed with a non linear force-free approach. The phostospheric current pattern of the recurrent jets were associated with the quasi-separatrix layers deduced from the magnetic extrapolation. The large twisted near-by Eiffel-tower-shape jet was also caused by reconnection in current layers containing a null point. This jet cannot be classified precisely within either the quiescent or the blowout jet types. We will show the importance of the existence of bald patches in the low atmosphere

  5. The effect of anisotropic heat transport on magnetic islands in 3-D configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Schlutt, M. G.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-08-15

    An analytic theory of nonlinear pressure-induced magnetic island formation using a boundary layer analysis is presented. This theory extends previous work by including the effects of finite parallel heat transport and is applicable to general three dimensional magnetic configurations. In this work, particular attention is paid to the role of finite parallel heat conduction in the context of pressure-induced island physics. It is found that localized currents that require self-consistent deformation of the pressure profile, such as resistive interchange and bootstrap currents, are attenuated by finite parallel heat conduction when the magnetic islands are sufficiently small. However, these anisotropic effects do not change saturated island widths caused by Pfirsch-Schlueter current effects. Implications for finite pressure-induced island healing are discussed.

  6. The spin-flip extended single excitation configuration interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, David; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-08-01

    An extension of the spin-flip single excitation configuration interaction (SF-CIS) method is introduced. The extension, abbreviated as SF-XCIS, includes all configurations in which no more than one virtual level of the high spin triplet reference becomes occupied and no more than one doubly occupied level becomes vacant. The number of such configurations is quadratic with molecule size, and the method is implemented in a direct algorithm whose cost scales in the same way with molecule size as CIS itself, thus permitting applications to large systems. Starting from a spin restricted triplet determinant, SF-XCIS yields spin-pure singlet, triplet, and quintet states, and treats both half-occupied reference orbitals in a fully balanced way to allow application to strongly correlated problems. Tests on bond dissociation in the HF molecule, the torsional potential of ethylene, and excited states of polyenes show encouraging improvements using SF-XCIS compared to SF-CIS and a previously suggested extension, the spin-complete CIS model.

  7. Low Boom Configuration Analysis with FUN3D Adjoint Simulation Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Off-body pressure, forces, and moments for the Gulfstream Low Boom Model are computed with a Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes solver coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. This is the first application of viscous output-based adaptation to reduce estimated discretization errors in off-body pressure for a wing body configuration. The output adaptation approach is compared to an a priori grid adaptation technique designed to resolve the signature on the centerline by stretching and aligning the grid to the freestream Mach angle. The output-based approach produced good predictions of centerline and off-centerline measurements. Eddy viscosity predicted by the SA turbulence model increased significantly with grid adaptation. Computed lift as a function of drag compares well with wind tunnel measurements for positive lift, but predicted lift, drag, and pitching moment as a function of angle of attack has significant differences from the measured data. The sensitivity of longitudinal forces and moment to grid refinement is much smaller than the differences between the computed and measured data.

  8. Convolution and iterative methods applied to low-frequency waves in 3D warm configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellet, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Popovich, P.; Villard, L.; Brunner, S.

    2011-03-01

    Kinetic effects have been implemented in the three-dimensional full-wave code LEMan. These allow modeling Landau damping as well as the Kinetic Alfvén Wave (KAW). Special attention has been taken on the exact computation of the parallel wave vector as it can have a strong impact on the results. Due to numerical specificities, two techniques have been used depending on the frequency domain under investigation. The damping of global modes like Toroidally-induced Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE), which is a key issue for future reactors as they can be driven by fast ions, can then be determined. Multiple couplings are shown to lead to an increase of the damping value and thus to a stabilization of the mode. In the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF), a Large Helical Device (LHD) configuration has been investigated. For this specific case, the difference between the results obtained with an accurate determination of the parallel wave vector and the approximation k=n/R has been shown to be insignificant.

  9. 3D digitization methods based on laser excitation and active triangulation: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubreton, Olivier; Mériaudeau, Fabrice; Truchetet, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    3D reconstruction of surfaces is an important topic in computer vision and corresponds to a large field of applications: industrial inspection, reverse engineering, object recognition, biometry, archeology… Because of the large varieties of applications, one can find in the literature a lot of approaches which can be classified into two families: passive and active [1]. Certainly because of their reliability, active approaches, using imaging system with an additional controlled light source, seem to be the most commonly used in the industrial field. In this domain, the 3D digitization approach based on active 3D triangulation has had important developments during the last ten years [2] and seems to be mature today if considering the important number of systems proposed by manufacturers. Unfortunately, the performances of active 3D scanners depend on the optical properties of the surface to digitize. As an example, on Fig 1.a, a 3D shape with a diffuse surface has been digitized with Comet V scanner (Steinbichler). The 3D reconstruction is presented on Fig 1.b. The same experiment was carried out on a similar object (same shape) but presenting a specular surface (Fig 1.c and Fig 1.d) ; it can clearly be observed, that the specularity influences of the performance of the digitization.

  10. A method for the quantification of the pressure dependent 3D collagen configuration in the arterial adventitia.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, J T C; Vilanova, A; Rezakhaniha, R; Stergiopulos, N; van de Vosse, F N; Bovendeerd, P H M

    2012-11-01

    Collagen plays an important role in the response of the arterial wall to mechanical loading and presumably has a load-bearing function preventing overdistension. Collagen configuration is important for understanding this role, in particular in mathematical models of arterial wall mechanics. In this study a new method is presented to image and quantify this configuration. Collagen in the arterial adventitia is stained with CNA35, and imaged in situ at high resolution with confocal microscopy at luminal pressures from 0 to 140mm Hg. The images are processed with a new automatic approach, utilizing techniques intended for MRI-DTI data. Collagen configuration is quantified through three parameters: the waviness, the transmural angle and the helical angle. The method is demonstrated for the case of carotid arteries of the white New Zealand rabbit. The waviness indicated a gradual straightening between 40 and 80mm Hg. The transmural angle was about zero indicating that the fibers stayed within an axial-circumferential plane at all pressures. The helical angle was characterized by a symmetrical distribution around the axial direction, indicating a double symmetrical helix. The method is the first to combine high resolution imaging with a new automatic image processing approach to quantify the 3D configuration of collagen in the adventitia as a function of pressure.

  11. Stereochemical configuration and selective excitation of the chiral molecule halothane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitzer, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Burzynski, Phillip; Weller, Miriam; Metz, Daniel; Neff, Jonathan; Waitz, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H.; Williams, Joshua B.; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Berger, Robert; Dörner, Reinhard; Schöffler, Markus

    2016-12-01

    X-ray single-photon ionization and fragmentation of the chiral molecule halothane from a racemic mixture have been investigated using the cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy technique. Two important facets related to the core ionization of this species are examined: Firstly, the distinction of enantiomers (mirror isomers) and the determination of absolute configuration on a single-molecule level by four-body Coulomb explosion; secondly, the interplay of site-selective excitation and fragmentation patterns. These results are easily transferable to other molecular species and show the wealth of features that can be investigated by coincidence spectroscopy of chiral molecules.

  12. System Configuration and Operation Plan of Hayabusa2 DCAM3-D Camera System for Scientific Observation During SCI Impact Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kazunori; Shirai, Kei; Sawada, Hirotaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Honda, Rie; Wada, Koji; Ishibashi, Ko; Iijima, Yu-ichi; Sakatani, Naoya; Nakazawa, Satoru; Hayakawa, Hajime

    2017-03-01

    An artificial impact experiment is scheduled for 2018-2019 in which an impactor will collide with asteroid 162137 Ryugu (1999 JU3) during the asteroid rendezvous phase of the Hayabusa2 spacecraft. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) will shoot a 2-kg projectile at 2 km/s to create a crater 1-10 m in diameter with an expected subsequent ejecta curtain of a 100-m scale on an ideal sandy surface. A miniaturized deployable camera (DCAM3) unit will separate from the spacecraft at about 1 km from impact, and simultaneously conduct optical observations of the experiment. We designed and developed a camera system (DCAM3-D) in the DCAM3, specialized for scientific observations of impact phenomenon, in order to clarify the subsurface structure, construct theories of impact applicable in a microgravity environment, and identify the impact point on the asteroid. The DCAM3-D system consists of a miniaturized camera with a wide-angle and high-focusing performance, high-speed radio communication devices, and control units with large data storage on both the DCAM3 unit and the spacecraft. These components were successfully developed under severe constraints of size, mass and power, and the whole DCAM3-D system has passed all tests verifying functions, performance, and environmental tolerance. Results indicated sufficient potential to conduct the scientific observations during the SCI impact experiment. An operation plan was carefully considered along with the configuration and a time schedule of the impact experiment, and pre-programed into the control unit before the launch. In this paper, we describe details of the system design concept, specifications, and the operating plan of the DCAM3-D system, focusing on the feasibility of scientific observations.

  13. System Configuration and Operation Plan of Hayabusa2 DCAM3-D Camera System for Scientific Observation During SCI Impact Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kazunori; Shirai, Kei; Sawada, Hirotaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Honda, Rie; Wada, Koji; Ishibashi, Ko; Iijima, Yu-ichi; Sakatani, Naoya; Nakazawa, Satoru; Hayakawa, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    An artificial impact experiment is scheduled for 2018-2019 in which an impactor will collide with asteroid 162137 Ryugu (1999 JU3) during the asteroid rendezvous phase of the Hayabusa2 spacecraft. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) will shoot a 2-kg projectile at 2 km/s to create a crater 1-10 m in diameter with an expected subsequent ejecta curtain of a 100-m scale on an ideal sandy surface. A miniaturized deployable camera (DCAM3) unit will separate from the spacecraft at about 1 km from impact, and simultaneously conduct optical observations of the experiment. We designed and developed a camera system (DCAM3-D) in the DCAM3, specialized for scientific observations of impact phenomenon, in order to clarify the subsurface structure, construct theories of impact applicable in a microgravity environment, and identify the impact point on the asteroid. The DCAM3-D system consists of a miniaturized camera with a wide-angle and high-focusing performance, high-speed radio communication devices, and control units with large data storage on both the DCAM3 unit and the spacecraft. These components were successfully developed under severe constraints of size, mass and power, and the whole DCAM3-D system has passed all tests verifying functions, performance, and environmental tolerance. Results indicated sufficient potential to conduct the scientific observations during the SCI impact experiment. An operation plan was carefully considered along with the configuration and a time schedule of the impact experiment, and pre-programed into the control unit before the launch. In this paper, we describe details of the system design concept, specifications, and the operating plan of the DCAM3-D system, focusing on the feasibility of scientific observations.

  14. Localized versus delocalized excitations just above the 3d threshold in krypton clusters studied by Auger electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tchaplyguine, M; Kivimäki, A; Peredkov, S; Sorensen, S L; Ohrwall, G; Schulz, J; Lundwall, M; Rander, T; Lindblad, A; Rosso, A; Svensson, S; Mårtensson, N; Björneholm, O

    2007-09-28

    We present Auger spectroscopy studies of large krypton clusters excited by soft x-ray photons with energies on and just above the 3d(52) ionization threshold. The deexcitation spectra contain new features as compared to the spectra measured both below and far above threshold. Possible origins of these extra features, which stay at constant kinetic energies, are discussed: (1) normal Auger process with a postcollision interaction induced energy shift, (2) recapture of photoelectrons into high Rydberg orbitals after Auger decay, and (3) excitation into the conduction band (or "internal" ionization) followed by Auger decay. The first two schemes are ruled out, hence internal ionization remains the most probable explanation.

  15. Electron beam excitation of coherent sub-terahertz radiation in periodic structures manufactured by 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A. R.; MacLachlan, A. J.; Robertson, C. W.; Zhang, L.; Konoplev, I. V.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.

    2017-07-01

    For the creation of novel coherent sub-THz sources excited by electron beams there is a requirement to manufacture intricate periodic structures to produce and radiate electromagnetic fields. The specification and the measured performance is reported of a periodic structure constructed by additive manufacturing and used successfully in an electron beam driven sub-THz radiation source. Additive manufacturing, or ;3D printing;, is promising to be quick and cost-effective for prototyping these periodic structures.

  16. Proteopedia: Exciting Advances in the 3D Encyclopedia of Biomolecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilusky, Jaime; Hodis, Eran; Sussman, Joel L.

    Proteopedia is a collaborative, 3D web-encyclopedia of protein, nucleic acid and other structures. Proteopedia ( http://www.proteopedia.org ) presents 3D biomolecule structures in a broadly accessible manner to a diverse scientific audience through easy-to-use molecular visualization tools integrated into a wiki environment that anyone with a user account can edit. We describe recent advances in the web resource in the areas of content and software. In terms of content, we describe a large growth in user-added content as well as improvements in automatically-generated content for all PDB entry pages in the resource. In terms of software, we describe new features ranging from the capability to create pages hidden from public view to the capability to export pages for offline viewing. New software features also include an improved file-handling system and availability of biological assemblies of protein structures alongside their asymmetric units.

  17. Numerical solutions of the compressible 3-D boundary-layer equations for aerospace configurations with emphasis on LFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Julius E.; Iyer, Venkit; Radwan, Samir

    1987-01-01

    The application of stability theory in Laminar Flow Control (LFC) research requires that density and velocity profiles be specified throughout the viscous flow field of interest. These profile values must be as numerically accurate as possible and free of any numerically induced oscillations. Guidelines for the present research project are presented: develop an efficient and accurate procedure for solving the 3-D boundary layer equation for aerospace configurations; develop an interface program to couple selected 3-D inviscid programs that span the subsonic to hypersonic Mach number range; and document and release software to the LFC community. The interface program was found to be a dependable approach for developing a user friendly procedure for generating the boundary-layer grid and transforming an inviscid solution from a relatively coarse grid to a sufficiently fine boundary-layer grid. The boundary-layer program was shown to be fourth-order accurate in the direction normal to the wall boundary and second-order accurate in planes parallel to the boundary. The fourth-order accuracy allows accurate calculations with as few as one-fifth the number of grid points required for conventional second-order schemes.

  18. Joint Design of Excitation k-Space Trajectory and RF Pulse for Small-Tip 3D Tailored Excitation in MRI.

    PubMed

    Hao, Sun; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Noll, Douglas C; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new method for the joint design of k-space trajectory and RF pulse in 3D small-tip tailored excitation. Designing time-varying RF and gradient waveforms for a desired 3D target excitation pattern in MRI poses a non-linear, non-convex, constrained optimization problem with relatively large problem size that is difficult to solve directly. Existing joint pulse design approaches are therefore typically restricted to predefined trajectory types such as EPI or stack-of-spirals that intrinsically satisfy the gradient maximum and slew rate constraints and reduce the problem size (dimensionality) dramatically, but lead to suboptimal excitation accuracy for a given pulse duration. Here we use a 2nd-order B-spline basis that can be fitted to an arbitrary k-space trajectory, and allows the gradient constraints to be implemented efficiently. We show that this allows the joint optimization problem to be solved with quite general k-space trajectories. Starting from an arbitrary initial trajectory, we first approximate the trajectory using B-spline basis, and then optimize the corresponding coefficients. We evaluate our method in simulation using four different k-space initializations: stack-of-spirals, SPINS, KT-points, and a new method based on KT-points. In all cases, our approach leads to substantial improvement in excitation accuracy for a given pulse duration. We also validated our method for inner-volume excitation using phantom experiments. The computation is fast enough for online applications.

  19. Investigation of Parametric Excitation of Whistler Waves Using 3D Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinger, James; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel; Rose, David; Paraschiv, Ioana

    2016-10-01

    Previous theoretical work has shown that a parametric interaction between quasi-electrostatic lower oblique resonance (LOR) and lower frequency (ω < ωLH) ion acoustic or extremely low frequency (ELF) waves can produce electromagnetic whistler waves in a cold magnetized plasma. It was also demonstrated theoretically that this interaction can more efficiently generate electromagnetic whistler waves than by direct excitation by a conventional loop antenna, operating at a single frequency. For the purpose of numerically validating the above result, a series of particle-in-cell simulations were carried out. We first demonstrate the ability to accurately model whistler wave excitation producing the familiar resonant surfaces which comprise the LOR using a modeled loop antenna. Next we demonstrate the ability to generate ion acoustic waves as well as ELF waves, both of which are shown to agree with the expected linear dispersion relations. Finally, we investigate the existence of any nonlinear interaction which indicates the desired parametric excitation and attempt to analyze the efficiency of this method of excitation and radiated power going into the whistler part of the VLF wave spectrum.

  20. SAFE-3D analysis of a piezoelectric transducer to excite guided waves in a rail web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramatlo, Dineo A.; Long, Craig S.; Loveday, Philip W.; Wilke, Daniel N.

    2016-02-01

    Our existing Ultrasonic Broken Rail Detection system detects complete breaks and primarily uses a propagating mode with energy concentrated in the head of the rail. Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that a mode with energy concentrated in the head of the rail, is capable of detecting weld reflections at long distances. Exploiting a mode with energy concentrated in the web of the rail would allow us to effectively detect defects in the web of the rail and could also help to distinguish between reflections from welds and cracks. In this paper, we will demonstrate the analysis of a piezoelectric transducer attached to the rail web. The forced response at different frequencies is computed by the Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method and compared to a full three-dimensional finite element method using ABAQUS. The SAFE method only requires the rail track cross-section to be meshed using two-dimensional elements. The ABAQUS model in turn requires a full three-dimensional discretisation of the rail track. The SAFE approach can yield poor predictions at cut-on frequencies associated with other modes in the rail. Problematic frequencies are identified and a suitable frequency range identified for transducer design. The forced response results of the two methods were found to be in good agreement with each other. We then use a previously developed SAFE-3D method to analyse a practical transducer over the selected frequency range. The results obtained from the SAFE-3D method are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  1. Computation of Flow Over a Drag Prediction Workshop Wing/Body Transport Configuration Using CFL3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2001-01-01

    A Drag Prediction Workshop was held in conjunction with the 19th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference in June 2001. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the prediction of drag by computational methods for a wing/body configuration (DLR-F4) representative of subsonic transport aircraft. This report details computed results submitted to this workshop using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code CFL3D. Two supplied grids were used: a point-matched 1-to-1 multi-block grid, and an overset multi-block grid. The 1-to-1 grid, generally of much poorer quality and with less streamwise resolution than the overset grid, is found to be too coarse to adequately resolve the surface pressures. However, the global forces and moments are nonetheless similar to those computed using the overset grid. The effect of three different turbulence models is assessed using the 1-to-1 grid. Surface pressures are very similar overall, and the drag variation due to turbulence model is 18 drag counts. Most of this drag variation is in the friction component, and is attributed in part to insufficient grid resolution of the 1-to-1 grid. The misnomer of 'fully turbulent' computations is discussed; comparisons are made using different transition locations and their effects on the global forces and moments are quantified. Finally, the effect of two different versions of a widely used one-equation turbulence model is explored.

  2. Full-field modal analysis during base motion excitation using high-speed 3D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Viedma, Ángel J.; López-Alba, Elías; Felipe-Sesé, Luis; Díaz, Francisco A.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made to exploit full-field measurement optical techniques for modal identification. Three-dimensional digital image correlation using high-speed cameras has been extensively employed for this purpose. Modal identification algorithms are applied to process the frequency response functions (FRF), which relate the displacement response of the structure to the excitation force. However, one of the most common tests for modal analysis involves the base motion excitation of a structural element instead of force excitation. In this case, the relationship between response and excitation is typically based on displacements, which are known as transmissibility functions. In this study, a methodology for experimental modal analysis using high-speed 3D digital image correlation and base motion excitation tests is proposed. In particular, a cantilever beam was excited from its base with a random signal, using a clamped edge join. Full-field transmissibility functions were obtained through the beam and converted into FRF for proper identification, considering a single degree-of-freedom theoretical conversion. Subsequently, modal identification was performed using a circle-fit approach. The proposed methodology facilitates the management of the typically large amounts of data points involved in the DIC measurement during modal identification. Moreover, it was possible to determine the natural frequencies, damping ratios and full-field mode shapes without requiring any additional tests. Finally, the results were experimentally validated by comparing them with those obtained by employing traditional accelerometers, analytical models and finite element method analyses. The comparison was performed by using the quantitative indicator modal assurance criterion. The results showed a high level of correspondence, consolidating the proposed experimental methodology.

  3. Joint design of excitation k-space trajectory and RF pulse for small-tip 3D tailored excitation in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Noll, Douglas C.; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for the joint design of k-space trajectory and RF pulse in 3D small-tip tailored excitation. Designing time-varying RF and gradient waveforms for a desired 3D target excitation pattern in MRI poses a non-linear, non-convex, constrained optimization problem with relatively large problem size that is difficult to solve directly. Existing joint pulse design approaches are therefore typically restricted to predefined trajectory types such as EPI or stack-of-spirals that intrinsically satisfy the gradient maximum and slew rate constraints and reduce the problem size (dimensionality) dramatically, but lead to suboptimal excitation accuracy for a given pulse duration. Here we use a 2nd-order B-spline basis that can be fitted to an arbitrary k-space trajectory, and allows the gradient constraints to be implemented efficiently. We show that this allows the joint optimization problem to be solved with quite general k-space trajectories. Starting from an arbitrary initial trajectory, we first approximate the trajectory using B-spline basis, and then optimize the corresponding coefficients. We evaluate our method in simulation using four different k-space initializations: stack-of-spirals, SPINS, KT-points, and a new method based on KT-points. In all cases, our approach leads to substantial improvement in excitation accuracy for a given pulse duration. We also validated our method for inner-volume excitation using phantom experiments. The computation is fast enough for online applications. PMID:26390450

  4. 3D effects of edge magnetic field configuration on divertor/scrape-off layer transport and optimization possibilities for a future reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Xu, Y.; Ida, K.; Corre, Y.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Tabares, F. L.; Evans, T. E.; Coenen, J. W.; Liang, Y.; Bader, A.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, H.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Ciraolo, G.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Cui, Z. Y.; Reiter, D.; Asakura, N.; Wenzel, U.; Morita, S.; Ohno, N.; Peterson, B. J.; Masuzaki, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper assesses the three-dimensional (3D) effects of the edge magnetic field structure on divertor/scrape-off layer transport, based on an inter-machine comparison of experimental data and on the recent progress of 3D edge transport simulation. The 3D effects are elucidated as a consequence of competition between transports parallel (\\parallel ) and perpendicular (\\bot ) to the magnetic field, in open field lines cut by divertor plates, or in magnetic islands. The competition has strong impacts on divertor functions, such as determination of the divertor density regime, impurity screening and detachment control. The effects of magnetic perturbation on the edge electric field and turbulent transport are also discussed. Parameterization to measure the 3D effects on the edge transport is attempted for the individual divertor functions. Based on the suggested key parameters, an operation domain of the 3D divertor configuration is discussed for future devices.

  5. Excited state properties of the chromophore of the asFP595 chromoprotein: 2D and 3D theoretical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengtao

    The ground and excited state properties (e.g., the intramolecular charge and energy transfer, and electron-hole coherence) of the chromophore of the asFP595 chromoprotein from Anemonia sulcata in the neutral and anionic forms are theoretically studied with quantum chemistry methods. The ground-state properties of the asFP595 in the neutral and anionic forms, such as the alternations of the bond lengths and the Mulliken charge distributions, are compared. The calculated transition energies of the asFP595 in the neutral and anionic form are consistent with the experimental results. To study the excited state properties of the asFP595 chromophore, the energies and densities of highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs), as well as the CI main coefficients, are compared between the two forms. The intramolecular charge and energy transfer in the neutral and anionic forms are investigated and compared with the three-dimensional (3D) real-space analysis methods, including the strength and orientation of the transition dipoles with transition density, and the orientation and result of the intramolecular charge transfer with charge difference density. The electron-hole coherence and delocalization on the excitation are studied with the 2D real-space analysis method of the transition density matrix. In all, the calculated results are remain in good agreement with the experimental data, and the theoretical analysis results supported the proposed models in the experiment.

  6. Radiative data for highly excited 3d84d levels in Ni II from laboratory measurements and atomic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, H.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Palmeri, P.; Malcheva, G.; Blagoev, K.

    2017-04-01

    Aims: This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes and calculated oscillator strengths for transitions from 3d84d levels of astrophysical interest in singly ionized nickel. Methods: Radiative lifetimes of seven high-lying levels of even parity in Ni II (98 400-100 600 cm-1) have been measured using the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence method. Two-step photon excitation of ions produced by laser ablation has been utilized to populate the levels. Theoretical calculations of the radiative lifetimes of the measured levels and transition probabilities from these levels are reported. The calculations have been performed using a pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock method, taking into account core polarization effects. Results: A new set of transition probabilities and oscillator strengths has been deduced for 477 Ni II transitions of astrophysical interest in the spectral range 194-520 nm depopulating even parity 3d84d levels. The new calculated gf-values are, on the average, about 20% higher than a previous calculation and yield lifetimes within 5% of the experimental values.

  7. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Geng, Yang; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2013-11-01

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy.

  8. Fast Dynamic 3D MRSI with Compressed Sensing and Multiband Excitation Pulses for Hyperpolarized 13C Studies

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Kurhanewicz, John; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C MRSI can detect not only the uptake of the pre-polarized molecule but also its metabolic products in vivo, thus providing a powerful new method to study cellular metabolism. Imaging the dynamic perfusion and conversion of these metabolites provides additional tissue information but requires methods for efficient hyperpolarization usage and rapid acquisitions. In this work, we have developed a time-resolved 3D MRSI method for acquiring hyperpolarized 13C data by combining compressed sensing methods for acceleration and multiband excitation pulses to efficiently use the magnetization. This method achieved a 2 sec temporal resolution with full volumetric coverage of a mouse, and metabolites were observed for up to 60 sec following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate. The compressed sensing acquisition used random phase encode gradient blips to create a novel random undersampling pattern tailored to dynamic MRSI with sampling incoherency in four (time, frequency and two spatial) dimensions. The reconstruction was also tailored to dynamic MRSI by applying a temporal wavelet sparsifying transform in order to exploit the inherent temporal sparsity. Customized multiband excitation pulses were designed with a lower flip angle for the [1-13C]-pyruvate substrate given its higher concentration than its metabolic products ([1-13C]-lactate and [1-13C]-alanine), thus using less hyperpolarization per excitation. This approach has enabled the monitoring of perfusion and uptake of the pyruvate, and the conversion dynamics to lactate and alanine throughout a volume with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20939089

  9. A 3D TCAD simulation of a thermoelectric module configured for thermoelectric power generation, cooling and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, C. A.; Shammas, N. Y. A.; Grainger, S.; Taylor, I.; Simpson, K.

    2012-06-01

    This paper documents the 3D modeling and simulation of a three couple thermoelectric module using the Synopsys Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) semiconductor simulation software. Simulation results are presented for thermoelectric power generation, cooling and heating, and successfully demonstrate the basic thermoelectric principles. The 3D TCAD simulation model of a three couple thermoelectric module can be used in the future to evaluate different thermoelectric materials, device structures, and improve the efficiency and performance of thermoelectric modules.

  10. Insights into bonding interactions and excitation energies of 3d-4f mixed lanthanide transition metal macrocyclic complexes.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2016-12-07

    In this contribution, a computational study of equatorial bound tetranuclear macrocycle (butylene linked) [LnZn(HOM(Bu))](3+) (Ln = La(3+), Ce(3+)) complexes was carried out. Here, the electronic structure, bonding interaction and excitation energies were studied within the relativistic density functional theory framework. From the electronic structure analysis, the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) were strongly localized in the d-orbitals of the Zn centers and the f-orbitals of the lanthanide ions. Besides, the inner MOs were found to exhibit a π-character from the organic part of the macrocyclic chain. EDA-NOCV was used as a tool for evaluating the bonding interaction, taking the trinuclear metallomacrocycle (ZnHOM(Bu)) and the lanthanide center as fragments. This analysis showed that the interaction between these fragments was slightly covalent; with this covalency being the result of a charge transfer from the metallomacrocyclic ring to the lanthanide. This phenomenon was observed in the deformation density channels obtained from the EDA-NOCV study; in which π- and σ-charge transfer was observed. Finally, the TD-DFT study of the excitation energies evidenced three sets of bands: the first set with the highest intensity represented the ligand to metal charge transfer bands; the second set could be attributed to the 3d-4f electronic transitions between the metal centers; and the third set represented the f-f bands found for the open-shell cerium complex. This class of complexes accomplishes the "antenna effect" principle, which states that highly absorptive transition-metal (TM) complexes can be used to enhance the luminescence of poorly emissive systems, and are introduced in this study as self-sensitizer bimetallic d-f systems with potential applications in near infra-red (NIR) technologies.

  11. Simultaneous ionization-excitation of helium to the 3s, 3p, and 3d states of He+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    We extended our work on ionization of helium with simultaneous excitation to the n = 2 states to include the n = 3 manifold of the residual ion. This requires the inclusion of pseudo-states constructed on the 3s, 3p, and 3d ionic core. We used a parallelized version of the B-spline R-matrix (BSR) package to perform a calculation with 1,254 target states, resulting in up to 3,027 coupled channels and matrices of rank up to 200,000 to be diagonalized. The triple-differential cross section (TDCS) was extracted by the projection method. We obtain excellent agreement with experiment regarding the angular dependence of the TDCS for all kinematical situations available for comparison. Some discrepancies remain for the absolute magnitude. Results for the n = 2 states are stable and closely agree with previous predictions. Work supported by the United States National Science Foundation under grants No. PHY-1212450, PHY-1430245 and the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031.

  12. Excitation-energy influence at the scission configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Audouin, L.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Clement, E.; Cortina, D.; Delaune, O.; Derkx, X.; Dijon, A.; Doré, D.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; de France, G.; Heinz, A.; Jacquot, B.; Navin, A.; Paradela, C.; Rejmund, M.; Roger, T.; Salsac, M.-D.; Schmitt, C.

    2017-09-01

    Transfer- and fusion-induced fission in inverse kinematics was proven to be a powerful tool to investigate nuclear fission, widening the information of the fission fragments and the access to unstable fissioning systems with respect to other experimental approaches. An experimental campaign for fission investigation has being carried out at GANIL with this technique since 2008. In these experiments, a beam of 238U, accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u, impinges on a 12C target. Fissioning systems from U to Cf are populated through transfer and fusion reactions, with excitation energies that range from few MeV up to 46 MeV. The use of inverse kinematics, the SPIDER telescope, and the VAMOS spectrometer permitted the characterization of the fissioning system in terms of mass, nuclear charge, and excitation energy, and the isotopic identification of the full fragment distribution. The neutron excess, the total neutron multiplicity, and the even-odd staggering in the nuclear charge of fission fragments are presented as a function of the excitation energy of the fissioning system. Structure effects are observed at Z˜50 and Z˜55, where their impact evolves with the excitation energy.

  13. Spectroscopic Evidence for a 3d(10) Ground State Electronic Configuration and Ligand Field Inversion in [Cu(CF3)4](1-).

    PubMed

    Walroth, Richard C; Lukens, James T; MacMillan, Samantha N; Finkelstein, Kenneth D; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2016-02-17

    The contested electronic structure of [Cu(CF3)4](1-) is investigated with UV/visible/near IR spectroscopy, Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and 1s2p resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. These data, supported by density functional theory, multiplet theory, and multireference calculations, support a ground state electronic configuration in which the lowest unoccupied orbital is of predominantly trifluoromethyl character. The consensus 3d(10) configuration features an inverted ligand field in which all five metal-localized molecular orbitals are located at lower energy relative to the trifluoromethyl-centered σ orbitals.

  14. Multiparticle configurations of excited states in 155Lu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, R. J.; Hadinia, B.; Qi, C.; Joss, D. T.; Page, R. D.; Uusitalo, J.; Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Darby, I. G.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Gray-Jones, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppänen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Seweryniak, D.; Simpson, J.

    2016-12-01

    Excited states in the neutron-deficient N =84 nuclide 155Lu have been populated by using the 102Pd(58Ni,α p ) reaction. The 155Lu nuclei were separated by using the gas-filled recoil ion transport unit (RITU) separator and implanted into the Si detectors of the gamma recoil electron alpha tagging (GREAT) spectrometer. Prompt γ -ray emissions measured at the target position using the JUROGAM Ge detector array were assigned to 155Lu through correlations with α decays measured in GREAT. Structures feeding the (11 /2-) and (25 /2-)α -decaying states have been revised and extended. Shell-model calculations have been performed and are found to reproduce the excitation energies of several of the low-lying states observed to within an average of 71 keV. In particular, the seniority inversion of the 25 /2- and 27 /2- states is reproduced.

  15. AMC-Bio-Artificial Liver culturing enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in human liver cell lines: The role of oxygen, medium perfusion and 3D configuration.

    PubMed

    Adam, Aziza A A; van Wenum, Martien; van der Mark, Vincent A; Jongejan, Aldo; Moerland, Perry D; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Wanders, Ronald J A; Oude Elferink, Ronald P; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2017-08-24

    Human liver cell lines, like HepaRG and C3A, acquire higher functionality when cultured in the AMC-Bio-Artificial Liver (AMC-BAL). The three main differences between BAL and monolayer culture are the oxygenation (40% vs 20%O2), dynamic vs absent medium perfusion and 3D vs 2D configuration. Here, we investigated the background of the differences between BAL-cultures and monolayers. We performed whole-genome microarray analysis on HepaRG monolayer and BAL-cultures. Next, mitochondrial biogenesis was studied in monolayer and BAL-cultures of HepaRG and C3A. The driving forces for mitochondrial biogenesis by BAL-culturing were investigated in representative culture models differing in oxygenation level, medium flow or 2D vs 3D configuration. Gene-sets related to mitochondrial energy metabolism were most prominently up-regulated in HepaRG-BAL vs monolayer cultures. This was confirmed by a 2.4-fold higher mitochondrial abundance with increased expression of mitochondrial OxPhos complexes. Moreover, the transcript levels of mitochondria-encoded genes were up to 3.6-fold induced and mitochondrial membrane potential activity was 8.3-fold increased in BAL vs monolayers. Culturing with 40% O2, dynamic medium flow and/or in 3D increased the mitochondrial abundance and expression of mitochondrial complexes vs standard monolayer culturing. The stimulatory effect of the BAL culture on mitochondrial biogenesis was confirmed in C3A cells in which mitochondrial abundance increased 2.2-fold with induction of mitochondria-encoded genes. The increased functionality of liver cell lines upon AMC-BAL culturing is associated with increased mitochondrial biogenesis. High oxygenation, medium perfusion and 3D configuration contribute to the up-regulation of the mitochondrial biogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a Displacement- and Frequency-Noise-Free Interferometer in a 3D Configuration for Gravitational Wave Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kokeyama, Keiko; Sato, Shuichi; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Kawamura, Seiji; Chen Yanbei; Sugamoto, Akio

    2009-10-23

    The displacement- and frequency-noise-free interferometer (DFI) is a multiple laser interferometer array for gravitational-wave detection free from both the displacement noise of optics and laser frequency noise. So far, partial experimental demonstrations of the DFI have been done in 2D table top experiments. In this Letter, we report the complete demonstration of a 3D DFI. The DFI consists of four Mach-Zehnder interferometers with four mirrors and two beam splitters The attained maximum suppression of the displacement noise of both mirrors and beam splitters was 40 dB at about 50 MHz. The nonvanishing DFI response to a gravitational wave was successfully confirmed using multiple electro-optic modulators and computing methods.

  17. Calculation of excited-state properties using general coupled-cluster and configuration-interaction models.

    PubMed

    Kállay, Mihály; Gauss, Jürgen

    2004-11-15

    Using string-based algorithms excitation energies and analytic first derivatives for excited states have been implemented for general coupled-cluster (CC) models within CC linear-response (LR) theory which is equivalent to the equation-of-motion (EOM) CC approach for these quantities. Transition moments between the ground and excited states are also considered in the framework of linear-response theory. The presented procedures are applicable to both single-reference-type and multireference-type CC wave functions independently of the excitation manifold constituting the cluster operator and the space in which the effective Hamiltonian is diagonalized. The performance of different LR-CC/EOM-CC and configuration-interaction approaches for excited states is compared. The effect of higher excitations on excited-state properties is demonstrated in benchmark calculations for NH(2) and NH(3). As a first application, the stationary points of the S(1) surface of acetylene are characterized by high-accuracy calculations.

  18. Eddy Current Pulsed Thermography with Different Excitation Configurations for Metallic Material and Defect Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Gui Yun; Gao, Yunlai; Li, Kongjing; Wang, Yizhe; Gao, Bin; He, Yunze

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments of eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT) for material characterization and nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Due to the fact that line-coil-based ECPT, with the limitation of non-uniform heating and a restricted view, is not suitable for complex geometry structures evaluation, Helmholtz coils and ferrite-yoke-based excitation configurations of ECPT are proposed and compared. Simulations and experiments of new ECPT configurations considering the multi-physical-phenomenon of hysteresis losses, stray losses, and eddy current heating in conjunction with uniform induction magnetic field have been conducted and implemented for ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic materials. These configurations of ECPT for metallic material and defect characterization are discussed and compared with conventional line-coil configuration. The results indicate that the proposed ECPT excitation configurations can be applied for different shapes of samples such as turbine blade edges and rail tracks. PMID:27338389

  19. Eddy Current Pulsed Thermography with Different Excitation Configurations for Metallic Material and Defect Characterization.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gui Yun; Gao, Yunlai; Li, Kongjing; Wang, Yizhe; Gao, Bin; He, Yunze

    2016-06-08

    This paper reviews recent developments of eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT) for material characterization and nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Due to the fact that line-coil-based ECPT, with the limitation of non-uniform heating and a restricted view, is not suitable for complex geometry structures evaluation, Helmholtz coils and ferrite-yoke-based excitation configurations of ECPT are proposed and compared. Simulations and experiments of new ECPT configurations considering the multi-physical-phenomenon of hysteresis losses, stray losses, and eddy current heating in conjunction with uniform induction magnetic field have been conducted and implemented for ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic materials. These configurations of ECPT for metallic material and defect characterization are discussed and compared with conventional line-coil configuration. The results indicate that the proposed ECPT excitation configurations can be applied for different shapes of samples such as turbine blade edges and rail tracks.

  20. Numerical simulation of perfect fluid flows around complex 3D configurations by a multidomain solver using the MUSCL approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Ph.; Borrel, M.; Dormieux, M.

    1990-10-01

    A numerical scheme of the MUSCL type used for the numerical simulation of gas flow of different types around complex configurations is described. Approximate Riemann solvers of the Van Leer, Roc, and Osher types, developed for perfect gas flows are used. These solvers have been extended to non-reactive mixtures of two species and real gas flows by Abgrall, Montagne and Vinokur. The architecture of the code, dictated by constraints in geometrical considerations, computational aspects, the specific nature of the flow, and ergonomy, is described.

  1. Conceptual design of the 3D magnetic field configuration relevant to the magnetopause reconnection in the SPERF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Aohua; Ji, Hantao; Ren, Yang; E, Peng; Wang, Zhibin; Xiao, Qingmei; Xiao, Chijie

    2016-10-01

    A new terrella device, the Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), is designed and under construction in China, with Asymmetric Reconnection EXperiment (AREX) as one component to study the interaction between the magnetosheath and magnetosphere plasmas. AREX will provide a unique platform for studying asymmetric magnetic reconnection relevant to the magnetopause, via a set of coils for simulating ``solar-wind-side'' magnetosheath field and a dipole field on the ``magnetosphere-side''. Thus it could be able to investigate a range of important issues in the magnetosphere geometry, such as the electron and ion-scale dynamics in the current sheet, particle and energy transfer from magnetosheath to magnetosphere, particle energization/heating during magnetic reconnection, 3D and asymmetric effects in fast reconnection, and so on. The plasma is generated by two flux cores at the ``magnetosheath-side'' and one electron cyclotron resonance source at the ``magnetosphere-side''. Different kinds of coils with specific current driven functions, as well as advanced diagnostics are designed. Motivation, overview of the AREX design and reconnection scenarios will be discussed.

  2. Effect of varying strength and orientation of local interstellar magnetic field on configuration of exterior heliosphere: 3D MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkiewicz, R.; Barnes, A.; Molvik, G. A.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.; Vinokur, M.; Venkateswaran, S.

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the effects of varying magnitude and orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field on the heliospheric boundary region (the region between the termination shock and the bow shock containing the heliopause). Other effects such as interstellar neutrals, cosmic rays and the asymmetry of the solar wind caused by its heliolatitude dependence are disregarded. We calculate the shape and structure of the heliospheric boundary region for different interstellar Alfvenic Mach numbers and various inclination angles between Very Local InterStellar Medium (VLISM) velocity and magnetic field vectors using a fully three-dimensional MHD computational analysis. The new results show the asymmetry of this region for inclination angles 0(deg) < alpha < 90(deg) and are in agreement with the Newtonian approximation theory (Fahr et al. 1986, 1988) concerning trends in the heliopause orientation and location. Unlike the NA model which only qualitatively indicates the effects of the VLISM magnetic field on the heliospheric boundary region the present 3D MHD calculations reveal fully the nature of these effects by capturing all discontinuities including the termination shock, heliopause and bow shock. The numerical scheme employed in this study is fully implicit and conservative, using a Roe-type Riemann solver in a generalized coordinate system.

  3. 3D localization of a labeled target by means of a stereo vision configuration with subvoxel resolution.

    PubMed

    Arias H, Néstor A; Sandoz, Patrick; Meneses, Jaime E; Suarez, Miguel A; Gharbi, Tijani

    2010-11-08

    We present a method for the visual measurement of the 3D position and orientation of a moving target. Three dimensional sensing is based on stereo vision while high resolution results from a pseudo-periodic pattern (PPP) fixed onto the target. The PPP is suited for optimizing image processing that is based on phase computations. We describe experimental setup, image processing and system calibration. Resolutions reported are in the micrometer range for target position (x,y,z) and of 5:3x10(-4) rad: for target orientation (θx,θy,θz). These performances have to be appreciated with respect to the vision system used. The latter makes that every image pixel corresponds to an actual distance of 0:3x0:3 mm2 on the target while the PPP is made of elementary dots of 1 mm with a period of 2 mm. Target tilts as large as π=4 are allowed with respect to the Z axis of the system.

  4. Toward a rapid 3D spectral deconvolution of EMI conductivities measured with portable multi-configuration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemoteau, Julien; Tronicke, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Portable loop-loop electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors using multiple coil configurations are of growing interest in hydrological, archaeological and agricultural studies for mapping the subsurface electrical conductivity. In contrast with EMI methods employing larger scale geometries (e.g., magnetotellurics, marine EM, airborne EM, transient EM, large offset loop-loop harmonic source EM), the portable EMI multi-configuration sensors operate in the low induction number (LIN) domain as they employ a rather low frequency harmonic source (< 20 kHz) and rather small coil separations (≤ 2 m). In the LIN domain, electrical conductivity has a minor effect on the forward modelling kernel. Accordingly, we have developed an algorithm to model this kind of data, which is based on a homogeneous half-space kernel. By formulating the problem in the hybrid spectral-spatial domain (kx, ky, z), we show that it is possible to generate large data maps containing more than 100,000 stations within a minute on a standard modern laptop computer. We compared this forward modelling approach to a robust approach based on the integral equation (IE) method. Our results show that, as long as the LIN approximation is fulfilled (i.e., for the system of interest, if the electrical conductivity is smaller than 0.5 S/m), the linear theory allows to accurately and robustly handle the structural characteristics of the subsurface conductivity distribution. We therefore expect that our forward modelling procedure can be implemented in rapid multi-channel deconvolution procedures in order to rapidly extract the structural properties of the subsurface conductivity distribution from data sets acquired across rather large (hectare scale) areas.

  5. Determination and analysis of an analytical potential for ions in excited configurations in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Perez, Rafael

    The main objective in this Thesis is to propose an analytical expression, within the context of the Independent Particle Model in a central field, for the effective potential that a bound electron feels when it belongs to an ion which is in an excited configuration. It is also an objective that this potential will be obtained as a correction to the effective potential corresponding to the ion in ground state. The potential proposed not only allows to include the effects that the excited configurations introduce on atomic magnitudes but also allows to broach, in a simple and fast way, how to determine the ionic populations and the optical properties of plasmas. The great advantage of the analytical potentials is that they avoid the iterative procedures, which are characteristic in the self-consistent methods, in the calculations of atomic magnitudes and plasma properties. This fact allow a considerable diminution in calculation time. Moreover, the analytical potential proposed in this Thesis has the advantage with respect other analytical potentials that it does not need to fit its parameters when we consider different excited configurations. This fact implies a considerable diminution in the complexity of the problem and in the calculation time and allows to include more excited configurations to model the ions present in the plasma, which improves the results. With the potential proposed in this Thesis we have studied the influence of the excited configurations on atomic magnitudes. Those results have been checked satisfactorily with others obtained by self-consistent methods and by using analytical potentials. We have also used the potential proposed to determine which excited configurations have more probability of presence in a plasma in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

  6. Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo and Diffusion Monte Carlo: A Comparative Study of the 3D Homogeneous Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, James J.; López Ríos, Pablo; Needs, Richard J.; Drummond, Neil D.; Mohr, Jennifer A.-F.; Booth, George H.; Grüneis, Andreas; Kresse, Georg; Alavi, Ali

    2013-03-01

    Full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo1 (FCIQMC) and its initiator adaptation2 allow for exact solutions to the Schrödinger equation to be obtained within a finite-basis wavefunction ansatz. In this talk, we explore an application of FCIQMC to the homogeneous electron gas (HEG). In particular we use these exact finite-basis energies to compare with approximate quantum chemical calculations from the VASP code3. After removing the basis set incompleteness error by extrapolation4,5, we compare our energies with state-of-the-art diffusion Monte Carlo calculations from the CASINO package6. Using a combined approach of the two quantum Monte Carlo methods, we present the highest-accuracy thermodynamic (infinite-particle) limit energies for the HEG achieved to date. 1 G. H. Booth, A. Thom, and A. Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 054106 (2009). 2 D. Cleland, G. H. Booth, and A. Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 041103 (2010). 3 www.vasp.at (2012). 4 J. J. Shepherd, A. Grüneis, G. H. Booth, G. Kresse, and A. Alavi, Phys. Rev. B. 86, 035111 (2012). 5 J. J. Shepherd, G. H. Booth, and A. Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 244101 (2012). 6 R. Needs, M. Towler, N. Drummond, and P. L. Ríos, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 22, 023201 (2010).

  7. A hybrid configuration interaction treatment based on seniority number and excitation schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Capuzzi, Pablo; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Oña, Ofelia B.; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Bultinck, Patrick; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2014-12-28

    We present a configuration interaction method in which the Hamiltonian of an N-electron system is projected on Slater determinants selected according to the seniority-number criterion along with the traditional excitation-based procedure. This proposed method is especially useful to describe systems which exhibit dynamic (weak) correlation at determined geometric arrangements (where the excitation-based procedure is more suitable) but show static (strong) correlation at other arrangements (where the seniority-number technique is preferred). The hybrid method amends the shortcomings of both individual determinant selection procedures, yielding correct shapes of potential energy curves with results closer to those provided by the full configuration interaction method.

  8. Non-orthogonal configuration interaction for the calculation of multielectron excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, Eric J. Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-03-21

    We apply Non-orthogonal Configuration Interaction (NOCI) to molecular systems where multielectron excitations, in this case double excitations, play a substantial role: the linear polyenes and β-carotene. We demonstrate that NOCI when applied to systems with extended conjugation, provides a qualitatively correct wavefunction at a fraction of the cost of many other multireference treatments. We also present a new extension to this method allowing for purification of higher-order spin states by utilizing Generalized Hartree-Fock Slater determinants and the details for computing 〈S{sup 2}〉 for the ground and excited states.

  9. Non-orthogonal configuration interaction for the calculation of multielectron excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundstrom, Eric J.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-03-01

    We apply Non-orthogonal Configuration Interaction (NOCI) to molecular systems where multielectron excitations, in this case double excitations, play a substantial role: the linear polyenes and β-carotene. We demonstrate that NOCI when applied to systems with extended conjugation, provides a qualitatively correct wavefunction at a fraction of the cost of many other multireference treatments. We also present a new extension to this method allowing for purification of higher-order spin states by utilizing Generalized Hartree-Fock Slater determinants and the details for computing ⟨S2⟩ for the ground and excited states.

  10. Effects of RF inhomogeneity at 3.0T on ramped RF excitation: application to 3D time-of-flight MR angiography of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Amir M; Wilman, Alan H

    2007-03-01

    To demonstrate the effects of inherent RF inhomogeneity on ramped RF excitation at 3.0T, and to introduce a simple correction for improving visualization of distal intracranial arteries in three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (3D-TOF-MRA). At 3.0T, the effects of RF inhomogeneity arising from RF interference were demonstrated for ramped RF excitation in intracranial 3D-TOF-MRA. Computer simulations and experiments on phantoms and eight normal volunteers were performed. Four different ramp shapes were tested as a possible means of countering the reduced RF field that affects the distal intracranial arteries. RF destructive interference alters the ramp pulse shape, which is problematic for vessels that proceed from the center to the edge of the brain. Increasing the ramp pulse slope was shown to be an effective yet simple correction to counter the falling-off of the RF field toward the periphery of the head. With this approach, circle-of-Willis 3D-TOF-MRA studies had improved distal visibility. Ramped RF excitation is severely affected by RF interference at 3.0T, which makes the ramp profile suboptimal for distal intracranial blood vessels. A simple correction of the ramp slope can make a marked improvement.

  11. A Doubles Correction to Electronic Excited States from Configuration Interaction in the Space of Single Substitutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Rico, Rudolph J.; Lee, Timothy J.; Oumi, Manabu

    1994-01-01

    A perturbative correction to the method of configuration interaction with single substitutions (CIS) is presented. This CIS(D) correction approximately introduces the effect of double substitutions which are absent in CIS excited states. CIS(D) is a second-order perturbation expansion of the coupled-cluster excited state method, restricted to single and double substitutions, in a series in which CIS is zeroth order, and the first-order correction vanishes. CIS (D) excitation energies are size consistent and the calculational complexity scales with the fifth power of molecular size, akin to second-order Moller-Plesset theory for the ground state. Calculations on singlet excited states of ethylene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, butadiene and benzene show that CIS (D) is a uniform improvement over CIS. CIS(D) appears to be a promising method for examining excited states of large molecules, where more accurate methods are not feasible.

  12. Quasidegenerate scaled opposite spin second order perturbation corrections to single excitation configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, David; Rhee, Young Min; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Scaled opposite spin (SOS) second order perturbative corrections to single excitation configuration interaction (CIS) are extended to correctly treat quasidegeneracies between excited states. Two viable methods, termed as SOS-CIS(D0) and SOS-CIS(D1), are defined, implemented, and tested. Each involves one empirical parameter (plus a second for the SOS-MP2 ground state), has computational cost that scales with the fourth power of molecule size, and has storage requirements that are cubic, with only quantities of the rank of single excitations produced and stored during iterations. Tests on a set of low-lying adiabatic valence excitation energies and vertical Rydberg excitations of organic and inorganic molecules show that the empirical parameter can be acceptably transferred from the corresponding nondegenerate perturbation theories without any further fitting. Further tests on higher excited states show that the new methods correctly perform for surface crossings for which nondegenerate approaches fail. Numerical results show that SOS-CIS(D0) appears to treat Rydberg excitations in a more balanced way than SOS-CIS(D1) and is, therefore, likely to be the preferred approach. It should be useful for exploring excited state geometries, transition structures, and conical intersections for states of medium to large organic molecules that are dominated by single excitations.

  13. Natural orbitals from single and double excitation configuration interaction wave functions: their use in second-order configuration interaction and wave functions incorporating limited triple and quadruple excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grev, Roger S.; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1992-05-01

    As an alternative to orbitals obtained from a molecular complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) wave function, we have investigated the use of natural orbitals (NOs) obtained from configuration interaction (CI) wave functions including all single and double excitations (CISD) for use in multireference CI (MRCI) studies. The specific MRCI methods investigated are (1) second-order CI (SOCI), which includes all single and double excitations with respect to a full CI in the valence space and (2) a wave function that includes all single and double excitations out of a valence space CISD reference function. The latter wave function can also be described as a single-double-triple-quadruple excitation CI in which only two electrons are allowed to simultaneously reside outside of the valence space, ``which we call CISD[TQ].'' Comparison is made with CASSCF-SOCI and full CI results for NH2 (2B1), CH3 (2A`2), and SiH2 (1B1) at equilibrium bond distances (Re) 1.5 and 2.0Re, and with full CI results for the dissociation energy of N2. The dissociation energies of N2 and C2 are also obtained using large atomic natural orbital basis sets and the results compared to CASSCF-SOCI and internally contracted MRCI results. In all, the MRCI results with CISD NOs are very similar to the CASSCF-MRCI results, and at geometries where the reference wave function is dominant, the relatively compact CISD[TQ] method yields results that are very close to SOCI. In addition to their ease of generation, the CISD NOs offer the added advantage of allowing for truncation of the CI configuration list on an orbital basis by simply deleting high-lying virtual orbitals. The errors introduced by this truncation are almost quantitatively obtained at the CISD level of theory.

  14. M3D-C1 simulations of the plasma response to RMPs in NSTX-U single-null and snowflake divertor configurations

    DOE PAGES

    Canal, G. P.; Ferraro, N. M.; Evans, T. E.; ...

    2017-04-20

    Here in this work, single- and two-fluid resistive magnetohydrodynamic calculations of the plasma response to n = 3 magnetic perturbations in single-null (SN) and snowflake (SF) divertor configurations are compared with those based on the vacuum approach. The calculations are performed using the code M3D-C1 and are based on simulated NSTX-U plasmas. Significantly different plasma responses were found from these calculations, with the difference between the single- and two-fluid plasma responses being caused mainly by the different screening mechanism intrinsic to each of these models. Although different plasma responses were obtained from these different plasma models, no significant difference betweenmore » the SN and SF plasma responses were found. However, due to their different equilibrium properties, magnetic perturbations cause the SF configuration to develop additional and longer magnetic lobes in the null-point region than the SN, regardless of the plasma model used. The intersection of these longer and additional lobes with the divertor plates are expected to cause more striations in the particle and heat flux target profiles. In addition, the results indicate that the size of the magnetic lobes, in both single-null and snowflake configurations, are more sensitive to resonant magnetic perturbations than to non-resonant magnetic perturbations.« less

  15. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-08

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  16. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  17. A 3D Computational Model of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Estimating Aβ Tactile Nerve Fiber Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kaihua; Li, Liming; Wei, Xuyong; Sui, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    Tactile sensory feedback plays an important role in our daily life. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely accepted to produce artificial tactile sensation. To explore the underlying mechanism of tactile sensation under TENS, this paper presented a novel 3D TENS computational model including an active Aβ tactile nerve fiber (TNF) model and a forearm finite element model with the fine-layered skin structure. The conduction velocity vs. fiber diameter and strength-duration relationships in this combined TENS model matched well with experimental data. Based on this validated TENS model, threshold current variation were further investigated under different stimulating electrode sizes with varied fiber diameters. The computational results showed that the threshold current intensity increased with electrode size, and larger nerve fibers were recruited at lower current intensities. These results were comparable to our psychophysical experimental data from six healthy subjects. This novel 3D TENS model would further guide the floorplan of the surface electrodes, and the stimulating paradigms for tactile sensory feedback. PMID:28559787

  18. Excitation of the Uller-Zenneck electromagnetic surface waves in the prism-coupled configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Mehran; Faryad, Muhammad

    2017-08-01

    A configuration to excite the Uller-Zenneck surface electromagnetic waves at the planar interfaces of homogeneous and isotropic dielectric materials is proposed and theoretically analyzed. The Uller-Zenneck waves are surface waves that can exist at the planar interface of two dissimilar dielectric materials of which at least one is a lossy dielectric material. In this paper, a slab of a lossy dielectric material was taken with lossless dielectric materials on both sides. A canonical boundary-value problem was set up and solved to find the possible Uller-Zenneck waves and waveguide modes. The Uller-Zenneck waves guided by the slab of the lossy dielectric material were found to be either symmetric or antisymmetric and transmuted into waveguide modes when the thickness of that slab was increased. A prism-coupled configuration was then successfully devised to excite the Uller-Zenneck waves. The results showed that the Uller-Zenneck waves are excited at the same angle of incidence for any thickness of the slab of the lossy dielectric material, whereas the waveguide modes can be excited when the slab is sufficiently thick. The excitation of Uller-Zenneck waves at the planar interfaces with homogeneous and all-dielectric materials can usher in new avenues for the applications for electromagnetic surface waves.

  19. Effects of body configuration on pelvic injury in backward fall simulation using 3D finite element models of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Roychowdhury, Amit; Pal, Subrata

    2009-07-22

    Injuries due to backward fall apart from sideways fall are a major health problem, particularly among the aged populations. The objectives of this study was to evaluate the responses to changing body configurations (angle between the trunk and impacting floor as 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 45 degrees and 80 degrees) during backward fall, based on a previously developed CT-scan-derived 3D non-linear and non-homogeneous finite element (FE) model of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex with simplified biomechanical representation of the whole body. Under constant impact energy, these FE models evaluated the pelvic injury situations on the basis of peak impact force (7.64-16.74 kN) and peak principal compressive strain (more than 1.5%), consistent with the clinically observed injuries (sacral insufficiency, coccydynia). Also the change in location of peak strain and increase in peak impact force for changing configurations from 0 degrees to 80 degrees indicated the effect of whole body inertia during backward fall. It was also concluded that the inclusion of sacro-iliac and acetabular cartilages in the above FE models will further reduce above findings marginally (9.2% for 15 degrees fall). These quantifications would also be helpful for a better design and development of safety structures such as safety floor for the nursing home or home for the aged persons.

  20. A job for quantum dots: use of a smartphone and 3D-printed accessory for all-in-one excitation and imaging of photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W Russ

    2016-04-01

    Point-of-care (POC) diagnostic technologies are needed to improve global health and smartphones are a prospective platform for these technologies. While many fluorescence or photoluminescence-based smartphone assays have been reported in the literature, common shortcomings are the requirement of an excitation light source external to the smartphone and complicated integration of that excitation source with the smartphone. Here, we show that the photographic flash associated with the smartphone camera can be utilized to enable all-in-one excitation and imaging of photoluminescence (PL), thus eliminating the need for an excitation light source external to the smartphone. A simple and low-cost 3D-printed accessory was designed to create a dark environment and direct excitation light from the smartphone flash onto a sample. Multiple colors and compositions of semiconductor quantum dot (QD) were evaluated as photoluminescent materials for all-in-one smartphone excitation and imaging of PL, and these were compared with fluorescein and R-phycoerythrin (R-PE), which are widely utilized molecular and protein materials for fluorescence-based bioanalysis. The QDs were found to exhibit much better brightness and have the best potential for two-color detection. A model protein binding assay with a sub-microgram per milliliter detection limit and a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay for proteolytic activity were demonstrated, including imaging with serum as a sample matrix. In addition, FRET within tandem conjugates of a QD donor and fluorescent dye acceptor enabled smartphone detection of dye fluorescence that was otherwise unobservable without the QD to enhance its brightness. The ideal properties of photoluminescent materials for all-in-one smartphone excitation and imaging are discussed in the context of several different materials, where QDs appear to be the best overall material for this application.

  1. Alignment of the (3d104 s 5 s ) 3S1 State of Zn Excited by Polarized Electron Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayburn, N. B.; Gay, T. J.

    2017-09-01

    We measure the integrated Stokes parameters of light from Zn (4 s 4 p )4 3P0,1-(4 s 5 s )5 3S1 transitions excited by a transversely polarized electron impact at energies between 7.0 and 8.5 eV. Our results for the electron-polarization-normalized linear polarization Stokes parameter P2 , between incident electron energies 7.0 and 7.4 eV, are consistent with zero, as required by basic angular-momentum coupling considerations and by recent theoretical calculations. They are in qualitative disagreement with previous experimental results for the P2 parameter.

  2. Full Configuration Interaction Excitations of Ethene and Butadiene: Resolution of an Ancient Question.

    PubMed

    Daday, Csaba; Smart, Simon; Booth, George H; Alavi, Ali; Filippi, Claudia

    2012-11-13

    We employ the recently developed full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method to compute the π → π* vertical excitation energies of ethene and all-trans butadiene. These excitations have been the subject of extensive theoretical studies, and their location with respect to the corresponding absorption band maximum is the source of a long lingering debate. Here, we reliably estimate the vertical excitations of ethene and butadiene by performing FCIQMC calculations for spaces as large as 10(18) and 10(29) Slater determinants, respectively. For ethene, we obtain a vertical excitation energy in the range 7.89-7.96 eV, depending on the particular equilibrium ground-state geometry employed, and definitely higher than the absorption maximum located at 7.66 eV. For the computationally more challenging case of butadiene, our calculations provide a robust estimate of about 6.3 eV for this excitation, that is, 0.4 eV higher than the corresponding absorption band maximum. Our FCIQMC excitation energies represent a reliable benchmarking reference for future calculations.

  3. Exciting discrete breathers of two types in a computer 3D model of Pt3Al crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, N. N.; Starostenkov, M. D.; Zakharov, P. V.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of exciting discrete breathers (DBs) with both soft and hard nonlinearity in a threedimensional crystal has been shown for the first time using molecular dynamics simulation by example of an ordered Pt3Al crystal model. The oscillation frequencies of DBs of the first (soft) type fall in the gap of the phonon spectrum and decrease with increasing amplitude. For DBs of the second type, the oscillation frequencies are above the phonon spectrum and increase with the amplitude, i.e., exhibit hard nonlinearity. An example of the transformation of a hard DB into a set of gap (soft) DBs with soft nonlinearity is presented. The influence of various factors on the lifetime of interacting DBs is considered.

  4. NON-EQUILIBRIUM MODELING OF THE FE XVII 3C/3D LINE RATIO IN AN INTENSE X-RAY FREE-ELECTRON LASER EXCITED PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Li, Y.; Fogle, M.; Fontes, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent measurements using an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and an Electron Beam Ion Trap at the Linac Coherent Light Source facility highlighted large discrepancies between the observed and theoretical values for the Fe xvii 3C/3D line intensity ratio. This result raised the question of whether the theoretical oscillator strengths may be significantly in error, due to insufficiencies in the atomic structure calculations. We present time-dependent spectral modeling of this experiment and show that non-equilibrium effects can dramatically reduce the predicted 3C/3D line intensity ratio, compared with that obtained by simply taking the ratio of oscillator strengths. Once these non-equilibrium effects are accounted for, the measured line intensity ratio can be used to determine a revised value for the 3C/3D oscillator strength ratio, giving a range from 3.0 to 3.5. We also provide a framework to narrow this range further, if more precise information about the pulse parameters can be determined. We discuss the implications of the new results for the use of Fe xvii spectral features as astrophysical diagnostics and investigate the importance of time-dependent effects in interpreting XFEL-excited plasmas.

  5. Lithospheric 3D gravity modelling using upper-mantle density constraints: Towards a characterization of the crustal configuration in the North Patagonian Massif area, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Dacal, María Laura; Tocho, Claudia; Aragón, Eugenio; Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Ponce, Alexis

    2017-03-01

    The North Patagonian Massif is an Argentinean plateau that has an average height of 1200 m and stands from 500 to 700 m above the neighboring areas. During Paleogene, it suffered a sudden uplift of more than 1200 m without noticeable internal deformation; thus, it could be related to isostatic disequilibrium. To shed light on the geodynamic development of the area it is necessary to characterize the present-day configuration of the crust. In this study, a lithospheric-scale 3D density model was developed by integrating all the available data of the area with the objective of assessing the depth of the crust-mantle discontinuity (Moho). During the construction of the initial density model, we tested different mantle density scenarios obtained using P- and S-wave velocities from tomographic models, converting them into densities and comparing the conversions with densities obtained from xenoliths. Below the North Patagonian Massif plateau, we have derived a Moho depth between 40 and 50 km which is from 2 to 7 km deeper than its surroundings. There is an evident correlation between high topography and deep Moho that would indicate isostatic equilibrium at present. The model results provide a new approach to the Moho depth in an area where there is no seismic constraining information about this discontinuity. In addition, we found a spatial correlation between the variation of the mean crustal density and the location of the Paleozoic terranes that were proposed to constitute the basement of Argentina.

  6. Enhancement of the Excitation Efficiency of a Torsional Wave PPM EMAT Array for Pipe Inspection by Optimizing the Element Number of the Array Based on 3-D FEM

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yugang; Wu, Xinjun; Sun, Pengfei; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) can generate non-dispersive T(0,1) mode guided waves in a metallic pipe for nondestructive testing (NDT) by using a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) EMAT circular array. In order to enhance the excitation efficiency of the sensor, the effects of varying the number of elements of the array on the excitation efficiency is studied in this paper. The transduction process of the PPM EMAT array is studied based on 3-D finite element method (FEM). The passing signal amplitude of the torsional wave is obtained to represent the excitation efficiency of the sensor. Models with different numbers of elements are established and the results are compared to obtain an optimal element number. The simulation result is verified by experiments. It is shown that after optimization, the amplitudes of both the passing signal and defect signal with the optimal element number are increased by 29%, which verifies the feasibility of this optimal method. The essence of the optimization is to find the best match between the static magnetic field and the eddy current field in a limited circumferential space to obtain the maximum circumferential Lorentz force. PMID:25654722

  7. Enhancement of the excitation efficiency of a torsional wave PPM EMAT array for pipe inspection by optimizing the element number of the array based on 3-D FEM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yugang; Wu, Xinjun; Sun, Pengfei; Li, Jian

    2015-02-03

    Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) can generate non-dispersive T(0,1) mode guided waves in a metallic pipe for nondestructive testing (NDT) by using a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) EMAT circular array. In order to enhance the excitation efficiency of the sensor, the effects of varying the number of elements of the array on the excitation efficiency is studied in this paper. The transduction process of the PPM EMAT array is studied based on 3-D finite element method (FEM). The passing signal amplitude of the torsional wave is obtained to represent the excitation efficiency of the sensor. Models with different numbers of elements are established and the results are compared to obtain an optimal element number. The simulation result is verified by experiments. It is shown that after optimization, the amplitudes of both the passing signal and defect signal with the optimal element number are increased by 29%, which verifies the feasibility of this optimal method. The essence of the optimization is to find the best match between the static magnetic field and the eddy current field in a limited circumferential space to obtain the maximum circumferential Lorentz force.

  8. An excited-state approach within full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, N. S.; Smart, Simon D.; Booth, George H.; Alavi, Ali

    2015-10-07

    We present a new approach to calculate excited states with the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method. The approach uses a Gram-Schmidt procedure, instantaneously applied to the stochastically evolving distributions of walkers, to orthogonalize higher energy states against lower energy ones. It can thus be used to study several of the lowest-energy states of a system within the same symmetry. This additional step is particularly simple and computationally inexpensive, requiring only a small change to the underlying FCIQMC algorithm. No trial wave functions or partitioning of the space is needed. The approach should allow excited states to be studied for systems similar to those accessible to the ground-state method due to a comparable computational cost. As a first application, we consider the carbon dimer in basis sets up to quadruple-zeta quality and compare to existing results where available.

  9. Effects of vibration excitation methodology and configuration of an acoustic needle on its tip vibration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hu, Junhui

    2013-04-01

    One of design purposes of an acoustic needle is to obtain a big vibration displacement at its tip. In this paper, vibration characteristics of the tip of the acoustic needle driven by a sandwich type ultrasonic transducer, is investigated to obtain the guidelines for increasing the tip vibration. It is found that the tip vibration can be increased by employing acoustic needles with proper vibration excitation structure and configuration. The effective measures include using a sandwich type piezoelectric transducer with flexurally vibrating end plates and an acoustic needle with conical tip section, decreasing the length of vibration excitation section at the needle root, bonding the needle root at a proper location of the transducer end plate, and tuning the length ratio of the conical tip section to the whole needle.

  10. Communication: Excited states, dynamic correlation functions and spectral properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2012-11-21

    In this communication, we propose a method for obtaining isolated excited states within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo framework. This method allows for stable sampling with respect to collapse to lower energy states and requires no uncontrolled approximations. In contrast with most previous methods to extract excited state information from quantum Monte Carlo methods, this results from a modification to the underlying propagator, and does not require explicit orthogonalization, analytic continuation, transient estimators, or restriction of the Hilbert space via a trial wavefunction. Furthermore, we show that the propagator can directly yield frequency-domain correlation functions and spectral functions such as the density of states which are difficult to obtain within a traditional quantum Monte Carlo framework. We demonstrate this approach with pilot applications to the neon atom and beryllium dimer.

  11. Quasidegenerate second-order perturbation corrections to single excitation configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin

    1999-02-01

    A family of quasidegenerate second-order perturbation theories that correct excitation energies from single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) are introduced which generalize the earlier non-degenerate second-order method, CIS(D). The new methods are termed CIS(D), where n ranges from 0 to x, according to the number of terms retained in a doubles denominator expansion. Truncation at either n = 0 or n = 1 yields methods which involve the diagonalization of a dressed singles-only response matrix, where the dressing is state-independent. Hence CIS(D0) and CIS(D1) can be implemented efficiently using semidirect methods, which are discussed. Test calculations on formaldehyde, ethylene, chlorine nitrate, styrene, benzaldehyde, and chalcone are presented to assess the performance of these methods. CIS(D0) and CIS(D1) both show significant improvements relative to CIS(D) in cases of near-degeneracy.

  12. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  13. 3D time-of-flight MR angiography of the intracranial vessels: optimization of the technique with water excitation, parallel acquisition, eight-channel phased-array head coil and low-dose contrast administration.

    PubMed

    Ozsarlak, O; Van Goethem, J W; Parizel, P M

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study is three folds: to compare the eight-channel phased-array and standard circularly polarized (CP) head coils in visualisation of the intracranial vessels, to compare the three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) techniques, and to define the effects of parallel imaging in 3D TOF MRA. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent 3D TOF MRA of the intracranial vessels using eight-channel phased-array and CP standard head coils. The following MRA techniques were obtained on each volunteer: (1) conventional 3D TOF MRA with magnetization transfer; (2) 3D TOF MRA with water excitation for background suppression; and (3) low-dose (0.5 ml) gadolinium-enhanced 3D TOF MRA with water excitation. Results are demonstrating that water excitation is a valuable background suppression technique, especially when applied with an eight-channel phased-array head coil. For central and proximal portions of the intracranial arteries, unenhanced TOF MRA with water excitation was the best technique. Low-dose contrast enhanced TOF MRA using an eight-channel phased-array head coil is superior in the evaluation of distal branches over the standard CP head coil. Parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of two allows an important time gain without a significant decrease in vessel evaluation. Water excitation allows better background suppression, especially around the orbits and at the periphery, when compared to conventional acquisitions.

  14. Excited electronic states from a variational approach based on symmetry-projected Hartree–Fock configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2013-12-14

    Recent work from our research group has demonstrated that symmetry-projected Hartree–Fock (HF) methods provide a compact representation of molecular ground state wavefunctions based on a superposition of non-orthogonal Slater determinants. The symmetry-projected ansatz can account for static correlations in a computationally efficient way. Here we present a variational extension of this methodology applicable to excited states of the same symmetry as the ground state. Benchmark calculations on the C{sub 2} dimer with a modest basis set, which allows comparison with full configuration interaction results, indicate that this extension provides a high quality description of the low-lying spectrum for the entire dissociation profile. We apply the same methodology to obtain the full low-lying vertical excitation spectrum of formaldehyde, in good agreement with available theoretical and experimental data, as well as to a challenging model C{sub 2v} insertion pathway for BeH{sub 2}. The variational excited state methodology developed in this work has two remarkable traits: it is fully black-box and will be applicable to fairly large systems thanks to its mean-field computational cost.

  15. A systematic approach to vertically excited states of ethylene using configuration interaction and coupled cluster techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, David Peterson, Kirk A.; Davidson, Ernest R.

    2014-09-14

    A systematic sequence of configuration interaction and coupled cluster calculations were used to describe selected low-lying singlet and triplet vertically excited states of ethylene with the goal of approaching the all electron, full configuration interaction/complete basis set limit. Included among these is the notoriously difficult, mixed valence/Rydberg {sup 1}B{sub 1u} V state. Techniques included complete active space and iterative natural orbital configuration interaction with large reference spaces which led to variational spaces of 1.8 × 10{sup 9} parameters. Care was taken to avoid unintentionally biasing the results due to the widely recognized sensitivity of the V state to the details of the calculation. The lowest vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials to the {sup 2}B{sub 3u} and {sup 2}B{sub 3} states were also determined. In addition, the heat of formation of twisted ethylene {sup 3}A{sub 1} was obtained from large basis set coupled cluster theory calculations including corrections for core/valence, scalar relativistic and higher order correlation recovery.

  16. A systematic approach to vertically excited states of ethylene using configuration interaction and coupled cluster techniques.

    PubMed

    Feller, David; Peterson, Kirk A; Davidson, Ernest R

    2014-09-14

    A systematic sequence of configuration interaction and coupled cluster calculations were used to describe selected low-lying singlet and triplet vertically excited states of ethylene with the goal of approaching the all electron, full configuration interaction/complete basis set limit. Included among these is the notoriously difficult, mixed valence/Rydberg (1)B(1u) V state. Techniques included complete active space and iterative natural orbital configuration interaction with large reference spaces which led to variational spaces of 1.8 × 10(9) parameters. Care was taken to avoid unintentionally biasing the results due to the widely recognized sensitivity of the V state to the details of the calculation. The lowest vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials to the (2)B(3u) and (2)B3 states were also determined. In addition, the heat of formation of twisted ethylene (3)A1 was obtained from large basis set coupled cluster theory calculations including corrections for core/valence, scalar relativistic and higher order correlation recovery.

  17. Configuration interaction with Kohn Sham orbitals and their relation to excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouř, Petr

    2001-09-01

    Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals in CH 2, formaldehyde and acetone molecules were used as reference states for configuration interaction (CI) instead of the usual Hartree-Fock (HF) orbitals. A little difference in overall accuracy of electronic excitation energies was found between these schemes. However, analysis of the wave functions indicated that Slater determinant with the KS orbitals is more suitable for construction of the electronic states. Typically, the main expansion coefficients for the CI/KS procedure were closer to unity than those for HF. The difference was most pronounced for the lowest-energy transitions, while the two methods provided more comparable results for the higher-energy states. Similar behaviour of singlet and triplet states was observed. The results justify the common practice of using the KS determinant as a wave function, for example in sum-over-states theories.

  18. Ultrafast α -CC bond cleavage of acetone upon excitation to 3p and 3d Rydberg states by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüter, O.; Temps, F.

    2016-12-01

    The radiationless electronic relaxation and α -CC bond fission dynamics of jet-cooled acetone in the S1 (n π* ) state and in high-lying 3p and 3d Rydberg states have been investigated by femtosecond time-resolved mass spectrometry and photoelectron imaging. The S1 state was accessed by absorption of a UV pump photon at selected wavelengths between λ = 320 and 250 nm. The observed acetone mass signals and the S1 photoelectron band decayed on sub-picosecond time scales, consistent with a recently proposed ultrafast structural relaxation of the molecules in the S1 state away from the Franck-Condon probe window. No direct signatures could be observed by the experiments for CC dissociation on the S1 potential energy hypersurface in up to 1 ns. The observed acetyl mass signals at all pump wavelengths turned out to be associated with absorption by the molecules of one or more additional pump and/or probe photons. In particular, absorption of a second UV pump photon by the S1 (n π* ) state was found to populate a series of high-lying states belonging to the n = 3 Rydberg manifold. The respective transitions are favored by much larger cross sections compared to the S1 ← S0 transition. The characteristic energies revealed by the photoelectron images allowed for assignments to the 3p and 3dyz states. At two-photon excitation energies higher than 8.1 eV, an ultrafast reaction pathway for breaking the α -CC bond in 50-90 fs via the 3dyz Rydberg state and the elusive π π* state was observed, explaining the formation of acetyl radicals after femtosecond laser excitation of acetone at these wavelengths.

  19. Ergodicity, configurational entropy and free energy in pigment solutions and plant photosystems: influence of excited state lifetime.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We examine ergodicity and configurational entropy for a dilute pigment solution and for a suspension of plant photosystem particles in which both ground and excited state pigments are present. It is concluded that the pigment solution, due to the extreme brevity of the excited state lifetime, is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. Conversely, due to the rapid energy transfer among pigments, each photosystem is ergodic and the configurational entropy is positive. This decreases the free energy of the single photosystem pigment array by a small amount. On the other hand, the suspension of photosystems is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. The overall configurational entropy which, in principle, includes contributions from both the single excited photosystems and the suspension which contains excited photosystems, also approaches zero. Thus the configurational entropy upon photon absorption by either a pigment solution or a suspension of photosystem particles is approximately zero. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relativistic configuration interaction calculation on the ground and excited states of iridium monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Bingbing; Yu, Yan-Mei; Han, Huixian

    2015-03-07

    We present the fully relativistic multi-reference configuration interaction calculations of the ground and low-lying excited electronic states of IrO for individual spin-orbit component. The lowest-lying state is calculated for Ω = 1/2, 3/2, 5/2, and 7/2 in order to clarify the ground state of IrO. Our calculation suggests that the ground state is of Ω = 1/2, which is highly mixed with {sup 4}Σ{sup −} and {sup 2}Π states in Λ − S notation. The two low-lying states 5/2 and 7/2 are nearly degenerate with the ground state and locate only 234 and 260 cm{sup −1} above, respectively. The equilibrium bond length 1.712 Å and the harmonic vibrational frequency 903 cm{sup −1} of the 5/2 state are close to the experimental measurement of 1.724 Å and 909 cm{sup −1}, which suggests that the 5/2 state should be the low-lying state that contributes to the experimental spectra. Moreover, the electronic states that give rise to the observed transition bands are assigned for Ω = 5/2 and 7/2 in terms of the obtained excited energies and oscillator strengths.

  1. Scaled Second Order Perturbation Corrections to Configuration Interaction Singles: Efficient and Reliable Excitation Energy Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Young Min; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-02-01

    Two modifications of the perturbative doubles correction to configuration interaction with single substitutions (CIS(D)) are suggested, which are excited state analogs of ground state scaled second order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) methods. The first approach employs two parameters to scale the two spin components of the direct term of CIS(D), starting from the two-parameter spin-component scaled (SCS) MP2 ground state, and is termed SCS-CIS(D). An efficient resolution-of-the-identity (RI) implementation of this approach is described. The second approach employs a single parameter to scale only the opposite-spin direct term of CIS(D), starting from the one-parameter scaled opposite spin (SOS) MP2 ground state, and is called SOS-CIS(D). By utilizing auxiliary basis expansions and a Laplace transform, a fourth order algorithm for SOS-CIS(D) is described and implemented. The parameters describing SCS-CIS(D) and SOS-CIS(D) are optimized based on a training set including valence excitations of various organic molecules and Rydberg transitions of water and ammonia, and they significantly improve upon CIS(D) itself. The accuracy of the two methods is found to be comparable. This arises from a strong correlation between the same-spin and opposite-spin portions of the excitation energy terms. The methods are successfully applied to the zincbacteriochlorin-bacteriochlorin charge transfer transition, for which time-dependent density functional theory, with presently available exchange-correlation functionals, is known to fail. The methods are also successfully applied to describe various electronic transitions outside of the training set. The efficiency of SOS-CIS(D) and the auxiliary basis implementation of CIS(D) and SCS-CIS(D) are confirmed with a series of timing tests.

  2. 2D radially compensating excitation pulse in combination with an internal transceiver antenna for 3D MRI of the rectum at 7 T.

    PubMed

    van Kalleveen, I M L; Kroeze, H; Sbrizzi, A; Boer, V O; Reerink, O; Philippens, M E P; van de Berg, C A T; Luijten, P R; Klomp, D W J

    2016-07-01

    The high precession frequency in ultrahigh field MRI coincides with reduced RF penetration, increased RF power deposition and consequently can lead to reduced scan efficiency. However, the shorter wavelength enables the use of efficient antennas rather than loop coils. In fact, ultrathin monopole antennas have been demonstrated at 7 T, which fit in natural cavities like the rectum in the human body. As the RF field generated by the antenna provides an extremely nonuniform B1 field, the use of conventional RF pulses will lead to severe image distortions and highly nonuniform contrast. However, using the two predominant dimensions (orthogonal to the antenna), 2D RF pulses can be designed that counteract the nonuniform B1 into uniform flip angles. In this study the authors investigate the use of an ultrathin antenna not only for reception, but also for transmission in 7 T MRI of the rectum. The 2D radially compensating excitation (2D RACE) pulse was designed in matlab. SAR calculations between the 2D RACE pulse and an adiabatic RF pulse (BIR-4) have been obtained, to visualize the gain in decreasing the SAR when using the 2D RACE pulse instead of an adiabatic RF pulse. The authors used the 7 T whole body MR system in combination with an internally placed monopole antenna used for transceiving and obtained 3D gradient echo images with a conventional sinc pulse and with the 2D RACE pulse. For extra clarity, they also reconstructed an image where the receive field of the antenna was removed. Comparing the results of the SAR simulations of the 2D RACE pulse with a BIR-4 pulse shows that for low flip angles (θ < 41°) the SAR can be decreased with a factor of 4.8 or even more, when using the 2D RACE pulse. Relative to a conventional sinc excitation, the 2D RACE pulse achieves more uniform flip angle distributions than a BIR-4 pulse with a smaller SAR increase (16 × versus 64 ×). The authors have shown that the 2D RACE pulse provides more homogeneous flip angles for

  3. Spin contamination-free N-electron wave functions in the excitation-based configuration interaction treatment.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego R; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Oña, Ofelia B; Capuzzi, Pablo

    2016-07-07

    This work deals with the spin contamination in N-electron wave functions provided by the excitation-based configuration interaction methods. We propose a procedure to ensure a suitable selection of excited N-electron Slater determinants with respect to a given reference determinant, required in these schemes. The procedure guarantees the construction of N-electron wave functions which are eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator Sˆ(2), avoiding any spin contamination. Our treatment is based on the evaluation of the excitation level of the determinants by means of the expectation value of an excitation operator formulated in terms of spin-free replacement operators. We report numerical determinations of energies and 〈Sˆ(2)〉 expectation values, arising from our proposal as well as from traditional configuration interaction methods, in selected open-shell systems, in order to compare the behavior of these procedures and their computational costs.

  4. Electronic structure and properties of rare earth and 3d transition metal compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Dagys, R.; Babonas, G.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Excitation energies of various electronic configurations in rare earth and 3d transition metal compounds are considered and related to the peculiarities of the observed electrical and optical properties. Intraionic excitations of 4f, 3d electrons to less localized nl states are shown to be equally important as interionic d-d or charge transfer transitions usually considered, and to be even more significant in compounds containing low valence metals.

  5. Acceleration of MCNP calculations for small pipes configurations by using Weigth Windows Importance cards created by the SN-3D ATTILA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanier, Eric; Paterne, Loic; Louis, Céline

    2017-09-01

    In the nuclear engineering, you have to manage time and precision. Especially in shielding design, you have to be more accurate and efficient to reduce cost (shielding thickness optimization), and for this, you use 3D codes. In this paper, we want to see if we can easily applicate the CADIS methods for design shielding of small pipes which go through large concrete walls. We assess the impact of the WW generated by the 3D-deterministic code ATTILA versus WW directly generated by MCNP (iterative and manual process). The comparison is based on the quality of the convergence (estimated relative error (σ), Variance of Variance (VOV) and Figure of Merit (FOM)), on time (computer time + modelling) and on the implement for the engineer.

  6. A soluble cryogenic thermometer with high sensitivity based on excited-state configuration transformations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianwei; Wu, Yishi; Wang, Xuedong; Yu, Zhenyi; Tian, He; Yao, Jiannian; Fu, Hongbing

    2015-11-07

    Cryogenic temperature detection plays an irreplaceable role in exploring nature. Developing high sensitivity, accurate, observable and convenient measurements of cryogenic temperature is not only a challenge but also an opportunity for the thermometer field. The small molecule 9-(9,9-dimethyl-9H-fluoren-3yl)-14-phenyl-9,14-dihydrodibenzo[a,c]phenazine (FIPAC) in 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran (MeTHF) solution is utilized for the detection of cryogenic temperature with a wide range from 138 K to 343 K. This system possesses significantly high sensitivity at low temperature, which reaches as high as 19.4% K(-1) at 138 K. The temperature-dependent ratio of the dual emission intensity can be fitted as a single-exponential curve as a function of temperature. This single-exponential curve can be explained by the mechanism that the dual emission feature of FIPAC results from the excited-state configuration transformations upon heating or cooling, which is very different from the previously reported mechanisms. Here, our work gives an overall interpretation for this mechanism. Therefore, application of FIPAC as a cryogenic thermometer is experimentally and theoretically feasible.

  7. Doubly-excited {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Zishi; Li, Shuxia; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the bound {sup 1,3}D states and the doubly-excited {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} by employing correlated exponential wave functions. In the framework of the stabilization method, we are able to extract three series (2pnp, 2snd, 2pnf) of {sup 1}D{sup e} resonances and two series (2pnp, 2snd) of {sup 3}D{sup e} resonances below the N = 2 threshold. The {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance parameters (resonance energies and widths) for Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} along with the bound-excited 1s3d {sup 1,3}D state energies are reported for the first time as functions of the screening parameter. Accurate resonance energies and widths are also reported for Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} in vacuum. For free-atomic cases, comparisons are made with the reported results and few resonance states are reported for the first time.

  8. Interference effect in the dipole and nondipole anisotropy parameters of the Kr 4p photoelectrons in the vicinity of the Kr (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Ricz, S.; Ricsoka, T.; Holste, K.; Borovik, A. Jr.; Bernhardt, D.; Schippers, S.; Mueller, A.; Koever, A.; Varga, D.

    2010-04-15

    The angular distribution of the Kr 4p photoelectrons was investigated in the photon energy range of the (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations. The experimental dipole ({beta}) and nondipole ({gamma} and {delta}) anisotropy parameters were determined for the spin-orbit components of the Kr 4p shell. A simple theoretical model was developed for the description of the photoionization and excitation processes. An interference effect was observed between the direct photoionization and the resonant excitation participator Auger decay processes in the photon energy dependence of the experimental anisotropy parameters.

  9. Effects of cell type and configuration on anabolic and catabolic activity in 3D co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and nucleus pulposus cells.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ann; Cerchiari, Alec E; Tang, Xinyan; Liebenberg, Ellen; Alliston, Tamara; Gartner, Zev J; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineering constructs to treat intervertebral disc degeneration must adapt to the hypoxic and inflammatory degenerative disc microenvironment. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of two key design factors, cell type and cell configuration, on the regenerative potential of nucleus pulposus cell (NPC) and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) constructs. Anabolic and catabolic activity was quantified in constructs of varying cell type (NPCs, MSCs, and a 50:50 co-culture) and varying configuration (individual cells and micropellets). Anabolic and catabolic outcomes were both dependent on cell type. Gene expression of Agg and Col2A1, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and aggrecan immunohistochemistry (IHC), were significantly higher in NPC-only and co-culture groups than in MSC-only groups, with NPC-only groups exhibiting the highest anabolic gene expression levels. However, NPC-only constructs also responded to inflammation and hypoxia with significant upregulation of catabolic genes (MMP-1, MMP-9, MMP-13, and ADAMTS-5). MSC-only groups were unaffected by degenerative media conditions, and co-culture with MSCs modulated catabolic induction of the NPCs. Culturing cells in a micropellet configuration dramatically reduced catabolic induction in co-culture and NPC-only groups. Co-culture micropellets, which take advantage of both cell type and configuration effects, had the most immunomodulatory response, with a significant decrease in MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 expression in hypoxic and inflammatory media conditions. Co-culture micropellets were also found to self-organize into bilaminar formations with an MSC core and NPC outer layer. Further understanding of these cell type and configuration effects can improve tissue engineering designs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:61-73, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research

  10. Effects of cell type and configuration on anabolic and catabolic activity in 3D co‐culture of mesenchymal stem cells and nucleus pulposus cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Ann; Cerchiari, Alec E.; Tang, Xinyan; Liebenberg, Ellen; Alliston, Tamara; Gartner, Zev J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissue engineering constructs to treat intervertebral disc degeneration must adapt to the hypoxic and inflammatory degenerative disc microenvironment. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of two key design factors, cell type and cell configuration, on the regenerative potential of nucleus pulposus cell (NPC) and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) constructs. Anabolic and catabolic activity was quantified in constructs of varying cell type (NPCs, MSCs, and a 50:50 co‐culture) and varying configuration (individual cells and micropellets). Anabolic and catabolic outcomes were both dependent on cell type. Gene expression of Agg and Col2A1, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and aggrecan immunohistochemistry (IHC), were significantly higher in NPC‐only and co‐culture groups than in MSC‐only groups, with NPC‐only groups exhibiting the highest anabolic gene expression levels. However, NPC‐only constructs also responded to inflammation and hypoxia with significant upregulation of catabolic genes (MMP‐1, MMP‐9, MMP‐13, and ADAMTS‐5). MSC‐only groups were unaffected by degenerative media conditions, and co‐culture with MSCs modulated catabolic induction of the NPCs. Culturing cells in a micropellet configuration dramatically reduced catabolic induction in co‐culture and NPC‐only groups. Co‐culture micropellets, which take advantage of both cell type and configuration effects, had the most immunomodulatory response, with a significant decrease in MMP‐13 and ADAMTS‐5 expression in hypoxic and inflammatory media conditions. Co‐culture micropellets were also found to self‐organize into bilaminar formations with an MSC core and NPC outer layer. Further understanding of these cell type and configuration effects can improve tissue engineering designs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:61–73, 2017. PMID

  11. Configuration interaction study on the ground and excited electronic states of the SrH molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoting; Liang, Guiying; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Haifeng; Yan, Bing

    2016-02-01

    High-level ab initio calculations on the ground and the excited states of the SrH molecule have been carried out utilizing the multi-reference configuration interaction method plus Davidson correction (MRCI+Q) method, with small-core relativistic effective core potentials together with the corresponding correlation consistent polarized valence basis sets. The potential energy curves (PECs) of the 16 Λ-S states have been obtained with the aid of the avoided crossing rule between electronic states of the same symmetry. The spectroscopic constants of the bound states were calculated, most of which have been reported for the first time, with those pertaining to the X2Σ+, A2П, B2Σ+, and A‧2Δ states being in line with the available experimental and theoretical values. The calculated spin-orbit matrix element indicates a strong interaction between the X2Σ+ and A2П states in the Franck-Condon region. The spin-orbit coupling (SOC) splits the lowest strongly bound X2Σ+, A2П, A‧2Δ, B2Σ+, and D2Σ+ states into 9 Ω states. For the D2Σ+ state, the SOC shifts the potential-well minimum to higher energy and shortens the bond length. The transition properties of the bound Λ-S states were predicated, including the transition dipole moments (TDMs), the Franck-Condon factors, and the radiative lifetimes. The lifetimes were calculated to be 34.2 ns (v‧=0) and 55.0 ns (v‧=0) for A2П and B2Σ+, in good agreement with the experimental results of 33.8±1.9 ns and 48.4±2.0 ns.

  12. New Theoretical Developments in Exploring Electronically Excited States: Including Localized Configuration Interaction Singles and Application to Large Helium Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closser, Kristina Danielle

    This thesis presents new developments in excited state electronic structure theory. Contrasted with the ground state, the electronically excited states of atoms and molecules often are unstable and have short lifetimes, exhibit a greater diversity of character and are generally less well understood. The very unusual excited states of helium clusters motivated much of this work. These clusters consist of large numbers of atoms (experimentally 103--109 atoms) and bands of nearly degenerate excited states. For an isolated atom the lowest energy excitation energies are from 1s → 2s and 1s → 2 p transitions, and in clusters describing the lowest energy band minimally requires four states per atom. In the ground state the clusters are weakly bound by van der Waals interactions, however in the excited state they can form well-defined covalent bonds. The computational cost of quantum chemical calculations rapidly becomes prohibitive as the size of the systems increase. Standard excited-state methods such as configuration interaction singles (CIS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) can be used with ≈100 atoms, and are optimized to treat only a few states. Thus, one of our primary aims is to develop a method which can treat these large systems with large numbers of nearly degenerate excited states. Additionally, excited states are generally formed far from their equilibrium structures. Vertical excitations from the ground state induce dynamics in the excited states. Thus, another focus of this work is to explore the results of these forces and the fate of the excited states. Very little was known about helium cluster excited states when this work began, thus we first investigated the excitations in small helium clusters consisting of 7 or 25 atoms using CIS. The character of these excited states was determined using attachment/detachment density analysis and we found that in the n = 2 manifold the excitations could generally be interpreted as

  13. Relative populations of excited levels within the ground configuration of Si-like Cu, Zn, Ge and Se ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datla, R. U.; Roberts, J. R.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Populations of 3p2 1D2, 3P1, 3P2 levels in Si-like Cu, Zn, Ge, and Se ions have been deduced from the measurements of absolute intensities of magnetic dipole transitions within the 3s2 3p2 ground configuration. The measured population ratios are compared with theoretical calculations based on the distorted-wave approximation for the electron collisions and a semiclassical approximation for the proton collisions. The observed deviation from the statistical distribution for the excited-level populations within the ground configuration along the silicon isoelectronic sequence is in agreement with theoretical prediction.

  14. A 3D numerical study of LO2/GH2 supercritical combustion in the ONERA-Mascotte Test-rig configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmansour, Abdelkrim; Liazid, Abdelkrim; Logerais, Pierre-Olivier; Durastanti, Jean-Félix

    2016-02-01

    Cryogenic propellants LOx/H2 are used at very high pressure in rocket engine combustion. The description of the combustion process in such application is very complex due essentially to the supercritical regime. Ideal gas law becomes invalid. In order to try to capture the average characteristics of this combustion process, numerical computations are performed using a model based on a one-phase multi-component approach. Such work requires fluid properties and a correct definition of the mixture behavior generally described by cubic equations of state with appropriated thermodynamic relations validated against the NIST data. In this study we consider an alternative way to get the effect of real gas by testing the volume-weighted-mixing-law with association of the component transport properties using directly the NIST library data fitting including the supercritical regime range. The numerical simulations are carried out using 3D RANS approach associated with two tested turbulence models, the standard k-Epsilon model and the realizable k-Epsilon one. The combustion model is also associated with two chemical reaction mechanisms. The first one is a one-step generic chemical reaction and the second one is a two-step chemical reaction. The obtained results like temperature profiles, recirculation zones, visible flame lengths and distributions of OH species are discussed.

  15. Solvent-induced configuration mixing and triplet excited-state inversion: insights from transient absorption and transient dc photoconductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    She, Chunxing; Rachford, Aaron A; Wang, Xianghuai; Goeb, Sébastien; El-Ballouli, Ala'a O; Castellano, Felix N; Hupp, Joseph T

    2009-10-14

    Solvent-induced excited-state configuration mixing in a Pt(II) diimine chromophore with phenylene ethynylene containing acetylide ligands, [Pt((t)Bu2bpy)(PE3)2] (1), was characterized by nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and transient dc photoconductivity (TDCP). The mixing is a result of closely spaced triplet charge transfer (3CT) and intraligand-localized (3IL) triplet energy levels that are finely tuned with solvent polarity as ascertained by their parent model chromophores [Pt((t)Bu2bpy)(PE1)2] (2) and [Pt(P2)(PE3)2] (3), respectively. The absorption difference spectrum of the mixed triplet state is dramatically different from those of the 3CT and 3IL state model chromophores. The 3CT, 3IL and configuration-mixed triplet states led to distinct TDCP signals. The TDCP response is of negative polarity for 3CT excited states but of positive polarity for 3IL excited states. TDCP transients for 1 in mixed solvents are a combination of signals from the 3IL and 3CT states, with the signal magnitude depending on the polarity of solvent composition. The fraction of 3CT state character in the configurationally mixed excited state was quantified by TDCP to be approximately 0.24 in pure benzene, while it decreased to approximately 0.05 in 20 : 80 (v : v) benzene-CH2Cl2. The charge transfer fraction appears to increase slightly to approximately 0.11 in the lower polarity 20 : 80 n-hexane-CH2Cl2 medium. TDCP is shown to be a useful tool for the identification of the lowest excited state in electrically neutral metal-organic chromophores.

  16. Testing 3D fault configuration in the northern Los Angeles basin, California via patterns of rock uplift the since 2.9 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M.; Meigs, A.; Marshall, S.

    2004-12-01

    Competing models of three-dimensional fault topology, starting from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Community Fault Model (CFM), were tested for viability using numerical Boundary Element Method (BEM) models and patterns of rock uplift by folds in the northern Los Angeles basin Los Angeles basin. Thirteen structural cross-sections constrained by well and outcrop data were used to compile a structure contour map of the base of the Pico Formation (2.9 Ma) across about 50 km of the northern Los Angeles basin from the Coyote Hills on the east to Pacific Palisades on the west. A map of rock uplift rate was constructed from these data by measuring the structural relief relative to the central trough of the Los Angeles basin, a long-lived northwest-trending structural low that lies to the northeast of the Newport-Inglewood fault. BEM models of 3D fault topology were used to generate uplift rates over the same region using North-South contraction at 100 nanostrain/year. A suite of models investigate the sensitivity of uplift patterns to 1) dip of blind thrust faults (e.g. Las Cienegas and Elysian Park), 2) presence of low-angle (20 degree) thrust ramp below 10 km depths 3) regional extent of this low-angle ramp and 4) inclusion of near surface splays of the Santa Monica fault. Model-data compatibility was evaluated on the basis of structural trend, spatial variation in rates and location of major structures (i.e. key near surface folds). All models are consistent with the location and uplift pattern of the Coyote Hills and Santa Fe Springs structures, the location and orientation of the central trough, and a North-trending structure separating Santa Fe Springs on the east from Montebello to the northwest. Incorporation of the low-angle ramp below 10 km depth that is regionally extensive (i.e. many faults sole into this fault) improves model and geologic uplift compatibility. Furthermore, steepening the Las Cienegas and Elysian Park faults to 60 degrees

  17. Configuration interaction singles natural orbitals: An orbital basis for an efficient and size intensive multireference description of electronic excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin G.; Hohenstein, Edward G.

    2015-01-14

    Multireference quantum chemical methods, such as the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, have long been the state of the art for computing regions of potential energy surfaces (PESs) where complex, multiconfigurational wavefunctions are required, such as near conical intersections. Herein, we present a computationally efficient alternative to the widely used CASSCF method based on a complete active space configuration interaction (CASCI) expansion built from the state-averaged natural orbitals of configuration interaction singles calculations (CISNOs). This CISNO-CASCI approach is shown to predict vertical excitation energies of molecules with closed-shell ground states similar to those predicted by state averaged (SA)-CASSCF in many cases and to provide an excellent reference for a perturbative treatment of dynamic electron correlation. Absolute energies computed at the CISNO-CASCI level are found to be variationally superior, on average, to other CASCI methods. Unlike SA-CASSCF, CISNO-CASCI provides vertical excitation energies which are both size intensive and size consistent, thus suggesting that CISNO-CASCI would be preferable to SA-CASSCF for the study of systems with multiple excitable centers. The fact that SA-CASSCF and some other CASCI methods do not provide a size intensive/consistent description of excited states is attributed to changes in the orbitals that occur upon introduction of non-interacting subsystems. Finally, CISNO-CASCI is found to provide a suitable description of the PES surrounding a biradicaloid conical intersection in ethylene.

  18. Density matrices in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo: Excited states, transition dipole moments, and parallel distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunt, N. S.; Booth, George H.; Alavi, Ali

    2017-06-01

    We present developments in the calculation of reduced density matrices (RDMs) in the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method. An efficient scheme is described to allow storage of RDMs across distributed memory, thereby allowing their calculation and storage in large basis sets. We demonstrate the calculation of RDMs for general states by using the recently introduced excited-state FCIQMC approach [N. S. Blunt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134117 (2015)] and further introduce calculation of transition density matrices in the method. These approaches are combined to calculate excited-state dipole and transition dipole moments for heteronuclear diatomic molecules, including LiH, BH, and MgO, and initiator error is investigated in these quantities.

  19. Excitation beyond the monochromatic laser limit: simultaneous 3-D confocal and multiphoton microscopy with a tapered fiber as white-light laser source.

    PubMed

    Betz, Timo; Teipel, Jörn; Koch, Daniel; Härtig, Wolfgang; Guck, Jochen; Käs, Josef; Giessen, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Confocal and multiphoton microscopy are essential tools in modern life sciences. They allow fast and highly resolved imaging of a steadily growing number of fluorescent markers, ranging from fluorescent proteins to quantum dots and other fluorophores, used for the localization of molecules and the quantitative detection of molecular properties within living cells and organisms. Up to now, only one physical limitation seemed to be unavoidable. Both confocal and multiphoton microscopy rely on lasers as excitation sources, and their monochromatic radiation allows only a limited number of simultaneously usable dyes, which depends on the specific number of laser lines available in the used microscope. We have overcome this limitation by successfully replacing all excitation lasers in a standard confocal microscope with pulsed white light ranging from 430 to 1300 nm generated in a tapered silica fiber. With this easily reproducible method, simultaneous confocal and multiphoton microscopy was demonstrated. By developing a coherent and intense laser source with spectral width comparable to a mercury lamp, we provide the flexibility to excite any desired fluorophore combination.

  20. Grid generation for 3D turbine configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Reymond, J.D.; Haeuser, J.; Xia, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Grid generation in domains with complex geometries presents the same degree of difficulty for both internal and external flow fields. A high degree of curvature of the flow bounding surfaces results in a mesh generation process, which has to exactly describe the geometry and therefore is not straightforward. However, for internal flow problems, such as an interblade channel of a turbine, the difficulties become particularly accute when the distance between the elements is relatively small (confined domains). It often occurs that the grids generated on the different surfaces of an internal domain are incompatible producing nonsmooth grids in some areas of the flow compartment. This incompatibility problem is particularly present if the distance between opposite surfaces varies considerably along the domain.

  1. Extracting full-field dynamic strain on a wind turbine rotor subjected to arbitrary excitations using 3D point tracking and a modal expansion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Health monitoring of rotating structures such as wind turbines and helicopter rotors is generally performed using conventional sensors that provide a limited set of data at discrete locations near or on the hub. These sensors usually provide no data on the blades or inside them where failures might occur. Within this paper, an approach was used to extract the full-field dynamic strain on a wind turbine assembly subject to arbitrary loading conditions. A three-bladed wind turbine having 2.3-m long blades was placed in a semi-built-in boundary condition using a hub, a machining chuck, and a steel block. For three different test cases, the turbine was excited using (1) pluck testing, (2) random impacts on blades with three impact hammers, and (3) random excitation by a mechanical shaker. The response of the structure to the excitations was measured using three-dimensional point tracking. A pair of high-speed cameras was used to measure displacement of optical targets on the structure when the blades were vibrating. The measured displacements at discrete locations were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the structure to extract the full-field dynamic strain. The results of the paper show an excellent correlation between the strain predicted using the proposed approach and the strain measured with strain-gages for each of the three loading conditions. The approach used in this paper to predict the strain showed higher accuracy than the digital image correlation technique. The new expansion approach is able to extract dynamic strain all over the entire structure, even inside the structure beyond the line of sight of the measurement system. Because the method is based on a non-contacting measurement approach, it can be readily applied to a variety of structures having different boundary and operating conditions, including rotating blades.

  2. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  3. When are Surface Plasmon Polaritons Excited in the Kretschmann-Raether configuration?

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Jonathan J.; Haratyunyan, Hayk; Rosenmann, Daniel; Divan, Ralu; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-04-23

    It is widely believed that the reflection minimum in a Kretschmann-Raether experiment results from direct coupling into surface plasmon polariton modes. Our experimental results provide a surprising discrepancy between the leakage radiation patterns of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched on a layered gold/germanium film compared to the K-R minimum, clearly challenging this belief. We provide definitive evidence that the reflectance dip in K-R experiments does not correlate with excitation of an SPP mode, but rather corresponds to a particular type of perfectly absorbing (PA) mode. Results from rigorous electrodynamics simulations show that the PA mode can only exist under external driving, whereas the SPP can exist in regions free from direct interaction with the driving field. These simulations show that it is possible to indirectly excite propagating SPPs guided by the reflectance minimum in a K-R experiment, but demonstrate the efficiency can be lower by more than a factor of 3. We find that optimal coupling into the SPP can be guided by the square magnitude of the Fresnel transmission amplitude.

  4. When are Surface Plasmon Polaritons Excited in the Kretschmann-Raether Configuration?

    PubMed Central

    Foley IV, Jonathan J.; Harutyunyan, Hayk; Rosenmann, Daniel; Divan, Ralu; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely believed that the reflection minimum in a Kretschmann-Raether experiment results from direct coupling into surface plasmon polariton modes. Our experimental results provide a surprising discrepancy between the leakage radiation patterns of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched on a layered gold/germanium film compared to the K-R minimum, clearly challenging this belief. We provide definitive evidence that the reflectance dip in K-R experiments does not correlate with excitation of an SPP mode, but rather corresponds to a particular type of perfectly absorbing (PA) mode. Results from rigorous electrodynamics simulations show that the PA mode can only exist under external driving, whereas the SPP can exist in regions free from direct interaction with the driving field. These simulations show that it is possible to indirectly excite propagating SPPs guided by the reflectance minimum in a K-R experiment, but demonstrate the efficiency can be lower by more than a factor of 3. We find that optimal coupling into the SPP can be guided by the square magnitude of the Fresnel transmission amplitude. PMID:25905685

  5. When are surface plasmon polaritons excited in the Kretschmann-Raether configuration?

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, IV, Jonathan J.; Harutyunyan, Hayk; Rosenmann, Daniel; Divan, Ralu; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-04-23

    It is widely believed that the reflection minimum in a Kretschmann-Raether experiment results from direct coupling into surface plasmon polariton modes. Our experimental results provide a surprising discrepancy between the leakage radiation patterns of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched on a layered gold/germanium film compared to the K-R minimum, clearly challenging this belief. We provide definitive evidence that the reflectance dip in K-R experiments does not correlate with excitation of an SPP mode, but rather corresponds to a particular type of perfectly absorbing (PA) mode. Results from rigorous electrodynamics simulations show that the PA mode can only exist under external driving, whereas the SPP can exist in regions free from direct interaction with the driving field. These simulations show that it is possible to indirectly excite propagating SPPs guided by the reflectance minimum in a K-R experiment, but demonstrate the efficiency can be lower by more than a factor of 3. We find that optimal coupling into the SPP can be guided by the square magnitude of the Fresnel transmission amplitude.

  6. When are surface plasmon polaritons excited in the Kretschmann-Raether configuration?

    DOE PAGES

    Foley, IV, Jonathan J.; Harutyunyan, Hayk; Rosenmann, Daniel; ...

    2015-04-23

    It is widely believed that the reflection minimum in a Kretschmann-Raether experiment results from direct coupling into surface plasmon polariton modes. Our experimental results provide a surprising discrepancy between the leakage radiation patterns of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched on a layered gold/germanium film compared to the K-R minimum, clearly challenging this belief. We provide definitive evidence that the reflectance dip in K-R experiments does not correlate with excitation of an SPP mode, but rather corresponds to a particular type of perfectly absorbing (PA) mode. Results from rigorous electrodynamics simulations show that the PA mode can only exist under externalmore » driving, whereas the SPP can exist in regions free from direct interaction with the driving field. These simulations show that it is possible to indirectly excite propagating SPPs guided by the reflectance minimum in a K-R experiment, but demonstrate the efficiency can be lower by more than a factor of 3. We find that optimal coupling into the SPP can be guided by the square magnitude of the Fresnel transmission amplitude.« less

  7. A 3D surface imaging system for assessing human obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Yu, W.; Yao, M.; Yao, X.; Li, Q.; Pepper, M. R.; Freeland-Graves, J. H.

    2009-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity suggests a need to develop a convenient, reliable and economical tool for assessment of this condition. Three-dimensional (3D) body surface imaging has emerged as an exciting technology for estimation of body composition. This paper presents a new 3D body imaging system, which was designed for enhanced portability, affordability, and functionality. In this system, stereo vision technology was used to satisfy the requirements for a simple hardware setup and fast image acquisitions. The portability of the system was created via a two-stand configuration, and the accuracy of body volume measurements was improved by customizing stereo matching and surface reconstruction algorithms that target specific problems in 3D body imaging. Body measurement functions dedicated to body composition assessment also were developed. The overall performance of the system was evaluated in human subjects by comparison to other conventional anthropometric methods, as well as air displacement plethysmography, for body fat assessment.

  8. Field configuration of beam excited modes in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, S. O.; Kustom, R. L.; Uslenghi, P. L.E.

    1994-05-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is in the process of building a positron accelerator and storage ring, the Advanced Photo source (APS). The RF system for the APS storage ring uses 16 cylindrical TM010-like, reentrant cavities operating at 351.93 MHz to resupply energy lost by the beam due to synchrotron radiation. The stored beam will have approximately 60 bunches, 5 mA per bunch, for a total beam current of 300 mA. Calculations of the threshold current for coupled-bench instabilities in the storage ring have indicated that several beam-induced higher-order modes (HOMs) will reduce the threshold for beam stability and therefore should be damped. Previous data taken using a pillbox cavity showed that it is likely that some of these modes couple, through the coupling loop, from the storage ring cavity into the waveguide. This study investigates the electric and magnetic field configuration of each HOM present in the waveguide. A pillbox and a prototype storage ring cavity, together with various WR2300 waveguide components, are used to obtain the measurements needed for the determination of the mode configuration of the HOMs at the frequencies of interest. To avoid the development of beam instabilities due to the existence of these HOMs in the rf cavity, damping of the modes will be required. The HOMs present in the rf cavity coupling into the loop coupler and traveling through the coupler into the waveguide, may allow damping of some of the HOMs by insertion of dampers into the waveguide adjacent to each cavity.

  9. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  10. Spectroscopy of nitrophenolates in vacuo: effect of spacer, configuration, and microsolvation on the charge-transfer excitation energy.

    PubMed

    Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen; Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Rubio, Angel

    2014-04-15

    gas-phase ion spectroscopy in Aarhus is given, and we address issues of whether double bonds or triple bonds best convey electronic coupling between the phenolate oxygen and the nitro group, the significance of separating the donor and acceptor spatially, the influence of cross-conjugation versus linear conjugation, and along this line ortho versus meta versus para configuration, and not least the effect of a single solvent molecule (water, methanol, or acetonitrile). From systematic studies, a clear picture has emerged that has been supported by high-level calculations of electronically excited states. Our work shows that CC2 coupled-cluster calculations of vertical excitation energies are within 0.2 eV of experimental band maxima, and importantly, that the theoretical method is excellent in predicting the relative order of excitation energies of a series of nitrophenolates. Finally, we discuss future challenges such as following the change in absorption as a function of the number of solvent molecules and when gradually approaching the bulk limit.

  11. Electronic spectra of azaindole and its excited state mixing: A symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction study

    SciTech Connect

    Arulmozhiraja, Sundaram Coote, Michelle L.; Hasegawa, Jun-ya

    2015-11-28

    Electronic structures of azaindole were studied using symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction theory utilizing Dunning’s cc-pVTZ basis set augmented with appropriate Rydberg spd functions on carbon and nitrogen atoms. The results obtained in the present study show good agreement with the available experimental values. Importantly, and contrary to previous theoretical studies, the excitation energy calculated for the important n–π{sup ∗} state agrees well with the experimental value. A recent study by Pratt and co-workers concluded that significant mixing of π-π{sup ∗} and n-π{sup ∗} states leads to major change in the magnitude and direction of the dipole moment of the upper state vibrational level in the 0,0 + 280 cm{sup −1} band in the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} transition when compared to that of the zero-point level of the S{sub 1} state. The present study, however, shows that all the four lowest lying excited states, {sup 1}L{sub b} π-π{sup ∗}, {sup 1}L{sub a} π-π{sup ∗}, n-π{sup ∗}, and π-σ{sup ∗}, cross each other in one way or another, and hence, significant state mixing between them is likely. The upper state vibrational level in the 0,0 + 280 cm{sup −1} band in the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} transition benefits from this four-state mixing and this can explain the change in magnitude and direction of the dipole moment of the S{sub 1} excited vibrational level. This multistate mixing, and especially the involvement of π-σ{sup ∗} state in mixing, could also provide a route for hydrogen atom detachment reactions. The electronic spectra of benzimidazole, a closely related system, were also investigated in the present study.

  12. Electronic spectra of azaindole and its excited state mixing: A symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arulmozhiraja, Sundaram; Coote, Michelle L.; Hasegawa, Jun-ya

    2015-11-01

    Electronic structures of azaindole were studied using symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction theory utilizing Dunning's cc-pVTZ basis set augmented with appropriate Rydberg spd functions on carbon and nitrogen atoms. The results obtained in the present study show good agreement with the available experimental values. Importantly, and contrary to previous theoretical studies, the excitation energy calculated for the important n-π∗ state agrees well with the experimental value. A recent study by Pratt and co-workers concluded that significant mixing of π-π∗ and n-π∗ states leads to major change in the magnitude and direction of the dipole moment of the upper state vibrational level in the 0,0 + 280 cm-1 band in the S1←S0 transition when compared to that of the zero-point level of the S1 state. The present study, however, shows that all the four lowest lying excited states, 1Lb π-π∗, 1La π-π∗, n-π∗, and π-σ∗, cross each other in one way or another, and hence, significant state mixing between them is likely. The upper state vibrational level in the 0,0 + 280 cm-1 band in the S1←S0 transition benefits from this four-state mixing and this can explain the change in magnitude and direction of the dipole moment of the S1 excited vibrational level. This multistate mixing, and especially the involvement of π-σ∗ state in mixing, could also provide a route for hydrogen atom detachment reactions. The electronic spectra of benzimidazole, a closely related system, were also investigated in the present study.

  13. Theoretical study of the vertical excited states of benzene, pyrimidine, and pyrazine by the symmetry adapted cluster--configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjian; Wan, Jian; Xu, Xin

    2007-07-30

    The ground state and the excited states of benzene, pyrimidine, and pyrazine have been examined by using the symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method. Detailed characterizations and the structures of the absorption peaks in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), low energy electron impact (LEEI), and electron energy loss (EEL) spectra were theoretically clarified by calculating the excitation energy and the oscillator strength for each excited state. We show that SAC-CI has the power to well reproduce the electronic excitation spectra (VUV, LEEI, and EEL) simultaneously to an accuracy for both the singlet and the triplet excited states originated from the low-lying pi --> pi*, n --> pi*, pi --> sigma* and n --> sigma* excited states of the titled compounds. The present results are compared with those of the previous theoretical studies by methods, such as EOM-CCSD(T), STEOM-CCSD, CASPT2 and TD-B3LYP, etc. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A 3d-3d appetizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-01

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 "Lens space theory" T [ L( p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L( p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S 3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[ L( p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[ L( p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere S b 3 . This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G ℂ complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  15. 3D vertical nanostructures for enhanced infrared plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Mario; Alabastri, Alessandro; Miele, Ermanno; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Patrini, Maddalena; Bajoni, Daniele; Messina, Gabriele C; Dipalo, Michele; Toma, Andrea; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; De Angelis, Francesco

    2015-11-10

    The exploitation of surface plasmon polaritons has been mostly limited to the visible and near infrared range, due to the low frequency limit for coherent plasmon excitation and the reduction of confinement on the metal surface for lower energies. In this work we show that 3D--out of plane--nanostructures can considerably increase the intrinsic quality of the optical output, light confinement and electric field enhancement factors, also in the near and mid-infrared. We suggest that the physical principle relies on the combination of far field and near field interactions between neighboring antennas, promoted by the 3D out-of-plane geometry. We first analyze the changes in the optical behavior, which occur when passing from a single on-plane nanostructure to a 3D out-of-plane configuration. Then we show that by arranging the nanostructures in periodic arrays, 3D architectures can provide, in the mid-IR, a much stronger plasmonic response, compared to that achievable with the use of 2D configurations, leading to higher energy harvesting properties and improved Q-factors, with bright perspective up to the terahertz range.

  16. 3D vertical nanostructures for enhanced infrared plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Mario; Alabastri, Alessandro; Miele, Ermanno; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Patrini, Maddalena; Bajoni, Daniele; Messina, Gabriele C.; Dipalo, Michele; Toma, Andrea; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; De Angelis, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The exploitation of surface plasmon polaritons has been mostly limited to the visible and near infrared range, due to the low frequency limit for coherent plasmon excitation and the reduction of confinement on the metal surface for lower energies. In this work we show that 3D - out of plane - nanostructures can considerably increase the intrinsic quality of the optical output, light confinement and electric field enhancement factors, also in the near and mid-infrared. We suggest that the physical principle relies on the combination of far field and near field interactions between neighboring antennas, promoted by the 3D out-of-plane geometry. We first analyze the changes in the optical behavior, which occur when passing from a single on-plane nanostructure to a 3D out-of-plane configuration. Then we show that by arranging the nanostructures in periodic arrays, 3D architectures can provide, in the mid-IR, a much stronger plasmonic response, compared to that achievable with the use of 2D configurations, leading to higher energy harvesting properties and improved Q-factors, with bright perspective up to the terahertz range. PMID:26552340

  17. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  18. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  19. 4f-5d Transitions of Tb3+ in Cs2NaYF6: the effect of distortion of the excited-state configuration.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chang-Kui; Tanner, Peter A; Meijerink, Andries; Makhov, Vladimir

    2011-08-25

    The low-temperature absorption and excitation spectra of interconfigurational 4f-5d transitions of Tb(3+) in a cubic fluoride host demonstrate the appearance of a first-order linear Jahn-Teller effect for the high-spin excited states of the excited electronic configuration 4f(7)5d involving 5d t(2g) orbitals. The τ(2g) mode is observed to be responsible for the splitting of the otherwise degenerate 5d t(2g) orbitals.

  20. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  1. Comparison of the quadratic configuration interaction and coupled cluster approaches to electron correlation including the effect of triple excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Rendell, Alistair P.

    1990-01-01

    The recently proposed quadratic configuration interaction (QCI) method is compared with the more rigorous coupled cluster (CC) approach for a variety of chemical systems. Some of these systems are well represented by a single-determinant reference function and others are not. The finite order singles and doubles correlation energy, the perturbational triples correlation energy, and a recently devised diagnostic for estimating the importance of multireference effects are considered. The spectroscopic constants of CuH, the equilibrium structure of cis-(NO)2 and the binding energies of Be3, Be4, Mg3, and Mg4 were calculated using both approaches. The diagnostic for estimating multireference character clearly demonstrates that the QCI method becomes less satisfactory than the CC approach as non-dynamical correlation becomes more important, in agreement with a perturbational analysis of the two methods and the numerical estimates of the triple excitation energies they yield. The results for CuH show that the differences between the two methods become more apparent as the chemical systems under investigation becomes more multireference in nature and the QCI results consequently become less reliable. Nonetheless, when the system of interest is dominated by a single reference determinant both QCI and CC give very similar results.

  2. Potential energy curves and lifetimes of low-lying excited electronic states of CSe studied by configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Sun, Erping; Jin, Mingxing; Xu, Haifeng; Yan, Bing

    2014-04-10

    In this work, we performed a high level ab initio study on the low-lying electronic states of CSe, utilizing MRCI+Q (the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction, and Davidson's correction) method with scalar relativistic and spin-orbit coupling effects taken into account. The potential energy curves of 18 Λ-S states associated with the lowest dissociation limit of CSe molecule, as well as those of 50 Ω states generated from the Λ-S states were computed. The spectroscopic parameters of bound states were evaluated, which agree well with existing theoretical and experimental results. With the aid of calculated spin-orbit matrix elements and the Λ-S compositional variation of the Ω states, the spin-orbit perturbations of low-lying states to the A(1)Π and a(3)Π states are analyzed. Finally, the transition dipole moments of A(1)Π, A'(1)Σ(+), a(3)Π0+, and a(3)Π1 to the ground X(1)Σ(+) state as well as the lifetimes of the four excited states were evaluated.

  3. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; van Loon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N = 2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N = 2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N = 2∗ theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-'t Hooft loops in the 4d N = 2∗ theory. In the presence of a mass parameter cfor the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  4. A 3d-3d appetizer

    DOE PAGES

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere Sb3. This enables us tomore » see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent GC complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.« less

  5. A 3d-3d appetizer

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere Sb3. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent GC complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  6. Electronic Excitations in Pyrrole: A Test Case for Determination of Chromophores in the Chromogenic Effects of Neurotoxic Hydrocarbons by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and Single-Excitation Configuration Interaction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo; Dixon, David A.

    2002-11-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) calculations on the electronic excitations in pyrrole have been performed to examine the reliability of these first-principles electronic structure methods in predicting electronic excitation spectraof pyrrole-containing compounds. Both the TD-DFT and CIS calculations led to satisfactory results when compared to available experimental data, particularly for low-lying excited states. The TD-DFT and CIS calculations provide lower and upper limits of the excitation energies, respectively, for low-lying singlet excited states. These results suggest that these methods can be used for the prediction of the excitation spectra, particularly the excitation energies for low-lying excited states, of chromophores responsible for the chromogenic effects of neurotoxic hydrocarbons, which are believed to be substituted pyrroles and their adducts with proteins. As an example of a practical application, the spectrum of the widely used 2,5-dimethylpyrrole has been calculated. It is shown that the 2,5-dimethylpyrrole molecule does not have an absorption in the region of the visible spectrum (400-700 nm), suggesting that the absorption observed at 530 nm and the color of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole is due to another species, probably a product of possible 2,5-dimethylpyrrole autoxidation. This suggests that the conclusions from previously reported experimental studies of biochemical reactions of neurotoxic γ-diketones need to be reexamined in terms of the relationship of chromogenicity to neurotoxicity.

  7. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  8. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  9. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  10. Diamond in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-20

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called Diamond Jenness was taken after NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time. 3D glasses are necessary.

  11. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  12. PB3D: A new code for edge 3-D ideal linear peeling-ballooning stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyens, T.; Sánchez, R.; Huijsmans, G.; Loarte, A.; García, L.

    2017-02-01

    A new numerical code PB3D (Peeling-Ballooning in 3-D) is presented. It implements and solves the intermediate-to-high-n ideal linear magnetohydrodynamic stability theory extended to full edge 3-D magnetic toroidal configurations in previous work [1]. The features that make PB3D unique are the assumptions on the perturbation structure through intermediate-to-high mode numbers n in general 3-D configurations, while allowing for displacement of the plasma edge. This makes PB3D capable of very efficient calculations of the full 3-D stability for the output of multiple equilibrium codes. As first verification, it is checked that results from the stability code MISHKA [2], which considers axisymmetric equilibrium configurations, are accurately reproduced, and these are then successfully extended to 3-D configurations, through comparison with COBRA [3], as well as using checks on physical consistency. The non-intuitive 3-D results presented serve as a tentative first proof of the capabilities of the code.

  13. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  14. Theoretical Studies of Excited State Energy Transfer and Radiative Properties of Transient Species Using MCSCF/CI (Multi-Configuration Self-Consistent Field/Configuration Interaction) Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-31

    application of this approach exists in the area of spin forbidden chemistry in which SA-MCSCF/CI methods could be applied to[I the determination of...2 (C) Excited State Chemistry The chemistry studied during the course of this grant falls naturall . into three categories which are summarized below

  15. 3D Plasmon Ruler

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    In this animation of a 3D plasmon ruler, the plasmonic assembly acts as a transducer to deliver optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein. (courtesy of Paul Alivisatos group)

  16. Prominent Rocks - 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-13

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image from NASA Mars Pathfinder. Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

  17. 3D Laser System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-16

    NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel 3D Laser System used for digitizing ice shapes created in the wind tunnel. The ice shapes are later utilized for characterization, analysis, and software development.

  18. SSME/side loads analysis for flight configuration, revision A. [structural analysis of space shuttle main engine under side load excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, W.

    1974-01-01

    This document describes the dynamic loads analysis accomplished for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) considering the side load excitation associated with transient flow separation on the engine bell during ground ignition. The results contained herein pertain only to the flight configuration. A Monte Carlo procedure was employed to select the input variables describing the side load excitation and the loads were statistically combined. This revision includes an active thrust vector control system representation and updated orbiter thrust structure stiffness characteristics. No future revisions are planned but may be necessary as system definition and input parameters change.

  19. Electronic excitation of molecules in solution calculated using the symmetry-adapted cluster–configuration interaction method in the polarizable continuum model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ryoichi Ehara, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    The effects from solvent environment are specific to the electronic states; therefore, a computational scheme for solvent effects consistent with the electronic states is necessary to discuss electronic excitation of molecules in solution. The PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (configuration interaction) methods are developed for such purposes. The PCM SAC-CI adopts the state-specific (SS) solvation scheme where solvent effects are self-consistently considered for every ground and excited states. For efficient computations of many excited states, we develop a perturbative approximation for the PCM SAC-CI method, which is called corrected linear response (cLR) scheme. Our test calculations show that the cLR PCM SAC-CI is a very good approximation of the SS PCM SAC-CI method for polar and nonpolar solvents.

  20. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  1. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  2. Quon 3D language for quantum information

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengwei; Wozniakowski, Alex; Jaffe, Arthur M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D topological picture-language for quantum information. Our approach combines charged excitations carried by strings, with topological properties that arise from embedding the strings in the interior of a 3D manifold with boundary. A quon is a composite that acts as a particle. Specifically, a quon is a hemisphere containing a neutral pair of open strings with opposite charge. We interpret multiquons and their transformations in a natural way. We obtain a type of relation, a string–genus “joint relation,” involving both a string and the 3D manifold. We use the joint relation to obtain a topological interpretation of the C∗-Hopf algebra relations, which are widely used in tensor networks. We obtain a 3D representation of the controlled NOT (CNOT) gate that is considerably simpler than earlier work, and a 3D topological protocol for teleportation. PMID:28167790

  3. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  4. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  5. Medical 3-D Printing.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional printing is used in the manufacturing industry, medical and pharmaceutical research, drug production, clinical medicine, and dentistry, with implications for precision and personalized medicine. This technology is advancing the development of patient-specific prosthetics, stents, splints, and fixation devices and is changing medical education, treatment decision making, and surgical planning. Diagnostic imaging modalities play a fundamental role in the creation of 3-D printed models. Although most 3-D printed objects are rigid, flexible soft-tissue-like prosthetics also can be produced. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  6. NUBEAM developments and 3d halo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Medley, S. S.; Kaye, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments related to the 3D halo model in NUBEAM code are described. To have a reliable halo neutral source for diagnostic simulation, the TRANSP/NUBEAM code has been enhanced with full implementation of ADAS atomic physic ground state and excited state data for hydrogenic beams and mixed species plasma targets. The ADAS codes and database provide the density and temperature dependence of the atomic data, and the collective nature of the state excitation process. To be able to populate 3D halo output with sufficient statistical resolution, the capability to control the statistics of fast ion CX modeling and for thermal halo launch has been added to NUBEAM. The 3D halo neutral model is based on modification and extension of the ``beam in box'' aligned 3d Cartesian grid that includes the neutral beam itself, 3D fast neutral densities due to CX of partially slowed down fast ions in the beam halo region, 3D thermal neutral densities due to CX deposition and fast neutral recapture source. More details on the 3D halo simulation design will be presented.

  7. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  8. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  9. Conference Proceedings of Applications of Mesh Generation to Complex 3-D Configurations Held at the Specialists’ Meeting of the Fluid Dynamics Panel in Leon, Norway on 24th-25th May 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    Bezier , B-Splines). the general form of 3-D elliptic grid generation equations can be used taking into account the constraints represented by Eqs.(2...has its maximum slope where the curvature of u(x) has its maximum curva - ture and its minimum slope where the curvature of u(x) is also minimal The...Among the many techniques available, we mention: analytic definition (for simple geometries), Bezier -patches, and transfinite mappings. Our experience

  10. Electronic Excitations in Pyrrole: A Test Case for Determination of Chromophores in the Chromogenic Effects of Neurotoxic Hydrocarbons by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and Single-Excitation Configuration Interaction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Chang-Guo N.; Dixon, David A. )

    2002-11-01

    Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and single excitation configuration interaction (CIS) calculations on the electronic excitations in pyrrole have been performed to examine the reliability of these first-principles electronic structure methods in predicting electronic excitation spectra of pyrrole-containing compounds. Both the TD-DFT and CIS calculations led to satisfactory results when compared to available experimental data. The TD-DFT and CIS calculations provide lower and upper limits of the excitations energies, respectively. These results suggest that these methods can be used for the prediction of the excitation spectra of chromophores responsible for the chromogenic effects of neurotoxic hydrocarbons which are believed to be substituted pyrroles and their adducts with proteins. As an example of practical application, the spectrum of the widely used 2,5-dimethylpyrrole has been calculated. It is shown that the 2,5-dimethylpyrrole molecule does not have an absorption in the region of the visible spectrum (400-700 nm), suggesting that the absorption observed at 530 nm and the color of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole is due to another species, probably a product of possible 2,5-dimethylpyrrole autoxidation. This suggests that the conclusions from previously reported experimental studies of biochemical reactions of neurotoxic y-diketones need to be re-examined in terms of the relationship of chromogenicity to neurotoxicity.

  11. 3-D Grab!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    Modern technologies in imaging greatly extend the potential to present visual information. With recently developed software tools, the perception of the third dimension can not only dramatically enhance presentation, but also allow spatial data to be better encoded. 3-D images can be taken for many subjects with only one camera, carefully moved to generate a stereo pair. Color anaglyph viewing now can be very effective using computer screens, and active filter technologies can enhance visual effects with ever-decreasing cost. We will present various novel results of 3-D imaging, including those from the auroral observations of the new twinned Athabasca University Geophysical Observatories.; Single camera stereo image for viewing with red/cyan glasses.

  12. Unoriented 3d TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Lakshya

    2017-05-01

    This paper generalizes two facts about oriented 3d TFTs to the unoriented case. On one hand, it is known that oriented 3d TFTs having a topological boundary condition admit a state-sum construction known as the Turaev-Viro construction. This is related to the string-net construction of fermionic phases of matter. We show how Turaev-Viro construction can be generalized to unoriented 3d TFTs. On the other hand, it is known that the "fermionic" versions of oriented TFTs, known as Spin-TFTs, can be constructed in terms of "shadow" TFTs which are ordinary oriented TFTs with an anomalous ℤ 2 1-form symmetry. We generalize this correspondence to Pin+-TFTs by showing that they can be constructed in terms of ordinary unoriented TFTs with anomalous ℤ 2 1-form symmetry having a mixed anomaly with time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding Pin+-TFT does not have any anomaly for time-reversal symmetry however and hence it can be unambiguously defined on a non-orientable manifold. In case a Pin+-TFT admits a topological boundary condition, one can combine the above two statements to obtain a Turaev-Viro-like construction of Pin+-TFTs. As an application of these ideas, we construct a large class of Pin+-SPT phases.

  13. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  14. Stereoscopic reconfiguration for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houde, Jean-Christophe; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Desch"nes, François

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present a method to reconfigure 3D movies in order to minimize distortion when seen on a different display than the one it has been configured for. By their very nature, 3D broadcasts come with a stereoscopic pair to be seen by the left and right eyes. However, according to reasons that we ought to explain in the paper, the cameras used to shoot a movie are calibrated according to specific viewing parameters such as the screen size, the viewing distance and the eye separation. As a consequence, a 3D broadcast seen on a different display (say a home theater or a PC screen) than the one it has been configured for (say an IMAX R screen) will suffer from noticeable distortions. In this paper, we describe the relationship between the size of the 3D display, the position of the observer, and the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the cameras. With this information, we propose a method to reorganize the stereoscopic pair in order to minimize distortion when seen on an arbitrary display. In addition to the raw video pair, our method uses the viewing distance, a rough estimate of the 3D scene, and some basic information on the 3D display. An inpainting technique is used to fill disoccluded areas.

  15. Electronic excitation spectra of molecules in solution calculated using the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction method in the polarizable continuum model with perturbative approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ryoichi Ehara, Masahiro; Cammi, Roberto

    2014-02-14

    A perturbative approximation of the state specific polarizable continuum model (PCM) symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method is proposed for efficient calculations of the electronic excitations and absorption spectra of molecules in solutions. This first-order PCM SAC-CI method considers the solvent effects on the energies of excited states up to the first-order with using the zeroth-order wavefunctions. This method can avoid the costly iterative procedure of the self-consistent reaction field calculations. The first-order PCM SAC-CI calculations well reproduce the results obtained by the iterative method for various types of excitations of molecules in polar and nonpolar solvents. The first-order contribution is significant for the excitation energies. The results obtained by the zeroth-order PCM SAC-CI, which considers the fixed ground-state reaction field for the excited-state calculations, are deviated from the results by the iterative method about 0.1 eV, and the zeroth-order PCM SAC-CI cannot predict even the direction of solvent shifts in n-hexane for many cases. The first-order PCM SAC-CI is applied to studying the solvatochromisms of (2,2{sup ′}-bipyridine)tetracarbonyltungsten [W(CO){sub 4}(bpy), bpy = 2,2{sup ′}-bipyridine] and bis(pentacarbonyltungsten)pyrazine [(OC){sub 5}W(pyz)W(CO){sub 5}, pyz = pyrazine]. The SAC-CI calculations reveal the detailed character of the excited states and the mechanisms of solvent shifts. The energies of metal to ligand charge transfer states are significantly sensitive to solvents. The first-order PCM SAC-CI well reproduces the observed absorption spectra of the tungsten carbonyl complexes in several solvents.

  16. Excited-State Electronic Structure with Configuration Interaction Singles and Tamm-Dancoff Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory on Graphical Processing Units.

    PubMed

    Isborn, Christine M; Luehr, Nathan; Ufimtsev, Ivan S; Martínez, Todd J

    2011-06-14

    Excited-state calculations are implemented in a development version of the GPU-based TeraChem software package using the configuration interaction singles (CIS) and adiabatic linear response Tamm-Dancoff time-dependent density functional theory (TDA-TDDFT) methods. The speedup of the CIS and TDDFT methods using GPU-based electron repulsion integrals and density functional quadrature integration allows full ab initio excited-state calculations on molecules of unprecedented size. CIS/6-31G and TD-BLYP/6-31G benchmark timings are presented for a range of systems, including four generations of oligothiophene dendrimers, photoactive yellow protein (PYP), and the PYP chromophore solvated with 900 quantum mechanical water molecules. The effects of double and single precision integration are discussed, and mixed precision GPU integration is shown to give extremely good numerical accuracy for both CIS and TDDFT excitation energies (excitation energies within 0.0005 eV of extended double precision CPU results).

  17. PLOT3D Export Tool for Tecplot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The PLOT3D export tool for Tecplot solves the problem of modified data being impossible to output for use by another computational science solver. The PLOT3D Exporter add-on enables the use of the most commonly available visualization tools to engineers for output of a standard format. The exportation of PLOT3D data from Tecplot has far reaching effects because it allows for grid and solution manipulation within a graphical user interface (GUI) that is easily customized with macro language-based and user-developed GUIs. The add-on also enables the use of Tecplot as an interpolation tool for solution conversion between different grids of different types. This one add-on enhances the functionality of Tecplot so significantly, it offers the ability to incorporate Tecplot into a general suite of tools for computational science applications as a 3D graphics engine for visualization of all data. Within the PLOT3D Export Add-on are several functions that enhance the operations and effectiveness of the add-on. Unlike Tecplot output functions, the PLOT3D Export Add-on enables the use of the zone selection dialog in Tecplot to choose which zones are to be written by offering three distinct options - output of active, inactive, or all zones (grid blocks). As the user modifies the zones to output with the zone selection dialog, the zones to be written are similarly updated. This enables the use of Tecplot to create multiple configurations of a geometry being analyzed. For example, if an aircraft is loaded with multiple deflections of flaps, by activating and deactivating different zones for a specific flap setting, new specific configurations of that aircraft can be easily generated by only writing out specific zones. Thus, if ten flap settings are loaded into Tecplot, the PLOT3D Export software can output ten different configurations, one for each flap setting.

  18. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  19. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  20. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  1. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  2. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  3. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  4. Influence of excited configurations on the intensities of electric-dipole transitions of rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunina, E. B.; Kornienko, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    The theory of induced electric-dipole transitions of rare-earth ions in crystals and glasses is improved by taking into account the third-order effects of perturbation theory with respect to the energies of virtual excitations of 4 f electrons to the 5 d states. Since the energy regions of excited 4 f N - 15 d states are usually superimposed with the charge-transfer bands, the effects caused by a virtual transfer of an electron from the outer shells of ions of the surroundings (ligands) to the unfilled 4 f N shells are also considered. The Pr3+, Sm3+, and Eu3+ ions are considered as examples. It is found that some difficulties inherent in the Judd-Ofelt calculation scheme are successfully overcome. The agreement of the calculated results with the experimental data improves.

  5. Single-configuration descriptions of atomic ground and excited states - Ground states of He, Li, and Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Graham D.; Doggett, Graham; Howard, Alan S.

    1992-11-01

    A first-derivative variational principle is applied to the optimization of a single-configuration spin-coupled wave function to determine the ground states of some atoms. An orbital is chosen and optimized, and an expansion is taken for the orbital over a set of primitive atomic orbitals. Expected values of spin-free and -dependent operators are developed, and optimum wave-function parameters are determined for evaluating radial moments and radial density functions from spin or spinless one-electron density functions. The method is applied to the ground-state properties of He, Li, and Be by means of even-tempered and Clementi-Roetti basis sets. Energy profiles are determined for spin-coupled and full configuration-interaction computations. The ground states of He, Li, and Be are found to have energy profiles with a global minimum and at least on local minimum.

  6. De-excitation of the strongly coupled band in 177Au and implications for core intruder configurations in the light Hg isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venhart, M.; Ali, F. A.; Ryssens, W.; Wood, J. L.; Joss, D. T.; Andreyev, A. N.; Auranen, K.; Bally, B.; Balogh, M.; Bender, M.; Carroll, R. J.; Easton, J. L.; Greenlees, P. T.; Grahn, T.; Heenen, P.-H.; HerzáÅ, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kĺč, D.; Konki, J.; Lawrie, E.; Leino, M.; Matoušek, V.; McPeake, C. G.; O'Donnell, D.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Sayǧi, B.; Sedlák, M.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Thornthwaite, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Veselský, M.

    2017-06-01

    Excited states in the proton-unbound nuclide 177Au were populated in the 92Mo(88Sr, p 2 n ) reaction and identified using the Jurogam-II and GREAT spectrometers in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled separator at the University of Jyväskylä Accelerator Laboratory. A strongly coupled band and its decay path to the 11 /2-α -decaying isomer have been identified using recoil-decay tagging. Comparisons with cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations based on Skyrme energy functionals suggest that the band has a prolate deformation and is based upon coupling the odd 1 h11 /2 proton hole to the excited 02+ configuration in the 178Hg core. Although these configurations might be expected to follow the parabolic trend of core Hg(02+) states as a function of neutron number, the electromagnetic decay paths from the strongly coupled band in 177Au are markedly different from those observed in the heavier isotopes above the midshell. This indicates that a significant change in the structure of the underlying A +1Hg core occurs below the neutron midshell.

  7. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  8. SB3D User Manual, Santa Barbara 3D Radiative Transfer Model

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William

    1999-01-01

    SB3D is a three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic radiative transfer model for the Solar spectrum. The microphysics employed in the model are the same as used in the model SBDART. It is assumed that the user of SB3D is familiar with SBDART and IDL. SB3D differs from SBDART in that computations are conducted on media in three-dimensions rather than a single column (i.e. plane-parallel), and a stochastic method (Monte Carlo) is employed instead of a numerical approach (Discrete Ordinates) for estimating a solution to the radiative transfer equation. Because of these two differences between SB3D and SBDART, the input and running of SB3D is more unwieldy and requires compromises between model performance and computational expense. Hence, there is no one correct method for running the model and the user must develop a sense to the proper input and configuration of the model.

  9. Avoided crossings, conical intersections, and low-lying excited states with a single reference method: The restricted active space spin-flip configuration interaction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, David

    2012-08-01

    The restricted active space spin-flip CI (RASCI-SF) performance is tested in the electronic structure computation of the ground and the lowest electronically excited states in the presence of near-degeneracies. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by analyzing the avoided crossing between the ionic and neutral singlet states of LiF along the molecular dissociation. The two potential energy surfaces (PESs) are explored by means of the energies of computed adiabatic and approximated diabatic states, dipole moments, and natural orbital electronic occupancies of both states. The RASCI-SF methodology is also used to study the ground and first excited singlet surface crossing involved in the double bond isomerization of ethylene, as a model case. The two-dimensional PESs of the ground (S0) and excited (S1) states are calculated for the complete configuration space of torsion and pyramidalization molecular distortions. The parameters that define the state energetics in the vicinity of the S0/S1 conical intersection region are compared to complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) results. These examples show that it is possible to describe strongly correlated electronic states using a single reference methodology without the need to expand the wavefunction to high levels of collective excitations. Finally, RASCI is also examined in the electronic structure characterization of the ground and 2^1{A}^-_g, 1^1{B}^+_u, 1^1{B}^-_u, and 1^3{B}^-_u states of all-trans polyenes with two to seven double bonds and beyond. Transition energies are compared to configuration interaction singles, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), CASSCF, and its second-order perturbation correction calculations, and to experimental data. The capability of RASCI-SF to describe the nature and properties of each electronic state is discussed in detail. This example is also used to expose the properties of different truncations of the RASCI wavefunction and to show the

  10. Avoided crossings, conical intersections, and low-lying excited states with a single reference method: the restricted active space spin-flip configuration interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David

    2012-08-28

    The restricted active space spin-flip CI (RASCI-SF) performance is tested in the electronic structure computation of the ground and the lowest electronically excited states in the presence of near-degeneracies. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by analyzing the avoided crossing between the ionic and neutral singlet states of LiF along the molecular dissociation. The two potential energy surfaces (PESs) are explored by means of the energies of computed adiabatic and approximated diabatic states, dipole moments, and natural orbital electronic occupancies of both states. The RASCI-SF methodology is also used to study the ground and first excited singlet surface crossing involved in the double bond isomerization of ethylene, as a model case. The two-dimensional PESs of the ground (S(0)) and excited (S(1)) states are calculated for the complete configuration space of torsion and pyramidalization molecular distortions. The parameters that define the state energetics in the vicinity of the S(0)/S(1) conical intersection region are compared to complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) results. These examples show that it is possible to describe strongly correlated electronic states using a single reference methodology without the need to expand the wavefunction to high levels of collective excitations. Finally, RASCI is also examined in the electronic structure characterization of the ground and 2(1)A(g)(-), 1(1)B(u)(+), 1(1)B(u)(-), and 1(3)B(u)(-) states of all-trans polyenes with two to seven double bonds and beyond. Transition energies are compared to configuration interaction singles, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), CASSCF, and its second-order perturbation correction calculations, and to experimental data. The capability of RASCI-SF to describe the nature and properties of each electronic state is discussed in detail. This example is also used to expose the properties of different truncations of the RASCI wavefunction and to

  11. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  12. Charge-transfer pipi* excited state in the 7-azaindole dimer. A hybrid configuration interactions singles/time-dependent density functional theory description.

    PubMed

    Gelabert, Ricard; Moreno, Miquel; Lluch, José M

    2006-01-26

    The hybrid configuration interaction singles/time dependent density functional theory approach of Dreuw and Head-Gordon [Dreuw, A.; Head-Gordon, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 4007] has been applied to study the potential energy landscape and accessibility of the charge-transfer pipi* excited state in the dimer of 7-azaindole, which has been traditionally considered a model for DNA base pairing. It is found that the charge-transfer pipi* excited state preferentially stabilizes the product of a single proton transfer. In this situation, the crossing between this state and the photoactive electronic state of the dimer is accessible. It is found that the charge-transfer pipi* excited state has a very steep potential energy profile with respect to any single proton-transfer coordinate and, in contrast, an extremely flat potential energy profile with respect to the stretch of the single proton-transfer complex. This is predicted to bring about a pair of rare fragments of the 7-azaindole dimer, physically separated and hence having very long lifetimes. This could have implications in the DNA base pairs of which the system is an analogue, in the form of replication errors.

  13. An efficient computational scheme for electronic excitation spectra of molecules in solution using the symmetry-adapted cluster–configuration interaction method: The accuracy of excitation energies and intuitive charge-transfer indices

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ryoichi Ehara, Masahiro

    2014-10-21

    Solvent effects on electronic excitation spectra are considerable in many situations; therefore, we propose an efficient and reliable computational scheme that is based on the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method and the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for describing electronic excitations in solution. The new scheme combines the recently proposed first-order PCM SAC-CI method with the PTE (perturbation theory at the energy level) PCM SAC scheme. This is essentially equivalent to the usual SAC and SAC-CI computations with using the PCM Hartree-Fock orbital and integrals, except for the additional correction terms that represent solute-solvent interactions. The test calculations demonstrate that the present method is a very good approximation of the more costly iterative PCM SAC-CI method for excitation energies of closed-shell molecules in their equilibrium geometry. This method provides very accurate values of electric dipole moments but is insufficient for describing the charge-transfer (CT) indices in polar solvent. The present method accurately reproduces the absorption spectra and their solvatochromism of push-pull type 2,2{sup ′}-bithiophene molecules. Significant solvent and substituent effects on these molecules are intuitively visualized using the CT indices. The present method is the simplest and theoretically consistent extension of SAC-CI method for including PCM environment, and therefore, it is useful for theoretical and computational spectroscopy.

  14. An efficient computational scheme for electronic excitation spectra of molecules in solution using the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction method: The accuracy of excitation energies and intuitive charge-transfer indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Solvent effects on electronic excitation spectra are considerable in many situations; therefore, we propose an efficient and reliable computational scheme that is based on the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method and the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for describing electronic excitations in solution. The new scheme combines the recently proposed first-order PCM SAC-CI method with the PTE (perturbation theory at the energy level) PCM SAC scheme. This is essentially equivalent to the usual SAC and SAC-CI computations with using the PCM Hartree-Fock orbital and integrals, except for the additional correction terms that represent solute-solvent interactions. The test calculations demonstrate that the present method is a very good approximation of the more costly iterative PCM SAC-CI method for excitation energies of closed-shell molecules in their equilibrium geometry. This method provides very accurate values of electric dipole moments but is insufficient for describing the charge-transfer (CT) indices in polar solvent. The present method accurately reproduces the absorption spectra and their solvatochromism of push-pull type 2,2'-bithiophene molecules. Significant solvent and substituent effects on these molecules are intuitively visualized using the CT indices. The present method is the simplest and theoretically consistent extension of SAC-CI method for including PCM environment, and therefore, it is useful for theoretical and computational spectroscopy.

  15. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. Pluto in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-23

    Global stereo mapping of Pluto surface is now possible, as images taken from multiple directions are downlinked from NASA New Horizons spacecraft. Stereo images will eventually provide an accurate topographic map of most of the hemisphere of Pluto seen by New Horizons during the July 14 flyby, which will be key to understanding Pluto's geological history. This example, which requires red/blue stereo glasses for viewing, shows a region 180 miles (300 kilometers) across, centered near longitude 130 E, latitude 20 N (the red square in the global context image). North is to the upper left. The image shows an ancient, heavily cratered region of Pluto, dotted with low hills and cut by deep fractures, which indicate extension of Pluto's crust. Analysis of these stereo images shows that the steep fracture in the upper left of the image is about 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) deep, and the craters in the lower right part of the image are up to 1.3 miles (2.1 km) deep. Smallest visible details are about 0.4 miles (0.6 kilometers) across. You will need 3D glasses to view this image showing an ancient, heavily cratered region of Pluto. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20032

  17. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  18. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  19. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  20. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics. PMID:28952542

  1. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  2. 3D nanopillar optical antenna photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Pradeep; Hung, Chung-Hong; Shapiro, Joshua; Scofield, Adam; Lin, Andrew; Williams, Benjamin S; Huffaker, Diana L

    2012-11-05

    We demonstrate 3D surface plasmon photoresponse in nanopillar arrays resulting in enhanced responsivity due to both Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances (LSPRs) and Surface Plasmon Polariton Bloch Waves (SPP-BWs). The LSPRs are excited due to a partial gold shell coating the nanopillar which acts as a 3D Nanopillar Optical Antenna (NOA) in focusing light into the nanopillar. Angular photoresponse measurements show that SPP-BWs can be spectrally coincident with LSPRs to result in a x2 enhancement in responsivity at 1180 nm. Full-wave Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations substantiate both the spatial and spectral coupling of the SPP-BW / LSPR for enhanced absorption and the nature of the LSPR. Geometrical control of the 3D NOA and the self-aligned metal hole lattice allows the hybridization of both localized and propagating surface plasmon modes for enhanced absorption. Hybridized plasmonic modes opens up new avenues in optical antenna design in nanoscale photodetectors.

  3. Development of a 3D pixel module for an ultralarge screen 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, Toshihiko; Takaki, Yasuhiro

    2004-10-01

    A large screen 2D display used at stadiums and theaters consists of a number of pixel modules. The pixel module usually consists of 8x8 or 16x16 LED pixels. In this study we develop a 3D pixel module in order to construct a large screen 3D display which is glass-free and has the motion parallax. This configuration for a large screen 3D display dramatically reduces the complexity of wiring 3D pixels. The 3D pixel module consists of several LCD panels, several cylindrical lenses, and one small PC. The LCD panels are slanted in order to differentiate the distances from same color pixels to the axis of the cylindrical lens so that the rays from the same color pixels are refracted into the different horizontal directions by the cylindrical lens. We constructed a prototype 3D pixel module, which consists of 8x4 3D pixels. The prototype module is designed to display 300 different patterns into different horizontal directions with the horizontal display angle pitch of 0.099 degree. The LCD panels are controlled by a small PC and the 3D image data is transmitted through the Gigabit Ethernet.

  4. Scalable large format 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Nelson L.; Damera-Venkata, Niranjan

    2010-02-01

    We present a general framework for the modeling and optimization of scalable large format 3-D displays using multiple projectors. Based on this framework, we derive algorithms that can robustly optimize the visual quality of an arbitrary combination of projectors (e.g. tiled, superimposed, combinations of the two) without manual adjustment. The framework creates for the first time a new unified paradigm that is agnostic to a particular configuration of projectors yet robustly optimizes for the brightness, contrast, and resolution of that configuration. In addition, we demonstrate that our algorithms support high resolution stereoscopic video at real-time interactive frame rates achieved on commodity graphics hardware. Through complementary polarization, the framework creates high quality multi-projector 3-D displays at low hardware and operational cost for a variety of applications including digital cinema, visualization, and command-and-control walls.

  5. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states.

    PubMed

    Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-07

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  6. Four-component relativistic coupled cluster and configuration interaction calculations on the ground and excited states of the RbYb molecule.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Knecht, Stefan; Fleig, Timo; Marian, Christel M

    2009-11-12

    We present high-level four-component coupled cluster and multireference configuration interaction calculations of potential energy curves, dipole moment, Franck-Condon factors and spectroscopic constants of the newly formed RbYb molecule. From finite-field calculations we obtain an electric dipole moment for RbYb of almost 1 D. In combination with its magnetic dipole moment this makes RbYb an excellent candidate for trapping and for studying dipolar interaction in the ultracold regime. Significant Franck-Condon factors are found between the rovibronic ground state and the lowest rovibrational levels of the first excited 2Sigma1/2+ state but also between a broad range of rovibrational levels of the 2Pi1/2 and 2Pi3/2 states. This allows for several two-step approaches to reach the rovibronic ground state after initial photoassociation.

  7. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H.; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-01

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  8. Calculation of the vibrational excited states of malonaldehyde and their tunneling splittings with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Markus; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-07-21

    We report energies and tunneling splittings of vibrational excited states of malonaldehyde which have been obtained using full dimensional quantum mechanical calculations. To this end we employed the multi configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The results have been obtained using a recently published potential energy surface [Y. Wang, B. J. Braams, J. M. Bowman, S. Carter, and D. P. Tew, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 224314 (2008)] which has been brought into a suitable form by a modified version of the n-mode representation which was used with two different arrangements of coordinates. The relevant terms of the expansion have been identified with a Metropolis algorithm and a diffusion Monte-Carlo technique, respectively.

  9. An uniform DBD plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse using wire-cylinder electrode configuration in atmospheric air.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng-Chao; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Jia, Li; Yang, De-Zheng; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2014-03-25

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulsed power supply with 15 ns rising time is employed to generate an uniform dielectric barrier discharge using the wire-cylinder electrode configuration in atmospheric air. The images, waveforms of pulse voltage and discharge current, and the optical emission spectra of the discharges are recorded. The rotational and vibrational temperatures of plasma are determined by comparing the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra. The effects of pulse peak voltage, pulse repetition rate and quartz tube diameter on the emission intensities of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0) and N2(+)B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+),0-0 and the rotational and vibrational temperatures have been investigated. It is found that the uniform plasma with low gas temperature can be obtained, and the emission intensities of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0) and N2(+)B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+),0-0 rise with increasing the pulse peak voltage and pulse repetition rate, while decrease as the increase of quartz tube diameter. In addition, under the condition of 28 kV pulse peak voltage, 150 Hz pulse repetition rate and 7 mm quartz tube diameter, the plasma gas temperature is determined to be 330 K. The results also indicate that the plasma gas temperature keep almost constant when increasing the pulse peak voltage and pulse repetition rate but increase with the increase of the quartz tube diameter.

  10. Simultaneous analysis of matter radii, transition probabilities, and excitation energies of Mg isotopes by angular-momentum-projected configuration-mixing calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Shin; Tagami, Shingo; Matsumoto, Takuma; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    We perform simultaneous analysis of (1) matter radii, (2) B (E 2 ;0+→2+) transition probabilities, and (3) excitation energies, E (2+) and E (4+) , for Mg-4024 by using the beyond-mean-field (BMF) framework with angular-momentum-projected configuration mixing with respect to the axially symmetric β2 deformation with infinitesimal cranking. The BMF calculations successfully reproduce all of the data for rm,B (E 2 ) , and E (2+) and E (4+) , indicating that it is quite useful for data analysis; particularly for low-lying states. We also discuss the absolute value of the deformation parameter β2 deduced from measured values of B (E 2 ) and rm. This framework makes it possible to investigate the effects of β2 deformation, the change in β2 due to restoration of rotational symmetry, β2 configuration mixing, and the inclusion of time-odd components by infinitesimal cranking. Under the assumption of axial deformation and parity conservation, we clarify which effect is important for each of the three measurements and propose the kinds of BMF calculations that are practical for each of the three kinds of observables.

  11. Approximate Theoretical Model for the Five Electronic States (Ω = 5/2, 3/2, 3/2, 1/2, 1/2) Arising from the Ground 3d9 Configuration in Nickel Halide Molecules and for Rotational Levels of the Two Ω = 1/2 States in that Manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Allan S.-C.

    2011-06-01

    An effective Hamiltonian for a non-rotating diatomic molecule containing only crystal-field and spin-orbit operators has been set up to describe the energies of the five spin-orbit components that arise in the ground electronic configuration of the nickel monohalides. The model assumes that bonding in the nickel halides has the approximate form Ni+X-, with an electronic 3d9 configuration plus closed shells on the Ni+ moiety and a closed shell configuration on the X&- moiety. Least-squares fits of the observed five spin-orbit components of the three lowest electronic states in NiF and NiCl are then carried out in terms of the three crystal field parameters C0, C2, C4 and the spin-orbit coupling constant A. Following this, the usual effective Hamiltonian B(J-L-S)^2 for a rotating diatomic molecule is used to derive expressions for the unusually large Ω-type doubling parameter p in the two Ω = 1/2 states in the 3d9 manifold. These expressions show (for certain sign conventions) that the sum of the two p values should be -2B, but that their difference can vary between -10B and +10B. The theoretical magnitudes for p are in good agreement with the two observed p values for both NiF and NiCl, but the signs are not. The experimental signs can be brought into agreement with the theoretical signs by a fairly massive change in +/- parity assignments in the NiF and NiCl literature. The last part of the talk will focus on the theoretical and experimental implications of these parity changes.

  12. 3D conductive coupling for efficient generation of prominent Fano resonances in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiguang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Jiafang; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a 3D conductive coupling mechanism for the efficient generation of prominent and robust Fano resonances in 3D metamaterials (MMs) formed by integrating vertical U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs) or vertical rectangular plates along a planar metallic hole array with extraordinary optical transmission (EOT). In such a configuration, intensified vertical E-field is induced along the metallic holes and naturally excites the electric resonances of the vertical structures, which form non-radiative “dark” modes. These 3D conductive “dark” modes strongly interfere with the “bright” resonance mode of the EOT structure, generating significant Fano resonances with both prominent destructive and constructive interferences. The demonstrated 3D conductive coupling mechanism is highly universal in that both 3D MMs with vertical SRRs and vertical plates exhibit the same prominent Fano resonances despite their dramatic structural difference, which is conceptually different from conventional capacitive and inductive coupling mechanisms that degraded drastically upon small structural deviations.

  13. Atomic data for a five-configuration model of Fe XIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    Collision strengths calculated in the distorted wave approximation are presented for electron excitation of Fe XIV at incident energies of 10, 20 and 30 Rydbergs. Configurations 3s(2)3p, 3s3p(2), 3s(2)3d, 3p(3), and 3s3p3d are included, comprising 40 levels, and wave function mixing coefficients are tabulated. Radiative transition rates are given for the same model using the Superstructure program.

  14. Atomic data for a five-configuration model of Fe XIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    Collision strengths calculated in the distorted wave approximation are presented for electron excitation of Fe XIV at incident energies of 10, 20 and 30 Rydbergs. Configurations 3s(2)3p, 3s3p(2), 3s(2)3d, 3p(3), and 3s3p3d are included, comprising 40 levels, and wave function mixing coefficients are tabulated. Radiative transition rates are given for the same model using the Superstructure program.

  15. MOM3D/EM-ANIMATE - MOM3D WITH ANIMATION CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, J. F.

    1994-01-01

    MOM3D (LAR-15074) is a FORTRAN method-of-moments electromagnetic analysis algorithm for open or closed 3-D perfectly conducting or resistive surfaces. Radar cross section with plane wave illumination is the prime analysis emphasis; however, provision is also included for local port excitation for computing antenna gain patterns and input impedances. The Electric Field Integral Equation form of Maxwell's equations is solved using local triangle couple basis and testing functions with a resultant system impedance matrix. The analysis emphasis is not only for routine RCS pattern predictions, but also for phenomenological diagnostics: bistatic imaging, currents, and near scattered/total electric fields. The images, currents, and near fields are output in form suitable for animation. MOM3D computes the full backscatter and bistatic radar cross section polarization scattering matrix (amplitude and phase), body currents and near scattered and total fields for plane wave illumination. MOM3D also incorporates a new bistatic k space imaging algorithm for computing down range and down/cross range diagnostic images using only one matrix inversion. MOM3D has been made memory and cpu time efficient by using symmetric matrices, symmetric geometry, and partitioned fixed and variable geometries suitable for design iteration studies. MOM3D may be run interactively or in batch mode on 486 IBM PCs and compatibles, UNIX workstations or larger computers. A 486 PC with 16 megabytes of memory has the potential to solve a 30 square wavelength (containing 3000 unknowns) symmetric configuration. Geometries are described using a triangular mesh input in the form of a list of spatial vertex points and a triangle join connection list. The EM-ANIMATE (LAR-15075) program is a specialized visualization program that displays and animates the near-field and surface-current solutions obtained from an electromagnetics program, in particular, that from MOM3D. The EM-ANIMATE program is windows based and

  16. MOM3D/EM-ANIMATE - MOM3D WITH ANIMATION CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, J. F.

    1994-01-01

    MOM3D (LAR-15074) is a FORTRAN method-of-moments electromagnetic analysis algorithm for open or closed 3-D perfectly conducting or resistive surfaces. Radar cross section with plane wave illumination is the prime analysis emphasis; however, provision is also included for local port excitation for computing antenna gain patterns and input impedances. The Electric Field Integral Equation form of Maxwell's equations is solved using local triangle couple basis and testing functions with a resultant system impedance matrix. The analysis emphasis is not only for routine RCS pattern predictions, but also for phenomenological diagnostics: bistatic imaging, currents, and near scattered/total electric fields. The images, currents, and near fields are output in form suitable for animation. MOM3D computes the full backscatter and bistatic radar cross section polarization scattering matrix (amplitude and phase), body currents and near scattered and total fields for plane wave illumination. MOM3D also incorporates a new bistatic k space imaging algorithm for computing down range and down/cross range diagnostic images using only one matrix inversion. MOM3D has been made memory and cpu time efficient by using symmetric matrices, symmetric geometry, and partitioned fixed and variable geometries suitable for design iteration studies. MOM3D may be run interactively or in batch mode on 486 IBM PCs and compatibles, UNIX workstations or larger computers. A 486 PC with 16 megabytes of memory has the potential to solve a 30 square wavelength (containing 3000 unknowns) symmetric configuration. Geometries are described using a triangular mesh input in the form of a list of spatial vertex points and a triangle join connection list. The EM-ANIMATE (LAR-15075) program is a specialized visualization program that displays and animates the near-field and surface-current solutions obtained from an electromagnetics program, in particular, that from MOM3D. The EM-ANIMATE program is windows based and

  17. Scalable Multi-Platform Distribution of Spatial 3d Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, J.; Hagedorn, B.; Döllner, J.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models provide powerful user interfaces for communication of 2D and 3D geoinformation. Providing high quality visualization of massive 3D geoinformation in a scalable, fast, and cost efficient manner is still a challenging task. Especially for mobile and web-based system environments, software and hardware configurations of target systems differ significantly. This makes it hard to provide fast, visually appealing renderings of 3D data throughout a variety of platforms and devices. Current mobile or web-based solutions for 3D visualization usually require raw 3D scene data such as triangle meshes together with textures delivered from server to client, what makes them strongly limited in terms of size and complexity of the models they can handle. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for provisioning of massive, virtual 3D city models on different platforms namely web browsers, smartphones or tablets, by means of an interactive map assembled from artificial oblique image tiles. The key concept is to synthesize such images of a virtual 3D city model by a 3D rendering service in a preprocessing step. This service encapsulates model handling and 3D rendering techniques for high quality visualization of massive 3D models. By generating image tiles using this service, the 3D rendering process is shifted from the client side, which provides major advantages: (a) The complexity of the 3D city model data is decoupled from data transfer complexity (b) the implementation of client applications is simplified significantly as 3D rendering is encapsulated on server side (c) 3D city models can be easily deployed for and used by a large number of concurrent users, leading to a high degree of scalability of the overall approach. All core 3D rendering techniques are performed on a dedicated 3D rendering server, and thin-client applications can be compactly implemented for various devices and platforms.

  18. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of correlated electrons in solution. 1. Full configuration interaction (CI) excited-state relaxation dynamics of hydrated dielectrons.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2006-05-18

    The hydrated dielectron is composed of two excess electrons dissolved in liquid water that occupy a single cavity; in both its singlet and triplet spin states there is a significant exchange interaction so the two electrons cannot be considered to be independent. In this paper and the following paper,we present the results of mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the nonadiabatic relaxation dynamics of photoexcited hydrated dielectrons, where we use full configuration interaction (CI) to solve for the two-electron wave function at every simulation time step. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first systematic treatment of excited-state solvation dynamics where the multiple-electron problem is solved exactly. The simulations show that the effects of exchange and correlation contribute significantly to the relaxation dynamics. For example, spin-singlet dielectrons relax to the ground state on a time scale similar to that of single electrons excited at the same energy, but spin-triplet dielectrons relax much faster. The difference in relaxation dynamics is caused by exchange and correlation: The Pauli exclusion principle imposes very different electronic structure when the electrons' spins are singlet paired than when they are triplet paired, altering the available nonadiabatic relaxation pathways. In addition, we monitor how electronic correlation changes dynamically during nonadiabatic relaxation and show that solvent dynamics cause electron correlation to evolve quite differently for singlet and triplet dielectrons. Despite such differences, our calculations show that both spin states are stable to excited-state dissociation, but that the excited-state stability has different origins for the two spin states. For singlet dielectrons, the stability depends on whether the solvent structure can rearrange to create a second cavity before the ground state is reached. For triplet dielectrons, in contrast, electronic correlation ensures

  19. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  20. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  1. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  2. MAP3D: a media processor approach for high-end 3D graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsa, Lucia; Stadnicki, Steven; Basoglu, Chris

    1999-12-01

    Equator Technologies, Inc. has used a software-first approach to produce several programmable and advanced VLIW processor architectures that have the flexibility to run both traditional systems tasks and an array of media-rich applications. For example, Equator's MAP1000A is the world's fastest single-chip programmable signal and image processor targeted for digital consumer and office automation markets. The Equator MAP3D is a proposal for the architecture of the next generation of the Equator MAP family. The MAP3D is designed to achieve high-end 3D performance and a variety of customizable special effects by combining special graphics features with high performance floating-point and media processor architecture. As a programmable media processor, it offers the advantages of a completely configurable 3D pipeline--allowing developers to experiment with different algorithms and to tailor their pipeline to achieve the highest performance for a particular application. With the support of Equator's advanced C compiler and toolkit, MAP3D programs can be written in a high-level language. This allows the compiler to successfully find and exploit any parallelism in a programmer's code, thus decreasing the time to market of a given applications. The ability to run an operating system makes it possible to run concurrent applications in the MAP3D chip, such as video decoding while executing the 3D pipelines, so that integration of applications is easily achieved--using real-time decoded imagery for texturing 3D objects, for instance. This novel architecture enables an affordable, integrated solution for high performance 3D graphics.

  3. [Development of a software for 3D virtual phantom design].

    PubMed

    Zou, Lian; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Qi

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D virtual phantom design software, which was developed based on object-oriented programming methodology and dedicated to medical physics research. This software was named Magical Phan tom (MPhantom), which is composed of 3D visual builder module and virtual CT scanner. The users can conveniently construct any complex 3D phantom, and then export the phantom as DICOM 3.0 CT images. MPhantom is a user-friendly and powerful software for 3D phantom configuration, and has passed the real scene's application test. MPhantom will accelerate the Monte Carlo simulation for dose calculation in radiation therapy and X ray imaging reconstruction algorithm research.

  4. Perception of 3D spatial relations for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Paul; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Hoffmann, Christoph; Popescu, Voicu S.

    2004-05-01

    We test perception of 3D spatial relations in 3D images rendered by a 3D display (Perspecta from Actuality Systems) and compare it to that of a high-resolution flat panel display. 3D images provide the observer with such depth cues as motion parallax and binocular disparity. Our 3D display is a device that renders a 3D image by displaying, in rapid succession, radial slices through the scene on a rotating screen. The image is contained in a glass globe and can be viewed from virtually any direction. In the psychophysical experiment several families of 3D objects are used as stimuli: primitive shapes (cylinders and cuboids), and complex objects (multi-story buildings, cars, and pieces of furniture). Each object has at least one plane of symmetry. On each trial an object or its "distorted" version is shown at an arbitrary orientation. The distortion is produced by stretching an object in a random direction by 40%. This distortion must eliminate the symmetry of an object. The subject's task is to decide whether or not the presented object is distorted under several viewing conditions (monocular/binocular, with/without motion parallax, and near/far). The subject's performance is measured by the discriminability d', which is a conventional dependent variable in signal detection experiments.

  5. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  6. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  7. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  8. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  9. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  10. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  11. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  12. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  13. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  14. Secondary Instability in 3-D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Chen, L.

    2016-12-01

    3-D magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic-electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out in the force free current sheet for cases with a strong guide field BG as occurring in the solar and laboratory plasmas. It is found that, following the growth of the primary reconnection, a secondary instability is excited in the separatrix region, which leads to the electron heating and acceleration in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. The instability is due to the 3-D physics associated with a finite kz, where kz is the wave number along the guide field direction. Dependences of the growth rate of the secondary instability on the electron-ion resistivity, the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me, beta values, and the half-width of the current sheet are investigated. It is demonstrated that the secondary instability is of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink type.

  15. Slate characterization using 3D laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M.; Taboada, J.; Martínez, J.; Matías, J. M.; Vilán, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Quality control is a necessary component of the slate slab manufacturing process so as to evaluate defects as defined by the current standard for slate. Quality control has traditionally been performed manually by an expert in the field, with the consequent human subjectivity. We studied the feasibility of using a 3D laser scanner to measure slate slabs and analyze possible defects that would lead to the rejection of slabs for particular industrial processes. The application requires slate characterization to be performed in real time and thereby requires a short computation time. We describe an optimized calibration method based on Tsai's approach that reduces calculation complexity and cost in this key 3D laser scanning stage. Configured and implemented for slate slab characterization, the system produces the required information in real time during the production process.

  16. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  17. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. Feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Voormolen, M M; Bouakaz, A; Krenning, B J; Lancée, C T; ten Cate, F J; de Jong, N

    2004-04-01

    Improved endocardial border delineation with the application of contrast agents should allow for less complex and faster tracing algorithms for left ventricular volume analysis. We developed a fast rotating phased array transducer for 3D imaging of the heart with harmonic capabilities making it suitable for contrast imaging. In this study the feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging is evaluated in vitro. A commercially available tissue mimicking flow phantom was used in combination with Sonovue. Backscatter power spectra from a tissue and contrast region of interest were calculated from recorded radio frequency data. The spectra and the extracted contrast to tissue ratio from these spectra were used to optimize the excitation frequency, the pulse length and the receive filter settings of the transducer. Frequencies ranging from 1.66 to 2.35 MHz and pulse lengths of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 cycles were explored. An increase of more than 15 dB in the contrast to tissue ratio was found around the second harmonic compared with the fundamental level at an optimal excitation frequency of 1.74 MHz and a pulse length of 2.5 cycles. Using the optimal settings for 3D harmonic contrast recordings volume measurements of a left ventricular shaped agar phantom were performed. Without contrast the extracted volume data resulted in a volume error of 1.5%, with contrast an accuracy of 3.8% was achieved. The results show the feasibility of accurate volume measurements from 3D harmonic contrast images. Further investigations will include the clinical evaluation of the presented technique for improved assessment of the heart.

  1. Complex self-consistent field and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction calculations for the 2Pi(g) resonance state of N2-.

    PubMed

    Honigmann, Michael; Buenker, Robert J; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter

    2006-12-21

    Self-consistent field and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction calculations employing the complex basis function technique are carried out for the (2)Pi(g) resonance state of the N(2) (-) molecule as well as several other anionic resonance states in the neighboring energy region. The results of calculations employing the same method for the (1)S (2s(2)) state of the He atom and the (1)Sigma(g) (+) (sigma(u) (2)) state of the H(2) molecule are found to be in good agreement with those of earlier work. The present theoretical treatment has succeeded for the first time in satisfying the rigorous criterion of the complex variational principle in computing the N(2) (-) resonance states, namely, a cusp in the plots of real versus imaginary components of the corresponding complex energies has been located at each internuclear distance. On this basis, it is found that the open-shell orbital in the lowest-energy adiabatic N(2) (-) resonance state of (2)Pi(g) symmetry changes its character from quite compact at large internuclear distance to relatively diffuse for r<2.3a(0). This is in contrast to all previous theoretical treatments of this system that have not rigorously satisfied the complex variational principle in their determination of this wave function.

  2. Excited configurations of hydrogen in the BaTiO3 -xHx perovskite lattice associated with hydrogen exchange and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T. U.; Koda, A.; Shimomura, K.; Higemoto, W.; Matsuzaki, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kageyama, H.

    2017-01-01

    Excited configurations of hydrogen in the oxyhydride BaTiO3 -xHx (x =0.1 -0.5 ), which are considered to be involved in its hydrogen transport and exchange processes, were investigated by positive muon spin relaxation spectroscopy using muonium (Mu) as a pseudoisotope of hydrogen. Muons implanted into the BaTiO3 -xHx perovskite lattice were mainly found in two qualitatively different metastable states. One was assigned to a highly mobile interstitial protonic state, which is commonly observed in perovskite oxides. The other was found to form an entangled two spin-1/2 system with the nuclear spin of an H- ion at the anion site. The structure of the (H,Mu) complex agrees well with that of a neutralized center containing two H- ions at a doubly charged oxygen vacancy, which was predicted to form in the SrTiO3 -δ perovskite lattice by a computational study [Y. Iwazaki et al., APL Mater. 2, 012103 (2014), 10.1063/1.4854355]. Above 100 K, interstitial Mu+ diffusion and retrapping to a deep defect were observed, which could be a rate-limiting step of macroscopic Mu/H transport in the BaTiO3 -xHx lattice.

  3. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  4. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-07

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models.

  5. Spectral Change in 3d-4f Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Ce Intermetallics Across the Transition between Kondo Singlet and Localized-Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasabe, Norimasa; Tonai, Hironori; Uozumi, Takayuki

    2017-09-01

    The spectral change in the 3d resonant X-ray inelastic scattering (RIXS) induced by the spin-state transition between Kondo singlet (KS) and localized spin (LS) state is theoretically investigated for γ-like Ce intermetallics by means of a single impurity Anderson model. The basis configurations with an electron-hole pair are included in the calculation within the configuration interaction scheme, in addition to the intra-atomic full multiplet coupling of the Ce impurity. A distinct spectral change is found across the KS-LS transition in the RIXS excited at the charge-transfer satellite of the 3d X-ray absorption spectrum (XAS) under a polarized geometry. In contrast, the 3d XAS and RIXS spectra under a depolarized geometry are rather insensitive to the spin-state transition.

  6. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  7. A 3-D chimera grid embedding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, J. A.; Buning, P. G.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) chimera grid-embedding technique is described. The technique simplifies the construction of computational grids about complex geometries. The method subdivides the physical domain into regions which can accommodate easily generated grids. Communication among the grids is accomplished by interpolation of the dependent variables at grid boundaries. The procedures for constructing the composite mesh and the associated data structures are described. The method is demonstrated by solution of the Euler equations for the transonic flow about a wing/body, wing/body/tail, and a configuration of three ellipsoidal bodies.

  8. Factorising the 3D topologically twisted index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabo-Bizet, Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    We explore the path integration — upon the contour of hermitian (non-auxliary) field configurations — of topologically twisted N=2 Chern-Simons-matter theory (TTCSM) on {S}_2 times a segment. In this way, we obtain the formula for the 3D topologically twisted index, first as a convolution of TTCSM on {S}_2 times halves of {S}_1 , second as TTCSM on {S}_2 times {S}_1 — with a puncture, — and third as TTCSM on {S}_2× {S}_1 . In contradistinction to the first two cases, in the third case, the vector multiplet auxiliary field D is constrained to be anti-hermitian.

  9. A novel 3D stereoscopic anatomy tutorial.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip M; Hamilton, Neil M; Denison, Alan R

    2012-02-01

    Advancement in technology is an important driver for the evolution of the medical curriculum. With continued criticism of medical students' knowledge of anatomy, further investigation into adjuncts for anatomy teaching seems appropriate. This project sought to create an interactive 3D stereoscopic tutorial to bridge the teaching of anatomy and pathology. Anonymised computed tomography (CT) scans were collected of a normal aorta and a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. These scans were rendered into 3D stereoscopic images using open-source software. These images were then annotated with interactive labels and buttons to access information on normal aortic anatomy and the clinical details of abdominal aortic aneurysms. A total of 183 first-year medical students viewed the tutorial, and 160 gave feedback (87%). The students found the 3D system aided their understanding of anatomy and pathology (93 versus 3%), and provided an advantage when compared with current anatomy classes (93 versus 1%). The students highlighted the musculoskeletal system and cerebral vasculature as areas for future 3D visualisation. Of the responders, 96 per cent felt that the curriculum would benefit from further 3D stereoscopic anatomy/pathology tutorials. This technology has the exciting potential to use the radiographic libraries in hospitals for medical education. The computer software, however, has some limitations at present. It is not able to effectively distinguish between tissues of similar densities. Furthermore, not all tissues are amenable to CT scanning of a high enough resolution for presentation. Despite these limitations, the software continues to advance and is capable of producing very high quality anatomy images. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  10. Weighted f-values, A-values, and line strengths for the E1 transitions among 3d 6, 3d 54s, and 3d 54p levels of Fe III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Narayan C.; Hibbert, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Weighted oscillator strengths, weighted radiative rates, and line strengths for all the E1 transitions between 285 fine-structure levels belonging to the 3d 6, 3d 54s, and 3d 54p configurations of Fe III are presented, in ascending order of wavelength. Calculations have been undertaken using the general configuration interaction (CI) code CIV3. The large configuration set is constructed by allowing single and double replacements from any of 3d 6, 3d 54s, 3d 54p, and 3d 54d configurations to nl orbitals with n⩽5,l⩽3 as well as 6p. Additional selective promotions from 3s and 3p subshells are also included in the CI expansions to incorporate the important correlation effects in the n=3 shell. Results of some strong transitions between levels of 3d 6, 3d 54s, and 3d 54p configurations are also presented and compared with other available calculations. It is found that large disagreements occur in many transitions among the existing calculations.

  11. ASI/MET - 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-13

    The Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package ASI/MET is the mast and windsocks at the center of this stereo image from NASA Mars Pathfinder. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

  12. 3D Models of Immunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    This collaborative grant is developing 3D models of both mouse and human biology to investigate aspects of therapeutic vaccination in order to answer key questions relevant to human cancer immunotherapy.

  13. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  14. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  15. [Tridimensional (3D) endoscopic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, M J; Muñoz Agel, F; Abad Belando, R

    2007-01-01

    A review and update on 3D endoscopic ultrasonography is included regarding all of this technique s aspects, technical details, and current indications. Images from our own clinical experience are presented.

  16. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  17. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  18. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the Cl+CH4 reaction dynamics on a quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitation interpolated potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Castillo, J F; Aoiz, F J; Bañares, L

    2006-09-28

    An ab initio interpolated potential energy surface (PES) for the Cl+CH(4) reactive system has been constructed using the interpolation method of Collins and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 102, 5647 (1995); 108, 8302 (1998); 111, 816 (1999); Theor. Chem. Acc. 108, 313 (2002)]. The ab initio calculations have been performed using quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitation theory to build the PES. A simple scaling all correlation technique has been used to obtain a PES which yields a barrier height and reaction energy in good agreement with high level ab initio calculations and experimental measurements. Using these interpolated PESs, a detailed quasiclassical trajectory study of integral and differential cross sections, product rovibrational populations, and internal energy distributions has been carried out for the Cl+CH(4) and Cl+CD(4) reactions, and the theoretical results have been compared with the available experimental data. It has been shown that the calculated total reaction cross sections versus collision energy for the Cl+CH(4) and Cl+CD(4) reactions is very sensitive to the barrier height. Besides, due to the zero-point energy (ZPE) leakage of the CH(4) molecule to the reaction coordinate in the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations, the reaction threshold falls below the barrier height of the PES. The ZPE leakage leads to CH(3) and HCl coproducts with internal energy below its corresponding ZPEs. We have shown that a Gaussian binning (GB) analysis of the trajectories yields excitation functions in somehow better agreement with the experimental determinations. The HCl(v'=0) and DCl(v'=0) rotational distributions are as well very sensitive to the ZPE problem. The GB correction narrows and shifts the rotational distributions to lower values of the rotational quantum numbers. However, the present QCT rotational distributions are still hotter than the experimental distributions. In both reactions the angular distributions shift

  19. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  20. 3-D threat image projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Yesna O.; Abraham, Douglas Q.; Agaian, Sos; Panetta, Karen

    2008-02-01

    Automated Explosive Detection Systems utilizing Computed Tomography perform a series X-ray scans of passenger bags being checked in at the airport, and produce various 2-D projection images and 3-D volumetric images of the bag. The determination as to whether the passenger bag contains an explosive and needs to be searched manually is performed through trained Transportation Security Administration screeners following an approved protocol. In order to keep the screeners vigilant with regards to screening quality, the Transportation Security Administration has mandated the use of Threat Image Projection on 2-D projection X-ray screening equipment used at all US airports. These algorithms insert visual artificial threats into images of the normal passenger bags in order to test the screeners with regards to their screening efficiency and their screening quality at determining threats. This technology for 2-D X-ray system is proven and is widespread amongst multiple manufacturers of X-ray projection systems. Until now, Threat Image Projection has been unsuccessful at being introduced into 3-D Automated Explosive Detection Systems for numerous reasons. The failure of these prior attempts are mainly due to imaging queues that the screeners pickup on, and therefore make it easy for the screeners to discern the presence of the threat image and thus defeating the intended purpose. This paper presents a novel approach for 3-D Threat Image Projection for 3-D Automated Explosive Detection Systems. The method presented here is a projection based approach where both the threat object and the bag remain in projection sinogram space. Novel approaches have been developed for projection based object segmentation, projection based streak reduction used for threat object isolation along with scan orientation independence and projection based streak generation for an overall realistic 3-D image. The algorithms are prototyped in MatLab and C++ and demonstrate non discernible 3-D threat

  1. A 3-d modular gripper design tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.G.; Brost, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    Modular fixturing kits are sets of components used for flexible, rapid construction of fixtures. A modular vise is a parallel-jaw vise, each jaw of which is a modular fixture plate with a regular grid of precisely positioned holes. To fixture a part, one places pins in some of the holes so that when the vise is closed, the part is reliably located and completely constrained. The modular vise concept can be adapted easily to the design of modular parallel-jaw grippers for robots. By attaching a grid-plate to each jaw of a parallel-jaw gripper, one gains the ability to easily construct high-quality grasps for a wide variety of parts from a standard set of hardware. Wallack and Canny developed an algorithm for planning planar grasp configurations for the modular vise. In this paper, the authors expand this work to produce a 3-d fixture/gripper design tool. They describe several analyses they have added to the planar algorithm, including a 3-d grasp quality metric based on force information, 3-d geometric loading analysis, and inter-gripper interference analysis. Finally, the authors describe two applications of their code. One of these is an internal application at Sandia, while the other shows a potential use of the code for designing part of an agile assembly line.

  2. 3-D Simulations of Ion Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelchenko, Yu. A.; Sudan, R. N.

    1996-11-01

    The FIREX (Field-Reversed Ion Ring Experiment) program is underway at Cornell University to demonstrate an ion ring magnetic field-reversed configuration (IRC) by injecting an intense annular proton beam across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. The previous axisymmetric PIC simulations performed with the 21\\over 2-D FIRE code have predicted [1] that strong ion rings (with a self-magnetic field large enough to reverse the applied field on axis) can be produced using this technique. We have constructed a new, parallel, object-oriented (C++), 3-D, hybrid, PIC code, FLAME to study the 3-D aspects of the ion ring formation in strongly magnetized plasmas and stability of ion ring configurations to the toroidal perturbations. These questions are extremely important for the practical realization of the FIREX ideas and are expected to be clarified in the course of investigation of the ion beam injection and ring formation in a toroidally aberrated applied magnetic field. The nonlinear evolution of ion ring tilt and precession modes as well as code testing and performance issues will also be addressed. 1. Yu.A. Omelchenko and R.N. Sudan, Phys. Plasmas, 2773 (1995)

  3. 3D Hall MHD Reconnection Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Rudakov, L.

    2002-05-01

    A 3D Hall MHD simulation code (VooDoo) has recently been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. We present preliminary results of a fully 3D magnetic reconnection study using this code. The initial configuration of the plasma system is as follows. The ambient, reversed magnetic field is in the x-direction and is proportional to B0 tanh(y/Ly) where Ly is the scale length of the current sheet. Perturbation fields δ Bx and δ By are introduced to initiate the reconnection process. This initial configuration is similar to that used in the 2D GEM reconnection study. However, the perturbation fields are localized in the z-direction. We consider two cases: no guide field (Bz = 0) and a weak guide field (Bz = 0.1B0). We find that the reconnection process is not stationary in the z-direction but propagates in the B x ∇ n direction consistent with Hall drift physics. Hence, an asymmetric disruption of the current sheet ensues. The flow structure of the plasma in the vicinity of the X-point is complex. We find that the `neutral line' (i.e, along the z-direction) is not an ignorable coordinate and is not periodic in Hall MHD reconnection dynamics; two assumptions that are often made in reconnection studies. \\ Research supported by NASA and ONR

  4. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  5. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  6. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  7. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  8. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  9. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    Soft materials and structured polymers are extremely useful nanotechnology building blocks. Block copolymers, in particular, have served as 2D masks for nanolithography and 3D scaffolds for photonic crystals, nanoparticle fabrication, and solar cells. F or many of these applications, the precise 3 dimensional structure and the number and type of defects in the polymer is important for ultimate function. However, directly visualizing the 3D structure of a soft material from the nanometer to millimeter length scales is a significant technical challenge. Here, we propose to develop the instrumentation needed for direct 3D structure determination at near nanometer resolution throughout a nearly millimeter-cubed volume of a soft, potentially heterogeneous, material. This new capability will be a valuable research tool for LANL missions in chemistry, materials science, and nanoscience. Our approach to soft materials visualization builds upon exciting developments in super-resolution optical microscopy that have occurred over the past two years. To date, these new, truly revolutionary, imaging methods have been developed and almost exclusively used for biological applications. However, in addition to biological cells, these super-resolution imaging techniques hold extreme promise for direct visualization of many important nanostructured polymers and other heterogeneous chemical systems. Los Alamos has a unique opportunity to lead the development of these super-resolution imaging methods for problems of chemical rather than biological significance. While these optical methods are limited to systems transparent to visible wavelengths, we stress that many important functional chemicals such as polymers, glasses, sol-gels, aerogels, or colloidal assemblies meet this requirement, with specific examples including materials designed for optical communication, manipulation, or light-harvesting Our Research Goals are: (1) Develop the instrumentation necessary for imaging materials

  10. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  11. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  12. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  13. 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Manousidaki, Maria; Danilov, Artem; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the excitation of plasmons in 3D plasmon crystal metamaterials and report the observation of a delocalized plasmon mode, which provides extremely high spectral sensitivity (>2600 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) change), outperforming all plasmonic counterparts excited in 2D nanoscale geometries, as well as a prominent phase-sensitive response (>3*104 deg. of phase per RIU). Combined with a large surface for bioimmobilization provided by the 3D matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology. PMID:27151104

  14. 3-D Printed Asteroids for Outreach Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, April

    2015-11-01

    3-D printed asteroids provide new opportunities for outreach astronomy education due to their low cost, interactive potential, and high interest value. Telescopes are expensive, bulky, fragile, and cannot be used effectively during the day. 3-D printing of asteroids combines exciting new technology with astronomy, appealing to a broader audience. The printed models are scientifically accurate, as their shapes have been modeled using light-curve inversion techniques using and occultation data to provide a jumping off point for discussions of these advanced and exciting topics.

  15. 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Manousidaki, Maria; Danilov, Artem; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the excitation of plasmons in 3D plasmon crystal metamaterials and report the observation of a delocalized plasmon mode, which provides extremely high spectral sensitivity (>2600 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) change), outperforming all plasmonic counterparts excited in 2D nanoscale geometries, as well as a prominent phase-sensitive response (>3*104 deg. of phase per RIU). Combined with a large surface for bioimmobilization provided by the 3D matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology.

  16. Depth-fused 3D imagery on an immaterial display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cha; Diverdi, Stephen; Höllerer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We present an immaterial display that uses a generalized form of depth-fused 3D (DFD) rendering to create unencumbered 3D visuals. To accomplish this result, we demonstrate a DFD display simulator that extends the established depth-fused 3D principle by using screens in arbitrary configurations and from arbitrary viewpoints. The feasibility of the generalized DFD effect is established with a user study using the simulator. Based on these results, we developed a prototype display using one or two immaterial screens to create an unencumbered 3D visual that users can penetrate, examining the potential for direct walk-through and reach-through manipulation of the 3D scene. We evaluate the prototype system in formative and summative user studies and report the tolerance thresholds discovered for both tracking and projector errors.

  17. Approximate theoretical model for the five electronic states ( Ω = 5/2, 3/2, 3/2, 1/2, 1/2) arising from the ground 3d 9 configuration in nickel halide molecules and for rotational levels of the two Ω = 1/2 states in that manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2011-05-01

    In the first part of this paper an effective Hamiltonian for a non-rotating diatomic molecule containing only crystal-field and spin-orbit operators is set up to describe the energies of the five spin-orbit components that arise in the ground electronic configuration of the nickel monohalides. The model assumes that bonding in the nickel halides has the approximate form Ni +X -, with an electronic 3d 9 configuration plus closed shells on the Ni + moiety and a closed shell configuration on the X - moiety. From a crystal-field point of view, interactions of the positive d-hole with the cylindrically symmetrical electric charge distribution of the hypothetical NiX - closed-shell core can then be parameterized by three terms in a traditional expansion in spherical harmonics: C0 + C2Y20( θ, ϕ) + C4Y40( θ, ϕ). Interaction of the hole with the magnetic field generated by its own orbital motion can be parameterized by a traditional spin-orbit interaction operator A L · S. The Hamiltonian matrix is set up in a basis set consisting of the 10 Hund's case (a) basis functions | L, Λ; S , Σ> that arise when L = 2 and S = 1/2. Least-squares fits of the observed five spin-orbit components of the three lowest electronic states in NiF and NiCl are then carried out in terms of the four parameters C0, C2, C4, and A which lead to good agreement, except for the two | Ω| = 1/2 states. The large equal and opposite residuals of the | Ω| = 1/2 states can be reduced to values comparable with those for the | Ω| = 3/2 and | Ω| = 5/2 states by fixing A to its value in Ni + and then introducing an empirical correction factor for one off-diagonal orbital matrix element. In the second part of this paper the usual effective Hamiltonian B( J- L- S) 2 for a rotating diatomic molecule is used to derive expressions for the Ω-type doubling parameter p in the two | Ω| = 1/2 states. These expressions show (for certain sign conventions) that the sum of the two p values should be -2 B, but that

  18. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  19. Baghdad Sulcus in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-23

    This anaglyph from images captured by NASA Cassini spacecraft shows a dramatic, 3-D view of one of the deep fractures nicknamed tiger stripes on Saturn moon Enceladus which are located near the moon south pole, spray jets of water ice.

  20. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  1. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  2. Ganges Chasma in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-25

    Ganges Chasma is part of the Valles Marineris trough system that stretches nearly 5,000 kilometers 3,000 miles across the western equatorial region of Mars. This stereo anaglyph is from NASA Mars Global Surveyor. 3D glasses are necessary.

  3. Opportunity Stretches Out 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-02

    This is a three-dimensional stereo anaglyph of an image taken by the front hazard-identification camera onboard NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, showing the rover arm in its extended position. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  4. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  5. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  6. Rosetta Comet in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-21

    A 3D image shows what it would look like to fly over the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image was generated by data collected by ESA Philae spacecraft during the decent to the spacecraft initial touchdown on the comet Nov. 12, 2014.

  7. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Hüser, Dorothee; Wolff, Helmut; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Koenders, Ludger; Bosse, Harald

    2011-09-01

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip-sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear.

  8. The 3d Rydberg (3A2) electronic state observed by Herzberg and Shoosmith for methylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yukio; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1997-06-01

    In 1959 and 1961 Herzberg and Shoosmith reported the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum of the triplet state of CH2. The present study focuses on a characterization of the upper state, the 3d Rydberg (3A2) state, observed at 1415 Å. The theoretical interpretation of these experiments is greatly complicated by the presence of a lower-lying 3A2 valence state with a very small equilibrium bond angle. Ab initio electronic structure methods involving self-consistent-field (SCF), configuration interaction with single and double excitations (CISD), complete active space (CAS) SCF, state-averaged (SA) CASSCF, coupled cluster with single and double excitations (CCSD), CCSD with perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)], CASSCF second-order (SO) CI, and SACASSCF-SOCI have been employed with six distinct basis sets. With the largest basis set, triple zeta plus triple polarization with two sets of higher angular momentum functions and three sets of diffuse functions TZ3P(2 f,2d)+3diff, the CISD level of theory predicts the equilibrium geometry of the 3d Rydberg (3A2) state to be re=1.093 Å and θe=141.3 deg. With the same basis set the energy (Te value) of the 3d Rydberg state relative to the ground (X˜ 3B1) state has been determined to be 201.6 kcal mol-1 (70 500 cm-1) at the CCSD (T) level, 200.92kcal mol-1 (70 270 cm-1) at the CASSCF-SOCI level, and 200.89kcal mol-1 (70 260 cm-1) at the SACASSCF-SOCI level of theory. These predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental T0 value of 201.95 kcalmol-1 (70 634 cm-1) reported by Herzberg.

  9. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  10. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  11. Action and gait recognition from recovered 3-D human joints.

    PubMed

    Gu, Junxia; Ding, Xiaoqing; Wang, Shengjin; Wu, Youshou

    2010-08-01

    A common viewpoint-free framework that fuses pose recovery and classification for action and gait recognition is presented in this paper. First, a markerless pose recovery method is adopted to automatically capture the 3-D human joint and pose parameter sequences from volume data. Second, multiple configuration features (combination of joints) and movement features (position, orientation, and height of the body) are extracted from the recovered 3-D human joint and pose parameter sequences. A hidden Markov model (HMM) and an exemplar-based HMM are then used to model the movement features and configuration features, respectively. Finally, actions are classified by a hierarchical classifier that fuses the movement features and the configuration features, and persons are recognized from their gait sequences with the configuration features. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated with experiments on the Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique Xmas Motion Acquisition Sequences data set.

  12. Monoligated monovalent Ni: the 3d(Ni)9 manifold of states of NiCu and comparison to the 3d9 States of AlNi, NiH, NiCl, and NiF.

    PubMed

    Rothschopf, Gretchen K; Morse, Michael D

    2005-12-22

    A dispersed fluorescence investigation of the low-lying electronic states of NiCu has allowed the observation of four out of the five states that derive from the 3d(Ni)9 3d(Cu)10 sigma2 manifold. Vibrational levels of the ground X2delta(5/2) state corresponding to v = 0-11 are observed and are fit to provide omega(e) = 275.93 +/- 1.06 cm(-1) and omega(e)x(e) = 1.44 +/- 0.11 cm(-1). The v = 0 levels of the higher lying states deriving from the 3d(Ni)9 3d(Cu)10 sigma2 manifold are located at 912, 1466, and 1734 cm(-1), and these states are assigned to omega values of 3/2, 1/2, and 3/2, respectively. The last of these assignments is based on selection rules and is unequivocal; the first two are based on a comparison to ab initio and ligand field calculations and could conceivably be in error. It is also possible that the v = 0 level of the state found at 912 cm(-1) is not observed, so that T0 for the lowest excited state actually lies near 658 cm(-1). These results are modeled using a matrix Hamiltonian based on the existence of a ground manifold of states deriving from the 3d9 configuration on nickel. This matrix Hamiltonian is also applied to the spectroscopically well-known molecules AlNi, NiH, NiCl, and NiF. The term energies of the 2sigma+, 2pi, and 2delta states of these molecules, which all derive from a 3d9 configuration on the nickel atom, display a clear and understandable trend as a function of the electronegativity of the ligands.

  13. Hartree-Fock values of energies, interaction constants, and atomic properties for excited states with 3 d N4 s0 and 3 d n4 s2 configurations of the negative ions, neutral atoms, and first four positive ions of the transition elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, C. D.; Jastram, J. D.; Hitt, N. P.; Woffod, J.; Rice, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate-change models predict warmer stream temperatures, but there have been few studies that document such effects on stream communities. In Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, long-term temperature records indicate that stream temperatures show an increasing trend over the last 20 years and especially over the last 10 years. Stream temperatures have increased apparently due to atmospheric warming (i.e., stream temperatures are strongly correlated with regional air temperature patterns). Across 14 monitored stream sites, the median increase in maximum annual water temperature was 0.32oC per year for the 10-yr period between 2000 and 2009, and all 14 sites had positive trend slopes. Moreover, in contrast to water-chemistry trends, temperature trends showed no spatial structure and were consistent throughout the park. The observed warming is consistent with global warming projections, but other factors, including the North Atlantic Oscillation and forest defoliation due to gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), also may have contributed to warming trends. We summarized benthic macroinvertebrate community composition and structure from samples collected at 24 stream sites over the last 20 years and evaluated temporal patterns in the context of observed temperature trends. We found that a substantial amount of temporal variation in both taxonomic composition and community structure could be explained by temperature trends, even after accounting for water-chemistry changes. We observed significant declines in community diversity as well as a decline in the abundance of several stonefly (Plecoptera) taxa, a cold-water-dependent taxonomic group. We hypothesize that temperature-induced changes in the diversity and composition of macroinvertebrate communities could cascade to other faunal groups and other parts of the watershed. For instance, reduced abundances of stoneflies, an important component of the shredder functional group, may lead to reduced export of fine particulate organic matter from headwaters, disrupting food webs and reducing productivity to stream reaches farther downstream.

  14. Modeling Molecular Systems at Extreme Pressure by an Extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) Based on the Symmetry-Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction (SAC-CI) Method: Confined Electronic Excited States of Furan as a Test Case.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Cammi, Roberto

    2015-05-12

    Novel molecular photochemistry can be developed by combining high pressure and laser irradiation. For studying such high-pressure effects on the confined electronic ground and excited states, we extend the PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (SAC-configuration interaction) methods to the PCM-XP (extreme pressure) framework. By using the PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method, molecular systems in various electronic states can be confined by polarizable media in a smooth and flexible way. The PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method is applied to a furan (C4H4O) molecule in cyclohexane at high pressure (1-60 GPa). The relationship between the calculated free-energy and cavity volume can be approximately represented with the Murnaghan equation of state. The excitation energies of furan in cyclohexane show blueshifts with increasing pressure, and the extents of the blueshifts significantly depend on the character of the excitations. Particularly large confinement effects are found in the Rydberg states. The energy ordering of the lowest Rydberg and valence states alters under high-pressure. The pressure effects on the electronic structure may be classified into two contributions: a confinement of the molecular orbital and a suppression of the mixing between the valence and Rydberg configurations. The valence or Rydberg character in an excited state is, therefore, enhanced under high pressure.

  15. Get Students Excited--3D Printing Brings Designs to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Students in technology education programs from middle school through high school around the nation are benefiting from--and enjoying--hands-on experience in mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, materials processing, basic electronics, robotics, industrial manufacturing, and other STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math)-focused…

  16. Get Students Excited--3D Printing Brings Designs to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Students in technology education programs from middle school through high school around the nation are benefiting from--and enjoying--hands-on experience in mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, materials processing, basic electronics, robotics, industrial manufacturing, and other STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math)-focused…

  17. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  18. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  19. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  20. 3-D sprag ratcheting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Michael O. (Inventor); Poland, Jr., James W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A ratcheting device comprising a driver head assembly which includes at least two 3-D sprag elements positioned within a first groove within the driver head assembly such that at least one of the 3-D sprag elements may lockingly engage the driver head assembly and a mating hub assembly to allow for rotation of the hub assembly in one direction with respect to the driver head assembly. This arrangement allows the ratcheting tool to impart torque in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction without having to first rotate the ratcheting tool in the direction opposite the direction in which the torque is applied. This arrangement also allows the ratcheting tool to impart torque in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction while in the neutral position.

  1. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  2. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  3. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  4. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  5. Holography of 3D flat cosmological horizons.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Arjun; Detournay, Stéphane; Fareghbal, Reza; Simón, Joan

    2013-04-05

    We provide a first derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of 3D flat cosmological horizons in terms of the counting of states in a dual field theory. These horizons appear in the flat limit of nonextremal rotating Banados-Teitleboim-Zanelli black holes and are remnants of the inner horizons. They also satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We study flat holography as a limit of AdS(3)/CFT(2) to semiclassically compute the density of states in the dual theory, which is given by a contraction of a 2D conformal field theory, exactly reproducing the bulk entropy in the limit of large charges. We comment on how the dual theory reproduces the bulk first law and how cosmological bulk excitations are matched with boundary quantum numbers.

  6. Development of 3D holographic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Meriç; Önal Tayyar, Duygu

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the development of a 3D holographic endoscope with an interferometer built around a commercial rigid endoscope. We consider recording the holograms with coherent and incoherent light separately without compromising the white light imaging capacity of the endoscope. In coherent light based recording, reference wave required for the hologram is obtained in two different ways. First, as in the classical holography, splitting the laser beam before the object illumination, and secondly creating the reference beam from the object beam itself. This second method does not require path-length matching between the object wave and the reference wave, and it allows the usage of short coherence length light sources. For incoherent light based holographic recordings various interferometric configurations are considered. Experimental results on both illumination conditions are presented.

  7. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  8. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  9. Global gyrokinetic models for energetic particle driven Alfvén instabilities in 3D equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Don; Holod, Ihor

    2015-11-01

    The GTC global gyrokinetic PIC model has been adapted to 3D VMEC equilibria and provides a new method for the analysis of Alfvénic instabilities in stellarators, 3D tokamaks, and helical RFP states. The gyrokinetic orderings (k||/k⊥ << 1, ω/Ωci << 1, ρEP/L << 1) are applicable to a range of energetic particle driven instabilities that have been observed in 3D configurations. Applications of this model to stellarators have indicated that a variety of different Alfvén instabilities can be excited, depending on the toroidal mode number, fast ion average energy and fast ion density profile. Both an LHD discharge where bursting n = 1 Alfvén activity in the TAE gap was observed and a W7-X case have been examined. TAE,/EAE/GAE modes have been found in the simulations, depending on the mode family and fast ion profiles used. The dynamical evolution of the instabilities shows the field period coupling between n and n + Nfp expected for a stellarator. The development of gyrofluid reduced models that can capture relevant physics aspects of the gyrokinetic models will also be discussed. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC and the GSEP SciDAC Center.

  10. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  11. State-Specific Reactions of Cu(+)((1)S,(3)D) with SF6 and SF5Cl.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William S; Redmon, Xavier S; Scheuter, Benjamin A

    2016-04-21

    State-specific reactions of Cu(+)((1)S,(3)D) were carried out in a selected ion drift cell apparatus with SF6 and SF5Cl. Copper ions were prepared in a glow discharge utilizing Ne as the working gas. Analysis of Cu(+) states using ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) indicated the presence of both Cu(+)(3d(10)) and Cu(+)(3d(9)4s(1)) configurations attributable to the (1)S ground and (3)D first excited states of this metal ion, respectively. State-specific product formation in reactions of these ions with the two neutral substrates of interest here was determined using IMS along with both known and calculated energetic requirements for product formation. These experiments indicate that Cu(+)((1)S) associates with both SF6 and SF5Cl; however, the process is approximately four times as efficient with the latter neutral under these conditions. Association is also observed as a minor product between Cu(+)((3)D) and both neutral reactants. Inefficient formation of SF3(+) occurs as the sole bimolecular product from SF6 via Cu(+)((3)D). In contrast, Cu(+)((3)D) reacts with SF5Cl in rapid parallel bimolecular processes yielding SF3(+) and CuCl(+). These results also indicate that CuCl(+) initiates additional higher-order processes which result in SF5(+) and SF4Cl(+). The energetics associated with the formation of SF3(+) suggest that a copper halide neutral byproduct must also be formed, requiring a more complex mechanism than simple dissociative charge-transfer.

  12. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  13. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  14. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  15. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  16. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  17. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  18. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  19. 3-D Electromagnetic Instabilities in Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Chen, Liu; Tummel, Kurt

    2016-10-01

    3-D electromagnetic instabilities in a Harris current sheet with a finite guide magnetic field BG are systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle model with a realistic mass ratio mi /me . Our studies show that lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) with k√{ρiρe } 1 and drift kink instability (DKI) and drift sausage instability (DSI) with kρi 1 are excited in the current sheet. The most unstable DKI is away from k . B = 0 , and the most unstable DSI is at k . B = 0 , where k ≡ (kx ,ky) , with kx being along the anti-parallel field direction and ky is along the current direction. On the other hand, an instability with a compressional magnetic field perturbation located at the center of current sheet is also excited under a relatively large BG, and its maximum growth rate is at k × B = 0 . The presence and structure of these instabilities as a function of BG is presented. The GeFi simulation results are compared with those from the fully kinetic particle simulation.

  20. Surgeon-Based 3D Printing for Microvascular Bone Flaps.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2017-03-04

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) printing has developed as a revolutionary technology with the capacity to design accurate physical models in preoperative planning. We present our experience in surgeon-based design of 3D models, using home 3D software and printing technology for use as an adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Methods Home 3D printing techniques were used in the design and execution of vascularized bone flap transfers to the upper extremity. Open source imaging software was used to convert preoperative computed tomography scans and create 3D models. These were printed in the surgeon's office as 3D models for the planned reconstruction. Vascularized bone flaps were designed intraoperatively based on the 3D printed models. Results Three-dimensional models were created for intraoperative use in vascularized bone flaps, including (1) medial femoral trochlea (MFT) flap for scaphoid avascular necrosis and nonunion, (2) MFT flap for lunate avascular necrosis and nonunion, (3) medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap for wrist arthrodesis, and (4) free fibula osteocutaneous flap for distal radius septic nonunion. Templates based on the 3D models allowed for the precise and rapid contouring of well-vascularized bone flaps in situ, prior to ligating the donor pedicle. Conclusions Surgeon-based 3D printing is a feasible, innovative technology that allows for the precise and rapid contouring of models that can be created in various configurations for pre- and intraoperative planning. The technology is easy to use, convenient, and highly economical as compared with traditional send-out manufacturing. Surgeon-based 3D printing is a useful adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Level of Evidence Level IV.

  1. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  2. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  3. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  4. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  5. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  6. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  7. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  8. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  9. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  12. 3D Printed Graphene Based Energy Storage Devices

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Christopher W.; Down, Michael P.; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo; Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Smith, Graham C.; Kelly, Peter J.; Banks, Craig E.

    2017-01-01

    3D printing technology provides a unique platform for rapid prototyping of numerous applications due to its ability to produce low cost 3D printed platforms. Herein, a graphene-based polylactic acid filament (graphene/PLA) has been 3D printed to fabricate a range of 3D disc electrode (3DE) configurations using a conventional RepRap fused deposition moulding (FDM) 3D printer, which requires no further modification/ex-situ curing step. To provide proof-of-concept, these 3D printed electrode architectures are characterised both electrochemically and physicochemically and are advantageously applied as freestanding anodes within Li-ion batteries and as solid-state supercapacitors. These freestanding anodes neglect the requirement for a current collector, thus offering a simplistic and cheaper alternative to traditional Li-ion based setups. Additionally, the ability of these devices’ to electrochemically produce hydrogen via the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) as an alternative to currently utilised platinum based electrodes (with in electrolysers) is also performed. The 3DE demonstrates an unexpectedly high catalytic activity towards the HER (−0.46 V vs. SCE) upon the 1000th cycle, such potential is the closest observed to the desired value of platinum at (−0.25 V vs. SCE). We subsequently suggest that 3D printing of graphene-based conductive filaments allows for the simple fabrication of energy storage devices with bespoke and conceptual designs to be realised. PMID:28256602

  13. 3D Printed Graphene Based Energy Storage Devices.

    PubMed

    Foster, Christopher W; Down, Michael P; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo; Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Smith, Graham C; Kelly, Peter J; Banks, Craig E

    2017-03-03

    3D printing technology provides a unique platform for rapid prototyping of numerous applications due to its ability to produce low cost 3D printed platforms. Herein, a graphene-based polylactic acid filament (graphene/PLA) has been 3D printed to fabricate a range of 3D disc electrode (3DE) configurations using a conventional RepRap fused deposition moulding (FDM) 3D printer, which requires no further modification/ex-situ curing step. To provide proof-of-concept, these 3D printed electrode architectures are characterised both electrochemically and physicochemically and are advantageously applied as freestanding anodes within Li-ion batteries and as solid-state supercapacitors. These freestanding anodes neglect the requirement for a current collector, thus offering a simplistic and cheaper alternative to traditional Li-ion based setups. Additionally, the ability of these devices' to electrochemically produce hydrogen via the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) as an alternative to currently utilised platinum based electrodes (with in electrolysers) is also performed. The 3DE demonstrates an unexpectedly high catalytic activity towards the HER (-0.46 V vs. SCE) upon the 1000th cycle, such potential is the closest observed to the desired value of platinum at (-0.25 V vs. SCE). We subsequently suggest that 3D printing of graphene-based conductive filaments allows for the simple fabrication of energy storage devices with bespoke and conceptual designs to be realised.

  14. 3D Printed Graphene Based Energy Storage Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Christopher W.; Down, Michael P.; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo; Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Smith, Graham C.; Kelly, Peter J.; Banks, Craig E.

    2017-03-01

    3D printing technology provides a unique platform for rapid prototyping of numerous applications due to its ability to produce low cost 3D printed platforms. Herein, a graphene-based polylactic acid filament (graphene/PLA) has been 3D printed to fabricate a range of 3D disc electrode (3DE) configurations using a conventional RepRap fused deposition moulding (FDM) 3D printer, which requires no further modification/ex-situ curing step. To provide proof-of-concept, these 3D printed electrode architectures are characterised both electrochemically and physicochemically and are advantageously applied as freestanding anodes within Li-ion batteries and as solid-state supercapacitors. These freestanding anodes neglect the requirement for a current collector, thus offering a simplistic and cheaper alternative to traditional Li-ion based setups. Additionally, the ability of these devices’ to electrochemically produce hydrogen via the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) as an alternative to currently utilised platinum based electrodes (with in electrolysers) is also performed. The 3DE demonstrates an unexpectedly high catalytic activity towards the HER (‑0.46 V vs. SCE) upon the 1000th cycle, such potential is the closest observed to the desired value of platinum at (‑0.25 V vs. SCE). We subsequently suggest that 3D printing of graphene-based conductive filaments allows for the simple fabrication of energy storage devices with bespoke and conceptual designs to be realised.

  15. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  16. SERS spectroscopy, electrical recording and intracellular injection in neuronal networks with 3D plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprettini, Valeria; Messina, Gabriele C.; Dipalo, Michele; La Rocca, Rosanna; Cerea, Andrea; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    We developed a platform based on 3D plasmonic nanoantennas able to perform different functions with applications in the biological research area. In particular it will be shown how the peculiar geometry of the system plays a fundamental role, leading to a tight interaction with the cellular membrane. Such configuration allows on one side the investigation of extracellular features through enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and electrical recording, and on the other the possibility of intracellular injection by optoporation. In this regard it will be demonstrated how the characteristics of the laser pulse used for exciting the antenna establish the kind of involved phenomena. A dependence of these properties on the metal coating the antenna will be also shown.

  17. The transition from the open minimum to the ring minimum on the ground state and on the lowest excited state of like symmetry in ozone: A configuration interaction study

    DOE PAGES

    Theis, Daniel; Ivanic, Joseph; Windus, Theresa L.; ...

    2016-03-10

    The metastable ring structure of the ozone 11A1 ground state, which theoretical calculations have shown to exist, has so far eluded experimental detection. An accurate prediction for the energy difference between this isomer and the lower open structure is therefore of interest, as is a prediction for the isomerization barrier between them, which results from interactions between the lowest two 1A1 states. In the present work, valence correlated energies of the 11A1 state and the 21A1 state were calculated at the 11A1 open minimum, the 11A1 ring minimum, the transition state between these two minima, the minimum of the 21A1more » state, and the conical intersection between the two states. The geometries were determined at the full-valence multi-configuration self-consistent-field level. Configuration interaction (CI) expansions up to quadruple excitations were calculated with triple-zeta atomic basis sets. The CI expansions based on eight different reference configuration spaces were explored. To obtain some of the quadruple excitation energies, the method of CorrelationEnergy Extrapolation by Intrinsic Scaling was generalized to the simultaneous extrapolation for two states. This extrapolation method was shown to be very accurate. On the other hand, none of the CI expansions were found to have converged to millihartree (mh) accuracy at the quadruple excitation level. The data suggest that convergence to mh accuracy is probably attained at the sextuple excitation level. On the 11A1 state, the present calculations yield the estimates of (ring minimum—open minimum) ~45–50 mh and (transition state—open minimum) ~85–90 mh. For the (21A1–1A1) excitation energy, the estimate of ~130–170 mh is found at the open minimum and 270–310 mh at the ring minimum. At the transition state, the difference (21A1–1A1) is found to be between 1 and 10 mh. The geometry of the transition state on the 11A1 surface and that of the minimum on the 21A1 surface nearly coincide

  18. The transition from the open minimum to the ring minimum on the ground state and on the lowest excited state of like symmetry in ozone: A configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Theis, Daniel; Ivanic, Joseph; Windus, Theresa L; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2016-03-14

    The metastable ring structure of the ozone 1(1)A1 ground state, which theoretical calculations have shown to exist, has so far eluded experimental detection. An accurate prediction for the energy difference between this isomer and the lower open structure is therefore of interest, as is a prediction for the isomerization barrier between them, which results from interactions between the lowest two (1)A1 states. In the present work, valence correlated energies of the 1(1)A1 state and the 2(1)A1 state were calculated at the 1(1)A1 open minimum, the 1(1)A1 ring minimum, the transition state between these two minima, the minimum of the 2(1)A1 state, and the conical intersection between the two states. The geometries were determined at the full-valence multi-configuration self-consistent-field level. Configuration interaction (CI) expansions up to quadruple excitations were calculated with triple-zeta atomic basis sets. The CI expansions based on eight different reference configuration spaces were explored. To obtain some of the quadruple excitation energies, the method of Correlation Energy Extrapolation by Intrinsic Scaling was generalized to the simultaneous extrapolation for two states. This extrapolation method was shown to be very accurate. On the other hand, none of the CI expansions were found to have converged to millihartree (mh) accuracy at the quadruple excitation level. The data suggest that convergence to mh accuracy is probably attained at the sextuple excitation level. On the 1(1)A1 state, the present calculations yield the estimates of (ring minimum-open minimum) ∼45-50 mh and (transition state-open minimum) ∼85-90 mh. For the (2(1)A1-(1)A1) excitation energy, the estimate of ∼130-170 mh is found at the open minimum and 270-310 mh at the ring minimum. At the transition state, the difference (2(1)A1-(1)A1) is found to be between 1 and 10 mh. The geometry of the transition state on the 1(1)A1 surface and that of the minimum on the 2(1)A1 surface

  19. Simulations of Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar for the EISCAT_3D Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Hoz, C.; Belyey, V.

    2012-12-01

    EISCAT_3D is a project to build the next generation of incoherent scatter radars endowed with multiple 3-dimensional capabilities that will replace the current EISCAT radars in Northern Scandinavia. Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar (ASIR) is one of the technologies adopted by the EISCAT_3D project to endow it with imaging capabilities in 3-dimensions that includes sub-beam resolution. Complemented by pulse compression, it will provide 3-dimensional images of certain types of incoherent scatter radar targets resolved to about 100 metres at 100 km range, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio. This ability will open new research opportunities to map small structures associated with non-homogeneous, unstable processes such as aurora, summer and winter polar radar echoes (PMSE and PMWE), Natural Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs), structures excited by HF ionospheric heating, meteors, space debris, and others. To demonstrate the feasibility of the antenna configurations and the imaging inversion algorithms a simulation of synthetic incoherent scattering data has been performed. The simulation algorithm incorporates the ability to control the background plasma parameters with non-homogeneous, non-stationary components over an extended 3-dimensional space. Control over the positions of a number of separated receiving antennas, their signal-to-noise-ratios and arriving phases allows realistic simulation of a multi-baseline interferometric imaging radar system. The resulting simulated data is fed into various inversion algorithms. This simulation package is a powerful tool to evaluate various antenna configurations and inversion algorithms. Results applied to realistic design alternatives of EISCAT_3D will be described.

  20. Empirical study of unipolar and bipolar configurations using high resolution single multi-walled carbon nanotube electrodes for electrophysiological probing of electrically excitable cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Asis, Edward D., Jr.; Leung, Joseph; Wood, Sally; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2010-03-01

    Identifying the neurophysiological basis underlying learning and memory in the mammalian central nervous system requires the development of biocompatible, high resolution, low electrode impedance electrophysiological probes; however, physically, electrode impedance will always be finite and, at times, large. Herein, we demonstrate through experiments performed on frog sartorius muscle that single multi-walled carbon nanotube electrode (sMWNT electrode) geometry and placement are two degrees of freedom that can improve biocompatibility of the probe and counteract the detrimental effects of MWNT/electrolyte interface impedance on the stimulation efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We show that high aspect ratio dependent electric field enhancement at the MWNT tip can boost stimulation efficiency. Derivation of the sMWNT electrode's electrical equivalent indicates that, at low stimulus voltage regimes below 1 V, current conduction is mediated by charge fluctuation in the double layer obviating electrolysis of water, which is potentially toxic to pH sensitive biological tissue. Despite the accompanying increase in electrode impedance, a pair of closely spaced sMWNT electrodes in a two probe (bipolar) configuration maintains biocompatibility and enhances stimulation efficiency and SNR compared to the single probe (unipolar) configuration. For stimulus voltages below 1 V, the electrical equivalent verifies that current conduction in the two probe configuration still proceeds via charge fluctuation in the double layer. As an extracellular stimulation electrode, the two sMWNT electrodes comprise a current dipole that concentrates the electric field and the current density in a smaller region of sartorius; consequently, the bipolar configuration can elicit muscle fiber twitching at low voltages that preclude electrolysis of water. When recording field potentials, the bipolar configuration subtracts the potential between two points allowing for the detection of

  1. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    ScienceCinema

    Love, Lonnie

    2016-11-02

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  2. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  3. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  4. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  5. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  6. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  7. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Eric D; Barney, Brett M; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E

    2014-10-07

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification.Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms.The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods.A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use.

  8. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-04-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated.

  9. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Kevin S; Di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J

    2015-04-23

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated.

  10. 3-D Worm Tracker for Freely Moving C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Namseop; Pyo, Jaeyeon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    The manner in which the nervous system regulates animal behaviors in natural environments is a fundamental issue in biology. To address this question, C. elegans has been widely used as a model animal for the analysis of various animal behaviors. Previous behavioral assays have been limited to two-dimensional (2-D) environments, confining the worm motion to a planar substrate that does not reflect three-dimensional (3-D) natural environments such as rotting fruits or soil. Here, we develop a 3-D worm tracker (3DWT) for freely moving C. elegans in 3-D environments, based on a stereoscopic configuration. The 3DWT provides us with a quantitative trajectory, including the position and movement direction of the worm in 3-D. The 3DWT is also capable of recording and visualizing postures of the moving worm in 3-D, which are more complex than those in 2-D. Our 3DWT affords new opportunities for understanding the nervous system function that regulates animal behaviors in natural 3-D environments. PMID:23437394

  11. 3-D worm tracker for freely moving C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Namseop; Pyo, Jaeyeon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    The manner in which the nervous system regulates animal behaviors in natural environments is a fundamental issue in biology. To address this question, C. elegans has been widely used as a model animal for the analysis of various animal behaviors. Previous behavioral assays have been limited to two-dimensional (2-D) environments, confining the worm motion to a planar substrate that does not reflect three-dimensional (3-D) natural environments such as rotting fruits or soil. Here, we develop a 3-D worm tracker (3DWT) for freely moving C. elegans in 3-D environments, based on a stereoscopic configuration. The 3DWT provides us with a quantitative trajectory, including the position and movement direction of the worm in 3-D. The 3DWT is also capable of recording and visualizing postures of the moving worm in 3-D, which are more complex than those in 2-D. Our 3DWT affords new opportunities for understanding the nervous system function that regulates animal behaviors in natural 3-D environments.

  12. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehler, Eric D.; Barney, Brett M.; Higgins, Patrick D.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use.

  13. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; Di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated. PMID:25904062

  14. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  15. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  16. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  17. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  18. Semiautomatic approaches to account for 3-D distortion of the electric field from local, near-surface structures in 3-D resistivity inversions of 3-D regional magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2017-03-31

    This report summarizes the results of three-dimensional (3-D) resistivity inversion simulations that were performed to account for local 3-D distortion of the electric field in the presence of 3-D regional structure, without any a priori information on the actual 3-D distribution of the known subsurface geology. The methodology used a 3-D geologic model to create a 3-D resistivity forward (“known”) model that depicted the subsurface resistivity structure expected for the input geologic configuration. The calculated magnetotelluric response of the modeled resistivity structure was assumed to represent observed magnetotelluric data and was subsequently used as input into a 3-D resistivity inverse model that used an iterative 3-D algorithm to estimate 3-D distortions without any a priori geologic information. A publicly available inversion code, WSINV3DMT, was used for all of the simulated inversions, initially using the default parameters, and subsequently using adjusted inversion parameters. A semiautomatic approach of accounting for the static shift using various selections of the highest frequencies and initial models was also tested. The resulting 3-D resistivity inversion simulation was compared to the “known” model and the results evaluated. The inversion approach that produced the lowest misfit to the various local 3-D distortions was an inversion that employed an initial model volume resistivity that was nearest to the maximum resistivities in the near-surface layer.

  19. Electric-dipole allowed and intercombination transitions among the 3d 5, 3d 44s and 3d 44p levels of Fe IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Narayan C.; Hibbert, Alan

    2010-07-01

    Oscillator strengths and transition rates for the electric-dipole (E1) allowed and intercombination transitions among 3d 5, 3d 44s and 3d 44p levels of Fe IV are calculated using the CIV3 code of Hibbert and coworkers. Using the Hartree-Fock functions up to 3d orbitals we have also optimized 4s, 4p, 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p and 5d orbitals of which 4s and 4p are taken to be spectroscopic and the remaining orbitals represent corrections to the spectroscopic orbitals or the correlation effects. The J-dependent levels of 108 LS states are included in the calculation and the relativistic effects are accounted for via the Breit-Pauli operator. Configurations are chosen in two steps: (a) two promotions were allowed from the 3p, 3d, 4s and 4p subshells, using all the orbitals; and (b) selective promotions from the 3s subshell are included, but only to the 3s and 4s orbitals. The ab initio fine-structure levels are then fine tuned to reproduce observed energy levels as closely as possible, and the resulting wavefunctions are used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition rates for all possible E1 transitions. For many of these transitions, the present results show good agreement between the length and velocity forms while for some transitions, some large disagreements are found with other available results. The complete list of weighted oscillator strengths, transition rates, and line strengths for transitions among the fine structure levels of the three lowest configurations are presented in ascending order of wavelength.

  20. First fabrication of full 3D-detectors at SINTEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Thor-Erik; Kok, Angela; Hansen, Trond A.; Lietaer, Nicolas; Mielnik, Michal; Storås, Preben; Da'Via, Cinzia; Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Chris; Parker, Sherwood

    2009-03-01

    3D-detectors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire substrates have drawn great interests for high energy physics and medical imaging applications. Since its introduction by C. Kenney et al in 1995, many laboratories have begun research on different 3D-detector structures to simplify and industrialise the fabrication process. SINTEF MiNaLab joined the 3D collaboration in 2006 and started the first 3D fabrication run in 2007. This is the first step in an effort to fabricate affordable 3D-detectors in small to medium size production volumes. The first run was fully completed in February 2008 and preliminary results are promising. Good p-n junction characteristics have been shown on selected devices at the chip level with a leakage current of less than 0.5 nA per pixel. Thus SINTEF is the second laboratory in the world after the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility that has succeeded in demonstrating full 3D-detectors with active edge. A full 3D-stacked detector system were formed by bump-bonding the detectors to the ATLAS readout electronics, and successful particle hit maps using an Am-241 source were recorded. Most modules, however, showed largely increased leakage currents after assembly, which is due to the active edge and p-spray acting as part of the total chip pn-junction and not as a depletion stop. This paper describes the first fabrication and the encountered processing issues. The preliminary measurements on both the individual detector chips and the integrated 3D-stacked modules are discussed. A new lot has now been started on p-type wafers, which offers a more robust configuration with the active edge acting as depletion stop instead of part of the pn-junction.

  1. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  2. Light driven micro-robotics with holographic 3D tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We recently pioneered the concept of light-driven micro-robotics including the new and disruptive 3D-printed micro-tools coined Wave-guided Optical Waveguides that can be real-time optically trapped and "remote-controlled" in a volume with six-degrees-of-freedom. To be exploring the full potential of this new drone-like 3D light robotics approach in challenging microscopic geometries requires a versatile and real-time reconfigurable light coupling that can dynamically track a plurality of "light robots" in 3D to ensure continuous optimal light coupling on the fly. Our latest developments in this new and exciting area will be reviewed in this invited paper.

  3. 3D Bioprinting of Tissue/Organ Models.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Gantelius, Jesper; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2016-04-04

    In vitro tissue/organ models are useful platforms that can facilitate systematic, repetitive, and quantitative investigations of drugs/chemicals. The primary objective when developing tissue/organ models is to reproduce physiologically relevant functions that typically require complex culture systems. Bioprinting offers exciting prospects for constructing 3D tissue/organ models, as it enables the reproducible, automated production of complex living tissues. Bioprinted tissues/organs may prove useful for screening novel compounds or predicting toxicity, as the spatial and chemical complexity inherent to native tissues/organs can be recreated. In this Review, we highlight the importance of developing 3D in vitro tissue/organ models by 3D bioprinting techniques, characterization of these models for evaluating their resemblance to native tissue, and their application in the prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing, and as disease/tumor models.

  4. America's National Parks 3d (4)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-04-11

    article title:  America's National Parks Viewed in 3D by NASA's MISR (Anaglyph 4)   ... four new anaglyphs that showcase 33 of our nation's national parks, monuments, historical sites and recreation areas in glorious 3D.   ...

  5. America's National Parks 3d (3)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-30

    article title:  America's National Parks Viewed in 3D by NASA's MISR (Anaglyph 3)   ... four new anaglyphs that showcase 33 of our nation's national parks, monuments, historical sites and recreation areas in glorious 3D.   ...

  6. America's National Parks 3d (2)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-30

    article title:  America's National Parks Viewed in 3D by NASA's MISR (Anaglyph 2)   ... four new anaglyphs that showcase 33 of our nation's national parks, monuments, historical sites and recreation areas in glorious 3D.   ...

  7. America's National Parks 3d (1)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-30

    article title:  America's National Parks Viewed in 3D by NASA's MISR (Anaglyph 1)   ... four new anaglyphs that showcase 33 of our nation's national parks, monuments, historical sites and recreation areas in glorious 3D.   ...

  8. 3D ultrasound in fetal spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Gloning, K-P; Minderer, S; Tutschek, B

    2008-12-01

    3D ultrasound can be used to study the fetal spine, but skeletal mode can be inconclusive for the diagnosis of fetal spina bifida. We illustrate a diagnostic approach using 2D and 3D ultrasound and indicate possible pitfalls.

  9. An interactive multiview 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Zhang, Mei; Dong, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The progresses in 3D display systems and user interaction technologies will help more effective 3D visualization of 3D information. They yield a realistic representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them. In this paper, we describe an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system with capability of real-time user interaction. Design principle of this autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system is presented, together with the details of its hardware/software architecture. A prototype is built and tested based upon multi-projectors and horizontal optical anisotropic display structure. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of this novel 3D display and user interaction system.

  10. [3D emulation of epicardium dynamic mapping].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Yang, Cui-Wei; Fang, Zu-Xiang

    2005-03-01

    In order to realize epicardium dynamic mapping of the whole atria, 3-D graphics are drawn with OpenGL. Some source codes are introduced in the paper to explain how to produce, read, and manipulate 3-D model data.

  11. 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-04-20

    We present the first 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence obtained from nonlinear force-free field simulations, with a detailed description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Through the use of a novel radiative transfer visualization technique for the Hα line such plasma-loaded magnetic field model produces synthetic images of the modeled prominence comparable with high-resolution observations. This allows us for the first time to use a single technique to consistently study, in both emission on the limb and absorption against the solar disk, the fine structures of prominences/filaments produced by a magnetic field model.

  12. Development of a 3D printer using scanning projection stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael P; Cooper, Geoffrey J T; Hinkley, Trevor; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-04-23

    We have developed a system for the rapid fabrication of low cost 3D devices and systems in the laboratory with micro-scale features yet cm-scale objects. Our system is inspired by maskless lithography, where a digital micromirror device (DMD) is used to project patterns with resolution up to 10 µm onto a layer of photoresist. Large area objects can be fabricated by stitching projected images over a 5 cm(2) area. The addition of a z-stage allows multiple layers to be stacked to create 3D objects, removing the need for any developing or etching steps but at the same time leading to true 3D devices which are robust, configurable and scalable. We demonstrate the applications of the system by printing a range of micro-scale objects as well as a fully functioning microfluidic droplet device and test its integrity by pumping dye through the channels.

  13. Development of a 3D printer using scanning projection stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael P.; Cooper, Geoffrey J. T.; Hinkley, Trevor; Gibson, Graham M.; Padgett, Miles J.; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a system for the rapid fabrication of low cost 3D devices and systems in the laboratory with micro-scale features yet cm-scale objects. Our system is inspired by maskless lithography, where a digital micromirror device (DMD) is used to project patterns with resolution up to 10 µm onto a layer of photoresist. Large area objects can be fabricated by stitching projected images over a 5cm2 area. The addition of a z-stage allows multiple layers to be stacked to create 3D objects, removing the need for any developing or etching steps but at the same time leading to true 3D devices which are robust, configurable and scalable. We demonstrate the applications of the system by printing a range of micro-scale objects as well as a fully functioning microfluidic droplet device and test its integrity by pumping dye through the channels. PMID:25906401

  14. The 3-D lattice theory of Flower Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jeremy J.; Avendaño, Martín E.; Mortari, Daniele

    2013-08-01

    Flower Constellations (FCs) have been extensively studied for use in optimal constellation design. The Harmonic FCs (HFCs) subset, representing the symmetric configurations, have recently been reformulated into 2-D Lattice Flower Constellations (2D-LFCs), encompassing the complete set of HFCs. Elliptic orbits are generally avoided due to the deleterious effects of Earth's oblateness on the constellation, but here we present a novel concept for avoiding this problem and enabling more effective global coverage utilizing elliptic orbits. This new 3D Lattice Flower Constellations (3D-LFCs) framework generalizes the 2D-LFCs, Walker constellations, elliptical Walker constellations, and many of Draim's global coverage constellations. Previous studies have shown FCs can provide improved performance in global navigation over existing Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). We found a 3D-LFC design that improved the average positioning accuracy by 3.5 % while reducing launch \\varDelta v requirements when compared to the existing Galileo GNSS constellation.

  15. Impact of lighting and attire on 3D scanner performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajjimaporn, Pann; Feist, Dakota; Straub, Jeremy; Kerlin, Scott

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers the impact of lighting and attire on the performance of a previously created low-cost 3D scanning system. It considers the effect of adjusting the lighting configuration and of the subject's clothing on the quality of the scans and the number and types of objects that can be scanned. The experimentation performed tested different types (colors and textures) of clothing to assess which produced the best scans and multiple lighting configurations. This paper presents the results from this experimentation and, from this, make generalizations about optimizing visible light scanner performance before concluding with a discussion of scanner efficacy.

  16. Spiroconjugated intramolecular charge-transfer emission in non-typical spiroconjugated molecules: the effect of molecular structure upon the excited-state configuration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linna; Zhong, Cheng; Liu, Cui; Liu, Zhongyin; Qin, Jingui; Yang, Chuluo

    2013-04-02

    A set of terfluorenes and terfluorene-like molecules with different pendant substitutions or side groups were designed and synthesized, their photophysical properties and the excited-state geometries were studied. Dual fluorescence emissions were observed in compounds with rigid pendant groups bearing electron-donating N atoms. According to our earlier studies, in this set of terfluorenes, the blue emission is from the local π-π* transition, while the long-wavelength emission is attributed to a spiroconjugation-like through-space charge-transfer process. Herein, we probe further into how the molecular structures (referring to the side groups, the type of linkage between central fluorene and the 2,2'-azanediyldiethanol units, and-most importantly-the amount of pendant groups), as well as the excited-state geometries, affect the charge-transfer process of these terfluorenes or terfluorene-like compounds. 9-(9,9,9'',9''-tetrahexyl-9H,9'H,9''H-[2,2':7',2''-terfluoren]-9'-yl)-1,2,3,5,6,7-hexahydropyrido[3,2,1-ij]quinolone (TFPJH), with only one julolidine pendant group, was particularly synthesized, which exhibits complete "perpendicular" conformation between julolidine and the central fluorene unit in the excited state, thus typical spiroconjugation could be achieved. Notably, its photophysical behaviors resemble those of TFPJ with two pendant julolidines. This study proves that spiroconjugation does happen in these terfluorene derivatives, although their structures are not in line with the typical orthogonal π fragments. The spiroconjugation charge-transfer emission closely relates to the electron-donating N atoms on the pendant groups, and to the rigid connection between the central fluorene and the N atoms, whereas the amount of pendant groups and the nature of the side chromophores have little effect. These findings may shed light on the understanding of the through-space charge-transfer properties and the emission color tuning of fluorene derivatives.

  17. 3-D Extensions for Trustworthy Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    modifications to the floor planning stage of the 3-D design flow that are necessary to support our design approach. We strongly recommend that the 3-D EDA ...and we outline problems, challenges, attacks, solutions, and topics for future research. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Requirements for automated 3-D IC design tools for the physical layout of components. Since fully automated Electronic Design Automation ( EDA ) for 3-D

  18. True 3d Images and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; wang@hzgeospace., zheng.

    2012-07-01

    A true 3D image is a geo-referenced image. Besides having its radiometric information, it also has true 3Dground coordinates XYZ for every pixels of it. For a true 3D image, especially a true 3D oblique image, it has true 3D coordinates not only for building roofs and/or open grounds, but also for all other visible objects on the ground, such as visible building walls/windows and even trees. The true 3D image breaks the 2D barrier of the traditional orthophotos by introducing the third dimension (elevation) into the image. From a true 3D image, for example, people will not only be able to read a building's location (XY), but also its height (Z). true 3D images will fundamentally change, if not revolutionize, the way people display, look, extract, use, and represent the geospatial information from imagery. In many areas, true 3D images can make profound impacts on the ways of how geospatial information is represented, how true 3D ground modeling is performed, and how the real world scenes are presented. This paper first gives a definition and description of a true 3D image and followed by a brief review of what key advancements of geospatial technologies have made the creation of true 3D images possible. Next, the paper introduces what a true 3D image is made of. Then, the paper discusses some possible contributions and impacts the true 3D images can make to geospatial information fields. At the end, the paper presents a list of the benefits of having and using true 3D images and the applications of true 3D images in a couple of 3D city modeling projects.

  19. Microfabricating 3D Structures by Laser Origami

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-09

    10.1117/2.1201111.003952 Microfabricating 3D structures by laser origami Alberto Piqué, Scott Mathews, Andrew Birnbaum, and Nicholas Charipar A new...folding known as origami allows the transformation of flat patterns into 3D shapes. A similar approach can be used to generate 3D structures com...materials Figure 1. (A–C) Schematic illustrating the steps in the laser origami process and (D) a resulting folded out-of-plane 3D structure. that can

  20. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  1. EISCAT Aperture Synthesis Imaging (EASI _3D) for the EISCAT_3D Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Hoz, Cesar; Belyey, Vasyl

    2012-07-01

    Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar (ASIR) is one of the technologies adopted by the EISCAT_3D project to endow it with imaging capabilities in 3-dimensions that includes sub-beam resolution. Complemented by pulse compression, it will provide 3-dimensional images of certain types of incoherent scatter radar targets resolved to about 100 metres at 100 km range, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio. This ability will open new research opportunities to map small structures associated with non-homogeneous, unstable processes such as aurora, summer and winter polar radar echoes (PMSE and PMWE), Natural Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs), structures excited by HF ionospheric heating, meteors, space debris, and others. The underlying physico-mathematical principles of the technique are the same as the technique employed in radioastronomy to image stellar objects; both require sophisticated inversion techniques to obtain reliable images.

  2. User benefits of visualization with 3-D stereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichansky, Anna M.

    1991-08-01

    The power of today''s supercomputers promises tremendous benefits to users in terms of productivity, creativity, and excitement in computing. A study of a stereoscopic display system for computer workstations was conducted with 20 users and third-party software developers, to determine whether 3-D stereo displays were perceived as better than flat, 2- 1/2D displays. Users perceived more benefits of 3-D stereo in applications such as molecular modeling and cell biology, which involved viewing of complex, abstract, amorphous objects. Users typically mentioned clearer visualization and better understanding of data, easier recognition of form and pattern, and more fun and excitement at work as the chief benefits of stereo displays. Human factors issues affecting the usefulness of stereo included use of 3-D glasses over regular eyeglasses, difficulties in group viewing, lack of portability, and need for better input devices. The future marketability of 3-D stereo displays would be improved by eliminating the need for users to wear equipment, reducing cost, and identifying markets where the abstract display value can be maximized.

  3. Characterizing Properties and Performance of 3D Printed Plastic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    We are determining various characteristics of the performance of 3D printed scintillators. A scintillator luminesces when an energetic particle raises electrons to an excited state by depositing some of its energy in the atom. When these excited electrons fall back down to their stable states, they emit the excess energy as light. We have characterized the transmission spectrum, emission spectrum, and relative intensity of light produced by 3D printed scintillators. We are also determining mechanical properties such as tensile strength and compressibility, and the refractive index. The emission and transmission spectra were measured using a monochromator. By observing the transmission spectrum, we can see which optical wavelengths are absorbed by the scintillator. This is then used to correct the emission spectrum, since this absorption is present in the emission spectrum. Using photomultiplier tubes in conjunction with integration hardware (QDC) to measure the intensity of light emitted by 3D printed scintillators, we compare with commercial plastic scintillators. We are using the characterizations to determine if 3D printed scintillators are a viable alternative to commercial scintillators for use at Jefferson Lab in nuclear and accelerated physics detectors. I would like to thank Wouter Deconinck, as well as the Parity group at the College of William and Mary for all advice and assistance with my research.

  4. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  5. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  6. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  7. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  8. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  9. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  10. Beowulf 3D: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Rob

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the creative and technical challenges encountered during the production of "Beowulf 3D," director Robert Zemeckis' adaptation of the Old English epic poem and the first film to be simultaneously released in IMAX 3D and digital 3D formats.

  11. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  12. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  13. Excited-state geometries and vibrational frequencies studied using the analytical energy gradients of the direct symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction method. I. HAX-type molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehara, Masahiro; Oyagi, Fumito; Abe, Yoko; Fukuda, Ryoichi; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    In this series of studies, we systematically apply the analytical energy gradients of the direct symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction singles and doubles nonvariational method to calculate the equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies of excited and ionized states of molecules. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated using the second derivatives numerically computed from the analytical first derivatives and the anharmonicity was evaluated from the three-dimensional potential energy surfaces around the local minima. In this paper, the method is applied to the low-lying valence singlet and triplet excited states of HAX-type molecules, HCF, HCCl, HSiF, HSiCl, HNO, HPO, and their deuterium isotopomers. The vibrational level emission spectra of HSiF and DSiF and absorption spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl were also simulated within the Franck-Condon approximation and agree well with the experimental spectra. The results show that the present method is useful and reliable for calculating these quantities and spectra. The change in geometry in the excited states was qualitatively interpreted in the light of the electrostatic force theory. The effect of perturbation selection with the localized molecular orbitals on the geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies is also discussed.

  14. FUN3D and CFL3D Computations for the First High Lift Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used to compute flow over the NASA Trapezoidal Wing at high lift conditions for the 1st AIAA CFD High Lift Prediction Workshop, held in Chicago in June 2010. The unstructured-grid code FUN3D and the structured-grid code CFL3D were applied to several different grid systems. The effects of code, grid system, turbulence model, viscous term treatment, and brackets were studied. The SST model on this configuration predicted lower lift than the Spalart-Allmaras model at high angles of attack; the Spalart-Allmaras model agreed better with experiment. Neglecting viscous cross-derivative terms caused poorer prediction in the wing tip vortex region. Output-based grid adaptation was applied to the unstructured-grid solutions. The adapted grids better resolved wake structures and reduced flap flow separation, which was also observed in uniform grid refinement studies. Limitations of the adaptation method as well as areas for future improvement were identified.

  15. A new neural net approach to robot 3D perception and visuo-motor coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1992-01-01

    A novel neural network approach to robot hand-eye coordination is presented. The approach provides a true sense of visual error servoing, redundant arm configuration control for collision avoidance, and invariant visuo-motor learning under gazing control. A 3-D perception network is introduced to represent the robot internal 3-D metric space in which visual error servoing and arm configuration control are performed. The arm kinematic network performs the bidirectional association between 3-D space arm configurations and joint angles, and enforces the legitimate arm configurations. The arm kinematic net is structured by a radial-based competitive and cooperative network with hierarchical self-organizing learning. The main goal of the present work is to demonstrate that the neural net representation of the robot 3-D perception net serves as an important intermediate functional block connecting robot eyes and arms.

  16. A new neural net approach to robot 3D perception and visuo-motor coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1992-01-01

    A novel neural network approach to robot hand-eye coordination is presented. The approach provides a true sense of visual error servoing, redundant arm configuration control for collision avoidance, and invariant visuo-motor learning under gazing control. A 3-D perception network is introduced to represent the robot internal 3-D metric space in which visual error servoing and arm configuration control are performed. The arm kinematic network performs the bidirectional association between 3-D space arm configurations and joint angles, and enforces the legitimate arm configurations. The arm kinematic net is structured by a radial-based competitive and cooperative network with hierarchical self-organizing learning. The main goal of the present work is to demonstrate that the neural net representation of the robot 3-D perception net serves as an important intermediate functional block connecting robot eyes and arms.

  17. Proton acceleration by 3D magnetic reconnection in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, P. K.; Dalla, S.

    2007-05-01

    High energy charged particles are an important feature of solar activity such as flares, and indeed non thermal particles play a significant role in flare energy balance. Magnetic reconnection is the primary energy release mechanism in flares, and the strong DC electric fields associated with this reconnection may well be the origin of the high energy charged particles. Whilst particle acceleration has been widely studied for 2D configurations, little is known about 3D configurations. We investigate particle acceleration using a test particle approach, in the simplest 3D reconnection configuration, a 3D magnetic null point. Two modes of reconnection are possible: with a strong current filament along the "spine" field line connecting to the null, or with a sheet current at the "fan" plane of field lines emerging from the null. Using simple model fields, incorporating intiially only thee ideal reconnection region outside the current sheet (or filament), particle trajectories are investigated and the energy spectra and spatial distribution of accelerated particles are determined. We consider and compare fan and spine reconnection, and determine how the properties of the accelerated particles depend on the parameters of the reonnecting field. We also present preliminary results using more realistic, self consistent model fields.

  18. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  19. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  20. Mini 3D for shallow gas reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, T. des; Enns, D.; Kuehn, H.; Parron, D.; Lafet, Y.; Van Hulle, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Mini 3D project was undertaken by TOTAL and ELF with the support of CEPM (Comite d`Etudes Petrolieres et Marines) to define an economical method of obtaining 3D seismic HR data for shallow gas assessment. An experimental 3D survey was carried out with classical site survey techniques in the North Sea. From these data 19 simulations, were produced to compare different acquisition geometries ranging from dual, 600 m long cables to a single receiver. Results show that short offset, low fold and very simple streamer positioning are sufficient to give a reliable 3D image of gas charged bodies. The 3D data allow a much more accurate risk delineation than 2D HR data. Moreover on financial grounds Mini-3D is comparable in cost to a classical HR 2D survey. In view of these results, such HR 3D should now be the standard for shallow gas surveying.

  1. Peptide Directed 3D Assembly of Nanoparticles through Biomolecular Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prerna

    The current challenge of the 'bottom up' process is the programmed self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks into complex and larger-scale superstructures with unique properties that can be integrated as components in solar cells, microelectronics, meta materials, catalysis, and sensors. Recent trends in the complexity of device design demand the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) superstructures from multi-nanomaterial components in precise configurations. Bio mimetic assembly is an emerging technique for building hybrid materials because living organisms are efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally benign material generators, allowing low temperature fabrication. Using this approach, a novel peptide-directed nanomaterial assembly technology based on bio molecular interaction of streptavidin and biotin is presented for assembling nanomaterials with peptides for the construction of 3D peptide-inorganic superlattices with defined 3D shape. We took advantage of robust natural collagen triple-helix peptides and used them as nanowire building blocks for 3D peptide-gold nanoparticles superlattice generation. The type of 3D peptide superlattice assembly with hybrid NP building blocks described herein shows potential for the fabrication of complex functional device which demands precise long-range arrangement and periodicity of NPs.

  2. Development of a 3D artificial compound eye.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yi, Allen Y

    2010-08-16

    In this research paper, in a major departure from conventional 2D micromachining processes, design and fabrication of a 3D compound eye system consisting of a 3D microprism array, an aperture array, and a microlens array were investigated. Specifically, the 3D microprism array on a curved surface was designed to steer the incident light from all three dimensions to a 2D plane for image formation. For each microprism, there is a corresponding microlens to focus the refracted light on the image plane. An aperture array was also implemented between the microprism array and the microlens array to eliminate cross-talk among the neighboring channels. In this system, 601 individual micro-assemblies consisting of microprisms and microlenses were constructed in a 20 mm diameter area. In this configuration, the maximum light deviation angle was determined to be 18.43 degrees. This research demonstrated an innovative and integrated approach to fabricating true 3D micro and meso scale optical structures. This work also validated the feasibility of using ultraprecision machining process for 3D microoptical device fabrication. The technology demonstrated in this research has high potentials in optical sensing, vision research and many other optical and photonic applications.

  3. 3D effects on energetic particle confinement and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Don

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the confinement and stability of energetic particle (EP) populations in 3D magnetic configurations is crucial to the future of all toroidal devices. Tokamaks will have weak symmetry-breaking effects from discrete coils, heterogeneous distributions of ferritic materials and non-symmetric (ELM/RWM) control coils, while stellarators and helical RFP states have dominant 3D features by design. Significant EP issues for 3D systems include: modifications of the plasma equilibrium and potential amplification of field errors, asymmetry enhanced EP losses and their impact both on wall heat loads and the confined EP distribution, 3D modifications to the Alfvén gap and mode structure, and the stability properties of EP-destabilized Alfvén modes. 3D equilibria that resolve localized TBM (test blanket module) asymmetries have now been developed for DIII-D and ITER. Such symmetry breaking leads to enhanced EP losses and focused wall deposition. 3D effects also modify the Alfvén spectrum by increasing the number of possibilities for mode coupling and introducing new gap structures, including the helical and mirror gaps, fine scale ripple-induced gaps and continuum crossing gaps. Improved methods have recently been developed for evaluating these modes and their stability, taking into account the large number of coupled modes and finite orbit width effects. Successful Alfvén mode identifications have been made for a range of stellarators, including W7-AS, LHD, HSX and TJ-II. A comprehensive understanding of energetic particle physics with 3D effects is a necessary prerequisite for wall protection, plasma control and flexibility and for new diagnostic development possibilities in future ignited systems.

  4. The transition from the open minimum to the ring minimum on the ground state and on the lowest excited state of like symmetry in ozone: A configuration interaction study

    SciTech Connect

    Theis, Daniel; Ivanic, Joseph; Windus, Theresa L.; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2016-03-10

    The metastable ring structure of the ozone 11A1 ground state, which theoretical calculations have shown to exist, has so far eluded experimental detection. An accurate prediction for the energy difference between this isomer and the lower open structure is therefore of interest, as is a prediction for the isomerization barrier between them, which results from interactions between the lowest two 1A1 states. In the present work, valence correlated energies of the 11A1 state and the 21A1 state were calculated at the 11A1 open minimum, the 11A1 ring minimum, the transition state between these two minima, the minimum of the 21A1 state, and the conical intersection between the two states. The geometries were determined at the full-valence multi-configuration self-consistent-field level. Configuration interaction (CI) expansions up to quadruple excitations were calculated with triple-zeta atomic basis sets. The CI expansions based on eight different reference configuration spaces were explored. To obtain some of the quadruple excitation energies, the method of CorrelationEnergy Extrapolation by Intrinsic Scaling was generalized to the simultaneous extrapolation for two states. This extrapolation method was shown to be very accurate. On the other hand, none of the CI expansions were found to have converged to millihartree (mh) accuracy at the quadruple excitation level. The data suggest that convergence to mh accuracy is probably attained at the sextuple excitation level. On the 11A1 state, the present calculations yield the estimates of (ring minimum—open minimum) ~45–50 mh and (transition state—open minimum) ~85–90 mh. For the (21A11A1) excitation energy, the estimate of ~130–170 mh is found at the open minimum and 270–310 mh at the ring minimum. At the

  5. Automatic respiration tracking for radiotherapy using optical 3D camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Rapid optical three-dimensional (O3D) imaging systems provide accurate digitized 3D surface data in real-time, with no patient contact nor radiation. The accurate 3D surface images offer crucial information in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatments for accurate patient repositioning and respiration management. However, applications of O3D imaging techniques to image-guided radiotherapy have been clinically challenged by body deformation, pathological and anatomical variations among individual patients, extremely high dimensionality of the 3D surface data, and irregular respiration motion. In existing clinical radiation therapy (RT) procedures target displacements are caused by (1) inter-fractional anatomy changes due to weight, swell, food/water intake; (2) intra-fractional variations from anatomy changes within any treatment session due to voluntary/involuntary physiologic processes (e.g. respiration, muscle relaxation); (3) patient setup misalignment in daily reposition due to user errors; and (4) changes of marker or positioning device, etc. Presently, viable solution is lacking for in-vivo tracking of target motion and anatomy changes during the beam-on time without exposing patient with additional ionized radiation or high magnet field. Current O3D-guided radiotherapy systems relay on selected points or areas in the 3D surface to track surface motion. The configuration of the marks or areas may change with time that makes it inconsistent in quantifying and interpreting the respiration patterns. To meet the challenge of performing real-time respiration tracking using O3D imaging technology in IGRT, we propose a new approach to automatic respiration motion analysis based on linear dimensionality reduction technique based on PCA (principle component analysis). Optical 3D image sequence is decomposed with principle component analysis into a limited number of independent (orthogonal) motion patterns (a low dimension eigen-space span by eigen-vectors). New

  6. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  7. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  8. 3D change detection - Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Tian, Jiaojiao; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Due to the unprecedented technology development of sensors, platforms and algorithms for 3D data acquisition and generation, 3D spaceborne, airborne and close-range data, in the form of image based, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) based point clouds, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and 3D city models, become more accessible than ever before. Change detection (CD) or time-series data analysis in 3D has gained great attention due to its capability of providing volumetric dynamics to facilitate more applications and provide more accurate results. The state-of-the-art CD reviews aim to provide a comprehensive synthesis and to simplify the taxonomy of the traditional remote sensing CD techniques, which mainly sit within the boundary of 2D image/spectrum analysis, largely ignoring the particularities of 3D aspects of the data. The inclusion of 3D data for change detection (termed 3D CD), not only provides a source with different modality for analysis, but also transcends the border of traditional top-view 2D pixel/object-based analysis to highly detailed, oblique view or voxel-based geometric analysis. This paper reviews the recent developments and applications of 3D CD using remote sensing and close-range data, in support of both academia and industry researchers who seek for solutions in detecting and analyzing 3D dynamics of various objects of interest. We first describe the general considerations of 3D CD problems in different processing stages and identify CD types based on the information used, being the geometric comparison and geometric-spectral analysis. We then summarize relevant works and practices in urban, environment, ecology and civil applications, etc. Given the broad spectrum of applications and different types of 3D data, we discuss important issues in 3D CD methods. Finally, we present concluding remarks in algorithmic aspects of 3D CD.

  9. Nonlinear 3D MHD verification study: SpeCyl and PIXIE3D codes for RFP and Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfiglio, D.; Cappello, S.; Chacon, L.

    2010-11-01

    A strong emphasis is presently placed in the fusion community on reaching predictive capability of computational models. An essential requirement of such endeavor is the process of assessing the mathematical correctness of computational tools, termed verification [1]. We present here a successful nonlinear cross-benchmark verification study between the 3D nonlinear MHD codes SpeCyl [2] and PIXIE3D [3]. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained in both 2D and 3D nonlinear visco-resistive dynamics for reversed-field pinch (RFP) and tokamak configurations [4]. RFP dynamics, in particular, lends itself as an ideal non trivial test-bed for 3D nonlinear verification. Perspectives for future application of the fully-implicit parallel code PIXIE3D to RFP physics, in particular to address open issues on RFP helical self-organization, will be provided. [4pt] [1] M. Greenwald, Phys. Plasmas 17, 058101 (2010) [0pt] [2] S. Cappello and D. Biskamp, Nucl. Fusion 36, 571 (1996) [0pt] [3] L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas 15, 056103 (2008) [0pt] [4] D. Bonfiglio, L. Chac'on and S. Cappello, Phys. Plasmas 17 (2010)

  10. Thermal characterization of a liquid resin for 3D printing using photothermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Pérez, José L.; Pincel, Pavel Vieyra; Cruz-Orea, Alfredo; Correa-Pacheco, Zormy N.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal properties of a liquid resin were studied by thermal lens spectrometry (TLS) and open photoacoustic cell (OPC), respectively. In the case of the TLS technique, the two mismatched mode experimental configuration was used with a He-Ne laser, as a probe beam and an Argon laser was used as the excitation source. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was obtained by fitting the theoretical expression to the experimental data in order to obtain the thermal diffusivity ( α) of the resin. On the other hand, the sample thermal effusivity ( e) was obtained by using the OPC technique. In this technique, an Argon laser was used as the excitation source and was operated at 514 nm with an output power of 30 mW. From the obtained thermal diffusivity ( α) and thermal effusivity ( e) values, the thermal conductivity ( k) and specific heat capacity per unit volume ( ρc) of resin were calculated through the relationships k = e( α)1/2 and ρc = e/( α)1/2. The obtained thermal parameters were compared with the thermal parameters of the literature. To our knowledge, the thermal characterization of resin has not been reported until now. The present study has applications in laser stereo-lithography to manufacture 3D printing pieces.

  11. Cooling of 3D granular gases in microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    Granular gases are a most peculiar state, superficially similar to molecular gases: They are loose ensembles of moving grains, rarely interacting with each other and with container walls. The most investigated scenario is the "granular cooling", the collective loss of energy from an initially excited state. We present an experimental study of the cooling of a 3D granular gas of rodlike grains in micro-gravity. Driven steady states of non-spherical grains are characterized by a lack of energy equipartition between the degrees of freedom of translation and rotation. Excitation by vibrating walls additionally introduces strong gradients in the direction and magnitude of translational velocities. We show that the degrees of freedom equilibrate during granular cooling in the homogeneous cooling state. The energy loss follows a t-2 scaling. In addition, the alignment of the rod axes with the excitation direction and with the instantaneous velocities are altered during this process.

  12. MOM3D method of moments code theory manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, John F.

    1992-01-01

    MOM3D is a FORTRAN algorithm that solves Maxwell's equations as expressed via the electric field integral equation for the electromagnetic response of open or closed three dimensional surfaces modeled with triangle patches. Two joined triangles (couples) form the vector current unknowns for the surface. Boundary conditions are for perfectly conducting or resistive surfaces. The impedance matrix represents the fundamental electromagnetic interaction of the body with itself. A variety of electromagnetic analysis options are possible once the impedance matrix is computed including backscatter radar cross section (RCS), bistatic RCS, antenna pattern prediction for user specified body voltage excitation ports, RCS image projection showing RCS scattering center locations, surface currents excited on the body as induced by specified plane wave excitation, and near field computation for the electric field on or near the body.

  13. FUN3D Analyses in Support of the First Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Florance, Jennifer P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the computational aeroelastic results generated in support of the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop for the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) and the HIgh REynolds Number AeroStructural Dynamics (HIRENASD) configurations and compares them to the experimental data. The computational results are obtained using FUN3D, an unstructured grid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The analysis results for both configurations include aerodynamic coefficients and surface pressures obtained for steady-state or static aeroelastic equilibrium (BSCW and HIRENASD, respectively) and for unsteady flow due to a pitching wing (BSCW) or modally-excited wing (HIRENASD). Frequency response functions of the pressure coefficients with respect to displacement are computed and compared with the experimental data. For the BSCW, the shock location is computed aft of the experimentally-located shock position. The pressure distribution upstream of this shock is in excellent agreement with the experimental data, but the pressure downstream of the shock in the separated flow region does not match as well. For HIRENASD, very good agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data is observed at the mid-span wing locations.

  14. A 3-d modular gripper design tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.G.; Brost, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    Modular fixturing kits are precisely machined sets of components used for flexible, short-turnaround construction of fixtures for a variety of manufacturing purposes. A modular vise is a parallel-jaw vise, where each jaw is a modular fixture plate with a regular grid of precisely positioned holes. A modular vise can be used to locate and hold parts for machining, assembly, and inspection tasks. To fixture a part, one places pins in some of the holes so that when the vise is closed, the part is reliably located and completely constrained. The modular vise concept can be adapted easily to the design of modular parallel-jaw grippers for robots. By attaching a grid plate to each jaw of a parallel-jaw gripper, the authors gain the ability to easily construct high-quality grasps for a wide variety of parts from a standard set of hardware. Wallack and Canny developed a previous algorithm for planning planar grasp configurations for the modular vise. In this paper, the authors expand this work to produce a 3-d fixture/gripper design tool. They describe several analyses added to the planar algorithm to improve its utility, including a three-dimensional grasp quality metric based on geometric and force information, three-dimensional geometric loading analysis, and inter-gripper interference analysis to determine the compatibility of multiple grasps for handing the part from one gripper to another. Finally, the authors describe two applications which combine the utility of modular vise-style grasping with inter-gripper interference: The first is the design of a flexible part-handling subsystem for a part cleaning workcell under development at Sandia National Laboratories; the second is the automatic design of grippers that support the assembly of multiple products on a single assembly line.

  15. 3D Printer Coupon removal and stowage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-09

    iss042e031282 (12/09/2014) ---US Astronaut Barry (Butch) Wilmore holding a 3D coupon works with the new 3D printer aboard the International Space Station. The 3D Printing experiment in zero gravity demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. In general, a 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the International Space Station is the first step towards establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

  16. 3D measurement for rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Peter; Lilienblum, Tilo; Sommerkorn, Gerd; Michaelis, Bernd

    1996-08-01

    Optical 3-D measurement is an interesting approach for rapid prototyping. On one hand it's necessary to get the 3-D data of an object and on the other hand it's necessary to check the manufactured object (quality checking). Optical 3-D measurement can realize both. Classical 3-D measurement procedures based on photogrammetry cause systematic errors at strongly curved surfaces or steps in surfaces. One possibility to reduce these errors is to calculate the 3-D coordinates from several successively taken images. Thus it's possible to get higher spatial resolution and to reduce the systematic errors at 'problem surfaces.' Another possibility is to process the measurement values by neural networks. A modified associative memory smoothes and corrects the calculated 3-D coordinates using a-priori knowledge about the measurement object.

  17. Comparison of divertor heat flux splitting by 3D fields with field line tracing simulation in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kimin; Ahn, J.-W.; Lee, H. H.; Park, J.-K.; Kang, C. S.; In, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Oh, O. K.; Choe, Wonho

    2017-05-01

    We present the experimental and numerical analysis of divertor heat flux spitting by 3D magnetic fields in KSTAR. A dedicated experiment to measure the modification of the divertor heat flux profile in the n = 2 resonant and non-resonant field configurations has been conducted. The measured heat flux profiles were directly compared to the magnetic field line tracing (FLT) simulation using the POCA-FLT code, which fully considers vacuum and ideal plasma response models. Measurements indicate that the 3D fields induce strong splitting of heat flux on the divertor target due to the formation of stochastic field layers. Splitting characteristics largely depend on the applied 3D field structure and its alignment to the axisymmetric magnetic pitch. The modeling of the field line connection length shows good agreement with measurements, reproducing well the pattern of heat flux splitting. Simulations with the ideal plasma response better reproduce measured heat flux profiles by excitation of non-resonant field components in the non-resonant 0° phase and shielding of resonant field components in the resonant 90° phase.

  18. Expedient Gap Definition Using 3D LADAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Research and Development Center (ERDC), ASI has developed an algorithm to reduce the 3D point cloud acquired with the LADAR system into sets of 2D ...developed an algorithm to extract from this 3D point cloud any user-defined number of 2D slices. ASI has incorporated this sensor and algorithm into...direction, ASI has developed an algorithm to condense the 3D point cloud acquired with the LADAR system into sets of 2D profiles that describe the

  19. Digital holography and 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Partha; Barbastathis, George; Kim, Myung; Kukhtarev, Nickolai

    2011-03-01

    This feature issue on Digital Holography and 3-D Imaging comprises 15 papers on digital holographic techniques and applications, computer-generated holography and encryption techniques, and 3-D display. It is hoped that future work in the area leads to innovative applications of digital holography and 3-D imaging to biology and sensing, and to the development of novel nonlinear dynamic digital holographic techniques.

  20. 3D carotid plaque MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS There has been significant progress made in 3D carotid plaque magnetic resonance imaging techniques in recent years. 3D plaque imaging clearly represents the future in clinical use. With effective flow suppression techniques, choices of different contrast weighting acquisitions, and time-efficient imaging approaches, 3D plaque imaging offers flexible imaging plane and view angle analysis, large coverage, multi-vascular beds capability, and even can be used in fast screening. PMID:26610656

  1. Photorefractive Polymers for Updateable 3D Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-24

    Final Performance Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-01-2007 to 11-30-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photorefractive Polymers for Updateable 3D ...ABSTRACT During the tenure of this project a large area updateable 3D color display has been developed for the first time using a new co-polymer...photorefractive polymers have been demonstrated. Moreover, a 6 inch × 6 inch sample was fabricated demonstrating the feasibility of making large area 3D

  2. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  3. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  4. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, T.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories, and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  5. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1993-11-30

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  6. TAURUS. 3-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1991-05-01

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (ESTSC 139), DYNA3D (ESTSC 138), TACO3D (ESTSC 287), TOPAZ3D (ESTSC 231), and GEMINI (ESTSC 455) and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  7. TAURUS. 3-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (ESTSC 139), DYNA3D (ESTSC 138), TACO3D (ESTSC 287), TOPAZ3D (ESTSC 231), and GEMINI (ESTSC 455) and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  8. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  9. Theoretical study of one-electron-oxidized salen complexes of group 7 (Mn(iii), Tc(iii), and Re(iii)) and group 10 metals (Ni(ii), Pd(ii), and Pt(ii)) with the 3D-RISM-GMC-QDPT method: localized vs. delocalized ground and excited states in solution.

    PubMed

    Aono, Shinji; Nakagaki, Masayuki; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2017-06-28

    One-electron oxidized salen complexes of Mn(iii) and Ni(ii) were recently reported to be unique mixed-valence compounds. Their electronic structures are sensitive to the salen ligand and solvation. We systematically investigated a series of one-electron oxidized salen complexes of group 7 metals (Mn(iii), Tc(iii), and Re(iii)) and their group 10 analogues (Ni(ii), Pd(ii), and Pt(ii)) using the general multi-configuration reference quasi-degenerate perturbation theory (GMC-QDPT) which was combined with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model self-consistent field theory (3D-RISM-SCF) to incorporate the solvation effect. The calculated absorption spectra and electronic structures agree with the experimental observation. The one-electron oxidized salen complexes of group 10 metals with a symmetrical salen ligand have a delocalized electronic structure belonging to class III (Robin-Day classification) in weakly polar solvents. The tendency for taking a delocalized electronic structure increases in the order Pd(ii) < Ni(ii) < Pt(ii). When the salen ligand is asymmetrical, the one-electron oxidized complexes have a localized electronic structure belonging to class II. The group 7 analogues of Mn(iii) and Tc(iii) have a localized electronic structure belonging to class II even in weakly polar solvents and even with a symmetrical salen ligand. However, the one-electron oxidized Re(iii) complex has no mixed-valence nature because one-electron oxidation occurs on the Re center. Theoretical study shows that the solvation effect plays a crucial role in determining the mixed-valence character, class II or III, and thereby its incorporation in the calculation is indispensable for correctly describing geometries, electronic structures, and the inter-valence absorption spectra of these complexes. The d orbital energy is one of the most important factors for determining the localization/delocalization electronic structures in these complexes. Detailed discussion of

  10. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  11. Cooling of 3D Granular Gases: Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; Wegner, Sandra; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    Granular gases are ensembles of macroscopic grains, which move randomly and interact through inelastic collisions. This non-equilibrium statistical system is easy to picture, but still insufficiently understood. Numerous theoretical treatments have been performed, favorably with spherical grains and periodic boundaries, starting from a homogeneous state. Experimentally, such a gas in 3D can only be realized with strong external forcing or in microgravity. We have recently demonstrated that the use of elongated grains facilitates the realization of 3D experiments beyond the Knudsen regime (1). Main findings in a sounding rocket experiment were non-Gaussian velocity distributions and a violation of the equipartition of kinetic energy in the steady state. Rotational degrees of freedom are under-excited. When the excitation is stopped, energy is dissipated, the granular gas is ''cooling''. We present the first quantitative study of the cooling of a granular gas, based on a 3D data evaluation, from drop tower experiments. The evolution of the kinetic energy in translational and rotational degrees of freedom is compared to Haff's law and recent numerical studies. Additionally, we analyze velocity and density distributions.(1) K. Harth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 144102 (2013) This research was funded by German Aerospace Center DLR Grants 50WM1241 and 50WB1344 and by DFG Grant STA-425/34-1.

  12. Electron structure of excited configurations in Ca2V2O7 studied by electron-induced core-ionization loss spectroscopy, appearance-potential spectroscopy, and x-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curelaru, I. M.; Strid, K.-G.; Suoninen, E.; Minni, E.; Rönnhult, T.

    1981-04-01

    We have measured the electron-induced core-ionization loss (CILS) spectra, the appearance-potential (APS) spectra, and the x-ray-photoelectron (XPS) spectra of Ca2V2O7, that is a prototype for a series of luminescent materials with general formula M2V2O7(M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, Hg). From the analysis of the data provided by the edge spectroscopies (CILS and APS) and their comparison with the XPS binding energies, we deduced the electronic structure of the outer orbitals (occupied and empty) involved in these processes. Our data illustrate the strong many-body effects that occur in the excitation and decay of localized atomiclike configurations within the big ionic cluster V2O4-7. Excitation of core levels in calcium, outside the V2O4-7 ion, seems to involve more extended orbitals, since the screening is more efficient. Usefulness of complementary studies by x-ray emission and Auger electron spectroscopy is anticipated.

  13. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  14. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  15. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  16. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-07

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  17. Study of profiles of autoionization resonances of the 6p7p configuration of the Ba atom

    SciTech Connect

    Bobashev, S.V.; Elizarov, A.Y.; Korshunov, V.V.

    1995-05-01

    Two-stage laser excitation is used to study autoionization resonances of the 6p7p configuration of the Ba atom. Fano parameters q and lifetimes of the 6p7p({sup 3}P{sub 1}),6p7p({sup 3}P{sub 2}), and 6p7p({sup 3}D{sub 2}) autoionization states are found experimentally. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Parallel Optimization of 3D Cardiac Electrophysiological Model Using GPU.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Wang, Kuanquan; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale 3D virtual heart model simulations are highly demanding in computational resources. This imposes a big challenge to the traditional computation resources based on CPU environment, which already cannot meet the requirement of the whole computation demands or are not easily available due to expensive costs. GPU as a parallel computing environment therefore provides an alternative to solve the large-scale computational problems of whole heart modeling. In this study, using a 3D sheep atrial model as a test bed, we developed a GPU-based simulation algorithm to simulate the conduction of electrical excitation waves in the 3D atria. In the GPU algorithm, a multicellular tissue model was split into two components: one is the single cell model (ordinary differential equation) and the other is the diffusion term of the monodomain model (partial differential equation). Such a decoupling enabled realization of the GPU parallel algorithm. Furthermore, several optimization strategies were proposed based on the features of the virtual heart model, which enabled a 200-fold speedup as compared to a CPU implementation. In conclusion, an optimized GPU algorithm has been developed that provides an economic and powerful platform for 3D whole heart simulations.

  19. Parallel Optimization of 3D Cardiac Electrophysiological Model Using GPU

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yong; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale 3D virtual heart model simulations are highly demanding in computational resources. This imposes a big challenge to the traditional computation resources based on CPU environment, which already cannot meet the requirement of the whole computation demands or are not easily available due to expensive costs. GPU as a parallel computing environment therefore provides an alternative to solve the large-scale computational problems of whole heart modeling. In this study, using a 3D sheep atrial model as a test bed, we developed a GPU-based simulation algorithm to simulate the conduction of electrical excitation waves in the 3D atria. In the GPU algorithm, a multicellular tissue model was split into two components: one is the single cell model (ordinary differential equation) and the other is the diffusion term of the monodomain model (partial differential equation). Such a decoupling enabled realization of the GPU parallel algorithm. Furthermore, several optimization strategies were proposed based on the features of the virtual heart model, which enabled a 200-fold speedup as compared to a CPU implementation. In conclusion, an optimized GPU algorithm has been developed that provides an economic and powerful platform for 3D whole heart simulations. PMID:26581957

  20. Wow! 3D Content Awakens the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2010-01-01

    From her first encounter with stereoscopic 3D technology designed for classroom instruction, Megan Timme, principal at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet School in Dallas, sensed it could be transformative. Last spring, when she began pilot-testing 3D content in her third-, fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, Timme wasn't disappointed. Students…

  1. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion"…

  2. Wow! 3D Content Awakens the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2010-01-01

    From her first encounter with stereoscopic 3D technology designed for classroom instruction, Megan Timme, principal at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet School in Dallas, sensed it could be transformative. Last spring, when she began pilot-testing 3D content in her third-, fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, Timme wasn't disappointed. Students…

  3. Infrastructure for 3D Imaging Test Bed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-11

    analysis. (c.) Real time detection & analysis of human gait: using a video camera we capture walking human silhouette for pattern modeling and gait ... analysis . Fig. 5 shows the scanning result result that is fed into a Geo-magic software tool for 3D meshing. Fig. 5: 3D scanning result In

  4. Berries on the Ground 2 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-12

    This 3-D anaglyph, from NASA Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, shows a microscopic image taken of soil featuring round, blueberry-shaped rock formations on the crater floor at Meridiani Planum, Mars. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  5. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  6. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  7. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  8. 3D elastic control for mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Martin; Pouderoux, Joachim; Guitton, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    To increase the input space of mobile devices, the authors developed a proof-of-concept 3D elastic controller that easily adapts to mobile devices. This embedded device improves the completion of high-level interaction tasks such as visualization of large documents and navigation in 3D environments. It also opens new directions for tomorrow's mobile applications.

  9. Immersive 3D Geovisualization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how immersive 3D geovisualization can be used in higher education. Based on MacEachren and Kraak's geovisualization cube, we examine the usage of immersive 3D geovisualization and its usefulness in a research-based learning module on flood risk, called GEOSimulator. Results of a survey among participating students…

  10. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  11. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  12. Computer Assisted Cancer Device - 3D Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    tomosynthesis images of the breast. iCAD has identified several sources of 3D tomosynthesis data, and has begun adapting its image analysis...collaborative relationships with major manufacturers of tomosynthesis equipment. 21. iCAD believes that tomosynthesis , a 3D breast imaging technique...purported advantages of tomosynthesis relative to conventional mammography include; improved lesion visibility, improved lesion detectability and

  13. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  14. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  15. Case study of 3D fingerprints applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Liang, Jinrong; Shen, Linlin; Yang, Meng; Zhang, David; Lai, Zhihui

    2017-01-01

    Human fingers are 3D objects. More information will be provided if three dimensional (3D) fingerprints are available compared with two dimensional (2D) fingerprints. Thus, this paper firstly collected 3D finger point cloud data by Structured-light Illumination method. Additional features from 3D fingerprint images are then studied and extracted. The applications of these features are finally discussed. A series of experiments are conducted to demonstrate the helpfulness of 3D information to fingerprint recognition. Results show that a quick alignment can be easily implemented under the guidance of 3D finger shape feature even though this feature does not work for fingerprint recognition directly. The newly defined distinctive 3D shape ridge feature can be used for personal authentication with Equal Error Rate (EER) of ~8.3%. Also, it is helpful to remove false core point. Furthermore, a promising of EER ~1.3% is realized by combining this feature with 2D features for fingerprint recognition which indicates the prospect of 3D fingerprint recognition.

  16. A 3D Geostatistical Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, W. W.; Stevenson, Graig; Patel, Ketan; Wang, Jun

    1999-02-09

    This software provides accurate 3D reservoir modeling tools and high quality 3D graphics for PC platforms enabling engineers and geologists to better comprehend reservoirs and consequently improve their decisions. The mapping algorithms are fractals, kriging, sequential guassian simulation, and three nearest neighbor methods.

  17. Topology dictionary for 3D video understanding.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tony; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that achieves 3D video understanding. 3D video consists of a stream of 3D models of subjects in motion. The acquisition of long sequences requires large storage space (2 GB for 1 min). Moreover, it is tedious to browse data sets and extract meaningful information. We propose the topology dictionary to encode and describe 3D video content. The model consists of a topology-based shape descriptor dictionary which can be generated from either extracted patterns or training sequences. The model relies on 1) topology description and classification using Reeb graphs, and 2) a Markov motion graph to represent topology change states. We show that the use of Reeb graphs as the high-level topology descriptor is relevant. It allows the dictionary to automatically model complex sequences, whereas other strategies would require prior knowledge on the shape and topology of the captured subjects. Our approach serves to encode 3D video sequences, and can be applied for content-based description and summarization of 3D video sequences. Furthermore, topology class labeling during a learning process enables the system to perform content-based event recognition. Experiments were carried out on various 3D videos. We showcase an application for 3D video progressive summarization using the topology dictionary.

  18. 3D, or Not to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Keith

    2012-01-01

    It may be too soon for students to be showing up for class with popcorn and gummy bears, but technology similar to that behind the 3D blockbuster movie "Avatar" is slowly finding its way into college classrooms. 3D classroom projectors are taking students on fantastic voyages inside the human body, to the ruins of ancient Greece--even to faraway…

  19. Immersive 3D Geovisualization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how immersive 3D geovisualization can be used in higher education. Based on MacEachren and Kraak's geovisualization cube, we examine the usage of immersive 3D geovisualization and its usefulness in a research-based learning module on flood risk, called GEOSimulator. Results of a survey among participating students…

  20. 3D, or Not to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Keith

    2012-01-01

    It may be too soon for students to be showing up for class with popcorn and gummy bears, but technology similar to that behind the 3D blockbuster movie "Avatar" is slowly finding its way into college classrooms. 3D classroom projectors are taking students on fantastic voyages inside the human body, to the ruins of ancient Greece--even to faraway…

  1. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  2. DOUGLAS XA3D-1 #413 AIRPLANE.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1955-07-27

    DOUGLAS XA3D-1 #413 AIRPLANE MOUNTED IN THE NACA AMES RESEARCH CENTER'S 40X80_FOOT SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL Testing the boundary layer control of the A3D in the 40 x 80 wind tunnel. Boundary layer control was added to increase the lift of the wing for take off from an aircraft carrier.

  3. DOUGLAS XA3D-1 #413 AIRPLANE.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1955-07-27

    DOUGLAS XA3D-1 #413 AIRPLANE MOUNTED IN THE NACA AMES RESEARCH CENTER'S 40X80_FOOT SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL sweptback wing Testing the wing boundary layer control of the A3D in the 40 x 80 wind tunnel. Boundary layer control was added to increase the lift of the wing for aircraft carrier take off and landing.

  4. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  5. Integration of real-time 3D image acquisition and multiview 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Li, Wei; Wang, Jingyi; Liu, Yongchun

    2014-03-01

    Seamless integration of 3D acquisition and 3D display systems offers enhanced experience in 3D visualization of the real world objects or scenes. The vivid representation of captured 3D objects displayed on a glasses-free 3D display screen could bring the realistic viewing experience to viewers as if they are viewing real-world scene. Although the technologies in 3D acquisition and 3D display have advanced rapidly in recent years, effort is lacking in studying the seamless integration of these two different aspects of 3D technologies. In this paper, we describe our recent progress on integrating a light-field 3D acquisition system and an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display for real-time light field capture and display. This paper focuses on both the architecture design and the implementation of the hardware and the software of this integrated 3D system. A prototype of the integrated 3D system is built to demonstrate the real-time 3D acquisition and 3D display capability of our proposed system.

  6. Advanced optical 3D scanners using DMD technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenstermann, P.; Godding, R.; Hermstein, M.

    2017-02-01

    Optical 3D measurement techniques are state-of-the-art for highly precise, non-contact surface scanners - not only in industrial development, but also in near-production and even in-line configurations. The need for automated systems with very high accuracy and clear implementation of national precision standards is growing extremely due to expanding international quality guidelines, increasing production transparency and new concepts related to the demands of the fourth industrial revolution. The presentation gives an overview about the present technical concepts for optical 3D scanners and their benefit for customers and various different applications - not only in quality control, but also in design centers or in medical applications. The advantages of DMD-based systems will be discussed and compared to other approaches. Looking at today's 3D scanner market, there is a confusing amount of solutions varying from lowprice solutions to high end systems. Many of them are linked to a very special target group or to special applications. The article will clarify the differences of the approaches and will discuss some key features which are necessary to render optical measurement systems suitable for industrial environments. The paper will be completed by examples for DMDbased systems, e. g. RGB true-color systems with very high accuracy like the StereoScan neo of AICON 3D Systems. Typical applications and the benefits for customers using such systems are described.

  7. A 3D printed superconducting aluminium microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Kostylev, Nikita; Tobar, Michael E.; Sercombe, Timothy B.

    2016-07-18

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals, in particular, has found a number of applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Although many techniques are used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a microwave cavity (resonant frequencies 9.9 and 11.2 GHz) 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable with the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. The result is achieved even with a very large concentration of non-superconducting silicon in the alloy of 12.18%, compared with Al-6061, which has between 0.4% and 0.8%. Our results may pave the way for the possibility of 3D printing superconducting cavity configurations that are otherwise impossible to machine.

  8. D3-D power supply, design, and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, A.

    1995-02-01

    An overview of the D3-D power supply system with information details concerning the configuration, power ratings, acquisition costs, and cost scaling relevant to the design of ITER and other tokamaks is presented. The power supplies for the D3-D tokamak were installed and commissioned during the late 1970's and the beginning of the 1980's. Several upgrades have been implemented during the last two years to solve increasing reliability problems encountered as the equipment aged, to provide enhanced operational flexibilities, and to enable operation at the higher power levels needed to provide experimental data relevant to the ITER and TPX design activities. These upgrades ranged from redesign of the power supply control systems to the replacement of vacuum circuit breakers which had become unreliable in service. A new interlock and protection system has also been implemented using the latest programmable logic controllers (PLC) and computer technology. These upgrades have been highly successful and are described to provide insight to many issues in the specification of high power converters. Power supply models used in the design of the D3-D Plasma Control System are also described along with model verification test data. These models are being used in the development of a new advanced plasma control system for the D3-D tokamak. Recent operational experience and results are presented.

  9. 3-D Terahertz Synthetic-Aperture Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Samuel C.

    Terahertz (THz) wavelengths have attracted recent interest in multiple disciplines within engineering and science. Situated between the infrared and the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum, THz energy can propagate through non-polar materials such as clothing or packaging layers. Moreover, many chemical compounds, including explosives and many drugs, reveal strong absorption signatures in the THz range. For these reasons, THz wavelengths have great potential for non-destructive evaluation and explosive detection. Three-dimensional (3-D) reflection imaging with considerable depth resolution is also possible using pulsed THz systems. While THz imaging (especially 3-D) systems typically operate in transmission mode, reflection offers the most practical configuration for standoff detection, especially for objects with high water content (like human tissue) which are opaque at THz frequencies. In this research, reflection-based THz synthetic-aperture (SA) imaging is investigated as a potential imaging solution. THz SA imaging results presented in this dissertation are unique in that a 2-D planar synthetic array was used to generate a 3-D image without relying on a narrow time-window for depth isolation cite [Shen 2005]. Novel THz chemical detection techniques are developed and combined with broadband THz SA capabilities to provide concurrent 3-D spectral imaging. All algorithms are tested with various objects and pressed pellets using a pulsed THz time-domain system in the Northwest Electromagnetics and Acoustics Research Laboratory (NEAR-Lab).

  10. A 3D printed superconducting aluminium microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals, in particular, has found a number of applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Although many techniques are used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a microwave cavity (resonant frequencies 9.9 and 11.2 GHz) 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable with the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. The result is achieved even with a very large concentration of non-superconducting silicon in the alloy of 12.18%, compared with Al-6061, which has between 0.4% and 0.8%. Our results may pave the way for the possibility of 3D printing superconducting cavity configurations that are otherwise impossible to machine.

  11. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  12. 6D Interpretation of 3D Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfray, Yannick; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We show that 3D gravity, in its pure connection formulation, admits a natural 6D interpretation. The 3D field equations for the connection are equivalent to 6D Hitchin equations for the Chern–Simons 3-form in the total space of the principal bundle over the 3-dimensional base. Turning this construction around one gets an explanation of why the pure connection formulation of 3D gravity exists. More generally, we interpret 3D gravity as the dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory. To this end, we show that any \\text{SU}(2) invariant closed 3-form in the total space of the principal \\text{SU}(2) bundle can be parametrised by a connection together with a 2-form field on the base. The dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory then gives rise to 3D gravity coupled to a topological 2-form field.

  13. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  14. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  15. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  16. Analysis of the 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f-5g supermultiplet of Fe I in laboratory and solar infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, S.; Nave, G.; Geller, M.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.; Schoenfeld, W. G.; Change, E. S.; Farmer, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    The combined laboratory and solar analysis of the highly excited subconfigurations 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f and 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)5g of Fe I has allowed us to classify 87 lines of the 4f-5g supermultiplet in the spectral region 2545-2585 per cm. The level structure of these JK-coupled configurations is predicted by semiempirical calculations and the quardrupolic approximation. Semiempirical gf-values have been calculated and are compared to gf-values derived from the solar spectrum. The solar analysis has shown that these lines, which should be much less sensitive than lower excitation lines to departures from Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) and to temperature uncertanties, lead to a solar abundance of iron which is consistent with the meteoritic value (A(sub Fe) = 7.51).

  17. Analysis of the 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f-5g supermultiplet of Fe I in laboratory and solar infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, S.; Nave, G.; Geller, M.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.; Schoenfeld, W. G.; Change, E. S.; Farmer, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    The combined laboratory and solar analysis of the highly excited subconfigurations 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f and 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)5g of Fe I has allowed us to classify 87 lines of the 4f-5g supermultiplet in the spectral region 2545-2585 per cm. The level structure of these JK-coupled configurations is predicted by semiempirical calculations and the quardrupolic approximation. Semiempirical gf-values have been calculated and are compared to gf-values derived from the solar spectrum. The solar analysis has shown that these lines, which should be much less sensitive than lower excitation lines to departures from Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) and to temperature uncertanties, lead to a solar abundance of iron which is consistent with the meteoritic value (A(sub Fe) = 7.51).

  18. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  19. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D presentations could provide additional sensorial cues (e.g., depth cues) that lead to a higher sense of being surrounded by the stimulus; a connection through general interest such that 3D presentation increases a viewer’s interest that leads to greater attention paid to the stimulus (e.g., "involvement"); and a connection through discomfort, with the 3D goggles causing discomfort that interferes with involvement and thus with memory. The memories of 396 participants who viewed two-dimensional (2D) or 3D movies at movie theaters in Southern California were tested. Within three days of viewing a movie, participants filled out an online anonymous questionnaire that queried them about their movie content memories, subjective movie-going experiences (including emotional reactions and "presence") and demographic backgrounds. The responses to the questionnaire were subjected to path analyses in which several different links between 3D presentation to memory (and other variables) were explored. The results showed there were no effects of 3D presentation, either directly or indirectly, upon memory. However, the largest effects of 3D presentation were on emotions and immersion, with 3D presentation leading to reduced positive emotions, increased negative emotions and lowered immersion, compared to 2D presentations. PMID:28078331

  20. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.