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Sample records for 3d feature profile

  1. Assist feature printability prediction by 3-D resist profile reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xin; Huang, Jensheng; Chin, Fook; Kazarian, Aram; Kuo, Chun-Chieh

    2012-06-01

    properties may then be used to optimize the printability vs. efficacy of an SRAF either prior to or during an Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) run. The process models that are used during OPC have never been able to reliably predict which SRAFs will print. This appears to be due to the fact that OPC process models are generally created using data that does not include printed subresolution patterns. An enhancement to compact modeling capability to predict Assist Features (AF) printability is developed and discussed. A hypsometric map representing 3-D resist profile was built by applying a first principle approximation to estimate the "energy loss" from the resist top to bottom. Such a 3-D resist profile is an extrapolation of a well calibrated traditional OPC model without any additional information. Assist features are detected at either top of resist (dark field) or bottom of resist (bright field). Such detection can be done by just extracting top or bottom resist models from our 3-D resist model. There is no measurement of assist features needed when we build AF but it can be included if interested but focusing on resist calibration to account for both exposure dosage and focus change sensitivities. This approach significantly increases resist model's capability for predicting printed SRAF accuracy. And we don't need to calibrate an SRAF model in addition to the OPC model. Without increase in computation time, this compact model can draw assist feature contour with real placement and size at any vertical plane. The result is compared and validated with 3-D rigorous modeling as well as SEM images. Since this method does not change any form of compact modeling, it can be integrated into current MBAF solutions without any additional work.

  2. 3D-profile measurement of advanced semiconductor features by reference metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Iwaki, Yuuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Kawada, Hiroki; Ikota, Masami; Lorusso, Gian F.; Horiguchi, Naoto

    2016-03-01

    A method of sub-nanometer uncertainty for the 3D-profile measurement using TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) images is proposed to standardize 3D-profile measurement through reference metrology. The proposed method has been validated for profiles of Si lines, photoresist features and advanced-FinFET (Fin-shaped Field-Effect Transistor) features in our previous investigations. However, efficiency of 3D-profile measurement using TEM is limited by measurement time including processing of the sample. In this article, we demonstrate a novel on-wafer 3D-profile metrology as "FIB-to-CDSEM method" with FIB (Focused Ion Beam) slope cut and CD-SEM (Critical Dimension Secondary Electron Microscope) measuring. Using the method, a few micrometer wide on a wafer is coated and cut by 45 degree slope using FIB tool. Then, the wafer is transferred to CD-SEM to measure the cross section image by top down CD-SEM measurement. We apply FIB-to-CDSEM method to CMOS sensor device. 3D-profile and 3D-profile parameters such as top line width and side wall angles of CMOS sensor device are evaluated. The 3D-profile parameters also are measured by TEM images as reference metrology. We compare the 3D-profile parameters by TEM method and FIB-to-CDSEM method. The average values and correlations on the wafer are agreed well between TEM and FIB-to- CDSEM methods.

  3. Towards automated firearm identification based on high resolution 3D data: rotation-invariant features for multiple line-profile-measurement of firing pin shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Understanding and evaluation of potential evidence, as well as evaluation of automated systems for forensic examinations currently play an important role within the domain of digital crime scene analysis. The application of 3D sensing and pattern recognition systems for automatic extraction and comparison of firearm related tool marks is an evolving field of research within this domain. In this context, the design and evaluation of rotation-invariant features for use on topography data play a particular important role. In this work, we propose and evaluate a 3D imaging system along with two novel features based on topography data and multiple profile-measurement-lines for automatic matching of firing pin shapes. Our test set contains 72 cartridges of three manufactures shot by six different 9mm guns. The entire pattern recognition workflow is addressed. This includes the application of confocal microscopy for data acquisition, preprocessing covers outlier handling, data normalization, as well as necessary segmentation and registration. Feature extraction involves the two introduced features for automatic comparison and matching of 3D firing pin shapes. The introduced features are called `Multiple-Circle-Path' (MCP) and `Multiple-Angle-Path' (MAP). Basically both features are compositions of freely configurable amounts of circular or straight path-lines combined with statistical evaluations. During the first part of evaluation (E1), we examine how well it is possible to differentiate between two 9mm weapons of the same mark and model. During second part (E2), we evaluate the discrimination accuracy regarding the set of six different 9mm guns. During the third part (E3), we evaluate the performance of the features in consideration of different rotation angles. In terms of E1, the best correct classification rate is 100% and in terms of E2 the best result is 86%. The preliminary results for E3 indicate robustness of both features regarding rotation. However, in future

  4. Feature detection on 3D images of dental imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Marielle; Laurendeau, Denis

    1994-09-01

    A computer vision approach for the extraction of feature points on 3D images of dental imprints is presented. The position of feature points are needed for the measurement of a set of parameters for automatic diagnosis of malocclusion problems in orthodontics. The system for the acquisition of the 3D profile of the imprint, the procedure for the detection of the interstices between teeth, and the approach for the identification of the type of tooth are described, as well as the algorithm for the reconstruction of the surface of each type of tooth. A new approach for the detection of feature points, called the watershed algorithm, is described in detail. The algorithm is a two-stage procedure which tracks the position of local minima at four different scales and produces a final map of the position of the minima. Experimental results of the application of the watershed algorithm on actual 3D images of dental imprints are presented for molars, premolars and canines. The segmentation approach for the analysis of the shape of incisors is also described in detail.

  5. Standard Features and Their Impact on 3D Engineering Graphics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldenmeyer, K. M.; Hartman, N. W.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of feature-based 3D modeling in industry has necessitated the accumulation and maintenance of standard feature libraries. Currently, firms who use standard features to design parts are storing and utilizing these libraries through their existing product data management (PDM) systems. Standard features have enabled companies to…

  6. Registration of 3D spectral OCT volumes using 3D SIFT feature point matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Lee, Kyungmoo; van Ginneken, Bram; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2009-02-01

    The recent introduction of next generation spectral OCT scanners has enabled routine acquisition of high resolution, 3D cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina. 3D OCT is used in the detection and management of serious eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. For follow-up studies, image registration is a vital tool to enable more precise, quantitative comparison of disease states. This work presents a registration method based on a recently introduced extension of the 2D Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) framework1 to 3D.2 The SIFT feature extractor locates minima and maxima in the difference of Gaussian scale space to find salient feature points. It then uses histograms of the local gradient directions around each found extremum in 3D to characterize them in a 4096 element feature vector. Matching points are found by comparing the distance between feature vectors. We apply this method to the rigid registration of optic nerve head- (ONH) and macula-centered 3D OCT scans of the same patient that have only limited overlap. Three OCT data set pairs with known deformation were used for quantitative assessment of the method's robustness and accuracy when deformations of rotation and scaling were considered. Three-dimensional registration accuracy of 2.0+/-3.3 voxels was observed. The accuracy was assessed as average voxel distance error in N=1572 matched locations. The registration method was applied to 12 3D OCT scans (200 x 200 x 1024 voxels) of 6 normal eyes imaged in vivo to demonstrate the clinical utility and robustness of the method in a real-world environment.

  7. Learning the spherical harmonic features for 3-D face recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peijiang; Wang, Yunhong; Huang, Di; Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Liming

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a competitive method for 3-D face recognition (FR) using spherical harmonic features (SHF) is proposed. With this solution, 3-D face models are characterized by the energies contained in spherical harmonics with different frequencies, thereby enabling the capture of both gross shape and fine surface details of a 3-D facial surface. This is in clear contrast to most 3-D FR techniques which are either holistic or feature based, using local features extracted from distinctive points. First, 3-D face models are represented in a canonical representation, namely, spherical depth map, by which SHF can be calculated. Then, considering the predictive contribution of each SHF feature, especially in the presence of facial expression and occlusion, feature selection methods are used to improve the predictive performance and provide faster and more cost-effective predictors. Experiments have been carried out on three public 3-D face datasets, SHREC2007, FRGC v2.0, and Bosphorus, with increasing difficulties in terms of facial expression, pose, and occlusion, and which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:23060332

  8. Random-Profiles-Based 3D Face Recognition System

    PubMed Central

    Joongrock, Kim; Sunjin, Yu; Sangyoun, Lee

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a noble nonintrusive three-dimensional (3D) face modeling system for random-profile-based 3D face recognition is presented. Although recent two-dimensional (2D) face recognition systems can achieve a reliable recognition rate under certain conditions, their performance is limited by internal and external changes, such as illumination and pose variation. To address these issues, 3D face recognition, which uses 3D face data, has recently received much attention. However, the performance of 3D face recognition highly depends on the precision of acquired 3D face data, while also requiring more computational power and storage capacity than 2D face recognition systems. In this paper, we present a developed nonintrusive 3D face modeling system composed of a stereo vision system and an invisible near-infrared line laser, which can be directly applied to profile-based 3D face recognition. We further propose a novel random-profile-based 3D face recognition method that is memory-efficient and pose-invariant. The experimental results demonstrate that the reconstructed 3D face data consists of more than 50 k 3D point clouds and a reliable recognition rate against pose variation. PMID:24691101

  9. Insights into Plasma Etch Profile Evolution with 3D Profile Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Paterson, Alex; Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma etching is critical for pattern transfer in microelectronics fabrication. For planar devices, efforts in 2D etch profile simulations were sufficient to understand critical etch process mechanisms. In contrast, to understand the complex mechanisms in etching 3D structures of current technology nodes such as FinFETs, 2D profile simulators are inadequate. In this paper, we report on development of a 3D profile simulation platform, the Monte Carlo Feature Profile Model (MCFPM-3D). The MCFPM-3D builds upon the 2D MCFPM platform that includes aspects such as mixing, implantation, and photon assisted processes and addresses reaction mechanisms in surface etching, sputtering, and deposition to predict profile evolution. Model inputs include fluxes of species from plasma derived from the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). Test cases of Si/SiO2 etching in Ar/Cl2 and Ar/CF4/O2 plasmas for representative 2D/3D feature topographies are considered and phenomena such as selectivity and aspect ratio dependent etching will be discussed.

  10. Comparison of protein structures using 3D profile alignment.

    PubMed

    Suyama, M; Matsuo, Y; Nishikawa, K

    1997-01-01

    A novel method for protein structure comparison using 3D profile alignment is presented. The 3D profile is a position-dependent scoring matrix derived from three-dimensional structures and is basically used to estimate sequence-structure compatibility for prediction of protein structure. Our idea is to compare two 3D profiles using a dynamic programming algorithm to obtain optimal alignment and a similarity score between them. When the 3D profile of hemoglobin was compared with each of the profiles in the library, which contained 325 profiles of representative structures, all the profiles of other globins were detected with relatively high scores, and proteins in the same structural class followed the globins. Exhaustive comparison of 3D profiles in the library was also performed to depict protein relatedness in the structure space. Using multidimensional scaling, a planar projection of points in the protein structure space revealed an overall grouping in terms of structural classes, i.e., all-alpha, all-beta, alpha/beta, and alpha+beta. These results differ in implication from those obtained by the conventional structure-structure comparison method. Differences are discussed with respect to the structural divergence of proteins in the course of molecular evolution. PMID:9071025

  11. Automated Recognition of 3D Features in GPIR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Stough, Timothy; Fijany, Amir

    2007-01-01

    A method of automated recognition of three-dimensional (3D) features in images generated by ground-penetrating imaging radar (GPIR) is undergoing development. GPIR 3D images can be analyzed to detect and identify such subsurface features as pipes and other utility conduits. Until now, much of the analysis of GPIR images has been performed manually by expert operators who must visually identify and track each feature. The present method is intended to satisfy a need for more efficient and accurate analysis by means of algorithms that can automatically identify and track subsurface features, with minimal supervision by human operators. In this method, data from multiple sources (for example, data on different features extracted by different algorithms) are fused together for identifying subsurface objects. The algorithms of this method can be classified in several different ways. In one classification, the algorithms fall into three classes: (1) image-processing algorithms, (2) feature- extraction algorithms, and (3) a multiaxis data-fusion/pattern-recognition algorithm that includes a combination of machine-learning, pattern-recognition, and object-linking algorithms. The image-processing class includes preprocessing algorithms for reducing noise and enhancing target features for pattern recognition. The feature-extraction algorithms operate on preprocessed data to extract such specific features in images as two-dimensional (2D) slices of a pipe. Then the multiaxis data-fusion/ pattern-recognition algorithm identifies, classifies, and reconstructs 3D objects from the extracted features. In this process, multiple 2D features extracted by use of different algorithms and representing views along different directions are used to identify and reconstruct 3D objects. In object linking, which is an essential part of this process, features identified in successive 2D slices and located within a threshold radius of identical features in adjacent slices are linked in a

  12. Dynamical Systems Analysis of Fully 3D Ocean Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Dynamical systems analysis of transport and stirring processes has been developed most thoroughly for 2D flow fields. The calculation of manifolds, turnstile lobes, transport barriers, etc. based on observations of the ocean is most often conducted near the sea surface, whereas analyses at depth, usually carried out with model output, is normally confined to constant-z surfaces. At the meoscale and larger, ocean flows are quasi 2D, but smaller scale (submesoscale) motions, including mixed layer phenomena with significant vertical velocity, may be predominantly 3D. The zoology of hyperbolic trajectories becomes richer in such cases and their attendant manifolds are much more difficult to calculate. I will describe some of the basic geometrical features and corresponding Lagrangian Coherent Features expected to arise in upper ocean fronts, eddies, and Langmuir circulations. Traditional GFD models such as the rotating can flow may capture the important generic features. The dynamical systems approach is most helpful when these features are coherent and persistent and the implications and difficulties for this requirement in fully 3D flows will also be discussed.

  13. THE THOMSON SURFACE. III. TRACKING FEATURES IN 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E.; Tappin, S. J.; Odstrcil, D.

    2013-03-01

    In this, the final installment in a three-part series on the Thomson surface, we present simulated observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by a hypothetical polarizing white light heliospheric imager. Thomson scattering yields a polarization signal that can be exploited to locate observed features in three dimensions relative to the Thomson surface. We consider how the appearance of the CME changes with the direction of trajectory, using simulations of a simple geometrical shape and also of a more realistic CME generated using the ENLIL model. We compare the appearance in both unpolarized B and polarized pB light, and show that there is a quantifiable difference in the measured brightness of a CME between unpolarized and polarized observations. We demonstrate a technique for using this difference to extract the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory of large objects such as CMEs. We conclude with a discussion on how a polarizing heliospheric imager could be used to extract 3D trajectory information about CMEs or other observed features.

  14. Feature-Based Quality Evaluation of 3d Point Clouds - Study of the Performance of 3d Registration Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridene, T.; Goulette, F.; Chendeb, S.

    2013-08-01

    The production of realistic 3D map databases is continuously growing. We studied an approach of 3D mapping database producing based on the fusion of heterogeneous 3D data. In this term, a rigid registration process was performed. Before starting the modeling process, we need to validate the quality of the registration results, and this is one of the most difficult and open research problems. In this paper, we suggest a new method of evaluation of 3D point clouds based on feature extraction and comparison with a 2D reference model. This method is based on tow metrics: binary and fuzzy.

  15. Process monitor of 3D-device features by using FIB and CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Hiroki; Ikota, Masami; Sakai, Hideo; Torikawa, Shota; Tomimatsu, Satoshi; Onishi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    For yield improvement of 3D-device manufacturing, metrology for the variability of individual device-features is on hot issue. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) can be used for monitoring the individual cross-section. However, efficiency of process monitoring is limited by the speed of measurement including preparation of lamella sample. In this work we demonstrate speedy 3D-profile measurement of individual line-features without the lamella sampling. For instance, we make a-few-micrometer-wide and 45-degree-descending slope in dense line-features by using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) tool capable of 300mm-wafer. On the descending slope, obliquely cut cross-section of the line features appears. Then, we transfer the wafer to Critical-Dimension Secondary Electron Microscope (CDSEM) to measure the oblique cross-section in normal top-down view. As the descending angle is 45 degrees, the oblique cross-section looks like a cross-section normal to the wafer surface. For every single line-features the 3D dimensions are measured. To the reference metrology of the Scanning TEM (STEM), nanometric linearity and precision are confirmed for the height and the width under the hard mask of the line features. Without cleaving wafer the 60 cells on the wafer can be measured in 3 hours, which allows us of near-line process monitor of in-wafer uniformity.

  16. Combination of 3D skin surface texture features and 2D ABCD features for improved melanoma diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; John, Nigel W; Smith, Lyndon; Sun, Jiuai; Smith, Melvyn

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional asymmetry, border irregularity, colour variegation and diameter (ABCD) features are important indicators currently used for computer-assisted diagnosis of malignant melanoma (MM); however, they often prove to be insufficient to make a convincing diagnosis. Previous work has demonstrated that 3D skin surface normal features in the form of tilt and slant pattern disruptions are promising new features independent from the existing 2D ABCD features. This work investigates that whether improved lesion classification can be achieved by combining the 3D features with the 2D ABCD features. Experiments using a nonlinear support vector machine classifier show that many combinations of the 2D ABCD features and the 3D features can give substantially better classification accuracy than using (1) single features and (2) many combinations of the 2D ABCD features. The best 2D and 3D feature combination includes the overall 3D skin surface disruption, the asymmetry and all the three colour channel features. It gives an overall 87.8 % successful classification, which is better than the best single feature with 78.0 % and the best 2D feature combination with 83.1 %. These demonstrate that (1) the 3D features have additive values to improve the existing lesion classification and (2) combining the 3D feature with all the 2D features does not lead to the best lesion classification. The two ABCD features not selected by the best 2D and 3D combination, namely (1) the border feature and (2) the diameter feature, were also studied in separate experiments. It found that inclusion of either feature in the 2D and 3D combination can successfully classify 3 out of 4 lesion groups. The only one group not accurately classified by either feature can be classified satisfactorily by the other. In both cases, they have shown better classification performances than those without the 3D feature in the combinations. This further demonstrates that (1) the 3D feature can be used to

  17. Registration of 3-D images using weighted geometrical features

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, C.R. Jr.; Aboutanos, G.B.; Dawant, B.M.; Maciunas, R.J.; Fitzpatrick, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper, the authors present a weighted geometrical features (WGF) registration algorithm. Its efficacy is demonstrated by combining points and a surface. The technique is an extension of Besl and McKay`s iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. The authors use the WGF algorithm to register X-ray computed tomography (CT) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) volume head images acquired from eleven patients that underwent craniotomies in a neurosurgical clinical trial. Each patient had five external markers attached to transcutaneous posts screwed into the outer table of the skull. The authors define registration error as the distance between positions of corresponding markers that are not used for registration. The CT and MR images are registered using fiducial points (marker positions) only, a surface only, and various weighted combinations of points and a surface. The CT surface is derived from contours corresponding to the inner surface of the skull. The MR surface is derived from contours corresponding to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-dura interface. Registration using points and a surface is found to be significantly more accurate than registration using only points or a surface.

  18. Feature edge extraction from 3D triangular meshes using a thinning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Masaru; Hamada, Nozomu

    2001-11-01

    Highly detailed geometric models, which are represented as dense triangular meshes are becoming popular in computer graphics. Since such 3D meshes often have huge information, we require some methods to treat them efficiently in the 3D mesh processing such as, surface simplification, subdivision surface, curved surface approximation and morphing. In these applications, we often extract features of 3D meshes such as feature vertices and feature edges in preprocessing step. An automatic extraction method of feature edges is treated in this study. In order to realize the feature edge extraction method, we first introduce the concavity and convexity evaluation value. Then the histogram of the concavity and convexity evaluation value is used to separate the feature edge region. We apply a thinning algorithm, which is used in 2D binary image processing. It is shown that the proposed method can extract appropriate feature edges from 3D meshes.

  19. Semantic 3D scene interpretation: A framework combining optimal neighborhood size selection with relevant features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Jutzi, B.; Mallet, C.

    2014-08-01

    3D scene analysis by automatically assigning 3D points a semantic label has become an issue of major interest in recent years. Whereas the tasks of feature extraction and classification have been in the focus of research, the idea of using only relevant and more distinctive features extracted from optimal 3D neighborhoods has only rarely been addressed in 3D lidar data processing. In this paper, we focus on the interleaved issue of extracting relevant, but not redundant features and increasing their distinctiveness by considering the respective optimal 3D neighborhood of each individual 3D point. We present a new, fully automatic and versatile framework consisting of four successive steps: (i) optimal neighborhood size selection, (ii) feature extraction, (iii) feature selection, and (iv) classification. In a detailed evaluation which involves 5 different neighborhood definitions, 21 features, 6 approaches for feature subset selection and 2 different classifiers, we demonstrate that optimal neighborhoods for individual 3D points significantly improve the results of scene interpretation and that the selection of adequate feature subsets may even further increase the quality of the derived results.

  20. Medical image retrieval system using multiple features from 3D ROIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongbing; Wang, Weiwei; Liao, Qimei; Zhang, Guopeng; Zhou, Zhiming

    2012-02-01

    Compared to a retrieval using global image features, features extracted from regions of interest (ROIs) that reflect distribution patterns of abnormalities would benefit more for content-based medical image retrieval (CBMIR) systems. Currently, most CBMIR systems have been designed for 2D ROIs, which cannot reflect 3D anatomical features and region distribution of lesions comprehensively. To further improve the accuracy of image retrieval, we proposed a retrieval method with 3D features including both geometric features such as Shape Index (SI) and Curvedness (CV) and texture features derived from 3D Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix, which were extracted from 3D ROIs, based on our previous 2D medical images retrieval system. The system was evaluated with 20 volume CT datasets for colon polyp detection. Preliminary experiments indicated that the integration of morphological features with texture features could improve retrieval performance greatly. The retrieval result using features extracted from 3D ROIs accorded better with the diagnosis from optical colonoscopy than that based on features from 2D ROIs. With the test database of images, the average accuracy rate for 3D retrieval method was 76.6%, indicating its potential value in clinical application.

  1. Morphological features of the macerated cranial bones registered by the 3D vision system for potential use in forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Skrzat, Janusz; Sioma, Andrzej; Kozerska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present potential usage of the 3D vision system for registering features of the macerated cranial bones. Applied 3D vision system collects height profiles of the object surface and from that data builds a three-dimensional image of the surface. This method appeared to be accurate enough to capture anatomical details of the macerated bones. With the aid of the 3D vision system we generated images of the surface of the human calvaria which was used for testing the system. Performed reconstruction visualized the imprints of the dural vascular system, cranial sutures, and the three-layer structure of the cranial bones observed in the cross-section. We figure out that the 3D vision system may deliver data which can enhance estimation of sex from the osteological material. PMID:24858457

  2. 3D printed polymers toxicity profiling: a caution for biodevice applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Skommer, Joanna; Friedrich, Timo; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-01

    A recent revolution in additive manufacturing technologies and access to 3D Computer Assisted Design (CAD) software has spurred an explosive growth of new technologies in biomedical engineering. This includes biomodels for diagnosis, surgical training, hard and soft tissue replacement, biodevices and tissue engineering. Moreover, recent developments in high-definition additive manufacturing systems such as Multi-Jet Modelling (MJM) and Stereolithography (SLA), capable of reproducing feature sizes close to 100 μm, promise brand new capabilities in fabrication of optical-grade biomicrofluidic Lab-on-a-Chip and MEMS devices. Compared with other rapid prototyping technologies such as soft lithography and infrared laser micromachining in PMMA, SLA and MJM systems can enable user-friendly production of prototypes, superior feature reproduction quality and comparable levels of optical transparency. Prospectively they can revolutionize fabrication of microfluidic devices with complex geometric features and eliminate the need to use clean room environment and conventional microfabrication techniques. In this work we demonstrate preliminary data on toxicity profiling of a panel of common polymers used in 3D printing applications. The main motivation of our work was to evaluate toxicity profiles of most commonly used polymers using standardized biotests according to OECD guidelines for testing of chemic risk assessment. Our work for the first time provides a multispecies view of potential dangers and limitation for building biocompatible devices using FDM, SLA and MJM additive manufacturing systems. Our work shows that additive manufacturing holds significant promise for fabricating LOC and MEMS but requires caution when selecting systems and polymers due to toxicity exhibited by some 3D printing polymers.

  3. Dielectrophoretic isolation of cells using 3D microelectrodes featuring castellated blocks.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaoxing; Yobas, Levent

    2015-05-21

    We present 3D microelectrodes featuring castellated blocks for dielectrophoretically isolating cells. These electrodes provide a more effective dielectrophoretic force field than thin-film surface electrodes and yet immobilize cells near stagnation points across a parabolic flow profile for enhanced cell viability and separation efficiency. Unlike known volumetric electrodes with linear profiles, the electrodes with structural variations introduced along their depth scale are versatile for constructing monolithic structures with readily integrated fluidic paths. This is exemplified here in the design of an interdigitated comb array wherein electrodes with castellated surfaces serve as building blocks and form digits with an array of fluidic pores. Activation of the design with low-voltage oscillations (±5 Vp, 400 kHz) is found adequate for retaining most viable cells (90.2% ± 3.5%) while removing nonviable cells (88.5% ± 5%) at an increased throughput (5 × 10(5) cells h(-1)). The electrodes, despite their intricate profile, are structured into single-crystal silicon through a self-aligned etching process without a precision layer-by-layer assembly. PMID:25857455

  4. A practical salient region feature based 3D multi-modality registration method for medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Wolz, Gabriele; Sun, Yiyong; Hornegger, Joachim; Sauer, Frank; Kuwert, Torsten; Xu, Chenyang

    2006-03-01

    We present a novel representation of 3D salient region features and its integration into a hybrid rigid-body registration framework. We adopt scale, translation and rotation invariance properties of those intrinsic 3D features to estimate a transform between underlying mono- or multi-modal 3D medical images. Our method combines advantageous aspects of both feature- and intensity-based approaches and consists of three steps: an automatic extraction of a set of 3D salient region features on each image, a robust estimation of correspondences and their sub-pixel accurate refinement with outliers elimination. We propose a region-growing based approach for the extraction of 3D salient region features, a solution to the problem of feature clustering and a reduction of the correspondence search space complexity. Results of the developed algorithm are presented for both mono- and multi-modal intra-patient 3D image pairs (CT, PET and SPECT) that have been acquired for change detection, tumor localization, and time based intra-person studies. The accuracy of the method is clinically evaluated by a medical expert with an approach that measures the distance between a set of selected corresponding points consisting of both anatomical and functional structures or lesion sites. This demonstrates the robustness of the proposed method to image overlap, missing information and artefacts. We conclude by discussing potential medical applications and possibilities for integration into a non-rigid registration framework.

  5. A Multiscale Constraints Method Localization of 3D Facial Feature Points

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-an; Zhang, Yongxin; Li, Zhanli; Li, Huilin

    2015-01-01

    It is an important task to locate facial feature points due to the widespread application of 3D human face models in medical fields. In this paper, we propose a 3D facial feature point localization method that combines the relative angle histograms with multiscale constraints. Firstly, the relative angle histogram of each vertex in a 3D point distribution model is calculated; then the cluster set of the facial feature points is determined using the cluster algorithm. Finally, the feature points are located precisely according to multiscale integral features. The experimental results show that the feature point localization accuracy of this algorithm is better than that of the localization method using the relative angle histograms. PMID:26539244

  6. A novel 3D wavelet based filter for visualizing features in noisy biological data

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W C; Haase, S; Lyle, J M; Agard, D A; Sedat, J W

    2005-01-05

    We have developed a 3D wavelet-based filter for visualizing structural features in volumetric data. The only variable parameter is a characteristic linear size of the feature of interest. The filtered output contains only those regions that are correlated with the characteristic size, thus denoising the image. We demonstrate the use of the filter by applying it to 3D data from a variety of electron microscopy samples including low contrast vitreous ice cryogenic preparations, as well as 3D optical microscopy specimens.

  7. MPEG-2 multiview profile and its application in 3D TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuemin; Luthra, Ajay

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in the technology of digital video compression, transmission and displays have made the multiple viewpoint digital video viable for many applications, e.g. stereoscopic view for 3D TV and arbitrary angle scene compositing for virtual camera, etc. To facilitate these applications the Motion Pictures Experts Group (MPEG) of the International Standards Organization (ISO), that successfully created the MPEG-1 & 2 standards, has been working on amending the MPEG-2 standard to create a new MPEG-2 profile, called the Multi-View Profile (MVP). MVP features a two-layer -- base layer and enhancement layer -- video coding scheme. The base layer video is coded as MPEG-2 main profile (MP) bitstream. The enhancement layer video is coded with temporal scalability tools and exploits the correlation between the two viewing angles to improve the compression efficiency. This type of two layer approach guarantees backward and forward compatibility with main profile receivers and encoders; i.e. an MVP decoder will be able to decode any main profile bit stream at the same level and a main profile receiver will be able to decode the base layer of an MVP stream to generate and display mono view scenes of the same program. In stereoscopic video applications the base layer is assigned to the left eye view and the enhancement layer to the right eye view. This paper provides an overview of the MPEG-2 MVP and focuses in detail on the stereoscopic video compression algorithms.

  8. Fuzzy zoning for feature matching technique in 3D reconstruction of nasal endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Rattanalappaiboon, Surapong; Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Ritthipravat, Panrasee

    2015-12-01

    3D reconstruction from nasal endoscopic images greatly supports an otolaryngologist in examining nasal passages, mucosa, polyps, sinuses, and nasopharyx. In general, structure from motion is a popular technique. It consists of four main steps; (1) camera calibration, (2) feature extraction, (3) feature matching, and (4) 3D reconstruction. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm is normally used for both feature extraction and feature matching. However, SIFT algorithm relatively consumes computational time particularly in the feature matching process because each feature in an image of interest is compared with all features in the subsequent image in order to find the best matched pair. A fuzzy zoning approach is developed for confining feature matching area. Matching between two corresponding features from different images can be efficiently performed. With this approach, it can greatly reduce the matching time. The proposed technique is tested with endoscopic images created from phantoms and compared with the original SIFT technique in terms of the matching time and average errors of the reconstructed models. Finally, original SIFT and the proposed fuzzy-based technique are applied to 3D model reconstruction of real nasal cavity based on images taken from a rigid nasal endoscope. The results showed that the fuzzy-based approach was significantly faster than traditional SIFT technique and provided similar quality of the 3D models. It could be used for creating a nasal cavity taken by a rigid nasal endoscope. PMID:26498516

  9. Early detection of skin cancer via terahertz spectral profiling and 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Anis; Rahman, Aunik K; Rao, Babar

    2016-08-15

    Terahertz scanning reflectometry, terahertz 3D imaging and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy have been used to identify features in human skin biopsy samples diagnosed for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and compared with healthy skin samples. It was found from the 3D images that the healthy skin samples exhibit regular cellular pattern while the BCC skin samples indicate lack of regular cell pattern. The skin is a highly layered structure organ; this is evident from the thickness profile via a scan through the thickness of the healthy skin samples, where, the reflected intensity of the terahertz beam exhibits fluctuations originating from different skin layers. Compared to the healthy skin samples, the BCC samples' profiles exhibit significantly diminished layer definition; thus indicating a lack of cellular order. In addition, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy reveals significant and quantifiable differences between the healthy and BCC skin samples. Thus, a combination of three different terahertz techniques constitutes a conclusive route for detecting the BCC condition on a cellular level compared to the healthy skin. PMID:27040943

  10. Feature relevance assessment for the semantic interpretation of 3D point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Jutzi, B.; Mallet, C.

    2013-10-01

    The automatic analysis of large 3D point clouds represents a crucial task in photogrammetry, remote sensing and computer vision. In this paper, we propose a new methodology for the semantic interpretation of such point clouds which involves feature relevance assessment in order to reduce both processing time and memory consumption. Given a standard benchmark dataset with 1.3 million 3D points, we first extract a set of 21 geometric 3D and 2D features. Subsequently, we apply a classifier-independent ranking procedure which involves a general relevance metric in order to derive compact and robust subsets of versatile features which are generally applicable for a large variety of subsequent tasks. This metric is based on 7 different feature selection strategies and thus addresses different intrinsic properties of the given data. For the example of semantically interpreting 3D point cloud data, we demonstrate the great potential of smaller subsets consisting of only the most relevant features with 4 different state-of-the-art classifiers. The results reveal that, instead of including as many features as possible in order to compensate for lack of knowledge, a crucial task such as scene interpretation can be carried out with only few versatile features and even improved accuracy.

  11. 3D Palmprint Identification Using Block-Wise Features and Collaborative Representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongyu; Lu, Jianwei

    2015-08-01

    Developing 3D palmprint recognition systems has recently begun to draw attention of researchers. Compared with its 2D counterpart, 3D palmprint has several unique merits. However, most of the existing 3D palmprint matching methods are designed for one-to-one verification and they are not efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we fill this gap by proposing a collaborative representation (CR) based framework with l1-norm or l2-norm regularizations for 3D palmprint identification. The effects of different regularization terms have been evaluated in experiments. To use the CR-based classification framework, one key issue is how to extract feature vectors. To this end, we propose a block-wise statistics based feature extraction scheme. We divide a 3D palmprint ROI into uniform blocks and extract a histogram of surface types from each block; histograms from all blocks are then concatenated to form a feature vector. Such feature vectors are highly discriminative and are robust to mere misalignment. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed CR-based framework with an l2-norm regularization term can achieve much better recognition accuracy than the other methods. More importantly, its computational complexity is extremely low, making it quite suitable for the large-scale identification application. Source codes are available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/cr3dpalm/cr3dpalm.htm. PMID:26353008

  12. Uniform Local Binary Pattern Based Texture-Edge Feature for 3D Human Behavior Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Yue; Wang, Guangchao; Fan, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of 3D somatosensory technology, human behavior recognition has become an important research field. Human behavior feature analysis has evolved from traditional 2D features to 3D features. In order to improve the performance of human activity recognition, a human behavior recognition method is proposed, which is based on a hybrid texture-edge local pattern coding feature extraction and integration of RGB and depth videos information. The paper mainly focuses on background subtraction on RGB and depth video sequences of behaviors, extracting and integrating historical images of the behavior outlines, feature extraction and classification. The new method of 3D human behavior recognition has achieved the rapid and efficient recognition of behavior videos. A large number of experiments show that the proposed method has faster speed and higher recognition rate. The recognition method has good robustness for different environmental colors, lightings and other factors. Meanwhile, the feature of mixed texture-edge uniform local binary pattern can be used in most 3D behavior recognition. PMID:25942404

  13. Uniform Local Binary Pattern Based Texture-Edge Feature for 3D Human Behavior Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yue; Wang, Guangchao; Fan, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of 3D somatosensory technology, human behavior recognition has become an important research field. Human behavior feature analysis has evolved from traditional 2D features to 3D features. In order to improve the performance of human activity recognition, a human behavior recognition method is proposed, which is based on a hybrid texture-edge local pattern coding feature extraction and integration of RGB and depth videos information. The paper mainly focuses on background subtraction on RGB and depth video sequences of behaviors, extracting and integrating historical images of the behavior outlines, feature extraction and classification. The new method of 3D human behavior recognition has achieved the rapid and efficient recognition of behavior videos. A large number of experiments show that the proposed method has faster speed and higher recognition rate. The recognition method has good robustness for different environmental colors, lightings and other factors. Meanwhile, the feature of mixed texture-edge uniform local binary pattern can be used in most 3D behavior recognition. PMID:25942404

  14. Bone segmentation and fracture detection in ultrasound using 3D local phase features.

    PubMed

    Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Hodgson, Antony; Rohling, Robert

    2008-01-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is increasingly considered as a viable alternative imaging modality in computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) applications. Automatic bone segmentation from US images, however, remains a challenge due to speckle noise and various other artifacts inherent to US. In this paper, we present intensity invariant three dimensional (3D) local image phase features, obtained using 3D Log-Gabor filter banks, for extracting ridge-like features similar to those that occur at soft tissue/bone interfaces. Our contributions include the novel extension of 2D phase symmetry features to 3D and their use in automatic extraction of bone surfaces and fractured fragments in 3D US. We validate our technique using phantom, in vitro, and in vivo experiments. Qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate remarkably clear segmentations results of bone surfaces with a localization accuracy of better than 0.62 mm and mean errors in estimating fracture displacements below 0.65 mm, which will likely be of strong clinical utility. PMID:18979759

  15. 3D automatic liver segmentation using feature-constrained Mahalanobis distance in CT images.

    PubMed

    Salman Al-Shaikhli, Saif Dawood; Yang, Michael Ying; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2016-08-01

    Automatic 3D liver segmentation is a fundamental step in the liver disease diagnosis and surgery planning. This paper presents a novel fully automatic algorithm for 3D liver segmentation in clinical 3D computed tomography (CT) images. Based on image features, we propose a new Mahalanobis distance cost function using an active shape model (ASM). We call our method MD-ASM. Unlike the standard active shape model (ST-ASM), the proposed method introduces a new feature-constrained Mahalanobis distance cost function to measure the distance between the generated shape during the iterative step and the mean shape model. The proposed Mahalanobis distance function is learned from a public database of liver segmentation challenge (MICCAI-SLiver07). As a refinement step, we propose the use of a 3D graph-cut segmentation. Foreground and background labels are automatically selected using texture features of the learned Mahalanobis distance. Quantitatively, the proposed method is evaluated using two clinical 3D CT scan databases (MICCAI-SLiver07 and MIDAS). The evaluation of the MICCAI-SLiver07 database is obtained by the challenge organizers using five different metric scores. The experimental results demonstrate the availability of the proposed method by achieving an accurate liver segmentation compared to the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26501155

  16. Building an accurate 3D model of a circular feature for robot vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, an accurate 3D model analysis of a circular feature is built with error compensation for robot vision. We propose an efficient method of fitting ellipses to data points by minimizing the algebraic distance subject to the constraint that a conic should be an ellipse and solving the ellipse parameters through a direct ellipse fitting method by analysing the 3D geometrical representation in a perspective projection scheme, the 3D position of a circular feature with known radius can be obtained. A set of identical circles, machined on a calibration board whose centres were known, was calibrated with a camera and did the model analysis that our method developed. Experimental results show that our method is more accurate than other methods.

  17. Enabling accurate gate profile control with inline 3D-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Tianming; Lopez, Andrew; Dawson, Dean

    2009-05-01

    The logic and memory semiconductor device technology strives to follow the aggressive ITRS roadmap. The ITRS calls for increased 3D metrology to meet the demand for tighter process control at 45nm and 32nm nodes. In particular, gate engineering has advanced to a level where conventional metrology by CD-SEM and optical scatterometry (OCD) faces fundamental limitations without involvement of 3D atomic force microscope (3D-AFM or CD-AFM). This paper reports recent progress in 3D-AFM to address the metrology need to control gate dimension in MOSFET transistor formation. 3D-AFM metrology measures the gate electrode at post-etch with the lowest measurement uncertainty for critical gate geometry, including linewidth, sidewall profile, sidewall angle (SWA), line width roughness (LWR), and line edge roughness (LER). 3D-AFM enables accurate gate profile control in three types of metrology applications: reference metrology to validate CD-SEM and OCD, inline depth or 3D monitoring, or replacing TEM for 3D characterization for engineering analysis.

  18. Edge features extraction from 3D laser point cloud based on corresponding images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-feng; Zhao, Zi-ming; Xu, Guo-qing; Geng, Yan-long

    2013-09-01

    An extraction method of edge features from 3D laser point cloud based on corresponding images was proposed. After the registration of point cloud and corresponding image, the sub-pixel edge can be extracted from the image using gray moment algorithm. Then project the sub-pixel edge to the point cloud in fitting scan-lines. At last the edge features were achieved by linking the crossing points. The experimental results demonstrate that the method guarantees accurate fine extraction.

  19. RELAP5-3D Code Includes Athena Features and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Riemke; Cliff B. Davis; Richard R. Schultz

    2006-07-01

    Version 2.3 of the RELAP5-3D computer program includes all features and models previously available only in the ATHENA version of the code. These include the addition of new working fluids (i.e., ammonia, blood, carbon dioxide, glycerol, helium, hydrogen, lead-bismuth, lithium, lithium-lead, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and sodium-potassium) and a magnetohydrodynamic model that expands the capability of the code to model many more thermal-hydraulic systems. In addition to the new working fluids along with the standard working fluid water, one or more noncondensable gases (e.g., air, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen, sf6, xenon) can be specified as part of the vapor/gas phase of the working fluid. These noncondensable gases were in previous versions of RELAP5- 3D. Recently four molten salts have been added as working fluids to RELAP5-3D Version 2.4, which has had limited release. These molten salts will be in RELAP5-3D Version 2.5, which will have a general release like RELAP5-3D Version 2.3. Applications that use these new features and models are discussed in this paper.

  20. RELAP5-3D Code Includes ATHENA Features and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Riemke, Richard A.; Davis, Cliff B.; Schultz, Richard R.

    2006-07-01

    Version 2.3 of the RELAP5-3D computer program includes all features and models previously available only in the ATHENA version of the code. These include the addition of new working fluids (i.e., ammonia, blood, carbon dioxide, glycerol, helium, hydrogen, lead-bismuth, lithium, lithium-lead, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and sodium-potassium) and a magnetohydrodynamic model that expands the capability of the code to model many more thermal-hydraulic systems. In addition to the new working fluids along with the standard working fluid water, one or more noncondensable gases (e.g., air, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen, SF{sub 6}, xenon) can be specified as part of the vapor/gas phase of the working fluid. These noncondensable gases were in previous versions of RELAP5-3D. Recently four molten salts have been added as working fluids to RELAP5-3D Version 2.4, which has had limited release. These molten salts will be in RELAP5-3D Version 2.5, which will have a general release like RELAP5-3D Version 2.3. Applications that use these new features and models are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  1. Quantitative analysis and feature recognition in 3-D microstructural data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A. C.; Suh, C.; Stukowski, M.; Geltmacher, A. B.; Spanos, G.; Rajan, K.

    2006-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of an austenitic stainless-steel microstructure was used as input for an image-based finite-element model to simulate the anisotropic elastic mechanical response of the microstructure. The quantitative data-mining and data-warehousing techniques used to correlate regions of high stress with critical microstructural features are discussed. Initial analysis of elastic stresses near grain boundaries due to mechanical loading revealed low overall correlation with their location in the microstructure. However, the use of data-mining and feature-tracking techniques to identify high-stress outliers revealed that many of these high-stress points are generated near grain boundaries and grain edges (triple junctions). These techniques also allowed for the differentiation between high stresses due to boundary conditions of the finite volume reconstructed, and those due to 3-D microstructural features.

  2. Stereomicroscopic 3D-pattern profiling of murine and human intestinal inflammation reveals unique structural phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Kodani, Tomohiro; Kaydo, Lindsey; Pietropaoli, Davide; Corridoni, Daniele; Howell, Scott; Katz, Jeffry; Xin, Wei; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Cominelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Histology is fundamental to assess two-dimensional intestinal inflammation; however, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are often indistinguishable microscopically on the basis of mucosal biopsies. Here, we use stereomicroscopy (SM) to rapidly profile the entire intestinal topography and assess inflammation. We examine the mucosal surface of >700 mice (encompassing >16 strains and various IBD-models), create a profiling catalogue of 3D-stereomicroscopic abnormalities and demonstrate that mice with comparable histological scores display unique sub-clusters of 3D-structure-patterns of IBD pathology, which we call 3D-stereoenterotypes, and which are otherwise indiscernible histologically. We show that two ileal IBD-stereoenterotypes (‘cobblestones' versus ‘villous mini-aggregation') cluster separately within two distinct mouse lines of spontaneous ileitis, suggesting that host genetics drive unique and divergent inflammatory 3D-structural patterns in the gut. In humans, stereomicroscopy reveals ‘liquefaction' lesions and hierarchical fistulous complexes, enriched with clostridia/segmented filamentous bacteria, running under healthy mucosa in Crohn's disease. We suggest that stereomicroscopic (3D-SMAPgut) profiling can be easily implemented and enable the comprehensive study of inflammatory 3D structures, genetics and flora in IBD. PMID:26154811

  3. Computational Identification of Genomic Features That Influence 3D Chromatin Domain Formation

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Raphaël; Cuvier, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in long-range Hi-C contact mapping have revealed the importance of the 3D structure of chromosomes in gene expression. A current challenge is to identify the key molecular drivers of this 3D structure. Several genomic features, such as architectural proteins and functional elements, were shown to be enriched at topological domain borders using classical enrichment tests. Here we propose multiple logistic regression to identify those genomic features that positively or negatively influence domain border establishment or maintenance. The model is flexible, and can account for statistical interactions among multiple genomic features. Using both simulated and real data, we show that our model outperforms enrichment test and non-parametric models, such as random forests, for the identification of genomic features that influence domain borders. Using Drosophila Hi-C data at a very high resolution of 1 kb, our model suggests that, among architectural proteins, BEAF-32 and CP190 are the main positive drivers of 3D domain borders. In humans, our model identifies well-known architectural proteins CTCF and cohesin, as well as ZNF143 and Polycomb group proteins as positive drivers of domain borders. The model also reveals the existence of several negative drivers that counteract the presence of domain borders including P300, RXRA, BCL11A and ELK1. PMID:27203237

  4. 3D Point Correspondence by Minimum Description Length in Feature Space.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiun-Hung; Zheng, Ke Colin; Shapiro, Linda G

    2010-01-01

    Finding point correspondences plays an important role in automatically building statistical shape models from a training set of 3D surfaces. For the point correspondence problem, Davies et al. [1] proposed a minimum-description-length-based objective function to balance the training errors and generalization ability. A recent evaluation study [2] that compares several well-known 3D point correspondence methods for modeling purposes shows that the MDL-based approach [1] is the best method. We adapt the MDL-based objective function for a feature space that can exploit nonlinear properties in point correspondences, and propose an efficient optimization method to minimize the objective function directly in the feature space, given that the inner product of any vector pair can be computed in the feature space. We further employ a Mercer kernel [3] to define the feature space implicitly. A key aspect of our proposed framework is the generalization of the MDL-based objective function to kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) [4] spaces and the design of a gradient-descent approach to minimize such an objective function. We compare the generalized MDL objective function on KPCA spaces with the original one and evaluate their abilities in terms of reconstruction errors and specificity. From our experimental results on different sets of 3D shapes of human body organs, the proposed method performs significantly better than the original method. PMID:25328917

  5. 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate segmentation based on optimal feature learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter J.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a 3D prostate segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on patch-based feature learning framework. Patient-specific anatomical features are extracted from aligned training images and adopted as signatures for each voxel. The most robust and informative features are identified by the feature selection process to train the kernel support vector machine (KSVM). The well-trained SVM was used to localize the prostate of the new patient. Our segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 10 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentations (gold standard). The mean volume Dice overlap coefficient was 89.7%. In this study, we have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with manual segmentations.

  6. Changes in quantitative 3D shape features of the optic nerve head associated with age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Mark; Tang, Li; Fingert, John H.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2013-02-01

    Optic nerve head (ONH) structure is an important biological feature of the eye used by clinicians to diagnose and monitor progression of diseases such as glaucoma. ONH structure is commonly examined using stereo fundus imaging or optical coherence tomography. Stereo fundus imaging provides stereo views of the ONH that retain 3D information useful for characterizing structure. In order to quantify 3D ONH structure, we applied a stereo correspondence algorithm to a set of stereo fundus images. Using these quantitative 3D ONH structure measurements, eigen structures were derived using principal component analysis from stereo images of 565 subjects from the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS). To evaluate the usefulness of the eigen structures, we explored associations with the demographic variables age, gender, and race. Using regression analysis, the eigen structures were found to have significant (p < 0.05) associations with both age and race after Bonferroni correction. In addition, classifiers were constructed to predict the demographic variables based solely on the eigen structures. These classifiers achieved an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.62 in predicting a binary age variable, 0.52 in predicting gender, and 0.67 in predicting race. The use of objective, quantitative features or eigen structures can reveal hidden relationships between ONH structure and demographics. The use of these features could similarly allow specific aspects of ONH structure to be isolated and associated with the diagnosis of glaucoma, disease progression and outcomes, and genetic factors.

  7. 3D laser scanning microscopy of hypervelocity impact features in metal and aerogel targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, J. K.; Postberg, F.; Price, M. C.; Trieloff, M.; Li, Y. W.; Srama, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of a study into the mapping of hypervelocity impact features using a Keyence VK-X200 3D laser scanning microscope. The impact features observed are impact craters in a variety of different metal targets (Al, Au and Cu) and impact tracks in aerogel targets, similar to those used in the Stardust mission. Differences in crater morphology between different target materials and impact velocities, as well as differences in track depth and diameter in aerogel, for particles of known constant dimensions, are discussed.

  8. Validate and update of 3D urban features using multi-source fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrington, Marcus; Edwards, Dan; Sengers, Arjan

    2012-06-01

    As forecast by the United Nations in May 2007, the population of the world transitioned from a rural to an urban demographic majority with more than half living in urban areas.1 Modern urban environments are complex 3- dimensional (3D) landscapes with 4-dimensional patterns of activity that challenge various traditional 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional sensors to accurately sample these man-made terrains. Depending on geographic location, data resulting from LIDAR, multi-spectral, electro-optical, thermal, ground-based static and mobile sensors may be available with multiple collects along with more traditional 2D GIS features. Reconciling differing data sources over time to correctly portray the dynamic urban landscape raises significant fusion and representational challenges particularly as higher levels of spatial resolution are available and expected by users. This paper presents a framework for integrating the imperfect answers of our differing sensors and data sources into a powerful representation of the complex urban environment. A case study is presented involving the integration of temporally diverse 2D, 2.5D and 3D spatial data sources over Kandahar, Afghanistan. In this case study we present a methodology for validating and augmenting 2D/2.5D urban feature and attribute data with LIDAR to produce validated 3D objects. We demonstrate that nearly 15% of buildings in Kandahar require understanding nearby vegetation before 3-D validation can be successful. We also address urban temporal change detection at the object level. Finally we address issues involved with increased sampling resolution since urban features are rarely simple cubes but in the case of Kandahar involve balconies, TV dishes, rooftop walls, small rooms, and domes among other things.

  9. AF printability check with a full-chip 3D resist profile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-En R.; Chang, Jason; Song, Hua; Shiely, James

    2013-09-01

    A single compact resist model capable of predicting 3D resist profile is strongly demanded for the advanced technology nodes to avoid the potential hotspots due to imperfect resist pattern shape and its lack of resistance in the subsequent etch process. In this work, we propose a resist 3D (R3D) compact model that takes acidz-diffusion effect into account. The chemical reaction between acid and base along z-direction is treated as second order effect that is absorbed into the anisotropic diffusion length as a fitting parameter. Meanwhile, the resist model in the x-y wafer plane is still kept in general by applying the compact solution of 2D reaction-diffusion equation. In order to have the 2D contour predictability at arbitrary resist height, calibration from entire 3D data (CDs at several heights) areconducted simultaneously witha single cost function so that the R3D compact model is described by a common set of resist free parameters and threshold for all resist heights. With the low energy approximation, the acid z-diffusion effect is equivalent to a z-diffused TCC that takes the form of linear combination of pure optical TCCs sampled at discrete image-depth which can be pre-calculated. With this benefit, the R3D compact model offers a more physical approach but adds no runtime concern on the OPC and verification applications. The predicted resist cross-section profiles from our test patterns are compared those computed with rigorous lithography simulator SLITHO and show very good matching results between them. The demonstration of the AF printability check from the predicted cross-section profile at AF indicates the success of our R3D compact model.

  10. Automatic detection of anatomical features on 3D ear impressions for canonical representation.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Sajjad; Melkisetoglu, Rupen; Flöry, Simon; Azernikov, Sergei; Slabaugh, Greg; Zouhar, Alexander; Fang, Tong

    2010-01-01

    We propose a shape descriptor for 3D ear impressions, derived from a comprehensive set of anatomical features. Motivated by hearing aid (HA) manufacturing, the selection of the anatomical features is carried out according to their uniqueness and importance in HA design. This leads to a canonical ear signature that is highly distinctive and potentially well suited for classification. First, the anatomical features are characterized into generic topological and geometric features, namely concavities, elbows, ridges, peaks, and bumps on the surface of the ear. Fast and robust algorithms are then developed for their detection. This indirect approach ensures the generality of the algorithms with potential applications in biomedicine, biometrics, and reverse engineering. PMID:20879444

  11. Avalanche for shape and feature-based virtual screening with 3D alignment.

    PubMed

    Diller, David J; Connell, Nancy D; Welsh, William J

    2015-11-01

    This report introduces a new ligand-based virtual screening tool called Avalanche that incorporates both shape- and feature-based comparison with three-dimensional (3D) alignment between the query molecule and test compounds residing in a chemical database. Avalanche proceeds in two steps. The first step is an extremely rapid shape/feature based comparison which is used to narrow the focus from potentially millions or billions of candidate molecules and conformations to a more manageable number that are then passed to the second step. The second step is a detailed yet still rapid 3D alignment of the remaining candidate conformations to the query conformation. Using the 3D alignment, these remaining candidate conformations are scored, re-ranked and presented to the user as the top hits for further visualization and evaluation. To provide further insight into the method, the results from two prospective virtual screens are presented which show the ability of Avalanche to identify hits from chemical databases that would likely be missed by common substructure-based or fingerprint-based search methods. The Avalanche method is extended to enable patent landscaping, i.e., structural refinements to improve the patentability of hits for deployment in drug discovery campaigns. PMID:26458937

  12. Hand Gesture Spotting Based on 3D Dynamic Features Using Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmezain, Mahmoud; Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Michaelis, Bernd

    In this paper, we propose an automatic system that handles hand gesture spotting and recognition simultaneously in stereo color image sequences without any time delay based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Color and 3D depth map are used to segment hand regions. The hand trajectory will determine in further step using Mean-shift algorithm and Kalman filter to generate 3D dynamic features. Furthermore, k-means clustering algorithm is employed for the HMMs codewords. To spot meaningful gestures accurately, a non-gesture model is proposed, which provides confidence limit for the calculated likelihood by other gesture models. The confidence measures are used as an adaptive threshold for spotting meaningful gestures. Experimental results show that the proposed system can successfully recognize isolated gestures with 98.33% and meaningful gestures with 94.35% reliability for numbers (0-9).

  13. Recognizing Objects in 3D Point Clouds with Multi-Scale Local Features

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms. PMID:25517694

  14. Recognizing objects in 3D point clouds with multi-scale local features.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms. PMID:25517694

  15. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    This work uses the canopy height model (CHM) based workflow for individual tree crown delineation and 3D feature extraction approach (Overwatch Geospatial's proprietary algorithm) for building feature delineation from high-density light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data in an urban environment and evaluates its accuracy by using very high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) (spatial) and 8-band (multispectral) WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery. LiDAR point cloud data over San Francisco, California, USA, recorded in June 2010, was used to detect tree and building features by classifying point elevation values. The workflow employed includes resampling of LiDAR point cloud to generate a raster surface or digital terrain model (DTM), generation of a hill-shade image and an intensity image, extraction of digital surface model, generation of bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) and extraction of tree and building features. First, the optical WV-2 data and the LiDAR intensity image were co-registered using ground control points (GCPs). The WV-2 rational polynomial coefficients model (RPC) was executed in ERDAS Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) using supplementary *.RPB file. In the second stage, ortho-rectification was carried out using ERDAS LPS by incorporating well-distributed GCPs. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the WV-2 was estimated to be 0.25 m by using more than 10 well-distributed GCPs. In the second stage, we generated the bare earth DEM from LiDAR point cloud data. In most of the cases, bare earth DEM does not represent true ground elevation. Hence, the model was edited to get the most accurate DEM/ DTM possible and normalized the LiDAR point cloud data based on DTM in order to reduce the effect of undulating terrain. We normalized the vegetation point cloud values by subtracting the ground points (DEM) from the LiDAR point cloud. A normalized digital surface model (nDSM) or CHM was calculated from the LiDAR data by subtracting the DEM from the DSM

  16. Feature, design intention and constraint preservation for direct modeling of 3D freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Luoting; Kara, Levent Burak; Shimada, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Direct modeling has recently emerged as a suitable approach for 3D free-form shape modeling in industrial design. It has several advantages over the conventional, parametric modeling techniques, including natural user interactions, as well as the underlying, automatic feature-preserving shape deformation algorithms. However, current direct modeling packages still lack several capabilities critical for product design, such as managing aesthetic design intentions, and enforcing dimensional, geometric constraints. In this paper, we describe a novel 3D surface editing system capable of jointly accommodating aesthetic design intentions expressed in the form of surface painting and color-coded annotations, as well as engineering constraints expressed as dimensions. The proposed system is built upon differential coordinates and constrained least squares, and is intended for conceptual design that involves frequent shape tuning and explorations. We also provide an extensive review of the state-of-the-art direct modeling approaches for 3D mesh-based, freeform surfaces, with an emphasis on the two broad categories of shape deformation algorithms developed in the relevant field of geometric modeling. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Visual Object Recognition with 3D-Aware Features in KITTI Urban Scenes.

    PubMed

    Yebes, J Javier; Bergasa, Luis M; García-Garrido, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Driver assistance systems and autonomous robotics rely on the deployment of several sensors for environment perception. Compared to LiDAR systems, the inexpensive vision sensors can capture the 3D scene as perceived by a driver in terms of appearance and depth cues. Indeed, providing 3D image understanding capabilities to vehicles is an essential target in order to infer scene semantics in urban environments. One of the challenges that arises from the navigation task in naturalistic urban scenarios is the detection of road participants (e.g., cyclists, pedestrians and vehicles). In this regard, this paper tackles the detection and orientation estimation of cars, pedestrians and cyclists, employing the challenging and naturalistic KITTI images. This work proposes 3D-aware features computed from stereo color images in order to capture the appearance and depth peculiarities of the objects in road scenes. The successful part-based object detector, known as DPM, is extended to learn richer models from the 2.5D data (color and disparity), while also carrying out a detailed analysis of the training pipeline. A large set of experiments evaluate the proposals, and the best performing approach is ranked on the KITTI website. Indeed, this is the first work that reports results with stereo data for the KITTI object challenge, achieving increased detection ratios for the classes car and cyclist compared to a baseline DPM. PMID:25903553

  18. Visual Object Recognition with 3D-Aware Features in KITTI Urban Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Yebes, J. Javier; Bergasa, Luis M.; García-Garrido, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Driver assistance systems and autonomous robotics rely on the deployment of several sensors for environment perception. Compared to LiDAR systems, the inexpensive vision sensors can capture the 3D scene as perceived by a driver in terms of appearance and depth cues. Indeed, providing 3D image understanding capabilities to vehicles is an essential target in order to infer scene semantics in urban environments. One of the challenges that arises from the navigation task in naturalistic urban scenarios is the detection of road participants (e.g., cyclists, pedestrians and vehicles). In this regard, this paper tackles the detection and orientation estimation of cars, pedestrians and cyclists, employing the challenging and naturalistic KITTI images. This work proposes 3D-aware features computed from stereo color images in order to capture the appearance and depth peculiarities of the objects in road scenes. The successful part-based object detector, known as DPM, is extended to learn richer models from the 2.5D data (color and disparity), while also carrying out a detailed analysis of the training pipeline. A large set of experiments evaluate the proposals, and the best performing approach is ranked on the KITTI website. Indeed, this is the first work that reports results with stereo data for the KITTI object challenge, achieving increased detection ratios for the classes car and cyclist compared to a baseline DPM. PMID:25903553

  19. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    This work uses the canopy height model (CHM) based workflow for individual tree crown delineation and 3D feature extraction approach (Overwatch Geospatial's proprietary algorithm) for building feature delineation from high-density light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data in an urban environment and evaluates its accuracy by using very high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) (spatial) and 8-band (multispectral) WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery. LiDAR point cloud data over San Francisco, California, USA, recorded in June 2010, was used to detect tree and building features by classifying point elevation values. The workflow employed includes resampling of LiDAR point cloud to generate a raster surface or digital terrain model (DTM), generation of a hill-shade image and an intensity image, extraction of digital surface model, generation of bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) and extraction of tree and building features. First, the optical WV-2 data and the LiDAR intensity image were co-registered using ground control points (GCPs). The WV-2 rational polynomial coefficients model (RPC) was executed in ERDAS Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) using supplementary *.RPB file. In the second stage, ortho-rectification was carried out using ERDAS LPS by incorporating well-distributed GCPs. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the WV-2 was estimated to be 0.25 m by using more than 10 well-distributed GCPs. In the second stage, we generated the bare earth DEM from LiDAR point cloud data. In most of the cases, bare earth DEM does not represent true ground elevation. Hence, the model was edited to get the most accurate DEM/ DTM possible and normalized the LiDAR point cloud data based on DTM in order to reduce the effect of undulating terrain. We normalized the vegetation point cloud values by subtracting the ground points (DEM) from the LiDAR point cloud. A normalized digital surface model (nDSM) or CHM was calculated from the LiDAR data by subtracting the DEM from the DSM

  20. 3D reconstruction for sinusoidal motion based on different feature detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Huaxia; Yu, Liandong

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic testing of structures and components is an important area of research. Extensive researches on the methods of using sensors for vibration parameters have been studied for years. With the rapid development of industrial high-speed camera and computer hardware, the method of using stereo vision for dynamic testing has been the focus of the research since the advantages of non-contact, full-field, high resolution and high accuracy. But in the country there is not much research about the dynamic testing based on stereo vision, and yet few people publish articles about the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of feature points in the case of dynamic. It is essential to the following analysis whether it can obtain accurate movement of target objects. In this paper, an object with sinusoidal motion is detected by stereo vision and the accuracy with different feature detection algorithms is investigated. Three different marks including dot, square and circle are stuck on the object and the object is doing sinusoidal motion by vibration table. Then use feature detection algorithm speed-up robust feature (SURF) to detect point, detect square corners by Harris and position the center by Hough transform. After obtaining the pixel coordinate values of the feature point, the stereo calibration parameters are used to achieve three-dimensional reconstruction through triangulation principle. The trajectories of the specific direction according to the vibration frequency and the frequency camera acquisition are obtained. At last, the reconstruction accuracy of different feature detection algorithms is compared.

  1. 3D CAD model retrieval method based on hierarchical multi-features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Wang, Qingwen

    2015-12-01

    The classical "Shape Distribution D2" algorithm takes the distance between two random points on a surface of CAD model as statistical features, and based on that it generates a feature vector to calculate the dissimilarity and achieve the retrieval goal. This algorithm has a simple principle, high computational efficiency and can get a better retrieval results for the simple shape models. Based on the analysis of D2 algorithm's shape distribution curve, this paper enhances the algorithm's descriptive ability for a model's overall shape through the statistics of the angle between two random points' normal vectors, especially for the distinctions between the model's plane features and curved surface features; meanwhile, introduce the ratio that a line between two random points cut off by the model's surface to enhance the algorithm's descriptive ability for a model's detailed features; finally, integrating the two shape describing methods with the original D2 algorithm, this paper proposes a new method based the hierarchical multi-features. Experimental results showed that this method has bigger improvements and could get a better retrieval results compared with the traditional 3D CAD model retrieval method.

  2. A 3D Feature Descriptor Recovered from a Single 2D Palmprint Image.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qian; Kumar, Ajay; Pan, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Design and development of efficient and accurate feature descriptors is critical for the success of many computer vision applications. This paper proposes a new feature descriptor, referred to as DoN, for the 2D palmprint matching. The descriptor is extracted for each point on the palmprint. It is based on the ordinal measure which partially describes the difference of the neighboring points' normal vectors. DoN has at least two advantages: 1) it describes the 3D information, which is expected to be highly stable under commonly occurring illumination variations during contactless imaging; 2) the size of DoN for each point is only one bit, which is computationally simple to extract, easy to match, and efficient to storage. We show that such 3D information can be extracted from a single 2D palmprint image. The analysis for the effectiveness of ordinal measure for palmprint matching is also provided. Four publicly available 2D palmprint databases are used to evaluate the effectiveness of DoN, both for identification and the verification. Our method on all these databases achieves the state-of-the-art performance. PMID:27164564

  3. The Wavelet Element Method. Part 2; Realization and Additional Features in 2D and 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, Claudio; Tabacco, Anita; Urban, Karsten

    1998-01-01

    The Wavelet Element Method (WEM) provides a construction of multiresolution systems and biorthogonal wavelets on fairly general domains. These are split into subdomains that are mapped to a single reference hypercube. Tensor products of scaling functions and wavelets defined on the unit interval are used on the reference domain. By introducing appropriate matching conditions across the interelement boundaries, a globally continuous biorthogonal wavelet basis on the general domain is obtained. This construction does not uniquely define the basis functions but rather leaves some freedom for fulfilling additional features. In this paper we detail the general construction principle of the WEM to the 1D, 2D and 3D cases. We address additional features such as symmetry, vanishing moments and minimal support of the wavelet functions in each particular dimension. The construction is illustrated by using biorthogonal spline wavelets on the interval.

  4. Automated real-time search and analysis algorithms for a non-contact 3D profiling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Mark; Wu, Chih-Hang John; Beck, B. Terry; Peterman, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a new means of identifying and extracting geometrical feature statistics from a non-contact precision-measurement 3D profilometer. Autonomous algorithms have been developed to search through large-scale Cartesian point clouds to identify and extract geometrical features. These algorithms are developed with the intent of providing real-time production quality control of cold-rolled steel wires. The steel wires in question are prestressing steel reinforcement wires for concrete members. The geometry of the wire is critical in the performance of the overall concrete structure. For this research a custom 3D non-contact profilometry system has been developed that utilizes laser displacement sensors for submicron resolution surface profiling. Optimizations in the control and sensory system allow for data points to be collected at up to an approximate 400,000 points per second. In order to achieve geometrical feature extraction and tolerancing with this large volume of data, the algorithms employed are optimized for parsing large data quantities. The methods used provide a unique means of maintaining high resolution data of the surface profiles while keeping algorithm running times within practical bounds for industrial application. By a combination of regional sampling, iterative search, spatial filtering, frequency filtering, spatial clustering, and template matching a robust feature identification method has been developed. These algorithms provide an autonomous means of verifying tolerances in geometrical features. The key method of identifying the features is through a combination of downhill simplex and geometrical feature templates. By performing downhill simplex through several procedural programming layers of different search and filtering techniques, very specific geometrical features can be identified within the point cloud and analyzed for proper tolerancing. Being able to perform this quality control in real time

  5. 3D facial expression recognition using maximum relevance minimum redundancy geometrical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiu, Habibu; Saripan, M. Iqbal; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Marhaban, Mohd Hamiruce

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, facial expression recognition (FER) has become an attractive research area, which besides the fundamental challenges, it poses, finds application in areas, such as human-computer interaction, clinical psychology, lie detection, pain assessment, and neurology. Generally the approaches to FER consist of three main steps: face detection, feature extraction and expression recognition. The recognition accuracy of FER hinges immensely on the relevance of the selected features in representing the target expressions. In this article, we present a person and gender independent 3D facial expression recognition method, using maximum relevance minimum redundancy geometrical features. The aim is to detect a compact set of features that sufficiently represents the most discriminative features between the target classes. Multi-class one-against-one SVM classifier was employed to recognize the seven facial expressions; neutral, happy, sad, angry, fear, disgust, and surprise. The average recognition accuracy of 92.2% was recorded. Furthermore, inter database homogeneity was investigated between two independent databases the BU-3DFE and UPM-3DFE the results showed a strong homogeneity between the two databases.

  6. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaohu; Cai, Yiqi; Yang, Yin; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun

    2016-01-01

    By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs) are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes. PMID:27019849

  7. 3D Object Recognition using Gabor Feature Extraction and PCA-FLD Projections of Holographically Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram

    In this research, a 3D object classification technique using a single hologram has been presented. The PCA-FLD classifier with feature vectors based on Gabor wavelets has been utilized for this purpose. Training and test data of the 3D objects were obtained by computational holographic imaging. We were able to classify 3D objects used in the experiments with a few reconstructed planes of the hologram. The Gabor approach appears to be a good feature extractor for hologram-based 3D classification. The FLD combined with the PCA proved to be a very efficient classifier even with a few training data. Substantial dimensionality reduction was achieved by using the proposed technique for 3D classification problem using holographic imaging. As a consequence, we were able to classify different classes of 3D objects using computer-reconstructed holographic images.

  8. Routine characterization of 3-D profiles of SRF cavity defects using replica techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, M.; Wu, G.; Burk, D.; Ozelis, J.; Harms, E.; Sergatskov, D.; Hicks, D.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Recent coordination of thermometry with optical images has shown that obvious defects at specific locations produce heat or even quench superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, imposing a significant limit on the overall accelerating gradient produced by the cavity. Characterization of the topography at such locations provides clues about how the defects originated, from which schemes for their prevention might be devised. Topographic analyses also provide understanding of the electromagnetic mechanism by which defects limit cavity performance, from which viability of repair techniques might be assessed. In this article we discuss how a variety of two-component silicone-based room-temperature vulcanizing agents can be routinely used to make replicas of the cavity surface and extract topographic details of cavity defects. Previously, this level of detail could only be obtained by cutting suspect regions from the cavity, thus destroying the cavity. We show 3-D profiles extracted from several different 1.3 GHz cavities. The defect locations, which were all near cavity welds, compelled us to develop extraction techniques for both equator and iris welds as well as from deep inside long 9-cell cavities. Profilometry scans of the replicas yield micrometer-scale information, and we describe various curious features, such as small peaks at the bottom of pits, which were not apparent in previous optical inspections. We also discuss contour information in terms of electromagnetic mechanisms proposed by others for local cavity heating. We show that production of the replica followed by high-pressure rinsing dose not adversely affect the cavity RF performance.

  9. Evaluation of feature-based 3-d registration of probabilistic volumetric scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Maria I.; Ulusoy, Ali O.; Mundy, Joseph L.

    2014-12-01

    Automatic estimation of the world surfaces from aerial images has seen much attention and progress in recent years. Among current modeling technologies, probabilistic volumetric models (PVMs) have evolved as an alternative representation that can learn geometry and appearance in a dense and probabilistic manner. Recent progress, in terms of storage and speed, achieved in the area of volumetric modeling, opens the opportunity to develop new frameworks that make use of the PVM to pursue the ultimate goal of creating an entire map of the earth, where one can reason about the semantics and dynamics of the 3-d world. Aligning 3-d models collected at different time-instances constitutes an important step for successful fusion of large spatio-temporal information. This paper evaluates how effectively probabilistic volumetric models can be aligned using robust feature-matching techniques, while considering different scenarios that reflect the kind of variability observed across aerial video collections from different time instances. More precisely, this work investigates variability in terms of discretization, resolution and sampling density, errors in the camera orientation, and changes in illumination and geographic characteristics. All results are given for large-scale, outdoor sites. In order to facilitate the comparison of the registration performance of PVMs to that of other 3-d reconstruction techniques, the registration pipeline is also carried out using Patch-based Multi-View Stereo (PMVS) algorithm. Registration performance is similar for scenes that have favorable geometry and the appearance characteristics necessary for high quality reconstruction. In scenes containing trees, such as a park, or many buildings, such as a city center, registration performance is significantly more accurate when using the PVM.

  10. Vertical Corner Feature Based Precise Vehicle Localization Using 3D LIDAR in Urban Area.

    PubMed

    Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Jee, Gyu-In

    2016-01-01

    Tall buildings are concentrated in urban areas. The outer walls of buildings are vertically erected to the ground and almost flat. Therefore, the vertical corners that meet the vertical planes are present everywhere in urban areas. These corners act as convenient landmarks, which can be extracted by using the light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensor. A vertical corner feature based precise vehicle localization method is proposed in this paper and implemented using 3D LIDAR (Velodyne HDL-32E). The vehicle motion is predicted by accumulating the pose increment output from the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm based on the geometric relations between the scan data of the 3D LIDAR. The vertical corner is extracted using the proposed corner extraction method. The vehicle position is then corrected by matching the prebuilt corner map with the extracted corner. The experiment was carried out in the Gangnam area of Seoul, South Korea. In the experimental results, the maximum horizontal position error is about 0.46 m and the 2D Root Mean Square (RMS) horizontal error is about 0.138 m. PMID:27517936

  11. The Learner Characteristics, Features of Desktop 3D Virtual Reality Environments, and College Chemistry Instruction: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merchant, Zahira; Goetz, Ernest T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Kwok, Oi-man; Cifuentes, Lauren; Davis, Trina J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined a model of the impact of a 3D desktop virtual reality environment on the learner characteristics (i.e. perceptual and psychological variables) that can enhance chemistry-related learning achievements in an introductory college chemistry class. The relationships between the 3D virtual reality features and the chemistry learning test as…

  12. Bispectrum feature extraction of gearbox faults based on nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition with 3D calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijun; Xu, Feiyun; Zhao, Jun'ai; Jia, Minping; Hu, Jianzhong; Huang, Peng

    2013-11-01

    Nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition(NTD) has attracted lots of attentions for its good performance in 3D data array analysis. However, further research is still necessary to solve the problems of overfitting and slow convergence under the anharmonic vibration circumstance occurred in the field of mechanical fault diagnosis. To decompose a large-scale tensor and extract available bispectrum feature, a method of conjugating Choi-Williams kernel function with Gauss-Newton Cartesian product based on nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition(NTD_EDF) is investigated. The complexity of the proposed method is reduced from o( n N lg n) in 3D spaces to o( R 1 R 2 nlg n) in 1D vectors due to its low rank form of the Tucker-product convolution. Meanwhile, a simultaneously updating algorithm is given to overcome the overfitting, slow convergence and low efficiency existing in the conventional one-by-one updating algorithm. Furthermore, the technique of spectral phase analysis for quadratic coupling estimation is used to explain the feature spectrum extracted from the gearbox fault data by the proposed method in detail. The simulated and experimental results show that the sparser and more inerratic feature distribution of basis images can be obtained with core tensor by the NTD_EDF method compared with the one by the other methods in bispectrum feature extraction, and a legible fault expression can also be performed by power spectral density(PSD) function. Besides, the deviations of successive relative error(DSRE) of NTD_EDF achieves 81.66 dB against 15.17 dB by beta-divergences based on NTD(NTD_Beta) and the time-cost of NTD_EDF is only 129.3 s, which is far less than 1 747.9 s by hierarchical alternative least square based on NTD (NTD_HALS). The NTD_EDF method proposed not only avoids the data overfitting and improves the computation efficiency but also can be used to extract more inerratic and sparser bispectrum features of the gearbox fault.

  13. Registration of Feature-Poor 3D Measurements from Fringe Projection

    PubMed Central

    von Enzberg, Sebastian; Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Ghoneim, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel method for registration of partly overlapping three-dimensional surface measurements for stereo-based optical sensors using fringe projection. Based on two-dimensional texture matching, it allows global registration of surfaces with poor and ambiguous three-dimensional features, which are common to surface inspection applications. No prior information about relative sensor position is necessary, which makes our approach suitable for semi-automatic and manual measurement. The algorithm is robust and works with challenging measurements, including uneven illumination, surfaces with specular reflection as well as sparsely textured surfaces. We show that precisions of 1 mm and below can be achieved along the surfaces, which is necessary for further local 3D registration. PMID:26927106

  14. Registration of Feature-Poor 3D Measurements from Fringe Projection.

    PubMed

    von Enzberg, Sebastian; Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Ghoneim, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel method for registration of partly overlapping three-dimensional surface measurements for stereo-based optical sensors using fringe projection. Based on two-dimensional texture matching, it allows global registration of surfaces with poor and ambiguous three-dimensional features, which are common to surface inspection applications. No prior information about relative sensor position is necessary, which makes our approach suitable for semi-automatic and manual measurement. The algorithm is robust and works with challenging measurements, including uneven illumination, surfaces with specular reflection as well as sparsely textured surfaces. We show that precisions of 1 mm and below can be achieved along the surfaces, which is necessary for further local 3D registration. PMID:26927106

  15. 3-D modeling useful tool for planning. [mapping groundwater and soil pollution and subsurface features

    SciTech Connect

    Calmbacher, C.W. )

    1992-12-01

    Visualizing and delineating subsurface geological features, groundwater contaminant plumes, soil contamination, geological faults, shears and other features can prove invaluable to environmental consultants, engineers, geologists and hydrogeologists. Three-dimensional modeling is useful for a variety of applications from planning remediation to site planning design. The problem often is figuring out how to convert drilling logs, map lists or contaminant levels from soil and groundwater into a 3-D model. Three-dimensional subsurface modeling is not a new requirement, but a flexible, easily applied method of developing such models has not always been readily available. LYNX Geosystems Inc. has developed the Geoscience Modeling System (GMS) in answer to the needs of those regularly having to do three-dimensional geostatistical modeling. The GMS program has been designed to allow analysis, interpretation and visualization of complex geological features and soil and groundwater contamination. This is a powerful program driven by a 30 volume modeling technology engine. Data can be entered, stored, manipulated and analyzed in ways that will present very few limitations to the user. The program has selections for Geoscience Data Management, Geoscience Data Analysis, Geological Modeling (interpretation and analysis), Geostatistical Modeling and an optional engineering component.

  16. Real time reconstruction of 3-D electron density distribution over Europe with TaD profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutiev, Ivan; Marinov, Pencho; Belehaki, Anna

    2015-04-01

    TaD (TSM-assisted Digisonde) profiler, developed on the base of Topside Sounder Model (TSM), provides vertical electron density profile (EDP) from the bottom of ionosphere up to the GNSS orbit heights over Digisonde sounding stations. TaD EDP uses the bottomside profile provided by Digisonde software and extends it above the F layer peak by representing O+ distribution by α-Chapman formula and H+ distribution by a single exponent. The profile above F layer peak takes the topside scale height HT and transition height hT from TSM and plasmasphere scale height Hp defined as a function of HT. All these profile parameters are adjusted to the current conditions by comparing the profile integral with measured GNSS TEC. The latter is taken from GNSS TEC maps produced by Royal Observatory of Belgium in the area (35˚, 60˚)N and (-15˚, 25˚)E. Maps of foF2 and hmF2 are produced in the same area on the base of DIAS (European Digital Upper Atmosphere Server) network of Digisonde stations and TaD profiles are calculated at all grid nodes (1˚x1˚) on latitude and longitude. Electron density at any point of the 3-D space is then obtained by simple interpolation between nodes. Possible use of reconstruction technique to GNSS applications is demonstrated by calculating the distribution of electron density along various ray paths of GNSS signals.

  17. Parallel Imaging of 3D Surface Profile with Space-Division Multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung Seok; Cho, Soon-Woo; Kim, Gyeong Hun; Jeong, Myung Yung; Won, Young Jae; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a modified optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) system that performs parallel imaging of three-dimensional (3D) surface profiles by using the space division multiplexing (SDM) method with dual-area swept sourced beams. We have also demonstrated that 3D surface information for two different areas could be well obtained in a same time with only one camera by our method. In this study, double field of views (FOVs) of 11.16 mm × 5.92 mm were achieved within 0.5 s. Height range for each FOV was 460 µm and axial and transverse resolutions were 3.6 and 5.52 µm, respectively. PMID:26805840

  18. Imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for 3D cloud profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Carlson, David; Evans, Thomas; Schundler, Elizabeth; Todd, Lori; Mottus, Kathleen

    2009-05-01

    OPTRA is developing an imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared (I-OP-FTIR) spectrometer for 3D profiling of chemical and biological agent simulant plumes released into test ranges and chambers. An array of I-OP-FTIR instruments positioned around the perimeter of the test site, in concert with advanced spectroscopic algorithms, enables real time tomographic reconstruction of the plume. The approach is intended as a referee measurement for test ranges and chambers. This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort combines the instrumentation and spectroscopic capabilities of OPTRA, Inc. with the computed tomographic expertise of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

  19. Automatic 3D segmentation of the kidney in MR images using wavelet feature extraction and probability shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Hamed; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    Numerical estimation of the size of the kidney is useful in evaluating conditions of the kidney, especially, when serial MR imaging is performed to evaluate the kidney function. This paper presents a new method for automatic segmentation of the kidney in three-dimensional (3D) MR images, by extracting texture features and statistical matching of geometrical shape of the kidney. A set of Wavelet-based support vector machines (W-SVMs) is trained on the MR images. The W-SVMs capture texture priors of MRI for classification of the kidney and non-kidney tissues in different zones around the kidney boundary. In the segmentation procedure, these W-SVMs are trained to tentatively label each voxel around the kidney model as a kidney or non-kidney voxel by texture matching. A probability kidney model is created using 10 segmented MRI data. The model is initially localized based on the intensity profiles in three directions. The weight functions are defined for each labeled voxel for each Wavelet-based, intensity-based, and model-based label. Consequently, each voxel has three labels and three weights for the Wavelet feature, intensity, and probability model. Using a 3D edge detection method, the model is re-localized and the segmented kidney is modified based on a region growing method in the model region. The probability model is re-localized based on the results and this loop continues until the segmentation converges. Experimental results with mouse MRI data show the good performance of the proposed method in segmenting the kidney in MR images.

  20. Focused ion beam 3D nano-patterned optical fiber tips for advanced beam profile engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeiro, Ricardo; Flores, Raquel; Ribeiro, Ana R.; Jorge, Pedro; Viegas, Jaime

    2015-03-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) patterning of 3D topography on optical fiber tips for application in stand-alone, rugged and simplified setups for optical tweezers cell sorters, optical near-field lithography and optical beam profile engineering are reported. We demonstrate various configurations based on single-step FIB patterning, multiple-step FIB processing and hybrid approaches based on optical fiber pre- and post-FIB treatment with either etching, fusion splicing, photopolymerization or electroplating steps for optical fiber texture, topography and composition engineering. Different conductive coatings for minimal charge accumulation and beam drift are studied with the relative merits compared. Furthermore optimal beam parameters for accurate pattern replication and positioning are also presented. Measured experimental field profiles are compared with numerical simulations of fabricated optical fiber tips for fabrication accuracy evaluation. Applications employing these engineered fiber tips in the field of optical tweezers, optical vortex generation, photolithography, photo-polymerization and beam forming are presented.

  1. Developing on-machine 3D profile measurement for deterministic fabrication of aspheric mirrors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo; Ye, Xu; Tam, Hon-Yuen

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional profile measurement is perceived as an indispensable process for deterministic fabrication of aspheric mirrors. In this work, we develop on-machine 3D profile measurement on a subaperture polishing machine, namely, JR-1800. The influences of mechanical errors, misalignments, output stability, temperature variation, and natural vibration are investigated in detail by calibration, mechanical alignment, and finite-element analysis. Two quantitative methods are presented for aligning the turntable, length gauge, and workpiece into together. An error compensation model is also developed for further eliminating misalignments. For feasibility validation, two prototypical workpieces are measured by JR-1800 and an interferometer. The results indicate that JR-1800 has an RMS repeatability of ~λ/30 (λ=632.8  nm). The data provided by the two systems are highly coincident. Direct subtractions of the results from the two systems indicate that the RMS deviations for both segments are less than 0.07 μm. PMID:25090332

  2. Retrieval of humidity and temperature profiles over the oceans from INSAT 3D satellite radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, C.; Kumar, Deo; Balaji, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, retrieval of temperature and humidity profiles of atmosphere from INSAT 3D-observed radiances has been accomplished. As the first step, a fast forward radiative transfer model using an Artificial neural network has been developed and it was proven to be highly effective, giving a correlation coefficient of 0.97. In order to develop this, a diverse set of physics-based clear sky profiles of pressure ( P), temperature ( T) and specific humidity ( q) has been developed. The developed database was further used for geophysical retrieval experiments in two different frameworks, namely, an ANN and Bayesian estimation. The neural network retrievals were performed for three different cases, viz., temperature only retrieval, humidity only retrieval and combined retrieval. The temperature/humidity only ANN retrievals were found superior to combined retrieval using an ANN. Furthermore, Bayesian estimation showed superior results when compared with the combined ANN retrievals.

  3. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  4. Identifying Key Structural Features and Spatial Relationships in Archean Microbialites Using 2D and 3D Visualization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, E. W.; Sumner, D. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Microbialites in the 2521 ± 3 Ma Gamohaan Formation, South Africa, have several different end-member morphologies which show distinct growth structures and spatial relationships. We characterized several growth structures and spatial relationships in two samples (DK20 and 2_06) using a combination of 2D and 3D analytical techniques. There are two main goals in studying complicated microbialites with a combination of 2D and 3D methods. First, one can better understand microbialite growth by identifying important structures and structural relationships. Once structures are identified, the order in which the structures formed and how they are related can be inferred from observations of crosscutting relationships. Second, it is important to use both 2D and 3D methods to correlate 3D observations with those in 2D that are more common in the field. Combining analysis provides significantly more insight into the 3D morphology of microbial structures. In our studies, 2D analysis consisted of describing polished slabs and serial sections created by grinding down the rock 100 microns at a time. 3D analysis was performed on serial sections visualized in 3D using Vrui and 3DVisualizer software developed at KeckCAVES, UCD (http://keckcaves.org). Data were visualized on a laptop and in an immersive cave system. Both samples contain microbial laminae and more vertically orients microbial "walls" called supports. The relationships between these features created voids now filled with herringbone and blocky calcite crystals. DK20, a classic plumose structure, contains two types of support structures. Both are 1st order structures (1st order structures with organic inclusions and 1st without organic inclusions) interpreted as planar features based on 2D analysis. In the 2D analysis the 1st order structures show v branching relationships as well as single cuspate relationships (two 1st order structures with inclusions merging upward), and single tented relationships (three supports

  5. Novel multiresolution mammographic density segmentation using pseudo 3D features and adaptive cluster merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenda; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erica R. E.; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Early detection, precise identification of women at risk, and application of appropriate disease prevention measures are by far the most effective ways to overcome the disease. Successful mammographic density segmentation is a key aspect in deriving correct tissue composition, ensuring an accurate mammographic risk assessment. However, mammographic densities have not yet been fully incorporated with non-image based risk prediction models, (e.g. the Gail and the Tyrer-Cuzick model), because of unreliable segmentation consistency and accuracy. This paper presents a novel multiresolution mammographic density segmentation, a concept of stack representation is proposed, and 3D texture features were extracted by adapting techniques based on classic 2D first-order statistics. An unsupervised clustering technique was employed to achieve mammographic segmentation, in which two improvements were made; 1) consistent segmentation by incorporating an optimal centroids initialisation step, and 2) significantly reduced the number of missegmentation by using an adaptive cluster merging technique. A set of full field digital mammograms was used in the evaluation. Visual assessment indicated substantial improvement on segmented anatomical structures and tissue specific areas, especially in low mammographic density categories. The developed method demonstrated an ability to improve the quality of mammographic segmentation via clustering, and results indicated an improvement of 26% in segmented image with good quality when compared with the standard clustering approach. This in turn can be found useful in early breast cancer detection, risk-stratified screening, and aiding radiologists in the process of decision making prior to surgery and/or treatment.

  6. Monitoring the solid-liquid interface in tanks using profiling sonar and 3D visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Nitin; Zhang, Jinsong; Roelant, David; Srivastava, Rajiv

    2005-03-01

    Visualization of the interface between settled solids and the optically opaque liquid above is necessary to facilitate efficient retrieval of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks. A profiling sonar was used to generate 2-D slices across the settled solids at the bottom of the tank. By incrementally rotating the sonar about its centerline, slices of the solid-liquid interface can be imaged and a 3-D image of the settled solids interface generated. To demonstrate the efficacy of the sonar in real-time solid-liquid interface monitoring systems inside HLW tanks, two sets of experiments were performed. First, various solid objects and kaolin clay (10 μm dia) were successfully imaged while agitating with 30% solids (by weight) entrained in the liquid. Second, a solid with a density similar to that of the immersed fluid density was successfully imaged. Two dimensional (2-D) sonar images and the accuracy and limitations of the in-tank imaging will be presented for these two experiments. In addition, a brief review of how to utilize a 2-D sonar image to generate a 3-D surface of the settled layer within a tank will be discussed.

  7. 3D printing of tablets containing multiple drugs with defined release profiles.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Shaban A; Burley, Jonathan C; Alexander, Morgan R; Yang, Jing; Roberts, Clive J

    2015-10-30

    We have employed three-dimensional (3D) extrusion-based printing as a medicine manufacturing technique for the production of multi-active tablets with well-defined and separate controlled release profiles for three different drugs. This 'polypill' made by a 3D additive manufacture technique demonstrates that complex medication regimes can be combined in a single tablet and that it is viable to formulate and 'dial up' this single tablet for the particular needs of an individual. The tablets used to illustrate this concept incorporate an osmotic pump with the drug captopril and sustained release compartments with the drugs nifedipine and glipizide. This combination of medicines could potentially be used to treat diabetics suffering from hypertension. The room temperature extrusion process used to print the formulations used excipients commonly employed in the pharmaceutical industry. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were used to assess drug-excipient interaction. The printed formulations were evaluated for drug release using USP dissolution testing. We found that the captopril portion showed the intended zero order drug release of an osmotic pump and noted that the nifedipine and glipizide portions showed either first order release or Korsmeyer-Peppas release kinetics dependent upon the active/excipient ratio used. PMID:26235921

  8. M3D: a kernel-based test for spatially correlated changes in methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Tom R.; Schweikert, Gabriele; Sanguinetti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA methylation is an intensely studied epigenetic mark implicated in many biological processes of direct clinical relevance. Although sequencing-based technologies are increasingly allowing high-resolution measurements of DNA methylation, statistical modelling of such data is still challenging. In particular, statistical identification of differentially methylated regions across different conditions poses unresolved challenges in accounting for spatial correlations within the statistical testing procedure. Results: We propose a non-parametric, kernel-based method, M3D, to detect higher order changes in methylation profiles, such as shape, across pre-defined regions. The test statistic explicitly accounts for differences in coverage levels between samples, thus handling in a principled way a major confounder in the analysis of methylation data. Empirical tests on real and simulated datasets show an increased power compared to established methods, as well as considerable robustness with respect to coverage and replication levels. Availability and implementation: R/Bioconductor package M3D. Contact: G.Sanguinetti@ed.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25398611

  9. Feasibility study on 3-D shape analysis of high-aspect-ratio features using through-focus scanning optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Weck, Peter; Kramar, John A.; Bunday, Benjamin; Vartanian, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In-line metrologies currently used in the semiconductor industry are being challenged by the aggressive pace of device scaling and the adoption of novel device architectures. Metrology and process control of three-dimensional (3-D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) features are becoming increasingly important and also challenging. In this paper we present a feasibility study of through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) for 3-D shape analysis of HAR features. TSOM makes use of 3-D optical data collected using a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape analysis. Simulation results of trenches and holes down to the 11 nm node are presented. The ability of TSOM to analyze an array of HAR features or a single isolated HAR feature is also presented. This allows for the use of targets with area over 100 times smaller than that of conventional gratings, saving valuable real estate on the wafers. Indications are that the sensitivity of TSOM may match or exceed the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) measurement requirements for the next several years. Both simulations and preliminary experimental results are presented. The simplicity, lowcost, high throughput, and nanometer scale 3-D shape sensitivity of TSOM make it an attractive inspection and process monitoring solution for nanomanufacturing. PMID:27464112

  10. Feasibility study on 3-D shape analysis of high-aspect-ratio features using through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Weck, Peter; Kramar, John A; Bunday, Benjamin; Vartanian, Victor

    2016-07-25

    In-line metrologies currently used in the semiconductor industry are being challenged by the aggressive pace of device scaling and the adoption of novel device architectures. Metrology and process control of three-dimensional (3-D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) features are becoming increasingly important and also challenging. In this paper we present a feasibility study of through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) for 3-D shape analysis of HAR features. TSOM makes use of 3-D optical data collected using a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape analysis. Simulation results of trenches and holes down to the 11 nm node are presented. The ability of TSOM to analyze an array of HAR features or a single isolated HAR feature is also presented. This allows for the use of targets with area over 100 times smaller than that of conventional gratings, saving valuable real estate on the wafers. Indications are that the sensitivity of TSOM may match or exceed the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) measurement requirements for the next several years. Both simulations and preliminary experimental results are presented. The simplicity, lowcost, high throughput, and nanometer scale 3-D shape sensitivity of TSOM make it an attractive inspection and process monitoring solution for nanomanufacturing. PMID:27464112

  11. 3D micro profile measurement with the method of spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-10-01

    3D micro profiles are often needed for measurement in many fields, e.g., binary optics, electronic industry, mechanical manufacturing, aeronautic and space industry, etc. In the case where height difference between two neighboring points of a test profile is equal to or greater than λ / 4, microscopic interferometry based on laser source will no longer be applicable because of the uncertainty in phase unwrapping. As white light possesses the characteristic of interference length approximate to zero, applying it for micro profilometry can avoid the trouble and can yield accurate results. Using self-developed Mirau-type scanning interference microscope, a step-like sample was tested twice, with 128 scanning interferograms recorded for each test. To process each set of the interferograms, the method of spatial frequency domain analysis was adopted. That is, for each point, by use of Furrier transform, white-light interference intensities were decomposed in spatial frequency domain, thus obtaining phase values corresponding to different wavenumbers; by using least square fitting on phases and wave numbers, a group-velocity OPD was gained for the very point; and finally in terms of the relation between relative height and the group-velocity OPD, the profile of the test sample was obtained. Two tests yielded same profile result for the sample, and step heights obtained were 50.88 nm and 50.94 nm, respectively. Meantime, the sample was also measured with a Zygo Newview 7200 topography instrument, with same profile result obtained and step height differing by 0.9 nm. In addition, data processing results indicate that chromatic dispersion equal to and higher than 2nd order is negligible when applying spatial frequency domain analysis method.

  12. Imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for 3D cloud profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Carlson, David; Evans, Thomas; Schundler, Elizabeth; Todd, Lori; Mottus, Kathleen

    2010-04-01

    OPTRA has developed an imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared (I-OP-FTIR) spectrometer for 3D profiling of chemical and biological agent simulant plumes released into test ranges and chambers. An array of I-OP-FTIR instruments positioned around the perimeter of the test site, in concert with advanced spectroscopic algorithms, enables real time tomographic reconstruction of the plume. The approach is intended as a referee measurement for test ranges and chambers. This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort combines the instrumentation and spectroscopic capabilities of OPTRA, Inc. with the computed tomographic expertise of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In this paper, we summarize the design and build and detail system characterization and test of a prototype I-OP-FTIR instrument. System characterization includes radiometric performance and spectral resolution. Results from a series of tomographic reconstructions of sulfur hexafluoride plumes in a laboratory setting are also presented.

  13. Imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for 3D cloud profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mansur, David J.; Engel, James R.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Todd, Lori; Mottus, Kathleen

    2008-04-01

    OPTRA and University of North Carolina are developing an imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared (I-OP-FTIR) spectrometer for 3D profiling of chemical and biological agent simulant plumes released into test ranges and chambers. An array of I-OP-FTIR instruments positioned around the perimeter of the test site, in concert with advanced spectroscopic algorithms, enables real time tomographic reconstruction of the plume. The approach will be considered as a candidate referee measurement for test ranges and chambers. This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort combines the instrumentation and spectroscopic capabilities of OPTRA, Inc. with the computed tomographic expertise of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In this paper, we summarize progress to date and overall system performance projections based on the instrument, spectroscopy, and tomographic reconstruction accuracy. We then present a preliminary optical design of the I-OP-FTIR.

  14. Wrapping-free phase retrieval with applications to interferometry, 3D-shape profiling, and deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Perciante, César D; Strojnik, Marija; Paez, Gonzalo; Di Martino, J Matias; Ayubi, Gastón A; Flores, Jorge L; Ferrari, José A

    2015-04-01

    Phase unwrapping is probably the most challenging step in the phase retrieval process in phase-shifting and spatial-carrier interferometry. Likewise, phase unwrapping is required in 3D-shape profiling and deflectometry. In this paper, we present a novel phase retrieval method that completely sidesteps the phase unwrapping process, significantly eliminating the guessing in phase reconstruction and thus decreasing the time data processing. The proposed wrapping-free method is based on the direct integration of the spatial derivatives of the interference patterns under the single assumption that the phase is continuous. This assumption is valid in most physical applications. Validation experiments are presented confirming the robustness of the proposed method. PMID:25967217

  15. Modeling Diurnal and Seasonal 3D Light Profiles in Amazon Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.; Rubio, J.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.; Cook, B. D.; Hunter, M. O.; Yin, T.; Nagol, J. R.; Keller, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The complex horizontal and vertical structure in tropical forests generates a diversity of light environments for canopy and understory trees. These 3D light profiles are dynamic on diurnal and seasonal time scales based on changes in solar illumination and the fraction of diffuse light. Understanding this variability is critical for improving ecosystem models and interpreting optical and LiDAR remote sensing data from tropical forests. Here, we initialized the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model using dense airborne LiDAR data (>20 returns m2) from three forest sites in the central and eastern Amazon. Forest scenes derived from airborne LiDAR data were tested using modeled and observed large-footprint LiDAR data from the ICESat-GLAS sensor. Next, diurnal and seasonal profiles of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for each forest site were simulated under clear sky and cloudy conditions using DART. Incident PAR was summarized for canopy, understory, and ground levels. Our study illustrates the importance of realistic canopy models for accurate representation of LiDAR and optical radiative transfer. In particular, canopy rugosity and ground topography information from airborne LiDAR data provided critical 3D information that cannot be recreated using stem maps and allometric relationships for crown dimensions. The spatial arrangement of canopy trees altered PAR availability, even for dominant individuals, compared to downwelling measurements from nearby eddy flux towers. Pseudo-realistic branch and leaf architecture was also essential for recreating multiple scattering within canopies at near-infrared wavelengths commonly used for LiDAR remote sensing and quantifying PAR attenuation from shading within and between canopies. These findings point to the need for more spatial information on forest structure to improve the representation of light availability in models of tropical forest productivity.

  16. 3D Surface Profile and Color Stability of Tooth Colored Filling Materials after Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Irawan, Bryant Anthony; Irawan, Stacey Natalie; Masudi, Sam'an Malik; Sukminingrum, Ninin; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide home bleaching and in-office bleaching on the color stability and 3D surface profile of dental restorative filling materials. Thirty discs (n = 30) measure 6 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick for each of three restorative materials. These are nanofilled composite Filtek Z350 XT, the submicron composite Estelite Σ Quick, and nanofilled glass ionomer Ketac N100 nanoionomer and were fabricated in shade A2. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n = 10): subgroup A (Opalescence PF), subgroup B (Opalescence Boost in-office bleaching), and subgroup C (distilled water) serving as control. Samples were bleached according to the manufacturer's instructions for a period of two weeks. The Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE L*, a*, b*) system was chosen for image processing, while 3D surface profile was tested with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Statistical analyses were performed with the Mann-Whitney tests and Krusal-Wallis with a P value of ≤0.05. The three restorative materials showed significant color changes (ΔE); P ≤ 0.05. In diminishing order, the mean color changes recorded were Estelite Σ (3.82 ± 1.6) > Ketac Nano (2.97 ± 1.2) > Filtek Z350 XT (2.25 ± 1.0). However, none of the tested materials showed statistically significant changes in surface roughness; P > 0.05. PMID:26558267

  17. Impact of the biophysical features of a 3D gelatin microenvironment on glioblastoma malignancy.

    PubMed

    Pedron, S; Harley, B A C

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional tissue engineered constructs provide a platform to examine how the local extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the malignancy of cancers such as human glioblastoma multiforme. Improved resolution of how local matrix biophysical features impact glioma proliferation, genomic and signal transduction paths, as well as phenotypic malignancy markers would complement recent improvements in our understanding of molecular mechanisms associated with enhanced malignancy. Here, we report the use of a gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) platform to create libraries of three-dimensional biomaterials to identify combinations of biophysical features that promote malignant phenotypes of human U87MG glioma cells. We noted key biophysical properties, namely matrix density, crosslinking density, and biodegradability, that significantly impact glioma cell morphology, proliferation, and motility. Gene expression profiles and secreted markers of increased malignancy, notably VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-9, HIF-1, and the ECM protein fibronectin, were also significantly impacted by the local biophysical environment as well as matrix-induced deficits in diffusion-mediated oxygen and nutrient biotransport. Overall, this biomaterial system provides a flexible platform to explore the role biophysical factors play in the etiology, growth, and subsequent invasive spreading of gliomas. PMID:23559545

  18. Moiré deflectometry under incoherent illumination: 3D profiler for specular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Tomohiro; Kitayama, Tsunaji

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel method for measuring a curved specular surface profile, which is the moiré deflectometry under incoherent (white light) illumination. In our proposed system, moiré is produced by a superposition of two pairs of Ronchi gratings to obtain orthogonal components of a normal vector on a surface under test. The grating pair was moved along an axis perpendicular to the grating plane to modulate a spatial frequency of the moiré. The moiré is reflected by a specular object, then observed with a calibrated stereo camera. Normal vector distribution of the tested surface was measured by analysis of intensity oscillations captured by the stereo camera as a function of the position of the moved grating. A surface profile was reconstructed by an integration calculation. We successfully measured surface profiles of deeply curved mirrors with the curvature from -20 to 20 m-1 by our system. Moreover, part of a miniature vehicle body, which has a complex curved specular surface, was also measured. Additionally, we theoretically and experimentally studied a measurable angle variation of the normal vector on the tested surface by our measurement system. We found that our system can allow to measure the angle deviation of 0.05 deg of the normal vector. This method has no ambiguity of slope and height measurements which is appeared in conventional deflectmetric metrologies. Furthermore, our proposed system only needs a single step calibration. Hence, the methodology we proposed has a potential to be developed into a 3D profiler for complex specular surfaces.

  19. 3-D x-ray mirror metrology with a vertical scanning long trace profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Li, H.; Li, X.; Grindel, M.W.

    1996-09-01

    The long trace profiler (LTP) was originally developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the specific purpose of measuring the surface figure of large cylindrical mirrors used at grazing incidence in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. In its original configuration, it could measure only along one line down the center of the cylinder. A single linear profile is often sufficient to gauge the quality of the optical surface on these kinds of mirrors. For some applications it is necessary to measure the topography of the entire surface, not just along one line but over a grid that covers the entire surface area. We have modified a standard LTP to enable measurement of the complete surface of Wolter telescope optics in a vertical configuration. The vertical scanning LTP (VSLTP) is capable of producing a complete 3-D map of the surface topography errors relative to the ideal desired surface on complete segments of paraboloids and hyperboloids. The instrument uses a penta prism assembly to scan the probe beam in the longitudinal direction parallel to the mirror symmetry axis and uses a precision rotary stage to provide scans in the azimuthal direction. A Risley prism pair and a dove prism are used to orient the probe beam in the proper direction for the azimuthal scans. The repeatability of the prototype instrument is better than 20 nm over trace lengths of 35 mm with a slope measurement accuracy of about 1 microradian. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. 3-D Surface Depression Profiling Using High Frequency Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. This article shows quantitative surface topography profiles as obtained using only high-frequency focused air-coupled ultrasonic pulses. The profiles were obtained using a profiling system developed by NASA Glenn Research Center and Sonix, Inc (via a formal cooperative agreement). (The air transducers are available as off-the-shelf items from several companies.) The method is simple and reproducible because it relies mainly on knowledge and constancy of the sound velocity through the air. The air transducer is scanned across the surface and sends pulses to the sample surface where they are reflected back from the surface along the same path as the incident wave. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface are acquired and converted to depth/surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in air (V). The system has the ability to resolve surface depression variations as small as 25 microns, is useable over a 1.4 mm vertical depth range, and can profile large areas only limited by the scan limits of the particular ultrasonic system. (Best-case depth resolution is 0.25 microns which may be achievable with improved isolation from vibration and air currents.) The method using an optimized configuration is reasonably rapid and has all quantitative analysis facilities on-line including 2-D and 3-D visualization capability, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling capability. Air-coupled surface profilometry is applicable to plate-like and curved samples. In this article, results are shown for several proof-of-concept samples, plastic samples burned in microgravity on the STS-54 space shuttle mission, and a partially-coated cylindrical ceramic

  1. Modification of divertor heat and article flux profiles with applied 3D fields in NSTX H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Canik, John; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Maingi, Rajesh; Battaglia, D. J.

    2010-04-01

    Externally imposed non-axisymmetric magnetic perurbations are observed to alter divertor heat and particle flux profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The divertor profiles are foud to have a modust level of multiple local peaks, characteristic of strike poimt splitting or the "magnetis lob" structure, even before the application of the 3D fields in some (but not all) NSTX discharges. This is thought to be due to the intrinsic error fields. The applied 3D fields augmented the intrinsic strike point splitting, making the ampliture of local peaks, and valleys larger in the divertor profile and striations at the divertor surface brighter. The measured heat flux profile shows that the radial location and spacing of the strations are qualitativel consistent witth a vacuum field tracing calcultion. 3D field application did not change the peak divertor heat and particle fluxes at the toroidal location of measurement. Spatial characteristics of the observed patterns are also reported in the paper.

  2. A synergistic approach to the design, fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed micro and nano featured scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-02-01

    3D bioprinting has begun to show great promise in advancing the development of functional tissue/organ replacements. However, to realize the true potential of 3D bioprinted tissues for clinical use requires the fabrication of an interconnected and effective vascular network. Solving this challenge is critical, as human tissue relies on an adequate network of blood vessels to transport oxygen, nutrients, other chemicals, biological factors and waste, in and out of the tissue. Here, we have successfully designed and printed a series of novel 3D bone scaffolds with both bone formation supporting structures and highly interconnected 3D microvascular mimicking channels, for efficient and enhanced osteogenic bone regeneration as well as vascular cell growth. Using a chemical functionalization process, we have conjugated our samples with nano hydroxyapatite (nHA), for the creation of novel micro and nano featured devices for vascularized bone growth. We evaluated our scaffolds with mechanical testing, hydrodynamic measurements and in vitro human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion (4 h), proliferation (1, 3 and 5 d) and osteogenic differentiation (1, 2 and 3 weeks). These tests confirmed bone-like physical properties and vascular-like flow profiles, as well as demonstrated enhanced hMSC adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Additional in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells also demonstrated improved vascular cell growth, migration and organization on micro-nano featured scaffolds.

  3. A synergistic approach to the design, fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed micro and nano featured scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Benjamin; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-02-12

    3D bioprinting has begun to show great promise in advancing the development of functional tissue/organ replacements. However, to realize the true potential of 3D bioprinted tissues for clinical use requires the fabrication of an interconnected and effective vascular network. Solving this challenge is critical, as human tissue relies on an adequate network of blood vessels to transport oxygen, nutrients, other chemicals, biological factors and waste, in and out of the tissue. Here, we have successfully designed and printed a series of novel 3D bone scaffolds with both bone formation supporting structures and highly interconnected 3D microvascular mimicking channels, for efficient and enhanced osteogenic bone regeneration as well as vascular cell growth. Using a chemical functionalization process, we have conjugated our samples with nano hydroxyapatite (nHA), for the creation of novel micro and nano featured devices for vascularized bone growth. We evaluated our scaffolds with mechanical testing, hydrodynamic measurements and in vitro human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion (4 h), proliferation (1, 3 and 5 d) and osteogenic differentiation (1, 2 and 3 weeks). These tests confirmed bone-like physical properties and vascular-like flow profiles, as well as demonstrated enhanced hMSC adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Additional in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells also demonstrated improved vascular cell growth, migration and organization on micro-nano featured scaffolds. PMID:26758780

  4. Integration of a 3D perspective view in the navigation display: featuring pilot's mental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrecht, L.; Schmerwitz, S.

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic vision systems (SVS) appear as spreading technology in the avionic domain. Several studies prove enhanced situational awareness when using synthetic vision. Since the introduction of synthetic vision a steady change and evolution started concerning the primary flight display (PFD) and the navigation display (ND). The main improvements of the ND comprise the representation of colored ground proximity warning systems (EGPWS), weather radar, and TCAS information. Synthetic vision seems to offer high potential to further enhance cockpit display systems. Especially, concerning the current trend having a 3D perspective view in a SVS-PFD while leaving the navigational content as well as methods of interaction unchanged the question arouses if and how the gap between both displays might evolve to a serious problem. This issue becomes important in relation to the transition and combination of strategic and tactical flight guidance. Hence, pros and cons of 2D and 3D views generally as well as the gap between the egocentric perspective 3D view of the PFD and the exocentric 2D top and side view of the ND will be discussed. Further a concept for the integration of a 3D perspective view, i.e., bird's eye view, in synthetic vision ND will be presented. The combination of 2D and 3D views in the ND enables a better correlation of the ND and the PFD. Additionally, this supports the building of pilot's mental model. The authors believe it will improve the situational and spatial awareness. It might prove to further raise the safety margin when operating in mountainous areas.

  5. A Novel Medical Freehand Sketch 3D Model Retrieval Method by Dimensionality Reduction and Feature Vector Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Zhang; Sheng, Kang Bao

    2016-01-01

    To assist physicians to quickly find the required 3D model from the mass medical model, we propose a novel retrieval method, called DRFVT, which combines the characteristics of dimensionality reduction (DR) and feature vector transformation (FVT) method. The DR method reduces the dimensionality of feature vector; only the top M low frequency Discrete Fourier Transform coefficients are retained. The FVT method does the transformation of the original feature vector and generates a new feature vector to solve the problem of noise sensitivity. The experiment results demonstrate that the DRFVT method achieves more effective and efficient retrieval results than other proposed methods. PMID:27293478

  6. Segmentation of 3D EBSD data for subgrain boundary identification and feature characterization.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Andrew; Ferry, Michael; Bassman, Lori

    2016-02-01

    Subgrain structures formed during plastic deformation of metals can be observed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) but are challenging to identify automatically. We have adapted a 2D image segmentation technique, fast multiscale clustering (FMC), to 3D EBSD data using a novel variance function to accommodate quaternion data. This adaptation, which has been incorporated into the free open source texture analysis software package MTEX, is capable of segmenting based on subtle and gradual variation as well as on sharp boundaries within the data. FMC has been further modified to group the resulting closed 3D segment boundaries into distinct coherent surfaces based on local normals of a triangulated surface. We demonstrate the excellent capabilities of this technique with application to 3D EBSD data sets generated from cold rolled aluminum containing well-defined microbands, cold rolled and partly recrystallized extra low carbon steel microstructure containing three magnitudes of boundary misorientations, and channel-die plane strain compressed Goss-oriented nickel crystal containing microbands with very subtle changes in orientation. PMID:26630071

  7. Multi-resolution Gabor wavelet feature extraction for needle detection in 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtaherian, Arash; Zinger, Svitlana; Mihajlovic, Nenad; de With, Peter H. N.; Huang, Jinfeng; Ng, Gary C.; Korsten, Hendrikus H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound imaging is employed for needle guidance in various minimally invasive procedures such as biopsy guidance, regional anesthesia and brachytherapy. Unfortunately, a needle guidance using 2D ultrasound is very challenging, due to a poor needle visibility and a limited field of view. Nowadays, 3D ultrasound systems are available and more widely used. Consequently, with an appropriate 3D image-based needle detection technique, needle guidance and interventions may significantly be improved and simplified. In this paper, we present a multi-resolution Gabor transformation for an automated and reliable extraction of the needle-like structures in a 3D ultrasound volume. We study and identify the best combination of the Gabor wavelet frequencies. High precision in detecting the needle voxels leads to a robust and accurate localization of the needle for the intervention support. Evaluation in several ex-vivo cases shows that the multi-resolution analysis significantly improves the precision of the needle voxel detection from 0.23 to 0.32 at a high recall rate of 0.75 (gain 40%), where a better robustness and confidence were confirmed in the practical experiments.

  8. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  9. Interpretation and mapping of geological features using mobile devices for 3D outcrop modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Simon J.; Kehl, Christian; Mullins, James R.; Howell, John A.

    2016-04-01

    Advances in 3D digital geometric characterisation have resulted in widespread adoption in recent years, with photorealistic models utilised for interpretation, quantitative and qualitative analysis, as well as education, in an increasingly diverse range of geoscience applications. Topographic models created using lidar and photogrammetry, optionally combined with imagery from sensors such as hyperspectral and thermal cameras, are now becoming commonplace in geoscientific research. Mobile devices (tablets and smartphones) are maturing rapidly to become powerful field computers capable of displaying and interpreting 3D models directly in the field. With increasingly high-quality digital image capture, combined with on-board sensor pose estimation, mobile devices are, in addition, a source of primary data, which can be employed to enhance existing geological models. Adding supplementary image textures and 2D annotations to photorealistic models is therefore a desirable next step to complement conventional field geoscience. This contribution reports on research into field-based interpretation and conceptual sketching on images and photorealistic models on mobile devices, motivated by the desire to utilise digital outcrop models to generate high quality training images (TIs) for multipoint statistics (MPS) property modelling. Representative training images define sedimentological concepts and spatial relationships between elements in the system, which are subsequently modelled using artificial learning to populate geocellular models. Photorealistic outcrop models are underused sources of quantitative and qualitative information for generating TIs, explored further in this research by linking field and office workflows through the mobile device. Existing textured models are loaded to the mobile device, allowing rendering in a 3D environment. Because interpretation in 2D is more familiar and comfortable for users, the developed application allows new images to be captured

  10. Automatic segmentation and 3D feature extraction of protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Moreira, António H. J.; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Oliveira, João; Dias, Nuno; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Vilaça, João L.

    2012-03-01

    In the last years, it has become increasingly clear that neurodegenerative diseases involve protein aggregation, a process often used as disease progression readout and to develop therapeutic strategies. This work presents an image processing tool to automatic segment, classify and quantify these aggregates and the whole 3D body of the nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans. A total of 150 data set images, containing different slices, were captured with a confocal microscope from animals of distinct genetic conditions. Because of the animals' transparency, most of the slices pixels appeared dark, hampering their body volume direct reconstruction. Therefore, for each data set, all slices were stacked in one single 2D image in order to determine a volume approximation. The gradient of this image was input to an anisotropic diffusion algorithm that uses the Tukey's biweight as edge-stopping function. The image histogram median of this outcome was used to dynamically determine a thresholding level, which allows the determination of a smoothed exterior contour of the worm and the medial axis of the worm body from thinning its skeleton. Based on this exterior contour diameter and the medial animal axis, random 3D points were then calculated to produce a volume mesh approximation. The protein aggregations were subsequently segmented based on an iso-value and blended with the resulting volume mesh. The results obtained were consistent with qualitative observations in literature, allowing non-biased, reliable and high throughput protein aggregates quantification. This may lead to a significant improvement on neurodegenerative diseases treatment planning and interventions prevention.

  11. Fully automatic detection of salient features in 3-d transesophageal images.

    PubMed

    Curiale, Ariel H; Haak, Alexander; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Ren, Ben; Aja-Fernández, Santiago; Bosch, Johan G

    2014-12-01

    Most automated segmentation approaches to the mitral valve and left ventricle in 3-D echocardiography require a manual initialization. In this article, we propose a fully automatic scheme to initialize a multicavity segmentation approach in 3-D transesophageal echocardiography by detecting the left ventricle long axis, the mitral valve and the aortic valve location. Our approach uses a probabilistic and structural tissue classification to find structures such as the mitral and aortic valves; the Hough transform for circles to find the center of the left ventricle; and multidimensional dynamic programming to find the best position for the left ventricle long axis. For accuracy and agreement assessment, the proposed method was evaluated in 19 patients with respect to manual landmarks and as initialization of a multicavity segmentation approach for the left ventricle, the right ventricle, the left atrium, the right atrium and the aorta. The segmentation results revealed no statistically significant differences between manual and automated initialization in a paired t-test (p > 0.05). Additionally, small biases between manual and automated initialization were detected in the Bland-Altman analysis (bias, variance) for the left ventricle (-0.04, 0.10); right ventricle (-0.07, 0.18); left atrium (-0.01, 0.03); right atrium (-0.04, 0.13); and aorta (-0.05, 0.14). These results indicate that the proposed approach provides robust and accurate detection to initialize a multicavity segmentation approach without any user interaction. PMID:25308940

  12. Multi-view alignment with database of features for an improved usage of high-end 3D scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonarrigo, Francesco; Signoroni, Alberto; Leonardi, Riccardo

    2012-12-01

    The usability of high-precision and high-resolution 3D scanners is of crucial importance due to the increasing demand of 3D data in both professional and general-purpose applications. Simplified, intuitive and rapid object modeling requires effective and automated alignment pipelines capable to trace back each independently acquired range image of the scanned object into a common reference system. To this end, we propose a reliable and fast feature-based multiple-view alignment pipeline that allows interactive registration of multiple views according to an unchained acquisition procedure. A robust alignment of each new view is estimated with respect to the previously aligned data through fast extraction, representation and matching of feature points detected in overlapping areas from different views. The proposed pipeline guarantees a highly reliable alignment of dense range image datasets on a variety of objects in few seconds per million of points.

  13. Implementation of a 3D-Var system for atmospheric profiling data assimilation into the RAMS model: initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the current status of development of a three-dimensional variational data assimilation system (3D-Var). The system can be used with different numerical weather prediction models, but it is mainly designed to be coupled with the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS). Analyses are given for the following parameters: zonal and meridional wind components, temperature, relative humidity, and geopotential height. Important features of the data assimilation system are the use of incremental formulation of the cost function, and the representation of the background error by recursive filters and the eigenmodes of the vertical component of the background error covariance matrix. This matrix is estimated by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) method. The data assimilation and forecasting system is applied to the real context of atmospheric profiling data assimilation, and in particular to the short-term wind prediction. The analyses are produced at 20 km horizontal resolution over central Europe and extend over the whole troposphere. Assimilated data are vertical soundings of wind, temperature, and relative humidity from radiosondes, and wind measurements of the European wind profiler network. Results show the validity of the analyses because they are closer to the observations (lower root mean square error (RMSE)) compared to the background (higher RMSE), and the differences of the RMSEs are in agreement with the data assimilation settings. To quantify the impact of improved initial conditions on the short-term forecast, the analyses are used as initial conditions of three-hours forecasts of the RAMS model. In particular two sets of forecasts are produced: (a) the first uses the ECMWF analysis/forecast cycle as initial and boundary conditions; (b) the second uses the analyses produced by the 3D-Var as initial conditions, then it is driven by the ECMWF forecast. The improvement is quantified by considering the horizontal components of the wind

  14. Classification of Informal Settlements Through the Integration of 2d and 3d Features Extracted from Uav Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, C. M.; Persello, C.; Sliuzas, R.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are capable of providing very high resolution and up-to-date information to support informal settlement upgrading projects. In order to provide accurate basemaps, urban scene understanding through the identification and classification of buildings and terrain is imperative. However, common characteristics of informal settlements such as small, irregular buildings with heterogeneous roof material and large presence of clutter challenge state-of-the-art algorithms. Especially the dense buildings and steeply sloped terrain cause difficulties in identifying elevated objects. This work investigates how 2D radiometric and textural features, 2.5D topographic features, and 3D geometric features obtained from UAV imagery can be integrated to obtain a high classification accuracy in challenging classification problems for the analysis of informal settlements. It compares the utility of pixel-based and segment-based features obtained from an orthomosaic and DSM with point-based and segment-based features extracted from the point cloud to classify an unplanned settlement in Kigali, Rwanda. Findings show that the integration of 2D and 3D features leads to higher classification accuracies.

  15. FDSOI bottom MOSFETs stability versus top transistor thermal budget featuring 3D monolithic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenouillet-Beranger, C.; Previtali, B.; Batude, P.; Nemouchi, F.; Cassé, M.; Garros, X.; Tosti, L.; Rambal, N.; Lafond, D.; Dansas, H.; Pasini, L.; Brunet, L.; Deprat, F.; Grégoire, M.; Mellier, M.; Vinet, M.

    2015-11-01

    To set up specification for 3D monolithic integration, for the first time, the thermal stability of state-of-the-art FDSOI (Fully Depleted SOI) transistors electrical performance is quantified. Post fabrication annealings are performed on FDSOI transistors to mimic the thermal budget associated to top layer processing. Degradation of the silicide for thermal treatments beyond 400 °C is identified as the main responsible for performance degradation for PMOS devices. For the NMOS transistors, arsenic (As) and phosphorus (P) dopants deactivation adds up to this effect. By optimizing both the n-type extension implantations and the bottom silicide process, thermal stability of FDSOI can be extended to allow relaxing upwards the thermal budget authorized for top transistors processing.

  16. 3D spheroid cultures improve the metabolic gene expression profiles of HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yu; Hori, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Urashima, Toshiki; Ohara, Yasunori; Tanaka, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    3D (three-dimensional) cultures are considered to be an effective method for toxicological studies; however, little evidence has been reported whether 3D cultures have an impact on hepatocellular physiology regarding lipid or glucose metabolism. In the present study, we conducted physiological characterization of hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and HepaRG cells cultured in 3D conditions using a hanging drop method to verify the effect of culture environment on cellular responses. Apo (Apolipoprotein)B as well as albumin secretion was augmented by 3D cultures. Expression of genes related to not only drug, but also glucose and lipid metabolism were significantly enhanced in 3D cultured HepaRG spheroids. Furthermore, mRNA levels of CYP (cytochrome P450) enzymes following exposure to corresponding inducers increased under the 3D condition. These data suggest that this simple 3D culture system without any special biomaterials can improve liver-specific characteristics including lipid metabolism. Considering that the system enables high-throughput assay, it may become a powerful tool for compound screening concerning hepatocellular responses in order to identify potential drugs. PMID:26182370

  17. Geometric and topological feature extraction of linear segments from 2D cross-section data of 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Rajesh; Harding, Kevin; Du, Xiaoming; Lucas, Vincent; Liao, Yi; Paul, Ratnadeep; Jia, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Optical measurement techniques are often employed to digitally capture three dimensional shapes of components. The digital data density output from these probes range from a few discrete points to exceeding millions of points in the point cloud. The point cloud taken as a whole represents a discretized measurement of the actual 3D shape of the surface of the component inspected to the measurement resolution of the sensor. Embedded within the measurement are the various features of the part that make up its overall shape. Part designers are often interested in the feature information since those relate directly to part function and to the analytical models used to develop the part design. Furthermore, tolerances are added to these dimensional features, making their extraction a requirement for the manufacturing quality plan of the product. The task of "extracting" these design features from the point cloud is a post processing task. Due to measurement repeatability and cycle time requirements often automated feature extraction from measurement data is required. The presence of non-ideal features such as high frequency optical noise and surface roughness can significantly complicate this feature extraction process. This research describes a robust process for extracting linear and arc segments from general 2D point clouds, to a prescribed tolerance. The feature extraction process generates the topology, specifically the number of linear and arc segments, and the geometry equations of the linear and arc segments automatically from the input 2D point clouds. This general feature extraction methodology has been employed as an integral part of the automated post processing algorithms of 3D data of fine features.

  18. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer's disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may be

  19. Efficient feature-based 2D/3D registration of transesophageal echocardiography to x-ray fluoroscopy for cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Charles R.; Speidel, Michael A.; Raval, Amish N.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel 2D/ 3D registration algorithm for fusion between transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and X-ray fluoroscopy (XRF). The TEE probe is modeled as a subset of 3D gradient and intensity point features, which facilitates efficient 3D-to-2D perspective projection. A novel cost-function, based on a combination of intensity and edge features, evaluates the registration cost value without the need for time-consuming generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Validation experiments were performed with simulations and phantom data. For simulations, in silica XRF images of a TEE probe were generated in a number of different pose configurations using a previously acquired CT image. Random misregistrations were applied and our method was used to recover the TEE probe pose and compare the result to the ground truth. Phantom experiments were performed by attaching fiducial markers externally to a TEE probe, imaging the probe with an interventional cardiac angiographic x-ray system, and comparing the pose estimated from the external markers to that estimated from the TEE probe using our algorithm. Simulations found a 3D target registration error of 1.08(1.92) mm for biplane (monoplane) geometries, while the phantom experiment found a 2D target registration error of 0.69mm. For phantom experiments, we demonstrated a monoplane tracking frame-rate of 1.38 fps. The proposed feature-based registration method is computationally efficient, resulting in near real-time, accurate image based registration between TEE and XRF.

  20. Form feature and tolerance transfer from a 3D model to a setup planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong-Chao; Zhou, Feng; Kuo, Tsai-Chi; Huang, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Currently, most CAD systems, even the feature-based design systems which were developed for the need of CAPP, cannot provide exact information of an object (e.g., dimensions and tolerances). Some feature-based design systems can provide product data directly or indirectly; however, most CAPP systems still does not have interface with those CAD systems. The product data required by these CAPP systems usually has a specific format. In the CAPP system, it is essential for setup planning to ensure the precision of machining processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an interface with CAD models that the part data file can be obtained directly from CAD representation. This paper proposes an approach to integrate the setup planning system with a feature-based CAD system. By using an object-oriented approach - Product Data Translator (PDT), the compute-automated extraction of geometry and complete tolerance information is achieved; and the automated generation of tool approach direction was developed.

  1. Topology-based Simplification for Feature Extraction from 3D Scalar Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, A; Natarajan, V; Pascucci, V; Bremer, P; Hamann, B

    2005-10-13

    This paper describes a topological approach for simplifying continuous functions defined on volumetric domains. We present a combinatorial algorithm that simplifies the Morse-Smale complex by repeated application of two atomic operations that removes pairs of critical points. The Morse-Smale complex is a topological data structure that provides a compact representation of gradient flows between critical points of a function. Critical points paired by the Morse-Smale complex identify topological features and their importance. The simplification procedure leaves important critical points untouched, and is therefore useful for extracting desirable features. We also present a visualization of the simplified topology.

  2. Visualizing and Tracking Evolving Features in 3D Unstructured and Adaptive Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, D.; Zabusky, N.

    2002-08-01

    The massive amounts of time-varying datasets being generated demand new visualization and quantification techniques. Visualization alone is not sufficient. Without proper measurement information/computations real science cannot be done. Our focus is this work was to combine visualization with quantification of the data to allow for advanced querying and searching. As part of this proposal, we have developed a feature extraction adn tracking methodology which allows researcher to identify features of interest and follow their evolution over time. The implementation is distributed and operates over data In-situ: where it is stored and when it was computed.

  3. Surface processes on the asteroid deduced from the external 3D shapes and surface features of Itokawa particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Matsumoto, T.

    2015-10-01

    Particles on the surface of S-type Asteroid 25143 Itokawa were successfully recovered by the Hayabusa mission of JAXA (e.g., [1,2]). They are not only the first samples recovered from an asteroid, but also the second extraterrestrial regolith to have been sampled, the first being the Moon by Apollo and Luna missions. The analysis of tiny sample particles (20-200 μm) shows that the Itokawa surface material is consistent with LL chondrites suffered by space weathering as expected and brought an end to the origin of meteorites (e.g., [2-4]). In addition, the examination of Itokawa particles allow studies of surface processes on the asteroid because regolith particles can be regarded as an interface with the space environment, where the impacts of small objects and irradiation by the solar wind and galactic cosmic rays should have been recorded. External 3D shapes and surface features of Itokawa regolith particles were examined. Two kinds of surface modification, formation of space-weathering rims mainly by solar wind implantation and surface abrasion by grain migration, were recognized. Spectral change of the asteroid proceeded by formation of space-weathering rims and refreshment of the regolith surfaces. External 3D shapes and surface morphologies of the regolith particles can provide information about formation and evolution history of regolith particles in relation to asteroidal surface processes. 3D shapes of Itokawa regolith particles were obtained using microtomography [3]. The surface nanomiromorpholgy of Itokawa particles were also observed using FE-SEM [5]. However, the number of particles was limited and genial feature on the surface morphology has not been understood. In this study, the surface morphology of Itokawa regolith particles was systematically investigated together with their 3D structures.

  4. Generation of 3D ellipsoidal laser beams by means of a profiled volume chirped Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, S. Yu; Poteomkin, A. K.; Gacheva, E. I.; Andrianov, A. V.; Zelenogorskii, V. V.; Vasiliev, R.; Smirnov, V.; Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Khazanov, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for shaping photocathode laser driver pulses into 3D ellipsoidal form has been proposed and implemented. The key idea of the method is to use a chirped Bragg grating recorded within the ellipsoid volume and absent outside it. If a beam with a constant (within the grating reflection band) spectral density and uniform (within the grating aperture) cross-section is incident on such a grating, the reflected beam will be a 3D ellipsoid in space and time. 3D ellipsoidal beams were obtained in experiment for the first time. It is expected that such laser beams will allow the electron bunch emittance to be reduced when applied at R± photo injectors.

  5. Stereo 3-D Imagery Uses for Definition of Geologic Structures and Geomorphic Features (Anaglyph colored glasses employed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, B. G.; Fuente, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Recently completed projects incorporating TopoMorpher* digital images as adjuncts to commonly employed tools has emphasized the distinct advantage gained with STEREO 3-D DIGITAL IMAGERY. By manipulating scale, relief (four types of digital shading), sun angle, direction of viewing and tilt of scene, etc. -- to produce differing views of the same terrain -- aids in identifying, tracing, and interpreting ground surface anomalies. *TopoMorpher is a digital software product of Eighteen Software (18 software.com). The advantage of Stereo 3-D views combined with digital removal of vegetation which blocked interpretation (commonly called 'bare earth/naked' views) cannot be over-emphasized. The TopoMorpher program creates scenes transferable to disk for printing at any size. Included is with computer projector which allows large display and discussion ease for groups. The examples include (1) fault systems for targeting water well locations in bedrock and (2) delineation of debris slide and avalanche terrain. Combining geologic mapping and spring locations with Stereo 3-D TopoMorpher tracing of fault lineaments has allowed targeting of water well drilling sites. Selection of geophysical study areas for well siting has been simplified. Stereo 3-D TopoMorpher has a specific "relief/terrain setting" to define potential failure sites by producing detailed colored slope maps keyed to field-data derived parameters. Posters display individual project images and large scale overviews for identifying unusual major terrain features. Images at scales using 10 and 30 meter digital data as well as Lidar (< 1 meter) will be shown.

  6. Feature extraction algorithm for 3D scene modeling and visualization using monostatic SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Julie A.; Moses, Randolph L.

    2006-05-01

    We present a feature extraction algorithm to detect scattering centers in three dimensions using monostatic synthetic aperture radar imagery. We develop attributed scattering center models that describe the radar response of canonical shapes. We employ these models to characterize a complex target geometry as a superposition of simpler, low-dimensional structures. Such a characterization provides a means for target visualization. Fitting an attributed scattering model to sensed radar data is comprised of two problems: detection and estimation. The detection problem is to find canonical targets in clutter. The estimation problem then fits the detected canonical shape model with parameters, such as size and orientation, that correspond to the measured target response. We present an algorithm to detect canonical scattering structures amidst clutter and to estimate the corresponding model parameters. We employ full-polarimetric imagery to accurately classify canonical shapes. Interformetric processing allows us to estimate scattering center locations in three-dimensions. We apply the algorithm to scattering prediction data of a simple scene comprised of canonical scatterers and to scattering predictions of a backhoe.

  7. High Resolution Prediction of Calcium-Binding Sites in 3D Protein Structures Using FEATURE

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metal-binding proteins are ubiquitous in biological systems ranging from enzymes to cell surface receptors. Among the various biologically active metal ions, calcium plays a large role in regulating cellular and physiological changes. With the increasing number of high-quality crystal structures of proteins associated with their metal ion ligands, many groups have built models to identify Ca2+ sites in proteins, utilizing information such as structure, geometry, or homology to do the inference. We present a FEATURE-based approach in building such a model and show that our model is able to discriminate between nonsites and calcium-binding sites with a very high precision of more than 98%. We demonstrate the high specificity of our model by applying it to test sets constructed from other ions. We also introduce an algorithm to convert high scoring regions into specific site predictions and demonstrate the usage by scanning a test set of 91 calcium-binding protein structures (190 calcium sites). The algorithm has a recall of more than 93% on the test set with predictions found within 3 Å of the actual sites. PMID:26226489

  8. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer’s disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may

  9. Implementation of a 3-D-Var system for atmospheric profiling data assimilation into the RAMS model: initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, S.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the current status of development of a three-dimensional variational data assimilation system. The system can be used with different numerical weather prediction models, but it is mainly designed to be coupled with the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS). Analyses are given for the following parameters: zonal and meridional wind components, temperature, relative humidity, and geopotential height. Important features of the data assimilation system are the use of incremental formulation of the cost-function, and the use of an analysis space represented by recursive filters and eigenmodes of the vertical background error matrix. This matrix and the length-scale of the recursive filters are estimated by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) method. The data assimilation and forecasting system is applied to the real context of atmospheric profiling data assimilation, and in particular to the short-term wind prediction. The analyses are produced at 20 km horizontal resolution over central Europe and extend over the whole troposphere. Assimilated data are vertical soundings of wind, temperature, and relative humidity from radiosondes, and wind measurements of the European wind profiler network. Results show the validity of the analysis solutions because they are closer to the observations (lower RMSE) compared to the background (higher RMSE), and the differences of the RMSEs are consistent with the data assimilation settings. To quantify the impact of improved initial conditions on the short-term forecast, the analyses are used as initial conditions of a three-hours forecast of the RAMS model. In particular two sets of forecasts are produced: (a) the first uses the ECMWF analysis/forecast cycle as initial and boundary conditions; (b) the second uses the analyses produced by the 3-D-Var scheme as initial conditions, then is driven by the ECMWF forecast. The improvement is quantified by considering the horizontal components of the wind, which

  10. Generated 3D-common feature hypotheses using the HipHop method for developing new topoisomerase I inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Sanaz; Yilmaz, Serap; Ertan-Bolelli, Tugba; Yildiz, Ilkay

    2015-07-01

    The continued interest in designing novel topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibitors and the lack of adequate ligand-based computer-aided drug discovery efforts combined with the drawbacks of structure-based design prompted us to explore the possibility of developing ligand-based three-dimensional (3D) pharmacophore(s). This approach avoids the pitfalls of structure-based techniques because it only focuses on common features among known ligands; furthermore, the pharmacophore model can be used as 3D search queries to discover new Topo I inhibitory scaffolds. In this article, we employed the HipHop module using Discovery Studio to construct plausible binding hypotheses for clinically used Topo I inhibitors, such as camptothecin, topotecan, belotecan, and SN-38, which is an active metabolite of irinotecan. The docked pose of topotecan was selected as a reference compound. The first hypothesis (Hypo 01) among the obtained 10 hypotheses was chosen for further analysis. Hypo 01 had six features, which were two hydrogen-bond acceptors, one hydrogen-bond donor, one hydrophob aromatic and one hydrophob aliphatic, and one ring aromatic. Our obtained hypothesis was checked by using some of the aromathecin derivatives which were published for their Topo I inhibitory potency. Moreover, five structures were found to be possible anti-Topo I compounds from the DruglikeDiverse database. From this research, it can be suggested that our model could be useful for further studies in order to design new potent Topo I-targeting antitumor drugs. PMID:25914208

  11. Profile of students' comprehension of 3D molecule representation and its interconversion on chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyarini, M.; Liliasari, Kadarohman, Asep; Martoprawiro, Muhamad A.

    2016-02-01

    This study aims at describing (1) students' level comprehension; (2) factors causing difficulties to 3D comprehend molecule representation and its interconversion on chirality. Data was collected using multiple-choice test consisting of eight questions. The participants were required to give answers along with their reasoning. The test was developed based on the indicators of concept comprehension. The study was conducted to 161 college students enrolled in stereochemistry topic in the odd semester (2014/2015) from two LPTK (teacher training institutes) in Bandar Lampung and Gorontalo, and one public university in Bandung. The result indicates that college students' level of comprehension towards 3D molecule representations and its inter-conversion was 5% on high level, 22 % on the moderate level, and 73 % on the low level. The dominant factors identified as the cause of difficulties to comprehend 3D molecule representation and its interconversion were (i) the lack of spatial awareness, (ii) violation of absolute configuration determination rules, (iii) imprecise placement of observers, (iv) the lack of rotation operation, and (v) the lack of understanding of correlation between the representations. This study recommends that learning show more rigorous spatial awareness training tasks accompanied using dynamic visualization media of molecules associated. Also students learned using static molecular models can help them overcome their difficulties encountered.

  12. 3D Simulation of Velocity Profile of Turbulent Flow in Open Channel with Complex Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Benoumessad; Ilhem, Kriba; Ali, Fourar; Abdelbaki, Djebaili

    Simulation of open channel flow or river flow presents unique challenge to numerical simulators, which is widely used in the applications of computational fluid dynamics. The prediction is extremely difficult because the flow in open channel is usually transient and turbulent, the geometry is irregular and curved, and the free-surface elevation is varying with time. The results from a 3D non-linear k- ɛ turbulence model are presented to investigate the flow structure, the velocity distribution and mass transport process in a meandering compound open channel and a straight open channel. The 3D numerical model for calculating flow is set up in cylinder coordinates in order to calculate the complex boundary channel. The finite volume method is used to disperse the governing equations and the SIMPLE algorithm is applied to acquire the coupling of velocity and pressure. The non-linear k- ɛ turbulent model has good useful value because of taking into account the anisotropy and not increasing the computational time. The main contributions of this study are developing a numerical method that can be applied to predict the flow in river bends with various bend curvatures and different width-depth ratios. This study demonstrates that the 3D non-linear k- ɛ turbulence model can be used for analyzing flow structures, the velocity distribution and pollutant transport in the complex boundary open channel, this model is applicable for real river and wetland problem.

  13. Obtaining 3d models of surface snow and ice features (penitentes) with a Xbox Kinect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Partan, Benjamin; Pętlicki, Michał; MacDonell, Shelley

    2014-05-01

    Penitentes are snow or ice spikes that can reach several metres in height. They are a common feature of snow and ice surfaces in the semi-arid Andes as their formation is favoured by very low humidity, persistently low temperatures and sustained high solar radiation. While the conditions of their formation are relatively well constrained it is not yet clear how their presence influences the rate of mass loss and meltwater production from the mountain cryosphere and there is a need for accurate measurements of ablation within penitente fields through time in order to evaluate how well existing energy balance models perform for surfaces with penitentes. The complex surface morphology poses a challenge to measuring the mass loss at snow or glacier surfaces as (i) the spatial distribution of surface lowering within a penitente field is very heterogeneous, and (ii) the steep walls and sharp edges of the penitentes limit the line of sight view for surveying from fixed positions. In this work we explored whether these problems can be solved by using the Xbox Kinect sensor to generate small scale digital terrain models (DTMs) of sample areas of snow and ice penitentes. The study site was Glaciar Tapado in Chile (30°08'S; 69°55'W) where three sample sites were monitored from November 2013 to January 2014. The range of the Kinect sensor was found to be restricted to about 1 m over snow and ice, and scanning was only possible after dusk. Moving the sensor around the penitente field was challenging and often resulted in fragmented scans. However, despite these challenges, the scans obtained could be successfully combined in MeshLab software to produce good surface representations of the penitentes. GPS locations of target stakes in the sample plots allow the DTMs to be orientated correctly in space so the morphology of the penitente field and the volume loss through time can be fully described. At the study site in snow penitentes the Kinect DTM was compared with the quality

  14. Techniques for Revealing 3d Hidden Archeological Features: Morphological Residual Models as Virtual-Polynomial Texture Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, H.; Martínez Rubio, J.; Elorza Arana, A.

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments in 3D scanning technologies are not been accompanied by visualization interfaces. We are still using the same types of visual codes as when maps and drawings were made by hand. The available information in 3D scanning data sets is not being fully exploited by current visualization techniques. In this paper we present recent developments regarding the use of 3D scanning data sets for revealing invisible information from archaeological sites. These sites are affected by a common problem, decay processes, such as erosion, that never ceases its action and endangers the persistence of last vestiges of some peoples and cultures. Rock art engravings, or epigraphical inscriptions, are among the most affected by these processes because they are, due to their one nature, carved at the surface of rocks often exposed to climatic agents. The study and interpretation of these motifs and texts is strongly conditioned by the degree of conservation of the imprints left by our ancestors. Every single detail in the remaining carvings can make a huge difference in the conclusions taken by specialists. We have selected two case-studies severely affected by erosion to present the results of the on-going work dedicated to explore in new ways the information contained in 3D scanning data sets. A new method for depicting subtle morphological features in the surface of objects or sites has been developed. It allows to contrast human patterns still present at the surface but invisible to naked eye or by any other archaeological inspection technique. It was called Morphological Residual Model (MRM) because of its ability to contrast the shallowest morphological details, to which we refer as residuals, contained in the wider forms of the backdrop. Afterwards, we have simulated the process of building Polynomial Texture Maps - a widespread technique that as been contributing to archaeological studies for some years - in a 3D virtual environment using the results of MRM

  15. Quantitative validation of the 3D SAR profile of hyperthermia applicators using the gamma method.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, Maarten; Samaras, Theodoros; Chavannes, Nicolas; van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2007-06-01

    For quality assurance of hyperthermia treatment planning systems, quantitative validation of the electromagnetic model of an applicator is essential. The objective of this study was to validate a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model implementation of the Lucite cone applicator (LCA) for superficial hyperthermia. The validation involved (i) the assessment of the match between the predicted and measured 3D specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution, and (ii) the assessment of the ratio between model power and real-world power. The 3D SAR distribution of seven LCAs was scanned in a phantom bath using the DASY4 dosimetric measurement system. The same set-up was modelled in SEMCAD X. The match between the predicted and the measured SAR distribution was quantified with the gamma method, which combines distance-to-agreement and dose difference criteria. Good quantitative agreement was observed: more than 95% of the measurement points met the acceptance criteria 2 mm/2% for all applicators. The ratio between measured and predicted power absorption ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 (mean 0.85). This study shows that quantitative validation of hyperthermia applicator models is feasible and is worth considering as a part of hyperthermia quality assurance procedures. PMID:17505090

  16. Recent Improvements to CALIOP Level 3 Aerosol Profile Product for Global 3-D Aerosol Extinction Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, J. L.; Getzewich, B. J.; Winker, D. M.; Vaughan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    With nine years of retrievals, the CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product provides an unprecedented synopsis of aerosol extinction in three dimensions and the potential to quantify changes in aerosol distributions over time. The CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product, initially released as a beta product in 2011, reports monthly averages of quality-screened aerosol extinction profiles on a uniform latitude/longitude grid for different cloud-cover scenarios, called "sky conditions". This presentation demonstrates improvements to the second version of the product which will be released in September 2015. The largest improvements are the new sky condition definitions which parse the atmosphere into "cloud-free" views accessible to passive remote sensors, "all-sky" views accessible to active remote sensors and "cloudy-sky" views for opaque and transparent clouds which were previously inaccessible to passive remote sensors. Taken together, the new sky conditions comprehensively summarize CALIOP aerosol extinction profiles for a broad range of scientific queries. In addition to dust-only extinction profiles, the new version will include polluted-dust and smoke-only extinction averages. A new method is adopted for averaging dust-only extinction profiles to reduce high biases which exist in the beta version of the level 3 aerosol profile product. This presentation justifies the new averaging methodology and demonstrates vertical profiles of dust and smoke extinction over Africa during the biomass burning season. Another crucial advancement demonstrated in this presentation is a new approach for computing monthly mean aerosol optical depth which removes low biases reported in the beta version - a scenario unique to lidar datasets.

  17. Sub-100 nm biodegradable nanoparticles: in vitro release features and toxicity testing in 2D and 3D cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Yu, Hui; Belli, Valentina; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2013-02-01

    A big challenge in tumor targeting by nanoparticles (NPs), taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention effect, is the fabrication of small size devices for enhanced tumor penetration, which is considered fundamental to improve chemotherapy efficacy. The purposes of this study are (i) to engineer the formulation of doxorubicin-loaded poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) NPs to obtain <100 nm devices and (ii) to translate standard 2D cytotoxicity studies to 3D collagen systems in which an initial step gradient of the NPs is present. Doxorubicin release can be prolonged for days to weeks depending on the NP formulation and the pH of the release medium. Sub-100 nm NPs are effectively internalized by HeLa cells in 2D and are less cytotoxic than free doxorubicin. In 3D, <100 nm NPs are significantly more toxic than larger ones towards HeLa cells, and the cell death rate is affected by the contributions of drug release and device transport through collagen. Thus, the reduction of NP size is a fundamental feature from both a technological and a biological point of view and must be properly engineered to optimize the tumor response to the NPs.

  18. The Radiological Feature of Anterior Occiput-to-Axis Screw Fixation as it Guides the Screw Trajectory on 3D Printed Models: A Feasibility Study on 3D Images and 3D Printed Models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Wan-Qing; Shao, Zhen-Xuan; Yang, Xin-Dong; Wang, Jian-Shun; Xu, Hua-Zi; Chi, Yong-Long

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Anterior occiput-to-axis screw fixation is more suitable than a posterior approach for some patients with a history of posterior surgery. The complex osseous anatomy between the occiput and the axis causes a high risk of injury to neurological and vascular structures, and it is important to have an accurate screw trajectory to guide anterior occiput-to-axis screw fixation. Thirty computed tomography (CT) scans of upper cervical spines were obtained for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Cylinders (1.75 mm radius) were drawn to simulate the trajectory of an anterior occiput-to-axis screw. The imitation screw was adjusted to 4 different angles and measured, as were the values of the maximized anteroposterior width and the left-right width of the occiput (C0) to the C1 and C1 to C2 joints. Then, the 3D models were printed, and an angle guide device was used to introduce the screws into the 3D models referring to the angles calculated from the 3D images. We found the screw angle ranged from α1 (left: 4.99 ± 4.59°; right: 4.28 ± 5.45°) to α2 (left: 20.22 ± 3.61°; right: 19.63 ± 4.94°); on the lateral view, the screw angle ranged from β1 (left: 13.13 ± 4.93°; right: 11.82 ± 5.64°) to β2 (left: 34.86 ± 6.00°; right: 35.01 ± 5.77°). No statistically significant difference was found between the data of the left and right sides. On the 3D printed models, all of the anterior occiput-to-axis screws were successfully introduced, and none of them penetrated outside of the cortex; the mean α4 was 12.00 ± 4.11 (left) and 12.25 ± 4.05 (right), and the mean β4 was 23.44 ± 4.21 (left) and 22.75 ± 4.41 (right). No significant difference was found between α4 and β4 on the 3D printed models and α3 and β3 calculated from the 3D digital images of the left and right sides. Aided with the angle guide device, we could achieve an optimal screw trajectory for anterior occiput-to-axis screw fixation on

  19. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  20. An intelligent recovery progress evaluation system for ACL reconstructed subjects using integrated 3-D kinematics and EMG features.

    PubMed

    Malik, Owais A; Senanayake, S M N Arosha; Zaheer, Dansih

    2015-03-01

    An intelligent recovery evaluation system is presented for objective assessment and performance monitoring of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. The system acquires 3-D kinematics of tibiofemoral joint and electromyography (EMG) data from surrounding muscles during various ambulatory and balance testing activities through wireless body-mounted inertial and EMG sensors, respectively. An integrated feature set is generated based on different features extracted from data collected for each activity. The fuzzy clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference techniques are applied to these integrated feature sets in order to provide different recovery progress assessment indicators (e.g., current stage of recovery, percentage of recovery progress as compared to healthy group, etc.) for ACL-R subjects. The system was trained and tested on data collected from a group of healthy and ACL-R subjects. For recovery stage identification, the average testing accuracy of the system was found above 95% (95-99%) for ambulatory activities and above 80% (80-84%) for balance testing activities. The overall recovery evaluation performed by the proposed system was found consistent with the assessment made by the physiotherapists using standard subjective/objective scores. The validated system can potentially be used as a decision supporting tool by physiatrists, physiotherapists, and clinicians for quantitative rehabilitation analysis of ACL-R subjects in conjunction with the existing recovery monitoring systems. PMID:24801517

  1. Slab Profile Encoding (PEN) for Minimizing Slab Boundary Artifact in 3D Diffusion-Weighted Multislab Acquisition*

    PubMed Central

    Van, Anh T; Aksoy, Murat; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Kopeinigg, Daniel; Vos, Sjoerd B; Bammer, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To propose a method for mitigating slab boundary artifacts in 3D multislab diffusion imaging with no or minimal increases in scan time. Methods The multislab acquisition was treated as parallel imaging acquisition where the slab profiles acted as the traditional receiver sensitivity profiles. All the slabs were then reconstructed simultaneously along the slab direction using Cartesian-based sensitivity encoding (SENSE) reconstruction. The slab profile estimation was performed using either a Bloch simulation or a calibration scan. Results Both phantom and in vivo results showed negligible slab boundary artifacts after reconstruction using the proposed method. The performance of the proposed method is comparable to the state-of-the-art slab combination method without the scan time penalty that depends on the number of acquired volumes. The obtained g-factor map of the SENSE reconstruction problem showed a maximum g-factor of 1.7 in the region of interest. Conclusion We proposed a novel method for mitigating slab boundary artifacts in 3D diffusion imaging by treating the multislab acquisition as a parallel imaging acquisition and reconstructing all slabs simultaneously using Cartesian SENSE. Unlike existing methods, the scan time increase, if any, does not scale with the number of image volumes acquired. PMID:24691843

  2. Automatic segmentation of solitary pulmonary nodules based on local intensity structure analysis and 3D neighborhood features in 3D chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Honma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) segmentation method based on local intensity structure analysis and neighborhood feature analysis in chest CT images. Automated segmentation of SPNs is desirable for a chest computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAS) system since a SPN may indicate early stage of lung cancer. Due to the similar intensities of SPNs and other chest structures such as blood vessels, many false positives (FPs) are generated by nodule detection methods. To reduce such FPs, we introduce two features that analyze the relation between each segmented nodule candidate and it neighborhood region. The proposed method utilizes a blob-like structure enhancement (BSE) filter based on Hessian analysis to augment the blob-like structures as initial nodule candidates. Then a fine segmentation is performed to segment much more accurate region of each nodule candidate. FP reduction is mainly addressed by investigating two neighborhood features based on volume ratio and eigenvector of Hessian that are calculates from the neighborhood region of each nodule candidate. We evaluated the proposed method by using 40 chest CT images, include 20 standard-dose CT images that we randomly chosen from a local database and 20 low-dose CT images that were randomly chosen from a public database: LIDC. The experimental results revealed that the average TP rate of proposed method was 93.6% with 12.3 FPs/case.

  3. Multi-sourced, 3D geometric characterization of volcanogenic karst features: Integrating lidar, sonar, and geophysical datasets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, J. M.; Gary, M. O.; Reyes, R.; Halihan, T.; Fairfield, N.; Stone, W. C.

    2009-12-01

    Karstic aquifers can form very complex hydrogeological systems and 3-D mapping has been difficult, but Lidar, phased array sonar, and improved earth resistivity techniques show promise in this and in linking metadata to models. Zacatón, perhaps the Earth’s deepest cenote, has a sub-aquatic void space exceeding 7.5 x 106 cubic m3. It is the focus of this study which has created detailed 3D maps of the system. These maps include data from above and beneath the the water table and within the rock matrix to document the extent of the immense karst features and to interpret the geologic processes that formed them. Phase 1 used high resolution (20 mm) Lidar scanning of surficial features of four large cenotes. Scan locations, selected to achieve full feature coverage once registered, were established atop surface benchmarks with UTM coordinates established using GPS and Total Stations. The combined datasets form a geo-registered mesh of surface features down to water level in the cenotes. Phase 2 conducted subsurface imaging using Earth Resistivity Imaging (ERI) geophysics. ERI identified void spaces isolated from open flow conduits. A unique travertine morphology exists in which some cenotes are dry or contain shallow lakes with flat travertine floors; some water-filled cenotes have flat floors without the cone of collapse material; and some have collapse cones. We hypothesize that the floors may have large water-filled voids beneath them. Three separate flat travertine caps were imaged: 1) La Pilita, which is partially open, exposing cap structure over a deep water-filled shaft; 2) Poza Seca, which is dry and vegetated; and 3) Tule, which contains a shallow (<1 m) lake. A fourth line was run adjacent to cenote Verde. La Pilita ERI, verified by SCUBA, documented the existence of large water-filled void zones ERI at Poza Seca showed a thin cap overlying a conductive zone extending to at least 25 m depth beneath the cap with no lower boundary of this zone evident

  4. 3-D surface profile measurements of large x-ray synchrotron radiation mirrors using stitching interferometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Bray, M.; Qian, J.; Shu, D.

    2002-09-12

    Stitching interferometry, using small-aperture, high-resolution, phase-measuring interferometry, has been proposed for quite some time now as a metrology technique to obtain 3-dimensional profiles of surfaces of oversized optical components and substrates. The aim of this work is to apply this method to the specific case of long grazing-incidence x-ray mirrors, such as those used in beamlines at synchrotron radiation facilities around the world. Both fabrication and characterization of these mirrors would greatly benefit from this technique because it offers the potential for providing measurements with accuracy and resolution better than those obtained using existing noncontact laser profilers, such as the long trace profiler (LTP). Measurement data can be used as feedback for computer-controlled fabrication processes to correct for possible topography errors. The data can also be used for simulating and predicting mirror performance under realistic conditions. A semiautomated stitching system was built and tested at the X-ray Optics Metrology Laboratory of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial objective was to achieve a measurement sensitivity on the order of 1 {micro}rad rms. Preliminary tests on a 1 m-long x-ray mirror showed system repeatability of less than 0.6 {micro}rad rms. This value is comparable to that of a conventional LTP. The measurement accuracy was mostly affected by environmental perturbations and system calibration effects. With a fully automated and improved system (to be built in the near future), we expect to achieve measurement sensitivity on the order of 0.0 {micro}rad rms or better. In this paper, after a brief review of basic principles and general technical difficulties and challenges of the stitching technique, a detailed description of the measurement setup is given and preliminary results obtained with it are analyzed and discussed.

  5. Using High Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound for 3-D Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. A prior study was performed demonstrating that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz was capable of profiling surfaces with 25 micron depth resolution and 400 micron lateral resolution over a 1.4 mm depth range. In this article, the question of whether higher-frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications is addressed. 10 and 25 MHz focused ultrasonic transducers were employed in the water-coupled mode. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface were acquired and converted to depth / surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in water (V). Results are compared for the two frequencies used and with those from the 1 MHz air-coupled configuration.

  6. Processes of Equatorial Thermal Structure: An Analysis of Galileo Temperature Profile with 3-D Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majeed, T.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Bougher, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Jupiter Thermosphere General Circulation Model (JTGCM) calculates the global dynamical structure of Jupiter's thermosphere self-consistently with its global thermal structure and composition. The main heat source that drives the thermospheric flow is high-latitude Joule heating. A secondary source of heating is the auroral process of particle precipitation. Global simulations of Jovian thermospheric dynamics indicate strong neutral outflows from the auroral ovals with velocities up to approximately 2 kilometers per second and subsequent convergence and downwelling at the Jovian equator. Such circulation is shown to be an important process for transporting significant amounts of auroral energy to equatorial latitudes and for regulating the global heat budget in a manner consistent with the high thermospheric temperatures observed by the Galileo probe. Adiabatic compression of the neutral atmosphere resulting from downward motion is an important source of equatorial heating (less than 0.06 microbar). The adiabatic heating continues to dominate between 0.06 and 0.2 microbar, but with an addition of comparable heating due to horizontal advection induced by the meridional flow. Thermal conduction plays an important role in transporting heat down to lower altitudes (greater than 0.2microbar) where it is balanced by the cooling associated with the wind transport processes. Interestingly, we find that radiative cooling caused by H3(+), CH4, and C2H2 emissions does not play a significant role in interpreting the Galileo temperature profile.

  7. Multiplex profiling of cellular invasion in 3D cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Gerald; Oehrle, Bettina; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states. PMID:23671660

  8. Multiplex Profiling of Cellular Invasion in 3D Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Gerald; Oehrle, Bettina; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states. PMID:23671660

  9. Atlas and feature based 3D pathway visualization enhancement for skull base pre-operative fast planning from head CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghdasi, Nava; Li, Yangming; Berens, Angelique; Moe, Kris S.; Bly, Randall A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive neuroendoscopic surgery provides an alternative to open craniotomy for many skull base lesions. These techniques provides a great benefit to the patient through shorter ICU stays, decreased post-operative pain and quicker return to baseline function. However, density of critical neurovascular structures at the skull base makes planning for these procedures highly complex. Furthermore, additional surgical portals are often used to improve visualization and instrument access, which adds to the complexity of pre-operative planning. Surgical approach planning is currently limited and typically involves review of 2D axial, coronal, and sagittal CT and MRI images. In addition, skull base surgeons manually change the visualization effect to review all possible approaches to the target lesion and achieve an optimal surgical plan. This cumbersome process relies heavily on surgeon experience and it does not allow for 3D visualization. In this paper, we describe a rapid pre-operative planning system for skull base surgery using the following two novel concepts: importance-based highlight and mobile portal. With this innovation, critical areas in the 3D CT model are highlighted based on segmentation results. Mobile portals allow surgeons to review multiple potential entry portals in real-time with improved visualization of critical structures located inside the pathway. To achieve this we used the following methods: (1) novel bone-only atlases were manually generated, (2) orbits and the center of the skull serve as features to quickly pre-align the patient's scan with the atlas, (3) deformable registration technique was used for fine alignment, (4) surgical importance was assigned to each voxel according to a surgical dictionary, and (5) pre-defined transfer function was applied to the processed data to highlight important structures. The proposed idea was fully implemented as independent planning software and additional

  10. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations: part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mul, Frits F. M.; George, Nibu A.; Qiu, Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K.

    2009-07-01

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is needed, especially when the two folds act differently, e.g. in the case of tumour growth. Recently, with our novel depth-kymographic laryngoscope, we obtained calibrated data about the horizontal and vertical positions of the visible surface of the vibrating vocal folds. In order to find relations with physical parameters such as elasticity and damping constants, we numerically simulated the horizontal and vertical positions and movements of the human vocal folds while vibrating and investigated the effect of varying several parameters on the characteristics of the phonation: the masses and their dimensions, the respective forces and pressures, and the details of the vocal tract compartments. Direct one-to-one comparison with measured 3D positions presents—for the first time—a direct means of validation of these calculations. This may start a new field in vocal folds research.

  11. A Sensory 3D Map of the Odor Description Space Derived from a Comparison of Numeric Odor Profile Databases.

    PubMed

    Zarzo, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Many authors have proposed different schemes of odor classification, which are useful to aid the complex task of describing smells. However, reaching a consensus on a particular classification seems difficult because our psychophysical space of odor description is a continuum and is not clustered into well-defined categories. An alternative approach is to describe the perceptual space of odors as a low-dimensional coordinate system. This idea was first proposed by Crocker and Henderson in 1927, who suggested using numeric profiles based on 4 dimensions: "fragrant," "acid," "burnt," and "caprylic." In the present work, the odor profiles of 144 aroma chemicals were compared by means of statistical regression with comparable numeric odor profiles obtained from 2 databases, enabling a plausible interpretation of the 4 dimensions. Based on the results and taking into account comparable 2D sensory maps of odor descriptors from the literature, a 3D sensory map (odor cube) has been drawn up to improve understanding of the similarities and dissimilarities of the odor descriptors most frequently used in fragrance chemistry. PMID:25847969

  12. A Diffusion-Based and Dynamic 3D-Printed Device That Enables Parallel in Vitro Pharmacokinetic Profiling of Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Sarah Y; Meisel, Jayda E; Monsma, Frederick J; Spence, Dana M

    2016-02-01

    The process of bringing a drug to market involves many steps, including the preclinical stage, where various properties of the drug candidate molecule are determined. These properties, which include drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, are often displayed in a pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. While PK profiles are determined in animal models, in vitro systems that model in vivo processes are available, although each possesses shortcomings. Here, we present a 3D-printed, diffusion-based, and dynamic in vitro PK device. The device contains six flow channels, each with integrated porous membrane-based insert wells. The pores of these membranes enable drugs to freely diffuse back and forth between the flow channels and the inserts, thus enabling both loading and clearance portions of a standard PK curve to be generated. The device is designed to work with 96-well plate technology and consumes single-digit milliliter volumes to generate multiple PK profiles, simultaneously. Generation of PK profiles by use of the device was initially performed with fluorescein as a test molecule. Effects of such parameters as flow rate, loading time, volume in the insert well, and initial concentration of the test molecule were investigated. A prediction model was generated from this data, enabling the user to predict the concentration of the test molecule at any point along the PK profile within a coefficient of variation of ∼ 5%. Depletion of the analyte from the well was characterized and was determined to follow first-order rate kinetics, indicated by statistically equivalent (p > 0.05) depletion half-lives that were independent of the starting concentration. A PK curve for an approved antibiotic, levofloxacin, was generated to show utility beyond the fluorescein test molecule. PMID:26727249

  13. Transcriptional profiles of valvular interstitial cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene, on 2D hydrogels, or within 3D hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Mabry, Kelly M.; Payne, Samuel Z.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) actively maintain and repair heart valve tissue; however, persistent activation of VICs to a myofibroblast phenotype can lead to aortic stenosis (Chen and Simmons, 2011) [1]. To better understand and quantify how microenvironmental cues influence VIC phenotype, we compared expression profiles of VICs cultured on/in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) gels to those cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), as well as fresh isolates. Here, we present both the raw and processed microarray data from these culture conditions. Interpretation of this data can be found in a research article entitled “Microarray analyses to quantify advantages of 2D and 3D hydrogel culture systems in maintaining the native valvular interstitial cell phenotype” (Mabry et al., 2015) [2]. PMID:26702427

  14. 3D SMoSIFT: three-dimensional sparse motion scale invariant feature transform for activity recognition from RGB-D videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jun; Ruan, Qiuqi; Li, Wei; An, Gaoyun; Zhao, Ruizhen

    2014-03-01

    Human activity recognition based on RGB-D data has received more attention in recent years. We propose a spatiotemporal feature named three-dimensional (3D) sparse motion scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) from RGB-D data for activity recognition. First, we build pyramids as scale space for each RGB and depth frame, and then use Shi-Tomasi corner detector and sparse optical flow to quickly detect and track robust keypoints around the motion pattern in the scale space. Subsequently, local patches around keypoints, which are extracted from RGB-D data, are used to build 3D gradient and motion spaces. Then SIFT-like descriptors are calculated on both 3D spaces, respectively. The proposed feature is invariant to scale, transition, and partial occlusions. More importantly, the running time of the proposed feature is fast so that it is well-suited for real-time applications. We have evaluated the proposed feature under a bag of words model on three public RGB-D datasets: one-shot learning Chalearn Gesture Dataset, Cornell Activity Dataset-60, and MSR Daily Activity 3D dataset. Experimental results show that the proposed feature outperforms other spatiotemporal features and are comparative to other state-of-the-art approaches, even though there is only one training sample for each class.

  15. Effect of catheter placement on 3-D velocity profiles in curved tubes resembling the human coronary system.

    PubMed

    Krams, R; Wentzel, J J; Cespedes, I; Vinke, R; Carlier, S; van der Steen, A F; Lancee, C T; Slager, C J

    1999-06-01

    Novel measurement techniques based on intravenous ultrasound (IVUS) technology ('IVUS-Flowmetry') require the location of a catheter inside the coronary bed. The present study quantifies disturbances in the 3-D velocity profile induced by catheter placement inside a tube, applying computational fluid dynamics. Two curved, circular meshes (radius K = 0.025 m and K = 0.035 m) with and without a catheter inside the lumen were applied. The catheter was located at the inner curve, the outer curve and at the top position. Boundary conditions were: no slip on the wall, zero stress at the outlet, uniform inflow with entrance velocities of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 m/s. Curvature-associated centrifugal forces shifted the maximal velocity to the outer curve and introduced two symmetrical vortices. Additional catheter placement redistributed the 3-D axial velocity field away from the catheter, which was accompanied by the appearance of multiple low-strength vortices. In addition, peak axial velocity increased, peak secondary velocities decreased, axial pressure drop increased and shear stress increased. Flow calculations simulated to resemble IVUS-based flowmetry changed by only 1% after considering secondary velocity. In conclusion, placement of a catheter inside a curved tube resembling the human coronary system changes the velocity field and reduces secondary patterns. The present study supports the usefulness of catheter-based flowmetry during resting flow conditions. During hyperemic flow conditions, flow measurements might be accompanied by large axial pressure drops because the catheter, itself, might act as a significant stenosis. PMID:10414897

  16. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic solids featuring 3d-4f heterometallic oxides comprised of spin chains and 3d-6p noncentrosymmetric oxides templated by acentric salt units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Jennings Palmer

    solvent media is the fact that the salt itself or the alkali/alkaline-earth oxides formed in situ can be incorporated in phase formations. Both of the aforementioned cases, if incorporated, lead to an additional and different type of nonmagnetic spacer for the formation of low-dimensional 3d-4 f extended solids. It is believed that these nonmagnetic, ionic spacers are more disruptive to magnetic super-super-exchange in comparison to the nonmagnetic oxyanionic spacers, and should assist further in achieving truly confined magnetic sublattices. In the studies presented, the overall highlight considering structure and property correlations will be most exemplified through the comparison of two different pseudo-one-dimensional (1D), 3d-4 f arsenate systems (Chapters 3 and 4) where it is observed that further spacing of the 3d-4f sublattices leads to interesting low-dimensional magnetic behavior. In addition, an extension of one of these pseudo-1D, 3d-4f systems (Chapter 5) will highlight the intriguing properties resulting from the study of a family of compounds whereby a double aliovalent substitution has been performed with respect to the parent family. This particular system features a solid solution series where charge disorder exists, and in terms of magnetic properties, there are unique variations in comparison to the parent family. And finally, in relation to heterometallic system types, a new noncentrosymmetric phosphate family containing mixed 3d-6p (where 3 d = Mn, Fe; 6p = Bi3+) will be discussed (Chapter 6). As will be mentioned, new 3d-6p systems were explored originally for host materials where lanthanides could be substituted. Independent of lanthanide substitutions that are yet to be proven, the combination of both bulk acentricity and magnetically active ions makes systems of this type worthy of study due to multiferroic potentials aimed toward the coupling of polarization and magnetization.

  17. Three-dimensional image technology in forensic anthropology: Assessing the validity of biological profiles derived from CT-3D images of the skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Leon Valenzuela, Maria Julia

    This project explores the reliability of building a biological profile for an unknown individual based on three-dimensional (3D) images of the individual's skeleton. 3D imaging technology has been widely researched for medical and engineering applications, and it is increasingly being used as a tool for anthropological inquiry. While the question of whether a biological profile can be derived from 3D images of a skeleton with the same accuracy as achieved when using dry bones has been explored, bigger sample sizes, a standardized scanning protocol and more interobserver error data are needed before 3D methods can become widely and confidently used in forensic anthropology. 3D images of Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained from 130 innominate bones from Boston University's skeletal collection (School of Medicine). For each bone, both 3D images and original bones were assessed using the Phenice and Suchey-Brooks methods. Statistical analysis was used to determine the agreement between 3D image assessment versus traditional assessment. A pool of six individuals with varying experience in the field of forensic anthropology scored a subsample (n = 20) to explore interobserver error. While a high agreement was found for age and sex estimation for specimens scored by the author, the interobserver study shows that observers found it difficult to apply standard methods to 3D images. Higher levels of experience did not result in higher agreement between observers, as would be expected. Thus, a need for training in 3D visualization before applying anthropological methods to 3D bones is suggested. Future research should explore interobserver error using a larger sample size in order to test the hypothesis that training in 3D visualization will result in a higher agreement between scores. The need for the development of a standard scanning protocol focusing on the optimization of 3D image resolution is highlighted. Applications for this research include the possibility

  18. Using a 3D profiler and infrared camera to monitor oven loading in fully cooked meat operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John; Giorges, Aklilu

    2009-05-01

    Ensuring meat is fully cooked is an important food safety issue for operations that produce "ready to eat" products. In order to kill harmful pathogens like Salmonella, all of the product must reach a minimum threshold temperature. Producers typically overcook the majority of the product to ensure meat in the most difficult scenario reaches the desired temperature. A difficult scenario can be caused by an especially thick piece of meat or by a surge of product into the process. Overcooking wastes energy, degrades product quality, lowers the maximum throughput rate of the production line and decreases product yield. At typical production rates of 6000lbs/hour, these losses from overcooking can have a significant cost impact on producers. A wide area 3D camera coupled with a thermal camera was used to measure the thermal mass variability of chicken breasts in a cooking process. Several types of variability are considered including time varying thermal mass (mass x temperature / time), variation in individual product geometry and variation in product temperature. The automatic identification of product arrangement issues that affect cooking such as overlapping product and folded products is also addressed. A thermal model is used along with individual product geometry and oven cook profiles to predict the percentage of product that will be overcooked and to identify products that may not fully cook in a given process.

  19. Characterization of 3D Voronoi Tessellation Nearest Neighbor Lipid Shells Provides Atomistic Lipid Disruption Profile of Protein Containing Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sara Y.; Duong, Hai V.; Compton, Campbell; Vaughn, Mark W.; Nguyen, Hoa; Cheng, Kwan H.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying protein-induced lipid disruptions at the atomistic level is a challenging problem in membrane biophysics. Here we propose a novel 3D Voronoi tessellation nearest-atom-neighbor shell method to classify and characterize lipid domains into discrete concentric lipid shells surrounding membrane proteins in structurally heterogeneous lipid membranes. This method needs only the coordinates of the system and is independent of force fields and simulation conditions. As a proof-of-principle, we use this multiple lipid shell method to analyze the lipid disruption profiles of three simulated membrane systems: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol, and beta-amyloid/phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol. We observed different atomic volume disruption mechanisms due to cholesterol and beta-amyloid Additionally, several lipid fractional groups and lipid-interfacial water did not converge to their control values with increasing distance or shell order from the protein. This volume divergent behavior was confirmed by bilayer thickness and chain orientational order calculations. Our method can also be used to analyze high-resolution structural experimental data. PMID:25637891

  20. 3D non-rigid registration using surface and local salient features for transrectal ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma; Fei, Baowei

    2011-03-01

    We present a 3D non-rigid registration algorithm for the potential use in combining PET/CT and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for targeted prostate biopsy. Our registration is a hybrid approach that simultaneously optimizes the similarities from point-based registration and volume matching methods. The 3D registration is obtained by minimizing the distances of corresponding points at the surface and within the prostate and by maximizing the overlap ratio of the bladder neck on both images. The hybrid approach not only capture deformation at the prostate surface and internal landmarks but also the deformation at the bladder neck regions. The registration uses a soft assignment and deterministic annealing process. The correspondences are iteratively established in a fuzzy-to-deterministic approach. B-splines are used to generate a smooth non-rigid spatial transformation. In this study, we tested our registration with pre- and postbiopsy TRUS images of the same patients. Registration accuracy is evaluated using manual defined anatomic landmarks, i.e. calcification. The root-mean-squared (RMS) of the difference image between the reference and floating images was decreased by 62.6+/-9.1% after registration. The mean target registration error (TRE) was 0.88+/-0.16 mm, i.e. less than 3 voxels with a voxel size of 0.38×0.38×0.38 mm3 for all five patients. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the 3D non-rigid registration algorithm.

  1. TU-F-12A-05: Sensitivity of Textural Features to 3D Vs. 4D FDG-PET/CT Imaging in NSCLC Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F; Nyflot, M; Bowen, S; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Neighborhood Gray-level difference matrices (NGLDM) based texture parameters extracted from conventional (3D) 18F-FDG PET scans in patients with NSCLC have been previously shown to associate with response to chemoradiation and poorer patient outcome. However, the change in these parameters when utilizing respiratory-correlated (4D) FDG-PET scans has not yet been characterized for NSCLC. The Objectives: of this study was to assess the extent to which NGLDM-based texture parameters on 4D PET images vary with reference to values derived from 3D scans in NSCLC. Methods: Eight patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. 4D PET scans were reconstructed with OSEM-IR in 5 respiratory phase-binned images and corresponding CT data of each phase were employed for attenuation correction. NGLDM-based texture features, consisting of coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity and strength, were evaluated for gross tumor volumes defined on 3D/4D PET scans by radiation oncologists. Variation of the obtained texture parameters over the respiratory cycle were examined with respect to values extracted from 3D scans. Results: Differences between texture parameters derived from 4D scans at different respiratory phases and those extracted from 3D scans ranged from −30% to 13% for coarseness, −12% to 40% for contrast, −5% to 50% for busyness, −7% to 38% for complexity, and −43% to 20% for strength. Furthermore, no evident correlations were observed between respiratory phase and 4D scan texture parameters. Conclusion: Results of the current study showed that NGLDM-based texture parameters varied considerably based on choice of 3D PET and 4D PET reconstruction of NSCLC patient images, indicating that standardized image acquisition and analysis protocols need to be established for clinical studies, especially multicenter clinical trials, intending to validate prognostic values of texture features for NSCLC.

  2. General fusion approaches for the age determination of latent fingerprint traces: results for 2D and 3D binary pixel feature fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Ronny; Gruhn, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Bräutigam, Anja

    2012-03-01

    Determining the age of latent fingerprint traces found at crime scenes is an unresolved research issue since decades. Solving this issue could provide criminal investigators with the specific time a fingerprint trace was left on a surface, and therefore would enable them to link potential suspects to the time a crime took place as well as to reconstruct the sequence of events or eliminate irrelevant fingerprints to ensure privacy constraints. Transferring imaging techniques from different application areas, such as 3D image acquisition, surface measurement and chemical analysis to the domain of lifting latent biometric fingerprint traces is an upcoming trend in forensics. Such non-destructive sensor devices might help to solve the challenge of determining the age of a latent fingerprint trace, since it provides the opportunity to create time series and process them using pattern recognition techniques and statistical methods on digitized 2D, 3D and chemical data, rather than classical, contact-based capturing techniques, which alter the fingerprint trace and therefore make continuous scans impossible. In prior work, we have suggested to use a feature called binary pixel, which is a novel approach in the working field of fingerprint age determination. The feature uses a Chromatic White Light (CWL) image sensor to continuously scan a fingerprint trace over time and retrieves a characteristic logarithmic aging tendency for 2D-intensity as well as 3D-topographic images from the sensor. In this paper, we propose to combine such two characteristic aging features with other 2D and 3D features from the domains of surface measurement, microscopy, photography and spectroscopy, to achieve an increase in accuracy and reliability of a potential future age determination scheme. Discussing the feasibility of such variety of sensor devices and possible aging features, we propose a general fusion approach, which might combine promising features to a joint age determination scheme

  3. Shallow 3-D vertical seismic profiling around a contaminant withdrawal well on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, J.; Bainer, R.; Milligan, P.; Tong, C.

    1997-01-30

    One of the major problems associated with ground water contaminant remediation is well placement. Optimal-placement of wells requires an accurate knowledge of geologic structure and stratigraphy in the near surface sediments and rock (0 to 100 m). Without the development of remote imaging provided by geophysical techniques, the required spacing between treatment wells may be less than 2 m in order to be confident that all contaminant reservoirs had been remediated. One method for characterizing geologic structure and stratigraphy in the near surface is vertical seismic profiling (VSP), a technique often used on deep exploration wells to calibrate surface seismic reflection data. For near-surface applications, VSP data can be acquired efficiently using an array of hydrophones lowered into a fluid-filled borehole (Milligan et al, 1997). In this paper we discuss the acquisition and processing of a 3-D VSP collected at a shallow remediation site located on the grounds of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) near Livermore, California. The site was used by the United States Navy as an air training base. At this time, initial releases of hazardous materials to the environment occurred in the form of solvents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs)] that were used for the cleaning of airplanes and their parts. Gasoline, diesel and other petroleum-based compounds are also known to have leaked into the ground. California Research and Development Company, a subsidy of Standard Oil, occupied the southeastern portion of the site from 1950 to 1954. The first releases of radioactive materials to the environment occurred at this time, with the beginning of testing of radioactive materials at the site. In 1952, LLNL acquired the site. Additional releases of VOCS, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals, radionuclides (primarily tritium), gasoline and pesticides have occurred since. These releases were due to localized spills, landfills, surface impoundments, disposal pits

  4. Tracking naturally occurring indoor features in 2-D and 3-D with lidar range/amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.D.; Kerstens, A.

    1998-09-01

    Sensor-data processing for the interpretation of a mobile robot`s indoor environment, and the manipulation of this data for reliable localization, are still some of the most important issues in robotics. This article presents algorithms that determine the true position of a mobile robot, based on real 2-D and 3-D optical range and intensity data. The authors start with the physics of the particular type of sensor used, so that the extraction of reliable and repeatable information (namely, edge coordinates) can be determined, taking into account the noise associated with each range sample and the possibility of optical multiple-path effects. Again, applying the physical model of the sensor, the estimated positions of the mobile robot and the uncertainty in these positions are determined. They demonstrate real experiments using 2-D and 3-D scan data taken in indoor environments. To update the robot`s position reliably, the authors address the problem of matching the information recorded in a scan to, first, an a priori map, and second, to information recorded in previous scans, eliminating the need for an a priori map.

  5. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-07-01

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3-D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This article proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3-D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3-D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm.

  6. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This paper proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm. PMID:26640425

  7. Automatic organ localizations on 3D CT images by using majority-voting of multiple 2D detections based on local binary patterns and Haar-like features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamaguchi, Shoutarou; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes an approach to accomplish the fast and automatic localization of the different inner organ regions on 3D CT scans. The proposed approach combines object detections and the majority voting technique to achieve the robust and quick organ localization. The basic idea of proposed method is to detect a number of 2D partial appearances of a 3D target region on CT images from multiple body directions, on multiple image scales, by using multiple feature spaces, and vote all the 2D detecting results back to the 3D image space to statistically decide one 3D bounding rectangle of the target organ. Ensemble learning was used to train the multiple 2D detectors based on template matching on local binary patterns and Haar-like feature spaces. A collaborative voting was used to decide the corner coordinates of the 3D bounding rectangle of the target organ region based on the coordinate histograms from detection results in three body directions. Since the architecture of the proposed method (multiple independent detections connected to a majority voting) naturally fits the parallel computing paradigm and multi-core CPU hardware, the proposed algorithm was easy to achieve a high computational efficiently for the organ localizations on a whole body CT scan by using general-purpose computers. We applied this approach to localization of 12 kinds of major organ regions independently on 1,300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected 300 CT scans (with human indicated organ and tissue locations) for training, and then, applied the proposed approach with the training results to localize each of the target regions on the other 1,000 CT scans for the performance testing. The experimental results showed the possibility of the proposed approach to automatically locate different kinds of organs on the whole body CT scans.

  8. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  9. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  10. A compositing approach for preserving signifigant features in atmospheric profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R. )

    1993-03-01

    Composite profiles of thermodynamic and kinematic variables are prepared to represent the characteristics of the environment within which a particular atmospheric phenomenon occurs. During the averaging process, it is desirable to retain the dominant features and associated gradients found in the individual profiles so that representative values of quantities such as flux parameters, energy budgets, convective available ptoential energy, and various stability indices can be computed from the composite profiles. The conventional compositing approach, where averages are computed at common heights, reduces or even smooths out a significant feature when the height and vertical extent of the feature differ from one individual file to the next. To retain a desirable feature in the composite profile, it is necessary to compute averages at the heights where the feature occurs and to compute the average height of the feature itself. As an example ot the capabilities of this scaling or feature-preserving approach, the technique was applied to a set of 33 hodographs from supercell thunderstorm environments as documented in the literature. The feature-preserving technique retained realistic wind-shear values, including a midaltitude minimum-shear layer that disappeared when the conventional compositing technique was used. 44 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  12. Personal identification by the comparison of facial profiles: testing the reliability of a high-resolution 3D-2D comparison model.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Cristina; Cantatore, Angela; Ciaffi, Romina; Gibelli, Daniele; Cigada, Alfredo; De Angelis, Danilo; Sala, Remo

    2012-01-01

    Identification from video surveillance systems is frequently requested in forensic practice. The "3D-2D" comparison has proven to be reliable in assessing identification but still requires standardization; this study concerns the validation of the 3D-2D profile comparison. The 3D models of the faces of five individuals were compared with photographs from the same subjects as well as from another 45 individuals. The difference in area and distance between maxima (glabella, tip of nose, fore point of upper and lower lips, pogonion) and minima points (selion, subnasale, stomion, suprapogonion) were measured. The highest difference in area between the 3D model and the 2D image was between 43 and 133 mm(2) in the five matches, always greater than 157 mm(2) in mismatches; the mean distance between the points was greater than 1.96 mm in mismatches, <1.9 mm in five matches (p < 0.05). These results indicate that this difference in areas may point toward a manner of distinguishing "correct" from "incorrect" matches. PMID:22074112

  13. 3-D sediment-basement tomography of the Northern Marmara trough by a dense OBS network at the nodes of a grid of controlled source profiles along the North Anatolian fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, G.; Laigle, M.; Bécel, A.; Hirn, A.; Taymaz, T.; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, S.; Seismarmara Team

    2013-09-01

    A 3-D tomographic inversion of first arrival times of shot profiles recorded by a dense 2-D OBS network provides an unprecedented constraint on the P-wave velocities heterogeneity of the upper-crustal part of the North Marmara Trough (NMT), over a region of 180 km long by 50 km wide. One of the specific aims of this controlled source tomography is to provide a 3-D initial model for the local earthquake tomography (LET). Hence, in an original way, the controlled source inversion has been performed by using a code dedicated to LET. After several tests to check the results trade-off with the inversion parameters, we build up a 3-D a priori velocity model, in which the sea-bottom topography, the acoustic and the crystalline basements and the Moho interfaces have been considered. The reliability of the obtained features has been checked by checkerboard tests and also by their comparison with the deep-penetration multichannel seismic profiles, and with the wide-angle reflection and refraction modelled profiles. This study provides the first 3-D view of the basement topography along the active North Anatolian fault beneath the Marmara Sea, even beneath the deepest part of three sedimentary basins of NMT. Clear basement depressions reaching down 6 km depth below the sea level (bsl) have been found beneath these basins. The North Imrali Basin located on the southern continental shelf is observed with a similar sedimentary thickness as its northern neighbours. Between Central and Çinarcik basins, the Central High rises up to 3 km depth below (bsl). Its crest position is offset by 10 km northwestward relatively to the bathymetric crest. On the contrary, Tekirdağ and Central basins appear linked, forming a 60-km-long basement depression. Beneath the bathymetric relief of Western High low velocities are observed down to 6 km depth (bsl) and no basement high have been found. The obtained 3-D Vp heterogeneity model allows the consideration of the 3-D supracrustal heterogeneity

  14. The μSCAPE System: 3-Dimensional Profiling of Microfluidic Architectural Features Using a Flatbed Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kerui; Liu, Qian; Jackson, Kimberly R.; Landers, James P.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a microfluidic scanner-based profile exploration system, μSCAPE, capable of generating high resolution 3D profiles of microstructure architecture in a variety of transparent substrates. The profile is obtained by scanning the dye-filled microstructure followed by absorbance calculation and the reconstruction of the optical length at each point. The power of the method was demonstrated in (1) the inspection of the variation of the cross-section of laser-ablated PDMS channel; (2) the volume of PeT chamber; and (3) the population distribution of the volumes of the micro wells in HF-etched glass and laser-ablated PDMS. The reported methods features low equipment-cost, convenient operation and large field of view (FOV), and has revealed unreported quality parameters of the tested microstructures.

  15. The μSCAPE System: 3-Dimensional Profiling of Microfluidic Architectural Features Using a Flatbed Scanner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kerui; Liu, Qian; Jackson, Kimberly R; Landers, James P

    2016-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic scanner-based profile exploration system, μSCAPE, capable of generating high resolution 3D profiles of microstructure architecture in a variety of transparent substrates. The profile is obtained by scanning the dye-filled microstructure followed by absorbance calculation and the reconstruction of the optical length at each point. The power of the method was demonstrated in (1) the inspection of the variation of the cross-section of laser-ablated PDMS channel; (2) the volume of PeT chamber; and (3) the population distribution of the volumes of the micro wells in HF-etched glass and laser-ablated PDMS. The reported methods features low equipment-cost, convenient operation and large field of view (FOV), and has revealed unreported quality parameters of the tested microstructures. PMID:26924294

  16. The μSCAPE System: 3-Dimensional Profiling of Microfluidic Architectural Features Using a Flatbed Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kerui; Liu, Qian; Jackson, Kimberly R.; Landers, James P.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic scanner-based profile exploration system, μSCAPE, capable of generating high resolution 3D profiles of microstructure architecture in a variety of transparent substrates. The profile is obtained by scanning the dye-filled microstructure followed by absorbance calculation and the reconstruction of the optical length at each point. The power of the method was demonstrated in (1) the inspection of the variation of the cross-section of laser-ablated PDMS channel; (2) the volume of PeT chamber; and (3) the population distribution of the volumes of the micro wells in HF-etched glass and laser-ablated PDMS. The reported methods features low equipment-cost, convenient operation and large field of view (FOV), and has revealed unreported quality parameters of the tested microstructures. PMID:26924294

  17. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  18. Modeling of feature profile evolution for ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kun-Dar

    2013-01-07

    A kinetic model is presented to investigate the profile evolution during ion etching. The effects of ion sputtering, redeposition, and diffusion processes are all taken into consideration in the formation mechanism of surface profile. The dominant factors accounting for the surface smoothening and roughening during ion etching are well explained in this study. Under high ion flux or ion energy, the sputtering effect plays a controlling role in roughening the surface profile with a high etching rate. While decreasing ion flux or ion energy, the surface profile is smoothened by the diffusion mechanism with a long time ion irradiation. For a low temperature, the characteristic length of nanostructures decreases with a sputtered feature profile due to the low mobility. Our simulation results are consistent well with many experimental observations. This theoretical model provides an efficient numerical approach to fully understand the mechanism for the formation of surface profile allowing for designing of appropriate experiments to form specific nanostructures through ion-beam technology.

  19. Mode profile imaging and loss measurement for uniform and tapered single-mode 3D waveguides in diffusive photopolymer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunfang; Kamysiak, Keith T; Sullivan, Amy C; McLeod, Robert R

    2012-03-12

    We demonstrate single-mode uniform and parabolically tapered three-dimensional waveguides fabricated via direct-write lithography in diffusion-based photopolymers. Modulation of the writing power is shown to compensate Beer-Lambert absorption in the single-photon initiator and to provide precise control of modal tapers. A laminated sample preparation is introduced to enable full 3D characterization of these modal tapers without the need for sample polishing which is difficult for this class of polymer. The accuracy and repeatability of this modal characterization is shown to allow precise measurement of propagation loss from single samples. These testing procedures are used to demonstrate single-mode waveguides with 0.147 dB/cm excess propagation loss and symmetrical tapers up to 1:2.5 using 1.5 microwatts of continuous write power. PMID:22418540

  20. Stratospheric profiles of heavy water vapor isotopes and CH3D from analysis of the ATMOS Spacelab 3 infrared solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Foster, J. C.; Toth, R. A.; Farmer, C. B.

    1991-01-01

    The isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapor and methane was investigated. Stratospheric profiles of HDO, (H-18)2O, (H-17)2O, and CH3D were derived from solar occultation spectra recorded on April 30 - May 1, 1985 by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Fourier transform spectrometer aboard Spacelab 3. The profiles of the three water-vapor isotopes showed an increase in the volume mixing ratio with altitude. The measured profiles of D/H in water vapor showed a large depletion in the lower stratosphere (about 63 percent relative to standard mean ocean water, SMOW, at 20 km) and a small increase in D/H with altitude at higher altitudes, up to 34 km. The D/H ratio in stratospheric methane was close to the corresponding isotopic ratio in SMOW.

  1. Development of a new 3D OpenFOAM¯ solver to model the cooling stage in profile extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, C.; Habla, F.; Carneiro, O. S.; Hinrichsen, O.; Nóbrega, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    In this work a new solver is developed in OpenFOAM® computational library, to model the cooling state in profile extrusion. The solver is able to calculate the temperature distribution in a two domain system, comprising the profile and calibrator, considering the temperature discontinuity at the interface. The derivation of the model is based on the local instantaneous energy conservation equation, in conjunction with the conditional volume averaging technique, which yields a single governing equation valid in both domains. Aiming the solution of automatic optimization/parameterization problems, the developed solver was coupled with the DAKOTA toolkit. The application of the novel calculation system is illustrated in a study of a complex geometry extruded profile cooling stage.

  2. Modeling the 3D In profile of In x Ga1‑x As/GaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R. Y.; Abe, N. M.; da Silva, E. C. F.; Quivy, A. A.; Passaro, A.

    2016-06-01

    An iterative procedure, based on the finite-elements method combined with a stochastic approach, was developed to calculate the energy levels of In x Ga1‑x As/GaAs quantum dots grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The vertical and radial In-composition profiles resulting from segregation and intermixing effects were taken into account. Two In profiles suggested in the literature were tested and compared to optical and structural data. One of them was shown to be compatible with the experimental data.

  3. 3D printed diffractive terahertz lenses.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Walter D; Ferrando, Vicente; Monsoriu, Juan A; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Czerwińska, Elżbieta; Szustakowski, Mieczysław

    2016-04-15

    A 3D printer was used to realize custom-made diffractive THz lenses. After testing several materials, phase binary lenses with periodic and aperiodic radial profiles were designed and constructed in polyamide material to work at 0.625 THz. The nonconventional focusing properties of such lenses were assessed by computing and measuring their axial point spread function (PSF). Our results demonstrate that inexpensive 3D printed THz diffractive lenses can be reliably used in focusing and imaging THz systems. Diffractive THz lenses with unprecedented features, such as extended depth of focus or bifocalization, have been demonstrated. PMID:27082335

  4. A common feature-based 3D-pharmacophore model generation and virtual screening: identification of potential PfDHFR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Adane, Legesse; Bharatam, Prasad V; Sharma, Vikas

    2010-10-01

    A four-feature 3D-pharmacophore model was built from a set of 24 compounds whose activities were reported against the V1/S strain of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (PfDHFR) enzyme. This is an enzyme harboring Asn51Ile + Cys59Arg + Ser108Asn + Ile164Leu mutations. The HipHop module of the Catalyst program was used to generate the model. Selection of the best model among the 10 hypotheses generated by HipHop was carried out based on rank and best-fit values or alignments of the training set compounds onto a particular hypothesis. The best model (hypo1) consisted of two H-bond donors, one hydrophobic aromatic, and one hydrophobic aliphatic features. Hypo1 was used as a query to virtually screen Maybridge2004 and NCI2000 databases. The hits obtained from the search were subsequently subjected to FlexX and Glide docking studies. Based on the binding scores and interactions in the active site of quadruple-mutant PfDHFR, a set of nine hits were identified as potential inhibitors. PMID:19995305

  5. Self-assembled 3D heterometallic Cu(II)/Fe(II) coordination polymers with octahedral net skeletons: structural features, molecular magnetism, thermal and oxidation catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Karabach, Yauhen Y; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Kopylovich, Maximilian N; Gil-Hernández, Beatriz; Sanchiz, Joaquin; Kirillov, Alexander M; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2010-12-01

    The new three-dimensional (3D) heterometallic Cu(II)/Fe(II) coordination polymers [Cu(6)(H(2)tea)(6)Fe(CN)(6)](n)(NO(3))(2n)·6nH(2)O (1) and [Cu(6)(Hmdea)(6)Fe(CN)(6)](n)(NO(3))(2n)·7nH(2)O (2) have been easily generated by aqueous-medium self-assembly reactions of copper(II) nitrate with triethanolamine or N-methyldiethanolamine (H(3)tea or H(2)mdea, respectively), in the presence of potassium ferricyanide and sodium hydroxide. They have been isolated as air-stable crystalline solids and fully characterized including by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The latter reveal the formation of 3D metal-organic frameworks that are constructed from the [Cu(2)(μ-H(2)tea)(2)](2+) or [Cu(2)(μ-Hmdea)(2)](2+) nodes and the octahedral [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) linkers, featuring regular (1) or distorted (2) octahedral net skeletons. Upon dehydration, both compounds show reversible escape and binding processes toward water or methanol molecules. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of 1 and 2 reveal strong antiferromagnetic [J = -199(1) cm(-1)] or strong ferromagnetic [J = +153(1) cm(-1)] couplings between the copper(II) ions through the μ-O-alkoxo atoms in 1 or 2, respectively. The differences in magnetic behavior are explained in terms of the dependence of the magnetic coupling constant on the Cu-O-Cu bridging angle. Compounds 1 and 2 also act as efficient catalyst precursors for the mild oxidation of cyclohexane by aqueous hydrogen peroxide to cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone (homogeneous catalytic system), leading to maximum total yields (based on cyclohexane) and turnover numbers (TONs) up to about 22% and 470, respectively. PMID:21028781

  6. ZipperDB: Predictions of Fibril-forming Segments within Proteins Identified by the 3D Profile Method (from the UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Goldschmidt, L.; Teng, P. K.; Riek, R.; Eisenberg, D.

    ZipperDB contains predictions of fibril-forming segments within proteins identified by the 3D Profile Method. The UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics has analyzed over 20,000 putative protein sequences for segments with high fibrillation propensity that could form a "steric zipper"ùtwo self-complementary beta sheets, giving rise to the spine of an amyloid fibril. The approach is unique in that structural information is used to evaluate the likelihood that a particular sequence can form fibrils. [copied with edits from http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/]. In addition to searching the database, academic and non-profit users may also submit their protein sequences to the database.

  7. Retrieving Leaf Area Index and Foliage Profiles Through Voxelized 3-D Forest Reconstruction Using Terrestrial Full-Waveform and Dual-Wavelength Echidna Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Yang, X.; Li, Z.; Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Yao, T.; Zhao, F.; Saenz, E.; Paynter, I.; Douglas, E. S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Martel, J.; Howe, G.; Hewawasam, K.; Jupp, D.; Culvenor, D.; Newnham, G.; Lowell, J.

    2013-12-01

    Measuring and monitoring canopy biophysical parameters provide a baseline for carbon flux studies related to deforestation and disturbance in forest ecosystems. Terrestrial full-waveform lidar systems, such as the Echidna Validation Instrument (EVI) and its successor Dual-Wavelength Echidna Lidar (DWEL), offer rapid, accurate, and automated characterization of forest structure. In this study, we apply a methodology based on voxelized 3-D forest reconstructions built from EVI and DWEL scans to directly estimate two important biophysical parameters: Leaf Area Index (LAI) and foliage profile. Gap probability, apparent reflectance, and volume associated with the laser pulse footprint at the observed range are assigned to the foliage scattering events in the reconstructed point cloud. Leaf angle distribution is accommodated with a simple model based on gap probability with zenith angle as observed in individual scans of the stand. The DWEL instrument, which emits simultaneous laser pulses at 1064 nm and 1548 nm wavelengths, provides a better capability to separate trunk and branch hits from foliage hits due to water absorption by leaf cellular contents at 1548 nm band. We generate voxel datasets of foliage points using a classification methodology solely based on pulse shape for scans collected by EVI and with pulse shape and band ratio for scans collected by DWEL. We then compare the LAIs and foliage profiles retrieved from the voxel datasets of the two instruments at the same red fir site in Sierra National Forest, CA, with each other and with observations from airborne and field measurements. This study further tests the voxelization methodology in obtaining LAI and foliage profiles that are largely free of clumping effects and returns from woody materials in the canopy. These retrievals can provide a valuable 'ground-truth' validation data source for large-footprint spaceborne or airborne lidar systems retrievals.

  8. On the comparison of visual discomfort generated by S3D and 2D content based on eye-tracking features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsun, Iana; Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    The changing of TV systems from 2D to 3D mode is the next expected step in the telecommunication world. Some works have already been done to perform this progress technically, but interaction of the third dimension with humans is not yet clear. Previously, it was found that any increased load of visual system can create visual fatigue, like prolonged TV watching, computer work or video gaming. But watching S3D can cause another nature of visual fatigue, since all S3D technologies creates illusion of the third dimension based on characteristics of binocular vision. In this work we propose to evaluate and compare the visual fatigue from watching 2D and S3D content. This work shows the difference in accumulation of visual fatigue and its assessment for two types of content. In order to perform this comparison eye-tracking experiments using six commercially available movies were conducted. Healthy naive participants took part into the test and gave their answers feeling the subjective evaluation. It was found that watching stereo 3D content induce stronger feeling of visual fatigue than conventional 2D, and the nature of video has an important effect on its increase. Visual characteristics obtained by using eye-tracking were investigated regarding their relation with visual fatigue.

  9. Metabolic profiling reveals key metabolic features of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Catchpole, Gareth; Platzer, Alexander; Weikert, Cornelia; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Johannsen, Manfred; Krause, Hans; Jung, Klaus; Miller, Kurt; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim; Weikert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent evidence suggests that metabolic changes play a pivotal role in the biology of cancer and in particular renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, a global metabolite profiling approach was applied to characterize the metabolite pool of RCC and normal renal tissue. Advanced decision tree models were applied to characterize the metabolic signature of RCC and to explore features of metastasized tumours. The findings were validated in a second independent dataset. Vitamin E derivates and metabolites of glucose, fatty acid, and inositol phosphate metabolism determined the metabolic profile of RCC. α-tocopherol, hippuric acid, myoinositol, fructose-1-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate contributed most to the tumour/normal discrimination and all showed pronounced concentration changes in RCC. The identified metabolic profile was characterized by a low recognition error of only 5% for tumour versus normal samples. Data on metastasized tumours suggested a key role for metabolic pathways involving arachidonic acid, free fatty acids, proline, uracil and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results illustrate the potential of mass spectroscopy based metabolomics in conjunction with sophisticated data analysis methods to uncover the metabolic phenotype of cancer. Differentially regulated metabolites, such as vitamin E compounds, hippuric acid and myoinositol, provide leads for the characterization of novel pathways in RCC. PMID:19845817

  10. Long-wave infrared profile feature extractor (PFx) sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartain, Ronald B.; Aliberti, Keith; Alexander, Troy; Chiu, David

    2009-05-01

    The Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) Profile Feature Extractor (PFx) sensor has evolved from the initial profiling sensor that was developed by the University of Memphis (Near IR) and the Army Research Laboratory (visible). This paper presents the initial signatures of the LWIR PFx for human with and without backpacks, human with animal (dog), and a number of other animals. The current version of the LWIR PFx sensor is a diverging optical tripwire sensor. The LWIR PFx signatures are compared to the signatures of the Profile Sensor in the visible and Near IR spectral regions. The LWIR PFx signatures were collected with two different un-cooled micro bolometer focal plane array cameras, where the individual pixels were used as stand alone detectors (a non imaging sensor). This approach results in a completely passive, much lower bandwidth, much longer battery life, low weight, small volume sensor that provides sufficient information to classify objects into human Vs non human categories with a 98.5% accuracy.

  11. Visual inspection of 3-D surface and refractive-index profiles of microscopic lenses using a single-arm off-axis holographic interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Mok; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-05-16

    A single-arm off-axis holographic interferometer (SA-OHI) system for visual inspection of the three-dimensional (3-D) surfaces and refractive-index profiles of micrometer-scale optical lenses is proposed. In this system, a couple of pellicle beam splitters and optical mirrors are employed to generate two sheared off-axis beams from the single object beam by controlling the tilted angle of the optical mirror. Each sheared beam is divided into two areas with and without object data, which are called half-object and half-reference beams, respectively. These sub-divided object and reference beams then make interference patterns, just like the conventional two-arm holographic interferometer. This holographic interferometer system, called SA-OHI, can solve the DC bias, virtual and duplicated image problems occurred in most lateral shearing interferometers, which allow extraction of the hologram data only related to the target object. The operational principle of the proposed system is analyzed based on ray-optics. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed system in the practical application fields, experiments with test lenses are also carried out and the results are comparatively discussed with those of the conventional system. PMID:27409857

  12. 3D Printed Micro Free-Flow Electrophoresis Device.

    PubMed

    Anciaux, Sarah K; Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    The cost, time, and restrictions on creative flexibility associated with current fabrication methods present significant challenges in the development and application of microfluidic devices. Additive manufacturing, also referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, provides many advantages over existing methods. With 3D printing, devices can be made in a cost-effective manner with the ability to rapidly prototype new designs. We have fabricated a micro free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) device using a low-cost, consumer-grade 3D printer. Test prints were performed to determine the minimum feature sizes that could be reproducibly produced using 3D printing fabrication. Microfluidic ridges could be fabricated with dimensions as small as 20 μm high × 640 μm wide. Minimum valley dimensions were 30 μm wide × 130 μm wide. An acetone vapor bath was used to smooth acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surfaces and facilitate bonding of fully enclosed channels. The surfaces of the 3D-printed features were profiled and compared to a similar device fabricated in a glass substrate. Stable stream profiles were obtained in a 3D-printed μFFE device. Separations of fluorescent dyes in the 3D-printed device and its glass counterpart were comparable. A μFFE separation of myoglobin and cytochrome c was also demonstrated on a 3D-printed device. Limits of detection for rhodamine 110 were determined to be 2 and 0.3 nM for the 3D-printed and glass devices, respectively. PMID:27377354

  13. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  14. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  16. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  17. Characterisation of natural organic matter (NOM) in depth profile of Mediterranean Sea by 3D-Fluorescence following with PARAFAC treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huiyu, Z.; Durrieu, G.; Redon, R.; Heimbuerger, L.; Mounier, S.

    2009-12-01

    A periodic series of samplings have made during one year(2008) organized by Ifremer into the central Ligurian Sea(DYFAMED site, 43°25’N, 07°52’E, Mediterranean Sea). Spectra were mesured by spectrofluorimetry(HITACHI 4500) at excitation wavelengths from 250nm to 500nm and emission wavelengths from 200nm to 550nm, both wavelength slits for 5nm, scan speed is 2400nm/min. Parallel factors analysis(PARAFAC) software is a powerful statistical technique to treat the 3D-fluorescence spectra leading to the decomposition by a number of independent fluorescent compounds 1 and 2. Found 4 fluorescent components representing the fluorescence maxima of previously identified moieties: [Tyr] maximal excitation wavelength and emission wavelength 265nm/305nm (tyrosine-like); [Trp] maximal λEX/λEM=280nm/340nm(Peak T, tryptophan-like group); [M] maximal λEX/λEM=295nm/410nm(Peak M, marine humic-like substance) and a double maximum component [CA] with maximal λEX/λEM=335nm/445nm(Peak C, visible humic-like group) and λEX/λEM=250nm/445nm(Peak A, UV humic-like substance). Fluorescence contribution of each component at different logarithmic depths(Fig.2) shows that the most concentrated fluorophores zone is deeper than 100m, which is different from the results of dissolved organic carbon(DOC) concentration which the most concentrated zone is on the seasurface(B.Avril,2002).The humic-like substances are generally less fluorescent, particularly the M compound. An important peak contribution of marine humic-like substance has appeared in May at the profound 100m and 2200m, although the other fluorophores kept their values reasonable. The intensity maxima was closed to 100m, while an augmentation of protein substances in the deep sea(about 400 m) following by a shut immediate at 600 m in the months July, August and September. It is probably due to the sufficient heat from the sea surface; micro-organism could modify their position in the depth profile in the seawater. Thanks to

  18. Smoothing of geoelectrical resistivity profiles in order to build a 3D model: A case study from an outcropping limestone block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Krisztina; Kovács, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    Geoelectrical imaging is one of the most common survey methods in the field of shallow geophysics. In order to get information from the subsurface electric current is induced into the ground. In our summer camp organized by the Department of Geophysics and Space Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University we have carried out resistivity surveys to get more accurate information about the lithology of the Dorog basin located in the Transdanubian range, Middle Hungary. This study focused on the outcropping limestone block located next to the village Leányvár in the Dorog basin. The main aim of the research is the impoundment of the subsurface continuation of the limestone outcrop. Cable problems occurred during field survey therefore the dataset obtained by the measurement have become very noisy thus we had to gain smoothed data with the appropriate editing steps. The goal was to produce an optimized model to demonstrate the reality beneath the subsurface. In order to achieve better results from the noisy dataset we changed some parameters based on the description of the program. Whereas cable problems occurred we exterminated the bad datum points visually and statistically as well. Because of the noisiness we increased the value of the so called damping factor which is a variable parameter in the equation used by the inversion routine responsible for smoothing the data. The limitation of the range of model resistivity values based on our knowledge about geological environment was also necessary in order to avoid physically unrealistic results. The purpose of the modification was to obtain smoothed and more interpretable geoelectric profiles. The geological background combined with the explanation of the profiles gave us the approximate location of the block. In the final step of the research we created a 3D model with proper location and smoothed resistivity data included. This study was supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA NK83400) and was realized

  19. Identification of the Structural Features of Guanine Derivatives as MGMT Inhibitors Using 3D-QSAR Modeling Combined with Molecular Docking.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guohui; Fan, Tengjiao; Zhang, Na; Ren, Ting; Zhao, Lijiao; Zhong, Rugang

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair enzyme O⁶-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which plays an important role in inducing drug resistance against alkylating agents that modify the O⁶ position of guanine in DNA, is an attractive target for anti-tumor chemotherapy. A series of MGMT inhibitors have been synthesized over the past decades to improve the chemotherapeutic effects of O⁶-alkylating agents. In the present study, we performed a three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) study on 97 guanine derivatives as MGMT inhibitors using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods. Three different alignment methods (ligand-based, DFT optimization-based and docking-based alignment) were employed to develop reliable 3D-QSAR models. Statistical parameters derived from the models using the above three alignment methods showed that the ligand-based CoMFA (Qcv² = 0.672 and Rncv² = 0.997) and CoMSIA (Qcv² = 0.703 and Rncv² = 0.946) models were better than the other two alignment methods-based CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The two ligand-based models were further confirmed by an external test-set validation and a Y-randomization examination. The ligand-based CoMFA model (Qext² = 0.691, Rpred² = 0.738 and slope k = 0.91) was observed with acceptable external test-set validation values rather than the CoMSIA model (Qext² = 0.307, Rpred² = 0.4 and slope k = 0.719). Docking studies were carried out to predict the binding modes of the inhibitors with MGMT. The results indicated that the obtained binding interactions were consistent with the 3D contour maps. Overall, the combined results of the 3D-QSAR and the docking obtained in this study provide an insight into the understanding of the interactions between guanine derivatives and MGMT protein, which will assist in designing novel MGMT inhibitors with desired activity. PMID:27347909

  20. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  1. 3D features of delayed thermal convection in fault zones: consequences for deep fluid processes in the Tiberias Basin, Jordan Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Fabien; Möller, Sebastian; Inbar, Nimrod; Siebert, Christian; Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that thermal convection in faults can also occur for subcritical Rayleigh conditions. This type of convection develops after a certain period and is referred to as "delayed convection" (Murphy, 1979). The delay in the onset is due to the heat exchange between the damage zone and the surrounding units that adds a thermal buffer along the fault walls. Few numerical studies investigated delayed thermal convection in fractured zones, despite it has the potential to transport energy and minerals over large spatial scales (Tournier, 2000). Here 3D numerical simulations of thermally driven flow in faults are presented in order to investigate the impact of delayed convection on deep fluid processes at basin-scale. The Tiberias Basin (TB), in the Jordan Rift Valley, serves as study area. The TB is characterized by upsurge of deep-seated hot waters along the faulted shores of Lake Tiberias and high temperature gradient that can locally reach 46 °C/km, as in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG). 3D simulations show that buoyant flow ascend in permeable faults which hydraulic conductivity is estimated to vary between 30 m/yr and 140 m/yr. Delayed convection starts respectively at 46 and 200 kyrs and generate temperature anomalies in agreement with observations. It turned out that delayed convective cells are transient. Cellular patterns that initially develop in permeable units surrounding the faults can trigger convection also within the fault plane. The combination of these two convective modes lead to helicoidal-like flow patterns. This complex flow can explain the location of springs along different fault traces of the TB. Besides being of importance for understanding the hydrogeological processes of the TB (Magri et al., 2015), the presented simulations provide a scenario illustrating fault-induced 3D cells that could develop in any geothermal system. References Magri, F., Inbar, N., Siebert, C., Rosenthal, E., Guttman, J., Möller, P., 2015. Transient

  2. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  3. Volumetric image display for complex 3D data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Che-Chih; Chen, Jyh Shing

    2000-05-01

    A volumetric image display is a new display technology capable of displaying computer generated 3D images in a volumetric space. Many viewers can walk around the display and see the image from omni-directions simultaneously without wearing any glasses. The image is real and possesses all major elements in both physiological and psychological depth cues. Due to the volumetric nature of its image, the VID can provide the most natural human-machine interface in operations involving 3D data manipulation and 3D targets monitoring. The technology creates volumetric 3D images by projecting a series of profiling images distributed in the space form a volumetric image because of the after-image effect of human eyes. Exemplary applications in biomedical image visualization were tested on a prototype display, using different methods to display a data set from Ct-scans. The features of this display technology make it most suitable for applications that require quick understanding of the 3D relations, need frequent spatial interactions with the 3D images, or involve time-varying 3D data. It can also be useful for group discussion and decision making.

  4. 3D statistical shape models incorporating 3D random forest regression voting for robust CT liver segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norajitra, Tobias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2015-03-01

    During image segmentation, 3D Statistical Shape Models (SSM) usually conduct a limited search for target landmarks within one-dimensional search profiles perpendicular to the model surface. In addition, landmark appearance is modeled only locally based on linear profiles and weak learners, altogether leading to segmentation errors from landmark ambiguities and limited search coverage. We present a new method for 3D SSM segmentation based on 3D Random Forest Regression Voting. For each surface landmark, a Random Regression Forest is trained that learns a 3D spatial displacement function between the according reference landmark and a set of surrounding sample points, based on an infinite set of non-local randomized 3D Haar-like features. Landmark search is then conducted omni-directionally within 3D search spaces, where voxelwise forest predictions on landmark position contribute to a common voting map which reflects the overall position estimate. Segmentation experiments were conducted on a set of 45 CT volumes of the human liver, of which 40 images were randomly chosen for training and 5 for testing. Without parameter optimization, using a simple candidate selection and a single resolution approach, excellent results were achieved, while faster convergence and better concavity segmentation were observed, altogether underlining the potential of our approach in terms of increased robustness from distinct landmark detection and from better search coverage.

  5. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  6. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  7. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  8. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  9. Designing 3D Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Merging Magnetic and Fluorescent Features: When Cell Sheet Technology Meets Image-Guided Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rahmi, Gabriel; Pidial, Laetitia; Silva, Amanda K. A.; Blondiaux, Eléonore; Meresse, Bertrand; Gazeau, Florence; Autret, Gwennhael; Balvay, Daniel; Cuenod, Charles André; Perretta, Silvana; Tavitian, Bertrand; Wilhelm, Claire; Cellier, Christophe; Clément, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell sheet technology opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration therapy by providing readily implantable, scaffold-free 3D tissue constructs. Many studies have focused on the therapeutic effects of cell sheet implantation while relatively little attention has concerned the fate of the implanted cells in vivo. The aim of the present study was to track longitudinally the cells implanted in the cell sheets in vivo in target tissues. To this end we (i) endowed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) with imaging properties by double labeling with fluorescent and magnetic tracers, (ii) applied BMMSC cell sheets to a digestive fistula model in mice, (iii) tracked the BMMSC fate in vivo by MRI and probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), and (iv) quantified healing of the fistula. We show that image-guided longitudinal follow-up can document both the fate of the cell sheet-derived BMMSCs and their healing capacity. Moreover, our theranostic approach informs on the mechanism of action, either directly by integration of cell sheet-derived BMMSCs into the host tissue or indirectly through the release of signaling molecules in the host tissue. Multimodal imaging and clinical evaluation converged to attest that cell sheet grafting resulted in minimal clinical inflammation, improved fistula healing, reduced tissue fibrosis and enhanced microvasculature density. At the molecular level, cell sheet transplantation induced an increase in the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-ß2 and IL-10) and host intestinal growth factors involved in tissue repair (EGF and VEGF). Multimodal imaging is useful for tracking cell sheets and for noninvasive follow-up of their regenerative properties. PMID:27022420

  10. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  11. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  12. Comments on the paper 'A novel 3D wavelet-based filter forvisualizing features in noisy biological data', by Moss et al.

    SciTech Connect

    Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Knowles, David W.

    2006-02-04

    Moss et al.(2005) describe, in a recent paper, a filter thatthey use to detect lines. We noticed that the wavelet on which thisfilter is based is a difference of uniform filters. This filter is anapproximation to the second derivative operator, which is commonlyimplemented as the Laplace of Gaussian (or Marr-Hildreth) operator (Marr&Hildreth, 1980; Jahne, 2002), Figure 1. We have compared Moss'filter with 1) the Laplace of Gaussian operator, 2) an approximation ofthe Laplace of Gaussian using uniform filters, and 3) a few common noisereduction filters. The Laplace-like operators detect lines by suppressingimage features both larger and smaller than the filter size. The noisereduction filters only suppress image features smaller than the filtersize. By estimating the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and mean squaredifference (MSD) of the filtered results, we found that the filterproposed by Moss et al. does not outperform the Laplace of Gaussianoperator. We also found that for images with extreme noise content, linedetection filters perform better than the noise reduction filters whentrying to enhance line structures. In less extreme cases of noise, thestandard noise reduction filters perform significantly better than boththe Laplace of Gaussian and Moss' filter.

  13. Incorporation of texture-based features in optimal graph-theoretic approach with application to the 3D segmentation of intraretinal surfaces in SD-OCT volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan; Kwon, Young H.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2012-02-01

    While efficient graph-theoretic approaches exist for the optimal (with respect to a cost function) and simultaneous segmentation of multiple surfaces within volumetric medical images, the appropriate design of cost functions remains an important challenge. Previously proposed methods have used simple cost functions or optimized a combination of the same, but little has been done to design cost functions using learned features from a training set, in a less biased fashion. Here, we present a method to design cost functions for the simultaneous segmentation of multiple surfaces using the graph-theoretic approach. Classified texture features were used to create probability maps, which were incorporated into the graph-search approach. The efficiency of such an approach was tested on 10 optic nerve head centered optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes obtained from 10 subjects that presented with glaucoma. The mean unsigned border position error was computed with respect to the average of manual tracings from two independent observers and compared to our previously reported results. A significant improvement was noted in the overall means which reduced from 9.25 +/- 4.03μm to 6.73 +/- 2.45μm (p < 0.01) and is also comparable with the inter-observer variability of 8.85 +/- 3.85μm.

  14. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  15. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  16. Enantioselective synthesis and olfactory evaluation of bicyclic alpha- and gamma-ionone derivatives: the 3D arrangement of key molecular features relevant to the violet odor of ionones.

    PubMed

    Luparia, Marco; Legnani, Laura; Porta, Alessio; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Toma, Lucio; Vidari, Giovanni

    2009-09-18

    Violet smelling ionones 1-3, occurring in the headspace of different flowers, are well-known perfumery raw materials. With the goal to recognize the still ill-defined spatial arrangement of structural features relevant to the binding of ionones to olfactory G-protein coupled receptors, through B3LYP/6-31G(d) modeling studies we identified bicyclic compounds 7-9 as conformationally constrained 13-alkyl-substituted analogues of monocyclic alpha- and gamma-ionones. They were thus synthesized to evaluate the olfactory properties. The enantioselective syntheses of 7-9 entailed two common key steps: (i) a Diels-Alder reaction to construct the octalinic core and (ii) a Julia-Lythgoe olefination to install the alpha,beta-enone side chain. The odor thresholds of synthetic 7 and 9 were significantly lower than the corresponding parent ionones, and 9 showed the lowest threshold value among violet-smelling odorants examined so far. Modeling studies suggested a nearly identical spatial orientation of key hydrophobic and polar moieties of compounds 1, 3, and 4-9. Presumably, interaction of these moieties with ionone olfactory receptors (ORs) triggers a similar receptor code that is ultimately interpreted by the human brain as a pleasant woody-violet smell. These results open the way to studies aimed at identifying and modeling complementary binding sites on alpha-helical domains of ionone receptor proteins. PMID:19743882

  17. 3D photo mosaicing of Tagiri shallow vent field by an autonomous underwater vehicle (3rd report) - Mosaicing method based on navigation data and visual features -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Toshihiro; Ura, Tamaki; Singh, Hanumant; Sakamaki, Takashi

    Large-area seafloor imaging will bring significant benefits to various fields such as academics, resource survey, marine development, security, and search-and-rescue. The authors have proposed a navigation method of an autonomous underwater vehicle for seafloor imaging, and verified its performance through mapping tubeworm colonies with the area of 3,000 square meters using the AUV Tri-Dog 1 at Tagiri vent field, Kagoshima bay in Japan (Maki et al., 2008, 2009). This paper proposes a post-processing method to build a natural photo mosaic from a number of pictures taken by an underwater platform. The method firstly removes lens distortion, invariances of color and lighting from each image, and then ortho-rectification is performed based on camera pose and seafloor estimated by navigation data. The image alignment is based on both navigation data and visual characteristics, implemented as an expansion of the image based method (Pizarro et al., 2003). Using the two types of information realizes an image alignment that is consistent both globally and locally, as well as making the method applicable to data sets with little visual keys. The method was evaluated using a data set obtained by the AUV Tri-Dog 1 at the vent field in Sep. 2009. A seamless, uniformly illuminated photo mosaic covering the area of around 500 square meters was created from 391 pictures, which covers unique features of the field such as bacteria mats and tubeworm colonies.

  18. Photogrammetric measurement of 3D freeform millimetre-sized objects with micro features: an experimental validation of the close-range camera calibration model for narrow angles of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percoco, Gianluca; Sánchez Salmerón, Antonio J.

    2015-09-01

    The measurement of millimetre and micro-scale features is performed by high-cost systems based on technologies with narrow working ranges to accurately control the position of the sensors. Photogrammetry would lower the costs of 3D inspection of micro-features and would be applicable to the inspection of non-removable micro parts of large objects too. Unfortunately, the behaviour of photogrammetry is not known when photogrammetry is applied to micro-features. In this paper, the authors address these issues towards the application of digital close-range photogrammetry (DCRP) to the micro-scale, taking into account that in literature there are research papers stating that an angle of view (AOV) around 10° is the lower limit to the application of the traditional pinhole close-range calibration model (CRCM), which is the basis of DCRP. At first a general calibration procedure is introduced, with the aid of an open-source software library, to calibrate narrow AOV cameras with the CRCM. Subsequently the procedure is validated using a reflex camera with a 60 mm macro lens, equipped with extension tubes (20 and 32 mm) achieving magnification of up to 2 times approximately, to verify literature findings with experimental photogrammetric 3D measurements of millimetre-sized objects with micro-features. The limitation experienced by the laser printing technology, used to produce the bi-dimensional pattern on common paper, has been overcome using an accurate pattern manufactured with a photolithographic process. The results of the experimental activity prove that the CRCM is valid for AOVs down to 3.4° and that DCRP results are comparable with the results of existing and more expensive commercial techniques.

  19. Synthesis, Anticancer Activity, Effect on Cell Cycle Profile, and Apoptosis-Inducing Ability of Novel Hexahydrocyclooctathieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Asmaa Elsayed; Gedawy, Ehab Mohamed; El-Malah, Afaf Ali; Abdelghany, Tamer Mohamed; Abdel-Bakky, Mohamed Sadek

    2016-01-01

    A novel series of hexahydrocyclooctathieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines was synthesized. Investigation of the anticancer activity of these derivatives revealed that compounds 2a and b showed broad-spectrum anticancer activity in nanomolar to micromolar concentrations. In particular, compound 2b showed a concentration required for 50% inhibition of cell growth (GI50) value of less than 1 µM against 20 cancer cell lines. Compounds 2a and b induced G2/M- and S-phase cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT116) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cell lines with a concomitant increase in the pre-G cell population in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, compound 2b increased the nuclear expression of the proapoptotic protein cleaved caspase-3, indicating that apoptosis has an important role, at least in part, in the cancer cell death induced by the new compounds. PMID:27150481

  20. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  1. ToF-SIMS depth profiling of cells: z-correction, 3D imaging, and sputter rate of individual NIH/3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael A; Graham, Daniel J; Castner, David G

    2012-06-01

    Proper display of three-dimensional time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) imaging data of complex, nonflat samples requires a correction of the data in the z-direction. Inaccuracies in displaying three-dimensional ToF-SIMS data arise from projecting data from a nonflat surface onto a 2D image plane, as well as possible variations in the sputter rate of the sample being probed. The current study builds on previous studies by creating software written in Matlab, the ZCorrectorGUI (available at http://mvsa.nb.uw.edu/), to apply the z-correction to entire 3D data sets. Three-dimensional image data sets were acquired from NIH/3T3 fibroblasts by collecting ToF-SIMS images, using a dual beam approach (25 keV Bi(3)(+) for analysis cycles and 20 keV C(60)(2+) for sputter cycles). The entire data cube was then corrected by using the new ZCorrectorGUI software, producing accurate chemical information from single cells in 3D. For the first time, a three-dimensional corrected view of a lipid-rich subcellular region, possibly the nuclear membrane, is presented. Additionally, the key assumption of a constant sputter rate throughout the data acquisition was tested by using ToF-SIMS and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of the same cells. For the dried NIH/3T3 fibroblasts examined in this study, the sputter rate was found to not change appreciably in x, y, or z, and the cellular material was sputtered at a rate of approximately 10 nm per 1.25 × 10(13) ions C(60)(2+)/cm(2). PMID:22530745

  2. 3D palmprint data fast acquisition and recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Huang, Shujun; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a fast 3D (Three-Dimension) palmprint capturing system and develops an efficient 3D palmprint feature extraction and recognition method. In order to fast acquire accurate 3D shape and texture of palmprint, a DLP projector triggers a CCD camera to realize synchronization. By generating and projecting green fringe pattern images onto the measured palm surface, 3D palmprint data are calculated from the fringe pattern images. The periodic feature vector can be derived from the calculated 3D palmprint data, so undistorted 3D biometrics is obtained. Using the obtained 3D palmprint data, feature matching test have been carried out by Gabor filter, competition rules and the mean curvature. Experimental results on capturing 3D palmprint show that the proposed acquisition method can fast get 3D shape information of palmprint. Some initial experiments on recognition show the proposed method is efficient by using 3D palmprint data.

  3. A 3-D microfluidic combinatorial cell array.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mike C; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-02-01

    We present the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) combinatorial cell culture array device featured with integrated three-input, eight-output combinatorial mixer and cell culture chambers. The device is designed for cell-based screening of multiple compounds simultaneously on a microfluidic platform. The final assembled device is composed of a porous membrane integrated in between a Parylene 3-D microfluidic chip and a PDMS microfluidic chip. The membrane turned the cell culture chambers into two-level configuration to facilitate cell loading and to maintain cells in a diffusion dominated space during device operation. Experimentally, we first characterized the combined compound concentration profile at each chamber using a fluorescence method. We then successfully demonstrated the functionality of the quantitative cell-based assay by culturing B35 rat neuronal cells on this device and screening the ability of three compounds (1,5-dihydroxyisoquinoline, deferoxamine, and 3-aminobenzoic acid) to attenuate cell death caused by cytotoxic hydrogen peroxide. In another experiment, we assayed for the combinatorial effects of three chemotherapeutic compound exposures (vinorelbine, paclitaxel, and γ-linolenic acid) on human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. The same technology will enable the construction of inexpensive lab-on-a-chip devices with high-input combinatorial mixer for performing high-throughput cell-based assay and highly parallel and combinatorial chemical or biochemical reactions. PMID:21063783

  4. 3D Feature Extraction for Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Deborah

    1996-01-01

    Visualization techniques provide tools that help scientists identify observed phenomena in scientific simulation. To be useful, these tools must allow the user to extract regions, classify and visualize them, abstract them for simplified representations, and track their evolution. Object Segmentation provides a technique to extract and quantify regions of interest within these massive datasets. This article explores basic algorithms to extract coherent amorphous regions from two-dimensional and three-dimensional scalar unstructured grids. The techniques are applied to datasets from Computational Fluid Dynamics and those from Finite Element Analysis.

  5. Whole Genome Phylogeny of Bacillus by Feature Frequency Profiles (FFP)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aisuo; Ash, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Fifty complete Bacillus genome sequences and associated plasmids were compared using the “feature frequency profile” (FFP) method. The resulting whole-genome phylogeny supports the placement of three Bacillus species (B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis and B. cereus) as a single clade. The monophyletic status of B. anthracis was strongly supported by the analysis. FFP proved to be more effective in inferring the phylogeny of Bacillus than methods based on single gene sequences [16s rRNA gene, GryB (gyrase subunit B) and AroE (shikimate-5-dehydrogenase)] analyses. The findings of FFP analysis were verified using kSNP v2 (alignment-free sequence analysis method) and Harvest suite (core genome sequence alignment method).

  6. A systematic profile/feature-based intelligence for spectral sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M.C.

    2000-10-16

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been creating a special-purpose software-engineering tool to support research and development of spectrum-output-type [chemical] sensors. The modular software system is called SAGE, the Sensor Algorithm Generation Environment and includes general-purpose signal conditioning algorithms (GP/SAGE) as well as intelligent classifiers, pattern recognizes, response accelerators, and sensitivity analyzers. GP/SAGE is an implementation of an approach for delivering a level of encapsulated intelligence to a wide range of sensors and instruments. It capitalizes on the genene classification and analysis needed to process most profile-type data. The GP/SAGE native data format is a generalized one-dimensional vector, signature, or spectrum. GP/SAGE modules form a computer-aided software engineering (CASE) workbench where users can experiment with various conditioning, filtering, and pattern recognition stages, then automatically generate final algorithm source code for data acquisition and analysis systems. SAGE was designed to free the [chemical] sensor developer from the signal processing allowing them to focus on understanding and improving the basic sensing mechanisms. The SAGE system's strength is its creative application of advanced neural computing techniques to response-vector and response-surface data, affording new insight and perspectives with regard to phenomena being studied for sensor development.

  7. Getting To Know You: Profiles of Children's Authors Featured in "Language Arts" 1985-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiefer, Barbara, Comp.

    This book is a selection of profiles of children's authors featured in the journal "Language Arts" over the years. The book's 12 individual profiles highlight some of the real people who contribute to children's book publishing, provide a sample of a few of the many genres of books available for children, and give an insight into the unique…

  8. 3-D SAR image formation from sparse aperture data using 3-D target grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Li, Junfei; Ling, Hao

    2005-05-01

    The performance of ATR systems can potentially be improved by using three-dimensional (3-D) SAR images instead of the traditional two-dimensional SAR images or one-dimensional range profiles. 3-D SAR image formation of targets from radar backscattered data collected on wide angle, sparse apertures has been identified by AFRL as fundamental to building an object detection and recognition capability. A set of data has been released as a challenge problem. This paper describes a technique based on the concept of 3-D target grids aimed at the formation of 3-D SAR images of targets from sparse aperture data. The 3-D target grids capture the 3-D spatial and angular scattering properties of the target and serve as matched filters for SAR formation. The results of 3-D SAR formation using the backhoe public release data are presented.

  9. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  10. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  11. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  12. Software for 3D radiotherapy dosimetry. Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this work is polyGeVero® software (GeVero Co., Poland), which has been developed to fill the requirements of fast calculations of 3D dosimetry data with the emphasis on polymer gel dosimetry for radiotherapy. This software comprises four workspaces that have been prepared for: (i) calculating calibration curves and calibration equations, (ii) storing the calibration characteristics of the 3D dosimeters, (iii) calculating 3D dose distributions in irradiated 3D dosimeters, and (iv) comparing 3D dose distributions obtained from measurements with the aid of 3D dosimeters and calculated with the aid of treatment planning systems (TPSs). The main features and functions of the software are described in this work. Moreover, the core algorithms were validated and the results are presented. The validation was performed using the data of the new PABIGnx polymer gel dosimeter. The polyGeVero® software simplifies and greatly accelerates the calculations of raw 3D dosimetry data. It is an effective tool for fast verification of TPS-generated plans for tumor irradiation when combined with a 3D dosimeter. Consequently, the software may facilitate calculations by the 3D dosimetry community. In this work, the calibration characteristics of the PABIGnx obtained through four calibration methods: multi vial, cross beam, depth dose, and brachytherapy, are discussed as well.

  13. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  14. Angular description for 3D scattering centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Raynal, Ann Marie; Ling, Hao; Moore, John; Velten, Vincent J.

    2006-05-01

    The electromagnetic scattered field from an electrically large target can often be well modeled as if it is emanating from a discrete set of scattering centers (see Fig. 1). In the scattering center extraction tool we developed previously based on the shooting and bouncing ray technique, no correspondence is maintained amongst the 3D scattering center extracted at adjacent angles. In this paper we present a multi-dimensional clustering algorithm to track the angular and spatial behaviors of 3D scattering centers and group them into features. The extracted features for the Slicy and backhoe targets are presented. We also describe two metrics for measuring the angular persistence and spatial mobility of the 3D scattering centers that make up these features in order to gather insights into target physics and feature stability. We find that features that are most persistent are also the most mobile and discuss implications for optimal SAR imaging.

  15. 3D ultrasound image segmentation using wavelet support vector machines

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Hamed; Fei, Baowei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is clinically used in prostate biopsy and therapy. Segmentation of the prostate on TRUS images has many applications. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method for TRUS images of the prostate is presented for 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy. Methods: This segmentation method utilizes a statistical shape, texture information, and intensity profiles. A set of wavelet support vector machines (W-SVMs) is applied to the images at various subregions of the prostate. The W-SVMs are trained to adaptively capture the features of the ultrasound images in order to differentiate the prostate and nonprostate tissue. This method consists of a set of wavelet transforms for extraction of prostate texture features and a kernel-based support vector machine to classify the textures. The voxels around the surface of the prostate are labeled in sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes. The weight functions are defined for each labeled voxel on each plane and on the model at each region. In the 3D segmentation procedure, the intensity profiles around the boundary between the tentatively labeled prostate and nonprostate tissue are compared to the prostate model. Consequently, the surfaces are modified based on the model intensity profiles. The segmented prostate is updated and compared to the shape model. These two steps are repeated until they converge. Manual segmentation of the prostate serves as the gold standard and a variety of methods are used to evaluate the performance of the segmentation method. Results: The results from 40 TRUS image volumes of 20 patients show that the Dice overlap ratio is 90.3% ± 2.3% and that the sensitivity is 87.7% ± 4.9%. Conclusions: The proposed method provides a useful tool in our 3D ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy and can also be applied to other applications in the prostate. PMID:22755682

  16. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  17. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  18. Novel 3D ultrasound image-based biomarkers based on a feature selection from a 2D standardized vessel wall thickness map: a tool for sensitive assessment of therapies for carotid atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Li, Bing; Chow, Tommy W. S.

    2013-09-01

    With the advent of new therapies and management strategies for carotid atherosclerosis, there is a parallel need for measurement tools or biomarkers to evaluate the efficacy of these new strategies. 3D ultrasound has been shown to provide reproducible measurements of plaque area/volume and vessel wall volume. However, since carotid atherosclerosis is a focal disease that predominantly occurs at bifurcations, biomarkers based on local plaque change may be more sensitive than global volumetric measurements in demonstrating efficacy of new therapies. The ultimate goal of this paper is to develop a biomarker that is based on the local distribution of vessel-wall-plus-plaque thickness change (VWT-Change) that has occurred during the course of a clinical study. To allow comparison between different treatment groups, the VWT-Change distribution of each subject must first be mapped to a standardized domain. In this study, we developed a technique to map the 3D VWT-Change distribution to a 2D standardized template. We then applied a feature selection technique to identify regions on the 2D standardized map on which subjects in different treatment groups exhibit greater difference in VWT-Change. The proposed algorithm was applied to analyse the VWT-Change of 20 subjects in a placebo-controlled study of the effect of atorvastatin (Lipitor). The average VWT-Change for each subject was computed (i) over all points in the 2D map and (ii) over feature points only. For the average computed over all points, 97 subjects per group would be required to detect an effect size of 25% that of atorvastatin in a six-month study. The sample size is reduced to 25 subjects if the average were computed over feature points only. The introduction of this sensitive quantification technique for carotid atherosclerosis progression/regression would allow many proof-of-principle studies to be performed before a more costly and longer study involving a larger population is held to confirm the treatment

  19. Down-hole seismic survey system with fiber-optic accelerometer sensor array for 3-dimensions vertical seismic profile (3D-VSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Qilin; Wang, Liwei; Pang, Meng; Tu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Min; Liao, Yanbiao

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrated a down-hole seismic survey system that can be applied in three dimensions vertical seismic profile (VSP) detection in petroleum exploration. The results of experiments show that the system has a dynamic measurement range of 80db (ratio of maximum to minimum value) and the total delay for signal collection, process and communication is less than 200ms @ 2k bit sample rates. An array consisting of six fiber-optic accelerometers (receivers) is applied in this system. Each receiver is comprised of three fiber-optic Michelson interferometers. In order to meet the requirements of high precision and real-time measurement, the high-speed DSP chips are employed to realize the algorithms of signal filters and Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) demodulation to obtain the seismic information. Multi-ARM CPUs are introduced into the system to design the fiber-optic accelerometer array controller and the receiver array local bus that are used for real-time data communication between the multi-level receivers and controller. The system interface for traditional ELIS Down-hole Instrument Bus (EDIB) is designed by the use of FPGA so that our system can attach to EDIB and cooperate with other instruments. The design and experiments of the system are given in this paper in detail.

  20. Using outcrop observations, 3D discrete feature network (DFN) fluid-flow simulations, and subsurface data to constrain the impact of normal faults and opening mode fractures on fluid flow in an active asphalt mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. E.; Aydin, A.; Durlofsky, L.; Karimi-Fard, M.; Brownlow, D. T.

    2008-12-01

    An active quarry near Uvalde, TX which mines asphaltic limestone from the Anacacho Formation offers an ideal setting to study fluid-flow in fractured and faulted carbonate rocks. Semi-3D exposures of normal faults and fractures in addition to visual evidence of asphalt concentrations in the quarry help constrain relationships between geologic structures and the flow and transport of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a subsurface dataset which includes thin sections and measured asphalt concentration from the surrounding region provides a basis to estimate asphalt concentrations and constrain the depositional architecture of both the previously mined portions of the quarry and the un-mined surrounding rock volume. We characterized a series of normal faults and opening mode fractures at the quarry and documented a correlation between the intensity and distribution of these structures with increased concentrations of asphalt. The three-dimensional depositional architecture of the Anacacho Formation was characterized using the subsurface thin sections. Then outcrop exposures of faults, fractured beds, and stratigraphic contacts were mapped and their three-dimensional positions were recorded with differential gps devices. These two datasets were assimilated and a quarry-scale, geologically realistic, three-dimensional Discrete Feature Network (DFN) which represents the geometries and material properties of the matrix, normal faults, and fractures within the quarry was constructed. We then performed two-point flux, control-volume finite- difference fluid-flow simulations with the DFN to investigate the 3D flow and transport of fluids. The results were compared and contrasted with available asphalt concentration estimates from the mine and the aforementioned data from the surrounding drill cores.

  1. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care. PMID:25620087

  2. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-10-30

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D-a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool-designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  3. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  4. 3D-patterned polymer brush surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuechang; Liu, Xuqing; Xie, Zhuang; Zheng, Zijian

    2011-12-01

    Polymer brush-based three-dimensional (3D) structures are emerging as a powerful platform to engineer a surface by providing abundant spatially distributed chemical and physical properties. In this feature article, we aim to give a summary of the recent progress on the fabrication of 3D structures with polymer brushes, with a particular focus on the micro- and nanoscale. We start with a brief introduction on polymer brushes and the challenges to prepare their 3D structures. Then, we highlight the recent advances of the fabrication approaches on the basis of traditional polymerization time and grafting density strategies, and a recently developed feature density strategy. Finally, we provide some perspective outlooks on the future directions of engineering the 3D structures with polymer brushes.

  5. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  6. An Improved Version of TOPAZ 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    An improved version of the TOPAZ 3D gun code is presented as a powerful tool for beam optics simulation. In contrast to the previous version of TOPAZ 3D, the geometry of the device under test is introduced into TOPAZ 3D directly from a CAD program, such as Solid Edge or AutoCAD. In order to have this new feature, an interface was developed, using the GiD software package as a meshing code. The article describes this method with two models to illustrate the results.

  7. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  8. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  9. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  10. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally describedmore » in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.« less

  11. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.

  12. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  13. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-01

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc. PMID:27137530

  14. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  15. Assessing 3d Photogrammetry Techniques in Craniometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshobane, M. C.; de Bruyn, P. J. N.; Bester, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features) has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc®) three-dimensional (3D) modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model's accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  16. 3D steerable wavelets in practice.

    PubMed

    Chenouard, Nicolas; Unser, Michael

    2012-11-01

    We introduce a systematic and practical design for steerable wavelet frames in 3D. Our steerable wavelets are obtained by applying a 3D version of the generalized Riesz transform to a primary isotropic wavelet frame. The novel transform is self-reversible (tight frame) and its elementary constituents (Riesz wavelets) can be efficiently rotated in any 3D direction by forming appropriate linear combinations. Moreover, the basis functions at a given location can be linearly combined to design custom (and adaptive) steerable wavelets. The features of the proposed method are illustrated with the processing and analysis of 3D biomedical data. In particular, we show how those wavelets can be used to characterize directional patterns and to detect edges by means of a 3D monogenic analysis. We also propose a new inverse-problem formalism along with an optimization algorithm for reconstructing 3D images from a sparse set of wavelet-domain edges. The scheme results in high-quality image reconstructions which demonstrate the feature-reduction ability of the steerable wavelets as well as their potential for solving inverse problems. PMID:22752138

  17. 3-D Volume Rendering of Sand Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of resin-impregnated Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) specimens are assembled to provide 3-D volume renderings of density patterns formed by dislocation under the external loading stress profile applied during the experiments. Experiments flown on STS-79 and STS-89. Principal Investigator: Dr. Stein Sture

  18. Laser profiling of 3D microturbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Andrew S.; Heaton, Mark E.; Hong, Guodong; Pullen, Keith R.; Rumsby, Phil T.

    2003-11-01

    We have used KrF excimer laser ablation in the fabrication of a novel MEMS power conversion device based on an axial-flow turbine with an integral axial-flux electromagnetic generator. The device has a sandwich structure, comprising a pair of silicon stators either side of an SU8 polymer rotor. The curved turbine rotor blades were fabricated by projection ablation of SU8 parts performed by conventional UV lithography. A variable aperture mask, implemented by stepping a moving aperture in front of a fixed one, was used to achieve the desired spatial variation in the ablated depth. An automatic process was set up on a commercial laser workstation, with the laser firing and mask motion being controlled by computer. High quality SU8 rotor parts with diameters of 13 mm and depths of 1 mm were produced at a fluence of 0.7 J/cm2, corresponding to a material removal rate of approximately 0.3 μm per pulse. A similar approach was used to form SU8 guide vane inserts for the stators.

  19. Feature Profile Evolution of SiO2 Trenches In Fluorocarbon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arunachalam, Valli; Rauf, Shahid; Coronell, Dan; Carroll, Carol W. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Etching of silicon microstructures for semiconductor manufacturing in chlorine plasmas has been well characterized. The etching proceeds in a two-part process, where the chlorine neutrals passivate the Si surface and then the ions etch away SiClx. However, etching in more complicated gas mixtures and materials, such as etching of SiO2 in Ar/C4F8, requires knowledge of the ion and neutral distribution functions as a function of angle and velocity, in addition to modeling the gas surface reactions. In order to address these needs, we have developed and integrated a suite of models to simulate the etching process from the plasma reactor level to the feature profile evolution level. This arrangement allows for a better understanding, control, and prediction of the influence of equipment level process parameters on feature profile evolution. We are currently using the HPEM (Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model) and PCMCM (Plasma Chemistry Monte Carlo Model) to generate plasma properties and ion and neutral distribution functions for argon/fluorocarbon discharges in a GEC Reference Cell. These quantities are then input to the feature scale model, Simulation of Profile Evolution by Level Sets (SPELS). A surface chemistry model is used to determine the interaction of the incoming species with the substrate material and simulate the evolution of the trench profile. The impact of change of gas pressure and inductive power on the relative flux of CFx and F to the wafer, the etch and polymerization rates, and feature profiles will be examined. Comparisons to experimental profiles will also be presented.

  20. 3D camera tracking from disparity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Woo, Woontack

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust camera tracking method that uses disparity images computed from known parameters of 3D camera and multiple epipolar constraints. We assume that baselines between lenses in 3D camera and intrinsic parameters are known. The proposed method reduces camera motion uncertainty encountered during camera tracking. Specifically, we first obtain corresponding feature points between initial lenses using normalized correlation method. In conjunction with matching features, we get disparity images. When the camera moves, the corresponding feature points, obtained from each lens of 3D camera, are robustly tracked via Kanade-Lukas-Tomasi (KLT) tracking algorithm. Secondly, relative pose parameters of each lens are calculated via Essential matrices. Essential matrices are computed from Fundamental matrix calculated using normalized 8-point algorithm with RANSAC scheme. Then, we determine scale factor of translation matrix by d-motion. This is required because the camera motion obtained from Essential matrix is up to scale. Finally, we optimize camera motion using multiple epipolar constraints between lenses and d-motion constraints computed from disparity images. The proposed method can be widely adopted in Augmented Reality (AR) applications, 3D reconstruction using 3D camera, and fine surveillance systems which not only need depth information, but also camera motion parameters in real-time.

  1. Sensitivity of an MT Array to 3D Structure Outside the Array Footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, J. R.; Mackie, R. L.; Burd, A. I.; Pomposiello, M. C.; Favetto, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Standard data collection strategy in magnetotellurics (MT) is to deploy a profile or array of sites that spans the target of interest. There is no expectation that structure can be imaged outside the area covered by sites. We have inverted two MT arrays for 3D structure under Argentina. The two arrays do not overlap, but serendipitously the 3D model for the northern array overlaps the position of a prominent 3D deep conductive structure seen in the inversion of the southern array. To our surprise this deep southern feature is also imaged by the northern array even though it is well outside the footprint of the northern array. It therefore appears that typical intuition about one's ability to image structure outside the span of the sites is not always true. We present model studies to demonstrate why this is so and under what conditions one can expect a 3D array to be capable of imaging structure outside the array.

  2. A simple method for producing freestanding 3D microstructures by integrated photomask micromolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Freestanding three-dimensional (3D) microstructures are widely used in micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) applications or can function as microdevices themselves. However, microfabrication methods for freestanding 3D microstructures have limitations in shape, size, cost, and mass production, etc. In this work, integrated photomask micromolding is demonstrated, which uses a portable UV light source and chrome glass micromolding to fabricate 3D microstructures without alignment. Specifically, a chrome layer on one side of the glass micromold shields the excess filling SU-8 photoresist from UV exposure and only the SU-8 photoresist in mold cavities is crosslinked. The 3D microstructures produced using this method have very high dimensional accuracy and the profile error is approximately 1.5%. This method can be used with features of virtually any size and shape and can be integrated into highly-parallel micromolding processes and has potential for MEMS applications.

  3. 3D fast wavelet network model-assisted 3D face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Salwa; Jemai, Olfa; Zaied, Mourad; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-12-01

    In last years, the emergence of 3D shape in face recognition is due to its robustness to pose and illumination changes. These attractive benefits are not all the challenges to achieve satisfactory recognition rate. Other challenges such as facial expressions and computing time of matching algorithms remain to be explored. In this context, we propose our 3D face recognition approach using 3D wavelet networks. Our approach contains two stages: learning stage and recognition stage. For the training we propose a novel algorithm based on 3D fast wavelet transform. From 3D coordinates of the face (x,y,z), we proceed to voxelization to get a 3D volume which will be decomposed by 3D fast wavelet transform and modeled after that with a wavelet network, then their associated weights are considered as vector features to represent each training face . For the recognition stage, an unknown identity face is projected on all the training WN to obtain a new vector features after every projection. A similarity score is computed between the old and the obtained vector features. To show the efficiency of our approach, experimental results were performed on all the FRGC v.2 benchmark.

  4. 3D face analysis for demographic biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tokola, Ryan A; Mikkilineni, Aravind K; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2015-01-01

    Despite being increasingly easy to acquire, 3D data is rarely used for face-based biometrics applications beyond identification. Recent work in image-based demographic biometrics has enjoyed much success, but these approaches suffer from the well-known limitations of 2D representations, particularly variations in illumination, texture, and pose, as well as a fundamental inability to describe 3D shape. This paper shows that simple 3D shape features in a face-based coordinate system are capable of representing many biometric attributes without problem-specific models or specialized domain knowledge. The same feature vector achieves impressive results for problems as diverse as age estimation, gender classification, and race classification.

  5. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  6. Automated Analysis and Classification of Histological Tissue Features by Multi-Dimensional Microscopic Molecular Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Daniel P.; Varma, Sushama; West, Robert B.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the molecular attributes and spatial arrangements of cells and features within complex human tissues provides a critical basis for understanding processes involved in development and disease. Moreover, the ability to automate steps in the analysis and interpretation of histological images that currently require manual inspection by pathologists could revolutionize medical diagnostics. Toward this end, we developed a new imaging approach called multidimensional microscopic molecular profiling (MMMP) that can measure several independent molecular properties in situ at subcellular resolution for the same tissue specimen. MMMP involves repeated cycles of antibody or histochemical staining, imaging, and signal removal, which ultimately can generate information analogous to a multidimensional flow cytometry analysis on intact tissue sections. We performed a MMMP analysis on a tissue microarray containing a diverse set of 102 human tissues using a panel of 15 informative antibody and 5 histochemical stains plus DAPI. Large-scale unsupervised analysis of MMMP data, and visualization of the resulting classifications, identified molecular profiles that were associated with functional tissue features. We then directly annotated H&E images from this MMMP series such that canonical histological features of interest (e.g. blood vessels, epithelium, red blood cells) were individually labeled. By integrating image annotation data, we identified molecular signatures that were associated with specific histological annotations and we developed statistical models for automatically classifying these features. The classification accuracy for automated histology labeling was objectively evaluated using a cross-validation strategy, and significant accuracy (with a median per-pixel rate of 77% per feature from 15 annotated samples) for de novo feature prediction was obtained. These results suggest that high-dimensional profiling may advance the development of computer

  7. Fluid Substitution Modeling to Determine Sensitivity of 3D Vertical Seismic Profile Data to Injected CO­2­ at an active Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project, Farnsworth field, TX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haar, K. K.; Balch, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration monitors a CO2 capture, utilization and storage project at Farnsworth field, TX. The reservoir interval is a Morrowan age fluvial sand deposited in an incised valley. The sands are between 10 to 25m thick and located about 2800m below the surface. Primary oil recovery began in 1958 and by the late 1960's secondary recovery through waterflooding was underway. In 2009, Chaparral Energy began tertiary recovery using 100% anthropogenic CO2 sourced from an ethanol and a fertilizer plant. This constitutes carbon sequestration and fulfills the DOE's initiative to determine the best approach to permanent carbon storage. One purpose of the study is to understand CO­2 migration from injection wells. CO2­ plume spatial distribution for this project is analyzed with the use of time-lapse 3D vertical seismic profiles centered on CO2 injection wells. They monitor raypaths traveling in a single direction compared to surface seismic surveys with raypaths traveling in both directions. 3D VSP surveys can image up to 1.5km away from the well of interest, exceeding regulatory requirements for maximum plume extent by a factor of two. To optimize the timing of repeat VSP acquisition, the sensitivity of the 3D VSP surveys to CO2 injection was analyzed to determine at what injection volumes a seismic response to the injected CO­2 will be observable. Static geologic models were generated for pre-CO2 and post-CO2 reservoir states through construction of fine scale seismic based geologic models, which were then history matched via flow simulations. These generated static states of the model, where CO2­ replaces oil and brine in pore spaces, allow for generation of impedance volumes which when convolved with a representative wavelet generate synthetic seismic volumes used in the sensitivity analysis. Funding for the project is provided by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591.

  8. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    PubMed

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ). PMID:26440264

  9. Electrochemical machining with ultrashort voltage pulses: modelling of charging dynamics and feature profile evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Jason A; Hwang, Gyeong S

    2005-07-01

    A two-dimensional computational model is developed to describe electrochemical nanostructuring of conducting materials with ultrashort voltage pulses. The model consists of (1) a transient charging simulation to describe the evolution of the overpotentials at the tool and workpiece surfaces and the resulting dissolution currents and (2) a feature profile evolution tool which uses the level set method to describe either vertical or lateral etching of the workpiece. Results presented include transient currents at different separations between tool and workpiece, evolution of overpotentials and dissolution currents as a function of position along the workpiece, and etch profiles as a function of pulse duration. PMID:21727446

  10. DYNA3D example problem manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, S.C.; Whirley, R.G.

    1990-10-10

    This manual describes in detail the solution of ten example problems using the explicit nonlinear finite element code DYNA3D. The sample problems include solid, shell, and beam element types, and a variety of linear and nonlinear material models. For each example, there is first an engineering description of the physical problem to be studied. Next, the analytical techniques incorporated in the model are discussed and key features of DYNA3D are highlighted. INGRID commands used to generate the mesh are listed, and sample plots from the DYNA3D analysis are given. Finally, there is a description of the TAURUS post-processing commands used to generate the plots of the solution. This set of example problems is useful in verifying the installation of DYNA3D on a new computer system. In addition, these documented analyses illustrate the application of DYNA3D to a variety of engineering problems, and thus this manual should be helpful to new analysts getting started with DYNA3D. 7 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  12. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  13. Use of Landsat-derived profile features for spring small-grains classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The present model for the temporal behavior of agricultural greenness is applied to the extraction of Landsat-derived profile features, distinguishing small from large grain crops. An additional feature derivable from the temporal behavior of the ratio of greenness to brightness is noted which aids in the separation of crops from other vegetation. A limited training set of 20 pure pixels/class, obtained from ground data, is subjected to the Ho-Kashyap (1965) linear classifier. The initial correct classification value for pure pixels of about 85 percent drops to 75 percent for all Landsat pixels.

  14. 3D EIT image reconstruction with GREIT.

    PubMed

    Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Müller, Beat; Adler, Andy

    2016-06-01

    Most applications of thoracic EIT use a single plane of electrodes on the chest from which a transverse image 'slice' is calculated. However, interpretation of EIT images is made difficult by the large region above and below the electrode plane to which EIT is sensitive. Volumetric EIT images using two (or more) electrode planes should help compensate, but are little used currently. The Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT (GREIT) has become popular in lung EIT. One shortcoming of the original formulation of GREIT is its restriction to reconstruction onto a 2D planar image. We present an extension of the GREIT algorithm to 3D and develop open-source tools to evaluate its performance as a function of the choice of stimulation and measurement pattern. Results show 3D GREIT using two electrode layers has significantly more uniform sensitivity profiles through the chest region. Overall, the advantages of 3D EIT are compelling. PMID:27203184

  15. Investigations on Sawtooth Reconnection in ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak Discharges Using the 3D Non-linear Two-fluid MHD Code M3D-C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Isabel; Jardin, Stephen C.; Igochine, Valentin; Guenter, Sibylle; Hoelzl, Matthias; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-10-01

    We study sawtooth reconnection in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak plasmas by means of 3D non-linear two-fluid MHD simulations in toroidal geometry using the high-order finite element code M3D-C1. Parameters and equilibrium of the simulations are based on typical sawtoothing ASDEX Upgrade discharges. The simulation results are compared to features of the experimental observations such as the sawtooth crash time and frequency, the evolution of the safety factor profile and the 3D evolution of the temperature. 2D ECE imaging measurements during sawtooth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade indicate that the heat is transported out of the core through a narrow poloidally localized region. We investigate if incomplete sawtooth reconnection can be seen in the simulations which is suggested by soft X-ray tomography measurements in ASDEX Upgrade showing that an (m = 1, n = 1) perturbation is typically observed to survive the sawtooth crash and approximately maintain its radial position.

  16. 3D Wavelet-Based Filter and Method

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.; Haase, Sebastian; Sedat, John W.

    2008-08-12

    A 3D wavelet-based filter for visualizing and locating structural features of a user-specified linear size in 2D or 3D image data. The only input parameter is a characteristic linear size of the feature of interest, and the filter output contains only those regions that are correlated with the characteristic size, thus denoising the image.

  17. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  18. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  19. 3D optical measuring technologies and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.

    2005-02-01

    The results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the 3D optical measuring technologies and systems for noncontact 3D optical dimensional inspection applied to atomic and railway industry safety problems are presented. This activity includes investigations of diffraction phenomena on some 3D objects, using the original constructive calculation method. The efficient algorithms for precise determining the transverse and longitudinal sizes of 3D objects of constant thickness by diffraction method, peculiarities on formation of the shadow and images of the typical elements of the extended objects were suggested. Ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors and running trains as well as their high exploitation reliability requires a 100% noncontact precise inspection of geometrical parameters of their components. To solve this problem we have developed methods and produced the technical vision measuring systems LMM, CONTROL, PROFIL, and technologies for noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of grid spacers and fuel elements for the nuclear reactor VVER-1000 and VVER-440, as well as automatic laser diagnostic COMPLEX for noncontact inspection of geometric parameters of running freight car wheel pairs. The performances of these systems and the results of industrial testing are presented and discussed. The created devices are in pilot operation at Atomic and Railway Companies.

  20. 3D Face Modeling Using the Multi-Deformable Method

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper. PMID:23201976

  1. Extraction of spatial features in hyperspectral images based on the analysis of differential attribute profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Nicola; Benediktsson, Jon A.; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    The new generation of hyperspectral sensors can provide images with a high spectral and spatial resolution. Recent improvements in mathematical morphology have developed new techniques such as the Attribute Profiles (APs) and the Extended Attribute Profiles (EAPs) that can effectively model the spatial information in remote sensing images. The main drawbacks of these techniques is the selection of the optimal range of values related to the family of criteria adopted to each filter step, and the high dimensionality of the profiles, which results in a very large number of features and therefore provoking the Hughes phenomenon. In this work, we focus on addressing the dimensionality issue, which leads to an highly intrinsic information redundancy, proposing a novel strategy for extracting spatial information from hyperspectral images based on the analysis of the Differential Attribute Profiles (DAPs). A DAP is generated by computing the derivative of the AP; it shows at each level the residual between two adjacent levels of the AP. By analyzing the multilevel behavior of the DAP, it is possible to extract geometrical features corresponding to the structures within the scene at different scales. Our proposed approach consists of two steps: 1) a homogeneity measurement is used to identify the level L in which a given pixel belongs to a region with a physical meaning; 2) the geometrical information of the extracted regions is fused into a single map considering their level L previously identified. The process is repeated for different attributes building a reduced EAP, whose dimensionality is much lower with respect to the original EAP ones. Experiments carried out on the hyperspectral data set of Pavia University area show the effectiveness of the proposed method in extracting spatial features related to the physical structures presented in the scene, achieving higher classification accuracy with respect to the ones reported in the state-of-the-art literature

  2. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  3. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  4. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  5. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  6. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  7. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  8. Competing descriptions of diffusion profiles with two features: Surface space-charge layer versus fast grain-boundary diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraknepper, H.; De Souza, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Two different physical processes, (i) fast grain-boundary diffusion (FGBD) of oxygen and (ii) hindered oxygen diffusion in a surface space-charge layer, yield oxygen isotope diffusion profiles in a similar form. Two features are observed, with the short, sharp profile close to the surface being followed by a longer, shallower profile. In this study, we develop a procedure for deciding which of the two descriptions applies to experimentally measured profiles. Specifically, we solve Fick's second law, using finite-element simulations, to obtain oxygen isotope diffusion profiles for the two cases. Each set of profiles is then analysed in terms of the competing description. In this manner, we derive falsifiable conditions that allow physical processes to be assigned unambiguously to the two features of such isotope profiles. Applying these conditions to experimental profiles for SrTiO3 single crystals published in the literature, we find that FGBD is an invalid model for describing the diffusion processes.

  9. HPF Implementation of ARC3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    We present an HPF (High Performance Fortran) implementation of ARC3D code along with the profiling and performance data on SGI Origin 2000. Advantages and limitations of HPF as a parallel programming language for CFD applications are discussed. For achieving good performance results we used the data distributions optimized for implementation of implicit and explicit operators of the solver and boundary conditions. We compare the results with MPI and directive based implementations.

  10. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  11. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  12. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  13. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  14. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  15. Scale profile as feature for quick satellite image object-based classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, David; Lepage, Richard

    2013-05-01

    With the increasing precision of recent spaceborne sensors, remotely sensed images have become exceedingly large. These images are being used more and more often in the preparation of emergency maps when a disaster occurs. Visual interpretation of these images is long and automatic pixel-based methods require a lot of memory, processing power and time. In this paper, we propose to use a fast level-set image transformation in order to obtain a hierarchical representation of image's objects. A scale profile is then extracted and included as a relevant feature for land-use classification in urban areas. The main contribution of this paper is the analysis of the scale profile for remote sensing applications. The data set from the earthquake that occurred on 12 January 2012 in Haiti is used.

  16. Pharmacological profile of novel acid pump antagonist 7-(4-fluorobenzyloxy)-2,3-dimethyl-1-{[(1S,2S)-2-methyl cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyridazine (CS-526).

    PubMed

    Ito, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Kazuya; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Inaba, Fumi; Morikawa-Inomata, Yuka; Makino, Mitsuko; Tabata, Keiichi; Shibakawa, Nobuhiko

    2007-10-01

    The pharmacological profiles of the novel acid pump antagonist 7-(4-fluorobenzyloxy)-2,3-dimethyl-1-{[(1S,2S)-2-methylcyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyridazine (CS-526) were investigated in terms of hog gastric H+,K+-ATPase activity, gastric acid secretion, and acute gastroesophageal lesions in comparison with other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). CS-526 inhibited H+,K+-ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 61 nM. The inhibitory effect of CS-526 on H+,K+-ATPase activity was more potent than that of any of the other PPIs examined. The inhibitory mechanism of CS-526 on H+,K+-ATPase was a competitive antagonism to the K+ binding site of H+,K+-ATPase, and it was also a reversible inhibition. In pylorus-ligated rats, intraduodenal or oral administration of CS-526 inhibited gastric acid secretion in a dose-dependent manner, and the ID50 values were 2.8 or 0.7 mg/kg, respectively. In Heidenhain pouch dogs, intrapouch administration of CS-526 inhibited histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion in a dose- and retention time-dependent manner. In a reflux esophagitis model, intraduodenal and oral administration of CS-526 prevented esophageal lesions with ID50 values of 5.4 and 1.9 mg/kg, respectively. Lansoprazole prevented esophagitis only by intraduodenal administration (ID50 = 2.2 mg/kg). Furthermore, CS-526 inhibited acute gastric mucosal lesions. These data demonstrate that the novel acid pump antagonist CS-526 has potent antisecretory and antiulcer effects. These findings indicate that CS-526 would have a curative effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease via its potent antisecretory and antiulcer actions. PMID:17630360

  17. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  1. Sensing and compressing 3-D models

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, J.

    1998-02-01

    The goal of this research project was to create a passive and robust computer vision system for producing 3-D computer models of arbitrary scenes. Although the authors were unsuccessful in achieving the overall goal, several components of this research have shown significant potential. Of particular interest is the application of parametric eigenspace methods for planar pose measurement of partially occluded objects in gray-level images. The techniques presented provide a simple, accurate, and robust solution to the planar pose measurement problem. In addition, the representational efficiency of eigenspace methods used with gray-level features were successfully extended to binary features, which are less sensitive to illumination changes. The results of this research are presented in two papers that were written during the course of this project. The papers are included in sections 2 and 3. The first section of this report summarizes the 3-D modeling efforts.

  2. An improved virtual aberration model to simulate mask 3D and resist effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Reiji; Fujii, Koichi; Imai, Motokatsu; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki; Tsuzuki, Takao; Lin, Qun Ying

    2015-03-01

    As shrinkage of design features progresses, the difference in best focus positions among different patterns is becoming a fatal issue, especially when many patterns co-exist in a layer. The problem arises from three major factors: aberrations of projection optics, mask 3D topography effects, and resist thickness effects. Aberrations in projection optics have already been thoroughly investigated, but mask 3D topography effects and resist thickness effects are still under study. It is well known that mask 3D topography effects can be simulated by various Electro-magnetic Field (EMF) analysis methods. However, it is almost impossible to use them for full chip modeling because all of these methods are extremely computationally intensive. Consequently, they usually apply only to a limited range of mask patterns which are about tens of square micro meters in area. Resist thickness effects on best focus positions are rarely treated as a topic of lithography investigations. Resist 3D effects are treated mostly for resist profile prediction, which also requires an intensive EMF analysis when one needs to predict it accurately. In this paper, we present a simplified Virtual Aberration (VA) model to simulate both mask 3D induced effects and resist thickness effects. A conventional simulator, when applied with this simplified method, can factor in both mask 3D topography effects and resist thickness effects. Thus it can be used to model inter-pattern Best Focus Difference (BFD) issues with the least amount of rigorous EMF analysis.

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  4. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  5. 'Berries' on the Ground 2 (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of soil featuring round, blueberry-shaped rock formations on the crater floor at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken on the 13th day of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's journey, before the Moessbauer spectrometer, an instrument located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' was pressed down to take measurements. The area in this image is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  6. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  7. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  8. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  9. The Galicia 3D experiment: an Introduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Martinez Loriente, Sara; Holroyd, Luke; Merry, Tobias; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Shillington, Donna; Gibson, James; Minshull, Tim; Karplus, Marianne; Bayracki, Gaye; Davy, Richard; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Ranero, Cesar; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Martinez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    In June and July 2013, scientists from 8 institutions took part in the Galicia 3D seismic experiment, the first ever crustal -scale academic 3D MCS survey over a rifted margin. The aim was to determine the 3D structure of a critical portion of the west Galicia rifted margin. At this margin, well-defined tilted fault blocks, bound by west-dipping faults and capped by synrift sediments are underlain by a bright reflection, undulating on time sections, termed the S reflector and thought to represent a major detachment fault of some kind. Moving west, the crust thins to zero thickness and mantle is unroofed, as evidence by the "Peridotite Ridge" first reported at this margin, but since observed at many other magma-poor margins. By imaging such a margin in detail, the experiment aimed to resolve the processes controlling crustal thinning and mantle unroofing at a type example magma poor margin. The experiment set out to collect several key datasets: a 3D seismic reflection volume measuring ~20x64km and extending down to ~14s TWT, a 3D ocean bottom seismometer dataset suitable for full wavefield inversion (the recording of the complete 3D seismic shots by 70 ocean bottom instruments), the "mirror imaging" of the crust using the same grid of OBS, a single 2D combined reflection/refraction profile extending to the west to determine the transition from unroofed mantle to true oceanic crust, and the seismic imaging of the water column, calibrated by regular deployment of XBTs to measure the temperature structure of the water column. We collected 1280 km2 of seismic reflection data, consisting of 136533 shots recorded on 1920 channels, producing 260 million seismic traces, each ~ 14s long. This adds up to ~ 8 terabytes of data, representing, we believe, the largest ever academic 3D MCS survey in terms of both the area covered and the volume of data. The OBS deployment was the largest ever within an academic 3D survey.

  10. Recognition methods for 3D textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Oana G.; Dana, Kristin J.

    2001-06-01

    Texture as a surface representation is the subject of a wide body of computer vision and computer graphics literature. While texture is always associated with a form of repetition in the image, the repeating quantity may vary. The texture may be a color or albedo variation as in a checkerboard, a paisley print or zebra stripes. Very often in real-world scenes, texture is instead due to a surface height variation, e.g. pebbles, gravel, foliage and any rough surface. Such surfaces are referred to here as 3D textured surfaces. Standard texture recognition algorithms are not appropriate for 3D textured surfaces because the appearance of these surfaces changes in a complex manner with viewing direction and illumination direction. Recent methods have been developed for recognition of 3D textured surfaces using a database of surfaces observed under varied imaging parameters. One of these methods is based on 3D textons obtained using K-means clustering of multiscale feature vectors. Another method uses eigen-analysis originally developed for appearance-based object recognition. In this work we develop a hybrid approach that employs both feature grouping and dimensionality reduction. The method is tested using the Columbia-Utrecht texture database and provides excellent recognition rates. The method is compared with existing recognition methods for 3D textured surfaces. A direct comparison is facilitated by empirical recognition rates from the same texture data set. The current method has key advantages over existing methods including requiring less prior information on both the training and novel images.

  11. Highway 3D model from image and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinfeng; Chu, Henry; Sun, Xiaoduan

    2014-05-01

    We present a new method of highway 3-D model construction developed based on feature extraction in highway images and LIDAR data. We describe the processing road coordinate data that connect the image frames to the coordinates of the elevation data. Image processing methods are used to extract sky, road, and ground regions as well as significant objects (such as signs and building fronts) in the roadside for the 3D model. LIDAR data are interpolated and processed to extract the road lanes as well as other features such as trees, ditches, and elevated objects to form the 3D model. 3D geometry reasoning is used to match the image features to the 3D model. Results from successive frames are integrated to improve the final model.

  12. Psychological features of North Korean female refugees on the MMPI-2: latent profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Hyeon; Kim, Hee Kyung; Lee, Narae

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the heterogeneity in the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2nd Edition (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) profiles of North Korean female refugee population (N = 2,163) using latent profile analysis (LPA). The North Korean female refugee sample arrived at Hanawon, South Korea's resettlement center for North Korean refugees in 2008 and 2009 and took the MMPI-2 as part of an initial psychological screen. The analysis, which included the T scores of the 6 validity scales and the 10 standard clinical scales, identified 4 classes with distinctive psychological features: Class 1 (nonclinical), Class 2 (demoralized), Class 3 (somatized), and Class 4 (detached). The 4 covariates entered into the model (age, education, affiliation with a religion, and the number of forced repatriations) impacted the likelihood of belonging to certain classes. As hypothesized, older age, fewer years of education, and more incidents of forced repatriation predicted higher proneness to psychopathology. However, contrary to our expectation, having a religious faith did not emerge as a salient protective factor. The current LPA results revealed distinct heterogeneous subgroups that previous research on the MMPI and MMPI-2 profiles of refugee populations overlooked with the assumption of a homogeneous sample. Clinical implications for the treatment of North Korean female refugees and the limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:23730825

  13. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the recent years 3D waveform inversion has become achievable procedure for seismic data processing. A number of datasets has been inverted and presented (Warner el al 2008, Ben Hadj at all, Sirgue et all 2010) using isotropic 3D waveform inversion. However the question arises will the results be affected by isotropic assumption. Full-wavefield inversion techniques seek to match field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, to synthetic data generated by a high-resolution model of the sub-surface. In this endeavour, correctly matching the travel times of the principal arrivals is a necessary minimal requirement. In many, perhaps most, long-offset and wide-azimuth datasets, it is necessary to introduce some form of p-wave velocity anisotropy to match the travel times successfully. If this anisotropy is not also incorporated into the wavefield inversion, then results from the inversion will necessarily be compromised. We have incorporated anisotropy into our 3D wavefield tomography codes, characterised as spatially varying transverse isotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry - TTI anisotropy. This enhancement approximately doubles both the run time and the memory requirements of the code. We show that neglect of anisotropy can lead to significant artefacts in the recovered velocity models. We will present inversion results of inverting anisotropic 3D dataset by assuming isotropic earth and compare them with anisotropic inversion result. As a test case Marmousi model extended to 3D with no velocity variation in third direction and with added spatially varying anisotropy is used. Acquisition geometry is assumed as OBC with sources and receivers everywhere at the surface. We attempted inversion using both 2D and full 3D acquisition for this dataset. Results show that if no anisotropy is taken into account although image looks plausible most features are miss positioned in depth and space, even for relatively low anisotropy, which leads to incorrect result. This may lead to

  14. 3D Virtual Reality for Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Angela; Ruzhitskaya, L.; Laffey, J.; Ding, N.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing 3D virtual learning environments (VLEs) as learning materials for an undergraduate astronomy course, in which will utilize advances both in technologies available and in our understanding of the social nature of learning. These learning materials will be used to test whether such VLEs can indeed augment science learning so that it is more engaging, active, visual and effective. Our project focuses on the challenges and requirements of introductory college astronomy classes. Here we present our virtual world of the Jupiter system and how we plan to implement it to allow students to learn course material - physical laws and concepts in astronomy - while engaging them into exploration of the Jupiter's system, encouraging their imagination, curiosity, and motivation. The VLE can allow students to work individually or collaboratively. The 3D world also provides an opportunity for research in astronomy education to investigate impact of social interaction, gaming features, and use of manipulatives offered by a learning tool on students’ motivation and learning outcomes. Use of this VLE is also a valuable source for exploration of how the learners’ spatial awareness can be enhanced by working in 3D environment. We will present the Jupiter-system environment along with a preliminary study of the efficacy and usability of our Jupiter 3D VLE.

  15. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  16. 3D measurement using circular gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    3D measurement using methods of structured light are well known in the industry. Most such systems use some variation of straight lines, either as simple lines or with some form of encoding. This geometry assumes the lines will be projected from one side and viewed from another to generate the profile information. But what about applications where a wide triangulation angle may not be practical, particularly at longer standoff distances. This paper explores the use of circular grating patterns projected from a center point to achieve 3D information. Originally suggested by John Caulfield around 1990, the method had some interesting potential, particularly if combined with alternate means of measurement from traditional triangulation including depth from focus methods. The possible advantages of a central reference point in the projected pattern may offer some different capabilities not as easily attained with a linear grating pattern. This paper will explore the pros and cons of the method and present some examples of possible applications.

  17. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. 3-D target-based distributed smart camera network localization.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, John; Bulusu, Nirupama; Feng, Wu-Chi

    2010-10-01

    For distributed smart camera networks to perform vision-based tasks such as subject recognition and tracking, every camera's position and orientation relative to a single 3-D coordinate frame must be accurately determined. In this paper, we present a new camera network localization solution that requires successively showing a 3-D feature point-rich target to all cameras, then using the known geometry of a 3-D target, cameras estimate and decompose projection matrices to compute their position and orientation relative to the coordinatization of the 3-D target's feature points. As each 3-D target position establishes a distinct coordinate frame, cameras that view more than one 3-D target position compute translations and rotations relating different positions' coordinate frames and share the transform data with neighbors to facilitate realignment of all cameras to a single coordinate frame. Compared to other localization solutions that use opportunistically found visual data, our solution is more suitable to battery-powered, processing-constrained camera networks because it requires communication only to determine simultaneous target viewings and for passing transform data. Additionally, our solution requires only pairwise view overlaps of sufficient size to see the 3-D target and detect its feature points, while also giving camera positions in meaningful units. We evaluate our algorithm in both real and simulated smart camera networks. In the real network, position error is less than 1 ('') when the 3-D target's feature points fill only 2.9% of the frame area. PMID:20679031

  20. On 3D instability of wake behind a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruba, Václav

    2016-06-01

    The canonical case of cross-flow behind prismatic circular cylinder is analyzed from the point of view of 3D instabilities appearance. Various flow conditions defined by various Reynolds number values are considered. All cases in question exhibit significant 3D features in close wake playing significant role in physical mechanisms of force generation.

  1. MELANCHOLIC DEPRESSION PREDICTION BY IDENTIFYING REPRESENTATIVE FEATURES IN METABOLIC AND MICROARRAY PROFILES WITH MISSING VALUES

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zhi; Yang, Tao; Liu, Yashu; Lin, Binbin; Li, Qingyang; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Wittenberg, Gayle; Ye, Jieping

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that melancholic depression, one major subtype of depression, is closely associated with the concentration of some metabolites and biological functions of certain genes and pathways. Meanwhile, recent advances in biotechnologies have allowed us to collect a large amount of genomic data, e.g., metabolites and microarray gene expression. With such a huge amount of information available, one approach that can give us new insights into the understanding of the fundamental biology underlying melancholic depression is to build disease status prediction models using classification or regression methods. However, the existence of strong empirical correlations, e.g., those exhibited by genes sharing the same biological pathway in microarray profiles, tremendously limits the performance of these methods. Furthermore, the occurrence of missing values which are ubiquitous in biomedical applications further complicates the problem. In this paper, we hypothesize that the problem of missing values might in some way benefit from the correlation between the variables and propose a method to learn a compressed set of representative features through an adapted version of sparse coding which is capable of identifying correlated variables and addressing the issue of missing values simultaneously. An efficient algorithm is also developed to solve the proposed formulation. We apply the proposed method on metabolic and microarray profiles collected from a group of subjects consisting of both patients with melancholic depression and healthy controls. Results show that the proposed method can not only produce meaningful clusters of variables but also generate a set of representative features that achieve superior classification performance over those generated by traditional clustering and data imputation techniques. In particular, on both datasets, we found that in comparison with the competing algorithms, the representative features learned by the proposed

  2. Melancholic depression prediction by identifying representative features in metabolic and microarray profiles with missing values.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhi; Yang, Tao; Liu, Yashu; Li, Qingyang; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Wittenberg, Gayle; Ye, Jieping

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that melancholic depression, one major subtype of depression, is closely associated with the concentration of some metabolites and biological functions of certain genes and pathways. Meanwhile, recent advances in biotechnologies have allowed us to collect a large amount of genomic data, e.g., metabolites and microarray gene expression. With such a huge amount of information available, one approach that can give us new insights into the understanding of the fundamental biology underlying melancholic depression is to build disease status prediction models using classification or regression methods. However, the existence of strong empirical correlations, e.g., those exhibited by genes sharing the same biological pathway in microarray profiles, tremendously limits the performance of these methods. Furthermore, the occurrence of missing values which are ubiquitous in biomedical applications further complicates the problem. In this paper, we hypothesize that the problem of missing values might in some way benefit from the correlation between the variables and propose a method to learn a compressed set of representative features through an adapted version of sparse coding which is capable of identifying correlated variables and addressing the issue of missing values simultaneously. An efficient algorithm is also developed to solve the proposed formulation. We apply the proposed method on metabolic and microarray profiles collected from a group of subjects consisting of both patients with melancholic depression and healthy controls. Results show that the proposed method can not only produce meaningful clusters of variables but also generate a set of representative features that achieve superior classification performance over those generated by traditional clustering and data imputation techniques. In particular, on both datasets, we found that in comparison with the competing algorithms, the representative features learned by the proposed

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  4. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  5. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  6. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  7. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  8. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  9. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2003-05-12

    This project is in its first full year after the combining of two previously funded projects: ''3D Code Development'' and ''Dynamic Material Properties''. The motivation behind this move was to emphasize and strengthen the ties between the experimental work and the computational model development in the materials area. The next year's activities will indicate the merging of the two efforts. The current activity is structured in two tasks. Task A, ''Simulations and Measurements'', combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. Task B, ''ALE3D Development'', is a continuation of the non-materials related activities from the previous project.

  10. A real-time 3D scanning system for pavement distortion inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingguang; Yao, Ming; Yao, Xun; Xu, Bugao

    2010-01-01

    Pavement distortions, such as rutting and shoving, are the common pavement distress problems that need to be inspected and repaired in a timely manner to ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper introduces a real-time, low-cost inspection system devoted to detecting these distress features using high-speed 3D transverse scanning techniques. The detection principle is the dynamic generation and characterization of the 3D pavement profile based on structured light triangulation. To improve the accuracy of the system, a multi-view coplanar scheme is employed in the calibration procedure so that more feature points can be used and distributed across the field of view of the camera. A sub-pixel line extraction method is applied for the laser stripe location, which includes filtering, edge detection and spline interpolation. The pavement transverse profile is then generated from the laser stripe curve and approximated by line segments. The second-order derivatives of the segment endpoints are used to identify the feature points of possible distortions. The system can output the real-time measurements and 3D visualization of rutting and shoving distress in a scanned pavement.

  11. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  12. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  13. Early thermal profiles and lithospheric strength of Ganymede from extensional tectonic features

    SciTech Connect

    Golombek, M.P.; Banerdt, W.B.

    1986-11-01

    The early thermal profiles and the lithospheric stability and strength of Ganymede are quantitatively determined on the basis of brittle lithosphere thickness estimates derived from the width and spacing of extensional tectonic features, together with lithospheric strength envelopes for ice. Plots of the brittle and ductile yield stress vs. depth for the icy lithosphere of Ganymede exhibit a linear increase in brittle strength with depth to a maximum at the brittle-ductile transition that is followed by an exponential decrease in ductile yield stress with depth. The results obtained imply that the thermal gradient and lithospheric strength have varied laterally by factor as great as 5, and that Ganymede underwent cooling in a highly inhomogeneous fashion with lateral thermal anomalies. The present analysis furnishes reasons for the stability of large cratered terrain remnants. 47 references.

  14. Algorithmic identification of limnological features in vertical profiles from the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietsma, T.; Collingsworth, P.; Minsker, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    High volume collection of environmental data in digital format presents a range of challenges for the researcher, from quality control and data management to efficient interpretation of the signal and the development of requisite information technology skills. These challenges have been termed the "data deluge". To aid in efficient data interpretation, we describe several algorithmic approaches for feature identification in signal streams, including gradient estimation, spectral analysis, and the hidden Markov model. These approaches are calibrated and evaluated over vertical temperature profiles from the Great Lakes obtained through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. To demonstrate the value of this data science approach, we describe how the algorithms can be integrated with the historical sampling record to yield an expert system that assists field technicians with adaptive sampling.

  15. Dual multispectral and 3D structured light laparoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Lin, Jianyu; Arya, Shobhit; Hanna, George B.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative feedback on tissue function, such as blood volume and oxygenation would be useful to the surgeon in cases where current clinical practice relies on subjective measures, such as identification of ischaemic bowel or tissue viability during anastomosis formation. Also, tissue surface profiling may be used to detect and identify certain pathologies, as well as diagnosing aspects of tissue health such as gut motility. In this paper a dual modality laparoscopic system is presented that combines multispectral reflectance and 3D surface imaging. White light illumination from a xenon source is detected by a laparoscope-mounted fast filter wheel camera to assemble a multispectral image (MSI) cube. Surface shape is then calculated using a spectrally-encoded structured light (SL) pattern detected by the same camera and triangulated using an active stereo technique. Images of porcine small bowel were acquired during open surgery. Tissue reflectance spectra were acquired and blood volume was calculated at each spatial pixel across the bowel wall and mesentery. SL features were segmented and identified using a `normalised cut' algoritm and the colour vector of each spot. Using the 3D geometry defined by the camera coordinate system the multispectral data could be overlaid onto the surface mesh. Dual MSI and SL imaging has the potential to provide augmented views to the surgeon supplying diagnostic information related to blood supply health and organ function. Future work on this system will include filter optimisation to reduce noise in tissue optical property measurement, and minimise spot identification errors in the SL pattern.

  16. 3D scene modeling from multiple range views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, Vitor; Goncalves, Joao G. M.; Ribeiro, M. Isabel

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a new 3D scene analysis system that automatically reconstructs the 3D geometric model of real-world scenes from multiple range images acquired by a laser range finder on board of a mobile robot. The reconstruction is achieved through an integrated procedure including range data acquisition, geometrical feature extraction, registration, and integration of multiple views. Different descriptions of the final 3D scene model are obtained: a polygonal triangular mesh, a surface description in terms of planar and biquadratics surfaces, and a 3D boundary representation. Relevant experimental results from the complete 3D scene modeling are presented. Direct applications of this technique include 3D reconstruction and/or update of architectual or industrial plans into a CAD model, design verification of buildings, navigation of autonomous robots, and input to virtual reality systems.

  17. 3D scene reconstruction from multi-aperture images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Miao; Qin, Kaihuai

    2014-04-01

    With the development of virtual reality, there is a growing demand for 3D modeling of real scenes. This paper proposes a novel 3D scene reconstruction framework based on multi-aperture images. Our framework consists of four parts. Firstly, images with different apertures are captured via programmable aperture. Secondly, we use SIFT method for feature point matching. Then we exploit binocular stereo vision to calculate camera parameters and 3D positions of matching points, forming a sparse 3D scene model. Finally, we apply patch-based multi-view stereo to obtain a dense 3D scene model. Experimental results show that our method is practical and effective to reconstruct dense 3D scene.

  18. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy; Davy, Richard; Sawyer, Dale; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Reston, Timothy; Shillington, Donna; Ranero, Cesar

    2015-04-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  19. Improving feature size uniformity from interference lithography systems with non-uniform intensity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, En-Chiang; Mikolas, David; Lin, Pao-Te; Schenk, Tony; Wu, Chien-Li; Sung, Cheng-Kuo; Fu, Chien-Chung

    2013-11-01

    The non-uniform intensity profile of Gaussian-like laser beams used in interference lithography (IL) leads to a non-uniform dose and feature size distribution across the sample. Previously described methods to improve dose uniformity are reviewed. However, here we examine the behavior of the non-uniformity from the viewpoint of photoresist response rather than the IL system configuration. Samples with a fixed intra-sample dose profile were exposed with an increasing average dose. A line/space pattern with a period of 240 nm across an area of 2 × 2 cm2 was produced using IL on identical samples using a HeCd laser operated at 325 nm and a Lloyd’s mirror IL system. A binary model of photoresist response predicts that the absolute range of line widths in nanometers should be significantly reduced as the overall sample dose is increased. We have experimentally verified a reduction in the range of line widths within a given sample from 50 to 16 nm as the overall dose is increased by only 60%. This resulted in a drop in the narrowest line width from 120 to 65 nm. An etch process is demonstrated to increase the line width by generating a wider secondary chrome hard mask from the narrowly patterned primary chrome hard mask. The subsequent fabrication of a silicon nanoimprint mold is used as a demonstration of the technique.

  20. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  1. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  2. An Automatic Registration Algorithm for 3D Maxillofacial Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Luwen; Zhou, Zhongwei; Guo, Jixiang; Lv, Jiancheng

    2016-09-01

    3D image registration aims at aligning two 3D data sets in a common coordinate system, which has been widely used in computer vision, pattern recognition and computer assisted surgery. One challenging problem in 3D registration is that point-wise correspondences between two point sets are often unknown apriori. In this work, we develop an automatic algorithm for 3D maxillofacial models registration including facial surface model and skull model. Our proposed registration algorithm can achieve a good alignment result between partial and whole maxillofacial model in spite of ambiguous matching, which has a potential application in the oral and maxillofacial reparative and reconstructive surgery. The proposed algorithm includes three steps: (1) 3D-SIFT features extraction and FPFH descriptors construction; (2) feature matching using SAC-IA; (3) coarse rigid alignment and refinement by ICP. Experiments on facial surfaces and mandible skull models demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our algorithm.

  3. Personal perceptual and cognitive property for 3D recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matozaki, Takeshi; Tanisita, Akihiko

    1996-04-01

    3D closed circuit TV which produces stereoscopic vision by observing different images through each eye alternately, has been proposed. But, there are several problems, both physiological and psychological, for 3D image observation in many fields. From this prospective, we are learning personal visual characteristics for 3D recognition in the transition from 2D to 3D. We have separated the mechanism of 3D recognition into several categories, and formed some hypothesis about the personal features. These hypotheses are related to an observer's personal features, as follows: (1) consideration of the angle between the left and the right eye's line of vision and the adjustment of focus, (2) consideration of the angle of vision and the time required for fusion, (3) consideration of depth sense based on life experience, (4) consideration of 3D experience, and (5) consideration of 3D sense based on the observer's age. To establish these hypotheses, and we have analyzed the personal features of the time interval required for 3D recognition through some examinations to examinees. Examinees indicate their response for 3D recognition by pushing a button. Recently, we introduced a method for picking up the reaction of 3D recognition from examinees through their biological information, for example, analysis of pulse waves of the finger. We also bring a hypothesis, as a result of the analysis of pulse waves. (1) We can observe chaotic response when the examinee is recognizing a 2D image. (2) We can observe periodic response when the examinee is recognizing a 3D image. We are making nonlinear forecasts by getting correlation between the forecast and the biological phenomena. Deterministic nonlinear prediction are applied to the data, as a promising method of chaotic time series analysis in order to analyze the long term unpredictability, one of the fundamental characteristics of deterministic chaos.

  4. The upper crustal 3-D resistivity structure of the Kristineberg area, Skellefte district, northern Sweden revealed by magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübert, Juliane; Juanatey, María de los Ángeles García; Malehmir, Alireza; Tryggvason, Ari; Pedersen, Laust B.

    2013-02-01

    A 3-D model of the crustal electrical resistivity was constructed from the inversion of magnetotelluric data in the Kristineberg area, Skellefte district, the location of one of Sweden's most successful mining activities. Forward modelling of vertical magnetic transfer data supports our model which was derived from the magnetotelluric impedance only. The dominant features in the 3-D model are the strong conductors at various depth levels and resistive bodies of variable thickness occurring in the shallower subsurface. The deepest conductor, previously associated with the Skellefte crustal conductivity anomaly, is imaged in the southern part of the area as a north-dipping feature starting at ˜4 km depth. Several shallow conductors are attributed to graphite in the black shales defining the contact between the metasedimentary rocks and the underlying metavolcanic rocks. Furthermore, an elongated intermediate depth conductor is possibly associated with alteration zones in the metavolcanic rocks that host the ore occurrences. The most prominent crustal resistors occur in the southern and northern part of the area, where their lateral extent on the surface coincides with the late-orogenic Revsund type intrusions. To the east, a resistive feature can be correlated to the early-orogenic Viterliden intrusion. The 3-D model is compared with two previous 2-D inversion models along two perpendicular profiles. The main electrical features are confirmed with the new model and previous uncertainties regarding 3-D effects, caused by off-profile conductors, can be better assessed in 3-D, although the resolution is lower due to a coarser model discretization. The comparison with seismic sections along two north-south profiles reveals structural correspondence between electrical features, zones of different reflectivity and geological units.

  5. Transcriptional Profiling of Th2 Cells Identifies Pathogenic Features Associated with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Seumois, Grégory; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; White, Brandie; Singh, Divya; Schulten, Veronique; Dillon, Myles; Hinz, Denize; Broide, David H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern; Vijayanand, Pandurangan

    2016-07-15

    Allergic asthma and rhinitis are two common chronic allergic diseases that affect the lungs and nose, respectively. Both diseases share clinical and pathological features characteristic of excessive allergen-induced type 2 inflammation, orchestrated by memory CD4(+) T cells that produce type 2 cytokines (Th2 cells). However, a large majority of subjects with allergic rhinitis do not develop asthma, suggesting divergence in disease mechanisms. Because Th2 cells play a pathogenic role in both these diseases and are also present in healthy nonallergic subjects, we performed global transcriptional profiling to determine whether there are qualitative differences in Th2 cells from subjects with allergic asthma, rhinitis, and healthy controls. Th2 cells from asthmatic subjects expressed higher levels of several genes that promote their survival as well as alter their metabolic pathways to favor persistence at sites of allergic inflammation. In addition, genes that enhanced Th2 polarization and Th2 cytokine production were also upregulated in asthma. Several genes that oppose T cell activation were downregulated in asthma, suggesting enhanced activation potential of Th2 cells from asthmatic subjects. Many novel genes with poorly defined functions were also differentially expressed in asthma. Thus, our transcriptomic analysis of circulating Th2 cells has identified several molecules that are likely to confer pathogenic features to Th2 cells that are either unique or common to both asthma and rhinitis. PMID:27271570

  6. Auditory Profiles of Classical, Jazz, and Rock Musicians: Genre-Specific Sensitivity to Musical Sound Features

    PubMed Central

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Janhunen, Lauri; Kruck, Stefanie; Putkinen, Vesa; Huotilainen, Minna

    2016-01-01

    When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e., varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians' and non-musicians' accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians), timing (classical and jazz musicians), transposition (jazz musicians), and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians). Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content. PMID:26779055

  7. Auditory Profiles of Classical, Jazz, and Rock Musicians: Genre-Specific Sensitivity to Musical Sound Features.

    PubMed

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Janhunen, Lauri; Kruck, Stefanie; Putkinen, Vesa; Huotilainen, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e., varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians' and non-musicians' accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians), timing (classical and jazz musicians), transposition (jazz musicians), and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians). Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content. PMID:26779055

  8. Clinical Features and Drug-Resistance Profile of Urinary Tuberculosis in South-Western China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yuanxin; Hu, Xuejiao; Shi, Yunying; Zhou, Juan; Zhou, Yi; Song, Xingbo; Xie, Yi; Lu, Xiaojun; Wang, Lanlan; Ying, Binwu; Chen, Xuerong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the epidemiology, clinical features, and drug-resistance profile of urinary tuberculosis (UTB) in south-western China to improve UTB diagnostics. After the screening of 1036 cases of suspected UTB, 193 patients with UTB were enrolled during 2009 to 2014. Urine samples were collected for routine urinalysis, smear, tuberculosis DNA (TB-DNA) detection, and drug-resistant analysis, whereas blood samples were collected for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and renal function evaluation. Clinical features (such as symptoms and outcome) and imageology results (such as B ultrasonic, computerized tomography, intravenous pyelography, and renography) were also collected and analyzed to investigate the epidemiology, clinical features, and drug-resistance profile. The most common presenting symptoms were urinary irritation (61.1%) and lumbago (49.2%). High proportions of microscopic hematuria (63.2%) and microscopic proteinuria (45.6%) were also observed. The positive rate for TB-DNA was 66.3%. The positive rate for culture was 13.1% and for smear it was 9.8%. The abnormal outcome rates of the computerized tomography, ultrasonography, intravenous pyelography, and the nephrogram were 76.9%, 70.1%, 29.8%, and 37.0%, respectively. The total rate of drug-resistant TB (resistant to at least 1 drug) was 39.7%, of which 20.7% was multidrug-resistance TB. The most prevalent mutation sites were katG S315T1, rpoB S531L, and gyrA D94G. We observed a serious epidemic of drug-resistant UTB and a substantial number of new UTB cases with multidrug resistance TB. Molecular diagnostics is crucial in the definite diagnosis of UTB, and our finding is a supplement and further confirmation of polymerase chain reaction usage for TB diagnosis. We recommend real-time polymerase chain reaction for TB-DNA identification instead of culture, and GenoType tests (MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl assay) for drug resistance as routine assays for patients with

  9. Light Attenuation Method for 3D data acquisition (LAM3D) of bottom particle deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric; Yang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique, Light Attenuation Method for 3D data acquisition (LAM3D), to acquire three-dimensional spatial characteristics and temporal development of bottom particle deposits. The new technique performs data acquisition with higher spatial and temporal resolution than existing approaches with laser and ultrasonic 3D profilers, and is therefore ideal for laboratory investigations with fast varying changes in the sediment bed, such as the developing deposition profile from sediment clouds commonly formed during dredging or land reclamation projects and the dynamic evolution in movable bed processes in rivers. The principle of the technique is based on the analysis of the light attenuation due to multiple light scattering through the particle deposits layer compared to the clear water column. With appropriate calibration, the particles size and distribution thickness can be quantified by the transmitted light spectrum. In the presentation, we will first show our measurement setup with a light panel for calibrated illumination and a system of DSLR cameras for the light capturing. Subsequently, we shall present the experimental results of fast evolving deposition profile of a barge-disposed sediment cloud upon its bottom impact on the sea bed.

  10. Estimating 3D variation in active-layer thickness beneath arctic streams using ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Bradford, J.H.; McNamara, J.P.; Gooseff, M.N.; Zarnetske, J.P.; Bowden, W.B.; Johnston, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    We acquired three-dimensional (3D) ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data across three stream sites on the North Slope, AK, in August 2005, to investigate the dependence of thaw depth on channel morphology. Data were migrated with mean velocities derived from multi-offset GPR profiles collected across a stream section within each of the 3D survey areas. GPR data interpretations from the alluvial-lined stream site illustrate greater thaw depths beneath riffle and gravel bar features relative to neighboring pool features. The peat-lined stream sites indicate the opposite; greater thaw depths beneath pools and shallower thaw beneath the connecting runs. Results provide detailed 3D geometry of active-layer thaw depths that can support hydrological studies seeking to quantify transport and biogeochemical processes that occur within the hyporheic zone.

  11. 3D object retrieval using salient views.

    PubMed

    Atmosukarto, Indriyati; Shapiro, Linda G

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a method for selecting salient 2D views to describe 3D objects for the purpose of retrieval. The views are obtained by first identifying salient points via a learning approach that uses shape characteristics of the 3D points (Atmosukarto and Shapiro in International workshop on structural, syntactic, and statistical pattern recognition, 2008; Atmosukarto and Shapiro in ACM multimedia information retrieval, 2008). The salient views are selected by choosing views with multiple salient points on the silhouette of the object. Silhouette-based similarity measures from Chen et al. (Comput Graph Forum 22(3):223-232, 2003) are then used to calculate the similarity between two 3D objects. Retrieval experiments were performed on three datasets: the Heads dataset, the SHREC2008 dataset, and the Princeton dataset. Experimental results show that the retrieval results using the salient views are comparable to the existing light field descriptor method (Chen et al. in Comput Graph Forum 22(3):223-232, 2003), and our method achieves a 15-fold speedup in the feature extraction computation time. PMID:23833704

  12. 3D object retrieval using salient views

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Linda G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a method for selecting salient 2D views to describe 3D objects for the purpose of retrieval. The views are obtained by first identifying salient points via a learning approach that uses shape characteristics of the 3D points (Atmosukarto and Shapiro in International workshop on structural, syntactic, and statistical pattern recognition, 2008; Atmosukarto and Shapiro in ACM multimedia information retrieval, 2008). The salient views are selected by choosing views with multiple salient points on the silhouette of the object. Silhouette-based similarity measures from Chen et al. (Comput Graph Forum 22(3):223–232, 2003) are then used to calculate the similarity between two 3D objects. Retrieval experiments were performed on three datasets: the Heads dataset, the SHREC2008 dataset, and the Princeton dataset. Experimental results show that the retrieval results using the salient views are comparable to the existing light field descriptor method (Chen et al. in Comput Graph Forum 22(3):223–232, 2003), and our method achieves a 15-fold speedup in the feature extraction computation time. PMID:23833704

  13. 'Berries' on the Ground 2 (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of soil featuring round, blueberry-shaped rock formations on the crater floor at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken on the 13th day of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's journey, after the Moessbauer spectrometer, an instrument located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' was pressed down to measure the soil's iron mineralogy. Note the donut-shaped imprint of the instrument in the lower part of the image. The area in this image is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  14. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  15. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  16. Optoplasmonics: hybridization in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, L.; Gervinskas, G.; Žukauskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.; Brasselet, E.; Juodkazis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Femtosecond laser fabrication has been used to make hybrid refractive and di ractive micro-optical elements in photo-polymer SZ2080. For applications in micro- uidics, axicon lenses were fabricated (both single and arrays), for generation of light intensity patterns extending through the entire depth of a typically tens-of-micrometers deep channel. Further hybridisation of an axicon with a plasmonic slot is fabricated and demonstrated nu- merically. Spiralling chiral grooves were inscribed into a 100-nm-thick gold coating sputtered over polymerized micro-axicon lenses, using a focused ion beam. This demonstrates possibility of hybridisation between optical and plasmonic 3D micro-optical elements. Numerical modelling of optical performance by 3D-FDTD method is presented.

  17. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  18. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  19. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  20. 360-degree 3D profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanhe; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wenyi; Tan, Yushan

    1997-12-01

    A new method of 360 degree turning 3D shape measurement in which light sectioning and phase shifting techniques are both used is presented in this paper. A sine light field is applied in the projected light stripe, meanwhile phase shifting technique is used to calculate phases of the light slit. Thereafter wrapped phase distribution of the slit is formed and the unwrapping process is made by means of the height information based on the light sectioning method. Therefore phase measuring results with better precision can be obtained. At last the target 3D shape data can be produced according to geometric relationships between phases and the object heights. The principles of this method are discussed in detail and experimental results are shown in this paper.

  1. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  2. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  3. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  4. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  5. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  6. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  7. Evaluation of 3D-Jury on CASP7 models

    PubMed Central

    Kaján, László; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Background 3D-Jury, the structure prediction consensus method publicly available in the Meta Server , was evaluated using models gathered in the 7th round of the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP7). 3D-Jury is an automated expert process that generates protein structure meta-predictions from sets of models obtained from partner servers. Results The performance of 3D-Jury was analysed for three aspects. First, we examined the correlation between the 3D-Jury score and a model quality measure: the number of correctly predicted residues. The 3D-Jury score was shown to correlate significantly with the number of correctly predicted residues, the correlation is good enough to be used for prediction. 3D-Jury was also found to improve upon the competing servers' choice of the best structure model in most cases. The value of the 3D-Jury score as a generic reliability measure was also examined. We found that the 3D-Jury score separates bad models from good models better than the reliability score of the original server in 27 cases and falls short of it in only 5 cases out of a total of 38. We report the release of a new Meta Server feature: instant 3D-Jury scoring of uploaded user models. Conclusion The 3D-Jury score continues to be a good indicator of structural model quality. It also provides a generic reliability score, especially important for models that were not assigned such by the original server. Individual structure modellers can also benefit from the 3D-Jury scoring system by testing their models in the new instant scoring feature available in the Meta Server. PMID:17711571

  8. 3D barcodes: theoretical aspects and practical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstein, David; Kakarala, Ramakrishna; Baharav, Zachi

    2015-02-01

    This paper introduces the concept of three dimensional (3D) barcodes. A 3D barcode is composed of an array of 3D cells, called modules, and each can be either filled or empty, corresponding to two possible values of a bit. These barcodes have great theoretical promise thanks to their very large information capacity, which grows as the cube of the linear size of the barcode, and in addition are becoming practically manufacturable thanks to the ubiquitous use of 3D printers. In order to make these 3D barcodes practical for consumers, it is important to keep the decoding simple using commonly available means like smartphones. We therefore limit ourselves to decoding mechanisms based only on three projections of the barcode, which imply specific constraints on the barcode itself. The three projections produce the marginal sums of the 3D cube, which are the counts of filled-in modules along each Cartesian axis. In this paper we present some of the theoretical aspects of the 2D and 3D cases, and describe the resulting complexity of the 3D case. We then describe a method to reduce these complexities into a practical application. The method features an asymmetric coding scheme, where the decoder is much simpler than the encoder. We close by demonstrating 3D barcodes we created and their usability.

  9. Light field display and 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwane, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Light field optics and its applications become rather popular in these days. With light field optics or light field thesis, real 3D space can be described in 2D plane as 4D data, which we call as light field data. This process can be divided in two procedures. First, real3D scene is optically reduced with imaging lens. Second, this optically reduced 3D image is encoded into light field data. In later procedure we can say that 3D information is encoded onto a plane as 2D data by lens array plate. This transformation is reversible and acquired light field data can be decoded again into 3D image with the arrayed lens plate. "Refocusing" (focusing image on your favorite point after taking a picture), light-field camera's most popular function, is some kind of sectioning process from encoded 3D data (light field data) to 2D image. In this paper at first I show our actual light field camera and our 3D display using acquired and computer-simulated light field data, on which real 3D image is reconstructed. In second I explain our data processing method whose arithmetic operation is performed not in Fourier domain but in real domain. Then our 3D display system is characterized by a few features; reconstructed image is of finer resolutions than density of arrayed lenses and it is not necessary to adjust lens array plate to flat display on which light field data is displayed.

  10. New portable FELIX 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Knut; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis; Bahr, Detlef; Vogt, Carsten; Blohm, Christian; Scharschmidt, Karl-Heinz

    1998-04-01

    An improved generation of our 'FELIX 3D Display' is presented. This system is compact, light, modular and easy to transport. The created volumetric images consist of many voxels, which are generated in a half-sphere display volume. In that way a spatial object can be displayed occupying a physical space with height, width and depth. The new FELIX generation uses a screen rotating with 20 revolutions per second. This target screen is mounted by an easy to change mechanism making it possible to use appropriate screens for the specific purpose of the display. An acousto-optic deflection unit with an integrated small diode pumped laser draws the images on the spinning screen. Images can consist of up to 10,000 voxels at a refresh rate of 20 Hz. Currently two different hardware systems are investigated. The first one is based on a standard PCMCIA digital/analog converter card as an interface and is controlled by a notebook. The developed software is provided with a graphical user interface enabling several animation features. The second, new prototype is designed to display images created by standard CAD applications. It includes the development of a new high speed hardware interface suitable for state-of-the- art fast and high resolution scanning devices, which require high data rates. A true 3D volume display as described will complement the broad range of 3D visualization tools, such as volume rendering packages, stereoscopic and virtual reality techniques, which have become widely available in recent years. Potential applications for the FELIX 3D display include imaging in the field so fair traffic control, medical imaging, computer aided design, science as well as entertainment.

  11. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  12. Influence of the conditions in pharmacophore generation, scoring, and 3D database search for chemical feature-based pharmacophore models: one application study of ETA- and ETB-selective antagonists.

    PubMed

    Cucarull-González, Joan R; Laggner, Christian; Langer, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Using the commercial pharmacophore modeling suite Catalyst, we have studied the influence of the compare.scaledMultiBlobFeatureErrors . Catalyst parameter. The influence of this parameter has been studied in pharmacophore generation, hypothesis scoring, and database searching. This parameter, introduced in Catalyst 4.7, changed its default value in Catalyst 4.8, and it strongly influences the statistical quality of pharmacophore generation, scoring of the hypotheses, and database searching. Two different pharmacophore models have been constructed for the ETA and ETB receptor antagonists. Both models contain one positive ionizable, one negative ionizable, one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one hydrophobic aromatic, and one hydrophobic aliphatic feature. The models have been compared, and some differences in the position of the hydrogen-bond acceptor in the putative binding pocket have been highlighted. PMID:16711764

  13. Life in 3D is never flat: 3D models to optimise drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kathleen A; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Curtin, Caroline M; O' Brien, Fergal J; O' Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-10-10

    The development of safe, effective and patient-acceptable drug products is an expensive and lengthy process and the risk of failure at different stages of the development life-cycle is high. Improved biopharmaceutical tools which are robust, easy to use and accurately predict the in vivo response are urgently required to help address these issues. In this review the advantages and challenges of in vitro 3D versus 2D cell culture models will be discussed in terms of evaluating new drug products at the pre-clinical development stage. Examples of models with a 3D architecture including scaffolds, cell-derived matrices, multicellular spheroids and biochips will be described. The ability to simulate the microenvironment of tumours and vital organs including the liver, kidney, heart and intestine which have major impact on drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and toxicity will be evaluated. Examples of the application of 3D models including a role in formulation development, pharmacokinetic profiling and toxicity testing will be critically assessed. Although utilisation of 3D cell culture models in the field of drug delivery is still in its infancy, the area is attracting high levels of interest and is likely to become a significant in vitro tool to assist in drug product development thus reducing the requirement for unnecessary animal studies. PMID:26220617

  14. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Rahrig, Ryan R; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles B; Zirbel, Craig L

    2013-07-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to 'RNA 3D Align' (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/. PMID:23716643

  15. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Rahrig, Ryan R.; Petrov, Anton I.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Zirbel, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to ‘RNA 3D Align’ (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/. PMID:23716643

  16. The Profile of Academic Offenders: Features of Students Who Admit to Academic Dishonesty.

    PubMed

    Korn, Liat; Davidovitch, Nitza

    2016-01-01

    Dishonesty in academic settings is a reckless behavior that is unique to students and is associated with cheat    ing and plagiarism of academic tasks. Incidents involving dishonesty in higher education have increased considerably in the past decade, with regard to the extent of these practices, the types of dishonesty employed, and their prevalence. The current study examines the profile of "academic offenders". Which types are more prone to commit academic offenses? To what degree are they "normative" and do they represent the average student with regard to personal traits, personal perceptions, features of their academic studies, risk behaviors, and health risks. The study is based on a structured anonymous questionnaire. The sample consisted of 1,432 students, of whom 899 were female (63%) and 533 male (37%). The research findings indicate a common tendency among more than one quarter of the sample reported cheating on homework and 12.5% reported cheating on tests. Strong associations were found between academic dishonesty and various personal perceptions, the academic study experience, and involvement in other risky and deviant behaviors. Significant predictors of academic dishonesty were found, i.e., self-image, ethics, grades, time devoted to homework, and deviant and daring behaviors. The research findings might help indicate policies for optimally dealing with dishonesty, maybe even before the offense is committed, by means of cooperation between academic forces. PMID:27569198

  17. Evaluating scatterometry 3D capabilities for EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Kritsun, Oleg; Dasari, Prasad; Volkman, Catherine; Wallow, Tom; Hu, Jiangtao

    2013-04-01

    Optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology using scatterometry has been demonstrated to be a viable solution for fast and non-destructive in-line process control and monitoring. As extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is more widely adopted to fabricate smaller and smaller patterns for electronic devices, scatterometry faces new challenges due to several reasons. For 14nm node and beyond, the feature size is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the shortest wavelength used in scatterometry. In addition, thinner resist layer is used in EUVL compared with conventional lithography, which leads to reduced measurement sensitivity. Despite these difficulties, tolerance has reduced for smaller feature size. In this work we evaluate 3D capability of scatterometry for EUV process using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Three types of structures, contact holes, tip-to-tip, and tip-to-edge, are studied to test CD and end-gap metrology capabilities. The wafer is processed with focus and exposure matrix. Good correlations to CD-SEM results are achieved and good dynamic precision is obtained for all the key parameters. In addition, the fit to process provides an independent method to evaluate data quality from different metrology tools such as OCD and CDSEM. We demonstrate 3D capabilities of scatterometry OCD metrology for EUVL using spectroscopic ellipsometry, which provides valuable in-line metrology for CD and end-gap control in electronic circuit fabrications.

  18. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  19. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  20. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  1. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  2. Vacant Lander in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rear hazard-identification camera shows the now-empty lander that carried the rover 283 million miles to Meridiani Planum, Mars. Engineers received confirmation that Opportunity's six wheels successfully rolled off the lander and onto martian soil at 3:01 a.m. PST, January 31, 2004, on the seventh martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the lander, facing north.

  3. MAGNUS-3D: Accelerator magnet calculations in 3-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pissanetzky, S.

    1988-12-01

    MAGNUS-3D is a professional finite element code for nonlinear magnetic engineering. MAGNUS-3D can solve numerically any general problem of linear or nonlinear magnetostatics in three dimensions. The problem is formulated in a domain with Dirichlet, Neumann or periodic boundary conditions, that can contain any combination of conductors of any shape in space, nonlinear magnetic materials with magnetic properties specified by magnetization tables, and nonlinear permanent magnets with any given demagnetization curve. MAGNUS-3D uses the two-scalar-potentials formulation of Magnetostatics and the finite element method, has an automatic 3D mesh generator, and advanced post-processing features that include graphics on a variety of supported devices, tabulation, and calculation of design quantities required in Magnetic Engineering. MAGNUS-3D is a general purpose 3D code, but it has been extensively used for accelerator work and many special features required for accelerator engineering have been incorporated into the code. One of such features is the calculation of field harmonic coefficients averaged in the direction of the beam, so important for the design of magnet ends. Another feature is its ability to calculate line integrals of any field component along the direction of the beam, or plot the field as a function of the z coordinate. MAGNUS-3D has found applications to the design of accelerator magnets and spectrometers, steering magnets, wigglers and undulators for free electron lasers, microtrons and magnets for synchrotron light sources, as well as magnets for NMR and medical applications, recording heads and various magnetic devices. There are three more programs closely associated with MAGNUS-3D. MAGNUS-GKS is the graphical postprocessor for the package; it supports a numer of output devices, including color vector or bit map devices. WIRE is an independent program that can calculate the field produced by any configuration of electric conductors in space, at any

  4. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  5. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  6. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  7. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  8. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  9. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  10. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  11. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  12. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  13. Development of visual 3D virtual environment for control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Michitaka; Myoi, Takeshi; Amari, Haruo; Inamura, Kohei; Stark, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments for software visualization may enable complex programs to be created and maintained. A typical application might be for control of regional electric power systems. As these encompass broader computer networks than ever, construction of such systems becomes very difficult. Conventional text-oriented environments are useful in programming individual processors. However, they are obviously insufficient to program a large and complicated system, that includes large numbers of computers connected to each other; such programming is called 'programming in the large.' As a solution for this problem, the authors are developing a graphic programming environment wherein one can visualize complicated software in virtual 3D world. One of the major features of the environment is the 3D representation of concurrent process. 3D representation is used to supply both network-wide interprocess programming capability (capability for 'programming in the large') and real-time programming capability. The authors' idea is to fuse both the block diagram (which is useful to check relationship among large number of processes or processors) and the time chart (which is useful to check precise timing for synchronization) into a single 3D space. The 3D representation gives us a capability for direct and intuitive planning or understanding of complicated relationship among many concurrent processes. To realize the 3D representation, a technology to enable easy handling of virtual 3D object is a definite necessity. Using a stereo display system and a gesture input device (VPL DataGlove), our prototype of the virtual workstation has been implemented. The workstation can supply the 'sensation' of the virtual 3D space to a programmer. Software for the 3D programming environment is implemented on the workstation. According to preliminary assessments, a 50 percent reduction of programming effort is achieved by using the virtual 3D environment. The authors expect that the 3D

  14. Who Needs 3D When the Universe Is Flat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Urban; Linder, Cedric; Airey, John; Redfors, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    An overlooked feature in astronomy education is the need for students to learn to extrapolate three-dimensionality and the challenges that this may involve. Discerning critical features in the night sky that are embedded in dimensionality is a long-term learning process. Several articles have addressed the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D)…

  15. Automatic Reconstruction of Spacecraft 3D Shape from Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelman, C.; Radtke, R.; Voorhees, H.

    We describe a system that computes the three-dimensional (3D) shape of a spacecraft from a sequence of uncalibrated, two-dimensional images. While the mathematics of multi-view geometry is well understood, building a system that accurately recovers 3D shape from real imagery remains an art. A novel aspect of our approach is the combination of algorithms from computer vision, photogrammetry, and computer graphics. We demonstrate our system by computing spacecraft models from imagery taken by the Air Force Research Laboratory's XSS-10 satellite and DARPA's Orbital Express satellite. Using feature tie points (each identified in two or more images), we compute the relative motion of each frame and the 3D location of each feature using iterative linear factorization followed by non-linear bundle adjustment. The "point cloud" that results from this traditional shape-from-motion approach is typically too sparse to generate a detailed 3D model. Therefore, we use the computed motion solution as input to a volumetric silhouette-carving algorithm, which constructs a solid 3D model based on viewpoint consistency with the image frames. The resulting voxel model is then converted to a facet-based surface representation and is texture-mapped, yielding realistic images from arbitrary viewpoints. We also illustrate other applications of the algorithm, including 3D mensuration and stereoscopic 3D movie generation.

  16. Development of feature extraction analysis for a multi-functional optical profiling device applied to field engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Xie, Guangping; Laflen, Brandon; Jia, Ming; Song, Guiju; Harding, Kevin G.

    2015-05-01

    In the real application environment of field engineering, a large variety of metrology tools are required by the technician to inspect part profile features. However, some of these tools are burdensome and only address a sole application or measurement. In other cases, standard tools lack the capability of accessing irregular profile features. Customers of field engineering want the next generation metrology devices to have the ability to replace the many current tools with one single device. This paper will describe a method based on the ring optical gage concept to the measurement of numerous kinds of profile features useful for the field technician. The ring optical system is composed of a collimated laser, a conical mirror and a CCD camera. To be useful for a wide range of applications, the ring optical system requires profile feature extraction algorithms and data manipulation directed toward real world applications in field operation. The paper will discuss such practical applications as measuring the non-ideal round hole with both off-centered and oblique axes. The algorithms needed to analyze other features such as measuring the width of gaps, radius of transition fillets, fall of step surfaces, and surface parallelism will also be discussed in this paper. With the assistance of image processing and geometric algorithms, these features can be extracted with a reasonable performance. Tailoring the feature extraction analysis to this specific gage offers the potential for a wider application base beyond simple inner diameter measurements. The paper will present experimental results that are compared with standard gages to prove the performance and feasibility of the analysis in real world field engineering. Potential accuracy improvement methods, a new dual ring design and future work will be discussed at the end of this paper.

  17. Powder-based 3D printing for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Brunello, G; Sivolella, S; Meneghello, R; Ferroni, L; Gardin, C; Piattelli, A; Zavan, B; Bressan, E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineered 3-D constructs customized to patient-specific needs are emerging as attractive biomimetic scaffolds to enhance bone cell and tissue growth and differentiation. The article outlines the features of the most common additive manufacturing technologies (3D printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and selective laser sintering) used to fabricate bone tissue engineering scaffolds. It concentrates, in particular, on the current state of knowledge concerning powder-based 3D printing, including a description of the properties of powders and binder solutions, the critical phases of scaffold manufacturing, and its applications in bone tissue engineering. Clinical aspects and future applications are also discussed. PMID:27086202

  18. S3D: An interactive surface grid generation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luh, Raymond Ching-Chung; Pierce, Lawrence E.; Yip, David

    1992-01-01

    S3D, an interactive software tool for surface grid generation, is described. S3D provides the means with which a geometry definition based either on a discretized curve set or a rectangular set can be quickly processed towards the generation of a surface grid for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. This is made possible as a result of implementing commonly encountered surface gridding tasks in an environment with a highly efficient and user friendly graphical interface. Some of the more advanced features of S3D include surface-surface intersections, optimized surface domain decomposition and recomposition, and automated propagation of edge distributions to surrounding grids.

  19. Recognition technology research based on 3D fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qianxiao; Huang, Shujun; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-11-01

    Fingerprint has been widely studied and applied to personal recognition in both forensics and civilian. However, the current widespread used fingerprint is identified by 2D (two-dimensional) fingerprint image and the mapping from 3D (three-dimensional) to 2D loses 1D information, which leads to low accurate and even wrong recognition. This paper presents a 3D fingerprint recognition method based on the fringe projection technique. A series of fringe patterns generated by software are projected onto a finger surface through a projecting system. From another viewpoint, the fringe patterns are deformed by the finger surface and captured by a CCD camera. The deformed fringe pattern images give the 3D shape data of the finger and the 3D fingerprint features. Through converting the 3D fingerprints to 2D space, traditional 2D fingerprint recognition method can be used to 3D fingerprints recognition. Experimental results on measuring and recognizing some 3D fingerprints show the accuracy and availability of the developed 3D fingerprint system.

  20. USJ metrology: from 0D to 3D analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2007-09-26

    The analysis of ultra shallow junctions is becoming a challenging task for which numerous tools and concepts are available. The requirements range from a simple 0D-analysis such as the integral dose or the sheet resistance over a simple 1D-profile (as obtained on blanket films) towards the 2D-dopant profile within a transistor. The ultimate complexity will be the analysis of a complete 3D-structure such as a FINFET, requiring a metrology tool with 3D-resolution. In each of these areas significant progress has been made in recent years and new concepts are emerging which will be discussed in this review.

  1. 3D scanning and printing skeletal tissues for anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel B; Hiscox, Jessica D; Dixon, Blair J; Potgieter, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Detailed anatomical models can be produced with consumer-level 3D scanning and printing systems. 3D replication techniques are significant advances for anatomical education as they allow practitioners to more easily introduce diverse or numerous specimens into classrooms. Here we present a methodology for producing anatomical models in-house, with the chondrocranium cartilage from a spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and the skeleton of a cane toad (Rhinella marina) as case studies. 3D digital replicas were produced using two consumer-level scanners and specimens were 3D-printed with selective laser sintering. The fidelity of the two case study models was determined with respect to key anatomical features. Larger-scale features of the dogfish chondrocranium and frog skeleton were all well-resolved and distinct in the 3D digital models, and many finer-scale features were also well-resolved, but some more subtle features were absent from the digital models (e.g. endolymphatic foramina in chondrocranium). All characters identified in the digital chondrocranium could be identified in the subsequent 3D print; however, three characters in the 3D-printed frog skeleton could not be clearly delimited (palatines, parasphenoid and pubis). Characters that were absent in the digital models or 3D prints had low-relief in the original scanned specimen and represent a minor loss of fidelity. Our method description and case studies show that minimal equipment and training is needed to produce durable skeletal specimens. These technologies support the tailored production of models for specific classes or research aims. PMID:27146106

  2. 3D sensors and micro-fabricated detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Vià, Cinzia

    2014-11-01

    Micro-systems based on the Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology have been used in miniaturized low power and low mass smart structures in medicine, biology and space applications. Recently similar features found their way inside high energy physics with applications in vertex detectors for high-luminosity LHC Upgrades, with 3D sensors, 3D integration and efficient power management using silicon micro-channel cooling. This paper reports on the state of this development.

  3. Integrated Genomics Identifies Five Medulloblastoma Subtypes with Distinct Genetic Profiles, Pathway Signatures and Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Marcel; Koster, Jan; Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Lakeman, Arjan; van Sluis, Peter; Troost, Dirk; Meeteren, Netteke Schouten-van; Caron, Huib N.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Mršić, Alan; Ylstra, Bauke; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellison, David; Clifford, Steven C.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2008-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite recent improvements in cure rates, prediction of disease outcome remains a major challenge and survivors suffer from serious therapy-related side-effects. Recent data showed that patients with WNT-activated tumors have a favorable prognosis, suggesting that these patients could be treated less intensively, thereby reducing the side-effects. This illustrates the potential benefits of a robust classification of medulloblastoma patients and a detailed knowledge of associated biological mechanisms. Methods and Findings To get a better insight into the molecular biology of medulloblastoma we established mRNA expression profiles of 62 medulloblastomas and analyzed 52 of them also by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. Five molecular subtypes were identified, characterized by WNT signaling (A; 9 cases), SHH signaling (B; 15 cases), expression of neuronal differentiation genes (C and D; 16 and 11 cases, respectively) or photoreceptor genes (D and E; both 11 cases). Mutations in β-catenin were identified in all 9 type A tumors, but not in any other tumor. PTCH1 mutations were exclusively identified in type B tumors. CGH analysis identified several fully or partly subtype-specific chromosomal aberrations. Monosomy of chromosome 6 occurred only in type A tumors, loss of 9q mostly occurred in type B tumors, whereas chromosome 17 aberrations, most common in medulloblastoma, were strongly associated with type C or D tumors. Loss of the inactivated X-chromosome was highly specific for female cases of type C, D and E tumors. Gene expression levels faithfully reflected the chromosomal copy number changes. Clinicopathological features significantly different between the 5 subtypes included metastatic disease and age at diagnosis and histology. Metastatic disease at diagnosis was significantly associated with subtypes C and D and most strongly with subtype E. Patients below 3 yrs of

  4. Two-wavelength phase shift interferometry to characterize ballistic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Glenn W.; Mann, Christopher J.

    2014-05-01

    We apply two-wavelength phase shifting interferometry to generate 3D surface profile maps of spent bullet cartridge cases. From the captured interferograms, an optimized algorithm was used to calculate a phase profile from which a precise digital surface map of the cartridge casing may be produced. This 3D surface profile is used to enhance a firearms examiner's ability to uniquely identify distinct features or toolmarks imprinted on the casing when the weapon is fired. These features play a key role in the matching process of ballistic forensic examination.

  5. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  6. 3D structures of the crust and upper mantle in Atlas Mountains of Morocco from magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyan, D.; Jones, A.; Ledo, J.; Fullea, J.; Sinischalchi, A.; Romano, G.; Campanya, J.

    2012-04-01

    As a part of the PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) and concomitant TopoMed (Plate re-organization in the western Mediterranean: Lithospheric causes and topographic consequences - an ESF EUROCORES TOPO-EUROPE project) projects, a multi-institutional magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the Atlas Mountains initiated in September 2009 and ended in February 2010. The overarching objective of the project is to provide new constrains on the lithospheric structure of the Atlas Mountains, and to aid in discriminating between competing models describing the tectonics of the region. The experiment comprised acquisition of broad-band (crustal probing) and long period (mantle probing) MT data along two profiles: a N-S oriented profile crossing the Middle Atlas through the Central High Atlas to the east (profile MEK) and a NE-SW oriented profile crossing the western High Atlas towards the Anti Atlas in the west (profile MAR). Our MT inversion results from the MEK profile (Ledo et al., 2011), assuming that the Earth can be validly represented by two-dimensional (2D) structures, reveal two major mid- to lower crustal scale conductive features. The first anomaly is stretching from the Middle Atlas southward towards the High Moulouya basin and the second one is located beneath the Anti Atlas. There is a gradual increase in mantle resistivity to the south which may indicate a thickening lithosphere beneath the Anti Atlas. To validate the 2D inversion results, the MT data on the same profile were inverted for 3D electrical resistivity structure using both WSINV3DMT (Siripunvaraporn et al., 2005a) and ModEM (Egbert et al., 2011). We ran inversions with the full impedance tensor and also with only the off-diagonal components. Following the paper of Patro and Egbert (2011), we are testing the effect of using different length scales in the along-strike and across strike directions. As expected, the 3D inversion results provide a better fit to the

  7. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  8. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  9. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  10. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease. PMID:26529689

  11. Overview of 3D surface digitization technologies in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of the different 3D surface digitization technologies commercially available in the European market. The solutions for 3D surface measurement offered by major European companies can be divided into different groups depending on various characteristics, such as technology (e.g. laser scanning, white light projection), system construction (e.g. fix, on CMM/robot/arm) or measurement type (e.g. surface scanning, profile scanning). Crossing between the categories is possible, however, the majority of commercial products can be divided into the following groups: (a) laser profilers mounted on CMM, (b) portable coded light projection systems, (c) desktop solutions with laser profiler or coded light projectin system and multi-axes platform, (d) laser point measurement systems where both sensor and object move, (e) hand operated laser profilers, hand held laser profiler or point measurement systems, (f) dedicated systems. This paper presents the different 3D surface digitization technologies and describes them with their advantages and disadvantages. Various examples of their use are shown for different application fields. A special interest is given to applications regarding the 3D surface measurement of the human body.

  12. Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface. Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

  13. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  14. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  15. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman's rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D surface

  16. High Productivity DRIE solutions for 3D-SiP and MEMS Volume Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, M.; Thevenoud, JM; Launay, N.; Arnal, N.; Godinat, P.; Andrieu, B.; Gruffat, JM

    2006-04-01

    Emerging 3D-SiP technologies and high volume MEMS applications require high productivity mass production DRIE systems. The Alcatel DRIE product range has recently been optimised to reach the highest process and hardware production performances. A study based on sub-micron high aspect ratio structures encountered in the most stringent 3D-SiP has been carried out. The optimization of the Bosch process parameters has resulted in ultra high silicon etch rates, with unrivalled uniformity and repeatability leading to excellent process. In parallel, most recent hardware and proprietary design optimization including vacuum pumping lines, process chamber, wafer chucks, pressure control system, gas delivery are discussed. These improvements have been monitored in a mass production environment for a mobile phone application. Field data analysis shows a significant reduction of cost of ownership thanks to increased throughput and much lower running costs. These benefits are now available for all 3D-SiP and high volume MEMS applications. The typical etched patterns include tapered trenches for CMOS imagers, through silicon via holes for die stacking, well controlled profile angle for 3D high precision inertial sensors, and large exposed area features for inkjet printer heads and Silicon microphones.

  17. High-productivity DRIE solutions for 3D-SiP and MEMS volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, M.; Thevenoud, J. M.; Launay, N.; Arnal, N.; Godinat, P.; Andrieu, B.; Gruffat, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Emerging 3D-SiP technologies and high volume MEMS applications require high productivity mass production DRIE systems. The Alcatel DRIE product range has recently been optimized to reach the highest process and hardware production performances. A study based on sub-micron high aspect ratio structures encountered in the most stringent 3D-SiP has been carried out. The optimization of the Bosch process parameters have shown ultra high silicon etch rate, with unrivaled uniformity and repeatability leading to excellent process yields. In parallel, most recent hardware and proprietary design optimization including vacuum pumping lines, process chamber, wafer chucks, pressure control system, gas delivery are discussed. A key factor for achieving the highest performances was the recognized expertise of Alcatel vacuum and plasma science technologies. These improvements have been monitored in a mass production environment for a mobile phone application. Field data analysis shows a significant reduction of cost of ownership thanks to increased throughput and much lower running costs. These benefits are now available for all 3D-SiP and high volume MEMS applications. The typical etched patterns include tapered trenches for CMOS imagers, through silicon via holes for die stacking, well controlled profile angle for 3D high precision inertial sensors, and large exposed area features for inkjet printer head and Silicon microphones.

  18. 3-D intestinal scaffolds for evaluating the therapeutic potential of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Costello, Cait M; Sorna, Rachel M; Goh, Yih-Lin; Cengic, Ivana; Jain, Nina K; March, John C

    2014-07-01

    Biomimetic in vitro intestinal models are becoming useful tools for studying host-microbial interactions. In the past, these models have typically been limited to simple cultures on 2-D scaffolds or Transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3-D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue, and that different microbial species will preferentially adhere to select locations along the intestinal villi. We used a synthetic 3-D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the coculture of epithelial cell types with select bacterial populations. Our end goal was to establish microbial niches along the crypt-villus axis in order to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine, which could potentially provide new insights into microbe-induced intestinal disorders, as well as enabling targeted probiotic therapies. We recreated the surface topography of the small intestine by fabricating a biodegradable and biocompatible villous scaffold using poly lactic-glycolic acid to enable the culture of Caco-2 with differentiation along the crypt-villus axis in a similar manner to native intestines. This was then used as a platform to mimic the adhesion and invasion profiles of both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, and assess the therapeutic potential of Lactobacillus and commensal Escherichia coli in a 3-D setting. We found that, in a 3-D environment, Lactobacillus is more successful at displacing pathogens, whereas Nissle is more effective at inhibiting pathogen adhesion. PMID:24798584

  19. 3-D Intestinal Scaffolds for Evaluating the Therapeutic Potential of Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic in vitro intestinal models are becoming useful tools for studying host–microbial interactions. In the past, these models have typically been limited to simple cultures on 2-D scaffolds or Transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3-D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue, and that different microbial species will preferentially adhere to select locations along the intestinal villi. We used a synthetic 3-D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the coculture of epithelial cell types with select bacterial populations. Our end goal was to establish microbial niches along the crypt–villus axis in order to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine, which could potentially provide new insights into microbe-induced intestinal disorders, as well as enabling targeted probiotic therapies. We recreated the surface topography of the small intestine by fabricating a biodegradable and biocompatible villous scaffold using poly lactic-glycolic acid to enable the culture of Caco-2 with differentiation along the crypt–villus axis in a similar manner to native intestines. This was then used as a platform to mimic the adhesion and invasion profiles of both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, and assess the therapeutic potential of Lactobacillus and commensal Escherichia coli in a 3-D setting. We found that, in a 3-D environment, Lactobacillus is more successful at displacing pathogens, whereas Nissle is more effective at inhibiting pathogen adhesion. PMID:24798584

  20. Emergence of 3D Printed Dosage Forms: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alhnan, Mohamed A; Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Sadia, Muzna; Wan, Ka-Wai; Ahmed, Waqar; Arafat, Basel

    2016-08-01

    The recent introduction of the first FDA approved 3D-printed drug has fuelled interest in 3D printing technology, which is set to revolutionize healthcare. Since its initial use, this rapid prototyping (RP) technology has evolved to such an extent that it is currently being used in a wide range of applications including in tissue engineering, dentistry, construction, automotive and aerospace. However, in the pharmaceutical industry this technology is still in its infancy and its potential yet to be fully explored. This paper presents various 3D printing technologies such as stereolithographic, powder based, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modelling and semi-solid extrusion 3D printing. It also provides a comprehensive review of previous attempts at using 3D printing technologies on the manufacturing dosage forms with a particular focus on oral tablets. Their advantages particularly with adaptability in the pharmaceutical field have been highlighted, which enables the preparation of dosage forms with complex designs and geometries, multiple actives and tailored release profiles. An insight into the technical challenges facing the different 3D printing technologies such as the formulation and processing parameters is provided. Light is also shed on the different regulatory challenges that need to be overcome for 3D printing to fulfil its real potential in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27194002

  1. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  2. 3D Printing technologies for drug delivery: a review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; Smyth, Hugh

    2016-07-01

    With the FDA approval of the first 3D printed tablet, Spritam®, there is now precedence set for the utilization of 3D printing for the preparation of drug delivery systems. The capabilities for dispensing low volumes with accuracy, precise spatial control and layer-by-layer assembly allow for the preparation of complex compositions and geometries. The high degree of flexibility and control with 3D printing enables the preparation of dosage forms with multiple active pharmaceutical ingredients with complex and tailored release profiles. A unique opportunity for this technology for the preparation of personalized doses to address individual patient needs. This review will highlight the 3D printing technologies being utilized for the fabrication of drug delivery systems, as well as the formulation and processing parameters for consideration. This article will also summarize the range of dosage forms that have been prepared using these technologies, specifically over the last 10 years. PMID:26625986

  3. 3D Simulations of Supernovae into the Young Remnant Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinger, Carola I.; Young, P. A.; Fryer, C.; Rockefeller, G.; Park, S.

    2013-01-01

    The explosion of massive stars as core-collapse supernovae is an inherently three dimensional phenomenon. Observations of the young, ejecta dominated remnants of those explosions unambiguously demonstrate that asymmetry on large and small scales is the rule, rather than the exception. Numerical models of supernova remnants connect the observed remnants to models of the exploding stellar system and thus facilitate both improved interpretations of the observations as well as improve our understanding of the explosion mechanism. We present first 3D simulations of core- collapse supernovae evolving into supernova remnants calculated with SNSPH. The calculations were started from 1D collapsed models of 2 progenitor stars of different types, and follow the explosion from revival of the shock wave to shock break out in 3D. Two different interstellar media, a cold neutral medium and a dense molecular cloud, as well as a red supergiant stellar wind profile, were added to the explosion calculations shortly before shock breakout, so that the blast wave stays in the simulation. With this setup we can follow the dispersal of the nucleosynthesis products from the explosion into the Sedov stage of the supernova remnant evolution starting from realistic initial conditions for the supernova ejecta. We will present a first investigation in the mixing between stellar and interstellar matter as the supernova evolves into the young supernova remnant phase, and contrasts differences that are observed between the scenarios that are investigated. One of the goals is to distinguish between features that arose in instabilities during the explosion from those that were created in the interaction with the surrounding medium.

  4. 3D RoboMET Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Jonathan D.; Susan, Donald F.; Kilgo, Alice C.

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this project is to generate 3D microstructural data by destructive and non-destructive means and provide accompanying characterization and quantitative analysis of such data. This work is a continuing part of a larger effort to relate material performance variability to microstructural variability. That larger effort is called “Predicting Performance Margins” or PPM. In conjunction with that overarching initiative, the RoboMET.3D™ is a specific asset of Center 1800 and is an automated serialsectioning system for destructive analysis of microstructure, which is called upon to provide direct customer support to 1800 and non-1800 customers. To that end, data collection, 3d reconstruction and analysis of typical and atypical microstructures have been pursued for the purposes of qualitative and quantitative characterization with a goal toward linking microstructural defects and/or microstructural features with mechanical response. Material systems examined in FY15 include precipitation hardened 17-4 steel, laser-welds of 304L stainless steel, thermal spray coatings of 304L and geological samples of sandstone.

  5. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  6. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  7. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  8. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  9. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingjie; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  10. Low Dose, Low Energy 3d Image Guidance during Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Marchant, T.; Amer, A.; Sharrock, P.; Price, P.; Burton, D.

    2006-04-01

    Patient kilo-voltage X-ray cone beam volumetric imaging for radiotherapy was first demonstrated on an Elekta Synergy mega-voltage X-ray linear accelerator. Subsequently low dose, reduced profile reconstruction imaging was shown to be practical for 3D geometric setup registration to pre-treatment planning images without compromising registration accuracy. Reconstruction from X-ray profiles gathered between treatment beam deliveries was also introduced. The innovation of zonal cone beam imaging promises significantly reduced doses to patients and improved soft tissue contrast in the tumour target zone. These developments coincided with the first dynamic 3D monitoring of continuous body topology changes in patients, at the moment of irradiation, using a laser interferometer. They signal the arrival of low dose, low energy 3D image guidance during radiotherapy itself.

  11. Enhancements to the opera-3d suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Christopher P.

    1997-02-01

    The OPERA-3D suite of programs has been enhanced to include 2 additional 3 dimensional finite element based solvers, with complimentary features in the pre- and postprocessing. SOPRANO computes electromagnetic fields at high frequency including displacement current effects. It has 2 modules—a deterministic solution at a user defined frequency and an eigenvalue solution for modal analysis. It is suitable for designing microwave structures and cavities found in particle accelerators. SCALA computes electrostatic fields in the presence of space charge from charged particle beams. The user may define the emission characteristics of electrodes or plasma surfaces and compute the resultant space charge limited beams, including the presence of magnetic fields. Typical applications in particle accelerators are electron guns and ion sources. Other enhancements to the suite include additional capabilities in TOSCA and ELEKTRA, the static and dynamic solvers.

  12. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  13. Yogi the rock - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Yogi, a rock taller than rover Sojourner, is the subject of this image, taken in stereo by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The soil in the foreground has been the location of multiple soil mechanics experiments performed by Sojourner's cleated wheels. Pathfinder scientists were able to control the force inflicted on the soil beneath the rover's wheels, giving them insight into the soil's mechanical properties. The soil mechanics experiments were conducted after this image was taken.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  14. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  15. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  16. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  17. The upcoming 3D-printing revolution in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Urrios, Arturo; Kang, Shawn; Folch, Albert

    2016-05-21

    In the last two decades, the vast majority of microfluidic systems have been built in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft lithography, a technique based on PDMS micromolding. A long list of key PDMS properties have contributed to the success of soft lithography: PDMS is biocompatible, elastomeric, transparent, gas-permeable, water-impermeable, fairly inexpensive, copyright-free, and rapidly prototyped with high precision using simple procedures. However, the fabrication process typically involves substantial human labor, which tends to make PDMS devices difficult to disseminate outside of research labs, and the layered molding limits the 3D complexity of the devices that can be produced. 3D-printing has recently attracted attention as a way to fabricate microfluidic systems due to its automated, assembly-free 3D fabrication, rapidly decreasing costs, and fast-improving resolution and throughput. Resins with properties approaching those of PDMS are being developed. Here we review past and recent efforts in 3D-printing of microfluidic systems. We compare the salient features of PDMS molding with those of 3D-printing and we give an overview of the critical barriers that have prevented the adoption of 3D-printing by microfluidic developers, namely resolution, throughput, and resin biocompatibility. We also evaluate the various forces that are persuading researchers to abandon PDMS molding in favor of 3D-printing in growing numbers. PMID:27101171

  18. A systematized WYSIWYG pipeline for digital stereoscopic 3D filmmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Robert; Ward, Chris; Hušák, Michal

    2008-02-01

    Digital tools are transforming stereoscopic 3D content creation and delivery, creating an opportunity for the broad acceptance and success of stereoscopic 3D films. Beginning in late 2005, a series of mostly CGI features has successfully initiated the public to this new generation of highly-comfortable, artifact-free digital 3D. While the response has been decidedly favorable, a lack of high-quality live-action films could hinder long-term success. Liveaction stereoscopic films have historically been more time-consuming, costly, and creatively-limiting than 2D films - thus a need arises for a live-action 3D filmmaking process which minimizes such limitations. A unique 'systematized' what-you-see-is-what-you-get (WYSIWYG) pipeline is described which allows the efficient, intuitive and accurate capture and integration of 3D and 2D elements from multiple shoots and sources - both live-action and CGI. Throughout this pipeline, digital tools utilize a consistent algorithm to provide meaningful and accurate visual depth references with respect to the viewing audience in the target theater environment. This intuitive, visual approach introduces efficiency and creativity to the 3D filmmaking process by eliminating both the need for a 'mathematician mentality' of spreadsheets and calculators, as well as any trial and error guesswork, while enabling the most comfortable, 'pixel-perfect', artifact-free 3D product possible.

  19. 3D-dynamic representation of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wąż, Piotr; Bielińska-Wąż, Dorota

    2014-03-01

    A new 3D graphical representation of DNA sequences is introduced. This representation is called 3D-dynamic representation. It is a generalization of the 2D-dynamic dynamic representation. The sequences are represented by sets of "material points" in the 3D space. The resulting 3D-dynamic graphs are treated as rigid bodies. The descriptors characterizing the graphs are analogous to the ones used in the classical dynamics. The classification diagrams derived from this representation are presented and discussed. Due to the third dimension, "the history of the graph" can be recognized graphically because the 3D-dynamic graph does not overlap with itself. Specific parts of the graphs correspond to specific parts of the sequence. This feature is essential for graphical comparisons of the sequences. Numerically, both 2D and 3D approaches are of high quality. In particular, a difference in a single base between two sequences can be identified and correctly described (one can identify which base) by both 2D and 3D methods. PMID:24567158

  20. World Wind 3D Earth Viewing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Patrick; Maxwell, Christopher; Kim, Randolph; Gaskins, Tom

    2007-01-01

    World Wind allows users to zoom from satellite altitude down to any place on Earth, leveraging high-resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) elevation data to experience Earth in visually rich 3D. In addition to Earth, World Wind can also visualize other planets, and there are already comprehensive data sets for Mars and the Earth's moon, which are as easily accessible as those of Earth. There have been more than 20 million downloads to date, and the software is being used heavily by the Department of Defense due to the code s ability to be extended and the evolution of the code courtesy of NASA and the user community. Primary features include the dynamic access to public domain imagery and its ease of use. All one needs to control World Wind is a two-button mouse. Additional guides and features can be accessed through a simplified menu. A JAVA version will be available soon. Navigation is automated with single clicks of a mouse, or by typing in any location to automatically zoom in to see it. The World Wind install package contains the necessary requirements such as the .NET runtime and managed DirectX library. World Wind can display combinations of data from a variety of sources, including Blue Marble, LandSat 7, SRTM, NASA Scientific Visualization Studio, GLOBE, and much more. A thorough list of features, the user manual, a key chart, and screen shots are available at http://worldwind.arc.nasa.gov.

  1. Imaging thin-bed reservoirs with 3-D seismic

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.

    1996-12-01

    This article explains how a 3-D seismic data volume, a vertical seismic profile (VSP), electric well logs and reservoir pressure data can be used to image closely stacked thin-bed reservoirs. This interpretation focuses on the Oligocene Frio reservoir in South Texas which has multiple thin-beds spanning a vertical interval of about 3,000 ft.

  2. John C. Belland: A Pioneer in 3D Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Provides a profile of the career of John Belland and his work in instructional technology. Highlights include his educational background, teaching experience in higher education, work in learning with 3D computer-generated animation, alternative paradigms of instructional design, and ideas of postmodernism. (LRW)

  3. Synthesis, anticancer activity and effects on cell cycle profile and apoptosis of novel thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine and thieno[3,2-e] triazolo[4,3-c]pyrimidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Manal M; Refaat, Hanan M; Kassab, Asmaa E; Shahin, Inas G; Abdelghany, Tamer M

    2015-01-27

    Motivated by the widely reported anticancer activity of thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines a series of 24 new 2-substitutedhexahydrocycloocta[4,5] thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines with different substituents at C-4 position and hexahydrocycloocta[4,5]thieno[3,2-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-c]pyrimidines were synthesized. The anticancer activity of 17 compounds were evaluated by National Cancer Institute (USA) using a two stage process utilizing 59 different human tumor cell lines representing leukemia, melanoma, cancers of lung, colon, central nervous system (CNS), ovary, kidney, prostate as well as breast. Compound 9c showed broad spectrum potent anticancer activity in nano molar to micro molar range against 56 human tumor cell lines with GI50 less than 10 μM ranging from 0.495 to 5.57 μM, also it is worth mentioning that compound 9c had the marked highest selectivity against the two cell lines T-47D and MDA-MB-468 belonging to breast cancer with GI50 = 0.495 and 0.568 μM respectively, and its effect was further studied on cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis in the MDA-MB-468 cell line. Results showed that compound 9c induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and also, showed accumulation of cells in pre-G1 phase which may result from, degradation or fragmentation of the genetic materials indicating a possible role of apoptosis in compound 9c-induced cancer cell death and cytotoxicity and verifying this compound as promising selective anticancer lead. Compound 6c was selective against K-562, SR and MOLT-4 cell lines belonging to leukemia showing growth inhibition percentages 86.38, 65.76 and 60.40 at a single dose test, at the same time it showed lethal activity against HOP-92 representing non-small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, leukemia SR, CNS cancer SNB-75 and renal cancer UO-31 cell lines proved to be sensitive to compound 6d with growth inhibition percentages 52.86, 50.94 and 53.99 respectively. Additionally, compound 6d demonstrated lethal activity to HOP-92

  4. Improving Semantic Updating Method on 3d City Models Using Hybrid Semantic-Geometric 3d Segmentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkawi, K.-H.; Abdul-Rahman, A.

    2013-09-01

    to LoD4. The accuracy and structural complexity of the 3D objects increases with the LoD level where LoD0 is the simplest LoD (2.5D; Digital Terrain Model (DTM) + building or roof print) while LoD4 is the most complex LoD (architectural details with interior structures). Semantic information is one of the main components in CityGML and 3D City Models, and provides important information for any analyses. However, more often than not, the semantic information is not available for the 3D city model due to the unstandardized modelling process. One of the examples is where a building is normally generated as one object (without specific feature layers such as Roof, Ground floor, Level 1, Level 2, Block A, Block B, etc). This research attempts to develop a method to improve the semantic data updating process by segmenting the 3D building into simpler parts which will make it easier for the users to select and update the semantic information. The methodology is implemented for 3D buildings in LoD2 where the buildings are generated without architectural details but with distinct roof structures. This paper also introduces hybrid semantic-geometric 3D segmentation method that deals with hierarchical segmentation of a 3D building based on its semantic value and surface characteristics, fitted by one of the predefined primitives. For future work, the segmentation method will be implemented as part of the change detection module that can detect any changes on the 3D buildings, store and retrieve semantic information of the changed structure, automatically updates the 3D models and visualize the results in a userfriendly graphical user interface (GUI).

  5. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  6. Electrical conductivity of the Iapetus Suture Zone Scotland, revisited with 3D inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckmann, U.; Toelg, D.; Ritter, O.

    2012-12-01

    The electrical conductivity structure of the crust beneath the Southern Uplands of Scotland has been investigated with electromagnetic and magneto-variational studies since the early 1970ies. The Southern Uplands formed in Ordovician and Silurian times as an accretionary prism on the Laurentian margin of the Iapetus Ocean as overthrusted wedges of sediments bounded by thrust faults. A pronounced zone of high electrical conductivity extending in northeast to southwest direction for at least 150 km was a common feature of many of these studies. The anomaly follows major structural trends of the Caledonian orogeny, such as the Southern Uplands Fault, the Orlock Bridge Fault and the Moniave Shear Zone. Graphite enrichment at mid-crustal levels trapped during the closure of the Iapetus Ocean or in detachment zones was discussed as possible causes for the high conductivity. In 1997, a high resolution MT experiment was conducted in southwestern Scotland across the most prominent faults. The station distribution, with an average spacing of 1-2km, concentrated on three parallel NW-SE profiles perpendicular to the tectonic structures and a strike parallel profile. Strike and dimensionality analyses indicated three-dimensional subsurface structures which also became evident in phases exceeding 90°. Nevertheless, 2D inversion of a sub-set of data revealed good spatial correlation of conductive zones and surface expressions of known faults. The 2D inversion results supported a mid-crustal detachment zone. However, some of the smaller profiles as well as the strike parallel profile could not be interpreted adequately with a 2D approach. Since 3D inversion algorithms are now available, we present a re-interpretation of the MT data set. We reprocessed the time series to improve estimates of the full impedance tensor for subsequent 3D inversion. 3D inversion reproduces the main features found along the published profiles. However, significant deviation from a 2D subsurface can be

  7. 3D printing of liquid metals as fugitive inks for fabrication of 3D microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Dishit P; Ladd, Collin; Panich, Lazar; Moussa, Khalil; Dickey, Michael D

    2016-05-21

    This paper demonstrates a simple method to fabricate 3D microchannels and microvasculature at room temperature by direct-writing liquid metal as a sacrificial template. The formation of a surface oxide skin on the low-viscosity liquid metal stabilizes the shape of the printed metal for planar and out-of-plane structures. The printed structures can be embedded in a variety of soft (e.g. elastomeric) and rigid (e.g. thermoset) polymers. Both acid and electrochemical reduction are capable of removing the oxide skin that forms on the metal, which destabilizes the ink so that it withdraws from the encapsulating material due to capillary forces, resulting in nearly full recovery of the fugitive ink at room temperature. Whereas conventional fabrication procedures typically confine microchannels to 2D planes, the geometry of the printed microchannels can be varied from a simple 2D network to complex 3D architectures without using lithography. The method produces robust monolithic structures without the need for any bonding or assembling techniques that often limit the materials of construction of conventional microchannels. Removing select portions of the metal leaves behind 3D metal features that can be used as antennas, interconnects, or electrodes for interfacing with lab-on-a-chip devices. This paper describes the capabilities and limitations of this simple process. PMID:27025537

  8. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India). This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can't do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good result. For Large city

  9. Virtual 3d City Modeling: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2013-08-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as Building, Tree, Vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. There are various terms used for 3D city models such as "Cybertown", "Cybercity", "Virtual City", or "Digital City". 3D city models are basically a computerized or digital model of a city contains the graphic representation of buildings and other objects in 2.5 or 3D. Generally three main Geomatics approach are using for Virtual 3-D City models generation, in first approach, researcher are using Conventional techniques such as Vector Map data, DEM, Aerial images, second approach are based on High resolution satellite images with LASER scanning, In third method, many researcher are using Terrestrial images by using Close Range Photogrammetry with DSM & Texture mapping. We start this paper from the introduction of various Geomatics techniques for 3D City modeling. These techniques divided in to two main categories: one is based on Automation (Automatic, Semi-automatic and Manual methods), and another is Based on Data input techniques (one is Photogrammetry, another is Laser Techniques). After details study of this, finally in short, we are trying to give the conclusions of this study. In the last, we are trying to give the conclusions of this research paper and also giving a short view for justification and analysis, and present trend for 3D City modeling. This paper gives an overview about the Techniques related with "Generation of Virtual 3-D City models using Geomatics Techniques" and the Applications of Virtual 3D City models. Photogrammetry, (Close range, Aerial, Satellite), Lasergrammetry, GPS, or combination of these modern Geomatics techniques play a major role to create a virtual 3-D City model. Each and every techniques and method has some advantages and some drawbacks. Point cloud model is a modern trend for virtual 3-D city model. Photo-realistic, Scalable, Geo-referenced virtual 3

  10. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  11. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  12. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  13. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  14. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  15. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  16. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  17. Dark matter in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Daniele S. M.; El Hedri, Sonia; Wacker, Jay G.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the relevance of directional detection experiments in the post-discovery era and propose a method to extract the local dark matter phase space distribution from directional data. The first feature of this method is a parameterization of the dark matter distribution function in terms of integrals of motion, which can be analytically extended to infer properties of the global distribution if certain equilibrium conditions hold. The second feature of our method is a decomposition of the distribution function in moments of a model independent basis, with minimal reliance on the ansatz for its functional form. We illustrate our method using the Via Lactea II N-body simulation as well as an analytical model for the dark matter halo. We conclude that {O}(1000) events are necessary to measure deviations from the Standard Halo Model and constrain or measure the presence of anisotropies.

  18. Dark Matter in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Daniele S.M.; Hedri, Sonia El; Wacker, Jay G.

    2012-04-01

    We discuss the relevance of directional detection experiments in the post-discovery era and propose a method to extract the local dark matter phase space distribution from directional data. The first feature of this method is a parameterization of the dark matter distribution function in terms of integrals of motion, which can be analytically extended to infer properties of the global distribution if certain equilibrium conditions hold. The second feature of our method is a decomposition of the distribution function in moments of a model independent basis, with minimal reliance on the ansatz for its functional form. We illustrate our method using the Via Lactea II N-body simulation as well as an analytical model for the dark matter halo. We conclude that O(1000) events are necessary to measure deviations from the Standard Halo Model and constrain or measure the presence of anisotropies.

  19. Dark matter in 3D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alves, Daniele S. M.; El Hedri, Sonia; Wacker, Jay G.

    2016-03-21

    We discuss the relevance of directional detection experiments in the post-discovery era and propose a method to extract the local dark matter phase space distribution from directional data. The first feature of this method is a parameterization of the dark matter distribution function in terms of integrals of motion, which can be analytically extended to infer properties of the global distribution if certain equilibrium conditions hold. The second feature of our method is a decomposition of the distribution function in moments of a model independent basis, with minimal reliance on the ansatz for its functional form. We illustrate our methodmore » using the Via Lactea II N-body simulation as well as an analytical model for the dark matter halo. Furthermore, we conclude that O(1000) events are necessary to measure deviations from the Standard Halo Model and constrain or measure the presence of anisotropies.« less

  20. A 3D feature point tracking method for ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Kouwenberg, Jasper J M; Ulrich, Leonie; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    A robust and computationally efficient algorithm for automated tracking of high densities of particles travelling in (semi-) straight lines is presented. It extends the implementation of (Sbalzarini and Koumoutsakos 2005) and is intended for use in the analysis of single ion track detectors. By including information of existing tracks in the exclusion criteria and a recursive cost minimization function, the algorithm is robust to variations on the measured particle tracks. A trajectory relinking algorithm was included to resolve the crossing of tracks in high particle density images. Validation of the algorithm was performed using fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) irradiated with high- and low (heavy) ion fluences and showed less than 1% faulty trajectories in the latter. PMID:27163162

  1. Optimizing fabrication of electrodeposited 3D surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    Selective electrodeposition onto specially masked surfaces (producing blind holes with non-conductive side walls) has been investigated. The thick masks are low cost polymer sheet into which holes and other patterns are machined. Plating with this type of masking system is one method of fabricating medium aspect ratio metallic structures (structures whose width to length ratio is greater than 10/1). The experiment was conducted with deposits of OFC copper from an acid sulfate solution, but similar results are expected with other metals. Structure diameter varied from 0.25 mm to 3.8 mm (0.01`` to 0.150``). The effect of current density, electrolyte concentration, solution temperature, and agitation on deposition rate were investigated. Deposit quality, deposition rate, and optimal plating parameters were evaluated.

  2. A 3D feature point tracking method for ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenberg, Jasper J. M.; Ulrich, Leonie; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    A robust and computationally efficient algorithm for automated tracking of high densities of particles travelling in (semi-) straight lines is presented. It extends the implementation of (Sbalzarini and Koumoutsakos 2005) and is intended for use in the analysis of single ion track detectors. By including information of existing tracks in the exclusion criteria and a recursive cost minimization function, the algorithm is robust to variations on the measured particle tracks. A trajectory relinking algorithm was included to resolve the crossing of tracks in high particle density images. Validation of the algorithm was performed using fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) irradiated with high- and low (heavy) ion fluences and showed less than 1% faulty trajectories in the latter.

  3. Multivariate 3D modelling of Scottish soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Information regarding soil properties across landscapes at national or continental scales is critical for better soil and environmental management and for climate regulation and adaptation policy. The prediction of soil properties variation in space and time and their uncertainty is an important part of environmental modelling. Soil properties, and in particular the 3 fractions of soil texture, exhibit strong co-variation among themselves and therefore taking into account this correlation leads to spatially more accurate results. In this study the continuous vertical and lateral distributions of relevant soil properties in Scottish soils were modelled with a multivariate 3D-GAM+GS approach. The approach used involves 1) modelling the multivariate trend with full 3D spatial correlation, i.e., exploiting the values of the neighbouring pixels in 3D-space, and 2) 3D kriging to interpolate the residuals. The values at each cell for each of the considered depth layers were defined using a hybrid GAM-geostatistical 3D model, combining the fitting of a GAM (generalised Additive Models) to estimate multivariate trend of the variables, using a 3D smoother with related covariates. Gaussian simulations of the model residuals were used as spatial component to account for local details. A dataset of about 26,000 horizons (7,800 profiles) was used for this study. A validation set was randomly selected as 25% of the full dataset. Numerous covariates derived from globally available data, such as MODIS and SRTM, are considered. The results of the 3D-GAM+kriging showed low RMSE values, good R squared and an accurate reproduction of the spatial structure of the data for a range of soil properties. The results have an out-of-sample RMSE between 10 to 15% of the observed range when taking into account the whole profile. The approach followed allows the assessment of the uncertainty of both the trend and the residuals.

  4. The Esri 3D city information model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, T.; Schubiger-Banz, S.

    2014-02-01

    With residential and commercial space becoming increasingly scarce, cities are going vertical. Managing the urban environments in 3D is an increasingly important and complex undertaking. To help solving this problem, Esri has released the ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution. The ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution provides the information model, tools and apps for creating, analyzing and maintaining a 3D city using the ArcGIS platform. This paper presents an overview of the 3D City Information Model and some sample use cases.

  5. A review of recent advances in 3D face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jing; Geng, Shuze; Xiao, Zhaoxia; Xiu, Chunbo

    2015-03-01

    Face recognition based on machine vision has achieved great advances and been widely used in the various fields. However, there are some challenges on the face recognition, such as facial pose, variations in illumination, and facial expression. So, this paper gives the recent advances in 3D face recognition. 3D face recognition approaches are categorized into four groups: minutiae approach, space transform approach, geometric features approach, model approach. Several typical approaches are compared in detail, including feature extraction, recognition algorithm, and the performance of the algorithm. Finally, this paper summarized the challenge existing in 3D face recognition and the future trend. This paper aims to help the researches majoring on face recognition.

  6. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  7. 3D seismics for geothermal reservoir characterization - a case study from Schneeberg (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlousek, F.; Hellwig, O.; Buske, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a 3D seismic survey acquired near Schneeberg in the western Erzgebirge (Germany). The aim of the project is to use seismic exploration methods to image and to characterize a major fault zone in crystalline rock which could be used as a geothermal reservoir at a target depth of about 5-6 km with expected temperatures between 160-180°C. For this purpose a high resolution 3D Vibroseis survey with more than 5300 source and approximately 8000 receiver locations was performed at the end of 2012 and covered an area of approximately 10 km x 13 km. The 3D survey was complemented by an additional wide-angle seismic survey using explosives along eleven profile lines radially centered at the target area. The region itself is dominated by the NW-SE striking Gera-Jáchymov fault system. The main geological features in the survey area are well known from intensive mining activities down to a depth of about 2 km. The seismic investigations aimed at imaging the partly steeply dipping fault branches at greater depth, in particular a dominant steeply NE dipping fault in the central part of the survey area. Beside this main structure, the Gera-Jáchymov fault zone consists of a couple of steeply SW dipping conjugated faults. Advanced processing and imaging methods have been applied to the data set. 3D Kirchhoff prestack depth migration delivered a clear image of the structure of the various fault branches at depths of around 2-5 km. Furthermore, focusing migration methods (e.g. coherency migration) have been applied and even sharpened the image such that the 3D seismic result allows for a profound characterization of this potential geothermal reservoir in crystalline rock.

  8. Line formation in accretion disks. 3D comoving frame calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkalla, R.

    1994-10-01

    The 3D radiative transfer equation is written in O(nu/c) in the comoving frame and solved by a short characteristics method for a two-level atom with complete redistribution. An Approximate-LAMBDA operator and various other acceleration techniques are applied to improve the rate of convergence. Line profiles and source functions are calculated for accretion disk models of cataclysmic variables (CV) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) homogeneous in density and temperature. We find that the velocity gradient in the disks makes it necessary for line transfer problems to use the full 3D radiative transfer equation.

  9. MOSSFRAC: An anisotropic 3D fracture model

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W C; Levatin, J L

    2006-08-14

    Despite the intense effort for nearly half a century to construct detailed numerical models of plastic flow and plastic damage accumulation, models for describing fracture, an equally important damage mechanism still cannot describe basic fracture phenomena. Typical fracture models set the stress tensor to zero for tensile fracture and set the deviatoric stress tensor to zero for compressive fracture. One consequence is that the simple case of the tensile fracture of a cylinder under combined compressive radial and tensile axial loads is not modeled correctly. The experimental result is a cylinder that can support compressive radial loads, but no axial load, whereas, the typical numerical result is a cylinder with all stresses equal to zero. This incorrect modeling of fracture locally also has a global effect, because material that is fracturing produces stress release waves, which propagate from the fracture and influence the surrounding material. Consequently, it would be useful to have a model that can describe the stress relief and the resulting anisotropy due to fracture. MOSSFRAC is a material model that simulates three-dimensional tensile and shear fracture in initially isotropic elastic-plastic materials, although its framework is also amenable to initially anisotropic materials. It differs from other models by accounting for the effects of cracks on the constitutive response of the material, so that the previously described experiment, as well as complicated fracture scenarios are simulated more accurately. The model is implemented currently in the LLNL hydrocodes DYNA3D, PARADYN, and ALE3D. The purpose of this technical note is to present a complete qualitative description of the model and quantitative descriptions of salient features.

  10. NDE of spacecraft materials using 3D Compton backscatter x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, E. R.; Grubsky, V.; Romanov, V.; Shoemaker, K.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of testing of the NDE performance of a Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) system for single-sided, penetrating 3D inspection. The system was recently developed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) and delivered to NASA for testing and evaluation. The CIT technology is based on 3D structure mapping by collecting the information on density profiles in multiple object cross sections through hard x-ray Compton backscatter imaging. The individual cross sections are processed and fused together in software, generating a 3D map of the density profile of the object which can then be analyzed slice-by-slice in x, y, or z directions. The developed CIT scanner is based on a 200-kV x-ray source, flat-panel x-ray detector (FPD), and apodized x-ray imaging optics. The CIT technology is particularly well suited to the NDE of lightweight aerospace materials, such as the thermal protection system (TPS) ceramic and composite materials, micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding, spacecraft pressure walls, inflatable habitat structures, composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and aluminum honeycomb materials. The current system provides 3D localization of defects and features with field of view 20x12x8 cm3 and spatial resolution ˜2 mm. In this paper, we review several aerospace NDE applications of the CIT technology, with particular emphasis on TPS. Based on the analysis of the testing results, we provide recommendations for continued development on TPS applications that can benefit the most from the unique capabilities of this new NDE technology.

  11. Demonstration of a 3D vision algorithm for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, Rui J. P. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports an extension of the MIAG algorithm for recognition and motion parameter determination of general 3-D polyhedral objects based on model matching techniques and using movement invariants as features of object representation. Results of tests conducted on the algorithm under conditions simulating space conditions are presented.

  12. The Feasibility of 3d Point Cloud Generation from Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, N.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new technique for increasing the accuracy of direct geo-referenced image-based 3D point cloud generated from low-cost sensors in smartphones. The smartphone's motion sensors are used to directly acquire the Exterior Orientation Parameters (EOPs) of the captured images. These EOPs, along with the Interior Orientation Parameters (IOPs) of the camera/ phone, are used to reconstruct the image-based 3D point cloud. However, because smartphone motion sensors suffer from poor GPS accuracy, accumulated drift and high signal noise, inaccurate 3D mapping solutions often result. Therefore, horizontal and vertical linear features, visible in each image, are extracted and used as constraints in the bundle adjustment procedure. These constraints correct the relative position and orientation of the 3D mapping solution. Once the enhanced EOPs are estimated, the semi-global matching algorithm (SGM) is used to generate the image-based dense 3D point cloud. Statistical analysis and assessment are implemented herein, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D point cloud generation from the consumer-grade sensors in smartphones.

  13. Self-Assembled 3D Graphene Monolith from Solution.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Li, Zhengjie; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2015-02-19

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-assembled monoliths (GAs), especially ones prepared by self-assembly in the liquid phase, represent promising forms to realize the practical applications of graphene due to their high surface utilization and operability. However, the understanding of the assembly process and structure control of 3D GAs, as a new class of carbon materials, is quite inadequate. In this Perspective, we give a demonstration of the assembly process and discuss the key factors involved in the structure control of 3D GAs to pave the way for their future applications. It is shown that the assembly process starts with the phase separation, which is responsible for the formation of the 3D networked structure and liquid phase as the spacers avoid the parallel overlap of graphene layers and help form an interlinked pore system. Well-tailored graphene sheets and selected assembly media must be a precondition for a well-controlled assembly process and microstructure of a 3D GA. The potential applications in energy storage featuring high rate and high volumetric energy density demonstrate advantages of 3D GAs in real applications. PMID:26262482

  14. Sockeye: a 3D environment for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephen B; Astakhova, Tamara; Bilenky, Mikhail; Birney, Ewan; Fu, Tony; Hassel, Maik; Melsopp, Craig; Rak, Marcin; Robertson, A Gordon; Sleumer, Monica; Siddiqui, Asim S; Jones, Steven J M

    2004-05-01

    Comparative genomics techniques are used in bioinformatics analyses to identify the structural and functional properties of DNA sequences. As the amount of avai