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Sample records for 3d finite-difference method

  1. A time-space domain stereo finite difference method for 3D scalar wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yushu; Yang, Guangwen; Ma, Xiao; He, Conghui; Song, Guojie

    2016-11-01

    The time-space domain finite difference methods reduce numerical dispersion effectively by minimizing the error in the joint time-space domain. However, their interpolating coefficients are related with the Courant numbers, leading to significantly extra time costs for loading the coefficients consecutively according to velocity in heterogeneous models. In the present study, we develop a time-space domain stereo finite difference (TSSFD) method for 3D scalar wave equation. The method propagates both the displacements and their gradients simultaneously to keep more information of the wavefields, and minimizes the maximum phase velocity error directly using constant interpolation coefficients for different Courant numbers. We obtain the optimal constant coefficients by combining the truncated Taylor series approximation and the time-space domain optimization, and adjust the coefficients to improve the stability condition. Subsequent investigation shows that the TSSFD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively with high computational efficiency. The maximum phase velocity error of the TSSFD is just 3.09% even with only 2 sampling points per minimum wavelength when the Courant number is 0.4. Numerical experiments show that to generate wavefields with no visible numerical dispersion, the computational efficiency of the TSSFD is 576.9%, 193.5%, 699.0%, and 191.6% of those of the 4th-order and 8th-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method, the 4th-order staggered grid method (SG), and the 8th-order optimal finite difference method (OFD), respectively. Meanwhile, the TSSFD is compatible to the unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) boundary condition for absorbing artificial boundaries. The efficiency and capability to handle complex velocity models make it an attractive tool in imaging methods such as acoustic reverse time migration (RTM).

  2. Ground motion simulations in Marmara (Turkey) region from 3D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ulrich, Thomas; Douglas, John

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European project MARSite (2012-2016), one of the main contributions from our research team was to provide ground-motion simulations for the Marmara region from various earthquake source scenarios. We adopted a 3D finite difference code, taking into account the 3D structure around the Sea of Marmara (including the bathymetry) and the sea layer. We simulated two moderate earthquakes (about Mw4.5) and found that the 3D structure improves significantly the waveforms compared to the 1D layer model. Simulations were carried out for different earthquakes (moderate point sources and large finite sources) in order to provide shake maps (Aochi and Ulrich, BSSA, 2015), to study the variability of ground-motion parameters (Douglas & Aochi, BSSA, 2016) as well as to provide synthetic seismograms for the blind inversion tests (Diao et al., GJI, 2016). The results are also planned to be integrated in broadband ground-motion simulations, tsunamis generation and simulations of triggered landslides (in progress by different partners). The simulations are freely shared among the partners via the internet and the visualization of the results is diffused on the project's homepage. All these simulations should be seen as a reference for this region, as they are based on the latest knowledge that obtained during the MARSite project, although their refinement and validation of the model parameters and the simulations are a continuing research task relying on continuing observations. The numerical code used, the models and the simulations are available on demand.

  3. Iterative methods for 3D implicit finite-difference migration using the complex Padé approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Carlos A. N.; Campos, Itamara S.; Costa, Jessé C.; Neto, Francisco A.; Schleicher, Jörg; Novais, Amélia

    2013-08-01

    Conventional implementations of 3D finite-difference (FD) migration use splitting techniques to accelerate performance and save computational cost. However, such techniques are plagued with numerical anisotropy that jeopardises the correct positioning of dipping reflectors in the directions not used for the operator splitting. We implement 3D downward continuation FD migration without splitting using a complex Padé approximation. In this way, the numerical anisotropy is eliminated at the expense of a computationally more intensive solution of a large-band linear system. We compare the performance of the iterative stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) and that of the multifrontal massively parallel direct solver (MUMPS). It turns out that the use of the complex Padé approximation not only stabilizes the solution, but also acts as an effective preconditioner for the BICGSTAB algorithm, reducing the number of iterations as compared to the implementation using the real Padé expansion. As a consequence, the iterative BICGSTAB method is more efficient than the direct MUMPS method when solving a single term in the Padé expansion. The results of both algorithms, here evaluated by computing the migration impulse response in the SEG/EAGE salt model, are of comparable quality.

  4. Massive parallelization of a 3D finite difference electromagnetic forward solution using domain decomposition methods on multiple CUDA enabled GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, A.

    2010-12-01

    describe our ongoing efforts to achieve massive parallelization on a novel hybrid GPU testbed machine currently configured with 12 Intel Westmere Xeon CPU cores (or 24 parallel computational threads) with 96 GB DDR3 system memory, 4 GPU subsystems which in aggregate contain 960 NVidia Tesla GPU cores with 16 GB dedicated DDR3 GPU memory, and a second interleved bank of 4 GPU subsystems containing in aggregate 1792 NVidia Fermi GPU cores with 12 GB dedicated DDR5 GPU memory. We are applying domain decomposition methods to a modified version of Weiss' (2001) 3D frequency domain full physics EM finite difference code, an open source GPL licensed f90 code available for download from www.OpenEM.org. This will be the core of a new hybrid 3D inversion that parallelizes frequencies across CPUs and individual forward solutions across GPUs. We describe progress made in modifying the code to use direct solvers in GPU cores dedicated to each small subdomain, iteratively improving the solution by matching adjacent subdomain boundary solutions, rather than iterative Krylov space sparse solvers as currently applied to the whole domain.

  5. Long Period Ground Motion Prediction Of Linked Tonankai And Nankai Subduction Earthquakes Using 3D Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabe, H.; Kamae, K.

    2005-12-01

    There is high possibility of the occurrence of the Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes which are capable of causing immense damage. During these huge earthquakes, long period ground motions may strike mega-cities Osaka and Nagoya located inside the Osaka and Nobi basins in which there are many long period and low damping structures (such as tall buildings and oil tanks). It is very important for the earthquake disaster mitigation to predict long period strong ground motions of the future Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes that are capable of exciting long-period strong ground motions over a wide area. In this study, we tried to predict long-period ground motions of the future Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes using 3D finite difference method. We construct a three-dimensional underground structure model including not only the basins but also propagation field from the source to the basins. Resultantly, we can point out that the predominant periods of pseudo-velocity response spectra change basin by basin. Long period ground motions with periods of 5 to 8 second are predominant in the Osaka basin, 3 to 6 second in the Nobi basin and 2 to 5 second in the Kyoto basin. These characteristics of the long-period ground motions are related with the thicknesses of the sediments of the basins. The duration of long period ground motions inside the basin are more than 5 minutes. These results are very useful for the earthquake disaster mitigation of long period structures such as tall buildings and oil tanks.

  6. 3D finite-difference seismic migration with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Gjertsen, R.; Minkoff, S.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is essential for reducing the risk associated with oil exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive as datasets can be terabytes in size. Traditional ray-tracing migration methods cannot handle complex velocity variations commonly found near such salt structures. Instead the authors use the full 3D acoustic wave equation, discretized via a finite difference algorithm. They reduce the cost of solving the apraxial wave equation by a number of numerical techniques including the method of fractional steps and pipelining the tridiagonal solves. The imaging code, Salvo, uses both frequency parallelism (generally 90% efficient) and spatial parallelism (65% efficient). Salvo has been tested on synthetic and real data and produces clear images of the subsurface even beneath complicated salt structures.

  7. Parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    Computational power has advanced to a state where we can begin to perform wavefield simulations for realistic (complex) 3-D earth models at frequencies of interest to both seismologists and engineers. On serial platforms, however, 3-D calculations are still limited to small grid sizes and short seismic wave traveltimes. To make use of the efficiency of network computers a parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference (FD) code is implemented which allows to distribute the work on several PCs or workstations connected via standard ethernet in an in-house network. By using the portable message passing interface standard (MPI) for the communication between processors, running times can be reduced and grid sizes can be increased significantly. Furthermore, the code shows good performance on massive parallel supercomputers which makes the computation of very large grids feasible. This implementation greatly expands the applicability of the 3-D elastic/viscoelastic finite-difference modelling technique by providing an efficient, portable and practical C-program.

  8. 3D Finite Difference Modelling of Basaltic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell-Sørensen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The main purpose of the work was to generate realistic data to be applied for testing of processing and migration tools for basaltic regions. The project is based on the three - dimensional finite difference code (FD), TIGER, made by Sintef. The FD code was optimized (parallelized) by the author, to run on parallel computers. The parallel code enables us to model large-scale realistic geological models and to apply traditional seismic and micro seismic sources. The parallel code uses multiple processors in order to manipulate subsets of large amounts of data simultaneously. The general anisotropic code uses 21 elastic coefficients. Eight independent coefficients are needed as input parameters for the general TI medium. In the FD code, the elastic wave field computation is implemented by a higher order FD solution to the elastic wave equation and the wave fields are computed on a staggered grid, shifted half a node in one or two directions. The geological model is a gridded basalt model, which covers from 24 km to 37 km of a real shot line in horizontal direction and from the water surface to the depth of 3.5 km. The 2frac {1}{2}D model has been constructed using the compound modeling software from Norsk Hydro. The vertical parameter distribution is obtained from observations in two wells. At The depth of between 1100 m to 1500 m, a basalt horizon covers the whole sub surface layers. We have shown that it is possible to simulate a line survey in realistic (3D) geological models in reasonable time by using high performance computers. The author would like to thank Norsk Hydro, Statoil, GEUS, and SINTEF for very helpful discussions and Parallab for being helpful with the new IBM, p690 Regatta system.

  9. A 3D staggered-grid finite difference scheme for poroelastic wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijie; Gao, Jinghuai

    2014-10-01

    Three dimensional numerical modeling has been a viable tool for understanding wave propagation in real media. The poroelastic media can better describe the phenomena of hydrocarbon reservoirs than acoustic and elastic media. However, the numerical modeling in 3D poroelastic media demands significantly more computational capacity, including both computational time and memory. In this paper, we present a 3D poroelastic staggered-grid finite difference (SFD) scheme. During the procedure, parallel computing is implemented to reduce the computational time. Parallelization is based on domain decomposition, and communication between processors is performed using message passing interface (MPI). Parallel analysis shows that the parallelized SFD scheme significantly improves the simulation efficiency and 3D decomposition in domain is the most efficient. We also analyze the numerical dispersion and stability condition of the 3D poroelastic SFD method. Numerical results show that the 3D numerical simulation can provide a real description of wave propagation.

  10. HEMP 3D -- a finite difference program for calculating elastic-plastic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.

    1993-05-26

    The HEMP 3D program can be used to solve problems in solid mechanics involving dynamic plasticity and time dependent material behavior and problems in gas dynamics. The equations of motion, the conservation equations, and the constitutive relations are solved by finite difference methods following the format of the HEMP computer simulation program formulated in two space dimensions and time. Presented here is an update of the 1975 report on the HEMP 3D numerical technique. The present report includes the sliding surface routines programmed by Robert Gulliford.

  11. 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm and anomaly features of ZTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tan, Han-Dong; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kun-Peng; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Zhang, Xing-Dong

    2016-09-01

    The Z-Axis tipper electromagnetic (ZTEM) technique is based on a frequency-domain airborne electromagnetic system that measures the natural magnetic field. A survey area was divided into several blocks by using the Maxwell's equations, and the magnetic components at the center of each edge of the grid cell are evaluated by applying the staggered-grid finite-difference method. The tipper and its divergence are derived to complete the 3D ZTEM forward modeling algorithm. A synthetic model is then used to compare the responses with those of 2D finite-element forward modeling to verify the accuracy of the algorithm. ZTEM offers high horizontal resolution to both simple and complex distributions of conductivity. This work is the theoretical foundation for the interpretation of ZTEM data and the study of 3D ZTEM inversion.

  12. DNS of Sheared Particulate Flows with a 3D Explicit Finite-Difference Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Andrew; Hu, Howard

    2007-11-01

    A 3D explicit finite-difference code for direct simulation of the motion of solid particulates in fluids has been developed, and a periodic boundary condition implemented to study the effective viscosity of suspensions in shear. The code enforces the no-slip condition on the surface of spherical particles in a uniform Cartesian grid with a special particle boundary condition based on matching the Stokes flow solutions next to the particle surface with a numerical solution away from it. The method proceeds by approximating the flow next to the particle surface as a Stokes flow in the particle's local coordinates, which is then matched to the finite difference update in the bulk fluid on a ``cage'' of grid points near the particle surface. (The boundary condition is related to the PHYSALIS method (2003), but modified for explicit schemes and with an iterative process removed.) Advantages of the method include superior accuracy of the scheme on a relatively coarse grid for intermediate particle Reynolds numbers, ease of implementation, and the elimination of the need to track the particle surface. For the sheared suspension, the effects of fluid and solid inertia and solid volume fraction on effective viscosity at moderate particle Reynolds numbers and concentrated suspensions will be discussed.

  13. Second Order Accurate Finite Difference Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-20

    a study of the idealized material has direct applications to some polymer structures (4, 5). Wave propagation studies in hyperelastic materials have...34Acceleration Wave Propagation in Hyperelastic Rods of Variable Cross- section. Wave Motion, V4, pp. 173-180, 1982. 9. M. Hirao and N. Sugimoto...Waves in Hyperelastic Road," Quart. Appl. Math., V37, pp. 377-399, 1979. 11. G. A. Sod. "A Survey of Several Finite Difference Methods for Systems of

  14. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  15. Finite difference methods for approximating Heaviside functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towers, John D.

    2009-05-01

    We present a finite difference method for discretizing a Heaviside function H(u(x→)), where u is a level set function u:Rn ↦ R that is positive on a bounded region Ω⊂Rn. There are two variants of our algorithm, both of which are adapted from finite difference methods that we proposed for discretizing delta functions in [J.D. Towers, Two methods for discretizing a delta function supported on a level set, J. Comput. Phys. 220 (2007) 915-931; J.D. Towers, Discretizing delta functions via finite differences and gradient normalization, Preprint at http://www.miracosta.edu/home/jtowers/; J.D. Towers, A convergence rate theorem for finite difference approximations to delta functions, J. Comput. Phys. 227 (2008) 6591-6597]. We consider our approximate Heaviside functions as they are used to approximate integrals over Ω. We prove that our first approximate Heaviside function leads to second order accurate quadrature algorithms. Numerical experiments verify this second order accuracy. For our second algorithm, numerical experiments indicate at least third order accuracy if the integrand f and ∂Ω are sufficiently smooth. Numerical experiments also indicate that our approximations are effective when used to discretize certain singular source terms in partial differential equations. We mostly focus on smooth f and u. By this we mean that f is smooth in a neighborhood of Ω, u is smooth in a neighborhood of ∂Ω, and the level set u(x)=0 is a manifold of codimension one. However, our algorithms still give reasonable results if either f or u has jumps in its derivatives. Numerical experiments indicate approximately second order accuracy for both algorithms if the regularity of the data is reduced in this way, assuming that the level set u(x)=0 is a manifold. Numerical experiments indicate that dependence on the placement of Ω with respect to the grid is quite small for our algorithms. Specifically, a grid shift results in an O(hp) change in the computed solution

  16. 3-D Finite-Difference Modeling of Earthquakes in the City of Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinci, A.; Olsen, K. B.; Rovelli, A.; Marra, F.; Malagnini, L.

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate 3-D amplification effects from regional and local earthquakes in the city of Rome. Mainly, two distinct seismogenic districts may affect the city of Rome: the (1) Alban Hills region, located about 25 km from downtown Rome, and (2) the Central Apennines, located 80-100 km from Rome where the most recent event occurred on January 13, 1915 (M=6.8) which was felt in Rome with a VII degree intensity. To address the seismic hazard in Rome from such sources we have simulated 0-1 Hz viscoelastic wave propagation in a three-dimensional model of the Tiber Valley, Rome, for an M5.5 scenario earthquake (1 Hz) in the seismogenic area of Alban Hills about 25 km from downtown Rome and an M7.0 earthquake (0.5 Hz) about 100 km east of the valley using a fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference method. We used a basin model (~ 6 km by 6 km by 0.050 km) which includes sediments with shear-wave velocities as low as 250 m/s in the Tiber River sediments, constrained by more than 3000 borehole measurements. We have also estimated the amplification of the 3D model due to a 1-Hz vertically-incident planar SH wave. Our results suggest that the strongest ground motion amplification in Rome is restricted to the Holocene alluvial areas with a significant concentration close to the edges of the Tiber River valley, in agreement with the results by Tertulliani and Riguzzi (1995). In particular, the fill deposits in the Tiber River generate amplification by up to a factor of 2 with respect to the surrounding volcanics, largest near the contact between the alluvial sediments and the surrounding volcanic deposits for the incident plane wave source. We find 1-Hz peak ground velocities of up to 30 cm/sec for the M5.5, Alban Hills earthquake, largest near the northwestern edges of the Tiber River. The largest 0.5-Hz peak velocity is 24 cm/s for the M7.0 earthquake with extended durations up to about 1 min. The lower maximum frequency for this scenario is

  17. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Scattered Teleseismic Wavefields in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, I. B.; Zheng, H.

    2005-12-01

    For a teleseismic array targeting subducting crust in a zone of active subduction, scattering from the zone underlying the trench result in subhorizontally-propagating waves that could be difficult to distinguish from converted P- and S- wave backscattered from the surface. Because back-scattered modes often provide the most spectacular images of subducting slabs, it is important to understand their differences from the arrivals scattered from the trench zone. To investigate the detailed teleseismic wavefield in a subduction zone environment, we performed a full-waveform, 3-D visco-elastic finite-difference modeling of teleseismic wave propagation using a Beowulf cluster. The synthetics show strong scattering from the trench zone, dominated by the mantle and crustal P-waves propagating at 6.2-8.1.km/s and slower. These scattered waves occupy the same time and moveout intervals as the backscattered modes, and also have similar amplitudes. Although their amplitude decay characters are different, with the uncertainties in the velocity and density structure of the subduction zone, unambiguous distinguishing of these modes appears difficult. However, under minimal assumptions (in particular, without invoking slab dehydration), recent observations of receiver function amplitudes decreasing away from the trench favor the interpretation of trench-zone scattering.

  18. Poroelastic Wave Propagation With a 3D Velocity-Stress-Pressure Finite-Difference Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.; Bartel, L. C.

    2004-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation within a three-dimensional, heterogeneous, isotropic poroelastic medium is numerically simulated with an explicit, time-domain, finite-difference algorithm. A system of thirteen, coupled, first-order, partial differential equations is solved for the particle velocity vector components, the stress tensor components, and the pressure associated with solid and fluid constituents of the two-phase continuum. These thirteen dependent variables are stored on staggered temporal and spatial grids, analogous to the scheme utilized for solution of the conventional velocity-stress system of isotropic elastodynamics. Centered finite-difference operators possess 2nd-order accuracy in time and 4th-order accuracy in space. Seismological utility is enhanced by an optional stress-free boundary condition applied on a horizontal plane representing the earth's surface. Absorbing boundary conditions are imposed on the flanks of the 3D spatial grid via a simple wavefield amplitude taper approach. A massively parallel computational implementation, utilizing the spatial domain decomposition strategy, allows investigation of large-scale earth models and/or broadband wave propagation within reasonable execution times. Initial algorithm testing indicates that a point force density and/or moment density source activated within a poroelastic medium generates diverging fast and slow P waves (and possibly an S-wave)in accord with Biot theory. Solid and fluid particle velocities are in-phase for the fast P-wave, whereas they are out-of-phase for the slow P-wave. Conversions between all wave types occur during reflection and transmission at interfaces. Thus, although the slow P-wave is regarded as difficult to detect experimentally, its presence is strongly manifest within the complex of waves generated at a lithologic or fluid boundary. Very fine spatial and temporal gridding are required for high-fidelity representation of the slow P-wave, without inducing excessive

  19. Optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Han, B.; Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate an optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling. An anti-lumped mass strategy is incorporated to minimize the numerical dispersion. The optimal finite-difference coefficients and the mass weighting coefficients are obtained by minimizing the misfit between the normalized phase velocities and the unity. An iterative damped least-squares method, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, is utilized for the optimization. Dispersion analysis shows that the optimal fourth-order scheme presents less grid dispersion and anisotropy than the conventional fourth-order scheme with respect to different Poisson's ratios. Moreover, only 3.7 grid-points per minimum shear wavelength are required to keep the error of the group velocities below 1%. The memory cost is then greatly reduced due to a coarser sampling. A parallel iterative method named CARP-CG is used to solve the large ill-conditioned linear system for the frequency-domain modeling. Validations are conducted with respect to both the analytic viscoacoustic and viscoelastic solutions. Compared with the conventional fourth-order scheme, the optimal scheme generates wavefields having smaller error under the same discretization setups. Profiles of the wavefields are presented to confirm better agreement between the optimal results and the analytic solutions.

  20. 3-D geoelectrical modelling using finite-difference: a new boundary conditions improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maineult, A.; Schott, J.-J.; Ardiot, A.

    2003-04-01

    Geoelectrical prospecting is a well-known and frequently used method for quantitative and non-destructive subsurface exploration until depths of a few hundreds metres. Thus archeological objects can be efficiently detected as their resistivities often contrast with those of the surrounding media. Nevertheless using the geoelectrical prospecting method has long been restricted due to inhability to model correctly arbitrarily-shaped structures. The one-dimensional modelling and inversion have long been classical, but are of no interest for the majority of field data, since the natural distribution of resistivity is rarely homogeneous or tabular. Since the 1970's some authors developed discrete methods in order to solve the two and three-dimensional problem, using mathematical tools such as finite-element or finite-difference. The finite-difference approach is quite simple, easily understandable and programmable. Since the work of Dey and Morrison (1979), this approach has become quite popular. Nevertheless, one of its major drawbacks is the difficulty to establish satisfying boundary conditions. Recently Lowry et al. (1989) and Zhao and Yedlin (1996) suggested some refinements on the improvement of the boundary problem. We propose a new betterment, based on the splitting of the potential into two terms, the potential due to a reference tabular medium and a secondary potential caused by a disturbance of this medium. The surface response of a tabular medium has long been known (see for example Koefoed 1979). Here we developed the analytical solution for the electrical tabular potential everywhere in the medium, in order to establish more satisfying boundary conditions. The response of the perturbation, that is to say the object of interest, is then solved using volume-difference and preconditioned conjugate gradient. Finally the grid is refined one or more times in the perturbed domain in order to ameliorate the precision. This method of modelling is easy to implement

  1. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  2. A Finite Difference-Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-21

    ARL-RP-0531 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Finite Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion by...AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Finite Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion by Raymond A Wildman and George...Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  3. Eigenvalues of singular differential operators by finite difference methods. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, J. V.

    1972-01-01

    Note is made of an earlier paper which defined finite difference operators for the Hilbert space L2(m), and gave the eigenvalues for these operators. The present work examines eigenvalues for higher order singular differential operators by using finite difference methods. The two self-adjoint operators investigated are defined by a particular value in the same Hilbert space, L2(m), and are strictly positive with compact inverses. A class of finite difference operators is considered, with the idea of application to the theory of Toeplitz matrices. The approximating operators consist of a good approximation plus a perturbing operator.

  4. Finite-difference model for 3-D flow in bays and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Peter E.; Larock, Bruce E.; ,

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a semi-implicit finite-difference model for the numerical solution of three-dimensional flow in bays and estuaries. The model treats the gravity wave and vertical diffusion terms in the governing equations implicitly, and other terms explicitly. The model achieves essentially second-order accurate and stable solutions in strongly nonlinear problems by using a three-time-level leapfrog-trapezoidal scheme for the time integration.

  5. Compact finite difference method for American option pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jichao; Davison, Matt; Corless, Robert M.

    2007-09-01

    A compact finite difference method is designed to obtain quick and accurate solutions to partial differential equation problems. The problem of pricing an American option can be cast as a partial differential equation. Using the compact finite difference method this problem can be recast as an ordinary differential equation initial value problem. The complicating factor for American options is the existence of an optimal exercise boundary which is jointly determined with the value of the option. In this article we develop three ways of combining compact finite difference methods for American option price on a single asset with methods for dealing with this optimal exercise boundary. Compact finite difference method one uses the implicit condition that solutions of the transformed partial differential equation be nonnegative to detect the optimal exercise value. This method is very fast and accurate even when the spatial step size h is large (h[greater-or-equal, slanted]0.1). Compact difference method two must solve an algebraic nonlinear equation obtained by Pantazopoulos (1998) at every time step. This method can obtain second order accuracy for space x and requires a moderate amount of time comparable with that required by the Crank Nicolson projected successive over relaxation method. Compact finite difference method three refines the free boundary value by a method developed by Barone-Adesi and Lugano [The saga of the American put, 2003], and this method can obtain high accuracy for space x. The last two of these three methods are convergent, moreover all the three methods work for both short term and long term options. Through comparison with existing popular methods by numerical experiments, our work shows that compact finite difference methods provide an exciting new tool for American option pricing.

  6. A 3D Explicit Finite-Difference Scheme for Particulate Flows with Boundary Conditions based on Stokes Flow Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, A.; Hu, H.

    2006-11-01

    We have extended previous work on an 2D explicit finite-difference code for direct simulation of the motion of solid particles in a fluid to 3D. It is challenging to enforce the no-slip condition on the surface of spherical particles in a uniform Cartesian grid. We have implemented a treatment of the boundary condition similar to that in the PHYSALIS method of Takagi et. al. (2003), which is based on matching the Stokes flow solutions next to the particle surface with a numerical solution away from it. The original PHYSALIS method was developed for implicit flow solvers, and required an iterative process to match the Stokes flow solutions with the numerical solution. However, it was easily adapted to work with the present explicit scheme, and found to be more efficient since no iterative process is required in the matching. The method proceeds by approximating the flow next to the particle surface as a Stokes flow in the particle’s local coordinates, which is then matched to the numerically computed external flow on a ``cage'' of grid points near the particle surface. Advantages of the method include superior accuracy of the scheme on a relatively coarse grid for intermediate Reynolds numbers, ease of implementation, and the elimination of the need to track the particle surface. Several examples are presented, including flow over a stationary sphere in a square tube, sedimentation of a particle, and dropping, kissing, and tumbling of two particles. This research is supported by a GAANN fellowship from the U.S. Dept. of Education.

  7. Application of a novel finite difference method to dynamic crack problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. M.; Wilkins, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A versatile finite difference method (HEMP and HEMP 3D computer programs) was developed originally for solving dynamic problems in continuum mechanics. It was extended to analyze the stress field around cracks in a solid with finite geometry subjected to dynamic loads and to simulate numerically the dynamic fracture phenomena with success. This method is an explicit finite difference method applied to the Lagrangian formulation of the equations of continuum mechanics in two and three space dimensions and time. The calculational grid moves with the material and in this way it gives a more detailed description of the physics of the problem than the Eulerian formulation.

  8. Finite-Difference Algorithm for Simulating 3D Electromagnetic Wavefields in Conductive Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wavefields are routinely used in geophysical exploration for detection and characterization of subsurface geological formations of economic interest. Recorded EM signals depend strongly on the current conductivity of geologic media. Hence, they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of saturated porous bodies. In order to enhance understanding of field-recorded data, we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating three-dimensional (3D) EM wave propagation and diffusion in heterogeneous conductive materials. Maxwell's equations are combined with isotropic constitutive relations to obtain a set of six, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing the electric and magnetic vectors. An advantage of this system is that it does not contain spatial derivatives of the three medium parameters electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, and current conductivity. Numerical solution methodology consists of explicit, time-domain finite-differencing on a 3D staggered rectangular grid. Temporal and spatial FD operators have order 2 and N, where N is user-selectable. We use an artificially-large electric permittivity to maximize the FD timestep, and thus reduce execution time. For the low frequencies typically used in geophysical exploration, accuracy is not unduly compromised. Grid boundary reflections are mitigated via convolutional perfectly matched layers (C-PMLs) imposed at the six grid flanks. A shared-memory-parallel code implementation via OpenMP directives enables rapid algorithm execution on a multi-thread computational platform. Good agreement is obtained in comparisons of numerically-generated data with reference solutions. EM wavefields are sourced via point current density and magnetic dipole vectors. Spatially-extended inductive sources (current carrying wire loops) are under development. We are particularly interested in accurate representation of high-conductivity sub-grid-scale features that are common

  9. Introduction to finite-difference methods for numerical fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, E.; Harlow, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    This work is intended to be a beginner`s exercise book for the study of basic finite-difference techniques in computational fluid dynamics. It is written for a student level ranging from high-school senior to university senior. Equations are derived from basic principles using algebra. Some discussion of partial-differential equations is included, but knowledge of calculus is not essential. The student is expected, however, to have some familiarity with the FORTRAN computer language, as the syntax of the computer codes themselves is not discussed. Topics examined in this work include: one-dimensional heat flow, one-dimensional compressible fluid flow, two-dimensional compressible fluid flow, and two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow with additions of the equations of heat flow and the {Kappa}-{epsilon} model for turbulence transport. Emphasis is placed on numerical instabilities and methods by which they can be avoided, techniques that can be used to evaluate the accuracy of finite-difference approximations, and the writing of the finite-difference codes themselves. Concepts introduced in this work include: flux and conservation, implicit and explicit methods, Lagrangian and Eulerian methods, shocks and rarefactions, donor-cell and cell-centered advective fluxes, compressible and incompressible fluids, the Boussinesq approximation for heat flow, Cartesian tensor notation, the Boussinesq approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor, and the modeling of transport equations. A glossary is provided which defines these and other terms.

  10. Macroscopic traffic modeling with the finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.; Azarm, A.; Stock, D.

    1996-03-15

    A traffic congestion forecasting model (ATOP), developed in the present investigation, is described briefly. Several macroscopic models, based on the solution of the partial differential equation of conservation of vehicles by the finite difference method, were tested using actual traffic data. The functional form, as well as the parameters, of the equation of state which describes the relation between traffic speed and traffic density, were determined for a section of the Long Island Expressway. The Lax method and the forward difference technique were applied. The results of extensive tests showed that the Lax method, in addition to giving very good agreement with the traffic data, produces stable solutions.

  11. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  12. A parallel finite-difference method for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisshelm, Julie M.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for solving complex three-dimensional aerodynamic flow on parallel-processing supercomputers is presented. The method consists of a basic flow solver with multigrid convergence acceleration, embedded grid refinements, and a zonal equation scheme. Multitasking and vectorization have been incorporated into the algorithm. Results obtained include multiprocessed flow simulations from the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Speedups as high as 3.3 for the two-dimensional case and 3.5 for segments of the three-dimensional case have been achieved on the Cray-2. The entire solver attained a factor of 2.7 improvement over its unitasked version on the Cray-2. The performance of the parallel algorithm on each machine is analyzed.

  13. Preliminary simulation of a M6.5 earthquake on the Seattle Fault using 3D finite-difference modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Frankel, Arthur D.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference simulation of a moderate-sized (M 6.5) thrust-faulting earthquake on the Seattle fault demonstrates the effects of the Seattle Basin on strong ground motion in the Puget lowland. The model area includes the cities of Seattle, Bremerton and Bellevue. We use a recently developed detailed 3D-velocity model of the Seattle Basin in these simulations. The model extended to 20-km depth and assumed rupture on a finite fault with random slip distribution. Preliminary results from simulations of frequencies 0.5 Hz and lower suggest amplification can occur at the surface of the Seattle Basin by the trapping of energy in the Quaternary sediments. Surface waves generated within the basin appear to contribute to amplification throughout the modeled region. Several factors apparently contribute to large ground motions in downtown Seattle: (1) radiation pattern and directivity from the rupture; (2) amplification and energy trapping within the Quaternary sediments; and (3) basin geometry and variation in depth of both Quaternary and Tertiary sediments

  14. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems.

  15. Elastic finite-difference method for irregular grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oprsal, I.; Zahradnik, J.

    1999-01-01

    Finite-difference (FD) modeling of complicated structures requires simple algorithms. This paper presents a new elastic FD method for spatially irregular grids that is simple and, at the same time, saves considerable memory and computing time. Features like faults, low-velocity layers, cavities, and/or nonplanar surfaces are treated on a fine grid, while the remaining parts of the model are, with equal accuracy, represented on a coarse grid. No interpolation is needed between the fine and coarse parts due to the rectangular grid cells. Relatively abrupt transitions between the small and large grid steps produce no numerical artifacts in the present method. Planar or nonplanar free surfaces, including underground cavities, are treated in a way similar to internal grid points but with consideration of the zero-valued elastic parameters and density outside the free surface (vacuum formalism). A theoretical proof that vacuum formalism fulfills the free-surface conditions is given. Numerical validation is performed through comparison with independent methods, comparing FD with explicitly prescribed boundary conditions and finite elements. Memory and computing time needed in the studied models was only about 10 to 40% of that employing regular square grids of equal accuracy. A practical example of a synthetic seismic section, showing clear signatures of a coal seam and cavity, is presented. The method can be extended to three dimensions.

  16. Elastic wave modelling in 3D heterogeneous media: 3D grid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianfeng, Zhang; Tielin, Liu

    2002-09-01

    We present a new numerical technique for elastic wave modelling in 3D heterogeneous media with surface topography, which is called the 3D grid method in this paper. This work is an extension of the 2D grid method that models P-SV wave propagation in 2D heterogeneous media. Similar to the finite-element method in the discretization of a numerical mesh, the proposed scheme is flexible in incorporating surface topography and curved interfaces; moreover it satisfies the free-surface boundary conditions of 3D topography naturally. The algorithm, developed from a parsimonious staggered-grid scheme, solves the problem using integral equilibrium around each node, instead of satisfying elastodynamic differential equations at each node as in the conventional finite-difference method. The computational cost and memory requirements for the proposed scheme are approximately the same as those used by the same order finite-difference method. In this paper, a mixed tetrahedral and parallelepiped grid method is presented; and the numerical dispersion and stability criteria on the tetrahedral grid method and parallelepiped grid method are discussed in detail. The proposed scheme is successfully tested against an analytical solution for the 3D Lamb problem and a solution of the boundary method for the diffraction of a hemispherical crater. Moreover, examples of surface-wave propagation in an elastic half-space with a semi-cylindrical trench on the surface and 3D plane-layered model are presented.

  17. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  18. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  19. A non-linear constrained optimization technique for the mimetic finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Svyatskiy, Daniil; Bertolazzi, Enrico; Frego, Marco

    2014-09-30

    This is a strategy for the construction of monotone schemes in the framework of the mimetic finite difference method for the approximation of diffusion problems on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes.

  20. Combination of the discontinuous Galerkin method with finite differences for simulation of seismic wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsa, Vadim; Tcheverda, Vladimir; Botter, Charlotte

    2016-04-15

    We present an algorithm for the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation in models with a complex near surface part and free surface topography. The approach is based on the combination of finite differences with the discontinuous Galerkin method. The discontinuous Galerkin method can be used on polyhedral meshes; thus, it is easy to handle the complex surfaces in the models. However, this approach is computationally intense in comparison with finite differences. Finite differences are computationally efficient, but in general, they require rectangular grids, leading to the stair-step approximation of the interfaces, which causes strong diffraction of the wavefield. In this research we present a hybrid algorithm where the discontinuous Galerkin method is used in a relatively small upper part of the model and finite differences are applied to the main part of the model.

  1. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. J.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation, a new non-hydrostatic (NH) dynamical core using the spectral element method (SEM) in the horizontal discretization and the finite difference method (FDM) in the vertical discretization will be presented. By using horizontal SEM, which decomposes the physical domain into smaller pieces with a small communication stencil, we can achieve a high level of scalability. Also by using vertical FDM, we provide an easy way for coupling the dynamics and existing physics packages. The Euler equations used here are in a flux form based on the hybrid sigma hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate, which are similar to those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Within these Euler equations, we use a time-split third-order Runge-Kutta (RK3) for the time discretization. In order to establish robustness, firstly the NH dynamical core is verified in a simplified two dimensional (2D) slice framework by conducting widely used standard benchmark tests, and then we verify the global three dimensional (3D) dynamical core on the cubed-sphere grid with several test cases introduced by Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP).

  2. SOME NEW FINITE DIFFERENCE METHODS FOR HELMHOLTZ EQUATIONS ON IRREGULAR DOMAINS OR WITH INTERFACES.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaohai; Li, Zhilin

    2012-06-01

    Solving a Helmholtz equation Δu + λu = f efficiently is a challenge for many applications. For example, the core part of many efficient solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is to solve one or several Helmholtz equations. In this paper, two new finite difference methods are proposed for solving Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, or with interfaces. For Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, the accuracy of the numerical solution obtained using the existing augmented immersed interface method (AIIM) may deteriorate when the magnitude of λ is large. In our new method, we use a level set function to extend the source term and the PDE to a larger domain before we apply the AIIM. For Helmholtz equations with interfaces, a new maximum principle preserving finite difference method is developed. The new method still uses the standard five-point stencil with modifications of the finite difference scheme at irregular grid points. The resulting coefficient matrix of the linear system of finite difference equations satisfies the sign property of the discrete maximum principle and can be solved efficiently using a multigrid solver. The finite difference method is also extended to handle temporal discretized equations where the solution coefficient λ is inversely proportional to the mesh size.

  3. A composite Chebyshev finite difference method for nonlinear optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzban, H. R.; Hoseini, S. M.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a composite Chebyshev finite difference method is introduced and is successfully employed for solving nonlinear optimal control problems. The proposed method is an extension of the Chebyshev finite difference scheme. This method can be regarded as a non-uniform finite difference scheme and is based on a hybrid of block-pulse functions and Chebyshev polynomials using the well-known Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto points. The convergence of the method is established. The nice properties of hybrid functions are then used to convert the nonlinear optimal control problem into a nonlinear mathematical programming one that can be solved efficiently by a globally convergent algorithm. The validity and applicability of the proposed method are demonstrated through some numerical examples. The method is simple, easy to implement and yields very accurate results.

  4. A FINITE-DIFFERENCE, DISCRETE-WAVENUMBER METHOD FOR CALCULATING RADAR TRACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid of the finite-difference method and the discrete-wavenumber method is developed to calculate radar traces. The method is based on a three-dimensional model defined in the Cartesian coordinate system; the electromag-netic properties of the model are symmetric with respect...

  5. A FINITE-DIFFERENCE, DISCRETE-WAVENUMBER METHOD FOR CALCULATING RADAR TRACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid of the finite-difference method and the discrete-wavenumber method is developed to calculate radar traces. The method is based on a three-dimensional model defined in the Cartesian coordinate system; the electromagnetic properties of the model are symmetric with respect ...

  6. An immersed boundary method for aeroacoustic flow using a high-order finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Britton

    2016-11-01

    An immersed boundary method that achieves second order accuracy in space on acoustic reflection problems is introduced and tested on a number of aero-acoustic related problems. The method follows a continuous forcing approach and uses existing solver operators to smoothly extend the flow solution though the immersed boundary. Both no-slip and free-slip boundary conditions are demonstrated on complex geometries using a high-order finite difference code on a Cartesian grid. High Mach number test problems are also shown, demonstrating the method's robustness in the presence of shock waves.

  7. Rupture Dynamics Simulation for Non-Planar fault by a Curved Grid Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhu, G.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    We first implement the non-staggered finite difference method to solve the dynamic rupture problem, with split-node, for non-planar fault. Split-node method for dynamic simulation has been used widely, because of that it's more precise to represent the fault plane than other methods, for example, thick fault, stress glut and so on. The finite difference method is also a popular numeric method to solve kinematic and dynamic problem in seismology. However, previous works focus most of theirs eyes on the staggered-grid method, because of its simplicity and computational efficiency. However this method has its own disadvantage comparing to non-staggered finite difference method at some fact for example describing the boundary condition, especially the irregular boundary, or non-planar fault. Zhang and Chen (2006) proposed the MacCormack high order non-staggered finite difference method based on curved grids to precisely solve irregular boundary problem. Based upon on this non-staggered grid method, we make success of simulating the spontaneous rupture problem. The fault plane is a kind of boundary condition, which could be irregular of course. So it's convinced that we could simulate rupture process in the case of any kind of bending fault plane. We will prove this method is valid in the case of Cartesian coordinate first. In the case of bending fault, the curvilinear grids will be used.

  8. Numerical solution of a diffusion problem by exponentially fitted finite difference methods.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Raffaele; Paternoster, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    This paper is focused on the accurate and efficient solution of partial differential differential equations modelling a diffusion problem by means of exponentially fitted finite difference numerical methods. After constructing and analysing special purpose finite differences for the approximation of second order partial derivatives, we employed them in the numerical solution of a diffusion equation with mixed boundary conditions. Numerical experiments reveal that a special purpose integration, both in space and in time, is more accurate and efficient than that gained by employing a general purpose solver.

  9. Nonstandard and Higher-Order Finite-Difference Methods for Electromagnetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-26

    NONSTANDARD AND HIGHER-ORDER FINITE-DIFFERENCE METHODS FOR ELECTROMAGNETICS by Constantine A. Balanis Bo Yang Craig R. Birtcher Department of Electrical ...116 3.55. Geometry of the simulated free-space region. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 3.56. Normalized electric charge densities using... electric charge densities using the nonstandard differentiation of (3.78) and (3.87

  10. High Order Finite Difference Methods, Multidimensional Linear Problems and Curvilinear Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrom, Jan; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1999-01-01

    Boundary and interface conditions are derived for high order finite difference methods applied to multidimensional linear problems in curvilinear coordinates. The boundary and interface conditions lead to conservative schemes and strict and strong stability provided that certain metric conditions are met.

  11. The role of finite-difference methods in design and analysis for supersonic cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Finite-difference methods for analysis of steady, inviscid supersonic flows are described, and their present state of development is assessed with particular attention to their applicability to vehicles designed for efficient cruise flight. Current work is described which will allow greater geometric latitude, improve treatment of embedded shock waves, and relax the requirement that the axial velocity must be supersonic.

  12. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  13. Parallel electromagnetic simulator based on the Finite-Difference Time Domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walendziuk, Wojciech

    2006-03-01

    In the following paper the parallel tool for electromagnetic field distribution analysis is presented. The main simulation programme is based on the parallel algorithm of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method and use Message Passing Interface as a communication library. In the paper also ways of communications among computation nodes in a parallel environment and efficiency of the parallel algorithm are presented.

  14. Finite-difference, spectral and Galerkin methods for time-dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, E.

    1983-01-01

    Finite difference, spectral and Galerkin methods for the approximate solution of time dependent problems are surveyed. A unified discussion on their accuracy, stability and convergence is given. In particular, the dilemma of high accuracy versus stability is studied in some detail.

  15. A Non-Linear Mixed Spectral Finite-Difference 3-D Model of Planetary Boundary-Layer Flow over Complex Terrain and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, W.; Taylor, P. A.

    2010-09-01

    Based on the early linear and Non-Linear Mixed Spectral Finite-Difference (MSFD and NLMSFD) models, a 3-D non-linear model of planetary boundary-layer flow (NLMSFD-PBL) was developed to study neutral PBL flow over complex terrain. The model assumes upwind or zero-order profiles of mean and turbulence variables about which perturbation quantities are calculated due to the effects of the terrain. In early models, the mean zero-order wind profile was assumed to be a simple logarithmic surface-layer profile and Reynolds stresses were constant throughout the depth of the model domain. This formally limits the applications of model to the surface-layer flow. The new model utilizes the results of early 1-D planetary boundary layer model of Weng and Taylor as the zero-order or upstream profiles of mean and turbulent quantities. The limitations associated with the original MSFD/NLMSFD model (e.g. logarithmic wind profile and constant shear stress layer) are relaxed. The effect of earth's rotation is also included in the model. Model results for planetary boundary-layer flow over complex terrain are discussed, particularly, the flow over Askervein hill - the site of a detailed and much referenced field study of flow over hills in the 1980s. This type of modelling of flow over complex terrain has important applications for wind energy resource assessment and wind farm design.

  16. A coarse-mesh nodal method-diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross sections (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly-coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes, and can lead to a difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the Diffusive-Mesh Finite Difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper.

  17. Comparison of Finite Differences and WKB approximation Methods for PT symmetric complex potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naceri, Leila; Chekkal, Meziane; Hammou, Amine B.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the one dimensional schrödinger eigenvalue problem on a finite domain (Strum-Liouville problem) for several PT-symmetric complex potentials, studied by Bender and Jones using the WKB approximation method. We make a comparison between the solutions of theses PT-symmetric complex potentials using both the finite difference method (FDM) and the WKB approximation method and show quantitative and qualitative agreement between the two methods.

  18. A 3D finite-difference BiCG iterative solver with the Fourier-Jacobi preconditioner for the anisotropic EIT/EEG forward problem.

    PubMed

    Turovets, Sergei; Volkov, Vasily; Zherdetsky, Aleksej; Prakonina, Alena; Malony, Allen D

    2014-01-01

    The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) and electroencephalography (EEG) forward problems in anisotropic inhomogeneous media like the human head belongs to the class of the three-dimensional boundary value problems for elliptic equations with mixed derivatives. We introduce and explore the performance of several new promising numerical techniques, which seem to be more suitable for solving these problems. The proposed numerical schemes combine the fictitious domain approach together with the finite-difference method and the optimally preconditioned Conjugate Gradient- (CG-) type iterative method for treatment of the discrete model. The numerical scheme includes the standard operations of summation and multiplication of sparse matrices and vector, as well as FFT, making it easy to implement and eligible for the effective parallel implementation. Some typical use cases for the EIT/EEG problems are considered demonstrating high efficiency of the proposed numerical technique.

  19. Thermal Analysis of AC Contactor Using Thermal Network Finite Difference Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chunping; Chen, Degui; Li, Xingwen; Geng, Yingsan

    To predict the thermal behavior of switchgear quickly, the Thermal Network Finite Difference Analysis method (TNFDA) is adopted in thermal analysis of AC contactor in the paper. The thermal network model is built with nodes, thermal resistors and heat generators, and it is solved using finite difference method (FDM). The main circuit and the control system are connected by thermal resistors network, which solves the problem of multi-sources interaction in the application of TNFDA. The temperature of conducting wires is calculated according to the heat transfer process and the fundamental equations of thermal conduction. It provides a method to solve the problem of boundary conditions in applying the TNFDA. The comparison between the results of TNFDA and measurements shows the feasibility and practicability of the method.

  20. Finite difference methods for transient signal propagation in stratified dispersive media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Explicit difference equations are presented for the solution of a signal of arbitrary waveform propagating in an ohmic dielectric, a cold plasma, a Debye model dielectric, and a Lorentz model dielectric. These difference equations are derived from the governing time-dependent integro-differential equations for the electric fields by a finite difference method. A special difference equation is derived for the grid point at the boundary of two different media. Employing this difference equation, transient signal propagation in an inhomogeneous media can be solved provided that the medium is approximated in a step-wise fashion. The solutions are generated simply by marching on in time. It is concluded that while the classical transform methods will remain useful in certain cases, with the development of the finite difference methods described, an extensive class of problems of transient signal propagating in stratified dispersive media can be effectively solved by numerical methods.

  1. Propagation Characteristics of Rectangular Waveguides at Terahertz Frequencies with Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Binke; Zhao, Chongfeng

    2014-01-01

    The 2-D finite-difference frequency-domain method (FDFD) combined with the surface impedance boundary condition (SIBC) was employed to analyze the propagation characteristics of hollow rectangular waveguides at Terahertz (THz) frequencies. The electromagnetic field components, in the interior of the waveguide, were discretized using central finite-difference schemes. Considering the hollow rectangular waveguide surrounded by a medium of finite conductivity, the electric and magnetic tangential field components on the metal surface were related by the SIBC. The surface impedance was calculated by the Drude dispersion model at THz frequencies, which was used to characterize the conductivity of the metal. By solving the Eigen equations, the propagation constants, including the attenuation constant and the phase constant, were obtained for a given frequency. The proposed method shows good applicability for full-wave analysis of THz waveguides with complex boundaries.

  2. Transient analysis of printed lines using finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Shahid

    2012-03-29

    Comprehensive studies of ultra-wideband pulses and electromagnetic coupling on printed coupled lines have been performed using full-wave 3D finite-difference time-domain analysis. Effects of unequal phase velocities of coupled modes, coupling between line traces, and the frequency dispersion on the waveform fidelity and crosstalk have been investigated in detail. To discriminate the contributions of different mechanisms into pulse evolution, single and coupled microstrip lines without (ϵr = 1) and with (ϵr > 1) dielectric substrates have been examined. To consistently compare the performance of the coupled lines with substrates of different permittivities and transients of different characteristic times, a generic metric similar to the electrical wavelength has been introduced. The features of pulse propagation on coupled lines with layered and pedestal substrates and on the irregular traces have been explored. Finally, physical interpretations of the simulation results are discussed in the paper.

  3. Dynamic Buckling of Elastic Bar under Axial Impact Based on Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Yang, Qiang; Han, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Guo-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Considering first order shear deformation theory, the dynamic buckling governing equations of elastic bar with initial imperfections, transverse inertia and axial inertia are derived by Hamilton principle. The equations are converted into the form of non-dimension. Based on the finite difference method, the equations are solved approximately. The buckling mode of elastic bar under different axial impact velocities has been obtained. The influence of different axial impact velocity on the dynamic buckling of elastic bar is discussed.

  4. Finite Difference Methods for Time-Dependent, Linear Differential Algebraic Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-27

    Time-Dependent, Linear Differential Algebraic Equations ’ BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT 2 T r e n - sa le; its tot puba"- c. 2 ed...1993 Finite Difference Methods for Time-Dependent, I Linear Differential Algebraic Equations ’ BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT2...LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL ALGEBRAIC EQUATIONS 1 BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT 2 ABSTRACT. Recently the authors developed a global reduction

  5. The modified equation approach to the stability and accuracy analysis of finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, R. F.; Hyett, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The stability and accuracy of finite-difference approximations to simple linear partial differential equations are analyzed by studying the modified partial differential equation. Aside from round-off error, the modified equation represents the actual partial differential equation solved when a numerical solution is computed using a finite-difference equation. The modified equation is derived by first expanding each term of a difference scheme in a Taylor series and then eliminating time derivatives higher than first order by certain algebraic manipulations. The connection between 'heuristic' stability theory based on the modified equation approach and the von Neumann (Fourier) method is established. In addition to the determination of necessary and sufficient conditions for computational stability, a truncated version of the modified equation can be used to gain insight into the nature of both dissipative and dispersive errors.

  6. Electromagnetic field distribution calculation in solenoidal inductively coupled plasma using finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W. P.; Liu, Y.; Long, Q.; Chen, D. H.; Chen, Y. M.

    2008-10-15

    The electromagnetic field (both E and B fields) is calculated for a solenoidal inductively coupled plasma (ICP) discharge. The model is based on two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, and the finite difference method is used for solving Maxwell equations in both the radial and axial directions. Through one-turn coil measurements, assuming that the electrical conductivity has a constant value in each cross section of the discharge tube, the calculated E and B fields rise sharply near the tube wall. The nonuniform radial distributions imply that the skin effect plays a significant role in the energy balance of the stable ICP. Damped distributions in the axial direction show that the magnetic flux gradually dissipates into the surrounding space. A finite difference calculation allows prediction of the electrical conductivity and plasma permeability, and the induction coil voltage and plasma current can be calculated, which are verified for correctness.

  7. Modeling unsteady state leachate flow in a landfill using finite difference and boundary element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.

    1992-01-01

    The physical processes involving leachate flow in a solid waste landfill are described by the unsaturated flow through the refuse to the saturated leachate mound at the bottom of a landfill. The moisture-flow in the unsaturated zone helps build up the saturated leachate mound at the bottom of a landfill. The moisture content in the unsaturated zone is obtained by solving the two-dimensional unsaturated moisture-flow equation using numerical techniques. A two-dimensional unsteady sate Flow Investigation for Landfill Leachate (FILL) model, based on the implicit finite-difference technique, has been developed to describe the leachate flow process in a landfill. To obtain accuracy and efficiency in numerical molding, it is important to investigate the numerical solution techniques suitable to solve the governing equations. Accuracy and efficiency of the boundary integral method over the finite-difference methods has been investigated. Two approaches, direct Green's function and perturbation Green's function formulations have been developed to solve the unsaturated flow problem. Direct Green's function and perturbation Green's function boundary integral solutions are found to be more accurate than both the Gauss-Seidel iteration and Gauss-Jordon elimination method of finite-difference solution. The efficiency of the boundary integral formulation for the computation of the moisture-flux is an advantage that is useful to estimate leachate of the moisture-flux is an advantage that is useful to estimate leachate accretion in a landfill. A close agreement of the internal fluxes with the exact solution shows the ability of the boundary integral methods to compute accurate recharge from the unsaturated zone to the saturated leachate mound.

  8. A study of unstable rock failures using finite difference and discrete element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Ryan J.

    Case histories in mining have long described pillars or faces of rock failing violently with an accompanying rapid ejection of debris and broken material into the working areas of the mine. These unstable failures have resulted in large losses of life and collapses of entire mine panels. Modern mining operations take significant steps to reduce the likelihood of unstable failure, however eliminating their occurrence is difficult in practice. Researchers over several decades have supplemented studies of unstable failures through the application of various numerical methods. The direction of the current research is to extend these methods and to develop improved numerical tools with which to study unstable failures in underground mining layouts. An extensive study is first conducted on the expression of unstable failure in discrete element and finite difference methods. Simulated uniaxial compressive strength tests are run on brittle rock specimens. Stable or unstable loading conditions are applied onto the brittle specimens by a pair of elastic platens with ranging stiffnesses. Determinations of instability are established through stress and strain histories taken for the specimen and the system. Additional numerical tools are then developed for the finite difference method to analyze unstable failure in larger mine models. Instability identifiers are established for assessing the locations and relative magnitudes of unstable failure through measures of rapid dynamic motion. An energy balance is developed which calculates the excess energy released as a result of unstable equilibria in rock systems. These tools are validated through uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength tests and are extended to models of coal pillars and a simplified mining layout. The results of the finite difference simulations reveal that the instability identifiers and excess energy calculations provide a generalized methodology for assessing unstable failures within potentially complex

  9. Serpentine: Finite Difference Methods for Wave Propagation in Second Order Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2012-03-26

    second order system is significantly smaller. Another issue with re-writing a second order system into first order form is that compatibility conditions often must be imposed on the first order form. These (Saint-Venant) conditions ensure that the solution of the first order system also satisfies the original second order system. However, such conditions can be difficult to enforce on the discretized equations, without introducing additional modeling errors. This project has previously developed robust and memory efficient algorithms for wave propagation including effects of curved boundaries, heterogeneous isotropic, and viscoelastic materials. Partially supported by internal funding from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, many of these methods have been implemented in the open source software WPP, which is geared towards 3-D seismic wave propagation applications. This code has shown excellent scaling on up to 32,768 processors and has enabled seismic wave calculations with up to 26 Billion grid points. TheWPP calculations have resulted in several publications in the field of computational seismology, e.g.. All of our current methods are second order accurate in both space and time. The benefits of higher order accurate schemes for wave propagation have been known for a long time, but have mostly been developed for first order hyperbolic systems. For second order hyperbolic systems, it has not been known how to make finite difference schemes stable with free surface boundary conditions, heterogeneous material properties, and curvilinear coordinates. The importance of higher order accurate methods is not necessarily to make the numerical solution more accurate, but to reduce the computational cost for obtaining a solution within an acceptable error tolerance. This is because the accuracy in the solution can always be improved by reducing the grid size h. However, in practice, the available computational resources might not be large enough to solve the problem with a

  10. High order finite difference methods with subcell resolution for advection equations with stiff source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Shu, Chi-Wang; Yee, H.C.; Sjögreen, Björn

    2012-01-01

    A new high order finite-difference method utilizing the idea of Harten ENO subcell resolution method is proposed for chemical reactive flows and combustion. In reaction problems, when the reaction time scale is very small, e.g., orders of magnitude smaller than the fluid dynamics time scales, the governing equations will become very stiff. Wrong propagation speed of discontinuity may occur due to the underresolved numerical solution in both space and time. The present proposed method is a modified fractional step method which solves the convection step and reaction step separately. In the convection step, any high order shock-capturing method can be used. In the reaction step, an ODE solver is applied but with the computed flow variables in the shock region modified by the Harten subcell resolution idea. For numerical experiments, a fifth-order finite-difference WENO scheme and its anti-diffusion WENO variant are considered. A wide range of 1D and 2D scalar and Euler system test cases are investigated. Studies indicate that for the considered test cases, the new method maintains high order accuracy in space for smooth flows, and for stiff source terms with discontinuities, it can capture the correct propagation speed of discontinuities in very coarse meshes with reasonable CFL numbers.

  11. Finite difference methods for option pricing under Lévy processes: Wiener-Hopf factorization approach.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the problem of pricing options in wide classes of Lévy processes. We propose a general approach to the numerical methods based on a finite difference approximation for the generalized Black-Scholes equation. The goal of the paper is to incorporate the Wiener-Hopf factorization into finite difference methods for pricing options in Lévy models with jumps. The method is applicable for pricing barrier and American options. The pricing problem is reduced to the sequence of linear algebraic systems with a dense Toeplitz matrix; then the Wiener-Hopf factorization method is applied. We give an important probabilistic interpretation based on the infinitely divisible distributions theory to the Laurent operators in the correspondent factorization identity. Notice that our algorithm has the same complexity as the ones which use the explicit-implicit scheme, with a tridiagonal matrix. However, our method is more accurate. We support the advantage of the new method in terms of accuracy and convergence by using numerical experiments.

  12. Finite Difference Methods for Option Pricing under Lévy Processes: Wiener-Hopf Factorization Approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the problem of pricing options in wide classes of Lévy processes. We propose a general approach to the numerical methods based on a finite difference approximation for the generalized Black-Scholes equation. The goal of the paper is to incorporate the Wiener-Hopf factorization into finite difference methods for pricing options in Lévy models with jumps. The method is applicable for pricing barrier and American options. The pricing problem is reduced to the sequence of linear algebraic systems with a dense Toeplitz matrix; then the Wiener-Hopf factorization method is applied. We give an important probabilistic interpretation based on the infinitely divisible distributions theory to the Laurent operators in the correspondent factorization identity. Notice that our algorithm has the same complexity as the ones which use the explicit-implicit scheme, with a tridiagonal matrix. However, our method is more accurate. We support the advantage of the new method in terms of accuracy and convergence by using numerical experiments. PMID:24489518

  13. Subwavelength metrological chracterization by Mueller matrix polarimeter and finite difference time domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Achyut; Dev, Kapil; Asundi, Anand

    2016-11-01

    Wire grid polarizers (WGP), are sub-wavelength gratings with applications in display projection system due to their compact size, wide field of view and long-term stability. Measurement and testing of these structures are important to optimize their use. This is done by first measuring the Mueller matrix of the WGP using a Mueller matrix polarimeter. Next the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to simulate a similar Mueller matrix thus providing the period and step height of the WGP. This approach may lead to more generic determination of sub-wavelength structures including diffractive optical structures.

  14. A 3-dimensional finite-difference method for calculating the dynamic coefficients of seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzen, F. J.; Nordmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method to calculate the dynamic coefficients of seals with arbitrary geometry is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations are used in conjunction with the k-e turbulence model to describe the turbulent flow. These equations are solved by a full 3-dimensional finite-difference procedure instead of the normally used perturbation analysis. The time dependence of the equations is introduced by working with a coordinate system rotating with the precession frequency of the shaft. The results of this theory are compared with coefficients calculated by a perturbation analysis and with experimental results.

  15. Slat Noise Predictions Using Higher-Order Finite-Difference Methods on Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustic simulations using the structured overset grid approach and higher-order finite difference methods within the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) solver framework are presented for slat noise predictions. The simulations are part of a collaborative study comparing noise generation mechanisms between a conventional slat and a Krueger leading edge flap. Simulation results are compared with experimental data acquired during an aeroacoustic test in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility. Details of the structured overset grid, numerical discretization, and turbulence model are provided.

  16. Modelling migration in multilayer systems by a finite difference method: the spherical symmetry case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojbotǎ, C. I.; Toşa, V.; Mercea, P. V.

    2013-08-01

    We present a numerical model based on finite differences to solve the problem of chemical impurity migration within a multilayer spherical system. Migration here means diffusion of chemical species in conditions of concentration partitioning at layer interfaces due to different solubilities of the migrant in different layers. We detail here the numerical model and discuss the results of its implementation. To validate the method we compare it with cases where an analytic solution exists. We also present an application of our model to a practical problem in which we compute the migration of caprolactam from the packaging multilayer foil into the food.

  17. Arbitrary Order Mixed Mimetic Finite Differences Method with Nodal Degrees of Freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Iaroshenko, Oleksandr; Gyrya, Vitaliy; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2016-09-01

    In this work we consider a modification to an arbitrary order mixed mimetic finite difference method (MFD) for a diffusion equation on general polygonal meshes [1]. The modification is based on moving some degrees of freedom (DoF) for a flux variable from edges to vertices. We showed that for a non-degenerate element this transformation is locally equivalent, i.e. there is a one-to-one map between the new and the old DoF. Globally, on the other hand, this transformation leads to a reduction of the total number of degrees of freedom (by up to 40%) and additional continuity of the discrete flux.

  18. Methods for comparing 3D surface attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Alex; Freeman, Adam

    1996-03-01

    A common task in data analysis is to compare two or more sets of data, statistics, presentations, etc. A predominant method in use is side-by-side visual comparison of images. While straightforward, it burdens the user with the task of discerning the differences between the two images. The user if further taxed when the images are of 3D scenes. This paper presents several methods for analyzing the extent, magnitude, and manner in which surfaces in 3D differ in their attributes. The surface geometry are assumed to be identical and only the surface attributes (color, texture, etc.) are variable. As a case in point, we examine the differences obtained when a 3D scene is rendered progressively using radiosity with different form factor calculation methods. The comparison methods include extensions of simple methods such as mapping difference information to color or transparency, and more recent methods including the use of surface texture, perturbation, and adaptive placements of error glyphs.

  19. Experiments with explicit filtering for LES using a finite-difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, T. S.; Kaltenbach, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The equations for large-eddy simulation (LES) are derived formally by applying a spatial filter to the Navier-Stokes equations. The filter width as well as the details of the filter shape are free parameters in LES, and these can be used both to control the effective resolution of the simulation and to establish the relative importance of different portions of the resolved spectrum. An analogous, but less well justified, approach to filtering is more or less universally used in conjunction with LES using finite-difference methods. In this approach, the finite support provided by the computational mesh as well as the wavenumber-dependent truncation errors associated with the finite-difference operators are assumed to define the filter operation. This approach has the advantage that it is also 'automatic' in the sense that no explicit filtering: operations need to be performed. While it is certainly convenient to avoid the explicit filtering operation, there are some practical considerations associated with finite-difference methods that favor the use of an explicit filter. Foremost among these considerations is the issue of truncation error. All finite-difference approximations have an associated truncation error that increases with increasing wavenumber. These errors can be quite severe for the smallest resolved scales, and these errors will interfere with the dynamics of the small eddies if no corrective action is taken. Years of experience at CTR with a second-order finite-difference scheme for high Reynolds number LES has repeatedly indicated that truncation errors must be minimized in order to obtain acceptable simulation results. While the potential advantages of explicit filtering are rather clear, there is a significant cost associated with its implementation. In particular, explicit filtering reduces the effective resolution of the simulation compared with that afforded by the mesh. The resolution requirements for LES are usually set by the need to capture

  20. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor–corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  1. Determination of cutoff frequencies of simple waveguides using finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolagani, Sridhar

    Waveguides are used to transfer electromagnetic energy from one location to another. Within many electronic circles, waveguides are commonly used for microwave RF signals; the same principle can be used for many forms of waves from sound to light. They have been used in many technologies like acoustic waveguide speaker technology, high-performance passive waveguide technologies for remote sensing and communication, optical computing, robotic-vision, biochemical sensing and many more. Modern waveguide technology employs a variety of waveguides with different cross sections and perturbations, the cutoff frequencies and mode shapes of many of these waveguides are ill-suited for determination by an analytical method. In this thesis, we solve this type of waveguides by employing the numerical procedure of finite difference method. By adopting finite difference approach with an application of eigenvalue method, we discuss about few different types of these waveguides in determining the cutoff frequencies of supported modes, and extracting the possible degenerate modes and their field distributions. To validate the method and its accuracy, it is applied to the two well known rectangular waveguides, viz. PEC Rectangular Waveguide and Artificial Rectangular Waveguide (consists of PEC and PMC walls) and compared with the analytical solutions.

  2. Fast finite difference methods for space-fractional diffusion equations with fractional derivative boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Numerical methods for space-fractional diffusion equations often generate dense or even full stiffness matrices. Traditionally, these methods were solved via Gaussian type direct solvers, which requires O (N3) of computational work per time step and O (N2) of memory to store where N is the number of spatial grid points in the discretization. In this paper we develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace iterative method for the efficient and faithful solution of finite difference methods (both steady-state and time-dependent) space-fractional diffusion equations with fractional derivative boundary conditions in one space dimension. The method requires O (N) of memory and O (Nlog ⁡ N) of operations per iteration. Due to the application of effective preconditioners, significantly reduced numbers of iterations were achieved that further reduces the computational cost of the fast method. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  3. Comprehensive Numerical Analysis of Finite Difference Time Domain Methods for Improving Optical Waveguide Sensor Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Samak, M. Mosleh E. Abu; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Kashif, Muhammad; Zan, Mohd Saiful Dzulkifly

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses numerical analysis methods for different geometrical features that have limited interval values for typically used sensor wavelengths. Compared with existing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods, the alternating direction implicit (ADI)-FDTD method reduces the number of sub-steps by a factor of two to three, which represents a 33% time savings in each single run. The local one-dimensional (LOD)-FDTD method has similar numerical equation properties, which should be calculated as in the previous method. Generally, a small number of arithmetic processes, which result in a shorter simulation time, are desired. The alternating direction implicit technique can be considered a significant step forward for improving the efficiency of unconditionally stable FDTD schemes. This comparative study shows that the local one-dimensional method had minimum relative error ranges of less than 40% for analytical frequencies above 42.85 GHz, and the same accuracy was generated by both methods.

  4. The arbitrary order mixed mimetic finite difference method for the diffusion equation

    DOE PAGES

    Gyrya, Vitaliy; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2016-05-01

    Here, we propose an arbitrary-order accurate mimetic finite difference (MFD) method for the approximation of diffusion problems in mixed form on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes. As usual in the mimetic numerical technology, the method satisfies local consistency and stability conditions, which determines the accuracy and the well-posedness of the resulting approximation. The method also requires the definition of a high-order discrete divergence operator that is the discrete analog of the divergence operator and is acting on the degrees of freedom. The new family of mimetic methods is proved theoretically to be convergent and optimal error estimates for flux andmore » scalar variable are derived from the convergence analysis. A numerical experiment confirms the high-order accuracy of the method in solving diffusion problems with variable diffusion tensor. It is worth mentioning that the approximation of the scalar variable presents a superconvergence effect.« less

  5. The arbitrary order mixed mimetic finite difference method for the diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Gyrya, Vitaliy; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2016-05-01

    Here, we propose an arbitrary-order accurate mimetic finite difference (MFD) method for the approximation of diffusion problems in mixed form on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes. As usual in the mimetic numerical technology, the method satisfies local consistency and stability conditions, which determines the accuracy and the well-posedness of the resulting approximation. The method also requires the definition of a high-order discrete divergence operator that is the discrete analog of the divergence operator and is acting on the degrees of freedom. The new family of mimetic methods is proved theoretically to be convergent and optimal error estimates for flux and scalar variable are derived from the convergence analysis. A numerical experiment confirms the high-order accuracy of the method in solving diffusion problems with variable diffusion tensor. It is worth mentioning that the approximation of the scalar variable presents a superconvergence effect.

  6. A mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem with elected edge bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, K; Berirao, L

    2009-01-01

    A new mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem is proposed and analyzed. The unstable P{sub 1}-P{sub 0} discretization is stabilized by adding a small number of bubble functions to selected mesh edges. A simple strategy for selecting such edges is proposed and verified with numerical experiments. The discretizations schemes for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations must satisfy the celebrated inf-sup (or the LBB) stability condition. The stability condition implies a balance between discrete spaces for velocity and pressure. In finite elements, this balance is frequently achieved by adding bubble functions to the velocity space. The goal of this article is to show that the stabilizing edge bubble functions can be added only to a small set of mesh edges. This results in a smaller algebraic system and potentially in a faster calculations. We employ the mimetic finite difference (MFD) discretization technique that works for general polyhedral meshes and can accomodate non-uniform distribution of stabilizing bubbles.

  7. Virtual Investigation of Free Convection from Concentric Annulus Cylinder by the Finite Difference Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmir, O. Shahrul; Azwadi, C. S. Nor

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents numerical study of flow behavior from a heated concentric annulus cylinder at various Rayleigh number Ra, Prandtl number Pr while the aspect ratio is fixed to 5.0 of the outer and inner cylinders. The Finite Different Lattice Boltzmann Method (FDLBM) numerical scheme is proposed to improve the computational efficiency and numerical stability of the conventional method. The proposed FELBM applied UTOPIA approach (third order accuracy in space) to study the temperature distribution and the vortex formation in the annulus cylinder. The comparison of the flow pattern and temperature distribution for every case via streamline, vortices and temperature distribution contour with published paper in literature were carried out for the validation purposes. Current investigation concluded that the UTOPIA FDLBM is an efficient approach for the current problem in hand and good agreement with the benchmark solution.

  8. Finite difference time domain method for simulation of damage initiation in thin film coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalakys, Linas; Momgaudis, Balys; Grigutis, Robertas; Melninkaitis, Andrius

    2016-12-01

    Time resolved digital holography (TRDH) is a versatile tool that provides valuable insights into the dynamics of femtosecond damage initiation by providing spatiotemporal information of excited material. However, interpreting of TRDH data in thin film dielectric coatings is rather complicated without appropriate theoretical models that are able to correctly describe underlying nature of damage formation. Therefore, a model based on finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with complete Keldysh theory for nonlinear ionization of atoms and multiple rate equation (MRE) method for conduction band electrons was developed. The model was used to reproduce both temporal and spatial characteristics of TRDH experiment performed on Ta2O5 dielectric coating. Fitted material parameters were then applied to indirectly estimate LIDT of the coating.

  9. Finite difference method accelerated with sparse solvers for structural analysis of the metal-organic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, A. A.; Guda, S. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Bugaev, A. L.; Lamberti, C.; Gawelda, W.; Bressler, C.; Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Joly, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) implemented in the FDMNES software [Phys. Rev. B, 2001, 63, 125120] was revised. Thorough analysis shows, that the calculated diagonal in the FDM matrix consists of about 96% zero elements. Thus a sparse solver would be more suitable for the problem instead of traditional Gaussian elimination for the diagonal neighbourhood. We have tried several iterative sparse solvers and the direct one MUMPS solver with METIS ordering turned out to be the best. Compared to the Gaussian solver present method is up to 40 times faster and allows XANES simulations for complex systems already on personal computers. We show applicability of the software for metal-organic [Fe(bpy)3]2+ complex both for low spin and high spin states populated after laser excitation.

  10. Solution of nonlinear finite difference ocean models by optimization methods with sensitivity and observational strategy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeter, Jens; Wunsch, Carl

    1986-01-01

    The paper studies with finite difference nonlinear circulation models the uncertainties in interesting flow properties, such as western boundary current transport, potential and kinetic energy, owing to the uncertainty in the driving surface boundary condition. The procedure is based upon nonlinear optimization methods. The same calculations permit quantitative study of the importance of new information as a function of type, region of measurement and accuracy, providing a method to study various observing strategies. Uncertainty in a model parameter, the bottom friction coefficient, is studied in conjunction with uncertain measurements. The model is free to adjust the bottom friction coefficient such that an objective function is minimized while fitting a set of data to within prescribed bounds. The relative importance of the accuracy of the knowledge about the friction coefficient with respect to various kinds of observations is then quantified, and the possible range of the friction coefficients is calculated.

  11. An iterative finite difference method for solving the quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K

    2010-01-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion associated with the de Broglie-Bohm description of quantum mechanics describe a time evolving probability density whose 'fluid' elements evolve as a correlated ensemble of particle trajectories. These equations are intuitively appealing due to their similarities with classical fluid dynamics and the appearance of a generalized Newton's equation of motion in which the total force contains both a classical and quantum contribution. However, the direct numerical solution of the quantum hydrodynamic equations (QHE) is fraught with challenges: the probability 'fluid' is highly-compressible, it has zero viscosity, the quantum potential ('pressure') is non-linear, and if that weren't enough the quantum potential can also become singular during the course of the calculations. Collectively these properties are responsible for the notorious numerical instabilities associated with a direct numerical solution of the QHE. The most successful and stable numerical approach that has been used to date is based on the Moving Least Squares (MLS) algorithm. The improved stability of this approach is due to the repeated local least squares fitting which effectively filters or reduces the numerical noise which tends to accumulate with time. However, this method is also subject to instabilities if it is pushed too hard. In addition, the stability of the MLS approach often comes at the expense of reduced resolution or fidelity of the calculation (i.e., the MLS filtering eliminates the higher-frequency components of the solution which may be of interest). Recently, a promising new solution method has been developed which is based on an iterative solution of the QHE using finite differences. This method (referred to as the Iterative Finite Difference Method or IFDM) is straightforward to implement, computationally efficient, stable, and its accuracy and convergence properties are well understood. A brief overview of the IFDM will be presented

  12. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  13. Effect of increase in intraperitoneal pressure on fluid distribution in tissue using finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Selmi; Arif, Idam; Khotimah, Siti Nurul

    2015-04-01

    In this study, peritoneal dialysis transport system was numerically simulated using finite difference method. The increase in the intraperitoneal pressure due to coughing has a high value outside the working area of the void volume fraction of the hydrostatic pressure θ(P). Therefore to illustrate the effects of the pressure increment, the pressure of working area is chosen between 1 and 3 mmHg. The effects of increased pressure in peritoneal tissue cause more fluid to flow into the blood vessels and lymph. Furthermore, the increased pressure in peritoneal tissue makes the volumetric flux jv and solute flux js across the tissue also increase. The more fluid flow into the blood vessels and lymph causes the fluid to flow into tissue qv and the glucose flow qs to have more negative value and also decreases the glucose concentration CG in the tissue.

  14. Finite-difference and finite-volume methods for nonlinear standing ultrasonic waves in fluid media.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, C; Conde, C; Campos-Pozuelo, C

    2004-04-01

    In the framework of the application of high-power ultrasonics in industrial processing in fluid media, the mathematical prediction of the acoustical parameters inside resonators should improve the development of practical systems. This can be achieved by the use of numerical tools able to treat the nonlinear acoustics involved in these phenomena. In particular, effects like nonlinear distortion and nonlinear attenuation are fundamental in applications. In this paper, three one-dimensional numerical models in the time domain for calculating the nonlinear acoustic field inside a one-dimensional resonant cavity are presented and compared. They are based on the finite-difference and the finite-volume methods. These different algorithms solve the differential equations, from the linear up to the strongly nonlinear case (including weak shock). Some physical results obtained from the modelling of ultrasonic waves and a comparison of the efficiency of the different algorithms are presented.

  15. The mimetic finite difference method for the Landau–Lifshitz equation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eugenia Hail; Lipnikov, Konstantin Nikolayevich

    2017-01-01

    The Landau–Lifshitz equation describes the dynamics of the magnetization inside ferromagnetic materials. This equation is highly nonlinear and has a non-convex constraint (the magnitude of the magnetization is constant) which poses interesting challenges in developing numerical methods. We develop and analyze explicit and implicit mimetic finite difference schemes for this equation. These schemes work on general polytopal meshes which provide enormous flexibility to model magnetic devices with various shapes. A projection on the unit sphere is used to preserve the magnitude of the magnetization. We also provide a proof that shows the exchange energy is decreasing in certain conditions. The developed schemes are tested on general meshes that include distorted and randomized meshes. As a result, the numerical experiments include a test proposed by the National Institute of Standard and Technology and a test showing formation of domain wall structures in a thin film.

  16. The mimetic finite difference method for the Landau–Lifshitz equation

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Eugenia Hail; Lipnikov, Konstantin Nikolayevich

    2017-01-01

    The Landau–Lifshitz equation describes the dynamics of the magnetization inside ferromagnetic materials. This equation is highly nonlinear and has a non-convex constraint (the magnitude of the magnetization is constant) which poses interesting challenges in developing numerical methods. We develop and analyze explicit and implicit mimetic finite difference schemes for this equation. These schemes work on general polytopal meshes which provide enormous flexibility to model magnetic devices with various shapes. A projection on the unit sphere is used to preserve the magnitude of the magnetization. We also provide a proof that shows the exchange energy is decreasing in certain conditions. Themore » developed schemes are tested on general meshes that include distorted and randomized meshes. As a result, the numerical experiments include a test proposed by the National Institute of Standard and Technology and a test showing formation of domain wall structures in a thin film.« less

  17. Development of the Finite Difference Time Domain Method on a Lebedev Grid for Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauta, Marcel D.

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is derived on a Lebedev grid, instead of the standard Yee grid, to better represent the constitutive relations in anisotropic materials. The Lebedev grid extends the Yee grid by approximating Maxwell's equations with tensor constitutive relations using only central differences. A dispersion relation with stability criteria is derived and it is proven that the Lebedev grid has a consistent calculus. An integral derivation of the update equations illustrates how to appropriately excite the grid. This approach is also used to derive the update equations at planar material interfaces and domain edge PEC. Lebedev grid results are compared with analytical and Yee grid solutions using an equal memory comparison. Numerical results show that the Lebedev grid suffers greater dispersion error but better represents material interfaces. Focus is given to generalizing the concepts that make the Yee grid robust for isotropic materials. Keywords: FDTD, anisotropic materials, Lebedev grid, collocated grids.

  18. Free transverse vibration of a wrinkled annular thin film by using finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. G.; Liu, Y. P.; Lan, L.; Tan, H. F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the free transverse vibration of a wrinkled annular thin film. The non-dimensional Hamilton motion equation of the wrinkled annular thin film is established, which is solved by using the finite difference method to acquire the vibration frequency and mode. The predicted vibration characteristics are verified by the experimental measurements based on the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The results show that wrinkles have great effects on the vibration of the annular thin film. Especially for the heavily wrinkled cases, the local-global interactive mode dominates the vibration of the annular thin film. The frequency increases as the wrinkling level increases which is mainly due to the increased nonlinear geometric stiffness. The results provide favorable supports for understanding the role of nonlinear wrinkling on the vibration of thin films.

  19. Non-Reflecting Regions for Finite Difference Methods in Modeling of Elastic Wave Propagation in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishoni, Doron; Taasan, Shlomo

    1994-01-01

    Solution of the wave equation using techniques such as finite difference or finite element methods can model elastic wave propagation in solids. This requires mapping the physical geometry into a computational domain whose size is governed by the size of the physical domain of interest and by the required resolution. This computational domain, in turn, dictates the computer memory requirements as well as the calculation time. Quite often, the physical region of interest is only a part of the whole physical body, and does not necessarily include all the physical boundaries. Reduction of the calculation domain requires positioning an artificial boundary or region where a physical boundary does not exist. It is important however that such a boundary, or region, will not affect the internal domain, i.e., it should not cause reflections that propagate back into the material. This paper concentrates on the issue of constructing such a boundary region.

  20. The mimetic finite difference method for the Landau-Lifshitz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugenia; Lipnikov, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz equation describes the dynamics of the magnetization inside ferromagnetic materials. This equation is highly nonlinear and has a non-convex constraint (the magnitude of the magnetization is constant) which poses interesting challenges in developing numerical methods. We develop and analyze explicit and implicit mimetic finite difference schemes for this equation. These schemes work on general polytopal meshes which provide enormous flexibility to model magnetic devices with various shapes. A projection on the unit sphere is used to preserve the magnitude of the magnetization. We also provide a proof that shows the exchange energy is decreasing in certain conditions. The developed schemes are tested on general meshes that include distorted and randomized meshes. The numerical experiments include a test proposed by the National Institute of Standard and Technology and a test showing formation of domain wall structures in a thin film.

  1. A comparison of finite difference methods for solving Laplace's equation on curvilinear coordinate systems. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Various finite difference techniques used to solve Laplace's equation are compared. Curvilinear coordinate systems are used on two dimensional regions with irregular boundaries, specifically, regions around circles and airfoils. Truncation errors are analyzed for three different finite difference methods. The false boundary method and two point and three point extrapolation schemes, used when having the Neumann boundary condition are considered and the effects of spacing and nonorthogonality in the coordinate systems are studied.

  2. Mimetic finite difference method for the stokes problem on polygonal meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, K; Beirao Da Veiga, L; Gyrya, V; Manzini, G

    2009-01-01

    Various approaches to extend the finite element methods to non-traditional elements (pyramids, polyhedra, etc.) have been developed over the last decade. Building of basis functions for such elements is a challenging task and may require extensive geometry analysis. The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method has many similarities with low-order finite element methods. Both methods try to preserve fundamental properties of physical and mathematical models. The essential difference is that the MFD method uses only the surface representation of discrete unknowns to build stiffness and mass matrices. Since no extension inside the mesh element is required, practical implementation of the MFD method is simple for polygonal meshes that may include degenerate and non-convex elements. In this article, we develop a MFD method for the Stokes problem on arbitrary polygonal meshes. The method is constructed for tensor coefficients, which will allow to apply it to the linear elasticity problem. The numerical experiments show the second-order convergence for the velocity variable and the first-order for the pressure.

  3. Mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem on polygonal meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirão da Veiga, L.; Gyrya, V.; Lipnikov, K.; Manzini, G.

    2009-10-01

    Various approaches to extend finite element methods to non-traditional elements (general polygons, pyramids, polyhedra, etc.) have been developed over the last decade. The construction of basis functions for such elements is a challenging task and may require extensive geometrical analysis. The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method works on general polygonal meshes and has many similarities with low-order finite element methods. Both schemes try to preserve the fundamental properties of the underlying physical and mathematical models. The essential difference between the two schemes is that the MFD method uses only the surface representation of discrete unknowns to build the stiffness and mass matrices. Since no extension of basis functions inside the mesh elements is required, practical implementation of the MFD method is simple for polygonal meshes that may include degenerate and non-convex elements. In this article, we present a new MFD method for the Stokes problem on arbitrary polygonal meshes and analyze its stability. The method is developed for the general case of tensor coefficients, which allows us to apply it to a linear elasticity problem, as well. Numerical experiments show, for the velocity variable, second-order convergence in a discrete L2 norm and first-order convergence in a discrete H1 norm. For the pressure variable, first-order convergence is shown in the L2 norm.

  4. Boundary and Interface Conditions for High Order Finite Difference Methods Applied to the Euler and Navier-Strokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrom, Jan; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1998-01-01

    Boundary and interface conditions for high order finite difference methods applied to the constant coefficient Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are derived. The boundary conditions lead to strict and strong stability. The interface conditions are stable and conservative even if the finite difference operators and mesh sizes vary from domain to domain. Numerical experiments show that the new conditions also lead to good results for the corresponding nonlinear problems.

  5. Persistent Monitoring of Urban Infrasound Phenomenology. Report 1: Modeling an Urban Environment for Acoustical Analyses using the 3-D Finite-Difference Time-Domain Program PSTOP3D

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    information systems (GIS) software. A smaller 6.25 square kilometer area around the Southern Methodist University was extracted from the larger...area and analyzed using an acoustic finite- difference time-domain (FDTD) code. The procedures to model the area using GIS software, extract required...create directories. .................................................. 127 Figure 8.4. Choose section cut to extract data

  6. Semi-implicit finite difference methods for three-dimensional shallow water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, Vincenzo; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1992-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite difference method for the numerical solution of three-dimensional shallow water flows is presented and discussed. The governing equations are the primitive three-dimensional turbulent mean flow equations where the pressure distribution in the vertical has been assumed to be hydrostatic. In the method of solution a minimal degree of implicitness has been adopted in such a fashion that the resulting algorithm is stable and gives a maximal computational efficiency at a minimal computational cost. At each time step the numerical method requires the solution of one large linear system which can be formally decomposed into a set of small three-diagonal systems coupled with one five-diagonal system. All these linear systems are symmetric and positive definite. Thus the existence and uniquencess of the numerical solution are assured. When only one vertical layer is specified, this method reduces as a special case to a semi-implicit scheme for solving the corresponding two-dimensional shallow water equations. The resulting two- and three-dimensional algorithm has been shown to be fast, accurate and mass-conservative and can also be applied to simulate flooding and drying of tidal mud-flats in conjunction with three-dimensional flows. Furthermore, the resulting algorithm is fully vectorizable for an efficient implementation on modern vector computers.

  7. Conservative high-order-accurate finite-difference methods for curvilinear grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man M.; Chakrvarthy, Sukumar

    1993-01-01

    Two fourth-order-accurate finite-difference methods for numerically solving hyperbolic systems of conservation equations on smooth curvilinear grids are presented. The first method uses the differential form of the conservation equations; the second method uses the integral form of the conservation equations. Modifications to these schemes, which are required near boundaries to maintain overall high-order accuracy, are discussed. An analysis that demonstrates the stability of the modified schemes is also provided. Modifications to one of the schemes to make it total variation diminishing (TVD) are also discussed. Results that demonstrate the high-order accuracy of both schemes are included in the paper. In particular, a Ringleb-flow computation demonstrates the high-order accuracy and the stability of the boundary and near-boundary procedures. A second computation of supersonic flow over a cylinder demonstrates the shock-capturing capability of the TVD methodology. An important contribution of this paper is the dear demonstration that higher order accuracy leads to increased computational efficiency.

  8. Simulation of optical devices using parallel finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kang; Kong, Fanmin; Mei, Liangmo; Liu, Xin

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a new parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical method in a low-cost network environment to stimulate optical waveguide characteristics. The PC motherboard based cluster is used, as it is relatively low-cost, reliable and has high computing performance. Four clusters are networked by fast Ethernet technology. Due to the simplicity nature of FDTD algorithm, a native Ethernet packet communication mechanism is used to reduce the overhead of the communication between the adjacent clusters. To validate the method, a microcavity ring resonator based on semiconductor waveguides is chosen as an instance of FDTD parallel computation. Speed-up rate under different division density is calculated. From the result we can conclude that when the decomposing size reaches a certain point, a good parallel computing speed up will be maintained. This simulation shows that through the overlapping of computation and communication method and controlling the decomposing size, the overhead of the communication of the shared data will be conquered. The result indicates that the implementation can achieve significant speed up for the FDTD algorithm. This will enable us to tackle the larger real electromagnetic problem by the low-cost PC clusters.

  9. Use of the finite-difference time-domain method in electromagnetic dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Although there are acceptable methods for calculating whole body electromagnetic absorption, no completely acceptable method for calculating the local specific absorption rate (SAR) at points within the body has been developed. Frequency domain methods, such as the method of moments (MoM) have achieved some success; however, the MoM requires computer storage on the order of (3N)/sup 2/, and computation time on the order of (3N)/sup 3/ where N is the number of cells. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been employed extensively in calculating the scattering from metallic objects, and recently is seeing some use in calculating the interaction of EM fields with complex, lossy dielectric bodies. Since the FDTD method has storage and time requirements proportional to N, it presents an attractive alternative to calculating SAR distribution in large bodies. This dissertation describes the FDTD method and evaluates it by comparing its results with analytic solutions in 2 and 3 dimensions. The results obtained demonstrate that the FDTD method is capable of calculating internal SAR distribution with acceptable accuracy. The construction of a data base to provide detailed, inhomogeneous man models for use with the FDTD method is described. Using this construction method, a model of 40,000 1.31 cm. cells is developed for use at 350 MHz, and another model consisting of 5000 2.62 cm. cells is developed for use at 100 MHz. To add more realism to the problem, a ground plane is added to the FDTD software. The needed changes to the software are described, along with a test which confirms its accuracy. Using the CRAY II supercomputer, SAR distributions in human models are calculated using incident frequencies of 100 MHz and 350 MHz for three different cases: (1) A homogeneous man model in free space, (2) an inhomogeneous man model in free space, and (3) an inhomogeneous man model standing on a ground plane.

  10. Stochastic finite difference lattice Boltzmann method for steady incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S. C.; So, R. M. C.; Leung, W. W. F.

    2010-08-01

    With the advent of state-of-the-art computers and their rapid availability, the time is ripe for the development of efficient uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods to reduce the complexity of numerical models used to simulate complicated systems with incomplete knowledge and data. The spectral stochastic finite element method (SSFEM) which is one of the widely used UQ methods, regards uncertainty as generating a new dimension and the solution as dependent on this dimension. A convergent expansion along the new dimension is then sought in terms of the polynomial chaos system, and the coefficients in this representation are determined through a Galerkin approach. This approach provides an accurate representation even when only a small number of terms are used in the spectral expansion; consequently, saving in computational resource can be realized compared to the Monte Carlo (MC) scheme. Recent development of a finite difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) that provides a convenient algorithm for setting the boundary condition allows the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, with and without external body forces to be simulated with ease. Also, the inherent compressibility effect in the conventional lattice Boltzmann method, which might produce significant errors in some incompressible flow simulations, is eliminated. As such, the FDLBM together with an efficient UQ method can be used to treat incompressible flows with built in uncertainty, such as blood flow in stenosed arteries. The objective of this paper is to develop a stochastic numerical solver for steady incompressible viscous flows by combining the FDLBM with a SSFEM. Validation against MC solutions of channel/Couette, driven cavity, and sudden expansion flows are carried out.

  11. Fully discrete energy stable high order finite difference methods for hyperbolic problems in deforming domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkar, Samira; Nordström, Jan

    2015-06-01

    A time-dependent coordinate transformation of a constant coefficient hyperbolic system of equations which results in a variable coefficient system of equations is considered. By applying the energy method, well-posed boundary conditions for the continuous problem are derived. Summation-by-Parts (SBP) operators for the space and time discretization, together with a weak imposition of boundary and initial conditions using Simultaneously Approximation Terms (SATs) lead to a provable fully-discrete energy-stable conservative finite difference scheme. We show how to construct a time-dependent SAT formulation that automatically imposes boundary conditions, when and where they are required. We also prove that a uniform flow field is preserved, i.e. the Numerical Geometric Conservation Law (NGCL) holds automatically by using SBP-SAT in time and space. The developed technique is illustrated by considering an application using the linearized Euler equations: the sound generated by moving boundaries. Numerical calculations corroborate the stability and accuracy of the new fully discrete approximations.

  12. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method with a block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement technique.

    PubMed

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2014-03-01

    An adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) algorithm for the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) is presented in this study. The idea behind the proposed AMR is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure. Instead, pointer attributes are used to determine the neighbors of a certain block via appropriate adjustment of its children identifications. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with an efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. To allow different mesh sizes at separate parts of the computational domain, the Eulerian formulation of the streaming process is invoked. As a result, there is no need for rescaling the distribution functions or using a temporal interpolation at the fine-coarse grid boundaries. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed FDLBM AMR are extensively assessed by investigating a variety of vorticity-dominated flow fields, including Taylor-Green vortex flow, lid-driven cavity flow, thin shear layer flow, and the flow past a square cylinder.

  13. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method with a block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2014-03-01

    An adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) algorithm for the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) is presented in this study. The idea behind the proposed AMR is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure. Instead, pointer attributes are used to determine the neighbors of a certain block via appropriate adjustment of its children identifications. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with an efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. To allow different mesh sizes at separate parts of the computational domain, the Eulerian formulation of the streaming process is invoked. As a result, there is no need for rescaling the distribution functions or using a temporal interpolation at the fine-coarse grid boundaries. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed FDLBM AMR are extensively assessed by investigating a variety of vorticity-dominated flow fields, including Taylor-Green vortex flow, lid-driven cavity flow, thin shear layer flow, and the flow past a square cylinder.

  14. A Multifunctional Interface Method for Coupling Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods: Two-Dimensional Scalar-Field Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.

    2002-01-01

    A multifunctional interface method with capabilities for variable-fidelity modeling and multiple method analysis is presented. The methodology provides an effective capability by which domains with diverse idealizations can be modeled independently to exploit the advantages of one approach over another. The multifunctional method is used to couple independently discretized subdomains, and it is used to couple the finite element and the finite difference methods. The method is based on a weighted residual variational method and is presented for two-dimensional scalar-field problems. A verification test problem and a benchmark application are presented, and the computational implications are discussed.

  15. An Adaptive Finite Difference Method for Hyperbolic Systems in OneSpace Dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bolstad, John H.

    1982-06-01

    Many problems of physical interest have solutions which are generally quite smooth in a large portion of the region of interest, but have local phenomena such as shocks, discontinuities or large gradients which require much more accurate approximations or finer grids for reasonable accuracy. Examples are atmospheric fronts, ocean currents, and geological discontinuities. In this thesis we develop and partially analyze an adaptive finite difference mesh refinement algorithm for the initial boundary value problem for hyperbolic systems in one space dimension. The method uses clusters of uniform grids which can ''move'' along with pulses or steep gradients appearing in the calculation, and which are superimposed over a uniform coarse grid. Such refinements are created, destroyed, merged, separated, recursively nested or moved based on estimates of the local truncation error. We use a four-way linked tree and sequentially allocated deques (double-ended queues) to perform these operations efficiently. The local truncation error in the interior of the region is estimated using a three-step Richardson extrapolation procedure, which can also be considered a deferred correction method. At the boundaries we employ differences to estimate the error. Our algorithm was implemented using a portable, extensible Fortran preprocessor, to which we added records and pointers. The method is applied to three model problems: the first order wave equation, the second order wave equation, and the inviscid Burgers equation. For the first two model problems our algorithm is shown to be three to five times more efficient (in computing time) than the use of a uniform coarse mesh, for the same accuracy. Furthermore, to our knowledge, our algorithm is the only one which adaptively treats time-dependent boundary conditions for hyperbolic systems.

  16. Toward the Reliability of Fault Representation Methods in Finite Difference Schemes for Simulation of Shear Rupture Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalguer, L. A.; Day, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Accuracy in finite difference (FD) solutions to spontaneous rupture problems is controlled principally by the scheme used to represent the fault discontinuity, and not by the grid geometry used to represent the continuum. We have numerically tested three fault representation methods, the Thick Fault (TF) proposed by Madariaga et al (1998), the Stress Glut (SG) described by Andrews (1999), and the Staggered-Grid Split-Node (SGSN) methods proposed by Dalguer and Day (2006), each implemented in a the fourth-order velocity-stress staggered-grid (VSSG) FD scheme. The TF and the SG methods approximate the discontinuity through inelastic increments to stress components ("inelastic-zone" schemes) at a set of stress grid points taken to lie on the fault plane. With this type of scheme, the fault surface is indistinguishable from an inelastic zone with a thickness given by a spatial step dx for the SG, and 2dx for the TF model. The SGSN method uses the traction-at-split-node (TSN) approach adapted to the VSSG FD. This method represents the fault discontinuity by explicitly incorporating discontinuity terms at velocity nodes in the grid, with interactions between the "split nodes" occurring exclusively through the tractions (frictional resistance) acting between them. These tractions in turn are controlled by the jump conditions and a friction law. Our 3D tests problem solutions show that the inelastic-zone TF and SG methods show much poorer performance than does the SGSN formulation. The SG inelastic-zone method achieved solutions that are qualitatively meaningful and quantitatively reliable to within a few percent. The TF inelastic-zone method did not achieve qualitatively agreement with the reference solutions to the 3D test problem, and proved to be sufficiently computationally inefficient that it was not feasible to explore convergence quantitatively. The SGSN method gives very accurate solutions, and is also very efficient. Reliable solution of the rupture time is

  17. Numerical simulation of particulate flows using a hybrid of finite difference and boundary integral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Kesarkar, Tejas

    2016-10-01

    A combination of finite difference (FD) and boundary integral (BI) methods is used to formulate an efficient solver for simulating unsteady Stokes flow around particles. The two-dimensional (2D) unsteady Stokes equation is being solved on a Cartesian grid using a second order FD method, while the 2D steady Stokes equation is being solved near the particle using BI method. The two methods are coupled within the viscous boundary layer, a few FD grid cells away from the particle, where solutions from both FD and BI methods are valid. We demonstrate that this hybrid method can be used to accurately solve for the flow around particles with irregular shapes, even though radius of curvature of the particle surface is not resolved by the FD grid. For dilute particle concentrations, we construct a virtual envelope around each particle and solve the BI problem for the flow field located between the envelope and the particle. The BI solver provides velocity boundary condition to the FD solver at "boundary" nodes located on the FD grid, adjacent to the particles, while the FD solver provides the velocity boundary condition to the BI solver at points located on the envelope. The coupling between FD method and BI method is implicit at every time step. This method allows us to formulate an O (N ) scheme for dilute suspensions, where N is the number of particles. For semidilute suspensions, where particles may cluster, an envelope formation method has been formulated and implemented, which enables solving the BI problem for each individual particle cluster, allowing efficient simulation of hydrodynamic interaction between particles even when they are in close proximity. The method has been validated against analytical results for flow around a periodic array of cylinders and for Jeffrey orbit of a moving ellipse in shear flow. Simulation of multiple force-free irregular shaped particles in the presence of shear in a 2D slit flow has been conducted to demonstrate the robustness of

  18. Numerical simulation of particulate flows using a hybrid of finite difference and boundary integral methods.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Kesarkar, Tejas

    2016-10-01

    A combination of finite difference (FD) and boundary integral (BI) methods is used to formulate an efficient solver for simulating unsteady Stokes flow around particles. The two-dimensional (2D) unsteady Stokes equation is being solved on a Cartesian grid using a second order FD method, while the 2D steady Stokes equation is being solved near the particle using BI method. The two methods are coupled within the viscous boundary layer, a few FD grid cells away from the particle, where solutions from both FD and BI methods are valid. We demonstrate that this hybrid method can be used to accurately solve for the flow around particles with irregular shapes, even though radius of curvature of the particle surface is not resolved by the FD grid. For dilute particle concentrations, we construct a virtual envelope around each particle and solve the BI problem for the flow field located between the envelope and the particle. The BI solver provides velocity boundary condition to the FD solver at "boundary" nodes located on the FD grid, adjacent to the particles, while the FD solver provides the velocity boundary condition to the BI solver at points located on the envelope. The coupling between FD method and BI method is implicit at every time step. This method allows us to formulate an O(N) scheme for dilute suspensions, where N is the number of particles. For semidilute suspensions, where particles may cluster, an envelope formation method has been formulated and implemented, which enables solving the BI problem for each individual particle cluster, allowing efficient simulation of hydrodynamic interaction between particles even when they are in close proximity. The method has been validated against analytical results for flow around a periodic array of cylinders and for Jeffrey orbit of a moving ellipse in shear flow. Simulation of multiple force-free irregular shaped particles in the presence of shear in a 2D slit flow has been conducted to demonstrate the robustness of

  19. Variational finite-difference methods in linear and nonlinear problems of the deformation of metallic and composite shells (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimyuk, V. A.; Storozhuk, E. A.; Chernyshenko, I. S.

    2012-11-01

    Variational finite-difference methods of solving linear and nonlinear problems for thin and nonthin shells (plates) made of homogeneous isotropic (metallic) and orthotropic (composite) materials are analyzed and their classification principles and structure are discussed. Scalar and vector variational finite-difference methods that implement the Kirchhoff-Love hypotheses analytically or algorithmically using Lagrange multipliers are outlined. The Timoshenko hypotheses are implemented in a traditional way, i.e., analytically. The stress-strain state of metallic and composite shells of complex geometry is analyzed numerically. The numerical results are presented in the form of graphs and tables and used to assess the efficiency of using the variational finite-difference methods to solve linear and nonlinear problems of the statics of shells (plates)

  20. A user's guide for V174, a program using a finite difference method to analyze transonic flow over oscillating wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. D.; Weatherill, W. H.; Sebastian, J. D.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1977-01-01

    The design and usage of a pilot program using a finite difference method for calculating the pressure distributions over harmonically oscillating wings in transonic flow are discussed. The procedure used is based on separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady differential equation for small disturbances. The steady velocity potential which must be obtained from some other program, is required for input. The unsteady differential equation is linear, complex in form with spatially varying coefficients. Because sinusoidal motion is assumed, time is not a variable. The numerical solution is obtained through a finite difference formulation and a line relaxation solution method.

  1. A 3D Contact Smoothing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M A; Laursen, T A

    2002-05-02

    Smoothing of contact surfaces can be used to eliminate the chatter typically seen with node on facet contact and give a better representation of the actual contact surface. The latter affect is well demonstrated for problems with interference fits. In this work we present two methods for the smoothing of contact surfaces for 3D finite element contact. In the first method, we employ Gregory patches to smooth the faceted surface in a node on facet implementation. In the second method, we employ a Bezier interpolation of the faceted surface in a mortar method implementation of contact. As is well known, node on facet approaches can exhibit locking due to the failure of the Babuska-Brezzi condition and in some instances fail the patch test. The mortar method implementation is stable and provides optimal convergence in the energy of error. In the this work we demonstrate the superiority of the smoothed versus the non-smoothed node on facet implementations. We also show where the node on facet method fails and some results from the smoothed mortar method implementation.

  2. Development of low-frequency kernel-function aerodynamics for comparison with time-dependent finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Finite difference methods for unsteady transonic flow frequency use simplified equations in which certain of the time dependent terms are omitted from the governing equations. Kernel functions are derived for two dimensional subsonic flow, and provide accurate solutions of the linearized potential equation with the same time dependent terms omitted. These solutions make possible a direct evaluation of the finite difference codes for the linear problem. Calculations with two of these low frequency kernel functions verify the accuracy of the LTRAN2 and HYTRAN2 finite difference codes. Comparisons of the low frequency kernel function results with the Possio kernel function solution of the complete linear equations indicate the adequacy of the HYTRAN approximation for frequencies in the range of interest for flutter calculations.

  3. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference method: 2-D aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.-J.; Giraldo, F. X.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-06-01

    The non-hydrostatic (NH) compressible Euler equations of dry atmosphere are solved in a simplified two dimensional (2-D) slice framework employing a spectral element method (SEM) for the horizontal discretization and a finite difference method (FDM) for the vertical discretization. The SEM uses high-order nodal basis functions associated with Lagrange polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) quadrature points. The FDM employs a third-order upwind biased scheme for the vertical flux terms and a centered finite difference scheme for the vertical derivative terms and quadrature. The Euler equations used here are in a flux form based on the hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate, which are the same as those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, but a hybrid sigma-pressure vertical coordinate is implemented in this model. We verified the model by conducting widely used standard benchmark tests: the inertia-gravity wave, rising thermal bubble, density current wave, and linear hydrostatic mountain wave. The results from those tests demonstrate that the horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference model is accurate and robust. By using the 2-D slice model, we effectively show that the combined spatial discretization method of the spectral element and finite difference method in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, offers a viable method for the development of a NH dynamical core.

  4. Finite difference numerical methods for boundary control problems governed by hyperbolic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.; Zheng, Q.; Coleman, M.; Weerakoon, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews convergent finite difference schemes for hyperbolic initial boundary value problems and their applications to boundary control systems of hyperbolic type which arise in the modelling of vibrations. These difference schemes are combined with the primal and the dual approaches to compute the optimal control in the unconstrained case, as well as the case when the control is subject to inequality constraints. Some of the preliminary numerical results are also presented.

  5. Simulation model of stratified thermal energy storage tank using finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluyo, Joko

    2016-06-01

    Stratified TES tank is normally used in the cogeneration plant. The stratified TES tanks are simple, low cost, and equal or superior in thermal performance. The advantage of TES tank is that it enables shifting of energy usage from off-peak demand for on-peak demand requirement. To increase energy utilization in a stratified TES tank, it is required to build a simulation model which capable to simulate the charging phenomenon in the stratified TES tank precisely. This paper is aimed to develop a novel model in addressing the aforementioned problem. The model incorporated chiller into the charging of stratified TES tank system in a closed system. The model was developed in one-dimensional type involve with heat transfer aspect. The model covers the main factors affect to degradation of temperature distribution namely conduction through the tank wall, conduction between cool and warm water, mixing effect on the initial flow of the charging as well as heat loss to surrounding. The simulation model is developed based on finite difference method utilizing buffer concept theory and solved in explicit method. Validation of the simulation model is carried out using observed data obtained from operating stratified TES tank in cogeneration plant. The temperature distribution of the model capable of representing S-curve pattern as well as simulating decreased charging temperature after reaching full condition. The coefficient of determination values between the observed data and model obtained higher than 0.88. Meaning that the model has capability in simulating the charging phenomenon in the stratified TES tank. The model is not only capable of generating temperature distribution but also can be enhanced for representing transient condition during the charging of stratified TES tank. This successful model can be addressed for solving the limitation temperature occurs in charging of the stratified TES tank with the absorption chiller. Further, the stratified TES tank can be

  6. DNS of premixed turbulent V-flame: coupling spectral and finite difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauguel, Raphael; Vervisch, Luc; Domingo, Pascale

    2005-01-01

    To allow for a reliable examination of the interaction between velocity fluctuations, acoustics and combustion, a novel numerical procedure is discussed in which a spectral solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is directly associated to a high-order finite difference fully compressible DNS solver (sixth order PADE). Using this combination of high-order solvers with accurate boundary conditions, simulations have been performed where a turbulent premixed V-shape flame develops in grid turbulence. In the light of the DNS results, a sub-model for premixed turbulent combustion is analyzed. To cite this article: R. Hauguel et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  7. Newton's method applied to finite-difference approximations for the steady-state compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Harry E.; Beam, Richard M.

    1991-01-01

    Finite-difference approximations for steady-state compressible Navier-Stokes equations, whose two spatial dimensions are written in generalized curvilinear coordinates and strong conservation-law form, are presently solved by means of Newton's method in order to obtain a lifting-airfoil flow field under subsonic and transonnic conditions. In addition to ascertaining the computational requirements of an initial guess ensuring convergence and the degree of computational efficiency obtainable via the approximate Newton method's freezing of the Jacobian matrices, attention is given to the need for auxiliary methods assessing the temporal stability of steady-state solutions. It is demonstrated that nonunique solutions of the finite-difference equations are obtainable by Newton's method in conjunction with a continuation method.

  8. Numerical Investigation of 3D multichannel analysis of surface wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Limin; Xu, Yixian; Luo, Yinhe

    2015-08-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain near-surface S-wave velocity, and it has gained popularity in engineering practice. Up to now, most examples of using the MASW technique are focused on 2D models or data from a 1D linear receiver spread. We propose a 3D MASW scheme. A finite-difference (FD) method is used to investigate the method using linear and fan-shaped receiver spreads. Results show that the 3D topography strongly affects propagation of Rayleigh waves. The energy concentration of dispersion image is distorted and bifurcated because of the influence of free-surface topography. These effects are reduced with the 3D MASW method. Lastly we investigate the relation between the array size and the resolution of dispersion measurement.

  9. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  10. M2Di: Concise and efficient MATLAB 2-D Stokes solvers using the Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räss, Ludovic; Duretz, Thibault; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2017-02-01

    Recent development of many multiphysics modeling tools reflects the currently growing interest for studying coupled processes in Earth Sciences. The core of such tools should rely on fast and robust mechanical solvers. Here we provide M2Di, a set of routines for 2-D linear and power law incompressible viscous flow based on Finite Difference discretizations. The 2-D codes are written in a concise vectorized MATLAB fashion and can achieve a time to solution of 22 s for linear viscous flow on 10002 grid points using a standard personal computer. We provide application examples spanning from finely resolved crystal-melt dynamics, deformation of heterogeneous power law viscous fluids to instantaneous models of mantle flow in cylindrical coordinates. The routines are validated against analytical solution for linear viscous flow with highly variable viscosity and compared against analytical and numerical solutions of power law viscous folding and necking. In the power law case, both Picard and Newton iterations schemes are implemented. For linear Stokes flow and Picard linearization, the discretization results in symmetric positive-definite matrix operators on Cartesian grids with either regular or variable grid spacing allowing for an optimized solving procedure. For Newton linearization, the matrix operator is no longer symmetric and an adequate solving procedure is provided. The reported performance of linear and power law Stokes flow is finally analyzed in terms of wall time. All MATLAB codes are provided and can readily be used for educational as well as research purposes. The M2Di routines are available from Bitbucket and the University of Lausanne Scientific Computing Group website, and are also supplementary material to this article.

  11. 3-D finite-difference, finite-element, discontinuous-Galerkin and spectral-element schemes analysed for their accuracy with respect to P-wave to S-wave speed ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Galis, Martin; Chaljub, Emmanuel; Etienne, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    We analyse 13 3-D numerical time-domain explicit schemes for modelling seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion for their behaviour with a varying P-wave to S-wave speed ratio (VP/VS). The second-order schemes include three finite-difference, three finite-element and one discontinuous-Galerkin schemes. The fourth-order schemes include three finite-difference and two spectral-element schemes. All schemes are second-order in time. We assume a uniform cubic grid/mesh and present all schemes in a unified form. We assume plane S-wave propagation in an unbounded homogeneous isotropic elastic medium. We define relative local errors of the schemes in amplitude and the vector difference in one time step and normalize them for a unit time. We also define the equivalent spatial sampling ratio as a ratio at which the maximum relative error is equal to the reference maximum error. We present results of the extensive numerical analysis. We theoretically (i) show how a numerical scheme sees the P and S waves if the VP/VS ratio increases, (ii) show the structure of the errors in amplitude and the vector difference and (iii) compare the schemes in terms of the truncation errors of the discrete approximations to the second mixed and non-mixed spatial derivatives. We find that four of the tested schemes have errors in amplitude almost independent on the VP/VS ratio. The homogeneity of the approximations to the second mixed and non-mixed spatial derivatives in terms of the coefficients of the leading terms of their truncation errors as well as the absolute values of the coefficients are key factors for the behaviour of the schemes with increasing VP/VS ratio. The dependence of the errors in the vector difference on the VP/VS ratio should be accounted for by a proper (sufficiently dense) spatial sampling.

  12. Finite-difference time-domain methods to analyze ytterbium-doped Q-switched fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Haroldo T; Khaleque, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Q-switched lasers are widely used in material processing, laser ranging, medicine, and nonlinear optics--in particular, Q-switched lasers in optical fibers are important since they cannot only generate high peak powers but can also concentrate high peak powers in small areas. In this paper, we present new finite-difference time-domain methods that analyze the dynamics of Q-switched fiber lasers, which are more flexible and robust than previous methods. We extend the method to analyze fiber ring lasers and compare the results with our experiments.

  13. A Review of High-Order and Optimized Finite-Difference Methods for Simulating Linear Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, David W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a review of high-order and optimized finite-difference methods for numerically simulating the propagation and scattering of linear waves, such as electromagnetic, acoustic, or elastic waves. The spatial operators reviewed include compact schemes, non-compact schemes, schemes on staggered grids, and schemes which are optimized to produce specific characteristics. The time-marching methods discussed include Runge-Kutta methods, Adams-Bashforth methods, and the leapfrog method. In addition, the following fourth-order fully-discrete finite-difference methods are considered: a one-step implicit scheme with a three-point spatial stencil, a one-step explicit scheme with a five-point spatial stencil, and a two-step explicit scheme with a five-point spatial stencil. For each method studied, the number of grid points per wavelength required for accurate simulation of wave propagation over large distances is presented. Recommendations are made with respect to the suitability of the methods for specific problems and practical aspects of their use, such as appropriate Courant numbers and grid densities. Avenues for future research are suggested.

  14. Wave propagation in anisotropic elastic materials and curvilinear coordinates using a summation-by-parts finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N. Anders; Sjogreen, Bjorn

    2015-07-20

    We develop a fourth order accurate finite difference method for solving the three-dimensional elastic wave equation in general heterogeneous anisotropic materials on curvilinear grids. The proposed method is an extension of the method for isotropic materials, previously described in the paper by Sjögreen and Petersson (2012) [11]. The method we proposed discretizes the anisotropic elastic wave equation in second order formulation, using a node centered finite difference method that satisfies the principle of summation by parts. The summation by parts technique results in a provably stable numerical method that is energy conserving. Also, we generalize and evaluate the super-grid far-field technique for truncating unbounded domains. Unlike the commonly used perfectly matched layers (PML), the super-grid technique is stable for general anisotropic material, because it is based on a coordinate stretching combined with an artificial dissipation. Moreover, the discretization satisfies an energy estimate, proving that the numerical approximation is stable. We demonstrate by numerical experiments that sufficiently wide super-grid layers result in very small artificial reflections. Applications of the proposed method are demonstrated by three-dimensional simulations of anisotropic wave propagation in crystals.

  15. Wave propagation in anisotropic elastic materials and curvilinear coordinates using a summation-by-parts finite difference method

    DOE PAGES

    Petersson, N. Anders; Sjogreen, Bjorn

    2015-07-20

    We develop a fourth order accurate finite difference method for solving the three-dimensional elastic wave equation in general heterogeneous anisotropic materials on curvilinear grids. The proposed method is an extension of the method for isotropic materials, previously described in the paper by Sjögreen and Petersson (2012) [11]. The method we proposed discretizes the anisotropic elastic wave equation in second order formulation, using a node centered finite difference method that satisfies the principle of summation by parts. The summation by parts technique results in a provably stable numerical method that is energy conserving. Also, we generalize and evaluate the super-grid far-fieldmore » technique for truncating unbounded domains. Unlike the commonly used perfectly matched layers (PML), the super-grid technique is stable for general anisotropic material, because it is based on a coordinate stretching combined with an artificial dissipation. Moreover, the discretization satisfies an energy estimate, proving that the numerical approximation is stable. We demonstrate by numerical experiments that sufficiently wide super-grid layers result in very small artificial reflections. Applications of the proposed method are demonstrated by three-dimensional simulations of anisotropic wave propagation in crystals.« less

  16. 3D Face modeling using the multi-deformable method.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-09-25

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper.

  17. A users guide for A344: A program using a finite difference method to analyze transonic flow over oscillating airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherill, W. H.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1979-01-01

    The design and usage of a pilot program for calculating the pressure distributions over harmonically oscillating airfoils in transonic flow are described. The procedure used is based on separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady differential equations for small disturbances. The steady velocity potential which must be obtained from some other program, was required for input. The unsteady equation, as solved, is linear with spatially varying coefficients. Since sinusoidal motion was assumed, time was not a variable. The numerical solution was obtained through a finite difference formulation and either a line relaxation or an out of core direct solution method.

  18. Object-Oriented Implementation of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method in Parallel Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Kyungwon; Kim, Huioon; Hong, Hyunpyo; Chung, Youngjoo

    GMES which stands for GIST Maxwell's Equations Solver is a Python package for a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation. The FDTD method widely used for electromagnetic simulations is an algorithm to solve the Maxwell's equations. GMES follows Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm for the good maintainability and usability. With the several optimization techniques along with parallel computing environment, we could make the fast and interactive implementation. Execution speed has been tested in a single host and Beowulf class cluster. GMES is open source and available on the web (http://www.sf.net/projects/gmes).

  19. Beyond Euler's Method: Implicit Finite Differences in an Introductory ODE Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kull, Trent C.

    2011-01-01

    A typical introductory course in ordinary differential equations (ODEs) exposes students to exact solution methods. However, many differential equations must be approximated with numerical methods. Textbooks commonly include explicit methods such as Euler's and Improved Euler's. Implicit methods are typically introduced in more advanced courses…

  20. A Radial Basis Function (RBF)-Finite Difference (FD) Method for Diffusion and Reaction-Diffusion Equations on Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Varun; Wright, Grady B; Kirby, Robert M; Fogelson, Aaron L

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method based on Radial Basis Function (RBF)-generated Finite Differences (FD) for numerically solving diffusion and reaction-diffusion equations (PDEs) on closed surfaces embedded in ℝ (d) . Our method uses a method-of-lines formulation, in which surface derivatives that appear in the PDEs are approximated locally using RBF interpolation. The method requires only scattered nodes representing the surface and normal vectors at those scattered nodes. All computations use only extrinsic coordinates, thereby avoiding coordinate distortions and singularities. We also present an optimization procedure that allows for the stabilization of the discrete differential operators generated by our RBF-FD method by selecting shape parameters for each stencil that correspond to a global target condition number. We show the convergence of our method on two surfaces for different stencil sizes, and present applications to nonlinear PDEs simulated both on implicit/parametric surfaces and more general surfaces represented by point clouds.

  1. Finite-difference time-domain modeling of curved material interfaces by using boundary condition equations method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jia; Zhou, Huaichun

    2016-09-01

    To deal with the staircase approximation problem in the standard finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, the two-dimensional boundary condition equations (BCE) method is proposed in this paper. In the BCE method, the standard FDTD algorithm can be used as usual, and the curved surface is treated by adding the boundary condition equations. Thus, while maintaining the simplicity and computational efficiency of the standard FDTD algorithm, the BCE method can solve the staircase approximation problem. The BCE method is validated by analyzing near field and far field scattering properties of the PEC and dielectric cylinders. The results show that the BCE method can maintain a second-order accuracy by eliminating the staircase approximation errors. Moreover, the results of the BCE method show good accuracy for cylinder scattering cases with different permittivities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51025622).

  2. Method for 3D Airway Topology Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Grothausmann, Roman; Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kuehnel, Mark P.; Ochs, Matthias; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    In lungs the number of conducting airway generations as well as bifurcation patterns varies across species and shows specific characteristics relating to illnesses or gene variations. A method to characterize the topology of the mouse airway tree using scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) tomograms is presented in this paper. It is used to test discrimination between two types of mice based on detected differences in their conducting airway pattern. Based on segmentations of the airways in these tomograms, the main spanning tree of the volume skeleton is computed. The resulting graph structure is used to distinguish between wild type and surfactant protein (SP-D) deficient knock-out mice. PMID:25767561

  3. a Fast Method for Measuring the Similarity Between 3d Model and 3d Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Li, Jonathan; Li, Xin; Lin, Yangbin; Zhang, Shanxin; Wang, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a fast method for measuring the partial Similarity between 3D Model and 3D point Cloud (SimMC). It is crucial to measure SimMC for many point cloud-related applications such as 3D object retrieval and inverse procedural modelling. In our proposed method, the surface area of model and the Distance from Model to point Cloud (DistMC) are exploited as measurements to calculate SimMC. Here, DistMC is defined as the weighted distance of the distances between points sampled from model and point cloud. Similarly, Distance from point Cloud to Model (DistCM) is defined as the average distance of the distances between points in point cloud and model. In order to reduce huge computational burdens brought by calculation of DistCM in some traditional methods, we define SimMC as the ratio of weighted surface area of model to DistMC. Compared to those traditional SimMC measuring methods that are only able to measure global similarity, our method is capable of measuring partial similarity by employing distance-weighted strategy. Moreover, our method is able to be faster than other partial similarity assessment methods. We demonstrate the superiority of our method both on synthetic data and laser scanning data.

  4. 3D modelling of the electromagnetic response of geophysical targets using the FDTD method

    SciTech Connect

    Debroux, P.S.

    1996-05-01

    A publicly available and maintained electromagnetic finite-difference time domain (FDTD) code has been applied to the forward modelling of the response of 1D, 2D and 3D geophysical targets to a vertical magnetic dipole excitation. The FDTD method is used to analyze target responses in the 1 MHz to 100 MHz range, where either conduction or displacement currents may have the controlling role. The response of the geophysical target to the excitation is presented as changes in the magnetic field ellipticity. The results of the FDTD code compare favorably with previously published integral equation solutions of the response of 1D targets, and FDTD models calculated with different finite-difference cell sizes are compared to find the effect of model discretization on the solution. The discretization errors, calculated as absolute error in ellipticity, are presented for the different ground geometry models considered, and are, for the most part, below 10% of the integral equation solutions. Finally, the FDTD code is used to calculate the magnetic ellipticity response of a 2D survey and a 3D sounding of complicated geophysical targets. The response of these 2D and 3D targets are too complicated to be verified with integral equation solutions, but show the proper low- and high-frequency responses.

  5. A finite difference method for a conservative Allen-Cahn equation on non-flat surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junseok; Jeong, Darae; Yang, Seong-Deog; Choi, Yongho

    2017-04-01

    We present an efficient numerical scheme for the conservative Allen-Cahn (CAC) equation on various surfaces embedded in a narrow band domain in the three-dimensional space. We apply a quasi-Neumann boundary condition on the narrow band domain boundary using the closest point method. This boundary treatment allows us to use the standard Cartesian Laplacian operator instead of the Laplace-Beltrami operator. We apply a hybrid operator splitting method for solving the CAC equation. First, we use an explicit Euler method to solve the diffusion term. Second, we solve the nonlinear term by using a closed-form solution. Third, we apply a space-time-dependent Lagrange multiplier to conserve the total quantity. The overall scheme is explicit in time and does not need iterative steps; therefore, it is fast. A series of numerical experiments demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed hybrid scheme.

  6. Calculation of large ion densities under HVdc transmission lines by the finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Tomotaka; Sunaga, Yoshitaka

    1995-10-01

    A calculation method for large ion densities (charged aerosols) under HVdc transmission lines was developed considering both the charging mechanism of aerosols by small ions and the drifting process by wind. Large ion densities calculated by this method agreed well with the ones measured under the Shiobara HVdc test line on the lateral profiles at ground level up to about 70m downwind from the line. Measured values decreased more quickly than calculated ones farther downwind from the line. Considering the effect of point discharge from ground cover (earth corona) improved the agreement in the farther downwind region.

  7. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  8. Solutions of the Taylor-Green Vortex Problem Using High-Resolution Explicit Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2013-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code that solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations was applied to the Taylor-Green vortex problem to examine the code s ability to accurately simulate the vortex decay and subsequent turbulence. The code, WRLES (Wave Resolving Large-Eddy Simulation), uses explicit central-differencing to compute the spatial derivatives and explicit Low Dispersion Runge-Kutta methods for the temporal discretization. The flow was first studied and characterized using Bogey & Bailley s 13-point dispersion relation preserving (DRP) scheme. The kinetic energy dissipation rate, computed both directly and from the enstrophy field, vorticity contours, and the energy spectra are examined. Results are in excellent agreement with a reference solution obtained using a spectral method and provide insight into computations of turbulent flows. In addition the following studies were performed: a comparison of 4th-, 8th-, 12th- and DRP spatial differencing schemes, the effect of the solution filtering on the results, the effect of large-eddy simulation sub-grid scale models, and the effect of high-order discretization of the viscous terms.

  9. High-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite-difference formulation of the lattice Boltzmann method in generalized curvilinear coordinates.

    PubMed

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Saadat, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Sina

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (WENOLBM) is developed and assessed for an accurate simulation of incompressible flows. To handle curved geometries with nonuniform grids, the incompressible form of the discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation is transformed into the generalized curvilinear coordinates and the spatial derivatives of the resulting lattice Boltzmann equation in the computational plane are solved using the fifth-order WENO scheme. The first-order implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme and also the fourth-order Runge-Kutta explicit time integrating scheme are adopted for the discretization of the temporal term. To examine the accuracy and performance of the present solution procedure based on the WENOLBM developed, different benchmark test cases are simulated as follows: unsteady Taylor-Green vortex, unsteady doubly periodic shear layer flow, steady flow in a two-dimensional (2D) cavity, steady cylindrical Couette flow, steady flow over a 2D circular cylinder, and steady and unsteady flows over a NACA0012 hydrofoil at different flow conditions. Results of the present solution are compared with the existing numerical and experimental results which show good agreement. To show the efficiency and accuracy of the solution methodology, the results are also compared with the developed second-order central-difference finite-volume lattice Boltzmann method and the compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. It is shown that the present numerical scheme is robust, efficient, and accurate for solving steady and unsteady incompressible flows even at high Reynolds number flows.

  10. High-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite-difference formulation of the lattice Boltzmann method in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Saadat, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Sina

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (WENOLBM) is developed and assessed for an accurate simulation of incompressible flows. To handle curved geometries with nonuniform grids, the incompressible form of the discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation is transformed into the generalized curvilinear coordinates and the spatial derivatives of the resulting lattice Boltzmann equation in the computational plane are solved using the fifth-order WENO scheme. The first-order implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme and also the fourth-order Runge-Kutta explicit time integrating scheme are adopted for the discretization of the temporal term. To examine the accuracy and performance of the present solution procedure based on the WENOLBM developed, different benchmark test cases are simulated as follows: unsteady Taylor-Green vortex, unsteady doubly periodic shear layer flow, steady flow in a two-dimensional (2D) cavity, steady cylindrical Couette flow, steady flow over a 2D circular cylinder, and steady and unsteady flows over a NACA0012 hydrofoil at different flow conditions. Results of the present solution are compared with the existing numerical and experimental results which show good agreement. To show the efficiency and accuracy of the solution methodology, the results are also compared with the developed second-order central-difference finite-volume lattice Boltzmann method and the compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. It is shown that the present numerical scheme is robust, efficient, and accurate for solving steady and unsteady incompressible flows even at high Reynolds number flows.

  11. A note on the leap-frog scheme in two and three dimensions. [finite difference method for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, S.; Gottlieb, D.

    1976-01-01

    The paper considers the leap-frog finite-difference method (Kreiss and Oliger, 1973) for systems of partial differential equations of the form du/dt = dF/dx + dG/dy + dH/dz, where d denotes partial derivative, u is a q-component vector and a function of x, y, z, and t, and the vectors F, G, and H are functions of u only. The original leap-frog algorithm is shown to admit a modification that improves on the stability conditions for two and three dimensions by factors of 2 and 2.8, respectively, thereby permitting larger time steps. The scheme for three dimensions is considered optimal in the sense that it combines simple averaging and large time steps.

  12. Applicability of Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method to Simulation of Wave Propagation in Cancellous Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Yoshiki; Imaizumi, Hirotaka; Fukuda, Takashi; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Otani, Takahiko

    2006-09-01

    In cancellous bone, longitudinal waves often separate into fast and slow waves depending on the alignment of bone trabeculae. This interesting phenomenon becomes an effective tool for the diagnosis of osteoporosis because wave propagation behavior depends on the bone structure. We have, therefore, simulated wave propagation in such a complex medium by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, using a three-dimensional X-ray computer tomography (CT) model of an actual cancellous bone. In this simulation, experimentally observed acoustic constants of the cortical bone were adopted. As a result, the generation of fast and slow waves was confirmed. The speed of fast waves and the amplitude of slow waves showed good correlations with the bone volume fraction. The simulated results were also compared with the experimental results obtained from the identical cancellous bone.

  13. Efficient fabrication method of nano-grating for 3D holographic display with full parallax views.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenqiang; Qiao, Wen; Huang, Wenbin; Zhu, Ming; Fang, Zongbao; Pu, Donglin; Ye, Yan; Liu, Yanhua; Chen, Linsen

    2016-03-21

    Without any special glasses, multiview 3D displays based on the diffractive optics can present high resolution, full-parallax 3D images in an ultra-wide viewing angle. The enabling optical component, namely the phase plate, can produce arbitrarily distributed view zones by carefully designing the orientation and the period of each nano-grating pixel. However, such 3D display screen is restricted to a limited size due to the time-consuming fabricating process of nano-gratings on the phase plate. In this paper, we proposed and developed a lithography system that can fabricate the phase plate efficiently. Here we made two phase plates with full nano-grating pixel coverage at a speed of 20 mm2/mins, a 500 fold increment in the efficiency when compared to the method of E-beam lithography. One 2.5-inch phase plate generated 9-view 3D images with horizontal-parallax, while the other 6-inch phase plate produced 64-view 3D images with full-parallax. The angular divergence in horizontal axis and vertical axis was 1.5 degrees, and 1.25 degrees, respectively, slightly larger than the simulated value of 1.2 degrees by Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD). The intensity variation was less than 10% for each viewpoint, in consistency with the simulation results. On top of each phase plate, a high-resolution binary masking pattern containing amplitude information of all viewing zone was well aligned. We achieved a resolution of 400 pixels/inch and a viewing angle of 40 degrees for 9-view 3D images with horizontal parallax. In another prototype, the resolution of each view was 160 pixels/inch and the view angle was 50 degrees for 64-view 3D images with full parallax. As demonstrated in the experiments, the homemade lithography system provided the key fabricating technology for multiview 3D holographic display.

  14. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for modeling the effect of switched gradients on the human body in MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huawei; Crozier, Stuart; Liu, Feng

    2002-12-01

    Numerical modeling of the eddy currents induced in the human body by the pulsed field gradients in MRI presents a difficult computational problem. It requires an efficient and accurate computational method for high spatial resolution analyses with a relatively low input frequency. In this article, a new technique is described which allows the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to be efficiently applied over a very large frequency range, including low frequencies. This is not the case in conventional FDTD-based methods. A method of implementing streamline gradients in FDTD is presented, as well as comparative analyses which show that the correct source injection in the FDTD simulation plays a crucial rule in obtaining accurate solutions. In particular, making use of the derivative of the input source waveform is shown to provide distinct benefits in accuracy over direct source injection. In the method, no alterations to the properties of either the source or the transmission media are required. The method is essentially frequency independent and the source injection method has been verified against examples with analytical solutions. Results are presented showing the spatial distribution of gradient-induced electric fields and eddy currents in a complete body model.

  15. A 3D Level Set Method for Microwave Breast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Timothy J.; Hagness, Susan C.; Van Veen, Barry D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conventional inverse-scattering algorithms for microwave breast imaging result in moderate resolution images with blurred boundaries between tissues. Recent 2D numerical microwave imaging studies demonstrate that the use of a level set method preserves dielectric boundaries, resulting in a more accurate, higher resolution reconstruction of the dielectric properties distribution. Previously proposed level set algorithms are computationally expensive and thus impractical in 3D. In this paper we present a computationally tractable 3D microwave imaging algorithm based on level sets. Methods We reduce the computational cost of the level set method using a Jacobian matrix, rather than an adjoint method, to calculate Frechet derivatives. We demonstrate the feasibility of 3D imaging using simulated array measurements from 3D numerical breast phantoms. We evaluate performance by comparing full 3D reconstructions to those from a conventional microwave imaging technique. We also quantitatively assess the efficacy of our algorithm in evaluating breast density. Results Our reconstructions of 3D numerical breast phantoms improve upon those of a conventional microwave imaging technique. The density estimates from our level set algorithm are more accurate than those of conventional microwave imaging, and the accuracy is greater than that reported for mammographic density estimation. Conclusion Our level set method leads to a feasible level of computational complexity for full 3D imaging, and reconstructs the heterogeneous dielectric properties distribution of the breast more accurately than conventional microwave imaging methods. Significance 3D microwave breast imaging using a level set method is a promising low-cost, non-ionizing alternative to current breast imaging techniques. PMID:26011863

  16. Simulations of P-SV wave scattering due to cracks by the 2-D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yuji; Shiina, Takahiro; Kawahara, Jun; Okamoto, Taro; Miyashita, Kaoru

    2013-12-01

    We simulate P-SV wave scattering by 2-D parallel cracks using the finite difference method (FDM). Here, special emphasis is put on simplicity; we apply a standard FDM (second-order velocity-stress scheme with a staggered grid) to media including traction-free, infinitesimally thin cracks, which are expressed in a simple manner. As an accuracy test of the present method, we calculate the displacement discontinuity along an isolated crack caused by harmonic waves using the method, which is compared with the corresponding results based on a reliable boundary integral equation method. The test resultantly indicates that the present method yields sufficient accuracy. As an application of this method, we also simulate wave propagation in media with randomly distributed cracks. We experimentally determine the attenuation and velocity dispersion induced by scattering from the synthetic seismograms, using a waveform averaging technique. It is shown that the results are well explained by a theory based on the Foldy approximation, if the crack density is sufficiently low. The theory appears valid with a crack density up to at least 0.1 for SV wave incidence, whereas the validity limit appears lower for P wave incidence.

  17. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement method based on WENO finite difference scheme for the simulation of multi-dimensional detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Dong, XinZhuang; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2015-10-01

    For numerical simulation of detonation, computational cost using uniform meshes is large due to the vast separation in both time and space scales. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is advantageous for problems with vastly different scales. This paper aims to propose an AMR method with high order accuracy for numerical investigation of multi-dimensional detonation. A well-designed AMR method based on finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme, named as AMR&WENO is proposed. A new cell-based data structure is used to organize the adaptive meshes. The new data structure makes it possible for cells to communicate with each other quickly and easily. In order to develop an AMR method with high order accuracy, high order prolongations in both space and time are utilized in the data prolongation procedure. Based on the message passing interface (MPI) platform, we have developed a workload balancing parallel AMR&WENO code using the Hilbert space-filling curve algorithm. Our numerical experiments with detonation simulations indicate that the AMR&WENO is accurate and has a high resolution. Moreover, we evaluate and compare the performance of the uniform mesh WENO scheme and the parallel AMR&WENO method. The comparison results provide us further insight into the high performance of the parallel AMR&WENO method.

  18. Modeling and Calculation of Optical Amplification in One Dimensional Case of Laser Medium Using Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryana, Okky Fajar Tri; Hidayat, Rahmat

    2016-08-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method has been much employed for studying light propagation in various structures, from simple one-dimensional structures up to three-dimensional complex structures. One of challenging problems is to implement this method for the case of light propagation in amplifying medium or structures, such as optical amplifier and lasers. The implementation is hindered by the fact that the dielectric constant becomes a complex number when optical gain parameter is involved in the calculation. In general, complex dielectric constant is related to complex susceptibility, in which the imaginary part is related to optical gain. Here, we then modify the formulation for updating electric field in the calculation algorithm. Using this approach, we then finally can calculate light amplification in laser active medium of Nd3+ ion doped glass. The calculation result shows an agreement with the result from the calculation using differential equation for intensity. Although this method is more time consuming, the method seem promising for optical complex micro- and nano-structures, such quantum dot lasers, micro-ring lasers, etc.

  19. An efficient locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method based on the conformal scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Shao, Wei; Shi, Sheng-Bing; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Bing-Zhong

    2015-07-01

    An efficient conformal locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (LOD-CFDTD) method is presented for solving two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic (EM) scattering problems. The formulation for the 2D transverse-electric (TE) case is presented and its stability property and numerical dispersion relationship are theoretically investigated. It is shown that the introduction of irregular grids will not damage the numerical stability. Instead of the staircasing approximation, the conformal scheme is only employed to model the curve boundaries, whereas the standard Yee grids are used for the remaining regions. As the irregular grids account for a very small percentage of the total space grids, the conformal scheme has little effect on the numerical dispersion. Moreover, the proposed method, which requires fewer arithmetic operations than the alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) CFDTD method, leads to a further reduction of the CPU time. With the total-field/scattered-field (TF/SF) boundary and the perfectly matched layer (PML), the radar cross section (RCS) of two 2D structures is calculated. The numerical examples verify the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61331007 and 61471105).

  20. Application of the finite-difference time-domain method to scattering and radiation problems involving wires and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beker, B.

    1992-12-01

    Numerical modeling of electromagnetic (EM) interaction is normally performed by using either differential or integral equation methods. Both techniques can be implemented to solve problems in frequency or time domain. The method of moments (MOM) approach to solving integral equations has matured to the point where it can be used to solve complex problems. In the past, MOM has only been applied to scattering and radiation problems involving perfectly conducting or isotropic penetrable, lossy or lossless objects. However, many materials, (e.g., composites that are used on the Navy's surface ships in practical applications) exhibit anisotropic properties. To account for these new effects, several integral equation formulations for scattering and radiation by anisotropic objects have been developed recently. The differential equation approach to EM interaction studies has seen the emergence of the finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method as the method of choice in many of today's scattering and radiation applications. This approach has been applied to study transient as well as steady-state scattering from many complex structures, radiation from wire antennas, and coupling into wires through narrow apertures in conducting cavities. It is important to determine whether or not, and how effectively, the FD-TD can be used to solve EM interaction problems of interest to the Navy, such as investigating potential EM interference in shipboard communication systems. Consequently, this report partly addresses this issue by dealing exclusively with FD-TD modeling of time-domain EM scattering and radiation.

  1. Finite Difference Simulation of Ultrasonic NDE Methods for the Detection and Sizing of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pörtzgen, N.; Volker, A. W. F.; Fingerhut, M.; Tomar, M.; Wassink, C.

    2006-03-01

    Although solutions for detection and sizing of longitudinal and circumferential cracks in pipeline walls exist, reliable detection and sizing of SCC in pipelines has been a challenge for Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) for many years. Detection and sizing are impeded by the fact that SCC can have very irregular morphology and can occur in random orientations. NDE as an industry on the other hand has suffered from the emerging of many new UT techniques and a difficult jargon, making easy understanding of the actual problems and solutions impossible for an outsider (i.e. the pipeline operator). This paper presents a novel approach to provide insight into the capabilities of common NDE methods using finite difference simulation software developed by RTD. Simulations are performed on the most common morphologies of SCC using the most commonly used in-the-ditch NDE methods. Using the parameters of the actual inspection procedure a picture is painted of what works and doesn't work about the most common ways of accessing SCC.

  2. Analytic Coarse-Mesh Finite-Difference Method Generalized for Heterogeneous Multidimensional Two-Group Diffusion Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Cabellos, Oscar; Aragones, Jose M.; Ahnert, Carol

    2003-05-15

    In order to take into account in a more effective and accurate way the intranodal heterogeneities in coarse-mesh finite-difference (CMFD) methods, a new equivalent parameter generation methodology has been developed and tested. This methodology accounts for the dependence of the nodal homogeneized two-group cross sections and nodal coupling factors, with interface flux discontinuity (IFD) factors that account for heterogeneities on the flux-spectrum and burnup intranodal distributions as well as on neighbor effects.The methodology has been implemented in an analytic CMFD method, rigorously obtained for homogeneous nodes with transverse leakage and generalized now for heterogeneous nodes by including IFD heterogeneity factors. When intranodal mesh node heterogeneity vanishes, the heterogeneous solution tends to the analytic homogeneous nodal solution. On the other hand, when intranodal heterogeneity increases, a high accuracy is maintained since the linear and nonlinear feedbacks on equivalent parameters have been shown to be as a very effective way of accounting for heterogeneity effects in two-group multidimensional coarse-mesh diffusion calculations.

  3. Improving automated 3D reconstruction methods via vision metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Isabella; Nocerino, Erica; Hess, Mona; Menna, Fabio; Sargeant, Ben; MacDonald, Lindsay; Remondino, Fabio; Robson, Stuart

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims to provide a procedure for improving automated 3D reconstruction methods via vision metrology. The 3D reconstruction problem is generally addressed using two different approaches. On the one hand, vision metrology (VM) systems try to accurately derive 3D coordinates of few sparse object points for industrial measurement and inspection applications; on the other, recent dense image matching (DIM) algorithms are designed to produce dense point clouds for surface representations and analyses. This paper strives to demonstrate a step towards narrowing the gap between traditional VM and DIM approaches. Efforts are therefore intended to (i) test the metric performance of the automated photogrammetric 3D reconstruction procedure, (ii) enhance the accuracy of the final results and (iii) obtain statistical indicators of the quality achieved in the orientation step. VM tools are exploited to integrate their main functionalities (centroid measurement, photogrammetric network adjustment, precision assessment, etc.) into the pipeline of 3D dense reconstruction. Finally, geometric analyses and accuracy evaluations are performed on the raw output of the matching (i.e. the point clouds) by adopting a metrological approach. The latter is based on the use of known geometric shapes and quality parameters derived from VDI/VDE guidelines. Tests are carried out by imaging the calibrated Portable Metric Test Object, designed and built at University College London (UCL), UK. It allows assessment of the performance of the image orientation and matching procedures within a typical industrial scenario, characterised by poor texture and known 3D/2D shapes.

  4. Near-field: a finite-difference time-dependent method for simulation of electrodynamics on small scales.

    PubMed

    Coomar, Arunima; Arntsen, Christopher; Lopata, Kenneth A; Pistinner, Shlomi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2011-08-28

    We develop near-field (NF), a very efficient finite-difference time-dependent (FDTD) approach for simulating electromagnetic systems in the near-field regime. NF is essentially a time-dependent version of the quasistatic frequency-dependent Poisson algorithm. We assume that the electric field is longitudinal, and hence propagates only a set of time-dependent polarizations and currents. For near-field scales, the time step (dt) is much larger than in the usual Maxwell FDTD approach, as it is not related to the velocity of light; rather, it is determined by the rate of damping and plasma oscillations in the material, so dt = 2.5 a.u. was well converged in our simulations. The propagation in time is done via a leapfrog algorithm much like Yee's method, and only a single spatial convolution is needed per time step. In conjunction, we also develop a new and very accurate 8 and 9 Drude-oscillators fit to the permittivity of gold and silver, desired here because we use a large time step. We show that NF agrees with Mie-theory in the limit of small spheres and that it also accurately describes the evolution of the spectral shape as a function of the separation between two gold or silver spheres. The NF algorithm is especially efficient for systems with small scale dynamics and makes it very simple to introduce additional effects such as embedding.

  5. Improving Nearest Neighbour Search in 3d Spatial Access Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaibaha, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Mioc, D.

    2016-10-01

    Nearest Neighbour (NN) is one of the important queries and analyses for spatial application. In normal practice, spatial access method structure is used during the Nearest Neighbour query execution to retrieve information from the database. However, most of the spatial access method structures are still facing with unresolved issues such as overlapping among nodes and repetitive data entry. This situation will perform an excessive Input/Output (IO) operation which is inefficient for data retrieval. The situation will become more crucial while dealing with 3D data. The size of 3D data is usually large due to its detail geometry and other attached information. In this research, a clustered 3D hierarchical structure is introduced as a 3D spatial access method structure. The structure is expected to improve the retrieval of Nearest Neighbour information for 3D objects. Several tests are performed in answering Single Nearest Neighbour search and k Nearest Neighbour (kNN) search. The tests indicate that clustered hierarchical structure is efficient in handling Nearest Neighbour query compared to its competitor. From the results, clustered hierarchical structure reduced the repetitive data entry and the accessed page. The proposed structure also produced minimal Input/Output operation. The query response time is also outperformed compared to the other competitor. For future outlook of this research several possible applications are discussed and summarized.

  6. A method to fabricate disconnected silver nanostructures in 3D.

    PubMed

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Mazur, Eric

    2012-11-27

    The standard nanofabrication toolkit includes techniques primarily aimed at creating 2D patterns in dielectric media. Creating metal patterns on a submicron scale requires a combination of nanofabrication tools and several material processing steps. For example, steps to create planar metal structures using ultraviolet photolithography and electron-beam lithography can include sample exposure, sample development, metal deposition, and metal liftoff. To create 3D metal structures, the sequence is repeated multiple times. The complexity and difficulty of stacking and aligning multiple layers limits practical implementations of 3D metal structuring using standard nanofabrication tools. Femtosecond-laser direct-writing has emerged as a pre-eminent technique for 3D nanofabrication.(1,2) Femtosecond lasers are frequently used to create 3D patterns in polymers and glasses.(3-7) However, 3D metal direct-writing remains a challenge. Here, we describe a method to fabricate silver nanostructures embedded inside a polymer matrix using a femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm. The method enables the fabrication of patterns not feasible using other techniques, such as 3D arrays of disconnected silver voxels.(8) Disconnected 3D metal patterns are useful for metamaterials where unit cells are not in contact with each other,(9) such as coupled metal dot(10,11)or coupled metal rod(12,13) resonators. Potential applications include negative index metamaterials, invisibility cloaks, and perfect lenses. In femtosecond-laser direct-writing, the laser wavelength is chosen such that photons are not linearly absorbed in the target medium. When the laser pulse duration is compressed to the femtosecond time scale and the radiation is tightly focused inside the target, the extremely high intensity induces nonlinear absorption. Multiple photons are absorbed simultaneously to cause electronic transitions that lead to material modification within the focused region. Using this approach, one can

  7. A Method to Fabricate Disconnected Silver Nanostructures in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Mazur, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The standard nanofabrication toolkit includes techniques primarily aimed at creating 2D patterns in dielectric media. Creating metal patterns on a submicron scale requires a combination of nanofabrication tools and several material processing steps. For example, steps to create planar metal structures using ultraviolet photolithography and electron-beam lithography can include sample exposure, sample development, metal deposition, and metal liftoff. To create 3D metal structures, the sequence is repeated multiple times. The complexity and difficulty of stacking and aligning multiple layers limits practical implementations of 3D metal structuring using standard nanofabrication tools. Femtosecond-laser direct-writing has emerged as a pre-eminent technique for 3D nanofabrication.1,2 Femtosecond lasers are frequently used to create 3D patterns in polymers and glasses.3-7 However, 3D metal direct-writing remains a challenge. Here, we describe a method to fabricate silver nanostructures embedded inside a polymer matrix using a femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm. The method enables the fabrication of patterns not feasible using other techniques, such as 3D arrays of disconnected silver voxels.8 Disconnected 3D metal patterns are useful for metamaterials where unit cells are not in contact with each other,9 such as coupled metal dot10,11or coupled metal rod12,13 resonators. Potential applications include negative index metamaterials, invisibility cloaks, and perfect lenses. In femtosecond-laser direct-writing, the laser wavelength is chosen such that photons are not linearly absorbed in the target medium. When the laser pulse duration is compressed to the femtosecond time scale and the radiation is tightly focused inside the target, the extremely high intensity induces nonlinear absorption. Multiple photons are absorbed simultaneously to cause electronic transitions that lead to material modification within the focused region. Using this approach, one can form structures

  8. A harmonic polynomial cell (HPC) method for 3D Laplace equation with application in marine hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yan-Lin Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new efficient and accurate numerical method based on harmonic polynomials to solve boundary value problems governed by 3D Laplace equation. The computational domain is discretized by overlapping cells. Within each cell, the velocity potential is represented by the linear superposition of a complete set of harmonic polynomials, which are the elementary solutions of Laplace equation. By its definition, the method is named as Harmonic Polynomial Cell (HPC) method. The characteristics of the accuracy and efficiency of the HPC method are demonstrated by studying analytical cases. Comparisons will be made with some other existing boundary element based methods, e.g. Quadratic Boundary Element Method (QBEM) and the Fast Multipole Accelerated QBEM (FMA-QBEM) and a fourth order Finite Difference Method (FDM). To demonstrate the applications of the method, it is applied to some studies relevant for marine hydrodynamics. Sloshing in 3D rectangular tanks, a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank, fully-nonlinear wave focusing on a semi-circular shoal, and the nonlinear wave diffraction of a bottom-mounted cylinder in regular waves are studied. The comparisons with the experimental results and other numerical results are all in satisfactory agreement, indicating that the present HPC method is a promising method in solving potential-flow problems. The underlying procedure of the HPC method could also be useful in other fields than marine hydrodynamics involved with solving Laplace equation.

  9. Comparing 3D virtual methods for hemimandibular body reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Stefano; Fiorenza, Luca; Kozakowski, Stephanie; Kullmer, Ottmar

    2011-07-01

    Reconstruction of fractured, distorted, or missing parts in human skeleton presents an equal challenge in the fields of paleoanthropology, bioarcheology, forensics, and medicine. This is particularly important within the disciplines such as orthodontics and surgery, when dealing with mandibular defects due to tumors, developmental abnormalities, or trauma. In such cases, proper restorations of both form (for esthetic purposes) and function (restoration of articulation, occlusion, and mastication) are required. Several digital approaches based on three-dimensional (3D) digital modeling, computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing techniques, and more recently geometric morphometric methods have been used to solve this problem. Nevertheless, comparisons among their outcomes are rarely provided. In this contribution, three methods for hemimandibular body reconstruction have been tested. Two bone defects were virtually simulated in a 3D digital model of a human hemimandible. Accordingly, 3D digital scaffolds were obtained using the mirror copy of the unaffected hemimandible (Method 1), the thin plate spline (TPS) interpolation (Method 2), and the combination between TPS and CAD techniques (Method 3). The mirror copy of the unaffected hemimandible does not provide a suitable solution for bone restoration. The combination between TPS interpolation and CAD techniques (Method 3) produces an almost perfect-fitting 3D digital model that can be used for biocompatible custom-made scaffolds generated by rapid prototyping technologies.

  10. First-principles transport calculation method based on real-space finite-difference nonequilibrium Green's function scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Tomoya; Egami, Yoshiyuki; Hirose, Kikuji

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate an efficient nonequilibrium Green's function transport calculation procedure based on the real-space finite-difference method. The direct inversion of matrices for obtaining the self-energy terms of electrodes is computationally demanding in the real-space method because the matrix dimension corresponds to the number of grid points in the unit cell of electrodes, which is much larger than that of sites in the tight-binding approach. The procedure using the ratio matrices of the overbridging boundary-matching technique [Y. Fujimoto and K. Hirose, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.67.195315 67, 195315 (2003)], which is related to the wave functions of a couple of grid planes in the matching regions, greatly reduces the computational effort to calculate self-energy terms without losing mathematical strictness. In addition, the present procedure saves computational time to obtain the Green's function of the semi-infinite system required in the Landauer-Büttiker formula. Moreover, the compact expression to relate Green's functions and scattering wave functions, which provide a real-space picture of the scattering process, is introduced. An example of the calculated results is given for the transport property of the BN ring connected to (9,0) carbon nanotubes. The wave-function matching at the interface reveals that the rotational symmetry of wave functions with respect to the tube axis plays an important role in electron transport. Since the states coming from and going to electrodes show threefold rotational symmetry, the states in the vicinity of the Fermi level, the wave function of which exhibits fivefold symmetry, do not contribute to the electron transport through the BN ring.

  11. Episcopic 3D Imaging Methods: Tools for Researching Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Weninger, Wolfgang J; Geyer, Stefan H

    2008-01-01

    This work aims at describing episcopic 3D imaging methods and at discussing how these methods can contribute to researching the genetic mechanisms driving embryogenesis and tissue remodelling, and the genesis of pathologies. Several episcopic 3D imaging methods exist. The most advanced are capable of generating high-resolution volume data (voxel sizes from 0.5x0.5x1 µm upwards) of small to large embryos of model organisms and tissue samples. Beside anatomy and tissue architecture, gene expression and gene product patterns can be three dimensionally analyzed in their precise anatomical and histological context with the aid of whole mount in situ hybridization or whole mount immunohistochemical staining techniques. Episcopic 3D imaging techniques were and are employed for analyzing the precise morphological phenotype of experimentally malformed, randomly produced, or genetically engineered embryos of biomedical model organisms. It has been shown that episcopic 3D imaging also fits for describing the spatial distribution of genes and gene products during embryogenesis, and that it can be used for analyzing tissue samples of adult model animals and humans. The latter offers the possibility to use episcopic 3D imaging techniques for researching the causality and treatment of pathologies or for staging cancer. Such applications, however, are not yet routine and currently only preliminary results are available. We conclude that, although episcopic 3D imaging is in its very beginnings, it represents an upcoming methodology, which in short terms will become an indispensable tool for researching the genetic regulation of embryo development as well as the genesis of malformations and diseases. PMID:19452045

  12. A new visualization method for 3D head MRA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Satoshi; Hatanaka, Masahiko

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new visualization method for head MRA data which supports the user to easily determine the positioning of MPR images and/or MIP images based on the blood vessel network structure (the anatomic location of blood vessels). This visualization method has following features: (a) the blood vessel (cerebral artery) network structure in 3D head MRA data is portrayed the 3D line structure; (b) the MPR or MIP images are combined with the blood vessel network structure and displayed in a 3D visualization space; (c) the positioning of MPR or MIP is decided based on the anatomic location of blood vessels; (d) The image processing and drawing can be operated at real-time without a special hardware accelerator. As a result, we believe that our method is available to position MPR images or MIP images related to the blood vessel network structure. Moreover, we think that the user using this method can obtain the 3D information (position, angle, direction) of both these images and the blood vessel network structure.

  13. Upwind Compact Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I.

    1985-07-01

    It was shown by Ciment, Leventhal, and Weinberg ( J. Comput. Phys.28 (1978), 135) that the standard compact finite difference scheme may break down in convection dominated problems. An upwinding of the method, which maintains the fourth order accuracy, is suggested and favorable numerical results are found for a number of test problems.

  14. THREE-POINT BACKWARD FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD FOR SOLVING A SYSTEM OF MIXED HYPERBOLIC-PARABOLIC PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. (R825549C019)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-point backward finite-difference method has been derived for a system of mixed hyperbolic¯¯parabolic (convection¯¯diffusion) partial differential equations (mixed PDEs). The method resorts to the three-point backward differenci...

  15. Novel 3D Compression Methods for Geometry, Connectivity and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddeq, M. M.; Rodrigues, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    A large number of applications in medical visualization, games, engineering design, entertainment, heritage, e-commerce and so on require the transmission of 3D models over the Internet or over local networks. 3D data compression is an important requirement for fast data storage, access and transmission within bandwidth limitations. The Wavefront OBJ (object) file format is commonly used to share models due to its clear simple design. Normally each OBJ file contains a large amount of data (e.g. vertices and triangulated faces, normals, texture coordinates and other parameters) describing the mesh surface. In this paper we introduce a new method to compress geometry, connectivity and texture coordinates by a novel Geometry Minimization Algorithm (GM-Algorithm) in connection with arithmetic coding. First, each vertex ( x, y, z) coordinates are encoded to a single value by the GM-Algorithm. Second, triangle faces are encoded by computing the differences between two adjacent vertex locations, which are compressed by arithmetic coding together with texture coordinates. We demonstrate the method on large data sets achieving compression ratios between 87 and 99 % without reduction in the number of reconstructed vertices and triangle faces. The decompression step is based on a Parallel Fast Matching Search Algorithm (Parallel-FMS) to recover the structure of the 3D mesh. A comparative analysis of compression ratios is provided with a number of commonly used 3D file formats such as VRML, OpenCTM and STL highlighting the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2-D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-09-01

    The 2-D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly to computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2-D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional second-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2M)th-order accuracy in space and (2N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra

  17. A Kosloff/Basal method, 3D migration program implemented on the CYBER 205 supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, L. D.; Wheat, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional finite difference migration has relied on approximations to the acoustic wave equation which allow energy to propagate only downwards. Although generally reliable, such approaches usually do not yield an accurate migration for geological structures with strong lateral velocity variations or with steeply dipping reflectors. An earlier study by D. Kosloff and E. Baysal (Migration with the Full Acoustic Wave Equation) examined an alternative approach based on the full acoustic wave equation. The 2D, Fourier type algorithm which was developed was tested by Kosloff and Baysal against synthetic data and against physical model data. The results indicated that such a scheme gives accurate migration for complicated structures. This paper describes the development and testing of a vectorized, 3D migration program for the CYBER 205 using the Kosloff/Baysal method. The program can accept as many as 65,536 zero offset (stacked) traces.

  18. Effective classification of 3D image data using partitioning methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Pokrajac, Dragoljub; Lazarevic, Aleksandar; Obradovic, Zoran

    2002-03-01

    We propose partitioning-based methods to facilitate the classification of 3-D binary image data sets of regions of interest (ROIs) with highly non-uniform distributions. The first method is based on recursive dynamic partitioning of a 3-D volume into a number of 3-D hyper-rectangles. For each hyper-rectangle, we consider, as a potential attribute, the number of voxels (volume elements) that belong to ROIs. A hyper-rectangle is partitioned only if the corresponding attribute does not have high discriminative power, determined by statistical tests, but it is still sufficiently large for further splitting. The final discriminative hyper-rectangles form new attributes that are further employed in neural network classification models. The second method is based on maximum likelihood employing non-spatial (k-means) and spatial DBSCAN clustering algorithms to estimate the parameters of the underlying distributions. The proposed methods were experimentally evaluated on mixtures of Gaussian distributions, on realistic lesion-deficit data generated by a simulator conforming to a clinical study, and on synthetic fractal data. Both proposed methods have provided good classification on Gaussian mixtures and on realistic data. However, the experimental results on fractal data indicated that the clustering-based methods were only slightly better than random guess, while the recursive partitioning provided significantly better classification accuracy.

  19. Higher Order Finite Element Methods for Compositional Simulation in 3D Multiphase Multicomponent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, E.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D model for fully compositional multi-phase multi-component flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. Phase properties are modeled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Because phase properties may exhibit strong discontinuities, we approximate the mass transport update by the means of discontinuous Galerkin method. Pressure and velocity fields are continuous across the whole domain of solution, which is guaranteed by using the mixed hybrid finite element method. Complexity of the flow necessitates the use of either very fine mesh or higher-order schemes. The use of higher-order finite element methods significantly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects that plague traditional finite difference methods. We have shown that in 3D the convergence rate of our scheme is twice as first order method and the CPU time may improve up to three orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Our numerical model facilitates accurate simulation of delicate feature of compositional flow like fingering and CO2 injection in complex reservoirs for a broad range of applications, including CO2 sequestration in finite aquifer and water flooded reservoirs with transfer of all species between the phases.

  20. A method for building 3D models of barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nai, Yang; Li-lan, Su; Lin, Wan; Jie, Yang; Shi-yi, Chen; Wei-lu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of barchan dunes are usually represented by digital terrain models (DTMs) overlaid with digital orthophoto maps. Given that most regions with barchan dues have low relief, a 3D map obtained from a DTM may ineffectively show the stereoscopic shape of each dune. The method of building 3D models of barchan dunes using existing modeling software seldom considers the geographical environment. As a result, barchan dune models are often inconsistent with actual DTMs and incompletely express the morphological characteristics of dunes. Manual construction of barchan dune models is also costly and time consuming. Considering these problems, the morphological characteristics of barchan dunes and the mathematical relationships between the morphological parameters of the dunes, such as length, height, and width, are analyzed in this study. The methods of extracting the morphological feature points of barchan dunes, calculating their morphological parameters and building dune outlines and skeleton lines based on the medial axes, are also presented. The dune outlines, skeleton lines, and part of the medial axes of dunes are used to construct a constrained triangulated irregular network. C# and ArcEngine are employed to build 3D models of barchan dunes automatically. Experimental results of a study conducted in Tengger Desert show that the method can be used to approximate the morphological characteristics of barchan dunes and is less time consuming than manual methods.

  1. Application of 3D reflection seismic methods to mineral exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urosevic, Milovan

    2013-04-01

    Seismic exploration for mineral deposits is often tested by excessively complex structures, regolith heterogeneity, intrinsically low signal to noise ratio, ground relief and accessibility. In brown fields, where the majority of the seismic surveys have been conducted, existing infrastructure, old pits and tailings, heavy machinery in operation, mine drainage and other mine related activities are further challenging the application of seismic methods and furthermore increasing its cost. It is therefore not surprising that the mining industry has been reluctant to use seismic methods, particularly 3D for mineral exploration, primarily due to the high cost, but also because of variable performance, and in some cases ambiguous interpretation results. However, shallow mineral reserves are becoming depleted and exploration is moving towards deeper targets. Seismic methods will be more important for deeper investigations and may become the primary exploration tool in the near future. The big issue is if we have an appropriate seismic "strategy" for exploration of deep, complex mineral reserves. From the existing case histories worldwide we know that massive ore deposits (VMS, VHMS) constitute the best case scenario for the application of 3D seismic. Direct targeting of massive ore bodies from seismic has been documented in several case histories. Sediment hosted deposits could, in some cases, can also produce a detectable seismic signature. Other deposit types such as IOCG and skarn are much more challenging for the application of seismic methods. The complexity of these deposits requires new thinking. Several 3D surveys acquired over different deposit types will be presented and discussed.

  2. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  3. Optical Sensors and Methods for Underwater 3D Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Massot-Campos, Miquel; Oliver-Codina, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a survey on optical sensors and methods for 3D reconstruction in underwater environments. The techniques to obtain range data have been listed and explained, together with the different sensor hardware that makes them possible. The literature has been reviewed, and a classification has been proposed for the existing solutions. New developments, commercial solutions and previous reviews in this topic have also been gathered and considered. PMID:26694389

  4. Discrete Method of Images for 3D Radio Propagation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Discretization by rasterization is introduced into the method of images (MI) in the context of 3D deterministic radio propagation modeling as a way to exploit spatial coherence of electromagnetic propagation for fine-grained parallelism. Traditional algebraic treatment of bounding regions and surfaces is replaced by computer graphics rendering of 3D reflections and double refractions while building the image tree. The visibility of reception points and surfaces is also resolved by shader programs. The proposed rasterization is shown to be of comparable run time to that of the fundamentally parallel shooting and bouncing rays. The rasterization does not affect the signal evaluation backtracking step, thus preserving its advantage over the brute force ray-tracing methods in terms of accuracy. Moreover, the rendering resolution may be scaled back for a given level of scenario detail with only marginal impact on the image tree size. This allows selection of scene optimized execution parameters for faster execution, giving the method a competitive edge. The proposed variant of MI can be run on any GPU that supports real-time 3D graphics.

  5. Method for modeling post-mortem biometric 3D fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, Srijith; Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite the advancements of fingerprint recognition in 2-D and 3-D domain, authenticating deformed/post-mortem fingerprints continue to be an important challenge. Prior cleansing and reconditioning of the deceased finger is required before acquisition of the fingerprint. The victim's finger needs to be precisely and carefully operated by a medium to record the fingerprint impression. This process may damage the structure of the finger, which subsequently leads to higher false rejection rates. This paper proposes a non-invasive method to perform 3-D deformed/post-mortem finger modeling, which produces a 2-D rolled equivalent fingerprint for automated verification. The presented novel modeling method involves masking, filtering, and unrolling. Computer simulations were conducted on finger models with different depth variations obtained from Flashscan3D LLC. Results illustrate that the modeling scheme provides a viable 2-D fingerprint of deformed models for automated verification. The quality and adaptability of the obtained unrolled 2-D fingerprints were analyzed using NIST fingerprint software. Eventually, the presented method could be extended to other biometric traits such as palm, foot, tongue etc. for security and administrative applications.

  6. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  7. Improving Semantic Updating Method on 3d City Models Using Hybrid Semantic-Geometric 3d Segmentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkawi, K.-H.; Abdul-Rahman, A.

    2013-09-01

    to LoD4. The accuracy and structural complexity of the 3D objects increases with the LoD level where LoD0 is the simplest LoD (2.5D; Digital Terrain Model (DTM) + building or roof print) while LoD4 is the most complex LoD (architectural details with interior structures). Semantic information is one of the main components in CityGML and 3D City Models, and provides important information for any analyses. However, more often than not, the semantic information is not available for the 3D city model due to the unstandardized modelling process. One of the examples is where a building is normally generated as one object (without specific feature layers such as Roof, Ground floor, Level 1, Level 2, Block A, Block B, etc). This research attempts to develop a method to improve the semantic data updating process by segmenting the 3D building into simpler parts which will make it easier for the users to select and update the semantic information. The methodology is implemented for 3D buildings in LoD2 where the buildings are generated without architectural details but with distinct roof structures. This paper also introduces hybrid semantic-geometric 3D segmentation method that deals with hierarchical segmentation of a 3D building based on its semantic value and surface characteristics, fitted by one of the predefined primitives. For future work, the segmentation method will be implemented as part of the change detection module that can detect any changes on the 3D buildings, store and retrieve semantic information of the changed structure, automatically updates the 3D models and visualize the results in a userfriendly graphical user interface (GUI).

  8. Method and simulation to study 3D crosstalk perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaustova, Dar'ya; Blondé, Laurent; Huynh-Thu, Quan; Vienne, Cyril; Doyen, Didier

    2012-03-01

    To various degrees, all modern 3DTV displays suffer from crosstalk, which can lead to a decrease of both visual quality and visual comfort, and also affect perception of depth. In the absence of a perfect 3D display technology, crosstalk has to be taken into account when studying perception of 3D stereoscopic content. In order to improve 3D presentation systems and understand how to efficiently eliminate crosstalk, it is necessary to understand its impact on human perception. In this paper, we present a practical method to study the perception of crosstalk. The approach consists of four steps: (1) physical measurements of a 3DTV, (2) building of a crosstalk surface based on those measurements and representing specifically the behavior of that 3TV, (3) manipulation of the crosstalk function and application on reference images to produce test images degraded by crosstalk in various ways, and (4) psychophysical tests. Our approach allows both a realistic representation of the behavior of a 3DTV and the easy manipulation of its resulting crosstalk in order to conduct psycho-visual experiments. Our approach can be used in all studies requiring the understanding of how crosstalk affects perception of stereoscopic content and how it can be corrected efficiently.

  9. System and method for 3D printing of aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Duoss, Eric; Kuntz, Joshua; Spadaccini, Christopher; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-03-08

    A method of forming an aerogel. The method may involve providing a graphene oxide powder and mixing the graphene oxide powder with a solution to form an ink. A 3D printing technique may be used to write the ink into a catalytic solution that is contained in a fluid containment member to form a wet part. The wet part may then be cured in a sealed container for a predetermined period of time at a predetermined temperature. The cured wet part may then be dried to form a finished aerogel part.

  10. The practical application of a finite difference method for analyzing transonic flow over oscillating airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherill, W. H.; Sebastian, J. D.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1978-01-01

    Separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady equations for small disturbances was performed. The steady velocity potential was obtained first from the well known nonlinear equation for steady transonic flow. The unsteady velocity potential was then obtained from a linear differential equation in complex form with spatially varying coefficients. Since sinusoidal motion is assumed, the unsteady equation is independent of time. The results of an investigation into the relaxation-solution-instability problem was discussed. Concepts examined include variations in outer boundary conditions, a coordinate transformation so that the boundary condition at infinity may be applied to the outer boundaries of the finite difference region, and overlapping subregions. The general conclusion was that only a full direct solution in which all unknowns are obtained at the same time will avoid the solution instabilities of relaxation. An analysis of the one-dimensional form of the unsteady transonic equation was studied to evaluate errors between exact and finite difference solutions. Pressure distributions were presented for a low-aspect-ratio clipped delta wing at Mach number of 0.9 and for a moderate-aspect-ratio rectangular wing at a Mach number of 0.875.

  11. A Block-Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Technique with a Finite-Difference-Based Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2013-11-01

    A novel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for the numerical solution of fluid flow problems is presented in this study. The proposed AMR algorithm can be used to solve partial differential equations including, but not limited to, the Navier-Stokes equations using an AMR technique. Here, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed as a substitute of the nearly incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Besides its simplicity, the proposed AMR algorithm is straightforward and yet efficient. The idea is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure by using the pointer attributes in a unique way, along with an appropriate adjustment of the child block's IDs, to determine the neighbors of a certain block. Thanks to the unique way of invoking pointers, there is no need to construct a quad-tree (in 2D) or oct-tree (in 3D) data structure for maintaining the connectivity data between different blocks. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with a clean and efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. Several benchmark studies are carried out to assess the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed AMR-LBM, including lid-driven cavity flow, vortex shedding past a square cylinder, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for single-phase and multiphase fluids.

  12. Novel frequency domain techniques and advances in Finite Difference Time domain (FDTD) method for efficient solution of multiscale electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayappan, Kadappan

    With the advent of sub-micron technologies and increasing awareness of Electromagnetic Interference and Compatibility (EMI/EMC) issues, designers are often interested in full- wave solutions of complete systems, taking to account a variety of environments in which the system operates. However, attempts to do this substantially increase the complexities involved in computing full-wave solutions, especially when the problems involve multi- scale geometries with very fine features. For such problems, even the well-established numerical methods, such as the time domain technique FDTD and the frequency domain methods FEM and MoM, are often challenged to the limits of their capabilities. In an attempt to address such challenges, three novel techniques have been introduced in this work, namely Dipole Moment (DM) Approach, Recursive Update in Frequency Domain (RUFD) and New Finite Difference Time Domain ( vFDTD). Furthermore, the efficacy of the above techniques has been illustrated, via several examples, and the results obtained by proposed techniques have been compared with other existing numerical methods for the purpose of validation. The DM method is a new physics-based approach for formulating MoM problems, which is based on the use of dipole moments (DMs), as opposed to the conventional Green's functions. The absence of the Green's functions, as well as those of the vector and scalar potentials, helps to eliminate two of the key sources of difficulties in the conventional MoM formulation, namely the singularity and low-frequency problems. Specifically, we show that there are no singularities that we need to be concerned with in the DM formulation; hence, this obviates the need for special techniques for integrating these singularities. Yet another salutary feature of the DM approach is its ability to handle thin and lossy structures, or whether they are metallic, dielectric-type, or even combinations thereof. We have found that the DM formulation can handle these

  13. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  14. Approximation of the Lévy Feller advection dispersion process by random walk and finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Liu, F.; Turner, I.; Anh, V.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we present a random walk model for approximating a Lévy-Feller advection-dispersion process, governed by the Lévy-Feller advection-dispersion differential equation (LFADE). We show that the random walk model converges to LFADE by use of a properly scaled transition to vanishing space and time steps. We propose an explicit finite difference approximation (EFDA) for LFADE, resulting from the Grünwald-Letnikov discretization of fractional derivatives. As a result of the interpretation of the random walk model, the stability and convergence of EFDA for LFADE in a bounded domain are discussed. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to show the application of the present technique.

  15. Lightning Threat Analysis for the Space Shuttle Launch Pad and the Payload Changeout Room Using Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Richard S.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes finite difference computer calculations for the Space Shuttle Launch Pad which predict lightning induced electric currents and electric and magnetic fields caused by a lightning strike to the Lightning Protection System caternary wire. Description of possible lightning threats to Shuttle Payload components together with specifications for protection of these components, result from the calculation of lightning induced electric and magnetic fields inside and outside the during a lightning event. These fields also induce currents and voltages on cables and circuits which may be connected to, or a part of, shuttle payload components. These currents and voltages are also calculated. These threat levels are intended as a guide for designers of payload equipment to specify any shielding and/or lightning protection mitigation which may be required for payload components which are in the process of preparation or being transferred into the Shuttle Orbiter.

  16. Optical simulation of in-plane-switching blue phase liquid crystal display using the finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hu; Ma, Hongmei; Sun, Yu-Bao

    2016-09-01

    The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the optical characteristics of an in-plane switching blue phase liquid crystal display. Compared with the matrix optic methods and the refractive method, the finite-difference time-domain method, which is used to directly solve Maxwell’s equations, can consider the lateral variation of the refractive index and obtain an accurate convergence effect. The simulation results show that e-rays and o-rays bend in different directions when the in-plane switching blue phase liquid crystal display is driven by the operating voltage. The finite-difference time-domain method should be used when the distribution of the liquid crystal in the liquid crystal display has a large lateral change. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304074, 61475042, and 11274088), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2015202320 and GCC2014048), and the Key Subject Construction Project of Hebei Province University, China.

  17. Hybrid 3D-2D printing of bone scaffolds Hybrid 3D-2D printing methods for bone scaffolds fabrication.

    PubMed

    Prinz, V Ya; Seleznev, Vladimir

    2016-12-13

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  18. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using the horizontal spectral element method and vertical finite difference method: 2-D aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.-J.; Giraldo, F. X.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-11-01

    The non-hydrostatic (NH) compressible Euler equations for dry atmosphere were solved in a simplified two-dimensional (2-D) slice framework employing a spectral element method (SEM) for the horizontal discretization and a finite difference method (FDM) for the vertical discretization. By using horizontal SEM, which decomposes the physical domain into smaller pieces with a small communication stencil, a high level of scalability can be achieved. By using vertical FDM, an easy method for coupling the dynamics and existing physics packages can be provided. The SEM uses high-order nodal basis functions associated with Lagrange polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) quadrature points. The FDM employs a third-order upwind-biased scheme for the vertical flux terms and a centered finite difference scheme for the vertical derivative and integral terms. For temporal integration, a time-split, third-order Runge-Kutta (RK3) integration technique was applied. The Euler equations that were used here are in flux form based on the hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate. The equations are the same as those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, but a hybrid sigma-pressure vertical coordinate was implemented in this model. We validated the model by conducting the widely used standard tests: linear hydrostatic mountain wave, tracer advection, and gravity wave over the Schär-type mountain, as well as density current, inertia-gravity wave, and rising thermal bubble. The results from these tests demonstrated that the model using the horizontal SEM and the vertical FDM is accurate and robust provided sufficient diffusion is applied. The results with various horizontal resolutions also showed convergence of second-order accuracy due to the accuracy of the time integration scheme and that of the vertical direction, although high-order basis functions were used in the horizontal. By using the 2-D slice model, we effectively showed that the combined spatial

  19. The development of a 3D risk analysis method.

    PubMed

    I, Yet-Pole; Cheng, Te-Lung

    2008-05-01

    Much attention has been paid to the quantitative risk analysis (QRA) research in recent years due to more and more severe disasters that have happened in the process industries. Owing to its calculation complexity, very few software, such as SAFETI, can really make the risk presentation meet the practice requirements. However, the traditional risk presentation method, like the individual risk contour in SAFETI, is mainly based on the consequence analysis results of dispersion modeling, which usually assumes that the vapor cloud disperses over a constant ground roughness on a flat terrain with no obstructions and concentration fluctuations, which is quite different from the real situations of a chemical process plant. All these models usually over-predict the hazardous regions in order to maintain their conservativeness, which also increases the uncertainty of the simulation results. On the other hand, a more rigorous model such as the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model can resolve the previous limitations; however, it cannot resolve the complexity of risk calculations. In this research, a conceptual three-dimensional (3D) risk calculation method was proposed via the combination of results of a series of CFD simulations with some post-processing procedures to obtain the 3D individual risk iso-surfaces. It is believed that such technique will not only be limited to risk analysis at ground level, but also be extended into aerial, submarine, or space risk analyses in the near future.

  20. A perceptual preprocess method for 3D-HEVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yawen; Wang, Yongfang; Wang, Yubing

    2015-08-01

    A perceptual preprocessing method for 3D-HEVC coding is proposed in the paper. Firstly we proposed a new JND model, which accounts for luminance contrast masking effect, spatial masking effect, and temporal masking effect, saliency characteristic as well as depth information. We utilize spectral residual approach to obtain the saliency map and built a visual saliency factor based on saliency map. In order to distinguish the sensitivity of objects in different depth. We segment each texture frame into foreground and background by a automatic threshold selection algorithm using corresponding depth information, and then built a depth weighting factor. A JND modulation factor is built with a linear combined with visual saliency factor and depth weighting factor to adjust the JND threshold. Then, we applied the proposed JND model to 3D-HEVC for residual filtering and distortion coefficient processing. The filtering process is that the residual value will be set to zero if the JND threshold is greater than residual value, or directly subtract the JND threshold from residual value if JND threshold is less than residual value. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve average bit rate reduction of 15.11%, compared to the original coding scheme with HTM12.1, while maintains the same subjective quality.

  1. Solution of the scalar wave equation over very long distances using nonlinear solitary waves: Relation to finite difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, John; Chitta, Subhashini

    2012-08-01

    The linear wave equation represents the basis of many linear electromagnetic and acoustic propagation problems. Features that a computational model must have, to capture large scale realistic effects (for over the horizon or "OTH" radar communication, for example), include propagation of short waves with scattering and partial absorption by complex topography. For these reasons, it is not feasible to use Green's Function or any simple integral method, which neglects these intermediate effects and requires a known propagation function between source and observer. In this paper, we describe a new method for propagating such short waves over long distances, including intersecting scattered waves. The new method appears to be much simpler than conventional high frequency schemes: Lagrangian "particle" based approaches, such as "ray tracing" become very complex in 3-D, especially for waves that may be expanding, or even intersecting. The other high frequency scheme in common use, the Eikonal, also has difficulty with intersecting waves. Our approach, based on nonlinear solitary waves concentrated about centroid surfaces of physical wave features, is related to that of Whitham [1], which involves solving wave fronts propagating on characteristics. Then, the evolving electromagnetic (or acoustic) field can be approximated as a collection of propagating co-dimension one surfaces (for example, 2-D surfaces in three dimensions). This approach involves solving propagation equations discretely on an Eulerian grid to approximate the linear wave equation. However, to propagate short waves over long distances, conventional Eulerian numerical methods, which attempt to resolve the structure of each wave, require far too many grid cells and are not feasible on current or foreseeable computers. Instead, we employ an "extended" wave equation that captures the important features of the propagating waves. This method is first formulated at the partial differential equation (PDE) level

  2. Accelerating a 3D finite-difference wave propagation code by a factor of 50 and a spectral-element code by a factor of 25 using a cluster of GPU graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Michéa, David; Erlebacher, Gordon; Göddeke, Dominik

    2010-05-01

    We first accelerate a three-dimensional finite-difference in the time domain (FDTD) wave propagation code by a factor of about 50 using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computing on a cheap NVIDIA graphics card with the CUDA programming language. We implement the code in CUDA in the case of the fully heterogeneous elastic wave equation. We also implement Convolution Perfectly Matched Layers (CPMLs) on the graphics card to efficiently absorb outgoing waves on the fictitious edges of the grid. We show that the code that runs on the graphics card gives the expected results by comparing our results to those obtained by running the same simulation on a classical processor core. The methodology that we present can be used for Maxwell's equations as well because their form is similar to that of the seismic wave equation written in velocity vector and stress tensor. We then implement a high-order finite-element (spectral-element) application, which performs the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation resulting for instance from earthquakes at the scale of a continent or from active seismic acquisition experiments in the oil industry, on a cluster of NVIDIA Tesla graphics cards using the CUDA programming language and non blocking message passing based on MPI. We compare it to the implementation in C language and MPI on a classical cluster of CPU nodes. We use mesh coloring to efficiently handle summation operations over degrees of freedom on an unstructured mesh, and we exchange information between nodes using non blocking MPI messages. Using non-blocking communications allows us to overlap the communications across the network and the data transfer between the GPU card and the CPU node on which it is installed with calculations on that GPU card. We perform a number of numerical tests to validate the single-precision CUDA and MPI implementation and assess its accuracy. We then analyze performance measurements and in average we obtain a speedup of 20x to 25x.

  3. Computation of ground motion amplification in Kolkata megacity (India) using finite-difference method for seismic microzonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiuly, Amit; Kumar, Vinay; Narayan, Jay

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the ground motion amplification scenario along with fundamental frequency (F 0) of sedimentary deposit for the seismic microzonation of Kolkata City, situated on the world's largest delta island with very soft soil deposit. A 4th order accurate SH-wave viscoelastic finite-difference algorithm is used for computation of response of 1D model for each borehole location. Different maps, such as for F 0, amplification at F 0, average spectral amplification (ASA) in the different frequency bandwidth of earthquake engineering interest are developed for a variety of end-users communities. The obtained ASA of the order of 3-6 at most of the borehole locations in a frequency range of 0.25-10.0 Hz reveals that Kolkata City may suffer severe damage even during a moderate earthquake. Further, unexpected severe damage to collapse of multi-storey buildings may occur in localities near Hoogly River and Salt Lake area due to double resonance effects during distant large earthquakes.

  4. The COMET method in 3-D hexagonal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2012-07-01

    The hybrid stochastic-deterministic coarse mesh radiation transport (COMET) method developed at Georgia Tech now solves reactor core problems in 3-D hexagonal geometry. In this paper, the method is used to solve three preliminary test problems designed to challenge the method with steep flux gradients, high leakage, and strong asymmetry and heterogeneity in the core. The test problems are composed of blocks taken from a high temperature test reactor benchmark problem. As the method is still in development, these problems and their results are strictly preliminary. Results are compared to whole core Monte Carlo reference solutions in order to verify the method. Relative errors are on the order of 50 pcm in core eigenvalue, and mean relative error in pin fission density calculations is less than 1% in these difficult test cores. The method requires the one-time pre-computation of a response expansion coefficient library, which may be compiled in a comparable amount of time to a single whole core Monte Carlo calculation. After the library has been computed, COMET may solve any number of core configurations on the order of an hour, representing a significant gain in efficiency over other methods for whole core transport calculations. (authors)

  5. Comparison of bootstrap resampling methods for 3-D PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Lartizien, C; Aubin, J-B; Buvat, I

    2010-07-01

    Two groups of bootstrap methods have been proposed to estimate the statistical properties of positron emission tomography (PET) images by generating multiple statistically equivalent data sets from few data samples. The first group generates resampled data based on a parametric approach assuming that data from which resampling is performed follows a Poisson distribution while the second group consists of nonparametric approaches. These methods either require a unique original sample or a series of statistically equivalent data that can be list-mode files or sinograms. Previous reports regarding these bootstrap approaches suggest different results. This work compares the accuracy of three of these bootstrap methods for 3-D PET imaging based on simulated data. Two methods are based on a unique file, namely a list-mode based nonparametric (LMNP) method and a sinogram based parametric (SP) method. The third method is a sinogram-based nonparametric (SNP) method. Another original method (extended LMNP) was also investigated, which is an extension of the LMNP methods based on deriving a resampled list-mode file by drawings events from multiple original list-mode files. Our comparison is based on the analysis of the statistical moments estimated on the repeated and resampled data. This includes the probability density function and the moments of order 1 and 2. Results show that the two methods based on multiple original data (SNP and extended LMNP) are the only methods that correctly estimate the statistical parameters. Performances of the LMNP and SP methods are variable. Simulated data used in this study were characterized by a high noise level. Differences among the tested strategies might be reduced with clinical data sets with lower noise.

  6. On 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Holt, R. V.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.; Gellin, S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the 2-year program, to develop advanced 3-D inelastic structural stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades and vanes. The approach was to develop a matrix of formulation elements and constitutive models. Three constitutive models were developed in conjunction with optimized iterating techniques, accelerators, and convergence criteria within a framework of dynamic time incrementing. Three formulations models were developed; an eight-noded mid-surface shell element, a nine-noded mid-surface shell element and a twenty-noded isoparametric solid element. A separate computer program was developed for each combination of constitutive model-formulation model. Each program provides a functional stand alone capability for performing cyclic nonlinear structural analysis. In addition, the analysis capabilities incorporated into each program can be abstracted in subroutine form for incorporation into other codes or to form new combinations.

  7. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    A two-year program to develop advanced 3D inelastic structural stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes is described. The approach was to develop a matrix of formulation elements and constitutive models. Three constitutive models were developed in conjunction with optimized iterating techniques, accelerators, and convergence criteria within a framework of dynamic time incrementing. Three formulation models were developed: an eight-noded midsurface shell element; a nine-noded midsurface shell element; and a twenty-noded isoparametric solid element. A separate computer program has been developed for each combination of constitutive model-formulation model. Each program provides a functional stand alone capability for performing cyclic nonlinear structural analysis. In addition, the analysis capabilities incorporated into each program can be abstracted in subroutine form for incorporation into other codes or to form new combinations.

  8. An improved 3D MoF method based on analytical partial derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Xiong

    2016-12-01

    MoF (Moment of Fluid) method is one of the most accurate approaches among various surface reconstruction algorithms. As other second order methods, MoF method needs to solve an implicit optimization problem to obtain the optimal approximate surface. Therefore, the partial derivatives of the objective function have to be involved during the iteration for efficiency and accuracy. However, to the best of our knowledge, the derivatives are currently estimated numerically by finite difference approximation because it is very difficult to obtain the analytical derivatives of the object function for an implicit optimization problem. Employing numerical derivatives in an iteration not only increase the computational cost, but also deteriorate the convergence rate and robustness of the iteration due to their numerical error. In this paper, the analytical first order partial derivatives of the objective function are deduced for 3D problems. The analytical derivatives can be calculated accurately, so they are incorporated into the MoF method to improve its accuracy, efficiency and robustness. Numerical studies show that by using the analytical derivatives the iterations are converged in all mixed cells with the efficiency improvement of 3 to 4 times.

  9. Improved time-space method for 3-D heat transfer problems including global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Wakashima, Shinichiro

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the Time-Space Method (TSM) which has been proposed for solving general heat transfer and fluid flow problems was improved in order to cover global and urban warming. The TSM is effective in almost all-transient heat transfer and fluid flow problems, and has been already applied to the 2-D melting problems (or moving boundary problems). The computer running time will be reduced to only 1/100th--1/1000th of the existing schemes for 2-D and 3-D problems. However, in order to apply to much larger-scale problems, for example, global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, the SOR method (or other iterative methods) in four dimensions is somewhat tedious and provokingly slow. Motivated by the above situation, the authors improved the speed of iteration of the previous TSM by introducing the following ideas: (1) Timewise chopping: Time domain is chopped into small peaches to save memory requirement; (2) Adaptive iteration: Converged region is eliminated for further iteration; (3) Internal selective iteration: Equation with slow iteration speed in iterative procedure is selectively iterated to accelerate entire convergence; and (4) False transient integration: False transient term is added to the Poisson-type equation and the relevant solution is regarded as a parabolic equation. By adopting the above improvements, the higher-order finite different schemes and the hybrid mesh, the computer running time for the TSM is reduced to some 1/4600th of the conventional explicit method for a typical 3-D natural convection problem in a closed cavity. The proposed TSM will be more efficacious for large-scale environmental problems, such as global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, in which a tremendous computing time would be required.

  10. Second order Method for Solving 3D Elasticity Equations with Complex Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elastic materials are ubiquitous in nature and indispensable components in man-made devices and equipments. When a device or equipment involves composite or multiple elastic materials, elasticity interface problems come into play. The solution of three dimensional (3D) elasticity interface problems is significantly more difficult than that of elliptic counterparts due to the coupled vector components and cross derivatives in the governing elasticity equation. This work introduces the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for solving 3D elasticity interface problems. The proposed MIB elasticity interface scheme utilizes fictitious values on irregular grid points near the material interface to replace function values in the discretization so that the elasticity equation can be discretized using the standard finite difference schemes as if there were no material interface. The interface jump conditions are rigorously enforced on the intersecting points between the interface and the mesh lines. Such an enforcement determines the fictitious values. A number of new techniques has been developed to construct efficient MIB elasticity interface schemes for dealing with cross derivative in coupled governing equations. The proposed method is extensively validated over both weak and strong discontinuity of the solution, both piecewise constant and position-dependent material parameters, both smooth and nonsmooth interface geometries, and both small and large contrasts in the Poisson’s ratio and shear modulus across the interface. Numerical experiments indicate that the present MIB method is of second order convergence in both L∞ and L2 error norms for handling arbitrarily complex interfaces, including biomolecular surfaces. To our best knowledge, this is the first elasticity interface method that is able to deliver the second convergence for the molecular surfaces of proteins.. PMID:25914422

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Method for 3-D Flows with Curved Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Shyy, Wei; Yu, Dazhi; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we investigate two issues that are important to computational efficiency and reliability in fluid dynamics applications of the lattice, Boltzmann equation (LBE): (1) Computational stability and accuracy of different lattice Boltzmann models and (2) the treatment of the boundary conditions on curved solid boundaries and their 3-D implementations. Three athermal 3-D LBE models (D3QI5, D3Ql9, and D3Q27) are studied and compared in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness. The boundary treatment recently developed by Filippova and Hanel and Met et al. in 2-D is extended to and implemented for 3-D. The convergence, stability, and computational efficiency of the 3-D LBE models with the boundary treatment for curved boundaries were tested in simulations of four 3-D flows: (1) Fully developed flows in a square duct, (2) flow in a 3-D lid-driven cavity, (3) fully developed flows in a circular pipe, and (4) a uniform flow over a sphere. We found that while the fifteen-velocity 3-D (D3Ql5) model is more prone to numerical instability and the D3Q27 is more computationally intensive, the 63Q19 model provides a balance between computational reliability and efficiency. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the boundary treatment for 3-D arbitrary curved geometry has second-order accuracy and possesses satisfactory stability characteristics.

  12. 3D Wavelet-Based Filter and Method

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.; Haase, Sebastian; Sedat, John W.

    2008-08-12

    A 3D wavelet-based filter for visualizing and locating structural features of a user-specified linear size in 2D or 3D image data. The only input parameter is a characteristic linear size of the feature of interest, and the filter output contains only those regions that are correlated with the characteristic size, thus denoising the image.

  13. Methods for Geometric Data Validation of 3d City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Alam, N.; Wewetzer, M.; Pries, M.; Coors, V.

    2015-12-01

    Geometric quality of 3D city models is crucial for data analysis and simulation tasks, which are part of modern applications of the data (e.g. potential heating energy consumption of city quarters, solar potential, etc.). Geometric quality in these contexts is however a different concept as it is for 2D maps. In the latter case, aspects such as positional or temporal accuracy and correctness represent typical quality metrics of the data. They are defined in ISO 19157 and should be mentioned as part of the metadata. 3D data has a far wider range of aspects which influence their quality, plus the idea of quality itself is application dependent. Thus, concepts for definition of quality are needed, including methods to validate these definitions. Quality on this sense means internal validation and detection of inconsistent or wrong geometry according to a predefined set of rules. A useful starting point would be to have correct geometry in accordance with ISO 19107. A valid solid should consist of planar faces which touch their neighbours exclusively in defined corner points and edges. No gaps between them are allowed, and the whole feature must be 2-manifold. In this paper, we present methods to validate common geometric requirements for building geometry. Different checks based on several algorithms have been implemented to validate a set of rules derived from the solid definition mentioned above (e.g. water tightness of the solid or planarity of its polygons), as they were developed for the software tool CityDoctor. The method of each check is specified, with a special focus on the discussion of tolerance values where they are necessary. The checks include polygon level checks to validate the correctness of each polygon, i.e. closeness of the bounding linear ring and planarity. On the solid level, which is only validated if the polygons have passed validation, correct polygon orientation is checked, after self-intersections outside of defined corner points and edges

  14. A radial basis function (RBF) finite difference method for the simulation of reaction-diffusion equations on stationary platelets within the augmented forcing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Varun; Wright, Grady B.; Fogelson, Aaron L.; Kirby, Robert M.

    2014-05-01

    We present a computational method for solving the coupled problem of chemical transport in a fluid (blood) with binding/unbinding of the chemical to/from cellular (platelet) surfaces in contact with the fluid, and with transport of the chemical on the cellular surfaces. The overall framework is the Augmented Forcing Point Method (AFM) (\\emph{L. Yao and A.L. Fogelson, Simulations of chemical transport and reaction in a suspension of cells I: An augmented forcing point method for the stationary case, IJNMF (2012) 69, 1736-52.}) for solving fluid-phase transport in a region outside of a collection of cells suspended in the fluid. We introduce a novel Radial Basis Function-Finite Difference (RBF-FD) method to solve reaction-diffusion equations on the surface of each of a collection of 2D stationary platelets suspended in blood. Parametric RBFs are used to represent the geometry of the platelets and give accurate geometric information needed for the RBF-FD method. Symmetric Hermite-RBF interpolants are used for enforcing the boundary conditions on the fluid-phase chemical concentration, and their use removes a significant limitation of the original AFM. The efficacy of the new methods are shown through a series of numerical experiments; in particular, second order convergence for the coupled problem is demonstrated.

  15. 3D model retrieval method based on mesh segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yuanchao; Tang, Yan; Zhang, Qingchen

    2012-04-01

    In the process of feature description and extraction, current 3D model retrieval algorithms focus on the global features of 3D models but ignore the combination of global and local features of the model. For this reason, they show less effective performance to the models with similar global shape and different local shape. This paper proposes a novel algorithm for 3D model retrieval based on mesh segmentation. The key idea is to exact the structure feature and the local shape feature of 3D models, and then to compares the similarities of the two characteristics and the total similarity between the models. A system that realizes this approach was built and tested on a database of 200 objects and achieves expected results. The results show that the proposed algorithm improves the precision and the recall rate effectively.

  16. 3D face recognition by projection-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutagaci, Helin; Sankur, Bülent; Yemez, Yücel

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate recognition performances of various projection-based features applied on registered 3D scans of faces. Some features are data driven, such as ICA-based features or NNMF-based features. Other features are obtained using DFT or DCT-based schemes. We apply the feature extraction techniques to three different representations of registered faces, namely, 3D point clouds, 2D depth images and 3D voxel. We consider both global and local features. Global features are extracted from the whole face data, whereas local features are computed over the blocks partitioned from 2D depth images. The block-based local features are fused both at feature level and at decision level. The resulting feature vectors are matched using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Experiments using different combinations of representation types and feature vectors are conducted on the 3D-RMA dataset.

  17. Real-space finite-difference approach for multi-body systems: path-integral renormalization group method and direct energy minimization method.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Kojo, Masashi; Hirose, Kikuji; Goto, Hidekazu

    2011-11-02

    The path-integral renormalization group and direct energy minimization method of practical first-principles electronic structure calculations for multi-body systems within the framework of the real-space finite-difference scheme are introduced. These two methods can handle higher dimensional systems with consideration of the correlation effect. Furthermore, they can be easily extended to the multicomponent quantum systems which contain more than two kinds of quantum particles. The key to the present methods is employing linear combinations of nonorthogonal Slater determinants (SDs) as multi-body wavefunctions. As one of the noticeable results, the same accuracy as the variational Monte Carlo method is achieved with a few SDs. This enables us to study the entire ground state consisting of electrons and nuclei without the need to use the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Recent activities on methodological developments aiming towards practical calculations such as the implementation of auxiliary field for Coulombic interaction, the treatment of the kinetic operator in imaginary-time evolutions, the time-saving double-grid technique for bare-Coulomb atomic potentials and the optimization scheme for minimizing the total-energy functional are also introduced. As test examples, the total energy of the hydrogen molecule, the atomic configuration of the methylene and the electronic structures of two-dimensional quantum dots are calculated, and the accuracy, availability and possibility of the present methods are demonstrated.

  18. Unlocking the scientific potential of complex 3D point cloud dataset : new classification and 3D comparison methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.; Brodu, N.; Leroux, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based lidar and photogrammetric techniques are increasingly used to track the evolution of natural surfaces in 3D at an unprecedented resolution and precision. The range of applications encompass many type of natural surfaces with different geometries and roughness characteristics (landslides, cliff erosion, river beds, bank erosion,....). Unravelling surface change in these contexts requires to compare large point clouds in 2D or 3D. The most commonly used method in geomorphology is based on a 2D difference of the gridded point clouds. Yet this is hardly adapted to many 3D natural environments such as rivers (with horizontal beds and vertical banks), while gridding complex rough surfaces is a complex task. On the other hand, tools allowing to perform 3D comparison are scarce and may require to mesh the point clouds which is difficult on rough natural surfaces. Moreover, existing 3D comparison tools do not provide an explicit calculation of confidence intervals that would factor in registration errors, roughness effects and instrument related position uncertainties. To unlock this problem, we developed the first algorithm combining a 3D measurement of surface change directly on point clouds with an estimate of spatially variable confidence intervals (called M3C2). The method has two steps : (1) surface normal estimation and orientation in 3D at a scale consistent with the local roughness ; (2) measurement of mean surface change along the normal direction with explicit calculation of a local confidence interval. Comparison with existing 3D methods based on a closest-point calculation demonstrates the higher precision of the M3C2 method when mm changes needs to be detected. The M3C2 method is also simple to use as it does not require surface meshing or gridding, and is not sensitive to missing data or change in point density. We also present a 3D classification tool (CANUPO) for vegetation removal based on a new geometrical measure: the multi

  19. A hybrid wavelet-based adaptive immersed boundary finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method for two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiongwei; Yao, Xiongliang; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Minghao

    2017-03-01

    A second generation wavelet-based adaptive finite-difference Lattice Boltzmann method (FD-LBM) is developed in this paper. In this approach, the adaptive wavelet collocation method (AWCM) is firstly, to the best of our knowledge, incorporated into the FD-LBM. According to the grid refinement criterion based on the wavelet amplitudes of density distribution functions, an adaptive sparse grid is generated by the omission and addition of collocation points. On the sparse grid, the finite differences are used to approximate the derivatives. To eliminate the special treatments in using the FD-based derivative approximation near boundaries, the immersed boundary method (IBM) is also introduced into FD-LBM. By using the adaptive technique, the adaptive code requires much less grid points as compared to the uniform-mesh code. As a consequence, the computational efficiency can be improved. To justify the proposed method, a series of test cases, including fixed boundary cases and moving boundary cases, are invested. A good agreement between the present results and the data in previous literatures is obtained, which demonstrates the accuracy and effectiveness of the present AWCM-IB-LBM.

  20. Aspects of numerical and representational methods related to the finite-difference simulation of advective and dispersive transport of freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the transport of injected freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer, overlain and underlain by confining layers containing more saline water, is shown to be influenced by the choice of the finite-difference approximation method, the algorithm for representing vertical advective and dispersive fluxes, and the values assigned to parametric coefficients that specify the degree of vertical dispersion and molecular diffusion that occurs. Computed potable water recovery efficiencies will differ depending upon the choice of algorithm and approximation method, as will dispersion coefficients estimated based on the calibration of simulations to match measured data. A comparison of centered and backward finite-difference approximation methods shows that substantially different transition zones between injected and native waters are depicted by the different methods, and computed recovery efficiencies vary greatly. Standard and experimental algorithms and a variety of values for molecular diffusivity, transverse dispersivity, and vertical scaling factor were compared in simulations of freshwater storage in a thin brackish aquifer. Computed recovery efficiencies vary considerably, and appreciable differences are observed in the distribution of injected freshwater in the various cases tested. The results demonstrate both a qualitatively different description of transport using the experimental algorithms and the interrelated influences of molecular diffusion and transverse dispersion on simulated recovery efficiency. When simulating natural aquifer flow in cross-section, flushing of the aquifer occurred for all tested coefficient choices using both standard and experimental algorithms. ?? 1993.

  1. Time-splitting finite difference method with the wavelet-adaptive grids for semiclassical Gross-Pitaevskii equation in supercritical case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueyang; Xiao, Aiguo

    2014-06-01

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation is the model equation of the single-particle wave function in a Bose-Einstein condensation. A computation difficulty of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation comes from the semiclassical problem in supercritical case. In this paper, we apply a diffeomorphism to transform the original one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation into a modified equation. The adaptive grids are constructed through the interpolating wavelet method. Then, we use the time-splitting finite difference method with the wavelet-adaptive grids to solve the modified Gross-Pitaevskii equation, where the approximation to the second-order derivative is given by the Lagrange interpolation method. At last, the numerical results are given. It is shown that the obtained time-splitting finite difference method with the wavelet-adaptive grids is very efficient for solving the one-dimensional semiclassical Gross-Pitaevskii equation in supercritical case and it is suitable to deal with the local high oscillation of the solution.

  2. Methods For Electronic 3-D Moving Pictures Without Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collender, Robert B.

    1987-06-01

    This paper describes implementation approaches in image acquisition and playback for 3-D computer graphics, 3-D television and 3-D theatre movies without special glasses. Projection lamps, spatial light modulators, CRT's and dynamic scanning are all eliminated by the application of an active image array, all static components and a semi-specular screen. The resulting picture shows horizontal parallax with a wide horizontal view field (up to 360 de-grees) giving a holographic appearance in full color with smooth continuous viewing without speckle. Static component systems are compared with dynamic component systems using both linear and circular arrays. Implementation of computer graphic systems are shown that allow complex shaded color images to extend from the viewer's eyes to infinity. Large screen systems visible by hundreds of people are feasible by the use of low f-stops and high gain screens in projection. Screen geometries and special screen properties are shown. Viewing characteristics offer no restrictions in view-position over the entire view-field and have a "look-around" feature for all the categories of computer graphics, television and movies. Standard video cassettes and optical discs can also interface the system to generate a 3-D window viewable without glasses. A prognosis is given for technology application to 3-D pictures without glasses that replicate the daily viewing experience. Super-position of computer graphics on real-world pictures is shown feasible.

  3. A hybrid method for the computation of quasi-3D seismograms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Green's functions are computed using 2D SEM simulation in a 1D Earth model. Such seismograms account for the 3D structure inside the region of interest in a quasi-exact manner. Later we plan to extrapolate the misfit function computed from such seismograms at the stations back into the SEM region in order to compute local adjoint kernels. This opens a new path toward regional adjoint tomography into the deep Earth. Capdeville, Y., et al. (2002). "Coupling the spectral element method with a modal solution for elastic wave propagation in global Earth models." Geophysical Journal International 152(1): 34-67. Lekic, V. and B. Romanowicz (2011). "Inferring upper-mantle structure by full waveform tomography with the spectral element method." Geophysical Journal International 185(2): 799-831. Nissen-Meyer, T., et al. (2007). "A two-dimensional spectral-element method for computing spherical-earth seismograms-I. Moment-tensor source." Geophysical Journal International 168(3): 1067-1092. Robertsson, J. O. A. and C. H. Chapman (2000). "An efficient method for calculating finite-difference seismograms after model alterations." Geophysics 65(3): 907-918. Tape, C., et al. (2009). "Adjoint tomography of the southern California crust." Science 325(5943): 988-992.

  4. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    The current and future potential of finite difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism are demonstrated. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advanced-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  5. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the current and future potential of finite-difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advance-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  6. A Comparison of Spectral Element and Finite Difference Methods Using Statically Refined Nonconforming Grids for the MHD Island Coalescence Instability Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.; Rosenberg, D.; Pouquet, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2009-04-01

    A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code [Rosenberg, Fournier, Fischer, Pouquet, J. Comp. Phys. 215, 59-80 (2006)] is applied to simulate the problem of MHD island coalescence instability (\\ci) in two dimensions. \\ci is a fundamental MHD process that can produce sharp current layers and subsequent reconnection and heating in a high-Lundquist number plasma such as the solar corona [Ng and Bhattacharjee, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 4028 (1998)]. Due to the formation of thin current layers, it is highly desirable to use adaptively or statically refined grids to resolve them, and to maintain accuracy at the same time. The output of the spectral-element static adaptive refinement simulations are compared with simulations using a finite difference method on the same refinement grids, and both methods are compared to pseudo-spectral simulations with uniform grids as baselines. It is shown that with the statically refined grids roughly scaling linearly with effective resolution, spectral element runs can maintain accuracy significantly higher than that of the finite difference runs, in some cases achieving close to full spectral accuracy.

  7. Numerical solution of Maxwell equations by a finite-difference time-domain method in a medium with frequency and spatial dispersion.

    PubMed

    Potravkin, N N; Perezhogin, I A; Makarov, V A

    2012-11-01

    We propose an alternative method of integration of Maxwell equations. This method is the generalization of a finite-difference time-domain method with an auxiliary differential equation for the case of a linear optical medium with a frequency dispersion and an arbitrary source of spatial dispersion. We apply this method to the problem of the propagation of short plane-wave linearly polarized light pulses in such a medium. It is shown that some features of their propagation are completely different from those that are generally recognized for the linear optical activity phenomenon. For example, in some cases an initially linearly polarized light pulse becomes elliptically polarized during the propagation. This effect is more prominent in the front part of the pulse.

  8. A method of moments analysis and a finite-difference time-domain analysis of a probe-sleeve fed rectangular waveguide cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarem, John M.

    1991-03-01

    A multifilament method of moments (MOM) analysis and a finite-difference time-domain (FE-TD) analysis are used to numerically calculate the input impedance of a probe-sleeve fed rectangular waveguide which has been short-circuited on one side. The input impedance of the system is determined by using the above methods for several probe-sleeve configurations, and reasonable agreement between the two methods for the cases studied is found. An MOM Green's function formulation which is based on scattering superposition and which allows the input impedance of a probe-sleeve feed to be calculated when the waveguide is terminated in a given load is derived. The MOM results and FD-TD numerical results are compared for this loaded waveguide input impedance case, and reasonable agreement between the methods is found. A comparison of theory and experiment is given for when the waveguide is terminated in a ground plane aperture.

  9. Verification of a Non-Hydrostatic Dynamical Core Using Horizontally Spectral Element Vertically Finite Difference Method: 2D Aspects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    ranges of ′θ ∈ −1.51×10−3,2.78 ×10−3⎡⎣ ⎤⎦ from the model based on 351 the spectral element and discontinuous Galerkin method. Also Li et al. (2013...2008: A study of spectral element and discontinuous Galerkin 457 methods for the Navier-Stokes equations in nonhydrostatic mesoscale 458 atmospheric...of Computational Physics, 117, 35-46. 467 468 Kelly, J. F. and F. X. Giraldo, 2012: Continuous and discontinuous Galerkin methods for a 469

  10. Generalized semi-analytical finite difference method for dispersion curves calculation and numerical dispersion analysis for Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Packo, Pawel; Uhl, Tadeusz; Staszewski, Wieslaw J

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents an efficient and accurate method for dispersion curve calculation and analysis of numerical models for guided waves. The method can be used for any arbitrarily selected anisotropic material. The proposed approach utilizes the wave equation and through-thickness-only discretization of anisotropic, layered plates to obtain the Lamb wave characteristics. Thus, layered structures, such as composites, can be analyzed in a straightforward manner. A general framework for the proposed analysis is given, along with application examples. Although these examples are based on the local interaction simulation approach for elastic waves propagation, the proposed methodology can be easily adopted for other methods (e.g., finite elements). The method can be also used to study the influence of discretization parameters on dispersion curves estimates.

  11. Object-oriented urban 3D spatial data model organization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-wen; Li, Wen-qing; Lv, Nan; Su, Tao

    2015-12-01

    This paper combined the 3d data model with object-oriented organization method, put forward the model of 3d data based on object-oriented method, implemented the city 3d model to quickly build logical semantic expression and model, solved the city 3d spatial information representation problem of the same location with multiple property and the same property with multiple locations, designed the space object structure of point, line, polygon, body for city of 3d spatial database, and provided a new thought and method for the city 3d GIS model and organization management.

  12. Finite difference method for solving the Schroedinger equation with band nonparabolicity in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J. D.; Valavanis, A.; Ikonic, Z.; Harrison, P.; Cunningham, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    The nonparabolic Schroedinger equation for electrons in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is a cubic eigenvalue problem (EVP) which cannot be solved directly. While a method for linearizing this cubic EVP has been proposed in principle for quantum dots [Hwang et al., Math. Comput. Modell., 40, 519 (2004)] it was deemed too computationally expensive because of the three-dimensional geometry under consideration. We adapt this linearization approach to the one-dimensional geometry of QCLs, and arrive at a direct and exact solution to the cubic EVP. The method is then compared with the well established shooting method, and it is shown to be more accurate and reliable for calculating the bandstructure of mid-infrared QCLs.

  13. Prediction of low-frequency structure-borne sound in concrete structures using the finite-difference time-domain method.

    PubMed

    Asakura, T; Ishizuka, T; Miyajima, T; Toyoda, M; Sakamoto, S

    2014-09-01

    Due to limitations of computers, prediction of structure-borne sound remains difficult for large-scale problems. Herein a prediction method for low-frequency structure-borne sound transmissions on concrete structures using the finite-difference time-domain scheme is proposed. The target structure is modeled as a composition of multiple plate elements to reduce the dimensions of the simulated vibration field from three-dimensional discretization by solid elements to two-dimensional discretization. This scheme reduces both the calculation time and the amount of required memory. To validate the proposed method, the vibration characteristics using the numerical results of the proposed scheme are compared to those measured for a two-level concrete structure. Comparison of the measured and simulated results suggests that the proposed method can be used to simulate real-scale structures.

  14. An automated 3D reconstruction method of UAV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, He; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Feng; Sun, Guangtong; Song, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel fully automated 3D reconstruction approach based on low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle system (UAVs) images will be presented, which does not require previous camera calibration or any other external prior knowledge. Dense 3D point clouds are generated by integrating orderly feature extraction, image matching, structure from motion (SfM) and multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms, overcoming many of the cost, time limitations of rigorous photogrammetry techniques. An image topology analysis strategy is introduced to speed up large scene reconstruction by taking advantage of the flight-control data acquired by UAV. Image topology map can significantly reduce the running time of feature matching by limiting the combination of images. A high-resolution digital surface model of the study area is produced base on UAV point clouds by constructing the triangular irregular network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and feasible for automatic 3D reconstruction of low-altitude UAV images, and has great potential for the acquisition of spatial information at large scales mapping, especially suitable for rapid response and precise modelling in disaster emergency.

  15. Deployment of a 3D tag tracking method utilising RFID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasif Reza, Ahmed; Yun, Teoh Wei; Dimyati, Kaharudin; Geok Tan, Kim; Ariffin Noordin, Kamarul

    2012-04-01

    Recent trend shows that one of the crucial problems faced while using radio frequency to track the objects is the inconsistency of the signal strength reception, which can be mainly due to the environmental factors and the blockage, which always have the most impact on the tracking accuracy. Besides, three dimensions are more relevant to a warehouse scanning. Therefore, this study proposes a highly accurate and new three-dimensional (3D) radio frequency identification-based indoor tracking system with the consideration of different attenuation factors and obstacles. The obtained results show that the proposed system yields high-quality performance with an average error as low as 0.27 m (without obstacles and attenuation effects). The obtained results also show that the proposed tracking technique can achieve relatively lower errors (0.4 and 0.36 m, respectively) even in the presence of the highest attenuation effect, e = 3.3 or when the environment is largely affected by 50% of the obstacles. Furthermore, the superiority of the proposed 3D tracking system has been proved by comparing with other existing approaches. The 3D tracking system proposed in this study can be applicable to a warehouse scanning.

  16. 3D CSEM data inversion using Newton and Halley class methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, M.; Hansen, K. R.; Morten, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    For the first time in 3D controlled source electromagnetic data inversion, we explore the use of the Newton and the Halley optimization methods, which may show their potential when the cost function has a complex topology. The inversion is formulated as a constrained nonlinear least-squares problem which is solved by iterative optimization. These methods require the derivatives up to second order of the residuals with respect to model parameters. We show how Green's functions determine the high-order derivatives, and develop a diagrammatical representation of the residual derivatives. The Green's functions are efficiently calculated on-the-fly, making use of a finite-difference frequency-domain forward modelling code based on a multi-frontal sparse direct solver. This allow us to build the second-order derivatives of the residuals keeping the memory cost in the same order as in a Gauss-Newton (GN) scheme. Model updates are computed with a trust-region based conjugate-gradient solver which does not require the computation of a stabilizer. We present inversion results for a synthetic survey and compare the GN, Newton, and super-Halley optimization schemes, and consider two different approaches to set the initial trust-region radius. Our analysis shows that the Newton and super-Halley schemes, using the same regularization configuration, add significant information to the inversion so that the convergence is reached by different paths. In our simple resistivity model examples, the convergence speed of the Newton and the super-Halley schemes are either similar or slightly superior with respect to the convergence speed of the GN scheme, close to the minimum of the cost function. Due to the current noise levels and other measurement inaccuracies in geophysical investigations, this advantageous behaviour is at present of low consequence, but may, with the further improvement of geophysical data acquisition, be an argument for more accurate higher-order methods like those

  17. A 3D discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method for teleseismic modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    monteiller, vadim; Beller, Stephen; Nolet, Guust; Operto, Stephane; Virieux, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The massive development of dense seismic arrays and the rapide increase in computing capacity allow today to consider application of full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. We present an hybrid numerical method that allows for the modelling of short period telesismic waves in 3D lithospheric target with the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements method, opennig the possibility to perform waveform inversion of seismograms recorded by dense regional broadband arrays. In order to reduce the computational cost of the forward-problem, we developed a method that relies on multi-core parallel computing and computational-domain reduction. We defined two nested levels for parallelism based on MPI library, which are managed by two MPI communicators. Firstly, we use a domain partitionning strategy, assigning one subdomain to one cpu and, secondly we distribute telesismic sources on different copies of the partitioned domain. However, despite the supercomputer ability, the forward-problem remains expensive for telesismic configuration especially when 3D numerical methods are considered. In order to perform the forward problem in a reasonable amount of time, we reduce the computational domain in which full waveform modelling is performed. We defined a 3D regional domain located below the seismological network that is embeded in a background homogeneous or axisymetric model, in which the seismic wavefield can be computed efficiently. The background wavefield is used to compute the full wavefield in the 3D regional domain using the so-called total-field/scattered-field technique (Alterman & Karal (1968),Taflove & Hagness (2005)), which relies on the decomposition of the wavefield into a background and a scattered wavefields. The computational domain is subdivided intro three subdomains: an outer domain formed by the perfectly-mathed absorbing layers, an intermediate zone in which only the outgoing wavefield scattered by the

  18. 3D full tensor gradient method improves subsalt interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, G.W.

    1998-09-14

    Imagine you`re working the deepwater Gulf of Mexico, looking for potential subsalt prospects to guide your company`s bidding in an upcoming lease sale. There are no speculative 3D surveys in the area, just 2D seismic and a few well logs. So you obtain some regional 2D lines across a number of promising salt features and begin your initial structural interpretation. The top of salt is pretty easy to pick. But, not surprisingly, the base is fuzzy in many areas. Large shadow zones wipe out the image, making it difficult to tell how thick the salt may be and whether sediments continue beneath the salt or truncate at the edges. With the limited data you have available, you could pick the base of salt in several different places, all of them reasonable. How do you decide? One option is an expensive reprocessing job. But it would be nice to have another choice--a way to independently test your salt interpretation against high-quality data not derived from seismic. Three-dimensional full tensor gradient (FTG) data can provide such an alternative. This article focuses on an actual test study done on a regional 2D seismic line across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. The purpose of the study was to determine how well 3D FTG data could identify the base of salt, where standard seismic interpretation was ambiguous.

  19. Three dimensional optical modeling of amorphous silicon thin film solar cells using the finite-difference time-domain method including real randomly surface topographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Jürgen; Sergeev, Oleg; Chakanga, Kambulakwao; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, modeling of light propagation in silicon thin film solar cells without using any fitting parameter is presented. The aim is to create a realistic view of the light trapping effects and of the resulting optical generation rate in the absorbing semiconductor layers. The focus is on real three dimensional systems. Our software Sentaurus tcad, developed by Synopsys, has the ability to import real topography measurements and to model the light propagation using the finite-difference time-domain method. To verify the simulation, we compared the measured and simulated angular distribution functions of a glass/SnO2:F transparent conducting oxide system for different wavelengths. The optical generation rate of charge carriers in amorphous silicon thin film solar cells including rough interfaces is calculated. The distribution of the optical generation rate is correlated with the shape of the interface, and the external quantum efficiencies are calculated and compared to experimental data.

  20. Simulation of two-phase liquid-vapor flows using a high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Ezzatneshan, Eslam

    2015-11-01

    A high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (CFDLBM) is extended and applied to accurately simulate two-phase liquid-vapor flows with high density ratios. Herein, the He-Shan-Doolen-type lattice Boltzmann multiphase model is used and the spatial derivatives in the resulting equations are discretized by using the fourth-order compact finite-difference scheme and the temporal term is discretized with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to provide an accurate and efficient two-phase flow solver. A high-order spectral-type low-pass compact nonlinear filter is used to regularize the numerical solution and remove spurious waves generated by flow nonlinearities in smooth regions and at the same time to remove the numerical oscillations in the interfacial region between the two phases. Three discontinuity-detecting sensors for properly switching between a second-order and a higher-order filter are applied and assessed. It is shown that the filtering technique used can be conveniently adopted to reduce the spurious numerical effects and improve the numerical stability of the CFDLBM implemented. A sensitivity study is also conducted to evaluate the effects of grid size and the filtering procedure implemented on the accuracy and performance of the solution. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed solution procedure based on the compact finite-difference LBM are examined by solving different two-phase systems. Five test cases considered herein for validating the results of the two-phase flows are an equilibrium state of a planar interface in a liquid-vapor system, a droplet suspended in the gaseous phase, a liquid droplet located between two parallel wettable surfaces, the coalescence of two droplets, and a phase separation in a liquid-vapor system at different conditions. Numerical results are also presented for the coexistence curve and the verification of the Laplace law. Results obtained are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and also

  1. Simulation of two-phase liquid-vapor flows using a high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Ezzatneshan, Eslam

    2015-11-01

    A high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (CFDLBM) is extended and applied to accurately simulate two-phase liquid-vapor flows with high density ratios. Herein, the He-Shan-Doolen-type lattice Boltzmann multiphase model is used and the spatial derivatives in the resulting equations are discretized by using the fourth-order compact finite-difference scheme and the temporal term is discretized with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to provide an accurate and efficient two-phase flow solver. A high-order spectral-type low-pass compact nonlinear filter is used to regularize the numerical solution and remove spurious waves generated by flow nonlinearities in smooth regions and at the same time to remove the numerical oscillations in the interfacial region between the two phases. Three discontinuity-detecting sensors for properly switching between a second-order and a higher-order filter are applied and assessed. It is shown that the filtering technique used can be conveniently adopted to reduce the spurious numerical effects and improve the numerical stability of the CFDLBM implemented. A sensitivity study is also conducted to evaluate the effects of grid size and the filtering procedure implemented on the accuracy and performance of the solution. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed solution procedure based on the compact finite-difference LBM are examined by solving different two-phase systems. Five test cases considered herein for validating the results of the two-phase flows are an equilibrium state of a planar interface in a liquid-vapor system, a droplet suspended in the gaseous phase, a liquid droplet located between two parallel wettable surfaces, the coalescence of two droplets, and a phase separation in a liquid-vapor system at different conditions. Numerical results are also presented for the coexistence curve and the verification of the Laplace law. Results obtained are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and also

  2. MOM3D method of moments code theory manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, John F.

    1992-01-01

    MOM3D is a FORTRAN algorithm that solves Maxwell's equations as expressed via the electric field integral equation for the electromagnetic response of open or closed three dimensional surfaces modeled with triangle patches. Two joined triangles (couples) form the vector current unknowns for the surface. Boundary conditions are for perfectly conducting or resistive surfaces. The impedance matrix represents the fundamental electromagnetic interaction of the body with itself. A variety of electromagnetic analysis options are possible once the impedance matrix is computed including backscatter radar cross section (RCS), bistatic RCS, antenna pattern prediction for user specified body voltage excitation ports, RCS image projection showing RCS scattering center locations, surface currents excited on the body as induced by specified plane wave excitation, and near field computation for the electric field on or near the body.

  3. 3D sensitivity of 6-electrode Focused Impedance Method (FIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masum Iquebal, A. H.; Siddique-e Rabbani, K.

    2010-04-01

    The present work was taken up to have an understanding of the depth sensitivity of the 6 electrode FIM developed by our laboratory earlier, so that it may be applied judiciously for the measurement of organs in 3D, with electrodes on the skin surface. For a fixed electrode geometry sensitivity is expected to depend on the depth, size and conductivity of the target object. With current electrodes 18 cm apart and potential electrodes 5 cm apart, depth sensitivity of spherical conductors, insulators and of pieces of potato of different diameters were measured. The sensitivity dropped sharply with depth gradually leveling off to background, and objects could be sensed down to a depth of about twice their diameters. The sensitivity at a certain depth increases almost linearly with volume for objects with the same conductivity. Thus these results increase confidence in the use of FIM for studying organs at depths of the body.

  4. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  5. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  6. Development of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sam; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Sills, Robert; Pifer, Ellen M.

    2012-01-01

    A research plan is currently being implemented by NASA to develop and validate the use of a commercial laser scanner to record and archive fully three-dimensional (3-D) ice shapes from an icing wind tunnel. The plan focused specifically upon measuring ice accreted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The plan was divided into two phases. The first phase was the identification and selection of the laser scanning system and the post-processing software to purchase and develop further. The second phase was the implementation and validation of the selected system through a series of icing and aerodynamic tests. Phase I of the research plan has been completed. It consisted of evaluating several scanning hardware and software systems against an established selection criteria through demonstrations in the IRT. The results of Phase I showed that all of the scanning systems that were evaluated were equally capable of scanning ice shapes. The factors that differentiated the scanners were ease of use and the ability to operate in a wide range of IRT environmental conditions.

  7. Applications of an exponential finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An exponential finite difference scheme first presented by Bhattacharya for one dimensional unsteady heat conduction problems in Cartesian coordinates was extended. The finite difference algorithm developed was used to solve the unsteady diffusion equation in one dimensional cylindrical coordinates and was applied to two and three dimensional conduction problems in Cartesian coordinates. Heat conduction involving variable thermal conductivity was also investigated. The method was used to solve nonlinear partial differential equations in one and two dimensional Cartesian coordinates. Predicted results are compared to exact solutions where available or to results obtained by other numerical methods.

  8. Development and evaluation of a local grid refinement method for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models using shared nodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    A new method of local grid refinement for two-dimensional block-centered finite-difference meshes is presented in the context of steady-state groundwater-flow modeling. The method uses an iteration-based feedback with shared nodes to couple two separate grids. The new method is evaluated by comparison with results using a uniform fine mesh, a variably spaced mesh, and a traditional method of local grid refinement without a feedback. Results indicate: (1) The new method exhibits quadratic convergence for homogeneous systems and convergence equivalent to uniform-grid refinement for heterogeneous systems. (2) Coupling the coarse grid with the refined grid in a numerically rigorous way allowed for improvement in the coarse-grid results. (3) For heterogeneous systems, commonly used linear interpolation of heads from the large model onto the boundary of the refined model produced heads that are inconsistent with the physics of the flow field. (4) The traditional method works well in situations where the better resolution of the locally refined grid has little influence on the overall flow-system dynamics, but if this is not true, lack of a feedback mechanism produced errors in head up to 3.6% and errors in cell-to-cell flows up to 25%. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An optimal implicit staggered-grid finite-difference scheme based on the modified Taylor-series expansion with minimax approximation method for elastic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Yan, Hongyong; Liu, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Implicit staggered-grid finite-difference (ISFD) scheme is competitive for its great accuracy and stability, whereas its coefficients are conventionally determined by the Taylor-series expansion (TE) method, leading to a loss in numerical precision. In this paper, we modify the TE method using the minimax approximation (MA), and propose a new optimal ISFD scheme based on the modified TE (MTE) with MA method. The new ISFD scheme takes the advantage of the TE method that guarantees great accuracy at small wavenumbers, and keeps the property of the MA method that keeps the numerical errors within a limited bound at the same time. Thus, it leads to great accuracy for numerical solution of the wave equations. We derive the optimal ISFD coefficients by applying the new method to the construction of the objective function, and using a Remez algorithm to minimize its maximum. Numerical analysis is made in comparison with the conventional TE-based ISFD scheme, indicating that the MTE-based ISFD scheme with appropriate parameters can widen the wavenumber range with high accuracy, and achieve greater precision than the conventional ISFD scheme. The numerical modeling results also demonstrate that the MTE-based ISFD scheme performs well in elastic wave simulation, and is more efficient than the conventional ISFD scheme for elastic modeling.

  10. 3D dynamic rupture with anelastic wave propagation using an hp-adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tago, J.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Etienne, V.; Virieux, J.; Benjemaa, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Simulating any realistic seismic scenario requires incorporating physical basis into the model. Considering both the dynamics of the rupture process and the anelastic attenuation of seismic waves is essential to this purpose and, therefore, we choose to extend the hp-adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method to integrate these physical aspects. The 3D elastodynamic equations in an unstructured tetrahedral mesh are solved with a second-order time marching approach in a high-performance computing environment. The first extension incorporates the viscoelastic rheology so that the intrinsic attenuation of the medium is considered in terms of frequency dependent quality factors (Q). On the other hand, the extension related to dynamic rupture is integrated through explicit boundary conditions over the crack surface. For this visco-elastodynamic formulation, we introduce an original discrete scheme that preserves the optimal code performance of the elastodynamic equations. A set of relaxation mechanisms describes the behavior of a generalized Maxwell body. We approximate almost constant Q in a wide frequency range by selecting both suitable relaxation frequencies and anelastic coefficients characterizing these mechanisms. In order to do so, we solve an optimization problem which is critical to minimize the amount of relaxation mechanisms. Two strategies are explored: 1) a least squares method and 2) a genetic algorithm (GA). We found that the improvement provided by the heuristic GA method is negligible. Both optimization strategies yield Q values within the 5% of the target constant Q mechanism. Anelastic functions (i.e. memory variables) are introduced to efficiently evaluate the time convolution terms involved in the constitutive equations and thus to minimize the computational cost. The incorporation of anelastic functions implies new terms with ordinary differential equations in the mathematical formulation. We solve these equations using the same order

  11. Building a 3D Virtual Liver: Methods for Simulating Blood Flow and Hepatic Clearance on 3D Structures

    PubMed Central

    Rezania, Vahid; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a spatio-temporal modeling approach to describe blood and drug flow, as well as drug uptake and elimination, on an approximation of the liver. Extending on previously developed computational approaches, we generate an approximation of a liver, which consists of a portal and hepatic vein vasculature structure, embedded in the surrounding liver tissue. The vasculature is generated via constrained constructive optimization, and then converted to a spatial grid of a selected grid size. Estimates for surrounding upscaled lobule tissue properties are then presented appropriate to the same grid size. Simulation of fluid flow and drug metabolism (hepatic clearance) are completed using discretized forms of the relevant convective-diffusive-reactive partial differential equations for these processes. This results in a single stage, uniformly consistent method to simulate equations for blood and drug flow, as well as drug metabolism, on a 3D structure representative of a liver. PMID:27649537

  12. Comparison of wave propagation studies in plasmas using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain and ray-tracing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhury, Bhaskar; Chaturvedi, Shashank

    2006-12-15

    Power-flow trajectories of electromagnetic waves through a spatially nonuniform plasma have been computed using direct solutions of Maxwell's equations using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. This method yields accurate information on refraction as well as absorption effects. The method can be used to compute power-flow trajectories for plasmas with arbitrarily varying density profiles, including effects due to arbitrarily shaped conducting or dielectric surfaces bounding the plasma. Furthermore, since FDTD is computationally expensive, especially for parametric studies, it is desirable to use ray tracing to estimate refraction effects. A quantitative comparison is performed between two different methods of obtaining exact and approximate solutions of Maxwell's equations in order to assess their relative utility in different situations. In the present work, we limit ourselves to a cold, collisional, unmagnetized plasma, where the response to electromagnetic waves is fully specified by a dispersion relation based on magnetoionic theory. It is shown that ray tracing in such plasmas yields accurate results only when two conditions are satisfied. Firstly, the density scale length should be long as compared to the free-space wavelength of the incident wave. Secondly, the conduction current should be small as compared to the displacement current in the medium. The second condition is one which has been identified for the first time.

  13. 3D Discontinuous Galerkin elastic seismic wave modeling based upon a grid injection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a seismic imaging method that estimates thesub-surface physical properties with a spatial resolution of the order of thewavelength. FWI is generally recast as the iterative optimization of anobjective function that measures the distance between modeled and recordeddata. In the framework of local descent methods, FWI requires to perform atleast two seismic modelings per source and per FWI iteration.Due to the resulting computational burden, applications of elastic FWI have been usuallyrestricted to 2D geometries. Despite the continuous growth of high-performancecomputing facilities, application of 3D elastic FWI to real-scale problemsremain computationally too expensive. To perform elastic seismic modeling with a reasonable amount of time, weconsider a reduced computational domain embedded in a larger background modelin which seismic sources are located. Our aim is to compute repeatedly thefull wavefield in the targeted domain after model alteration, once theincident wavefield has been computed once for all in the background model. Toachieve this goal, we use a grid injection method referred to as the Total-Field/Scattered-Field (TF/SF) technique in theelectromagnetic community. We implemented the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach in theDiscontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DG-FEM) that is used to performmodeling in the local domain. We show how to interface the DG-FEM with any modeling engine (analytical solution, finite difference or finite elements methods) that is suitable for the background simulation. One advantage of the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach is related to thefact that the scattered wavefield instead of the full wavefield enter thePMLs, hence making more efficient the absorption of the outgoing waves at theouter edges of the computational domain. The domain reduction in which theDG-FEM is applied allows us to use modest computational resources opening theway for high-resolution imaging by full

  14. Finite-number-of-periods holographic gratings with finite-width incident beams: analysis using the finite-difference frequency-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shun-Der; Glytsis, Elias N.

    2002-10-01

    The effects of finite number of periods (FNP) and finite incident beams on the diffraction efficiencies of holographic gratings are investigated by the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method. Gratings comprising 20, 15, 10, 5, and 3 periods illuminated by TE and TM incident light with various beam sizes are analyzed with the FDFD method and compared with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Both unslanted and slanted gratings are treated in transmission as well as in reflection configurations. In general, the effect of the FNP is a decrease in the diffraction efficiency with a decrease in the number of periods of the grating. Similarly, a decrease in incident-beam width causes a decrease in the diffraction efficiency. Exceptions appear in off-Bragg incidence in which a smaller beam width could result in higher diffraction efficiency. For beam widths greater than 10 grating periods and for gratings with more than 20 periods in width, the diffraction efficiencies slowly converge to the values predicted by the RCWA (infinite incident beam and infinite-number-of-periods grating) for both TE and TM polarizations. Furthermore, the effects of FNP holographic gratings on their diffraction performance are found to be comparable to their counterparts of FNP surface-relief gratings. 2002 Optical Society of America

  15. Acceleration of split-field finite difference time-domain method for anisotropic media by means of graphics processing unit computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francés, Jorge; Bleda, Sergio; Álvarez, Mariela Lázara; Martínez, Francisco Javier; Márquez, Andres; Neipp, Cristian; Beléndez, Augusto

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of split-field finite difference time domain (SF-FDTD) applied to light-wave propagation through periodic media with arbitrary anisotropy method in graphics processing units (GPUs) is described. The SF-FDTD technique and the periodic boundary condition allow the consideration of a single period of the structure reducing the simulation grid. Nevertheless, the analysis of the anisotropic media implies considering all the electromagnetic field components and the use of complex notation. These aspects reduce the computational efficiency of the numerical method compared with the isotropic and nonperiodic implementation. Specifically, the implementation of the SF-FDTD in the Kepler family of GPUs of NVIDIA is presented. An analysis of the performance of this implementation is done, and several applications have been considered in order to estimate the possibilities provided by both the formalism and the implementation into GPU: binary phase gratings and twisted-nematic liquid crystal cells. Regarding the analysis of binary phase gratings, the validity of the scalar diffraction theory is evaluated by the comparison of the diffraction efficiencies predicted by SF-FDTD. The analysis for the second order of diffraction is extended, which is considered as a reference for the transmittance obtained by the SF-FDTD scheme for periodic media.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  17. Analyzing the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals based on a modified finite-difference frequency-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Ding, Guo-Wen; Lin, Yi-Bing; Chen, Yu-Qing

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) composed of the homogeneous and isotropic dielectric cylinders inserted into nonmagnetized plasma background with square lattices under transverse-magnetic wave are theoretically investigated by a modified finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method with supercell technique, whose symmetry of every supercell is broken by removing a central rod. A new FDFD method is developed to calculate the band structures of such PPCs. The novel FDFD method adopts a general function to describe the distribution of dielectric in the present PPCs, which can easily transform the complicated nonlinear eigenvalue equation to the simple linear equation. The details of convergence and effectiveness of proposed FDFD method are analyzed using a numerical example. The simulated results demonstrate that the enough accuracy of the proposed FDFD method can be observed compared to the plane wave expansion method, and the good convergence can also be obtained if the number of meshed grids is large enough. As a comparison, two different configurations of photonic crystals (PCs) but with similar defect are theoretically investigated. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs, not only the acceptor mode has a higher frequency but also an additional photonic bandgap (PBG) can be found in the low frequency region. The calculated results also show that PBGs of proposed PPCs can be enlarged as the point defect is introduced. The influences of the parameters for present PPCs on the properties of acceptor mode are also discussed in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the acceptor mode in the present PPCs can be easily tuned by changing those parameters. Those results can hold promise for designing the tunable applications in the signal process or time delay devices based on the present PPCs.

  18. Robust multispectral transparency in continuous metal film structures via multiple near-field plasmon coupling by a finite-difference time-domain method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gui-qiang; Hu, Ying; Liu, Zheng-qi; Chen, Yuan-hao; Cai, Zheng-jie; Zhang, Xiang-nan; Huang, Kuan

    2014-03-07

    We propose a robust multispectral transparent plasmonic structure and calculate its transparency response by using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The proposed structure is composed of a continuous ultrathin metal film sandwiched by double two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal non-close-packed metal-dielectric multilayer core-shell nanoparticle arrays. The top and bottom plasmonic arrays in such a structure, respectively, act as the light input and output couplers to carry out the efficient trapping and release of light. Near-perfect multispectral optical transparency in the visible and near-infrared regions is achieved theoretically. The calculated electric field distribution patterns show that the near-perfect multispectral optical transparency mainly originates from the excitation and hybridization of shell and core plasmon modes, strong near-field coupling of dipole plasmon modes between adjacent nanoparticles as well as the excitation of surface plasmon waves of the metal film. The robust transparency bands can be efficiently tuned in a large range by varying the structural parameters and the surrounding dielectric environment. The proposed structure also shows additional merits such as a deep sub-wavelength size and fully retained electrical and mechanical properties of the natural metal. These features might provide promising applications in highly integrated optoelectronic devices including plasmonic filters, nanoscale multiplexers, and non-linear optics.

  19. A simulation for effects of RF electromagnetic radiation from a mobile handset on eyes model using the finite-difference time-domain method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Ge, Manling; Guo, Jia; Wang, Qingmeng; Jiang, Xiaochi; Yan, Weili

    2007-01-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and specific absorption rate (SAR) are employed here to study the relationship between the radiation of a mobile handset and the human being health. Nowadays, much more attention has been paid to the simulations for the effects of RF radiation on the particular organs, such as the eyes or the ears because they are more sensitive and more near to the working mobile. In the paper, the simulation of the RF fields is focused on the eyes model and the eyes with glasses of metal frame respectively. A planar inverted F antenna is used as an exposure source at 900 MHz. Under this case, the intensity of the electrical field is calculated and analyzed. Also, SAR is utilized to evaluate the absorption of the organs to the radiation. Through the simulation, the peak values of SAR per 1G tissue at the radiating power being 600mW are obtained. It is concluded that when people are wearing glasses of metal framework, the peak value of SAR is shown to be a little higher than the safety limits. It is suggested that the radiation from the mobile handset do more harmful effect on the eyes with the glasses of metal frameworks.

  20. Production of Volume Wave Plasma with Internally Mounted Cylindrical Planar Microwave Launcher and Two-Dimensional Field Analysis Using Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Akihisa; Naito, Katsutoshi; Terashita, Fumie; Nanko, Shohei; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we presented experimental results on the production of volume wave plasma (VWP) using an internally mounted cylindrical planar microwave launcher, for application to novel plasma processings, such as inner wall coating, impurity-free etching or internal sterilization of medical instruments using VWP. It was demonstrated that the ellipsoidal VWP is produced in front of a microwave launcher in He or Ar gas atmosphere. Numerical analyses of microwave fields radiated from a planar launcher have been carried out using the two-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to determine the mechanism of VWP production in middle of the chamber. It was shown that the calculation results showed fairly good agreements with the experimental results measured using a dipole antenna probe. The spatial distributions of plasma density and the temperature of VWP were also measured using a double probe. It was found that the electron density is comparable to or slightly less than cutoff density of 7.4 × 1010 cm-3 corresponding to the microwave frequency of fm=2.45 GHz, and that the electron temperature is approximately 6 eV at the plasma center.

  1. Comparison of 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction algorithms for High-Resolution Research Tomograph studies: effects of randoms estimation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Velden, Floris H. P.; Kloet, Reina W.; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Wolfensberger, Saskia P. A.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-06-01

    The High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Recently, a 3D filtered backprojection (3D-FBP) reconstruction method has been implemented to reduce bias in short duration frames, currently observed in 3D ordinary Poisson OSEM (3D-OP-OSEM) reconstructions. Further improvements might be expected using a new method of variance reduction on randoms (VRR) based on coincidence histograms instead of using the delayed window technique (DW) to estimate randoms. The goal of this study was to evaluate VRR in combination with 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction techniques. To this end, several phantom studies and a human brain study were performed. For most phantom studies, 3D-OP-OSEM showed higher accuracy of observed activity concentrations with VRR than with DW. However, both positive and negative deviations in reconstructed activity concentrations and large biases of grey to white matter contrast ratio (up to 88%) were still observed as a function of scan statistics. Moreover 3D-OP-OSEM+VRR also showed bias up to 64% in clinical data, i.e. in some pharmacokinetic parameters as compared with those obtained with 3D-FBP+VRR. In the case of 3D-FBP, VRR showed similar results as DW for both phantom and clinical data, except that VRR showed a better standard deviation of 6-10%. Therefore, VRR should be used to correct for randoms in HRRT PET studies.

  2. Filtering method for 3D laser scanning point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Wang, Li; Hao, Yuncai; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of the hardware and software of the three-dimensional model acquisition, three-dimensional laser scanning technology is utilized in various aspects, especially in space exploration. The point cloud filter is very important before using the data. In the paper, considering both the processing quality and computing speed, an improved mean-shift point cloud filter method is proposed. Firstly, by analyze the relevance of the normal vector between the upcoming processing point and the near points, the iterative neighborhood of the mean-shift is selected dynamically, then the high frequency noise is constrained. Secondly, considering the normal vector of the processing point, the normal vector is updated. Finally, updated position is calculated for each point, then each point is moved in the normal vector according to the updated position. The experimental results show that the large features are retained, at the same time, the small sharp features are also existed for different size and shape of objects, so the target feature information is protected precisely. The computational complexity of the proposed method is not high, it can bring high precision results with fast speed, so it is very suitable for space application. It can also be utilized in civil, such as large object measurement, industrial measurement, car navigation etc. In the future, filter with the help of point strength will be further exploited.

  3. GPU Accelerated Spectral Element Methods: 3D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, D. S.; Wilcox, L.; Giraldo, F.; Warburton, T.

    2015-12-01

    A GPU accelerated nodal discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of three dimensional Euler equations is presented. The Euler equations are nonlinear hyperbolic equations that are widely used in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). Therefore, acceleration of the method plays an important practical role in not only getting daily forecasts faster but also in obtaining more accurate (high resolution) results. The equation sets used in our atomospheric model NUMA (non-hydrostatic unified model of the atmosphere) take into consideration non-hydrostatic effects that become more important with high resolution. We use algorithms suitable for the single instruction multiple thread (SIMT) architecture of GPUs to accelerate solution by an order of magnitude (20x) relative to CPU implementation. For portability to heterogeneous computing environment, we use a new programming language OCCA, which can be cross-compiled to either OpenCL, CUDA or OpenMP at runtime. Finally, the accuracy and performance of our GPU implementations are veried using several benchmark problems representative of different scales of atmospheric dynamics.

  4. Multi-crosswell profile 3D imaging and method

    DOEpatents

    Washbourne, John K.; Rector, III, James W.; Bube, Kenneth P.

    2002-01-01

    Characterizing the value of a particular property, for example, seismic velocity, of a subsurface region of ground is described. In one aspect, the value of the particular property is represented using at least one continuous analytic function such as a Chebychev polynomial. The seismic data may include data derived from at least one crosswell dataset for the subsurface region of interest and may also include other data. In either instance, data may simultaneously be used from a first crosswell dataset in conjunction with one or more other crosswell datasets and/or with the other data. In another aspect, the value of the property is characterized in three dimensions throughout the region of interest using crosswell and/or other data. In still another aspect, crosswell datasets for highly deviated or horizontal boreholes are inherently useful. The method is performed, in part, by fitting a set of vertically spaced layer boundaries, represented by an analytic function such as a Chebychev polynomial, within and across the region encompassing the boreholes such that a series of layers is defined between the layer boundaries. Initial values of the particular property are then established between the layer boundaries and across the subterranean region using a series of continuous analytic functions. The continuous analytic functions are then adjusted to more closely match the value of the particular property across the subterranean region of ground to determine the value of the particular property for any selected point within the region.

  5. A high-order WENO-Z finite difference based particle-source-in-cell method for computation of particle-laden flows with shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Gustaaf B.; Don, Wai-Sun

    2009-03-01

    A high-order particle-source-in-cell (PSIC) algorithm is presented for the computation of the interaction between shocks, small scale structures, and liquid and/or solid particles in high-speed engineering applications. The improved high-order finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO-Z) method for solution of the hyperbolic conservation laws that govern the shocked carrier gas flow, lies at the heart of the algorithm. Finite sized particles are modeled as points and are traced in the Lagrangian frame. The physical coupling of particles in the Lagrangian frame and the gas in the Eulerian frame through momentum and energy exchange, is numerically treated through high-order interpolation and weighing. The centered high-order interpolation of the fluid properties to the particle location is shown to lead to numerical instability in shocked flow. An essentially non-oscillatory interpolation (ENO) scheme is devised for the coupling that improves stability. The ENO based algorithm is shown to be numerically stable and to accurately capture shocks, small flow features and particle dispersion. Both the carrier gas and the particles are updated in time without splitting with a third-order Runge-Kutta TVD method. One and two-dimensional computations of a shock moving into a particle cloud demonstrates the characteristics of the WENO-Z based PSIC method (PSIC/WENO-Z). The PSIC/WENO-Z computations are not only in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations with a third-order Rusanov based PSIC and physical experiments in [V. Boiko, V.P. Kiselev, S.P. Kiselev, A. Papyrin, S. Poplavsky, V. Fomin, Shock wave interaction with a cloud of particles, Shock Waves, 7 (1997) 275-285], but also show a significant improvement in the resolution of small scale structures. In two-dimensional simulations of the Mach 3 shock moving into forty thousand bronze particles arranged in the shape of a rectangle, the long time accuracy of the high-order method is demonstrated

  6. A high-order WENO-Z finite difference based particle-source-in-cell method for computation of particle-laden flows with shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Gustaaf B. Don, W.-S.

    2009-03-20

    A high-order particle-source-in-cell (PSIC) algorithm is presented for the computation of the interaction between shocks, small scale structures, and liquid and/or solid particles in high-speed engineering applications. The improved high-order finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO-Z) method for solution of the hyperbolic conservation laws that govern the shocked carrier gas flow, lies at the heart of the algorithm. Finite sized particles are modeled as points and are traced in the Lagrangian frame. The physical coupling of particles in the Lagrangian frame and the gas in the Eulerian frame through momentum and energy exchange, is numerically treated through high-order interpolation and weighing. The centered high-order interpolation of the fluid properties to the particle location is shown to lead to numerical instability in shocked flow. An essentially non-oscillatory interpolation (ENO) scheme is devised for the coupling that improves stability. The ENO based algorithm is shown to be numerically stable and to accurately capture shocks, small flow features and particle dispersion. Both the carrier gas and the particles are updated in time without splitting with a third-order Runge-Kutta TVD method. One and two-dimensional computations of a shock moving into a particle cloud demonstrates the characteristics of the WENO-Z based PSIC method (PSIC/WENO-Z). The PSIC/WENO-Z computations are not only in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations with a third-order Rusanov based PSIC and physical experiments in [V. Boiko, V.P. Kiselev, S.P. Kiselev, A. Papyrin, S. Poplavsky, V. Fomin, Shock wave interaction with a cloud of particles, Shock Waves, 7 (1997) 275-285], but also show a significant improvement in the resolution of small scale structures. In two-dimensional simulations of the Mach 3 shock moving into forty thousand bronze particles arranged in the shape of a rectangle, the long time accuracy of the high-order method is demonstrated

  7. Nerves of Steel: a Low-Cost Method for 3D Printing the Cranial Nerves.

    PubMed

    Javan, Ramin; Davidson, Duncan; Javan, Afshin

    2017-02-21

    Steady-state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can demonstrate details down to the cranial nerve (CN) level. High-resolution three-dimensional (3D) visualization can now quickly be performed at the workstation. However, we are still limited by visualization on flat screens. The emerging technologies in rapid prototyping or 3D printing overcome this limitation. It comprises a variety of automated manufacturing techniques, which use virtual 3D data sets to fabricate solid forms in a layer-by-layer technique. The complex neuroanatomy of the CNs may be better understood and depicted by the use of highly customizable advanced 3D printed models. In this technical note, after manually perfecting the segmentation of each CN and brain stem on each SSFP-MRI image, initial 3D reconstruction was performed. The bony skull base was also reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) data. Autodesk 3D Studio Max, available through freeware student/educator license, was used to three-dimensionally trace the 3D reconstructed CNs in order to create smooth graphically designed CNs and to assure proper fitting of the CNs into their respective neural foramina and fissures. This model was then 3D printed with polyamide through a commercial online service. Two different methods are discussed for the key segmentation and 3D reconstruction steps, by either using professional commercial software, i.e., Materialise Mimics, or utilizing a combination of the widely available software Adobe Photoshop, as well as a freeware software, OsiriX Lite.

  8. 3D-2D registration of cerebral angiograms: a method and evaluation on clinical images.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Uroš; Špiclin, Žiga; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo

    2013-08-01

    Endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) involve navigation of a catheter through the vasculature followed by application of treatment at the site of anomaly using live 2D projection images for guidance. 3D images acquired prior to EIGI are used to quantify the vascular anomaly and plan the intervention. If fused with the information of live 2D images they can also facilitate navigation and treatment. For this purpose 3D-2D image registration is required. Although several 3D-2D registration methods for EIGI achieve registration accuracy below 1 mm, their clinical application is still limited by insufficient robustness or reliability. In this paper, we propose a 3D-2D registration method based on matching a 3D vasculature model to intensity gradients of live 2D images. To objectively validate 3D-2D registration methods, we acquired a clinical image database of 10 patients undergoing cerebral EIGI and established "gold standard" registrations by aligning fiducial markers in 3D and 2D images. The proposed method had mean registration accuracy below 0.65 mm, which was comparable to tested state-of-the-art methods, and execution time below 1 s. With the highest rate of successful registrations and the highest capture range the proposed method was the most robust and thus a good candidate for application in EIGI.

  9. Convergence of the point vortex method for the 3-D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Thomas Y.; Lowengrub, John

    1990-11-01

    Consistency, stability, and convergence of a point vortex approximation to the 3-D incompressible Euler equations with smooth solutions. The 3-D algorithm considered is similar to the corresponding 3-D vortex are proved blob algorithm introduced by Beale and Majda; The discretization error is second-order accurate. Then the method is stable in l sup p norm for the particle trajectories and in w sup -1,p norm for discrete vorticity. Consequently, the method converges up to any time for which the Euler equations have a smooth solution. One immediate application of the convergence result is that the vortex filament method without smoothing also converges.

  10. Finite difference numerical method for the superlattice Boltzmann transport equation and case comparison of CPU(C) and GPU(CUDA) implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Priimak, Dmitri

    2014-12-01

    We present a finite difference numerical algorithm for solving two dimensional spatially homogeneous Boltzmann transport equation which describes electron transport in a semiconductor superlattice subject to crossed time dependent electric and constant magnetic fields. The algorithm is implemented both in C language targeted to CPU and in CUDA C language targeted to commodity NVidia GPU. We compare performances and merits of one implementation versus another and discuss various software optimisation techniques.

  11. A Unified Approach to Joint Regional/Teleseismic Calibration and Event Location with a 3D Earth Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    time to forward model a travel-time data set when a fully 3D raytracing methods is used. An efficient alternative to full 3D raytracing is travel...when a fully 3D raytracing methods is used. An efficient alternative to full 3D raytracing is travel-time linearization, which approximates the...numerical methods are available for raytracing and travel-time calculation in 3D Earth models, such as the finite-difference eikonal method (e.g

  12. FGG-NUFFT-Based Method for Near-Field 3-D Imaging Using Millimeter Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Yingzhi; Zhu, Yongfeng; Tang, Liang; Fu, Qiang; Pei, Hucheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, to deal with the concealed target detection problem, an accurate and efficient algorithm for near-field millimeter wave three-dimensional (3-D) imaging is proposed that uses a two-dimensional (2-D) plane antenna array. First, a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT) is performed on the scattered data along the antenna array plane. Then, a phase shift is performed to compensate for the spherical wave effect. Finally, fast Gaussian gridding based nonuniform FFT (FGG-NUFFT) combined with 2-D inverse FFT (IFFT) is performed on the nonuniform 3-D spatial spectrum in the frequency wavenumber domain to achieve 3-D imaging. The conventional method for near-field 3-D imaging uses Stolt interpolation to obtain uniform spatial spectrum samples and performs 3-D IFFT to reconstruct a 3-D image. Compared with the conventional method, our FGG-NUFFT based method is comparable in both efficiency and accuracy in the full sampled case and can obtain more accurate images with less clutter and fewer noisy artifacts in the down-sampled case, which are good properties for practical applications. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FGG-NUFFT-based near-field 3-D imaging algorithm can have better imaging performance than the conventional method for down-sampled measurements. PMID:27657066

  13. FGG-NUFFT-Based Method for Near-Field 3-D Imaging Using Millimeter Waves.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yingzhi; Zhu, Yongfeng; Tang, Liang; Fu, Qiang; Pei, Hucheng

    2016-09-19

    In this paper, to deal with the concealed target detection problem, an accurate and efficient algorithm for near-field millimeter wave three-dimensional (3-D) imaging is proposed that uses a two-dimensional (2-D) plane antenna array. First, a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT) is performed on the scattered data along the antenna array plane. Then, a phase shift is performed to compensate for the spherical wave effect. Finally, fast Gaussian gridding based nonuniform FFT (FGG-NUFFT) combined with 2-D inverse FFT (IFFT) is performed on the nonuniform 3-D spatial spectrum in the frequency wavenumber domain to achieve 3-D imaging. The conventional method for near-field 3-D imaging uses Stolt interpolation to obtain uniform spatial spectrum samples and performs 3-D IFFT to reconstruct a 3-D image. Compared with the conventional method, our FGG-NUFFT based method is comparable in both efficiency and accuracy in the full sampled case and can obtain more accurate images with less clutter and fewer noisy artifacts in the down-sampled case, which are good properties for practical applications. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FGG-NUFFT-based near-field 3-D imaging algorithm can have better imaging performance than the conventional method for down-sampled measurements.

  14. A review of 3D/2D registration methods for image-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Markelj, P; Tomaževič, D; Likar, B; Pernuš, F

    2012-04-01

    Registration of pre- and intra-interventional data is one of the key technologies for image-guided radiation therapy, radiosurgery, minimally invasive surgery, endoscopy, and interventional radiology. In this paper, we survey those 3D/2D data registration methods that utilize 3D computer tomography or magnetic resonance images as the pre-interventional data and 2D X-ray projection images as the intra-interventional data. The 3D/2D registration methods are reviewed with respect to image modality, image dimensionality, registration basis, geometric transformation, user interaction, optimization procedure, subject, and object of registration.

  15. Finite difference neuroelectric modeling software.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hung V; Ng, Kwong T

    2011-06-15

    This paper describes a finite difference neuroelectric modeling software (FNS), written in C and MATLAB, which can be executed as a standalone program or integrated with other packages for electroencephalography (EEG) analysis. The package from the Oxford Center for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB), FMRIB Software Library (FSL), is used to segment the anatomical magnetic resonance (MR) image for realistic head modeling. The EEG electrode array is fitted to the realistic head model using the Bioelectromagnetism MATLAB toolbox. The finite difference formulation for a general inhomogeneous anisotropic body is used to obtain the system matrix equation, which is then solved using the conjugate gradient algorithm. The reciprocity theorem is utilized to limit the number of required forward solutions to N-1, where N is the number of electrodes. Results show that the forward solver only requires 500 MB of random-access memory (RAM) for a realistic 256×256×256 head model and that the software can be conveniently combined with inverse algorithms such as beamformers and MUSIC. The software is freely available under the GNU Public License.

  16. TM01-mode microwave propagation property analysis for plasmas with disk-plate windows by a finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshito; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Taiki; Teramoto, Koji; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Kagami, Shin; Furukawa, Masakazu

    2007-07-15

    Numerical studies of microwave propagation properties in a conical horn and an adjustable waveguides, and for plasmas generated under disk-plate windows of a 220 mm diameter and in a vacuum chamber are studied by a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method including plasma equations. In the numerical studies, a TM01-mode microwave of 2.45 GHz at a power of 1 kW is supplied from the top of the conical horn waveguide. In addition, numerical results by the FDTD method are compared with experimental results, and a validity of the numerical results is investigated. From the numerical results, it is found that the TM01-mode microwave changes its field shape and propagates along inner surfaces of the conical horn and the adjustable waveguides. Then electromagnetic fields of the TM01-mode microwave concentrate at the center surfaces of the disk-plate windows [quartz ({epsilon}{sub r}=3.8), alumina ({epsilon}{sub r}=9.7), and WG20 ({epsilon}{sub r}=20.0)]. A diameter of higher concentration is within 80 mm, and the orientation of electric field is almost vertical to the disk-plate window. The diameters within 80 mm are equivalent to a diameter at a higher electron density in an oxygen plasma experiment in the volume mode at 1 kW and 133 Pa with a quartz window. When heights of the adjustable waveguide are changed from 64 to 244 mm, peaks of electric fields in the heights, where microwave power is estimated to be strongly absorbed into the plasmas, appear and peak positions of the electric fields are observed periodically in surface-wave mode plasmas as well as the volume mode plasmas. Heights of the peaks increase with increasing dielectric constant and peak-to-peak distances of the peak positions decrease with increasing dielectric constant. The peak positions agree to the minimum microwave power reflections tuned by a combination of an autotuning unit and adjustable waveguide heights in experiments. Furthermore, peak positions of relatively absorbed microwave powers in

  17. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-In-Cell Methods on 3-D Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Pusok, A. E.; Popov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered to be a flexible and robust method to model advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e. rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems or incompressible Stokes problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an immobile, Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without preserving the zero divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e. non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Jenny et al., 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. Solutions to this problem include: using larger mesh resolutions and/or marker densities, or repeatedly controlling the marker distribution (i.e. inject/delete), but which does not have an established physical background. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (2001) and Meyer and Jenny (2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation (CVI) scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we follow up with these studies and report on the quality of velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We adapt the formulations from both Jenny et al. (2001) and Wang et al. (2015) for use on 3-D staggered grids, where the velocity components have different node locations as compared to finite element, where they share the same node location. We test the different interpolation schemes (CVI and non-CVI) in combination with different advection schemes (Euler, RK2 and RK4) and with/out marker control on Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. We show that a conservative formulation

  18. 3D X-ray imaging methods in support catheter ablations of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a very frequent illness. Pharmacotherapy is not very effective in persistent arrhythmias and brings along a number of risks. Catheter ablation has became an effective and curative treatment method over the past 20 years. To support complex arrhythmia ablations, the 3D X-ray cardiac cavities imaging is used, most frequently the 3D reconstruction of CT images. The 3D cardiac rotational angiography (3DRA) represents a modern method enabling to create CT like 3D images on a standard X-ray machine equipped with special software. Its advantage lies in the possibility to obtain images during the procedure, decreased radiation dose and reduction of amount of the contrast agent. The left atrium model is the one most frequently used for complex atrial arrhythmia ablations, particularly for atrial fibrillation. CT data allow for creation and segmentation of 3D models of all cardiac cavities. Recently, a research has been made proving the use of 3DRA to create 3D models of other cardiac (right ventricle, left ventricle, aorta) and non-cardiac structures (oesophagus). They can be used during catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias to improve orientation during the construction of 3D electroanatomic maps, directly fused with 3D electroanatomic systems and/or fused with fluoroscopy. An intensive development in the 3D model creation and use has taken place over the past years and they became routinely used during catheter ablations of arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Further development may be anticipated in the future in both the creation and use of these models.

  19. A 3D terrain reconstruction method of stereo vision based quadruped robot navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhuo; Zhu, Ying; Liang, Guanhao

    2017-01-01

    To provide 3D environment information for the quadruped robot autonomous navigation system during walking through rough terrain, based on the stereo vision, a novel 3D terrain reconstruction method is presented. In order to solve the problem that images collected by stereo sensors have large regions with similar grayscale and the problem that image matching is poor at real-time performance, watershed algorithm and fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm are combined for contour extraction. Aiming at the problem of error matching, duel constraint with region matching and pixel matching is established for matching optimization. Using the stereo matching edge pixel pairs, the 3D coordinate algorithm is estimated according to the binocular stereo vision imaging model. Experimental results show that the proposed method can yield high stereo matching ratio and reconstruct 3D scene quickly and efficiently.

  20. A method for 3D scene recognition using shadow information and a single fixed viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamber, David C.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Page, Scott F.

    2012-05-01

    The ability to passively reconstruct a scene in 3D provides significant benefit to Situational Awareness systems employed in security and surveillance applications. Traditionally, passive 3D scene modelling techniques, such as Shape from Silhouette, require images from multiple sensor viewpoints, acquired either through the motion of a single sensor or from multiple sensors. As a result, the application of these techniques often attracts high costs, and presents numerous practical challenges. This paper presents a 3D scene reconstruction approach based on exploiting scene shadows, which only requires information from a single static sensor. This paper demonstrates that a large amount of 3D information about a scene can be interpreted from shadows; shadows reveal the shape of objects as viewed from a solar perspective and additional perspectives are gained as the sun arcs across the sky. The approach has been tested on synthetic and real data and is shown to be capable of reconstructing 3D scene objects where traditional 3D imaging methods fail. Providing the shadows within a scene are discernible, the proposed technique is able to reconstruct 3D objects that are camouflaged, obscured or even outside of the sensor's Field of View. The proposed approach can be applied in a range of applications, for example urban surveillance, checkpoint and border control, critical infrastructure protection and for identifying concealed or suspicious objects or persons which would normally be hidden from the sensor viewpoint.

  1. Accurate compressed look up table method for CGH in 3D holographic display.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuan; Liu, Juan; Li, Xin; Xue, Gaolei; Jia, Jia; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-12-28

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) should be obtained with high accuracy and high speed in 3D holographic display, and most researches focus on the high speed. In this paper, a simple and effective computation method for CGH is proposed based on Fresnel diffraction theory and look up table. Numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed to demonstrate its feasibility. The proposed method can obtain more accurate reconstructed images with lower memory usage compared with split look up table method and compressed look up table method without sacrificing the computational speed in holograms generation, so it is called accurate compressed look up table method (AC-LUT). It is believed that AC-LUT method is an effective method to calculate the CGH of 3D objects for real-time 3D holographic display where the huge information data is required, and it could provide fast and accurate digital transmission in various dynamic optical fields in the future.

  2. A multimaterial bioink method for 3D printing tunable, cell-compatible hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Alexandra L; Hyland, Kelly E; Jakus, Adam E; Burghardt, Wesley R; Shah, Ramille N

    2015-03-04

    A multimaterial bio-ink method using polyethylene glycol crosslinking is presented for expanding the biomaterial palette required for 3D bioprinting of more mimetic and customizable tissue and organ constructs. Lightly crosslinked, soft hydrogels are produced from precursor solutions of various materials and 3D printed. Rheological and biological characterizations are presented, and the promise of this new bio-ink synthesis strategy is discussed.

  3. Novel scanning electron microscopy methods for analyzing the 3D structure of the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The structure of the Golgi apparatus has been extensively examined by light and electron microscopy, but details of its three-dimensional (3D) structure have remained unclear because of the technical limitations of conventional microscopy techniques. To overcome this problem, we have developed several novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods for observing the 3D structure of subcellular organelles including the Golgi apparatus: (1) an osmium maceration method that facilitates SEM observation of membranous organelles, including the Golgi apparatus, by selectively removing soluble cytoplasmic proteins, (2) an osmium impregnation/maceration method that combines an osmium impregnation method with the osmium maceration method to determine the polarity of the Golgi apparatus by SEM, (3) a correlative light and SEM method that combines a cryosectioning technique with the osmium maceration method to enable correlation of the immunocytochemical distribution of molecules with the 3D ultrastructure of the Golgi apparatus, and (4) array tomography based on the systematic collection and integration of SEM images of serial ultrathin sections on glass slides for revealing the 3D ultrastructure of the entire Golgi apparatus. Together, the novel SEM techniques listed above can reveal the complete 3D structure of the Golgi apparatus in different cell types.

  4. Local motion-compensated method for high-quality 3D coronary artery reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction of coronary artery from X-ray angiograms rotationally acquired on C-arm has great clinical value. While cardiac-gated reconstruction has shown promising results, it suffers from the problem of residual motion. This work proposed a new local motion-compensated reconstruction method to handle this issue. An initial image was firstly reconstructed using a regularized iterative reconstruction method. Then a 3D/2D registration method was proposed to estimate the residual vessel motion. Finally, the residual motion was compensated in the final reconstruction using the extended iterative reconstruction method. Through quantitative evaluation, it was found that high-quality 3D reconstruction could be obtained and the result was comparable to state-of-the-art method. PMID:28018741

  5. Local motion-compensated method for high-quality 3D coronary artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-12-01

    The 3D reconstruction of coronary artery from X-ray angiograms rotationally acquired on C-arm has great clinical value. While cardiac-gated reconstruction has shown promising results, it suffers from the problem of residual motion. This work proposed a new local motion-compensated reconstruction method to handle this issue. An initial image was firstly reconstructed using a regularized iterative reconstruction method. Then a 3D/2D registration method was proposed to estimate the residual vessel motion. Finally, the residual motion was compensated in the final reconstruction using the extended iterative reconstruction method. Through quantitative evaluation, it was found that high-quality 3D reconstruction could be obtained and the result was comparable to state-of-the-art method.

  6. Implementation of algebraic stress models in a general 3-D Navier-Stokes method (PAB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional multiblock Navier-Stokes code, PAB3D, which was developed for propulsion integration and general aerodynamic analysis, has been used extensively by NASA Langley and other organizations to perform both internal (exhaust) and external flow analysis of complex aircraft configurations. This code was designed to solve the simplified Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model has been used with considerable success, especially for attached flows. Accurate predicting of transonic shock wave location and pressure recovery in separated flow regions has been more difficult. Two algebraic Reynolds stress models (ASM) have been recently implemented in the code that greatly improved the code's ability to predict these difficult flow conditions. Good agreement with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for a subsonic flat plate was achieved with ASM's developed by Shih, Zhu, and Lumley and Gatski and Speziale. Good predictions were also achieved at subsonic and transonic Mach numbers for shock location and trailing edge boattail pressure recovery on a single-engine afterbody/nozzle model.

  7. Theoretical assessment of 3-D magnetotelluric method for oil and gas exploration: Synthetic examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Wei, Wenbo; Lu, Qingtian; Dong, Hao; Li, Yanqing

    2014-07-01

    In petroleum explorations, seismic reflection technique has been almost always the preferred method for its high exploration depth and resolution. However, with the development of three dimensional (3D) inversion and interpretation schemes, much potential has been shown in MT method dealing with complex geological structures as in oil and gas exploration. In this study, synthetic geophysical models of petroleum reservoir structures are modeled and utilized to demonstrate that feasibility of 3-D MT technique for hydrocarbon exploration. A series of typical reservoir structure models are constructed and used to generate synthetic MT and seismic data to test the capabilities of 2-D/3-D MT and 2-D seismic inversion techniques. According to the inversion comparison, in addition to correctly retrieve the original forward model, the 3-D MT method also has some advantages over the reflective seismology method, which suffered from the lack of reflection wave and multiple wave problems. With the presented 3-D high resolution MT inversion method, MT techniques should be employed as one of the first choices for petroleum explorations.

  8. A measurement method for micro 3D shape based on grids-processing and stereovision technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanwei; Liu, Zhanwei; Xie, Huimin

    2013-04-01

    An integrated measurement method for micro 3D surface shape by a combination of stereovision technology in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and grids-processing methodology is proposed. The principle of the proposed method is introduced in detail. By capturing two images of the tested specimen with grids on the surface at different tilt angles in an SEM, the 3D surface shape of the specimen can be obtained. Numerical simulation is applied to analyze the feasibility of the proposed method. A validation experiment is performed here. The surface shape of the metal-wire/polymer-membrane structures with thermal deformation is reconstructed. By processing the surface grids of the specimen, the out-of-plane displacement field of the specimen surface is also obtained. Compared with the measurement results obtained by a 3D digital microscope, the experimental error of the proposed method is discussed

  9. Tunable nonuniform sampling method for fast calculation and intensity modulation in 3D dynamic holographic display.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Juan; Jia, Jia; Li, Xin; Han, Jian; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-08-01

    Heavy computational load of computer-generated hologram (CGH) and imprecise intensity modulation of 3D images are crucial problems in dynamic holographic display. The nonuniform sampling method is proposed to speed up CGH generation and precisely modulate the reconstructed intensities of phase-only CGH. The proposed method can eliminate the redundant information properly, where 70% reduction in the storage amount can be reached when it is combined with the novel lookup table method. Multigrayscale modulation of reconstructed 3D images can be achieved successfully. Numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed, and both are in good agreement. It is believed that the proposed method can be used in 3D dynamic holographic display.

  10. Receptor-based 3D-QSAR in Drug Design: Methods and Applications in Kinase Studies.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-based 3D-QSAR strategy represents a superior integration of structure-based drug design (SBDD) and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) analysis. It combines the accurate prediction of ligand poses by the SBDD approach with the good predictability and interpretability of statistical models derived from the 3D-QSAR approach. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the development of receptor-based 3D-QSAR methods and two alternative approaches have been exploited. One associates with computing the binding interactions between a receptor and a ligand to generate structure-based descriptors for QSAR analyses. The other concerns the application of various docking protocols to generate optimal ligand poses so as to provide reliable molecular alignments for the conventional 3D-QSAR operations. This review highlights new concepts and methodologies recently developed in the field of receptorbased 3D-QSAR, and in particular, covers its application in kinase studies.

  11. a Method of 3d Measurement and Reconstruction for Cultural Relics in Museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S.; Zhou, Y.; Huang, R.; Zhou, L.; Xu, X.; Wang, C.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional measurement and reconstruction during conservation and restoration of cultural relics have become an essential part of a modem museum regular work. Although many kinds of methods including laser scanning, computer vision and close-range photogrammetry have been put forward, but problems still exist, such as contradiction between cost and good result, time and fine effect. Aimed at these problems, this paper proposed a structure-light based method for 3D measurement and reconstruction of cultural relics in museums. Firstly, based on structure-light principle, digitalization hardware has been built and with its help, dense point cloud of cultural relics' surface can be easily acquired. To produce accurate 3D geometry model from point cloud data, multi processing algorithms have been developed and corresponding software has been implemented whose functions include blunder detection and removal, point cloud alignment and merge, 3D mesh construction and simplification. Finally, high-resolution images are captured and the alignment of these images and 3D geometry model is conducted and realistic, accurate 3D model is constructed. Based on such method, a complete system including hardware and software are built. Multi-kinds of cultural relics have been used to test this method and results prove its own feature such as high efficiency, high accuracy, easy operation and so on.

  12. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  13. Methods for 2-D and 3-D Endobronchial Ultrasound Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Gilbert, Christopher; Toth, Jennifer; Higgins, William

    2016-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now commonly used for cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, EBUS is challenging to use and interpreting EBUS video sequences is difficult. Other ultrasound imaging domains, hampered by related difficulties, have benefited from computer-based image-segmentation methods. Yet, so far, no such methods have been proposed for EBUS. We propose image-segmentation methods for 2-D EBUS frames and 3-D EBUS sequences. Our 2-D method adapts the fast-marching level-set process, anisotropic diffusion, and region growing to the problem of segmenting 2-D EBUS frames. Our 3-D method builds upon the 2-D method while also incorporating the geodesic level-set process for segmenting EBUS sequences. Tests with lung-cancer patient data showed that the methods ran fully automatically for nearly 80% of test cases. For the remaining cases, the only user-interaction required was the selection of a seed point. When compared to ground-truth segmentations, the 2-D method achieved an overall Dice index = 90.0% ±4.9%, while the 3-D method achieved an overall Dice index = 83.9 ± 6.0%. In addition, the computation time (2-D, 0.070 s/frame; 3-D, 0.088 s/frame) was two orders of magnitude faster than interactive contour definition. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of the methods for EBUS localization in a multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy system.

  14. a Method of 3d Freeform Fabrication Using a Curing of Photopolymer Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Su; Kim, Dong Soo; Lee, Min Cheol; Lee, Won Hee

    Recently, Study of 3D freeform fabrication method was working in the various applications. For example, in the powder base, it's laminated using a binding method or laser sintering method. However, the demerits of these methods are to take long time for post process and not enough to keep high strength of manufacturing part. The binding method needs the post process and the time for post process needs longer time than a manufacturing time. The sintering method has huge size of system with module of the laser. In this paper, we introduce a method of 3D freeform fabrication using a curing of photopolymer resin. A photopolymer curing method has simply fabrication process and high strength of manufacturing part. So, we are configuration the system with compact type module for the office environment and experiment a UV curing test with photopolymer resin in the 3D freeform fabrication method. In the conclusion, we fabricate the 3D freeform part, which is suitable to the office environment using a photopolymer curing method.

  15. Numerical non-LTE 3D radiative transfer using a multigrid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørgen, Johan P.; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2017-03-01

    Context. 3D non-LTE radiative transfer problems are computationally demanding, and this sets limits on the size of the problems that can be solved. So far, multilevel accelerated lambda iteration (MALI) has been the method of choice to perform high-resolution computations in multidimensional problems. The disadvantage of MALI is that its computing time scales as O(n2), with n the number of grid points. When the grid becomes finer, the computational cost increases quadratically. Aims: We aim to develop a 3D non-LTE radiative transfer code that is more efficient than MALI. Methods: We implement a non-linear multigrid, fast approximation storage scheme, into the existing Multi3D radiative transfer code. We verify our multigrid implementation by comparing with MALI computations. We show that multigrid can be employed in realistic problems with snapshots from 3D radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations as input atmospheres. Results: With multigrid, we obtain a factor 3.3-4.5 speed-up compared to MALI. With full-multigrid, the speed-up increases to a factor 6. The speed-up is expected to increase for input atmospheres with more grid points and finer grid spacing. Conclusions: Solving 3D non-LTE radiative transfer problems using non-linear multigrid methods can be applied to realistic atmospheres with a substantial increase in speed.

  16. Voxel-coding method for quantification of vascular structure from 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Shahrokni, Ali; Zoroofi, Reza A.

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents an image processing method for information extraction from 3D images of vasculature. It automates the study of vascular structures by extracting quantitative information such as skeleton, length, diameter, and vessel-to- tissue ratio for different vessels as well as their branches. Furthermore, it generates 3D visualization of vessels based on desired anatomical characteristics such as vessel diameter or 3D connectivity. Steps of the proposed approach are as follows. (1) Preprocessing, in which intensity adjustment, optimal thresholding, and median filtering are done. (2) 3D thinning, in which medial axis and skeleton of the vessels are found. (3) Branch labeling, in which different branches are identified and each voxel is assigned to the corresponding branch. (4) Quantitation, in which length of each branch is estimated, based on the number of voxels assigned to it, and its diameter is calculated using the medial axis direction. (5) Visualization, in which vascular structure is shown in 3D, using color coding and surface rendering methods. We have tested and evaluated the proposed algorithms using simulated images of multi-branch vessels and real confocal microscopic images of the vessels in rat brains. Experimental results illustrate performance of the methods and usefulness of the results for medical image analysis applications.

  17. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  18. 3D FEM-BEM-coupling method to solve magnetostatic Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Feischl, Michael; Praetorius, Dirk; Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Fuger, Markus; Suess, Dieter

    2012-05-01

    3D magnetostatic Maxwell equations are solved using the direct Johnson-Nédélec FEM-BEM coupling method and a reduced scalar potential approach. The occurring BEM matrices are calculated analytically and approximated by H-matrices using the ACA+ algorithm. In addition a proper preconditioning method is suggested that allows to solve large-scale problems using iterative solvers.

  19. Detecting and estimating errors in 3D restoration methods using analog models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Ramón, Ma; Pueyo, Emilio L.; Briz, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    Some geological scenarios may be important for a number of socio-economic reasons, such as water or energy resources, but the available underground information is often limited, scarce and heterogeneous. A truly 3D reconstruction, which is still necessary during the decision-making process, may have important social and economic implications. For this reason, restoration methods were developed. By honoring some geometric or mechanical laws, they help build a reliable image of the subsurface. Pioneer methods were firstly applied in 2D (balanced and restored cross-sections) during the sixties and seventies. Later on, and due to the improvements of computational capabilities, they were extended to 3D. Currently, there are some academic and commercial restoration solutions; Unfold by the Université de Grenoble, Move by Midland Valley Exploration, Kine3D (on gOcad code) by Paradigm, Dynel3D by igeoss-Schlumberger. We have developed our own restoration method, Pmag3Drest (IGME-Universidad de Zaragoza), which is designed to tackle complex geometrical scenarios using paleomagnetic vectors as a pseudo-3D indicator of deformation. However, all these methods have limitations based on the assumptions they need to establish. For this reason, detecting and estimating uncertainty in 3D restoration methods is of key importance to trust the reconstructions. Checking the reliability and the internal consistency of every method, as well as to compare the results among restoration tools, is a critical issue never tackled so far because of the impossibility to test out the results in Nature. To overcome this problem we have developed a technique using analog models. We built complex geometric models inspired in real cases of superposed and/or conical folding at laboratory scale. The stratigraphic volumes were modeled using EVA sheets (ethylene vinyl acetate). Their rheology (tensile and tear strength, elongation, density etc) and thickness can be chosen among a large number of values

  20. A new 3D reconstruction method of small solar system bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capanna, C.; Jorda, L.; Lamy, P.; Gesquiere, G.

    2011-10-01

    The 3D reconstruction of small solar system bodies consitutes an essential step toward understanding and interpreting their physical and geological properties. We propose a new reconstruction method by photoclinometry based on the minimization of the chisquare difference between observed and synthetic images by deformation of a 3D triangular mesh. This method has been tested on images of the two asteroids (2867) Steins and (21) Lutetia observed during ESA's ROSETTA mission, and it will be applied to elaborate digital terrain models from images of the asteroid (4) Vesta, the target of NASA's DAWN spacecraft.

  1. Streaming video-based 3D reconstruction method compatible with existing monoscopic and stereoscopic endoscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Henri; van der Mark, Wannes; Eendebak, Pieter T.; Landsmeer, Sander H.; van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; ter Haar, Frank B.; Wieringa, F. Pieter; van Basten, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Compared to open surgery, minimal invasive surgery offers reduced trauma and faster recovery. However, lack of direct view limits space perception. Stereo-endoscopy improves depth perception, but is still restricted to the direct endoscopic field-of-view. We describe a novel technology that reconstructs 3D-panoramas from endoscopic video streams providing a much wider cumulative overview. The method is compatible with any endoscope. We demonstrate that it is possible to generate photorealistic 3D-environments from mono- and stereoscopic endoscopy. The resulting 3D-reconstructions can be directly applied in simulators and e-learning. Extended to real-time processing, the method looks promising for telesurgery or other remote vision-guided tasks.

  2. Simulations of Coulomb systems with slab geometry using an efficient 3D Ewald summation method.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Alexandre P; Girotto, Matheus; Levin, Yan

    2016-04-14

    We present a new approach to efficiently simulate electrolytes confined between infinite charged walls using a 3d Ewald summation method. The optimal performance is achieved by separating the electrostatic potential produced by the charged walls from the electrostatic potential of electrolyte. The electric field produced by the 3d periodic images of the walls is constant inside the simulation cell, with the field produced by the transverse images of the charged plates canceling out. The non-neutral confined electrolyte in an external potential can be simulated using 3d Ewald summation with a suitable renormalization of the electrostatic energy, to remove a divergence, and a correction that accounts for the conditional convergence of the resulting lattice sum. The new algorithm is at least an order of magnitude more rapid than the usual simulation methods for the slab geometry and can be further sped up by adopting a particle-particle particle-mesh approach.

  3. A Review of Failure Analysis Methods for Advanced 3D Microelectronic Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Srinath, Purushotham Kaushik Muthur; Goyal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Advanced three dimensional (3D) packaging is a key enabler in driving form factor reduction, performance benefits, and package cost reduction, especially in the fast paced mobility and ultraportable consumer electronics segments. The high level of functional integration and the complex package architecture pose a significant challenge for conventional fault isolation (FI) and failure analysis (FA) methods. Innovative FI/FA tools and techniques are required to tackle the technical and throughput challenges. In this paper, the applications of FI and FA techniques such as Electro Optic Terahertz Pulse Reflectometry, 3D x-ray computed tomography, lock-in thermography, and novel physical sample preparation methods to 3D packages with package on package and stacked die with through silicon via configurations are reviewed, along with the key FI and FA challenges.

  4. Multiplexing encoding method for full-color dynamic 3D holographic display.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gaolei; Liu, Juan; Li, Xin; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Zhao; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yongtian

    2014-07-28

    The multiplexing encoding method is proposed and demonstrated for reconstructing colorful images accurately by using single phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM). It will encode the light waves at different wavelengths into one pure-phase hologram at the same time based on the analytic formulas. The three-dimensional (3D) images can be reconstructed clearly when the light waves at different wavelengths are incident into the encoding hologram. Numerical simulations and optical experiments for 2D and 3D colorful images are performed. The results show that the colorful reconstructed images with high quality are achieved successfully. The proposed multiplexing method is a simple and fast encoding approach and the size of the system is small and compact. It is expected to be used for realizing full-color 3D holographic display in future.

  5. 3D reconstruction method from biplanar radiography using non-stereocorresponding points and elastic deformable meshes.

    PubMed

    Mitton, D; Landry, C; Véron, S; Skalli, W; Lavaste, F; De Guise, J A

    2000-03-01

    Standard 3D reconstruction of bones using stereoradiography is limited by the number of anatomical landmarks visible in more than one projection. The proposed technique enables the 3D reconstruction of additional landmarks that can be identified in only one of the radiographs. The principle of this method is the deformation of an elastic object that respects stereocorresponding and non-stereocorresponding observations available in different projections. This technique is based on the principle that any non-stereocorresponding point belongs to a line joining the X-ray source and the projection of the point in one view. The aim is to determine the 3D position of these points on their line of projection when submitted to geometrical and topological constraints. This technique is used to obtain the 3D geometry of 18 cadaveric upper cervical vertebrae. The reconstructed geometry obtained is compared with direct measurements using a magnetic digitiser. The order of precision determined with the point-to-surface distance between the reconstruction obtained with that technique and reference measurements is about 1 mm, depending on the vertebrae studied. Comparison results indicate that the obtained reconstruction is close to the actual vertebral geometry. This method can therefore be proposed to obtain the 3D geometry of vertebrae.

  6. Device and methods for "gold standard" registration of clinical 3D and 2D cerebral angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Hennadii; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Å piclin, Žiga

    2015-03-01

    Translation of any novel and existing 3D-2D image registration methods into clinical image-guidance systems is limited due to lack of their objective validation on clinical image datasets. The main reason is that, besides the calibration of the 2D imaging system, a reference or "gold standard" registration is very difficult to obtain on clinical image datasets. In the context of cerebral endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs), we present a calibration device in the form of a headband with integrated fiducial markers and, secondly, propose an automated pipeline comprising 3D and 2D image processing, analysis and annotation steps, the result of which is a retrospective calibration of the 2D imaging system and an optimal, i.e., "gold standard" registration of 3D and 2D images. The device and methods were used to create the "gold standard" on 15 datasets of 3D and 2D cerebral angiograms, whereas each dataset was acquired on a patient undergoing EIGI for either aneurysm coiling or embolization of arteriovenous malformation. The use of the device integrated seamlessly in the clinical workflow of EIGI. While the automated pipeline eliminated all manual input or interactive image processing, analysis or annotation. In this way, the time to obtain the "gold standard" was reduced from 30 to less than one minute and the "gold standard" of 3D-2D registration on all 15 datasets of cerebral angiograms was obtained with a sub-0.1 mm accuracy.

  7. Enhancement of the computational efficiency of the near-to-far field mapping in the finite-difference method and ray-by-ray method with the fast multi-pole plane wave expansion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guanglin; Yang, Ping; Sun, Bingqiang; Panetta, R. Lee; Kattawar, George W.

    2016-06-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and ray-by-ray (RBR) methods are techniques used to calculate the optical properties of nonspherical particles for small-to-moderate and large size parameters, respectively. The former is a rigorous method, and the latter is an approximate geometric-physical optics-hybrid method that takes advantage of both high efficiency of the geometric optics approach and high accuracy of the physical optics approach. In these two methods, the far field is calculated by mapping the near field to the far field with consideration of the phase interference. The mapping computation is more time-consuming than the near-field simulation when multiple scattering directions are involved, particularly in the case of the RBR implementation. To overcome the difficulty, in this study the fast multi-pole method is applied to both FDTD and RBR towards accelerating the far-field calculation, without degrading the accuracy of the simulation results.

  8. Investigation of Presage 3D Dosimetry as a Method of Clinically Intuitive Quality Assurance and Comparison to a Semi-3D Delta4 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Ethan Van

    The need for clinically intuitive metrics for patient-specific quality assurance in radiation therapy has been well-documented (Zhen, Nelms et al. 2011). A novel transform method has shown to be effective at converting full-density 3D dose measurements made in a phantom to dose values in the patient geometry, enabling comparisons using clinically intuitive metrics such as dose-volume histograms (Oldham et al. 2011). This work investigates the transform method and compares its calculated dose-volume histograms (DVHs) to DVH values calculated by a Delta4 QA device (Scandidos), marking the first comparison of a true 3D system to a semi-3D device using clinical metrics. Measurements were made using Presage 3D dosimeters, which were readout by an in-house optical-CT scanner. Three patient cases were chosen for the study: one head-and-neck VMAT treatment and two spine IMRT treatments. The transform method showed good agreement with the planned dose values for all three cases. Furthermore, the transformed DVHs adhered to the planned dose with more accuracy than the Delta4 DVHs. The similarity between the Delta4 DVHs and the transformed DVHs, however, was greater for one of the spine cases than it was for the head-and-neck case, implying that the accuracy of the Delta4 Anatomy software may vary from one treatment site to another. Overall, the transform method, which incorporates data from full-density 3D dose measurements, provides clinically intuitive results that are more accurate and consistent than the corresponding results from a semi-3D Delta 4 system.

  9. Methods of constructing a 3D geological model from scatter data

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, J.; Bethel, W.

    1995-04-01

    Most geoscience applications, such as assessment of an oil reservoir or hazardous waste site, require geological characterization of the site. Geological characterization involves analysis of spatial distributions of lithology, porosity, etc. Because of the complexity of the spatial relationships, the authors find that a 3-D model of geology is better suited for integration of many different types of data and provides a better representation of a site than a 2-D one. A 3-D model of geology is constructed from sample data obtained from field measurements, which are usually scattered. To create a volume model from scattered data, interpolation between points is required. The interpolation can be computed using one of several computational algorithms. Alternatively, a manual method may be employed, in which an interactive graphics device is used to input by hand the information that lies between the data points. For example, a mouse can be used to draw lines connecting data points with equal values. The combination of these two methods presents yet another approach. In this study, the authors will compare selected methods of 3-D geological modeling, They used a flow-based, modular visualization environment (AVS) to construct the geological models computationally. Within this system, they used three modules, scat{_}3d, trivar and scatter{_}to{_}ucd, as examples of computational methods. They compare these methods to the combined manual and computational approach. Because there are no tools readily available in AVS for this type of construction, they used a geological modeling system to demonstrate this method.

  10. A 3-D aerodynamic method for the analysis of isolated horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Ammara, I.; Masson, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1997-12-31

    In most existing performance-analysis methods, wind turbines are considered isolated so that interference effects caused by other rotors or by the site topography are neglected. The main objective of this paper is to propose a practical 3-D method suitable for the study of these effects, in order to optimize the arrangement and the positioning of Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs) in a wind farm. In the proposed methodology, the flow field around isolated HAWTs is predicted by solving the 3-D, time-averaged, steady-state, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations in which the turbines are represented by distributions of momentum sources. The resulting governing equations are solved using a Control-Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM). The fundamental aspects related to the development of a practical 3-D method are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on some of the challenges that arose during its implementation. The current implementation is limited to the analysis of isolated HAWTs. Preliminary results have indicated that, the proposed 3-D method reaches the same level of accuracy, in terms of performance predictions, that the previously developed 2-D axisymmetric model and the well-known momentum-strip theory, while still using reasonable computers resources. It can be considered as a useful tool for the design of HAWTs. Its main advantages, however, are its intrinsic capacity to predict the details of the flow in the wake, and its capabilities of modelling arbitrary wind-turbine arrangements and including ground effects.

  11. Efficient methods to model the scattering of ultrasonic guided waves in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, L.; Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-03-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic guided waves and their interaction with a defect is of interest to the nondestructive testing community. There is no general solution to the scattering problem and it is still an ongoing research topic. Due to the complexity of guided wave scattering problems, most existing models are related to the 2D case. However, thanks to the increase in computer calculation power, specific 3D problems can also be studied, with the help of numerical or semi-analytical methods. This paper describes two efficient methods aimed at modeling 3D scattering problems. The first method is the use of the Huygens' principle to reduce the size of finite element models. This principle allows the area of interest to be restricted to the very near field of the defect, for both the generation of the incident field and the modal decomposition of the scattered field. The second method consists of separating the 3D problem into two 2D problems for which the solutions are calculated and used to approximate the 3D solution. This can be used at low frequency-thickness products, where Lamb waves have a similar behavior to bulk waves. These two methods are presented briefly and compared on simple scattering cases.

  12. An improved 3-D Look--Locker imaging method for T(1) parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Nkongchu, Ken; Santyr, Giles

    2005-09-01

    The 3-D Look-Locker (LL) imaging method has been shown to be a highly efficient and accurate method for the volumetric mapping of the spin lattice relaxation time T(1). However, conventional 3-D LL imaging schemes are typically limited to small tip angle RF pulses (3-D LL imaging method that incorporates an additional and variable delay time between recovery samples is described, which permits the use of larger tip angles (>5 degrees ), thereby improving the SNR and the accuracy of the method. In phantom studies, a mean T(1) measurement accuracy of less than 2% (0.2-3.1%) using a tip angle of 10 degrees was obtained for a range of T(1) from approximately 300 to 1,700 ms with a measurement time increase of only 15%. This accuracy compares favorably with the conventional 3-D LL method that provided an accuracy between 2.2% and 7.3% using a 5 degrees flip angle.

  13. Accident or homicide--virtual crime scene reconstruction using 3D methods.

    PubMed

    Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Räss, Beat; Jackowski, Christian; Thali, Michael J

    2013-02-10

    The analysis and reconstruction of forensically relevant events, such as traffic accidents, criminal assaults and homicides are based on external and internal morphological findings of the injured or deceased person. For this approach high-tech methods are gaining increasing importance in forensic investigations. The non-contact optical 3D digitising system GOM ATOS is applied as a suitable tool for whole body surface and wound documentation and analysis in order to identify injury-causing instruments and to reconstruct the course of event. In addition to the surface documentation, cross-sectional imaging methods deliver medical internal findings of the body. These 3D data are fused into a whole body model of the deceased. Additional to the findings of the bodies, the injury inflicting instruments and incident scene is documented in 3D. The 3D data of the incident scene, generated by 3D laser scanning and photogrammetry, is also included into the reconstruction. Two cases illustrate the methods. In the fist case a man was shot in his bedroom and the main question was, if the offender shot the man intentionally or accidentally, as he declared. In the second case a woman was hit by a car, driving backwards into a garage. It was unclear if the driver drove backwards once or twice, which would indicate that he willingly injured and killed the woman. With this work, we demonstrate how 3D documentation, data merging and animation enable to answer reconstructive questions regarding the dynamic development of patterned injuries, and how this leads to a real data based reconstruction of the course of event.

  14. On the evaluation of photogrammetric methods for dense 3D surface reconstruction in a metrological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, I.; Capra, A.; De Luca, L.; Beraldin, J.-A.; Cournoyer, L.

    2014-05-01

    This paper discusses a methodology to evaluate the accuracy of recently developed image-based 3D modelling techniques. So far, the emergence of these novel methods has not been supported by the definition of an internationally recognized standard which is fundamental for user confidence and market growth. In order to provide an element of reflection and solution to the different communities involved in 3D imaging, a promising approach is presented in this paper for the assessment of both metric quality and limitations of an open-source suite of tools (Apero/MicMac), developed for the extraction of dense 3D point clouds from a set of unordered 2D images. The proposed procedural workflow is performed within a metrological context, through inter-comparisons with "reference" data acquired with two hemispherical laser scanners, one total station, and one laser tracker. The methodology is applied to two case studies, designed in order to analyse the software performances in dealing with both outdoor and environmentally controlled conditions, i.e. the main entrance of Cathédrale de la Major (Marseille, France) and a custom-made scene located at National Research Council of Canada 3D imaging Metrology Laboratory (Ottawa). Comparative data and accuracy evidence produced for both tests allow the study of some key factors affecting 3D model accuracy.

  15. Method of Individual Adjustment for 3D CT Analysis: Linear Measurement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Kyu; Choi, Dong Hun; Lee, Jeong Woo; Yang, Jung Dug; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae; Choi, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We aim to regularize measurement values in three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) reconstructed images for higher-precision 3D analysis, focusing on length-based 3D cephalometric examinations. Methods. We measure the linear distances between points on different skull models using Vernier calipers (real values). We use 10 differently tilted CT scans for 3D CT reconstruction of the models and measure the same linear distances from the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). In both cases, each measurement is performed three times by three doctors, yielding nine measurements. The real values are compared with the PACS values. Each PACS measurement is revised based on the display field of view (DFOV) values and compared with the real values. Results. The real values and the PACS measurement changes according to tilt value have no significant correlations (p > 0.05). However, significant correlations appear between the real values and DFOV-adjusted PACS measurements (p < 0.001). Hence, we obtain a correlation expression that can yield real physical values from PACS measurements. The DFOV value intervals for various age groups are also verified. Conclusion. Precise confirmation of individual preoperative length and precise analysis of postoperative improvements through 3D analysis is possible, which is helpful for facial-bone-surgery symmetry correction.

  16. Method of Individual Adjustment for 3D CT Analysis: Linear Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong Hun; Lee, Jeong Woo; Yang, Jung Dug; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We aim to regularize measurement values in three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) reconstructed images for higher-precision 3D analysis, focusing on length-based 3D cephalometric examinations. Methods. We measure the linear distances between points on different skull models using Vernier calipers (real values). We use 10 differently tilted CT scans for 3D CT reconstruction of the models and measure the same linear distances from the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). In both cases, each measurement is performed three times by three doctors, yielding nine measurements. The real values are compared with the PACS values. Each PACS measurement is revised based on the display field of view (DFOV) values and compared with the real values. Results. The real values and the PACS measurement changes according to tilt value have no significant correlations (p > 0.05). However, significant correlations appear between the real values and DFOV-adjusted PACS measurements (p < 0.001). Hence, we obtain a correlation expression that can yield real physical values from PACS measurements. The DFOV value intervals for various age groups are also verified. Conclusion. Precise confirmation of individual preoperative length and precise analysis of postoperative improvements through 3D analysis is possible, which is helpful for facial-bone-surgery symmetry correction. PMID:28070517

  17. 3D unstructured mesh ALE hydrodynamics with the upwind discontinuous galerkin method

    SciTech Connect

    Kershaw, D S; Milovich, J L; Prasad, M K; Shaw, M J; Shestakov, A I

    1999-05-07

    The authors describe a numerical scheme to solve 3D Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics on an unstructured mesh using a discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM) and an explicit Runge-Kutta time discretization. Upwinding is achieved through Roe's linearized Riemann solver with the Harten-Hyman entropy fix. For stabilization, a 3D quadratic programming generalization of van Leer's 1D minmod slope limiter is used along with a Lapidus type artificial viscosity. This DGM scheme has been tested on a variety of hydrodynamic test problems and appears to be robust making it the basis for the integrated 3D inertial confinement fusion modeling code (ICF3D). For efficient code development, they use C++ object oriented programming to easily separate the complexities of an unstructured mesh from the basic physics modules. ICF3D is fully parallelized using domain decomposition and the MPI message passing library. It is fully portable. It runs on uniprocessor workstations and massively parallel platforms with distributed and shared memory.

  18. Solving Dirac equations on a 3D lattice with inverse Hamiltonian and spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z. X.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.

    2017-02-01

    A new method to solve the Dirac equation on a 3D lattice is proposed, in which the variational collapse problem is avoided by the inverse Hamiltonian method and the fermion doubling problem is avoided by performing spatial derivatives in momentum space with the help of the discrete Fourier transform, i.e., the spectral method. This method is demonstrated in solving the Dirac equation for a given spherical potential in a 3D lattice space. In comparison with the results obtained by the shooting method, the differences in single-particle energy are smaller than 10-4 MeV, and the densities are almost identical, which demonstrates the high accuracy of the present method. The results obtained by applying this method without any modification to solve the Dirac equations for an axial-deformed, nonaxial-deformed, and octupole-deformed potential are provided and discussed.

  19. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  20. Fabrication of light, flexible and multifunctional graphene nanoribbon fibers via a 3D solution printing method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Shuai; Song, Yuanjun; Dong, Jidong; Wei, Huawei; Xie, Huaquan; Fang, Xiaojiao; Shao, Lu; Huang, Yudong; Jiang, Zaixing

    2016-11-18

    Graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) are one of the most promising carbon based materials. The integration of 2D GONR sheets into macroscopic materials, such as continuous fibers or film, leads the way in translating the good properties of individual GONR sheets into macroscopic and ordered materials for future applications. In this study, we first report the fabrication of GONR fibers utilizing GONR sheets as the raw material without any supporting surfactant or polymer. The method of fabricating fibers is referred to as '3D solution printing'. GONR fibers exhibit good mechanical and electrical properties, whose tensile strength and electrical conductivity could reach up to 95 MPa and 680 S cm(-1), respectively. Hence, the fabricated 3D integrated circuits are lighter and smaller compared to traditional metal circuits, and with high electrical properties. The 3D integrated circuits, therefore, have a bright future prospect.

  1. Fabrication of light, flexible and multifunctional graphene nanoribbon fibers via a 3D solution printing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Shuai; Song, Yuanjun; Dong, Jidong; Wei, Huawei; Xie, Huaquan; Fang, Xiaojiao; Shao, Lu; Huang, Yudong; Jiang, Zaixing

    2016-11-01

    Graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) are one of the most promising carbon based materials. The integration of 2D GONR sheets into macroscopic materials, such as continuous fibers or film, leads the way in translating the good properties of individual GONR sheets into macroscopic and ordered materials for future applications. In this study, we first report the fabrication of GONR fibers utilizing GONR sheets as the raw material without any supporting surfactant or polymer. The method of fabricating fibers is referred to as ‘3D solution printing’. GONR fibers exhibit good mechanical and electrical properties, whose tensile strength and electrical conductivity could reach up to 95 MPa and 680 S cm-1, respectively. Hence, the fabricated 3D integrated circuits are lighter and smaller compared to traditional metal circuits, and with high electrical properties. The 3D integrated circuits, therefore, have a bright future prospect.

  2. An efficient calibration method for freehand 3-D ultrasound imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F

    2004-07-01

    A phantom has been developed to quickly calibrate a freehand 3-D ultrasound (US) imaging system. Calibration defines the spatial relationship between the US image plane and an external tracking device attached to the scanhead. The phantom consists of a planar array of strings and beads, and a set of out-of-plane strings that guide the user to proper scanhead orientation for imaging. When an US image plane is coincident with the plane defined by the strings, the calibration parameters are calculated by matching of homologous points in the image and phantom. The resulting precision and accuracy of the 3-D imaging system are similar to those achieved with a more complex calibration procedure. The 3-D reconstruction performance of the calibrated system is demonstrated with a magnetic tracking system, but the method could be applied to other tracking devices.

  3. "Gold standard" data for evaluation and comparison of 3D/2D registration methods.

    PubMed

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation and comparison of registration techniques for image-guided surgery is an important problem that has received little attention in the literature. In this paper we address the challenging problem of generating reliable "gold standard" data for use in evaluating the accuracy of 3D/2D registrations. We have devised a cadaveric lumbar spine phantom with fiducial markers and established highly accurate correspondences between 3D CT and MR images and 18 2D X-ray images. The expected target registration errors for target points on the pedicles are less than 0.26 mm for CT-to-X-ray registration and less than 0.42 mm for MR-to-X-ray registration. As such, the "gold standard" data, which has been made publicly available on the Internet (http://lit.fe.uni-lj.si/Downloads/downloads.asp), is useful for evaluation and comparison of 3D/2D image registration methods.

  4. A 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure synthesized by a wet chemical oxidation method.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zaizhu; Huang, Baibiao; Ma, Xiangchao; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Qin, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zeyan; Dai, Ying; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2012-12-07

    A novel 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure, with fast growth along the 〈111〉 directions of cubic seeds, is synthesized by using a wet chemical oxidation method. The morphological structures and the growth process are investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures are analyzed by their crystallographic orientations. The surface energy of AgCl facets {100}, {110}, and {111} with absorbance of Cl(-) ions is studied by density functional theory calculations. Based on the experimental and computational results, a plausible mechanism is proposed to illustrate the formation of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures. With more active sites, the photocatalytic activity of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures is better than those of concave and cubic ones in oxygen evolution under irradiation by visible light.

  5. 2D and 3D Method of Characteristic Tools for Complex Nozzle Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Tharen

    2003-01-01

    This report details the development of a 2D and 3D Method of Characteristic (MOC) tool for the design of complex nozzle geometries. These tools are GUI driven and can be run on most Windows-based platforms. The report provides a user's manual for these tools as well as explains the mathematical algorithms used in the MOC solutions.

  6. A new method of 3D scene recognition from still images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-ming; Wang, Xing-song

    2014-04-01

    Most methods of monocular visual three dimensional (3D) scene recognition involve supervised machine learning. However, these methods often rely on prior knowledge. Specifically, they learn the image scene as part of a training dataset. For this reason, when the sampling equipment or scene is changed, monocular visual 3D scene recognition may fail. To cope with this problem, a new method of unsupervised learning for monocular visual 3D scene recognition is here proposed. First, the image is made using superpixel segmentation based on the CIELAB color space values L, a, and b and on the coordinate values x and y of pixels, forming a superpixel image with a specific density. Second, a spectral clustering algorithm based on the superpixels' color characteristics and neighboring relationships was used to reduce the dimensions of the superpixel image. Third, the fuzzy distribution density functions representing sky, ground, and façade are multiplied with the segment pixels, where the expectations of these segments are obtained. A preliminary classification of sky, ground, and façade is generated in this way. Fourth, the most accurate classification images of sky, ground, and façade were extracted through the tier-1 wavelet sampling and Manhattan direction feature. Finally, a depth perception map is generated based on the pinhole imaging model and the linear perspective information of ground surface. Here, 400 images of Make3D Image data from the Cornell University website were used to test the algorithm. The experimental results showed that this unsupervised learning method provides a more effective monocular visual 3D scene recognition model than other methods.

  7. 3-D Localization Method for a Magnetically Actuated Soft Capsule Endoscope and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sehyuk; Sitti, Metin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a 3-D localization method for a magnetically actuated soft capsule endoscope (MASCE). The proposed localization scheme consists of three steps. First, MASCE is oriented to be coaxially aligned with an external permanent magnet (EPM). Second, MASCE is axially contracted by the enhanced magnetic attraction of the approaching EPM. Third, MASCE recovers its initial shape by the retracting EPM as the magnetic attraction weakens. The combination of the estimated direction in the coaxial alignment step and the estimated distance in the shape deformation (recovery) step provides the position of MASCE in 3-D. It is experimentally shown that the proposed localization method could provide 2.0–3.7 mm of distance error in 3-D. This study also introduces two new applications of the proposed localization method. First, based on the trace of contact points between the MASCE and the surface of the stomach, the 3-D geometrical model of a synthetic stomach was reconstructed. Next, the relative tissue compliance at each local contact point in the stomach was characterized by measuring the local tissue deformation at each point due to the preloading force. Finally, the characterized relative tissue compliance parameter was mapped onto the geometrical model of the stomach toward future use in disease diagnosis. PMID:25383064

  8. Gap-filling methods for 3D PlanTIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukiala, A.; Tuna, U.; Beer, S.; Jahnke, S.; Ruotsalainen, U.

    2010-10-01

    The range of positron emitters and their labeled compounds have led to high-resolution PET scanners becoming widely used, not only in clinical and pre-clinical studies but also in plant studies. A high-resolution PET scanner, plant tomographic imaging system (PlanTIS), was designed to study metabolic and physiological functions of plants noninvasively. The gantry of the PlanTIS scanner has detector-free regions. Even when the gantry of the PlanTIS is rotated during the scan, these regions result in missing sinogram bins in the acquired data. Missing data need to be estimated prior to the analytical image reconstructions in order to avoid artifacts in the final reconstructed images. In this study, we propose three gap-filling methods for estimation of the unique gaps existing in the 3D PlanTIS sinogram data. The 3D sinogram data were gap-filled either by linear interpolation in the transaxial planes or by the bicubic interpolation method (proposed for the ECAT high-resolution research tomograph) in the transradial planes or by the inpainting method in the transangular planes. Each gap-filling method independently compensates for slices in one of three orthogonal sinogram planes (transaxial, transradial and transangular planes). A 3D numerical Shepp-Logan phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom were used to evaluate the methods. The gap-filled sinograms were reconstructed using the analytical 3D reprojection (3DRP) method. The NEMA phantom sinograms were also reconstructed by the iterative reconstruction method, ordered subsets maximum a posteriori one step late (OSMAPOSL), to compare the results of gap filling followed by 3DRP with the results of OSMAPOSL reconstruction without gap filling. The three methods were evaluated quantitatively (by mean square error and coefficients of variation) over the selected regions of the 3D numerical Shepp-Logan phantom at eight different Poisson noise levels. Moreover, the NEMA phantom scan data were used in visual assessments

  9. An extension of the Saltykov method to quantify 3D grain size distributions in mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Marco A.; Llana-Fúnez, Sergio

    2016-12-01

    The estimation of 3D grain size distributions (GSDs) in mylonites is key to understanding the rheological properties of crystalline aggregates and to constraining dynamic recrystallization models. This paper investigates whether a common stereological method, the Saltykov method, is appropriate for the study of GSDs in mylonites. In addition, we present a new stereological method, named the two-step method, which estimates a lognormal probability density function describing the 3D GSD. Both methods are tested for reproducibility and accuracy using natural and synthetic data sets. The main conclusion is that both methods are accurate and simple enough to be systematically used in recrystallized aggregates with near-equant grains. The Saltykov method is particularly suitable for estimating the volume percentage of particular grain-size fractions with an absolute uncertainty of ±5 in the estimates. The two-step method is suitable for quantifying the shape of the actual 3D GSD in recrystallized rocks using a single value, the multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) parameter, and providing a precision in the estimate typically better than 5%. The novel method provides a MSD value in recrystallized quartz that differs from previous estimates based on apparent 2D GSDs, highlighting the inconvenience of using apparent GSDs for such tasks.

  10. Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2013-10-01

    Protein structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) has made significant progress in the past decades. Resolutions of EM maps have been improving as evidenced by recently reported structures that are solved at high resolutions close to 3Å. Computational methods play a key role in interpreting EM data. Among many computational procedures applied to an EM map to obtain protein structure information, in this article we focus on reviewing computational methods that model protein three-dimensional (3D) structures from a 3D EM density map that is constructed from two-dimensional (2D) maps. The computational methods we discuss range from de novo methods, which identify structural elements in an EM map, to structure fitting methods, where known high resolution structures are fit into a low-resolution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided.

  11. Efficient calculation method for realistic deep 3D scene hologram using orthographic projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Tomoya; Matsushima, Kyoji; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    We propose a fast calculation method to synthesize a computer-generated hologram (CGH) of realistic deep three-dimensional (3D) scene. In our previous study, we have proposed a calculation method of CGH for reproducing such scene called ray-sampling-plane (RSP) method, in which light-ray information of a scene is converted to wavefront, and the wavefront is numerically propagated based on diffraction theory. In this paper, we introduce orthographic projection to the RSP method for accelerating calculation time. By numerical experiments, we verified the accelerated calculation with the ratio of 28-times compared to the conventional RSP method. The calculated CGH was fabricated by the printing system using laser lithography and demonstrated deep 3D image reconstruction in 52mm×52mm with realistic appearance effect such as gloss and translucent effect.

  12. Importance of a 3D forward modeling tool for surface wave analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pageot, Damien; Le Feuvre, Mathieu; Donatienne, Leparoux; Philippe, Côte; Yann, Capdeville

    2016-04-01

    Since a few years, seismic surface waves analysis methods (SWM) have been widely developed and tested in the context of subsurface characterization and have demonstrated their effectiveness for sounding and monitoring purposes, e.g., high-resolution tomography of the principal geological units of California or real time monitoring of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Historically, these methods are mostly developed under the assumption of semi-infinite 1D layered medium without topography. The forward modeling is generally based on Thomson-Haskell matrix based modeling algorithm and the inversion is driven by Monte-Carlo sampling. Given their efficiency, SWM have been transfered to several scale of which civil engineering structures in order to, e.g., determine the so-called V s30 parameter or assess other critical constructional parameters in pavement engineering. However, at this scale, many structures may often exhibit 3D surface variations which drastically limit the efficiency of SWM application. Indeed, even in the case of an homogeneous structure, 3D geometry can bias the dispersion diagram of Rayleigh waves up to obtain discontinuous phase velocity curves which drastically impact the 1D mean velocity model obtained from dispersion inversion. Taking advantages of high-performance computing center accessibility and wave propagation modeling algorithm development, it is now possible to consider the use of a 3D elastic forward modeling algorithm instead of Thomson-Haskell method in the SWM inversion process. We use a parallelized 3D elastic modeling code based on the spectral element method which allows to obtain accurate synthetic data with very low numerical dispersion and a reasonable numerical cost. In this study, we choose dike embankments as an illustrative example. We first show that their longitudinal geometry may have a significant effect on dispersion diagrams of Rayleigh waves. Then, we demonstrate the necessity of 3D elastic modeling as a forward

  13. TU-CD-BRA-01: A Novel 3D Registration Method for Multiparametric Radiological Images

    SciTech Connect

    Akhbardeh, A; Parekth, VS; Jacobs, MA

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Multiparametric and multimodality radiological imaging methods, such as, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI), computed tomography(CT), and positron emission tomography(PET), provide multiple types of tissue contrast and anatomical information for clinical diagnosis. However, these radiological modalities are acquired using very different technical parameters, e.g.,field of view(FOV), matrix size, and scan planes, which, can lead to challenges in registering the different data sets. Therefore, we developed a hybrid registration method based on 3D wavelet transformation and 3D interpolations that performs 3D resampling and rotation of the target radiological images without loss of information Methods: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted-imaging(DWI), dynamic-contrast-enhanced(DCE) MRI and PET/CT were used in the registration algorithm from breast and prostate data at 3T MRI and multimodality(PET/CT) cases. The hybrid registration scheme consists of several steps to reslice and match each modality using a combination of 3D wavelets, interpolations, and affine registration steps. First, orthogonal reslicing is performed to equalize FOV, matrix sizes and the number of slices using wavelet transformation. Second, angular resampling of the target data is performed to match the reference data. Finally, using optimized angles from resampling, 3D registration is performed using similarity transformation(scaling and translation) between the reference and resliced target volume is performed. After registration, the mean-square-error(MSE) and Dice Similarity(DS) between the reference and registered target volumes were calculated. Results: The 3D registration method registered synthetic and clinical data with significant improvement(p<0.05) of overlap between anatomical structures. After transforming and deforming the synthetic data, the MSE and Dice similarity were 0.12 and 0.99. The average improvement of the MSE in breast was 62%(0.27 to 0.10) and prostate was

  14. New data-driven method from 3D confocal microscopy for calculating phytoplankton cell biovolume.

    PubMed

    Roselli, L; Paparella, F; Stanca, E; Basset, A

    2015-06-01

    Confocal laser scanner microscopy coupled with an image analysis system was used to directly determine the shape and calculate the biovolume of phytoplankton organisms by constructing 3D models of cells. The study was performed on Biceratium furca (Ehrenberg) Vanhoeffen, which is one of the most complex-shaped phytoplankton. Traditionally, biovolume is obtained from a standardized set of geometric models based on linear dimensions measured by light microscopy. However, especially in the case of complex-shaped cells, biovolume is affected by very large errors associated with the numerous manual measurements that this entails. We evaluate the accuracy of these traditional methods by comparing the results obtained using geometric models with direct biovolume measurement by image analysis. Our results show cell biovolume measurement based on decomposition into simple geometrical shapes can be highly inaccurate. Although we assume that the most accurate cell shape is obtained by 3D direct biovolume measurement, which is based on voxel counting, the intrinsic uncertainty of this method is explored and assessed. Finally, we implement a data-driven formula-based approach to the calculation of biovolume of this complex-shaped organism. On one hand, the model is obtained from 3D direct calculation. On the other hand, it is based on just two linear dimensions which can easily be measured by hand. This approach has already been used for investigating the complexities of morphology and for determining the 3D structure of cells. It could also represent a novel way to generalize scaling laws for biovolume calculation.

  15. A correction method of color projection fringes in 3D contour measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-mei; Li, Zong-yan; Chen, Chang-man; Xi, Jiang-tao; Guo, Qing-hua; Li, Xiao-jie

    2015-07-01

    In the three-dimensional (3D) contour measurement, the phase shift profilometry (PSP) method is the most widely used one. However, the measurement speed of PSP is very low because of the multiple projections. In order to improve the measurement speed, color grating stripes are used for measurement in this paper. During the measurement, only one color sinusoidal fringe is projected on the measured object. Therefore, the measurement speed is greatly improved. Since there is coupling or interference phenomenon between the adjacent color grating stripes, a color correction method is used to improve the measurement results. A method for correcting nonlinear error of measurement system is proposed in this paper, and the sinusoidal property of acquired image after correction is better than that before correction. Experimental results show that with these correction methods, the measurement errors can be reduced. Therefore, it can support a good foundation for the high-precision 3D reconstruction.

  16. Robust method for extracting the pulmonary vascular trees from 3D MDCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2011-03-01

    Segmentation of pulmonary blood vessels from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. This work presents a method for extracting the vascular trees of the pulmonary arteries and veins, applicable to both contrast-enhanced and unenhanced 3D MDCT image data. The method finds 2D elliptical cross-sections and evaluates agreement of these cross-sections in consecutive slices to find likely cross-sections. It next employs morphological multiscale analysis to separate vessels from adjoining airway walls. The method then tracks the center of the likely cross-sections to connect them to the pulmonary vessels in the mediastinum and forms connected vascular trees spanning both lungs. A ground-truth study indicates that the method was able to detect on the order of 98% of the vessel branches having diameter >= 3.0 mm. The extracted vascular trees can be utilized for the guidance of safe bronchoscopic biopsy.

  17. A Multi-Scale Method for Dynamics Simulation in Continuum Solvent Models I: Finite-Difference Algorithm for Navier-Stokes Equation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Cai, Qin; Li, Zhilin; Zhao, Hongkai; Luo, Ray

    2014-11-25

    A multi-scale framework is proposed for more realistic molecular dynamics simulations in continuum solvent models by coupling a molecular mechanics treatment of solute with a fluid mechanics treatment of solvent. This article reports our initial efforts to formulate the physical concepts necessary for coupling the two mechanics and develop a 3D numerical algorithm to simulate the solvent fluid via the Navier-Stokes equation. The numerical algorithm was validated with multiple test cases. The validation shows that the algorithm is effective and stable, with observed accuracy consistent with our design.

  18. A Multi-Scale Method for Dynamics Simulation in Continuum Solvent Models I: Finite-Difference Algorithm for Navier-Stokes Equation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Cai, Qin; Li, Zhilin; Zhao, Hongkai; Luo, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A multi-scale framework is proposed for more realistic molecular dynamics simulations in continuum solvent models by coupling a molecular mechanics treatment of solute with a fluid mechanics treatment of solvent. This article reports our initial efforts to formulate the physical concepts necessary for coupling the two mechanics and develop a 3D numerical algorithm to simulate the solvent fluid via the Navier-Stokes equation. The numerical algorithm was validated with multiple test cases. The validation shows that the algorithm is effective and stable, with observed accuracy consistent with our design. PMID:25404761

  19. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied aerodynamic design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1988-01-01

    Several inverse methods have been compared and initial results indicate that differences in results are primarily due to coordinate systems and fuselage representations and not to design procedures. Further, results from a direct-inverse method that includes 3-D wing boundary layer effects, wake curvature, and wake displacement are presented. These results show that boundary layer displacements must be included in the design process for accurate results.

  20. Combination of photogrammetric and geoelectric methods to assess 3d structures associated to natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargier, Yannick; Dore, Ludovic; Antoine, Raphael; Palma Lopes, Sérgio; Fauchard, Cyrille

    2016-04-01

    The extraction of subsurface materials is a key element for the economy of a nation. However, natural degradation of underground quarries is a major issue from an economic and public safety point of view. Consequently, the quarries stakeholders require relevant tools to define hazards associated to these structures. Safety assessment methods of underground quarries are recent and mainly based on rock physical properties. This kind of method leads to a certain homogeneity assumption of pillar internal properties that can cause an underestimation of the risk. Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) is a widely used method that possesses two advantages to overcome this limitation. The first is to provide a qualitative understanding for the detection and monitoring of anomalies in the pillar body (e.g. faults). The second is to provide a quantitative description of the electrical resistivity distribution inside the pillar. This quantitative description can be interpreted with constitutive laws to help decision support (water content decreases the mechanical resistance of a chalk). However, conventional 2D and 3D Imaging techniques are usually applied to flat surface surveys or to surfaces with moderate topography. A 3D inversion of more complex media (case of the pillar) requires a full consideration of the geometry that was never taken into account before. The Photogrammetric technique presents a cost effective solution to obtain an accurate description of the external geometry of a complex media. However, this method has never been fully coupled with a geophysical method to enhance/improve the inversion process. Consequently we developed a complete procedure showing that photogrammetric and ERI tools can be efficiently combined to assess a complex 3D structure. This procedure includes in a first part a photogrammetric survey, a processing stage with an open source software and a post-processing stage finalizing a 3D surface model. The second part necessitates the

  1. 3D hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method: Implementation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Ahmadian, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    A hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method (HIFEM) is proposed for the mesh-independent treatment of 3D problems with intricate morphologies. The HIFEM implements a recursive algorithm for creating enrichment functions that capture gradient discontinuities in nonconforming finite elements cut by arbitrary number and configuration of materials interfaces. The method enables the mesh-independent simulation of multiphase problems with materials interfaces that are in close proximity or contact while providing a straightforward general approach for evaluating the enrichments. In this manuscript, we present a detailed discussion on the implementation issues and required computational geometry considerations associated with the HIFEM approximation of thermal and mechanical responses of 3D problems. A convergence study is provided to investigate the accuracy and convergence rate of the HIFEM and compare them with standard FEM benchmark solutions. We will also demonstrate the application of this mesh-independent method for simulating the thermal and mechanical responses of two composite materials systems with complex microstructures.

  2. A Method for Sectioning and Immunohistochemical Analysis of Stem Cell-Derived 3-D Organoids.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Luke A; Beebe, David C; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-05-12

    This unit describes a protocol for embedding, sectioning, and immunocytochemical analysis of pluripotent stem cell-derived 3-D organoids. Specifically, we describe a method to embed iPSC-derived retinal cups in low-melt agarose, acquire thick sections using a vibratome tissue slicer, and perform immunohistochemical analysis. This method includes an approach for antibody labeling that minimizes the amount of antibody needed for individual experiments and that utilizes large-volume washing to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, allowing for clean, high-resolution imaging of developing cell types. The universal methods described can be employed regardless of the type of pluripotent stem cell used and 3-D organoid generated. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. A novel adaptive 3D medical image interpolation method based on shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaxin; Ma, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Image interpolation of cross-sections is one of the key steps of medical visualization. Aiming at the problem of fuzzy boundaries and large amount of calculation, which are brought by the traditional interpolation, a novel adaptive 3-D medical image interpolation method is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the contour is obtained by the edge interpolation, and the corresponding points are found according to the relation of the contour and points on the original images. Secondly, this algorithm utilizes volume relativity to get the best point-pair with the adaptive methods. Finally, the grey value of interpolation pixel is got by the matching point interpolation. The experimental results show that the method presented in the paper not only can meet the requirements of interpolation accuracy, but also can be used effectively in medical image 3D reconstruction.

  4. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  5. Standardization based on human factors for 3D display: performance characteristics and measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Shin-ichi; Ujike, Hiroyasu; Hamagishi, Goro; Taira, Kazuki; Koike, Takafumi; Kato, Chiaki; Nomura, Toshio; Horikoshi, Tsutomu; Mashitani, Ken; Yuuki, Akimasa; Izumi, Kuniaki; Hisatake, Yuzo; Watanabe, Naoko; Umezu, Naoaki; Nakano, Yoshihiko

    2010-02-01

    We are engaged in international standardization activities for 3D displays. We consider that for a sound development of 3D displays' market, the standards should be based on not only mechanism of 3D displays, but also human factors for stereopsis. However, we think that there is no common understanding on what the 3D display should be and that the situation makes developing the standards difficult. In this paper, to understand the mechanism and human factors, we focus on a double image, which occurs in some conditions on an autostereoscopic display. Although the double image is generally considered as an unwanted effect, we consider that whether the double image is unwanted or not depends on the situation and that there are some allowable double images. We tried to classify the double images into the unwanted and the allowable in terms of the display mechanism and visual ergonomics for stereopsis. The issues associated with the double image are closely related to performance characteristics for the autostereoscopic display. We also propose performance characteristics, measurement and analysis methods to represent interocular crosstalk and motion parallax.

  6. A novel method for the 3-D reconstruction of scoliotic ribs from frontal and lateral radiographs.

    PubMed

    Seoud, Lama; Cheriet, Farida; Labelle, Hubert; Dansereau, Jean

    2011-05-01

    Among the external manifestations of scoliosis, the rib hump, which is associated with the ribs' deformities and rotations, constitutes the most disturbing aspect of the scoliotic deformity for patients. A personalized 3-D model of the rib cage is important for a better evaluation of the deformity, and hence, a better treatment planning. A novel method for the 3-D reconstruction of the rib cage, based only on two standard radiographs, is proposed in this paper. For each rib, two points are extrapolated from the reconstructed spine, and three points are reconstructed by stereo radiography. The reconstruction is then refined using a surface approximation. The method was evaluated using clinical data of 13 patients with scoliosis. A comparison was conducted between the reconstructions obtained with the proposed method and those obtained by using a previous reconstruction method based on two frontal radiographs. A first comparison criterion was the distances between the reconstructed ribs and the surface topography of the trunk, considered as the reference modality. The correlation between ribs axial rotation and back surface rotation was also evaluated. The proposed method successfully reconstructed the ribs of the 6th-12th thoracic levels. The evaluation results showed that the 3-D configuration of the new rib reconstructions is more consistent with the surface topography and provides more accurate measurements of ribs axial rotation.

  7. 3D Imaging of Rapidly Spinning Space Targets Based on a Factorization Method

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanxian; Wei, Shaoming; Wang, Jun; Mao, Shiyi

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of space targets can provide crucial information about the target shape and size, which are significant supports for the application of automatic target classification and recognition. In this paper, a new 3D imaging of space spinning targets via a factorization method is proposed. Firstly, after the translational compensation, the scattering centers two-dimensional (2D) range and range-rate sequence induced by the target spinning is extracted using a high resolution spectral estimation technique. Secondly, measurement data association is implemented to obtain the scattering center trajectory matrix by using a range-Doppler tracker. Then, we use an initial coarse angular velocity to generate the projection matrix, which consists of the scattering centers range and cross-range, and a factorization method is applied iteratively to the projection matrix to estimate the accurate angular velocity. Finally, we use the accurate estimate spinning angular velocity to rescale the projection matrix and the well-scaled target 3D geometry is reconstructed. Compared to the previous literature methods, ambiguity in the spatial axes can be removed by this method. Simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:28216588

  8. Three-dimensional local grid refinement for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models using iteratively coupled shared nodes: A new method of interpolation and analysis of errors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes work that extends to three dimensions the two-dimensional local-grid refinement method for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models of Mehl and Hill [Development and evaluation of a local grid refinement method for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models using shared nodes. Adv Water Resour 2002;25(5):497-511]. In this approach, the (parent) finite-difference grid is discretized more finely within a (child) sub-region. The grid refinement method sequentially solves each grid and uses specified flux (parent) and specified head (child) boundary conditions to couple the grids. Iteration achieves convergence between heads and fluxes of both grids. Of most concern is how to interpolate heads onto the boundary of the child grid such that the physics of the parent-grid flow is retained in three dimensions. We develop a new two-step, "cage-shell" interpolation method based on the solution of the flow equation on the boundary of the child between nodes shared with the parent grid. Error analysis using a test case indicates that the shared-node local grid refinement method with cage-shell boundary head interpolation is accurate and robust, and the resulting code is used to investigate three-dimensional local grid refinement of stream-aquifer interactions. Results reveal that (1) the parent and child grids interact to shift the true head and flux solution to a different solution where the heads and fluxes of both grids are in equilibrium, (2) the locally refined model provided a solution for both heads and fluxes in the region of the refinement that was more accurate than a model without refinement only if iterations are performed so that both heads and fluxes are in equilibrium, and (3) the accuracy of the coupling is limited by the parent-grid size - A coarse parent grid limits correct representation of the hydraulics in the feedback from the child grid.

  9. Earthquake source tensor inversion with the gCAP method and 3D Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Zhu, L.; Ross, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We develop and apply a method to invert earthquake seismograms for source properties using a general tensor representation and 3D Green's functions. The method employs (i) a general representation of earthquake potency/moment tensors with double couple (DC), compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD), and isotropic (ISO) components, and (ii) a corresponding generalized CAP (gCap) scheme where the continuous wave trains are broken into Pnl and surface waves (Zhu & Ben-Zion, 2013). For comparison, we also use the waveform inversion method of Zheng & Chen (2012) and Ammon et al. (1998). Sets of 3D Green's functions are calculated on a grid of 1 km3 using the 3-D community velocity model CVM-4 (Kohler et al. 2003). A bootstrap technique is adopted to establish robustness of the inversion results using the gCap method (Ross & Ben-Zion, 2013). Synthetic tests with 1-D and 3-D waveform calculations show that the source tensor inversion procedure is reasonably reliable and robust. As initial application, the method is used to investigate source properties of the March 11, 2013, Mw=4.7 earthquake on the San Jacinto fault using recordings of ~45 stations up to ~0.2Hz. Both the best fitting and most probable solutions include ISO component of ~1% and CLVD component of ~0%. The obtained ISO component, while small, is found to be a non-negligible positive value that can have significant implications for the physics of the failure process. Work on using higher frequency data for this and other earthquakes is in progress.

  10. A Quality Assurance Method that Utilizes 3D Dosimetry and Facilitates Clinical Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Juang, Titania; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Adamovics, John; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new three-dimensional (3D) quality assurance (QA) method that provides comprehensive dosimetry verification and facilitates evaluation of the clinical significance of QA data acquired in a phantom. Also to apply the method to investigate the dosimetric efficacy of base-of-skull (BOS) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment. Methods and Materials: Two types of IMRT QA verification plans were created for 6 patients who received BOS IMRT. The first plan enabled conventional 2D planar IMRT QA using the Varian portal dosimetry system. The second plan enabled 3D verification using an anthropomorphic head phantom. In the latter, the 3D dose distribution was measured using the DLOS/Presage dosimetry system (DLOS = Duke Large-field-of-view Optical-CT System, Presage Heuris Pharma, Skillman, NJ), which yielded isotropic 2-mm data throughout the treated volume. In a novel step, measured 3D dose distributions were transformed back to the patient's CT to enable calculation of dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose overlays. Measured and planned patient DVHs were compared to investigate clinical significance. Results: Close agreement between measured and calculated dose distributions was observed for all 6 cases. For gamma criteria of 3%, 2 mm, the mean passing rate for portal dosimetry was 96.8% (range, 92.0%-98.9%), compared to 94.9% (range, 90.1%-98.9%) for 3D. There was no clear correlation between 2D and 3D passing rates. Planned and measured dose distributions were evaluated on the patient's anatomy, using DVH and dose overlays. Minor deviations were detected, and the clinical significance of these are presented and discussed. Conclusions: Two advantages accrue to the methods presented here. First, treatment accuracy is evaluated throughout the whole treated volume, yielding comprehensive verification. Second, the clinical significance of any deviations can be assessed through the generation of DVH curves and dose overlays on the patient

  11. A 3-D liver segmentation method with parallel computing for selective internal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Guillen, Magno R; Cabrerizo, Mercedes; Barreto, Armando; Gulec, Seza; Barot, Tushar C; Suthar, Rekha R; Bhatt, Ruchir N; Mcgoron, Anthony; Adjouadi, Malek

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a new 3-D liver segmentation method in support of the selective internal radiation treatment as a treatment for liver tumors. This 3-D segmentation is based on coupling a modified k-means segmentation method with a special localized contouring algorithm. In the segmentation process, five separate regions are identified on the computerized tomography image frames. The merit of the proposed method lays in its potential to provide fast and accurate liver segmentation and 3-D rendering as well as in delineating tumor region(s), all with minimal user interaction. Leveraging of multicore platforms is shown to speed up the processing of medical images considerably, making this method more suitable in clinical settings. Experiments were performed to assess the effect of parallelization using up to 442 slices. Empirical results, using a single workstation, show a reduction in processing time from 4.5 h to almost 1 h for a 78% gain. Most important is the accuracy achieved in estimating the volumes of the liver and tumor region(s), yielding an average error of less than 2% in volume estimation over volumes generated on the basis of the current manually guided segmentation processes. Results were assessed using the analysis of variance statistical analysis.

  12. Enhanced Rgb-D Mapping Method for Detailed 3d Modeling of Large Indoor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shengjun; Zhu, Qing; Chen, Wu; Darwish, Walid; Wu, Bo; Hu, Han; Chen, Min

    2016-06-01

    RGB-D sensors are novel sensing systems that capture RGB images along with pixel-wise depth information. Although they are widely used in various applications, RGB-D sensors have significant drawbacks with respect to 3D dense mapping of indoor environments. First, they only allow a measurement range with a limited distance (e.g., within 3 m) and a limited field of view. Second, the error of the depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor. In this paper, we propose an enhanced RGB-D mapping method for detailed 3D modeling of large indoor environments by combining RGB image-based modeling and depth-based modeling. The scale ambiguity problem during the pose estimation with RGB image sequences can be resolved by integrating the information from the depth and visual information provided by the proposed system. A robust rigid-transformation recovery method is developed to register the RGB image-based and depth-based 3D models together. The proposed method is examined with two datasets collected in indoor environments for which the experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the proposed method

  13. Generic precise augmented reality guiding system and its calibration method based on 3D virtual model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Shourui; Wang, Zhangying; Huang, Shujun; Liu, Yue; Niu, Zhenqi; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Jigui; Zhang, Zonghua

    2016-05-30

    Augmented reality system can be applied to provide precise guidance for various kinds of manual works. The adaptability and guiding accuracy of such systems are decided by the computational model and the corresponding calibration method. In this paper, a novel type of augmented reality guiding system and the corresponding designing scheme are proposed. Guided by external positioning equipment, the proposed system can achieve high relative indication accuracy in a large working space. Meanwhile, the proposed system is realized with a digital projector and the general back projection model is derived with geometry relationship between digitized 3D model and the projector in free space. The corresponding calibration method is also designed for the proposed system to obtain the parameters of projector. To validate the proposed back projection model, the coordinate data collected by a 3D positioning equipment is used to calculate and optimize the extrinsic parameters. The final projecting indication accuracy of the system is verified with subpixel pattern projecting technique.

  14. A novel 3D constellation-masked method for physical security in hierarchical OFDMA system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijia; Liu, Bo; Xin, Xiangjun; Liu, Deming

    2013-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel 3D constellation-masked method to ensure the physical security in hierarchical optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing access (OFDMA) system. The 3D constellation masking is executed on the two levels of hierarchical modulation and among different OFDM subcarriers, which is realized by the masking vectors. The Lorenz chaotic model is adopted for the generation of masking vectors in the proposed scheme. A 9.85 Gb/s encrypted hierarchical QAM OFDM signal is successfully demonstrated in the experiment. The performance of illegal optical network unit (ONU) with different masking vectors is also investigated. The proposed method is demonstrated to be secure and efficient against the commonly known attacks in the experiment.

  15. Investigating the Bag-of-Words Method for 3D Shape Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolan; Godil, Afzal

    2010-12-01

    This paper investigates the capabilities of the Bag-of-Words (BWs) method in the 3D shape retrieval field. The contributions of this paper are (1) the 3D shape retrieval task is categorized from different points of view: specific versus generic, partial-to-global retrieval (PGR) versus global-to-global retrieval (GGR), and articulated versus nonarticulated (2) the spatial information, represented as concentric spheres, is integrated into the framework to improve the discriminative ability (3) the analysis of the experimental results on Purdue Engineering Benchmark (PEB) reveals that some properties of the BW approach make it perform better on the PGR task than the GGR task (4) the BW approach is evaluated on nonarticulated database PEB and articulated database McGill Shape Benchmark (MSB) and compared to other methods.

  16. Comparison of parabolic filtration methods for 3D filtered back projection in pulsed EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhiwei; Redler, Gage; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2014-11-01

    Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (Pulse EPRI) is a robust method for noninvasively measuring local oxygen concentrations in vivo. For 3D tomographic EPRI, the most commonly used reconstruction algorithm is filtered back projection (FBP), in which the parabolic filtration process strongly influences image quality. In this work, we designed and compared 7 parabolic filtration methods to reconstruct both simulated and real phantoms. To evaluate these methods, we designed 3 error criteria and 1 spatial resolution criterion. It was determined that the 2 point derivative filtration method and the two-ramp-filter method have unavoidable negative effects resulting in diminished spatial resolution and increased artifacts respectively. For the noiseless phantom the rectangular-window parabolic filtration method and sinc-window parabolic filtration method were found to be optimal, providing high spatial resolution and small errors. In the presence of noise, the 3 point derivative method and Hamming-window parabolic filtration method resulted in the best compromise between low image noise and high spatial resolution. The 3 point derivative method is faster than Hamming-window parabolic filtration method, so we conclude that the 3 point derivative method is optimal for 3D FBP.

  17. CONTINUOUS-ENERGY MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR CALCULATING GENERALIZED RESPONSE SENSITIVITIES USING TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces a new approach for calculating sensitivity coefficients for generalized neutronic responses to nuclear data uncertainties using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. The approach presented in this paper, known as the GEAR-MC method, allows for the calculation of generalized sensitivity coefficients for multiple responses in a single Monte Carlo calculation with no nuclear data perturbations or knowledge of nuclear covariance data. The theory behind the GEAR-MC method is presented here, and proof of principle is demonstrated by using the GEAR-MC method to calculate sensitivity coefficients for responses in several 3D, continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications.

  18. A Method for 3D Histopathology Reconstruction Supporting Mouse Microvasculature Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Nong, Zengxuan; Gibson, Eli; Arpino, John-Michael; Yin, Hao; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-01-01

    Structural abnormalities of the microvasculature can impair perfusion and function. Conventional histology provides good spatial resolution with which to evaluate the microvascular structure but affords no 3-dimensional information; this limitation could lead to misinterpretations of the complex microvessel network in health and disease. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate an accurate, fully automated 3D histology reconstruction method to visualize the arterioles and venules within the mouse hind-limb. Sections of the tibialis anterior muscle from C57BL/J6 mice (both normal and subjected to femoral artery excision) were reconstructed using pairwise rigid and affine registrations of 5 µm-thick, paraffin-embedded serial sections digitized at 0.25 µm/pixel. Low-resolution intensity-based rigid registration was used to initialize the nucleus landmark-based registration, and conventional high-resolution intensity-based registration method. The affine nucleus landmark-based registration was developed in this work and was compared to the conventional affine high-resolution intensity-based registration method. Target registration errors were measured between adjacent tissue sections (pairwise error), as well as with respect to a 3D reference reconstruction (accumulated error, to capture propagation of error through the stack of sections). Accumulated error measures were lower (p<0.01) for the nucleus landmark technique and superior vasculature continuity was observed. These findings indicate that registration based on automatic extraction and correspondence of small, homologous landmarks may support accurate 3D histology reconstruction. This technique avoids the otherwise problematic “banana-into-cylinder” effect observed using conventional methods that optimize the pairwise alignment of salient structures, forcing them to be section-orthogonal. This approach will provide a valuable tool for high-accuracy 3D histology tissue reconstructions for

  19. Ultrasonic 3-D Vector Flow Method for Quantitative In Vivo Peak Velocity and Flow Rate Estimation.

    PubMed

    Holbek, Simon; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bouzari, Hamed; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Thomsen, Carsten; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2017-03-01

    Current clinical ultrasound (US) systems are limited to show blood flow movement in either 1-D or 2-D. In this paper, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities in a plane using the transverse oscillation method, a 32×32 element matrix array, and the experimental US scanner SARUS is presented. The aim of this paper is to estimate precise flow rates and peak velocities derived from 3-D vector flow estimates. The emission sequence provides 3-D vector flow estimates at up to 1.145 frames/s in a plane, and was used to estimate 3-D vector flow in a cross-sectional image plane. The method is validated in two phantom studies, where flow rates are measured in a flow-rig, providing a constant parabolic flow, and in a straight-vessel phantom ( ∅=8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating time varying waveforms. Flow rates are estimated to be 82.1 ± 2.8 L/min in the flow-rig compared with the expected 79.8 L/min, and to 2.68 ± 0.04 mL/stroke in the pulsating environment compared with the expected 2.57 ± 0.08 mL/stroke. Flow rates estimated in the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer are compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measured flow rates using a 1-D through-plane velocity sequence. Mean flow rates were 333 ± 31 mL/min for the presented method and 346 ± 2 mL/min for the MRI measurements.

  20. Topographical surveys: Classical method versus 3D laser scanning. Case study - An application in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoraş, I.-R.; Covăsnianu, A.; Pleşu, G.; Benedict, B.

    2009-04-01

    The paper describes an experiment which took place in Iasi town, Romania, consisted in two different topographical survey techniques applied for one and the same objective placed in a block within the city (western part) - a thermal power station. The purpose was to compare those methods and to determine which one is proper to be used in this domain in terms of fastness, optimization and speed of data processing. First technique applied for our survey was the classical one, with a total station. Using the CAD technique, we obtained a final product (a dwg file) and a list of coordinates (a text file). The second method, which we focused our attention more, was the measurement with a very precise 3D laser scanstation, also very suitable in archeology. The data obtained were processed with special software. Result was a 3D model of the thermal power plant composed of measurable cloud point data. Finally, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of each method, we came to the conclusion that the 3D laser scanning which we used matches well the application, in this case civil engineering, but the future of accepting and implementing this technique is in the hands of Romanian authorities.

  1. A new combined prior based reconstruction method for compressed sensing in 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Muhammad S.; Islam, Rafiqul; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew J.; Pickering, Mark R.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities, with 3D US imaging gaining popularity recently due to its considerable advantages over 2D US imaging. However, as it is limited by long acquisition times and the huge amount of data processing it requires, methods for reducing these factors have attracted considerable research interest. Compressed sensing (CS) is one of the best candidates for accelerating the acquisition rate and reducing the data processing time without degrading image quality. However, CS is prone to introduce noise-like artefacts due to random under-sampling. To address this issue, we propose a combined prior-based reconstruction method for 3D US imaging. A Laplacian mixture model (LMM) constraint in the wavelet domain is combined with a total variation (TV) constraint to create a new regularization regularization prior. An experimental evaluation conducted to validate our method using synthetic 3D US images shows that it performs better than other approaches in terms of both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  2. Embedded 3D shape measurement system based on a novel spatio-temporal coding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Tian, Jindong; Tian, Yong; Li, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Structured light measurement has been wildly used since 1970s in industrial component detection, reverse engineering, 3D molding, robot navigation, medical and many other fields. In order to satisfy the demand for high speed, high precision and high resolution 3-D measurement for embedded system, a new patterns combining binary and gray coding principle in space are designed and projected onto the object surface orderly. Each pixel corresponds to the designed sequence of gray values in time - domain, which is treated as a feature vector. The unique gray vector is then dimensionally reduced to a scalar which could be used as characteristic information for binocular matching. In this method, the number of projected structured light patterns is reduced, and the time-consuming phase unwrapping in traditional phase shift methods is avoided. This algorithm is eventually implemented on DM3730 embedded system for 3-D measuring, which consists of an ARM and a DSP core and has a strong capability of digital signal processing. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method.

  3. A variable flip angle-based method for reducing blurring in 3D GRASE ASL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is an MRI technique to measure cerebral blood flow directly and noninvasively, and thus provides a more direct quantitative correlate of neural activity than blood-oxygen-level-dependent fMRI. A 3D gradient and spin-echo (GRASE) sequence is capable of enhancing signal-to-noise ratio, and has been shown to be a very useful readout module for ASL sequences. Nonetheless, the introduction of significant blurring in its single-shot version, due to T2 decay along the partition dimension, compromises the achievable spatial resolution, limiting the potential of this technique for whole-brain coverage. To address this issue, a method for reducing blurring based on a variable flip angle (VFA) scheme is proposed in this study for 3D GRASE ASL perfusion. Numerical simulations show that the proposed method is capable of reducing the blurring significantly compared to the standard constant flip angle approach; this result was further confirmed using in vivo data. The proposed VFA method should therefore be of significance to 3D GRASE ASL fMRI studies, since it is able to reduce blurring without sacrificing temporal resolution.

  4. Modelling of 3-D electromagnetic responses using the time-wavenumber method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    1991-12-01

    The diffusion of electromagnetic fields in time and the three spatial dimensions can be modelled using a new numerical algorithm that is tailored for geophysical applications. The novel feature of the algorithm is that a large part of the computation is done in the wavenumber domain. Here, the spatial Fourier transforms of the vertical magnetic field and the vertical current density are used to define two scalar potentials. For either a vertical electric or a vertical magnetic dipole source at the subsurface these wavenumber potentials can be represented by a simple Gaussian distribution function. In the air, the fields satisfy the Laplace equation. The flow of this algorithm is as follows: the potentials are defined in the wavenumber domain as an initial condition depending on the source configuration, the vector current density J in space is obtained from the potentials using the inverse Fourier transform, the vector electric field E is obtained by multiplying J by resistivity, the updated potentials are then obtained from the forward Fourier transform of E. Using the updated potential as a subsequent initial condition these steps are repeated until the solution reaches the final time. Since spatial derivatives can be exactly evaluated in the wavenumber domain by simple multiplications, this algorithm requires far less memory than the conventional finite difference (FD) method. The conventional FD method needs finer discretization in space in order to minimize the numerical dispersion caused by numerical differentiation in space. The conductivity distribution for this algorithm is piece-wise continuous and bounded in the wavenumber domain.

  5. Validation of 3D Seismic Velocity Models Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Larmat, C. S.; Porritt, R. W.; Higdon, D.; Allen, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    For over a decade now, many research institutions have been focusing on addressing the Earth's 3D heterogeneities and complexities by improving tomographic methods. Utilizing dense array datasets, these efforts have led to unprecedented 3D seismic images, but little is done in terms of model validation or to provide any absolute assessment of model uncertainty. Furthermore, the question of "How good is a 3D geophysical model at representing the Earth's true physics? " remains largely not addressed in a time when 3D Earth models are used for societal and energy security. In the last few years, new horizons have opened up in earth structure imaging, with the advent of new numerical and mathematical methods in computational seismology and statistical sciences. We use these methods to tackle the question of model validation taking advantage of unique and extensive High Performance Computing resources available at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We present results from a study focused on validating 3D models for the Western USA generated using both ray-theoretical and finite-frequency approximations. In this manner we do not validate just the model but also the imaging technique. For this test case, we utilize the Dynamic North America (DNA) model family of UC Berkeley, as they are readily available in both formulations. We evaluate model performances by comparing observed and synthetic seismograms generated using the Spectral Element Method. Results show that both, finite-frequency and ray-theoretical DNA09 models, predict the observations well. Waveform cross-correlation coefficients show a difference in performance between models obtained with the finite-frequency or ray-theory limited to smallest periods (<15s), with no perceptible difference at longer periods (50-200s). At those shortest periods, and based on statistical analyses on S-wave phase delay measurements, finite-frequency shows an improvement over ray theory. We are also investigating the breakdown of ray

  6. A 3D front tracking method on a CPU/GPU system

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Wurigen; Grove, John

    2011-01-21

    We describe the method to port a sequential 3D interface tracking code to a GPU with CUDA. The interface is represented as a triangular mesh. Interface geometry properties and point propagation are performed on a GPU. Interface mesh adaptation is performed on a CPU. The convergence of the method is assessed from the test problems with given velocity fields. Performance results show overall speedups from 11 to 14 for the test problems under mesh refinement. We also briefly describe our ongoing work to couple the interface tracking method with a hydro solver.

  7. Wound Measurement Techniques: Comparing the Use of Ruler Method, 2D Imaging and 3D Scanner.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aj; Wollak, C; Shah, J B

    2013-12-01

    The statistics on the growing number of non-healing wounds is alarming. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. An estimated US $25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing health care costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide.(1) Accurate wound measurement techniques will help health care personnel to monitor the wounds which will indirectly help improving care.(7,9) The clinical practice of measuring wounds has not improved even today.(2,3) A common method like the ruler method to measure wounds has poor interrater and intrarater reliability.(2,3) Measuring the greatest length by the greatest width perpendicular to the greatest length, the perpendicular method, is more valid and reliable than other ruler based methods.(2) Another common method like acetate tracing is more accurate than the ruler method but still has its disadvantages. These common measurement techniques are time consuming with variable inaccuracies. In this study, volumetric measurements taken with a non-contact 3-D scanner are benchmarked against the common ruler method, acetate grid tracing, and 2-D image planimetry volumetric measurement technique. A liquid volumetric fill method is used as the control volume. Results support the hypothesis that the 3-D scanner consistently shows accurate volumetric measurements in comparison to standard volumetric measurements obtained by the waterfill technique (average difference of 11%). The 3-D scanner measurement technique was found more reliable and valid compared to other three techniques, the ruler method (average difference of 75%), acetate grid tracing (average difference of 41%), and 2D planimetric measurements (average difference of 52%). Acetate tracing showed more accurate measurements compared to the ruler method (average difference of 41% (acetate tracing) compared to 75% (ruler method)). Improving

  8. Wound Measurement Techniques: Comparing the Use of Ruler Method, 2D Imaging and 3D Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aj; Wollak, C.; Shah, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    The statistics on the growing number of non-healing wounds is alarming. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. An estimated US $25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing health care costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide.1 Accurate wound measurement techniques will help health care personnel to monitor the wounds which will indirectly help improving care.7,9 The clinical practice of measuring wounds has not improved even today.2,3 A common method like the ruler method to measure wounds has poor interrater and intrarater reliability.2,3 Measuring the greatest length by the greatest width perpendicular to the greatest length, the perpendicular method, is more valid and reliable than other ruler based methods.2 Another common method like acetate tracing is more accurate than the ruler method but still has its disadvantages. These common measurement techniques are time consuming with variable inaccuracies. In this study, volumetric measurements taken with a non-contact 3-D scanner are benchmarked against the common ruler method, acetate grid tracing, and 2-D image planimetry volumetric measurement technique. A liquid volumetric fill method is used as the control volume. Results support the hypothesis that the 3-D scanner consistently shows accurate volumetric measurements in comparison to standard volumetric measurements obtained by the waterfill technique (average difference of 11%). The 3-D scanner measurement technique was found more reliable and valid compared to other three techniques, the ruler method (average difference of 75%), acetate grid tracing (average difference of 41%), and 2D planimetric measurements (average difference of 52%). Acetate tracing showed more accurate measurements compared to the ruler method (average difference of 41% (acetate tracing) compared to 75% (ruler method)). Improving the

  9. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    This annual status report presents the results of work performed during the fourth year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes permitting more accurate and efficient 3-D analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of math models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. Volume 1 of this report discusses the special finite element models developed during the fourth year of the contract.

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF 3-D IMAGE-GUIDED NEAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY USING BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Carpenter, Colin; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Multimodality imaging systems combining optical techniques with MRI/CT provide high-resolution functional characterization of tissue by imaging molecular and vascular biomarkers. To optimize these hybrid systems for clinical use, faster and automatable algorithms are required for 3-D imaging. Towards this end, a boundary element model was used to incorporate tissue boundaries from MRI/CT into image formation process. This method uses surface rendering to describe light propagation in 3-D using diffusion equation. Parallel computing provided speedup of up to 54% in time of computation. Simulations showed that location of NIRS probe was crucial for quantitatively accurate estimation of tumor response. A change of up to 61% was seen between cycles 1 and 3 in monitoring tissue response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:20523751

  11. A Novel 2D-to-3D Video Conversion Method Using Time-Coherent Depth Maps

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shouyi; Dong, Hao; Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel 2D-to-3D video conversion method for 3D entertainment applications. 3D entertainment is getting more and more popular and can be found in many contexts, such as TV and home gaming equipment. 3D image sensors are a new method to produce stereoscopic video content conveniently and at a low cost, and can thus meet the urgent demand for 3D videos in the 3D entertaiment market. Generally, 2D image sensor and 2D-to-3D conversion chip can compose a 3D image sensor. Our study presents a novel 2D-to-3D video conversion algorithm which can be adopted in a 3D image sensor. In our algorithm, a depth map is generated by combining global depth gradient and local depth refinement for each frame of 2D video input. Global depth gradient is computed according to image type while local depth refinement is related to color information. As input 2D video content consists of a number of video shots, the proposed algorithm reuses the global depth gradient of frames within the same video shot to generate time-coherent depth maps. The experimental results prove that this novel method can adapt to different image types, reduce computational complexity and improve the temporal smoothness of generated 3D video. PMID:26131674

  12. A compact robotic apparatus and method for 3-D ultrasound guided prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Smith, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging has revolutionized the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly accurate models of the prostate and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging, which allows 3D models of the prostate to be constructed from a series of two-dimensional images, helps to accurately target and implant seeds into the prostate. We have developed a compact robotic apparatus, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This device has been designed to accurately guide a needle in 3D space so that the needle can be inserted into the prostate at an angle that does not interfere with the pubic arch. The physician can adjust manually or automatically the position of the apparatus in order to place several radioactive seeds into the prostate at designated target locations. Because many physicians are wary of conducting robotic surgical procedures, the apparatus has been developed so that the physician can position the needle for manual insertion and apply a method for manually releasing the needle without damaging the apparatus or endangering the patient.

  13. 3D In Vitro Model for Breast Cancer Research Using Magnetic Levitation and Bioprinting Method.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Fransisca; Godin, Biana

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment composition and architecture are known as a major factor in orchestrating the tumor growth and its response to various therapies. In this context, in vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the responses. However, while tumor cells can be of human origin, tumor microenvironment in the in vivo models is host-based. On the other hand, in vitro studies in a flat monoculture of tumor cells (the most frequently used in vitro tumor model) are unable to recapitulate the complexity of tumor microenvironment. Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell cultures of tumor cells have been proven to be an important experimental tool in understanding mechanisms of tumor growth, response to therapeutics, and transport of nutrients/drugs. We have recently described a novel tool to create 3D co-cultures of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment. Our method utilizes magnetic manipulation/levitation of the specific ratios of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment (from human or animal origin) aiding in the formation of tumor spheres with defined cellular composition and density, as quickly as within 24 h. This chapter describes the experimental protocols developed to model the 3D structure of the cancer environment using the above method.

  14. 3D in vitro model for breast cancer research using magnetic levitation and bioprinting method

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Fransisca; Godin, Biana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor microenvironment composition and architecture are known as a major factor in orchestrating the tumor growth and its response to various therapies. In this context, in vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the responses. However, while tumor cells can be of human origin, tumor microenvironment in the in vivo models is host-based. On the other hand, in vitro studies in a flat monoculture of tumor cells (the most frequently used in vitro tumor model) are unable to recapitulate the complexity of tumor microenvironment. Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell cultures of tumor cells have been proven to be an important experimental tool in understanding mechanisms of tumor growth, response to therapeutics and transport of nutrients/drugs. We have recently described a novel tool to create 3D co-cultures of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment. Our method utilizes magnetic manipulation/levitation of the specific ratios of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment (from human or animal origin) aiding in the formation of tumor spheres with defined cellular composition and density, as quickly as within 24 hours. This chapter describes the experimental protocols developed to model the 3D structure of the cancer environment using the above method. PMID:26820961

  15. Scientific rotoscoping: a morphology-based method of 3-D motion analysis and visualization.

    PubMed

    Gatesy, Stephen M; Baier, David B; Jenkins, Farish A; Dial, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional skeletal movement is often impossible to accurately quantify from external markers. X-ray imaging more directly visualizes moving bones, but extracting 3-D kinematic data is notoriously difficult from a single perspective. Stereophotogrammetry is extremely powerful if bi-planar fluoroscopy is available, yet implantation of three radio-opaque markers in each segment of interest may be impractical. Herein we introduce scientific rotoscoping (SR), a new method of motion analysis that uses articulated bone models to simultaneously animate and quantify moving skeletons without markers. The three-step process is described using examples from our work on pigeon flight and alligator walking. First, the experimental scene is reconstructed in 3-D using commercial animation software so that frames of undistorted fluoroscopic and standard video can be viewed in their correct spatial context through calibrated virtual cameras. Second, polygonal models of relevant bones are created from CT or laser scans and rearticulated into a hierarchical marionette controlled by virtual joints. Third, the marionette is registered to video images by adjusting each of its degrees of freedom over a sequence of frames. SR outputs high-resolution 3-D kinematic data for multiple, unmarked bones and anatomically accurate animations that can be rendered from any perspective. Rather than generating moving stick figures abstracted from the coordinates of independent surface points, SR is a morphology-based method of motion analysis deeply rooted in osteological and arthrological data.

  16. Comparing a novel automatic 3D method for LGE-CMR quantification of scar size with established methods.

    PubMed

    Woie, Leik; Måløy, Frode; Eftestøl, Trygve; Engan, Kjersti; Edvardsen, Thor; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Ørn, Stein

    2014-02-01

    Current methods for the estimation of infarct size by late-enhanced cardiac magnetic imaging are based upon 2D analysis that first determines the size of the infarction in each slice, and thereafter adds the infarct sizes from each slice to generate a volume. We present a novel, automatic 3D method that estimates infarct size by a simultaneous analysis of all pixels from all slices. In a population of 54 patients with ischemic scars, the infarct size estimated by the automatic 3D method was compared with four established 2D methods. The new 3D method defined scar as the sum of all pixels with signal intensity (SI) ≥35 % of max SI from the complete myocardium, border zone: SI 35-50 % of max SI and core as SI ≥50 % of max SI. The 3D method yielded smaller infarct size (-2.8 ± 2.3 %) and core size (-3.0 ± 1.7 %) than the 2D method most similar to ours. There was no difference in the size of the border zone (0.2 ± 1.4 %). The 3D method demonstrated stronger correlations between scar size and left ventricular (LV) remodelling parameters (LV ejection fraction: r = -0.71, p < 0.0005, LV end-diastolic index: r = 0.54, p < 0.0005, and LV end-systolic index: r = 0.59, p < 0.0005) compared with conventional 2D methods. Infarct size estimation by our novel 3D automatic method is without the need for manual demarcation of the scar; it is less time-consuming and has a stronger correlation with remodelling parameters compared with existing methods.

  17. A Cost-Effective Method to Assemble Biomimetic 3D Cell Culture Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sabreen; El-Badri, Nagwa; El-Mokhtaar, Mohamed; Al-Mofty, Saif; Farghaly, Mohamed; Ayman, Radwa; Habib, Dina; Mousa, Noha

    2016-01-01

    Developing effective stem cell based therapies requires the design of complex in vitro culture systems for more accurate representation of the stem cell niche. Attempts to improve conventional cell culture platforms include the use of biomaterial coated culture plates, sphere culture, microfluidic systems and bioreactors. Most of these platforms are not cost-effective, require industrial technical expertise to fabricate, and remain too simplistic compared to the physiological cell niche. The human amniotic membrane (hAM) has been used successfully in clinical grafting applications due to its unique biological composition and regenerative properties. In this study, we present a combinatorial platform that integrates the hAM with biomolecular, topographic and mechanical cues in one versatile model. Methods We utilized the hAM to provide the biological and the three dimensional (3D) topographic components of the prototype. The 3D nano-roughness of the hAM was characterized using surface electron microscopy and surface image analysis (ImageJ and SurfaceJ). We developed additional macro-scale and micro-scale versions of the platform which provided additional shear stress factors to simulate the fluid dynamics of the in vivo extracellular fluids. Results Three models of varying complexities of the prototype were assembled. A well-defined 3D surface modulation of the hAM in comparable to commercial 3D biomaterial culture substrates was achieved without complex fabrication and with significantly lower cost. Performance of the prototype was demonstrated through culture of primary human umbilical cord mononuclear blood cells (MNCs), human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line (hBMSC), and human breast cancer tissue. Conclusion This study presents methods of assembling an integrated, flexible and low cost biomimetic cell culture platform for diverse cell culture applications. PMID:27935982

  18. 2D and 3D visualization methods of endoscopic panoramic bladder images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Alexander; Heisterklaus, Iris; Müller, Yannick; Stehle, Thomas; Gross, Sebastian; Aach, Til

    2011-03-01

    While several mosaicking algorithms have been developed to compose endoscopic images of the internal urinary bladder wall into panoramic images, the quantitative evaluation of these output images in terms of geometrical distortions have often not been discussed. However, the visualization of the distortion level is highly desired for an objective image-based medical diagnosis. Thus, we present in this paper a method to create quality maps from the characteristics of transformation parameters, which were applied to the endoscopic images during the registration process of the mosaicking algorithm. For a global first view impression, the quality maps are laid over the panoramic image and highlight image regions in pseudo-colors according to their local distortions. This illustration supports then surgeons to identify geometrically distorted structures easily in the panoramic image, which allow more objective medical interpretations of tumor tissue in shape and size. Aside from introducing quality maps in 2-D, we also discuss a visualization method to map panoramic images onto a 3-D spherical bladder model. Reference points are manually selected by the surgeon in the panoramic image and the 3-D model. Then the panoramic image is mapped by the Hammer-Aitoff equal-area projection onto the 3-D surface using texture mapping. Finally the textured bladder model can be freely moved in a virtual environment for inspection. Using a two-hemisphere bladder representation, references between panoramic image regions and their corresponding space coordinates within the bladder model are reconstructed. This additional spatial 3-D information thus assists the surgeon in navigation, documentation, as well as surgical planning.

  19. 3-D surface profilometry based on modulation measurement by applying wavelet transform method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Chen, Feng; Xiao, Chao; Wei, Yongchao

    2017-01-01

    A new analysis of 3-D surface profilometry based on modulation measurement technique by the application of Wavelet Transform method is proposed. As a tool excelling for its multi-resolution and localization in the time and frequency domains, Wavelet Transform method with good localized time-frequency analysis ability and effective de-noizing capacity can extract the modulation distribution more accurately than Fourier Transform method. Especially for the analysis of complex object, more details of the measured object can be well remained. In this paper, the theoretical derivation of Wavelet Transform method that obtains the modulation values from a captured fringe pattern is given. Both computer simulation and elementary experiment are used to show the validity of the proposed method by making a comparison with the results of Fourier Transform method. The results show that the Wavelet Transform method has a better performance than the Fourier Transform method in modulation values retrieval.

  20. A brain-computer interface method combined with eye tracking for 3D interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui Chul; Woo, Jin Cheol; Kim, Jong Hwa; Whang, Mincheol; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2010-07-15

    With the recent increase in the number of three-dimensional (3D) applications, the need for interfaces to these applications has increased. Although the eye tracking method has been widely used as an interaction interface for hand-disabled persons, this approach cannot be used for depth directional navigation. To solve this problem, we propose a new brain computer interface (BCI) method in which the BCI and eye tracking are combined to analyze depth navigation, including selection and two-dimensional (2D) gaze direction, respectively. The proposed method is novel in the following five ways compared to previous works. First, a device to measure both the gaze direction and an electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern is proposed with the sensors needed to measure the EEG attached to a head-mounted eye tracking device. Second, the reliability of the BCI interface is verified by demonstrating that there is no difference between the real and the imaginary movements for the same work in terms of the EEG power spectrum. Third, depth control for the 3D interaction interface is implemented by an imaginary arm reaching movement. Fourth, a selection method is implemented by an imaginary hand grabbing movement. Finally, for the independent operation of gazing and the BCI, a mode selection method is proposed that measures a user's concentration by analyzing the pupil accommodation speed, which is not affected by the operation of gazing and the BCI. According to experimental results, we confirmed the feasibility of the proposed 3D interaction method using eye tracking and a BCI.

  1. Spectral element method for band-structure calculations of 3D phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linlin; Liu, Na; Zhou, Jianyang; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jiamin; Huo Liu, Qing

    2016-11-01

    The spectral element method (SEM) is a special kind of high-order finite element method (FEM) which combines the flexibility of a finite element method with the accuracy of a spectral method. In contrast to the traditional FEM, the SEM exhibits advantages in the high-order accuracy as the error decreases exponentially with the increase of interpolation degree by employing the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) polynomials as basis functions. In this study, the spectral element method is developed for the first time for the determination of band structures of 3D isotropic/anisotropic phononic crystals (PCs). Based on the Bloch theorem, we present a novel, intuitive discretization formulation for Navier equation in the SEM scheme for periodic media. By virtue of using the orthogonal Legendre polynomials, the generalized eigenvalue problem is converted to a regular one in our SEM implementation to improve the efficiency. Besides, according to the specific geometry structure, 8-node and 27-node hexahedral elements as well as an analytic mesh have been used to accurately capture curved PC models in our SEM scheme. To verify its accuracy and efficiency, this study analyses the phononic-crystal plates with square and triangular lattice arrangements, and the 3D cubic phononic crystals consisting of simple cubic (SC), bulk central cubic (BCC) and faced central cubic (FCC) lattices with isotropic or anisotropic scatters. All the numerical results considered demonstrate that SEM is superior to the conventional FEM and can be an efficient alternative method for accurate determination of band structures of 3D phononic crystals.

  2. Locally conservative groundwater flow in the continuous Galerkin method using 3-D prismatic patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Zhao, Yingwang; Lin, Yu-Feng F.; Xu, Hua

    2016-11-01

    A new procedure has been developed to improve the velocity field computed by the continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG). It enables extending the postprocessing algorithm proposed by Cordes and Kinzelbach (1992) to three-dimensional (3-D) models by using prismatic patches for saturated groundwater flow. This approach leverages a dual mesh to preserve local mass conservation and provides interpolated velocities based on consistent fluxes. To develop this 3-D approach, a triangular conservative patch is introduced by computing not only advection fluxes, but also vertical infiltrations, storage changes, and other sink or source terms. This triangular patch is then used to develop a prismatic patch, which consists of subprisms in two layers. By dividing a single two-layer patch into two separate one-layer patches, two dimensional (2-D) algorithms can be applied to compute velocities. As a consequence, each subelement is able to preserve local mass conservation. A hypothetical 3-D model is used to evaluate the precision of streamlines and flow rates generated by this approach and the FEFLOW simulation program.

  3. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  4. Development of biologically active compounds by combining 3D QSAR and structure-based design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Wolfgang

    2002-11-01

    One of the major challenges in computational approaches to drug design is the accurate prediction of the binding affinity of novel biomolecules. In the present study an automated procedure which combines docking and 3D-QSAR methods was applied to several drug targets. The developed receptor-based 3D-QSAR methodology was tested on several sets of ligands for which the three-dimensional structure of the target protein has been solved - namely estrogen receptor, acetylcholine esterase and protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 1B. The molecular alignments of the studied ligands were determined using the docking program AutoDock and were compared with the X-ray structures of the corresponding protein-ligand complexes. The automatically generated protein-based ligand alignment obtained was subsequently taken as basis for a comparative field analysis applying the GRID/GOLPE approach. Using GRID interaction fields and applying variable selection procedures, highly predictive models were obtained. It is expected that concepts from receptor-based 3D QSAR will be valuable tools for the analysis of high-throughput screening as well as virtual screening data

  5. 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of optical phantoms simulating heterogeneous biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minjie; Shen, Shuwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    The performance of biomedical optical imaging devices heavily relies on appropriate calibration. However, many of existing calibration phantoms for biomedical optical devices are based on homogenous materials without considering the multi-layer heterogeneous structures observed in biological tissue. Using such a phantom for optical calibration may result in measurement bias. To overcome this problem, we propose a 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of tissue simulating phantoms with multilayer heterogeneous structure. The phantom simulates not only the morphologic characteristics of biological tissue but also absorption and scattering properties. The printing system is based on a 3D motion platform with coordinated control of the DC motors. A special jet nozzle is designed to mix base, scattering, and absorption materials at different ratios. 3D tissue structures are fabricated through layer-by-layer printing with selective deposition of phantom materials of different ingredients. Different mixed ratios of base, scattering and absorption materials have been tested in order to optimize the printing outcome. A spectrometer and a tissue spectrophotometer are used for characterizing phantom absorption and scattering properties. The goal of this project is to fabricate skin tissue simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for the calibration of biomedical optical spectral devices.

  6. A cut cell method for the 3D simulation of Crookes radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dechriste, Guillaume; Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-09

    Devices involved in engineering applications, such as vacuum pumps or MEMS, may be made of several moving parts. This raise the issue of the simulation of rarefied gas flow around moving boundaries. We propose a simple process, known as cut cell method, to treat the motion of a solid body in the framework of the deterministic solving of a kinetic equation. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been used for this kind of simulations. The method is illustrated by the 2D and 3D simulations of a Crookes radiometer.

  7. A cut cell method for the 3D simulation of Crookes radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechriste, Guillaume; Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-01

    Devices involved in engineering applications, such as vacuum pumps or MEMS, may be made of several moving parts. This raise the issue of the simulation of rarefied gas flow around moving boundaries. We propose a simple process, known as cut cell method, to treat the motion of a solid body in the framework of the deterministic solving of a kinetic equation. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been used for this kind of simulations. The method is illustrated by the 2D and 3D simulations of a Crookes radiometer.

  8. Numerical optimization of a three-channel radiofrequency coil for open, vertical-field, MR-guided, focused ultrasound surgery using the hybrid method of moment/finite difference time domain method.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xuegang; Wang, Di; Han, Jijun; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-07-01

    The numerical optimization of a three-channel radiofrequency (RF) coil with a physical aperture for the open, vertical-field, MR-guided, focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) system using the hybrid method of moment (MoM)/finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is reported. The numerical simulation of the current density distribution on an RF coil with a complicated irregular structure was performed using MoM. The electromagnetic field simulation containing the full coil-tissue interactions within the region of interest was accomplished using the FDTD method. Huygens' equivalent box with six surfaces smoothly connected the MoM and FDTD method. An electromagnetic model of the human pelvic region was reconstructed and loaded in the FDTD zone to optimize the three-channel RF coil and compensate for the lower sensitivity at the vertical field. In addition, the numerical MoM was used to model the resonance, decoupling and impedance matching of the RF coil in compliance with engineering practices. A prototype RF coil was constructed to verify the simulation results. The results demonstrate that the signal-to-noise ratio and the homogeneity of the B(1) field were both greatly improved compared with previously published results.

  9. Accurate gradient approximation for complex interface problems in 3D by an improved coupling interface method

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yu-Chen; Chern, I-Liang; Chang, Chien C.

    2014-10-15

    Most elliptic interface solvers become complicated for complex interface problems at those “exceptional points” where there are not enough neighboring interior points for high order interpolation. Such complication increases especially in three dimensions. Usually, the solvers are thus reduced to low order accuracy. In this paper, we classify these exceptional points and propose two recipes to maintain order of accuracy there, aiming at improving the previous coupling interface method [26]. Yet the idea is also applicable to other interface solvers. The main idea is to have at least first order approximations for second order derivatives at those exceptional points. Recipe 1 is to use the finite difference approximation for the second order derivatives at a nearby interior grid point, whenever this is possible. Recipe 2 is to flip domain signatures and introduce a ghost state so that a second-order method can be applied. This ghost state is a smooth extension of the solution at the exceptional point from the other side of the interface. The original state is recovered by a post-processing using nearby states and jump conditions. The choice of recipes is determined by a classification scheme of the exceptional points. The method renders the solution and its gradient uniformly second-order accurate in the entire computed domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the second order accuracy of the presently proposed method in approximating the gradients of the original states for some complex interfaces which we had tested previous in two and three dimensions, and a real molecule ( (1D63)) which is double-helix shape and composed of hundreds of atoms.

  10. A faster method for 3D/2D medical image registration—a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernard; Staedele, Harald; Hammer, Beat; Claudius Gellrich, Niels; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-08-01

    3D/2D patient-to-computed-tomography (CT) registration is a method to determine a transformation that maps two coordinate systems by comparing a projection image rendered from CT to a real projection image. Iterative variation of the CT's position between rendering steps finally leads to exact registration. Applications include exact patient positioning in radiation therapy, calibration of surgical robots, and pose estimation in computer-aided surgery. One of the problems associated with 3D/2D registration is the fact that finding a registration includes solving a minimization problem in six degrees of freedom (dof) in motion. This results in considerable time requirements since for each iteration step at least one volume rendering has to be computed. We show that by choosing an appropriate world coordinate system and by applying a 2D/2D registration method in each iteration step, the number of iterations can be grossly reduced from n6 to n5. Here, n is the number of discrete variations around a given coordinate. Depending on the configuration of the optimization algorithm, this reduces the total number of iterations necessary to at least 1/3 of it's original value. The method was implemented and extensively tested on simulated x-ray images of a tibia, a pelvis and a skull base. When using one projective image and a discrete full parameter space search for solving the optimization problem, average accuracy was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.6(°) and 4.1 +/- 1.9 (mm) for a registration in six parameters, and 1.0 +/- 0.7(°) and 4.2 +/- 1.6 (mm) when using the 5 + 1 dof method described in this paper. Time requirements were reduced by a factor 3.1. We conclude that this hardware-independent optimization of 3D/2D registration is a step towards increasing the acceptance of this promising method for a wide number of clinical applications.

  11. A faster method for 3D/2D medical image registration--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernard; Staedele, Harald; Hammer, Beat; Gellrich, Niels Claudius; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-08-21

    3D/2D patient-to-computed-tomography (CT) registration is a method to determine a transformation that maps two coordinate systems by comparing a projection image rendered from CT to a real projection image. Iterative variation of the CT's position between rendering steps finally leads to exact registration. Applications include exact patient positioning in radiation therapy, calibration of surgical robots, and pose estimation in computer-aided surgery. One of the problems associated with 3D/2D registration is the fact that finding a registration includes solving a minimization problem in six degrees of freedom (dof) in motion. This results in considerable time requirements since for each iteration step at least one volume rendering has to be computed. We show that by choosing an appropriate world coordinate system and by applying a 2D/2D registration method in each iteration step, the number of iterations can be grossly reduced from n6 to n5. Here, n is the number of discrete variations around a given coordinate. Depending on the configuration of the optimization algorithm, this reduces the total number of iterations necessary to at least 1/3 of it's original value. The method was implemented and extensively tested on simulated x-ray images of a tibia, a pelvis and a skull base. When using one projective image and a discrete full parameter space search for solving the optimization problem, average accuracy was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.6(degrees) and 4.1 +/- 1.9 (mm) for a registration in six parameters, and 1.0 +/- 0.7(degrees) and 4.2 +/- 1.6 (mm) when using the 5 + 1 dof method described in this paper. Time requirements were reduced by a factor 3.1. We conclude that this hardware-independent optimization of 3D/2D registration is a step towards increasing the acceptance of this promising method for a wide number of clinical applications.

  12. Elucidating the scapulo-humeral rhythm calculation: 3D joint contribution method.

    PubMed

    Robert-Lachaine, Xavier; Marion, Patrick; Godbout, Véronique; Bleau, Jacinte; Begon, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    The scapulo-humeral rhythm quantifies shoulder joint coordination during arm elevation. The common method calculates a ratio of gleno-humeral (GH) elevation to scapulo-thoracic upward rotation angles. However the other rotations also contribute to arm elevation. The objective is to propose a 3D dynamic scapulo-humeral rhythm calculation method including all rotations of the shoulder joints and compare with the common method. Twenty-nine skin markers were placed on the trunk and dominant arm of 14 healthy males to measure shoulder kinematics. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs were applied to compare the two methods of calculation of joint contributions and scapulo-humeral rhythm during arm elevation. Significant main effects (p < 0.05) were observed between methods in joint contribution angles and scapulo-humeral rhythms. A systematic overestimation of the GH contribution was observed when only using the GH elevation angle because the scapula is moved outside a vertical plane. Hence, the proposed 3D method to calculate the scapulo-humeral rhythm allows an improved functional shoulder evaluation.

  13. 3D registration method based on scattered point cloud from B-model ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lei; Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Na; Xie, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes a registration method on 3D point cloud of the bone tissue surface extracted by B-mode ultrasound image and the CT model . The B-mode ultrasound is used to get two-dimensional images of the femur tissue . The binocular stereo vision tracker is used to obtain spatial position and orientation of the optical positioning device fixed on the ultrasound probe. The combining of the two kind of data generates 3D point cloud of the bone tissue surface. The pixel coordinates of the bone surface are automatically obtained from ultrasound image using an improved local phase symmetry (phase symmetry, PS) . The mapping of the pixel coordinates on the ultrasound image and 3D space is obtained through a series of calibration methods. In order to detect the effect of registration, six markers are implanted on a complete fresh pig femoral .The actual coordinates of the marks are measured with two methods. The first method is to get the coordinates with measuring tools under a coordinate system. The second is to measure the coordinates of the markers in the CT model registered with 3D point cloud using the ICP registration algorithm under the same coordinate system. Ten registration experiments are carried out in the same way. Error results are obtained by comparing the two sets of mark point coordinates obtained by two different methods. The results is that a minimum error is 1.34mm, the maximum error is 3.22mm,and the average error of 2.52mm; ICP registration algorithm calculates the average error of 0.89mm and a standard deviation of 0.62mm.This evaluation standards of registration accuracy is different from the average error obtained by the ICP registration algorithm. It can be intuitive to show the error caused by the operation of clinical doctors. Reference to the accuracy requirements of different operation in the Department of orthopedics, the method can be apply to the bone reduction and the anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

  14. Development of a piecewise linear omnidirectional 3D image registration method.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyunsoo; Kang, Wonjin; Lee, SukGyu; Kim, Youngwoo

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a new piecewise linear omnidirectional image registration method. The proposed method segments an image captured by multiple cameras into 2D segments defined by feature points of the image and then stitches each segment geometrically by considering the inclination of the segment in the 3D space. Depending on the intended use of image registration, the proposed method can be used to improve image registration accuracy or reduce the computation time in image registration because the trade-off between the computation time and image registration accuracy can be controlled for. In general, nonlinear image registration methods have been used in 3D omnidirectional image registration processes to reduce image distortion by camera lenses. The proposed method depends on a linear transformation process for omnidirectional image registration, and therefore it can enhance the effectiveness of the geometry recognition process, increase image registration accuracy by increasing the number of cameras or feature points of each image, increase the image registration speed by reducing the number of cameras or feature points of each image, and provide simultaneous information on shapes and colors of captured objects.

  15. Development of a piecewise linear omnidirectional 3D image registration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyunsoo; Kang, Wonjin; Lee, SukGyu; Kim, Youngwoo

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a new piecewise linear omnidirectional image registration method. The proposed method segments an image captured by multiple cameras into 2D segments defined by feature points of the image and then stitches each segment geometrically by considering the inclination of the segment in the 3D space. Depending on the intended use of image registration, the proposed method can be used to improve image registration accuracy or reduce the computation time in image registration because the trade-off between the computation time and image registration accuracy can be controlled for. In general, nonlinear image registration methods have been used in 3D omnidirectional image registration processes to reduce image distortion by camera lenses. The proposed method depends on a linear transformation process for omnidirectional image registration, and therefore it can enhance the effectiveness of the geometry recognition process, increase image registration accuracy by increasing the number of cameras or feature points of each image, increase the image registration speed by reducing the number of cameras or feature points of each image, and provide simultaneous information on shapes and colors of captured objects.

  16. Clinical Evaluation of a 3-D Automatic Annotation Method for Breast Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Wei; Li, Cheng; Li, An-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2016-04-01

    The routine clinical breast ultrasound annotation method is limited by the time it consumes, inconsistency, inaccuracy and incomplete notation. A novel 3-D automatic annotation method for breast ultrasound imaging has been developed that uses a spatial sensor to track and record conventional B-mode scanning so as to provide more objective annotation. The aim of the study described here was to test the feasibility of the automatic annotation method in clinical breast ultrasound scanning. An ultrasound scanning procedure using the new method was established. The new method and the conventional manual annotation method were compared in 46 breast cancer patients (49 ± 12 y). The time used for scanning a patient was recorded and compared for the two methods. Intra-observer and inter-observer experiments were performed, and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to analyze system reproducibility. The results revealed that the new annotation method had an average scanning time 36 s (42.9%) less than that of the conventional method. There were high correlations between the results of the two annotation methods (r = 0.933, p < 0.0001 for distance; r = 0.995, p < 0.0001 for radial angle). Intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility was excellent, with all ICCs > 0.92. The results indicated that the 3-D automatic annotation method is reliable for clinical breast ultrasound scanning and can greatly reduce scanning time. Although large-scale clinical studies are still needed, this work verified that the new annotation method has potential to be a valuable tool in breast ultrasound examination.

  17. 3D resistivity inversion using an improved Genetic Algorithm based on control method of mutation direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Li, S. C.; Nie, L. C.; Wang, J.; L, X.; Zhang, Q. S.

    2012-12-01

    Traditional inversion method is the most commonly used procedure for three-dimensional (3D) resistivity inversion, which usually takes the linearization of the problem and accomplish it by iterations. However, its accuracy is often dependent on the initial model, which can make the inversion trapped in local optima, even cause a bad result. Non-linear method is a feasible way to eliminate the dependence on the initial model. However, for large problems such as 3D resistivity inversion with inversion parameters exceeding a thousand, main challenges of non-linear method are premature and quite low search efficiency. To deal with these problems, we present an improved Genetic Algorithm (GA) method. In the improved GA method, smooth constraint and inequality constraint are both applied on the object function, by which the degree of non-uniqueness and ill-conditioning is decreased. Some measures are adopted from others by reference to maintain the diversity and stability of GA, e.g. real-coded method, and the adaptive adjustment of crossover and mutation probabilities. Then a generation method of approximately uniform initial population is proposed in this paper, with which uniformly distributed initial generation can be produced and the dependence on initial model can be eliminated. Further, a mutation direction control method is presented based on the joint algorithm, in which the linearization method is embedded in GA. The update vector produced by linearization method is used as mutation increment to maintain a better search direction compared with the traditional GA with non-controlled mutation operation. By this method, the mutation direction is optimized and the search efficiency is improved greatly. The performance of improved GA is evaluated by comparing with traditional inversion results in synthetic example or with drilling columnar sections in practical example. The synthetic and practical examples illustrate that with the improved GA method we can eliminate

  18. Finite-Difference Algorithms For Computing Sound Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    Governing equations considered as matrix system. Method variant of method described in "Scheme for Finite-Difference Computations of Waves" (ARC-12970). Present method begins with matrix-vector formulation of fundamental equations, involving first-order partial derivatives of primitive variables with respect to space and time. Particular matrix formulation places time and spatial coordinates on equal footing, so governing equations considered as matrix system and treated as unit. Spatial and temporal discretizations not treated separately as in other finite-difference methods, instead treated together by linking spatial-grid interval and time step via common scale factor related to speed of sound.

  19. A simple, fast, and repeatable survey method for underwater visual 3D benthic mapping and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Oscar; Friedman, Ariell; Bryson, Mitch; Williams, Stefan B; Madin, Joshua

    2017-03-01

    Visual 3D reconstruction techniques provide rich ecological and habitat structural information from underwater imagery. However, an unaided swimmer or diver struggles to navigate precisely over larger extents with consistent image overlap needed for visual reconstruction. While underwater robots have demonstrated systematic coverage of areas much larger than the footprint of a single image, access to suitable robotic systems is limited and requires specialized operators. Furthermore, robots are poor at navigating hydrodynamic habitats such as shallow coral reefs. We present a simple approach that constrains the motion of a swimmer using a line unwinding from a fixed central drum. The resulting motion is the involute of a circle, a spiral-like path with constant spacing between revolutions. We test this survey method at a broad range of habitats and hydrodynamic conditions encircling Lizard Island in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The approach generates fast, structured, repeatable, and large-extent surveys (~110 m(2) in 15 min) that can be performed with two people and are superior to the commonly used "mow the lawn" method. The amount of image overlap is a design parameter, allowing for surveys that can then be reliably used in an automated processing pipeline to generate 3D reconstructions, orthographically projected mosaics, and structural complexity indices. The individual images or full mosaics can also be labeled for benthic diversity and cover estimates. The survey method we present can serve as a standard approach to repeatedly collecting underwater imagery for high-resolution 2D mosaics and 3D reconstructions covering spatial extents much larger than a single image footprint without requiring sophisticated robotic systems or lengthy deployment of visual guides. As such, it opens up cost-effective novel observations to inform studies relating habitat structure to ecological processes and biodiversity at scales and spatial resolutions not readily

  20. A novel 3D absorption correction method for quantitative EDX-STEM tomography.

    PubMed

    Burdet, Pierre; Saghi, Z; Filippin, A N; Borrás, A; Midgley, P A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel 3D method to correct for absorption in energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis of heterogeneous samples of unknown structure and composition. By using STEM-based tomography coupled with EDX, an initial 3D reconstruction is used to extract the location of generated X-rays as well as the X-ray path through the sample to the surface. The absorption correction needed to retrieve the generated X-ray intensity is then calculated voxel-by-voxel estimating the different compositions encountered by the X-ray. The method is applied to a core/shell nanowire containing carbon and oxygen, two elements generating highly absorbed low energy X-rays. Absorption is shown to cause major reconstruction artefacts, in the form of an incomplete recovery of the oxide and an erroneous presence of carbon in the shell. By applying the correction method, these artefacts are greatly reduced. The accuracy of the method is assessed using reference X-ray lines with low absorption.

  1. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problem results are presented.

  2. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  3. 3D measurement and camera attitude estimation method based on trifocal tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shengyi; Liu, Haibo; Yao, Linshen; Yu, Qifeng

    2016-11-01

    To simultaneously perform 3D measurement and camera attitude estimation, an efficient and robust method based on trifocal tensor is proposed in this paper, which only employs the intrinsic parameters and positions of three cameras. The initial trifocal tensor is obtained by using heteroscedastic errors-in-variables (HEIV) estimator and the initial relative poses of the three cameras is acquired by decomposing the tensor. Further the initial attitude of the cameras is obtained with knowledge of the three cameras' positions. Then the camera attitude and the interested points' image positions are optimized according to the constraint of trifocal tensor with the HEIV method. Finally the spatial positions of the points are obtained by using intersection measurement method. Both simulation and real image experiment results suggest that the proposed method achieves the same precision of the Bundle Adjustment (BA) method but be more efficient.

  4. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-D Inelastic Analysis Method program is described. This program consists of a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain)and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. Three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (Marc-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described in this report.

  5. Computation of an Underexpanded 3-D Rectangular Jet by the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Himansu, Ananda; Wang, Xiao Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, an unstructured three-dimensional space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) Euler solver was developed. Now it is also developed for parallel computation using METIS for domain decomposition and MPI (message passing interface). The method is employed here to numerically study the near-field of a typical 3-D rectangular under-expanded jet. For the computed case-a jet with Mach number Mj = 1.6. with a very modest grid of 1.7 million tetrahedrons, the flow features such as the shock-cell structures and the axis switching, are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  6. Characteristics Analysis on Various Kinds of Hybrid Stepping Motors Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Maki, Kohji; Miyata, Kenji; Oonishi, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Masafumi; Abukawa, Toshimi

    We have presented a powerful scheme of investigating hybrid stepping motor characteristics by using 3D finite element method. A linear magnetic field analysis is effectively applicable to predict relative performance of several motors in an extremely short computing time. The waveforms of cogging torque by linear and nonlinear analysis resemble each other, while the wave amplitude in the linear analysis is about 2 times larger than one in the nonlinear analysis in the presented example. The overestimation factor of cogging torque is approximately constant for the same material composition.

  7. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: Advanced special functions models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Sections Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analyses of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components.

  8. Modeling of thin heterogeneous sheets in the discontinuous Galerkin method for 3D transient scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubekeur, Mohamed; Kameni Ntichi, Abelin; Pichon, Lionel

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a modeling of heterogeneous sheets in the time domain discontinuous Galerkin method. An homogenization model combined to a sheet interface condition is used to avoid the mesh of these sheets in order to study the transient response of heterogeneous enclosures. The validation of this approach is based on a comparison with the case when the sheet is meshed. To illustrate the efficiency of the interface condition, the simulation of a 3D cavity is performed. Contribution to the topical issue "Numelec 2015 - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  9. A comparison of the Method of Lines to finite difference techniques in solving time-dependent partial differential equations. [with applications to Burger equation and stream function-vorticity problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, L. A.; Smith, R. E.; Parks, C. L.; Boney, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    Steady state solutions to two time dependent partial differential systems have been obtained by the Method of Lines (MOL) and compared to those obtained by efficient standard finite difference methods: (1) Burger's equation over a finite space domain by a forward time central space explicit method, and (2) the stream function - vorticity form of viscous incompressible fluid flow in a square cavity by an alternating direction implicit (ADI) method. The standard techniques were far more computationally efficient when applicable. In the second example, converged solutions at very high Reynolds numbers were obtained by MOL, whereas solution by ADI was either unattainable or impractical. With regard to 'set up' time, solution by MOL is an attractive alternative to techniques with complicated algorithms, as much of the programming difficulty is eliminated.

  10. Fast 3D inversion of airborne gravity-gradiometry data using Lanczos bidiagonalization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaohai; Li, Fengting; Zhang, Dailei; Xu, Xuechun; Huang, Danian

    2016-09-01

    We developed a new fast inversion method for to process and interpret airborne gravity gradiometry data, which was based on Lanczos bidiagonalization algorithm. Here, we describe the application of this new 3D gravity gradiometry inversion method to recover a subsurface density distribution model from the airborne measured gravity gradiometry anomalies. For this purpose, the survey area is divided into a large number of rectangular cells with each cell possessing a constant unknown density. It is well known that the solution of large linear gravity gradiometry is an ill-posed problem since using the smoothest inversion method is considerably time consuming. We demonstrate that the Lanczos bidiagonalization method can be an appropriate algorithm to solve a Tikhonov solver time cost function for resolving the large equations within a short time. Lanczos bidiagonalization is designed to make the very large gravity gradiometry forward modeling matrices to become low-rank, which will considerably reduce the running time of the inversion method. We also use a weighted generalized cross validation method to choose the appropriate Tikhonov parameter to improve inversion results. The inversion incorporates a model norm that allows us to attain the smoothing and depth of the solution; in addition, the model norm counteracts the natural decay of the kernels, which concentrate at shallow depths. The method is applied on noise-contaminated synthetic gravity gradiometry data to demonstrate its suitability for large 3D gravity gradiometry data inversion. The airborne gravity gradiometry data from the Vinton Salt Dome, USE, were considered as a case study. The validity of the new method on real data is discussed with reference to the Vinton Dome inversion result. The intermediate density values in the constructed model coincide well with previous results and geological information. This demonstrates the validity of the gravity gradiometry inversion method.

  11. Study of 3D printing method for GRIN micro-optics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. J.; Yeh, J. A.; Hsu, W. Y.; Cheng, Y. C.; Lee, W.; Wu, N. H.; Wu, C. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional optical elements are based on either refractive or reflective optics theory to fulfill the design specifications via optics performance data. In refractive optical lenses, the refractive index of materials and radius of curvature of element surfaces determine the optical power and wavefront aberrations so that optical performance can be further optimized iteratively. Although gradient index (GRIN) phenomenon in optical materials is well studied for more than a half century, the optics theory in lens design via GRIN materials is still yet to be comprehensively investigated before realistic GRIN lenses are manufactured. In this paper, 3D printing method for manufacture of micro-optics devices with special features has been studied based on methods reported in the literatures. Due to the additive nature of the method, GRIN lenses in micro-optics devices seem to be readily achievable if a design methodology is available. First, derivation of ray-tracing formulae is introduced for all possible structures in GRIN lenses. Optics simulation program is employed for characterization of GRIN lenses with performance data given by aberration coefficients in Zernike polynomial. Finally, a proposed structure of 3D printing machine is described with conceptual illustration.

  12. ROI-preserving 3D video compression method utilizing depth information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ti, Chunli; Xu, Guodong; Guan, Yudong; Teng, Yidan

    2015-09-01

    Efficiently transmitting the extra information of three dimensional (3D) video is becoming a key issue of the development of 3DTV. 2D plus depth format not only occupies the smaller bandwidth and is compatible transmission under the condition of the existing channel, but also can provide technique support for advanced 3D video compression in some extend. This paper proposes an ROI-preserving compression scheme to further improve the visual quality at a limited bit rate. According to the connection between the focus of Human Visual System (HVS) and depth information, region of interest (ROI) can be automatically selected via depth map progressing. The main improvement from common method is that a meanshift based segmentation is executed to the depth map before foreground ROI selection to keep the integrity of scene. Besides, the sensitive areas along the edges are also protected. The Spatio-temporal filtering adapting to H.264 is used to the non-ROI of both 2D video and depth map before compression. Experiments indicate that, the ROI extracted by this method is more undamaged and according with subjective feeling, and the proposed method can keep the key high-frequency information more effectively while the bit rate is reduced.

  13. A hybrid method for inversion of 3D DC resistivity logging measurements.

    PubMed

    Gajda-Zagórska, Ewa; Schaefer, Robert; Smołka, Maciej; Paszyński, Maciej; Pardo, David

    This paper focuses on the application of hp hierarchic genetic strategy (hp-HGS) for solution of a challenging problem, the inversion of 3D direct current (DC) resistivity logging measurements. The problem under consideration has been formulated as the global optimization one, for which the objective function (misfit between computed and reference data) exhibits multiple minima. In this paper, we consider the extension of the hp-HGS strategy, namely we couple the hp-HGS algorithm with a gradient based optimization method for a local search. Forward simulations are performed with a self-adaptive hp finite element method, hp-FEM. The computational cost of misfit evaluation by hp-FEM depends strongly on the assumed accuracy. This accuracy is adapted to the tree of populations generated by the hp-HGS algorithm, which makes the global phase significantly cheaper. Moreover, tree structure of demes as well as branch reduction and conditional sprouting mechanism reduces the number of expensive local searches up to the number of minima to be recognized. The common (direct and inverse) accuracy control, crucial for the hp-HGS efficiency, has been motivated by precise mathematical considerations. Numerical results demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method for the inversion of 3D DC resistivity logging measurements.

  14. Direct simulations of turbulent flow using finite-difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Moin, Parviz

    1989-01-01

    A high-order accurate finite-difference approach is presented for calculating incompressible turbulent flow. The methods used include a kinetic energy conserving central difference scheme and an upwind difference scheme. The methods are evaluated in test cases for the evolution of small-amplitude disturbances and fully developed turbulent channel flow. It is suggested that the finite-difference approach can be applied to complex geometries more easilty than highly accurate spectral methods. It is concluded that the upwind scheme is a good candidate for direct simulations of turbulent flows over complex geometries.

  15. Fast 3D Focusing Inversion of Gravity Data Using Reweighted Regularized Lanczos Bidiagonalization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaie, Mohammad; Moradzadeh, Ali; Kalate, Ali Nejati; Aghajani, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Inversion of gravity data is one of the important steps in the interpretation of practical data. One of the most interesting geological frameworks for gravity data inversion is the detection of sharp boundaries between orebody and host rocks. The focusing inversion is able to reconstruct a sharp image of the geological target. This technique can be efficiently applied for the quantitative interpretation of gravity data. In this study, a new reweighted regularized method for the 3D focusing inversion technique based on Lanczos bidiagonalization method is developed. The inversion results of synthetic data show that the new method is faster than common reweighted regularized conjugate gradient method to produce an acceptable solution for focusing inverse problem. The new developed inversion scheme is also applied for inversion of the gravity data collected over the San Nicolas Cu-Zn orebody in Zacatecas State, Mexico. The inversion results indicate a remarkable correlation with the true structure of the orebody that is achieved from drilling data.

  16. Multilevel local refinement and multigrid methods for 3-D turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.; Huang, T.T.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical approach based on multigrid, multilevel local refinement, and preconditioning methods for solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. 3-D turbulent flow around an underwater vehicle is computed. 3 multigrid levels and 2 local refinement grid levels are used. The global grid is 24 x 8 x 12. The first patch is 40 x 16 x 20 and the second patch is 72 x 32 x 36. 4th order artificial dissipation are used for numerical stability. The conservative artificial compressibility method are used for further improvement of convergence. To improve the accuracy of coarse/fine grid interface of local refinement, flux interpolation method for refined grid boundary is used. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data. The local refinement can improve the prediction accuracy significantly. The flux interpolation method for local refinement can keep conservation for a composite grid, therefore further modify the prediction accuracy.

  17. A flexible new method for 3D measurement based on multi-view image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Haihua; Zhao, Zhimin; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Guo, Changye; Jia, Huayu

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional measurement is the base part for reverse engineering. The paper developed a new flexible and fast optical measurement method based on multi-view geometry theory. At first, feature points are detected and matched with improved SIFT algorithm. The Hellinger Kernel is used to estimate the histogram distance instead of traditional Euclidean distance, which is immunity to the weak texture image; then a new filter three-principle for filtering the calculation of essential matrix is designed, the essential matrix is calculated using the improved a Contrario Ransac filter method. One view point cloud is constructed accurately with two view images; after this, the overlapped features are used to eliminate the accumulated errors caused by added view images, which improved the camera's position precision. At last, the method is verified with the application of dental restoration CAD/CAM, experiment results show that the proposed method is fast, accurate and flexible for tooth 3D measurement.

  18. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  19. A novel window based method for approximating the Hausdorff in 3D range imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William

    2004-10-01

    Matching a set of 3D points to another set of 3D points is an important part of any 3D object recognition system. The Hausdorff distance is known for it robustness in the face of obscuration, clutter, and noise. We show how to approximate the 3D Hausdorff fraction with linear time complexity and quadratic space complexity. We empirically demonstrate that the approximation is very good when compared to actual Hausdorff distances.

  20. Convergence of finite difference transient response computations for thin shells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, L. H.; Geers, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical studies pertaining to the limits of applicability of the finite difference method in the solution of linear transient shell response problems are performed, and a computational procedure for the use of the method is recommended. It is found that the only inherent limitation of the finite difference method is its inability to reproduce accurately response discontinuities. This is not a serious limitation in view of natural constraints imposed by the extension of Saint Venant's principle to transient response problems. It is also found that the short wavelength limitations of thin shell (Bernoulli-Euler) theory create significant convergence difficulties in computed response to certain types of transverse excitations. These difficulties may be overcome, however, through proper selection of finite difference mesh dimensions and temporal smoothing of the excitation.

  1. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  2. A new multiresolution method applied to the 3D reconstruction of small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capanna, C.; Jorda, L.; Lamy, P. L.; Gesquiere, G.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) shape of small solar system bodies, such as asteroids and comets, is essential in determining their global physical properties (volume, density, rotational parameters). It also allows performing geomorphological studies of their surface through the characterization of topographic features, such as craters, faults, landslides, grooves, hills, etc.. In the case of small bodies, the shape is often only constrained by images obtained by interplanetary spacecrafts. Several techniques are available to retrieve 3D global shapes from these images. Stereography which relies on control points has been extensively used in the past, most recently to reconstruct the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 [Thomas (2007)]. The most accurate methods are however photogrammetry and photoclinometry, often used in conjunction with stereography. Stereophotogrammetry (SPG) has been used to reconstruct the shapes of the nucleus of comet 19P/Borrelly [Oberst (2004)] and of the asteroid (21) Lutetia [Preusker (2012)]. Stereophotoclinometry (SPC) has allowed retrieving an accurate shape of the asteroids (25143) Itokawa [Gaskell (2008)] and (2867) Steins [Jorda (2012)]. We present a new photoclinometry method based on the deformation of a 3D triangular mesh [Capanna (2012)] using a multi-resolution scheme which starts from a sphere of 300 facets and yields a shape model with 100; 000 facets. Our strategy is inspired by the "Full Multigrid" method [Botsch (2007)] and consists in going alternatively between two resolutions in order to obtain an optimized shape model at a given resolution before going to the higher resolution. In order to improve the robustness of our method, we use a set of control points obtained by stereography. Our method has been tested on images acquired by the OSIRIS visible camera, aboard the Rosetta spacecraft of the European Space Agency, during the fly-by of asteroid (21) Lutetia in July 2010. We present the corresponding 3D shape

  3. Designing patient-specific 3D printed craniofacial implants using a novel topology optimization method.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Nguyen, Tam H; Miller, Michael J; Paulino, Glaucio H

    2016-07-01

    Large craniofacial defects require efficient bone replacements which should not only provide good aesthetics but also possess stable structural function. The proposed work uses a novel multiresolution topology optimization method to achieve the task. Using a compliance minimization objective, patient-specific bone replacement shapes can be designed for different clinical cases that ensure revival of efficient load transfer mechanisms in the mid-face. In this work, four clinical cases are introduced and their respective patient-specific designs are obtained using the proposed method. The optimized designs are then virtually inserted into the defect to visually inspect the viability of the design . Further, once the design is verified by the reconstructive surgeon, prototypes are fabricated using a 3D printer for validation. The robustness of the designs are mechanically tested by subjecting them to a physiological loading condition which mimics the masticatory activity. The full-field strain result through 3D image correlation and the finite element analysis implies that the solution can survive the maximum mastication of 120 lb. Also, the designs have the potential to restore the buttress system and provide the structural integrity. Using the topology optimization framework in designing the bone replacement shapes would deliver surgeons new alternatives for rather complicated mid-face reconstruction.

  4. Digital holographic tomography method for 3D observation of domain patterns in ferroelectric single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrý, Pavel; Psota, Pavel; Steiger, Kateřina; Václavík, Jan; Vápenka, David; Doleček, Roman; Vojtíšek, Petr; Sládek, Juraj; Lédl, Vít.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the development and implementation of the digital holographic tomography for the three-dimensio- nal (3D) observations of the domain patterns in the ferroelectric single crystals. Ferroelectric materials represent a group of materials, whose macroscopic dielectric, electromechanical, and elastic properties are greatly in uenced by the presence of domain patterns. Understanding the role of domain patterns on the aforementioned properties require the experimental techniques, which allow the precise 3D measurements of the spatial distribution of ferroelectric domains in the single crystal. Unfortunately, such techniques are rather limited at this time. The most frequently used piezoelectric atomic force microscopy allows 2D observations on the ferroelectric sample surface. Optical methods based on the birefringence measurements provide parameters of the domain patterns averaged over the sample volume. In this paper, we analyze the possibility that the spatial distribution of the ferroelectric domains can be obtained by means of the measurement of the wavefront deformation of the transmitted optical wave. We demonstrate that the spatial distribution of the ferroelectric domains can be determined by means of the measurement of the spatial distribution of the refractive index. Finally, it is demonstrated that the measurements of wavefront deformations generated in ferroelectric polydomain systems with small variations of the refractive index provide data, which can be further processed by means of the conventional tomographic methods.

  5. A coordinate-free method for the analysis of 3D facial change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhili; Siebert, Jan Paul; Cockshott, W. Paul; Ayoub, Ashraf Farouk

    2004-05-01

    Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA) is widely held as the most important coordinate-free method by which to analyze landmarks. It has been used extensively in the field of medical anthropometry and has already produced many useful results. Unfortunately this method renders little information regarding the surface on which these points are located and accordingly is inadequate for the 3D analysis of surface anatomy. Here we shall present a new inverse surface flatness metric, the ratio between the Geodesic and the Euclidean inter-landmark distances. Because this metric also only reflects one aspect of three-dimensional shape, i.e. surface flatness, we have combined it with the Euclidean distance to investigate 3D facial change. The goal of this investigation is to be able to analyze three-dimensional facial change in terms of bilateral symmetry as encoded both by surface flatness and by geometric configuration. Our initial study, based on 25 models of surgically managed children (unilateral cleft lip repair) and 40 models of control children at the age of 2 years, indicates that the faces of the surgically managed group were found to be significantly less symmetric than those of the control group in terms of surface flatness, geometric configuration and overall symmetry.

  6. Local 3-D Toroidal Plasma Tomography Using the Phillips-Tikhonov Regularization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Junghee; Choe, Wonho

    2008-11-01

    Tomography is one of a powerful diagnostic method for obtaining the local information from the line-integrated plasma emission in fusion devices. The 3-D tomography is a complicated task compared to the 2-D tomography. Because of the limitation of the spatial distribution of the array detectors around a torus, the regularization algorithm such as the Phillips-Tikhonov method is advantageous to achieve more reliable reconstruction. In this work, we performed a feasibility study of 3-D tomography for toroidal plasmas. Four tangentially-viewing array detectors of each array consisting of 16x16 detector elements were assumed to be implemented. The reconstruction area is configured as 70 cm x 50 cm of poloidal cross-section and 40 toroidal layers, which has spatial resolution of 5 cm. We chose the phantoms which are KSTAR plasma-like profiles combined with the equilibrium flux surfaces with n = 0, 1, 2, 3 modes. The change of the emission peak in each layer in the reconstruction result agrees reasonably well with that of the phantom, with relative error of 5 - 10 %.

  7. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bruce Weisman, R

    2016-05-21

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.

  8. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  9. Block-Iterative Methods for 3D Constant-Coefficient Stencils on GPUs and Multicore CPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Wang, Zhen; Berrill, Mark A

    2014-06-01

    Block iterative methods are extremely important as smoothers for multigrid methods, as preconditioners for Krylov methods, and as solvers for diagonally dominant linear systems. Developing robust and efficient smoother algorithms suitable for current and evolving GPU and multicore CPU systems is a significant challenge. We address this issue in the case of constant-coefficient stencils arising in the solution of elliptic partial differential equations on structured 3D uniform and adaptively refined block structured grids. Robust, highly parallel implementations of block Jacobi and chaotic block Gauss-Seidel algorithms with exact inversion of the blocks are developed using different parallelization techniques. Experimental results for NVIDIA Fermi/Kepler GPUs and AMD multicore systems are presented.

  10. ROI-based transmission method for stereoscopic video to maximize rendered 3D video quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewage, Chaminda T. E. R.; Martini, Maria G.; Appuhami, Harsha D.

    2012-03-01

    A technique to improve the rendering quality of novel views for colour plus depth based 3D video is proposed. Most depth discontinuities occur around the edges of depth map objects. If information around edges of both colour and depth map images is lost during transmission, this will affect the quality of the rendered views. Therefore this work proposes a technique to categorize edge and surrounding areas into two different regions (Region Of Interests (ROIs)) and later protect them separately to provide Unequal Error Protection (UEP) during transmission. In this way the most important edge areas (vital for novel view rendering) will be more protected than other surrounding areas. This method is tested over a H.264/AVC based simulcast encoding and transmission setup. The results show improved rendered quality with the proposed ROI-based UEP method compared to Equal Error Protection (EEP) method.

  11. 3-D sensor using relative stereo method for bio-seedlings transplanting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroyasu, Takehisa; Hayashi, Jun'ichiro; Hojo, Hirotaka; Hata, Seiji

    2005-12-01

    In the plant factory of crone seedlings, most of the production processes are highly automated, but the transplanting process of the small seedlings is hard to be automated because the figures of small seedlings are not stable and to handle the seedlings it is required to observe the shapes of the small seedlings. Here, a 3-D vision system for robot to be used for the transplanting process in a plant factory has been introduced. This system has been employed relative stereo method and slit light measuring method and it can detect the shape of small seedlings and decides the cutting point. In this paper, the structure of the vision system and the image processing method for the system is explained.

  12. Computation of dynamic seismic responses to viscous fluid of digitized three-dimensional Berea sandstones with a coupled finite-difference method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Toksöz, M Nafi

    2012-08-01

    The seismic response of saturated porous rocks is studied numerically using microtomographic images of three-dimensional digitized Berea sandstones. A stress-strain calculation is employed to compute the velocities and attenuations of rock samples whose sizes are much smaller than the seismic wavelength of interest. To compensate for the contributions of small cracks lost in the imaging process to the total velocity and attenuation, a hybrid method is developed to recover the crack distribution, in which the differential effective medium theory, the Kuster-Toksöz model, and a modified squirt-flow model are utilized in a two-step Monte Carlo inversion. In the inversion, the velocities of P- and S-waves measured for the dry and water-saturated cases, and the measured attenuation of P-waves for different fluids are used. By using such a hybrid method, both the velocities of saturated porous rocks and the attenuations are predicted accurately when compared to laboratory data. The hybrid method is a practical way to model numerically the seismic properties of saturated porous rocks until very high resolution digital data are available. Cracks lost in the imaging process are critical for accurately predicting velocities and attenuations of saturated porous rocks.

  13. Review on applications of 3D inverse design method for pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Junlian; Wang, Dezhong

    2014-05-01

    The 3D inverse design method, which methodology is far superior to the conventional design method that based on geometrical description, is gradually applied in pump blade design. However, no complete description about the method is outlined. Also, there are no general rules available to set the two important input parameters, blade loading distribution and stacking condition. In this sense, the basic theory and the mechanism why the design method can suppress the formation of secondary flow are summarized. And also, several typical pump design cases with different specific speeds ranging from centrifugal pump to axial pump are surveyed. The results indicates that, for centrifugal pump and mixed pump or turbine, the ratio of blade loading on the hub to that on the shroud is more than unit in the fore part of the blade, whereas in the aft part, the ratio is decreased to satisfy the same wrap angle for hub and shroud. And the choice of blade loading type depends on the balancing of efficiency and cavitation. If the cavitation is more weighted, the better choice is aft-loaded, otherwise, the fore-loaded or mid-loaded is preferable to improve the efficiency. The stacking condition, which is an auxiliary to suppress the secondary flow, can have great effect on the jet-wake outflow and the operation range for pump. Ultimately, how to link the design method to modern optimization techniques is illustrated. With the know-how design methodology and the know-how systematic optimization approach, the application of optimization design is promising for engineering. This paper summarizes the 3D inverse design method systematically.

  14. Calculation of the single-scattering properties of randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns: a comparison of the T-matrix and the finite-difference time-domain methods.

    PubMed

    Baran, A J; Yang, P; Havemann, S

    2001-08-20

    We calculated the scattering and absorption properties of randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns using T-matrix theory, employing analytic orientation averaging, and the finite-difference time-domain method, which uses a numerical procedure to simulate random orientation. The total optical properties calculated are the extinction efficiency, absorption efficiency, single-scattering albedo, and the asymmetry parameter. The optical properties are calculated at the wavelengths of 0.66, 8.5, and 12 mum, up to a size parameter of 20 at 0.66 mum and 15 at the two other wavelengths. The phase-matrix elements P11, P12, and P22 are also calculated and compared, up to a size parameter of 20 at 0.66 mum and 15 at 12.0 mum. The scattering and absorption solutions obtained from the two independent electromagnetic methods are compared and contrasted, as well as the central processing unit time and memory load for each size parameter. It is found that the total optical properties calculated by the two methods are well within 3% of each other for all three wavelengths and size parameters. In terms of the phase-matrix elements it is found that there are some differences between the T-matrix and the finite-difference time-domain methods appearing in all three elements. Differences between the two methods for the P11 element are seen particularly at scattering angles from approximately 120 degrees to 180 degrees ; and at the scattering angle of 180 degrees , relative differences are less than 16%. At scattering angles less than 100 degrees , agreement is generally within a few percent. Similar results are also found for the P12 and P22 elements of the phase matrix. The validity of approximating randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns by randomly oriented equal surface area circular cylinders is also investigated in terms of the linear depolarization ratio.

  15. Real-space finite-difference calculation method of generalized Bloch wave functions and complex band structures with reduced computational cost.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Hirose, Kikuji; Blügel, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    Generalized Bloch wave functions of bulk structures, which are composed of not only propagating waves but also decaying and growing evanescent waves, are known to be essential for defining the open boundary conditions in the calculations of the electronic surface states and scattering wave functions of surface and junction structures. Electronic complex band structures being derived from the generalized Bloch wave functions are also essential for studying bound states of the surface and junction structures, which do not appear in conventional band structures. We present a novel calculation method to obtain the generalized Bloch wave functions of periodic bulk structures by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem, whose dimension is drastically reduced in comparison with the conventional generalized eigenvalue problem derived by Fujimoto and Hirose [Phys. Rev. B 67, 195315 (2003)]. The generalized eigenvalue problem derived in this work is even mathematically equivalent to the conventional one, and, thus, we reduce computational cost for solving the eigenvalue problem considerably without any approximation and losing the strictness of the formulations. To exhibit the performance of the present method, we demonstrate practical calculations of electronic complex band structures and electron transport properties of Al and Cu nanoscale systems. Moreover, employing atom-structured electrodes and jellium-approximated ones for both of the Al and Si monatomic chains, we investigate how much the electron transport properties are unphysically affected by the jellium parts.

  16. A combined kick-out and dissociative diffusion mechanism of grown-in Be in InGaAs and InGaAsP. A new finite difference-Bairstow method for solution of the diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koumetz, Serge D. Martin, Patrick; Murray, Hugues

    2014-09-14

    Experimental results on the diffusion of grown-in beryllium (Be) in indium gallium arsenide (In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As) and indium gallium arsenide phosphide (In{sub 0.73}Ga{sub 0.27}As{sub 0.58}P{sub 0.42}) gas source molecular beam epitaxy alloys lattice-matched to indium phosphide (InP) can be successfully explained in terms of a combined kick-out and dissociative diffusion mechanism, involving neutral Be interstitials (Be{sub i}{sup 0}), singly positively charged gallium (Ga), indium (In) self-interstitials (I{sub III}{sup +}) and singly positively charged Ga, In vacancies (V{sub III}{sup +}). A new numerical method of solution to the system of diffusion equations, based on the finite difference approximations and Bairstow's method, is proposed.

  17. Evaluation and comparison of current biopsy needle localization and tracking methods using 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shen, Yi; Bernard, Adeline; Cachard, Christian; Liebgott, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    This article compares four different biopsy needle localization algorithms in both 3D and 4D situations to evaluate their accuracy and execution time. The localization algorithms were: Principle component analysis (PCA), random Hough transform (RHT), parallel integral projection (PIP) and ROI-RK (ROI based RANSAC and Kalman filter). To enhance the contrast of the biopsy needle and background tissue, a line filtering pre-processing step was implemented. To make the PCA, RHT and PIP algorithms comparable with the ROI-RK method, a region of interest (ROI) strategy was added. Simulated and ex-vivo data were used to evaluate the performance of the different biopsy needle localization algorithms. The resolutions of the sectorial and cylindrical volumes were 0.3mm×0.4mm×0.6mmand0.1mm×0.1mm×0.2mm (axial×lateral×azimuthal) respectively. In so far as the simulation and experimental results show, the ROI-RK method successfully located and tracked the biopsy needle in both 3D and 4D situations. The tip localization error was within 1.5mm and the axis accuracy was within 1.6mm. To the best of our knowledge, considering both localization accuracy and execution time, the ROI-RK was the most stable and time-saving method. Normally, accuracy comes at the expense of time. However, the ROI-RK method was able to locate the biopsy needle with high accuracy in real time, which makes it a promising method for clinical applications.

  18. Women's Preferences for Penis Size: A New Research Method Using Selection among 3D Models.

    PubMed

    Prause, Nicole; Park, Jaymie; Leung, Shannon; Miller, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Women's preferences for penis size may affect men's comfort with their own bodies and may have implications for sexual health. Studies of women's penis size preferences typically have relied on their abstract ratings or selecting amongst 2D, flaccid images. This study used haptic stimuli to allow assessment of women's size recall accuracy for the first time, as well as examine their preferences for erect penis sizes in different relationship contexts. Women (N = 75) selected amongst 33, 3D models. Women recalled model size accurately using this method, although they made more errors with respect to penis length than circumference. Women preferred a penis of slightly larger circumference and length for one-time (length = 6.4 inches/16.3 cm, circumference = 5.0 inches/12.7 cm) versus long-term (length = 6.3 inches/16.0 cm, circumference = 4.8 inches/12.2 cm) sexual partners. These first estimates of erect penis size preferences using 3D models suggest women accurately recall size and prefer penises only slightly larger than average.

  19. Detecting method of subjects' 3D positions and experimental advanced camera control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Daiichiro; Abe, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Akio; Yamada, Mitsuho; Suzuki, Takahito; Kuwashima, Shigesumi

    1997-04-01

    Steady progress is being made in the development of an intelligent robot camera capable of automatically shooting pictures with a powerful sense of reality or tracking objects whose shooting requires advanced techniques. Currently, only experienced broadcasting cameramen can provide these pictures.TO develop an intelligent robot camera with these abilities, we need to clearly understand how a broadcasting cameraman assesses his shooting situation and how his camera is moved during shooting. We use a real- time analyzer to study a cameraman's work and his gaze movements at studios and during sports broadcasts. This time, we have developed a detecting method of subjects' 3D positions and an experimental camera control system to help us further understand the movements required for an intelligent robot camera. The features are as follows: (1) Two sensor cameras shoot a moving subject and detect colors, producing its 3D coordinates. (2) Capable of driving a camera based on camera movement data obtained by a real-time analyzer. 'Moving shoot' is the name we have given to the object position detection technology on which this system is based. We used it in a soccer game, producing computer graphics showing how players moved. These results will also be reported.

  20. Women's Preferences for Penis Size: A New Research Method Using Selection among 3D Models

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaymie; Leung, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Women’s preferences for penis size may affect men’s comfort with their own bodies and may have implications for sexual health. Studies of women’s penis size preferences typically have relied on their abstract ratings or selecting amongst 2D, flaccid images. This study used haptic stimuli to allow assessment of women’s size recall accuracy for the first time, as well as examine their preferences for erect penis sizes in different relationship contexts. Women (N = 75) selected amongst 33, 3D models. Women recalled model size accurately using this method, although they made more errors with respect to penis length than circumference. Women preferred a penis of slightly larger circumference and length for one-time (length = 6.4 inches/16.3 cm, circumference = 5.0 inches/12.7 cm) versus long-term (length = 6.3 inches/16.0 cm, circumference = 4.8 inches/12.2 cm) sexual partners. These first estimates of erect penis size preferences using 3D models suggest women accurately recall size and prefer penises only slightly larger than average. PMID:26332467

  1. Method for accurate sizing of pulmonary vessels from 3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Walter G.

    2015-03-01

    Detailed characterization of vascular anatomy, in particular the quantification of changes in the distribution of vessel sizes and of vascular pruning, is essential for the diagnosis and management of a variety of pulmonary vascular diseases and for the care of cancer survivors who have received radiation to the thorax. Clinical estimates of vessel radii are typically based on setting a pixel intensity threshold and counting how many "On" pixels are present across the vessel cross-section. A more objective approach introduced recently involves fitting the image with a library of spherical Gaussian filters and utilizing the size of the best matching filter as the estimate of vessel diameter. However, both these approaches have significant accuracy limitations including mis-match between a Gaussian intensity distribution and that of real vessels. Here we introduce and demonstrate a novel approach for accurate vessel sizing using 3D appearance models of a tubular structure along a curvilinear trajectory in 3D space. The vessel branch trajectories are represented with cubic Hermite splines and the tubular branch surfaces represented as a finite element surface mesh. An iterative parameter adjustment scheme is employed to optimally match the appearance models to a patient's chest X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan to generate estimates for branch radii and trajectories with subpixel resolution. The method is demonstrated on pulmonary vasculature in an adult human CT scan, and on 2D simulated test cases.

  2. Derivation and evaluation of an approximate analysis for three-dimensional viscous subsonic flow with large secondary velocities. [finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1978-01-01

    An approximate analysis is presented for calculating three-dimensional, low Mach number, laminar viscous flows in curved passages with large secondary flows and corner boundary layers. The analysis is based on the decomposition of the overall velocity field into inviscid and viscous components with the overall velocity being determined from superposition. An incompressible vorticity transport equation is used to estimate inviscid secondary flow velocities to be used as corrections to the potential flow velocity field. A parabolized streamwise momentum equation coupled to an adiabatic energy equation and global continuity equation is used to obtain an approximate viscous correction to the pressure and longitudinal velocity fields. A collateral flow assumption is invoked to estimate the viscous correction to the transverse velocity fields. The approximate analysis is solved numerically using an implicit ADI solution for the viscous pressure and velocity fields. An iterative ADI procedure is used to solve for the inviscid secondary vorticity and velocity fields. This method was applied to computing the flow within a turbine vane passage with inlet flow conditions of M = 0.1 and M = 0.25, Re = 1000 and adiabatic walls, and for a constant radius curved rectangular duct with R/D = 12 and 14 and with inlet flow conditions of M = 0.1, Re = 1000, and adiabatic walls.

  3. A coordinate transformation method for calculating the 3D light intensity distribution in ICF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Kuixia; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Mingyu; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-06-01

    For an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system, the light intensity distribution in the hohlraum is key to the initial plasma excitation and later laser-plasma interaction process. Based on the concept of coordinate transformation of spatial points and vector, we present a robust method with a detailed procedure that makes the calculation of the three dimensional (3D) light intensity distribution in hohlraum easily. The method is intuitive but powerful enough to solve the complex cases of random number of laser beams with arbitrary polarization states and incidence angles. Its application is exemplified in the Shenguang III Facility (SG-III) that verifies its effectiveness and it is useful for guiding the design of hohlraum structure parameter.

  4. Development and Evaluation of Roadside/Obstacle Detection Method Using 3D Scanned Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Katsuyuki

    In this paper, we have reported the development of a snowblower support system which can safely navigate snowblowers, even during a whiteout, with the combination of a very accurate GPS system, so called RTK-GPS, and a unique and highly accurate map of roadsides and obstacles on roads. Particularly emphasized new techniques in this paper are ways to detect accurate geographical positions of roadsides and obstacles by utilizing and analyzing 3D laser scanned data, whose data has become available in recent days. The experiment has shown that the map created by the methods and RTK-GPS can sufficiently navigate snowblowers, whereby a secure and pleasant social environment can be archived in snow areas of Japan. In addition, proposed methods are expected to be useful for other systems such as a quick development of a highly accurate road map, a safely navigation of a wheeled chair, and so on.

  5. Segmentation of Brain MRI Using SOM-FCM-Based Method and 3D Statistical Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Andrés; Palacio, Antonio A.; Górriz, Juan M.; Ramírez, Javier; Salas-González, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Current medical imaging systems provide excellent spatial resolution, high tissue contrast, and up to 65535 intensity levels. Thus, image processing techniques which aim to exploit the information contained in the images are necessary for using these images in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Image segmentation may be defined as the process of parcelling the image to delimit different neuroanatomical tissues present on the brain. In this paper we propose a segmentation technique using 3D statistical features extracted from the volume image. In addition, the presented method is based on unsupervised vector quantization and fuzzy clustering techniques and does not use any a priori information. The resulting fuzzy segmentation method addresses the problem of partial volume effect (PVE) and has been assessed using real brain images from the Internet Brain Image Repository (IBSR). PMID:23762192

  6. Proposal of a taste evaluating method of the sponge cake by using 3D range sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Noriko

    2002-10-01

    Nowadays, the image processing techniques are while applying to the food industry in many situations. The most of these researches are applications for the quality control in plants, and there are hardly any cases of measuring the 'taste'. We are developing the measuring system of the deliciousness by using the image sensing. In this paper, we propose the estimation method of the deliciousness of a sponge cake. Considering about the deliciousness of the sponge cake, if the size of the bubbles on the surface is small and the number of them is large, then it is defined that the deliciousness of the sponge cake is better in the field of the food science. We proposed a method of detection bubbles in the surface of the sectional sponge cake automatically by using 3-D image processing. By the statistical information of these detected bubbles based on the food science, the deliciousness is estimated.

  7. 3D Pharmacophore, hierarchical methods, and 5-HT4 receptor binding data.

    PubMed

    Varin, Thibault; Saettel, Nicolas; Villain, Jonathan; Lesnard, Aurelien; Dauphin, François; Bureau, Ronan; Rault, Sylvain

    2008-10-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine subtype-4 (5-HT(4)) receptors have stimulated considerable interest amongst scientists and clinicians owing to their importance in neurophysiology and potential as therapeutic targets. A comparative analysis of hierarchical methods applied to data from one thousand 5-HT(4) receptor-ligand binding interactions was carried out. The chemical structures were described as chemical and pharmacophore fingerprints. The definitions of indices, related to the quality of the hierarchies in being able to distinguish between active and inactive compounds, revealed two interesting hierarchies with the Unity (1 active cluster) and pharmacophore fingerprints (4 active clusters). The results of this study also showed the importance of correct choice of metrics as well as the effectiveness of a new alternative of the Ward clustering algorithm named Energy (Minimum E-Distance method). In parallel, the relationship between these classifications and a previously defined 3D 5-HT(4) antagonist pharmacophore was established.

  8. [Application of PARAFAC method and 3-D fluorescence spectra in petroleum pollutant measurement and analysis].

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhao; Wang, Yu-tian; Shao, Xiao-qing; Wu, Xi-jun; Yang, Li-li

    2012-03-01

    A method for identification and concentration measurement of petroleum pollutant by combining three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence spectra with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was proposed. The main emphasis of research was the measurement of coexisting different kinds of petroleum. The CCl4 solutions of a 0# diesel sample, a 97# gasoline sample, and a kerosene sample were used as measurement objects. The condition of multiple petroleum coexistence was simulated by petroleum solutions with different mixed ratios. The character of PARAFAC in complex mixture coexisting system analysis was studied. The spectra of three kinds of solutions and the spectra of gasoline-diesel mixed samples, diesel-kerosene mixed samples, and gas oline-diesel mixed with small counts of kerosene interference samples were analyzed respectively. The core consistency diagnostic method and residual sum of squares method were applied to calculate the number of factors in PARAFAC. In gasoline-diesel experiment, gasoline or diesel can be identified and measured as a whole respectively by 2-factors parallel factors analysis. In diesel-kerosene experiment, 2-factors parallel factors analysis can only obtain the characters of diesel, and the 3rd factor is needed to separate the kerosene spectral character from the mixture spectrum. When small counts of kerosene exist in gasoline-diesel solution, gasoline and diesel still can be identified and measured as principal components by a 2-factors parallel factor analysis, and the effect of interference on qualitative analysis is not significant. The experiment verified that the PARAFAC method can obtain characteristic spectrum of each kind of petroleum, and the concentration of petroleum in solutions can be predicted simultaneously, with recoveries shown in the paper. The results showed the possibility of petroleum pollutant identification and concentration measurement based on the 3-D fluorescence spectra and PARAFAC.

  9. Testing 3D landform quantification methods with synthetic drumlins in a real digital elevation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, John K.; Smith, Mike J.

    2012-06-01

    Metrics such as height and volume quantifying the 3D morphology of landforms are important observations that reflect and constrain Earth surface processes. Errors in such measurements are, however, poorly understood. A novel approach, using statistically valid ‘synthetic' landscapes to quantify the errors is presented. The utility of the approach is illustrated using a case study of 184 drumlins observed in Scotland as quantified from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) by the ‘cookie cutter' extraction method. To create the synthetic DEMs, observed drumlins were removed from the measured DEM and replaced by elongate 3D Gaussian ones of equivalent dimensions positioned randomly with respect to the ‘noise' (e.g. trees) and regional trends (e.g. hills) that cause the errors. Then, errors in the cookie cutter extraction method were investigated by using it to quantify these ‘synthetic' drumlins, whose location and size is known. Thus, the approach determines which key metrics are recovered accurately. For example, mean height of 6.8 m is recovered poorly at 12.5 ± 0.6 (2σ) m, but mean volume is recovered correctly. Additionally, quantification methods can be compared: A variant on the cookie cutter using an un-tensioned spline induced about twice (× 1.79) as much error. Finally, a previously reportedly statistically significant (p = 0.007) difference in mean volume between sub-populations of different ages, which may reflect formational processes, is demonstrated to be only 30-50% likely to exist in reality. Critically, the synthetic DEMs are demonstrated to realistically model parameter recovery, primarily because they are still almost entirely the original landscape. Results are insensitive to the exact method used to create the synthetic DEMs, and the approach could be readily adapted to assess a variety of landforms (e.g. craters, dunes and volcanoes).

  10. First 3D thermal mapping of an active volcano using an advanced photogrammetric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Raphael; Baratoux, David; Lacogne, Julien; Lopez, Teodolina; Fauchard, Cyrille; Bretar, Frédéric; Arab-Sedze, Mélanie; Staudacher, Thomas; Jacquemoud, Stéphane; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Thermal infrared data obtained in the [7-14 microns] spectral range are usually used in many Earth Science disciplines. These studies are exclusively based on the analysis of 2D information. In this case, a quantitative analysis of the surface energy budget remains limited, as it may be difficult to estimate the radiative contribution of the topography, the thermal influence of winds on the surface or potential imprints of subsurface flows on the soil without any precise DEM. The draping of a thermal image on a recent DEM is a common method to obtain a 3D thermal map of a surface. However, this method has many disadvantages i) errors can be significant in the orientation process of the thermal images, due to the lack of tie points between the images and the DEM; ii) the use of a recent DEM implies the use of another remote sensing technique to quantify the topography; iii) finally, the characterization of the evolution of a surface requires the simultaneous acquisition of thermal data and topographic information, which may be expensive in most cases. The stereophotogrammetry method allows to reconstitute the relief of an object from photos taken from different positions. Recently, substantial progress have been realized in the generation of high spatial resolution topographic surfaces using stereophotogrammetry. However, the presence of shadows, homogeneous textures and/or weak contrasts in the visible spectrum (e.g., flowing lavas, uniform lithologies) may prevent from the use of such method, because of the difficulties to find tie points on each image. Such situations are more favorable in the thermal infrared spectrum, as any variation in the thermal properties or geometric orientation of the surfaces may induce temperature contrasts that are detectable with a thermal camera. This system, usually functioning with a array sensor (Focal Plane Array) and an optical device, have geometric characteristics that are similar to digital cameras. Thus, it may be possible

  11. Training toward Advanced 3D Seismic Methods for CO2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Liner

    2012-05-31

    The objective of our work is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. We utilize data and results developed through previous DOE-funded CO{sub 2} characterization project (DE-FG26-06NT42734) at the Dickman Field of Ness County, KS. Dickman is a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontinent to Indiana and Illinois. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. In a previous DOE-funded project, geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We believe that sequestration of CO{sub 2} will largely occur in areas of relatively flat geology and simple near surface, similar to Dickman. The challenge is not complex geology, but development of improved, lower-cost methods for detecting natural fractures and subtle faults. Our project used numerical simulation to test methods of gathering multicomponent, full azimuth data ideal for this purpose. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic methods to aide in quantifying reservoir properties and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. The purpose of the current project is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2

  12. Method of characteristics for the 3D perfect plasticity problem with the von Mises yield criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verveyko, N. D.; Kuptsov, A. V.

    2009-04-01

    We present a linearized system of partial differential equations for the three-dimensional perfect plasticity problem with the von Mises yield criterion. We construct the characteristics of the three-dimensional problem, obtain differential relations along the characteristic planes, and devise a consistent stable finite-difference scheme. The use of conditions on the stress discontinuity surfaces permits simultaneously solving the Cauchy, Goursat, and mixed problems.

  13. Rasterizing geological models for parallel finite difference simulation using seismic simulation as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehner, Björn; Hellwig, Olaf; Linke, Maik; Görz, Ines; Buske, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    3D geological underground models are often presented by vector data, such as triangulated networks representing boundaries of geological bodies and geological structures. Since models are to be used for numerical simulations based on the finite difference method, they have to be converted into a representation discretizing the full volume of the model into hexahedral cells. Often the simulations require a high grid resolution and are done using parallel computing. The storage of such a high-resolution raster model would require a large amount of storage space and it is difficult to create such a model using the standard geomodelling packages. Since the raster representation is only required for the calculation, but not for the geometry description, we present an algorithm and concept for rasterizing geological models on the fly for the use in finite difference codes that are parallelized by domain decomposition. As a proof of concept we implemented a rasterizer library and integrated it into seismic simulation software that is run as parallel code on a UNIX cluster using the Message Passing Interface. We can thus run the simulation with realistic and complicated surface-based geological models that are created using 3D geomodelling software, instead of using a simplified representation of the geological subsurface using mathematical functions or geometric primitives. We tested this set-up using an example model that we provide along with the implemented library.

  14. The `L' Array, a method to model 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Chavez-Hernandez, G.; Delgado, C.; Tejero-Andrade, A.

    2010-12-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method designed to calculate the distribution of apparent electrical resistivities in the subsoil by means of a great number of observations with the aim of determining an electrical image displaying the distribution of true resistivities in the subsoil. Such process can be carried out to define 2D or 3D models of the subsurface. For a 3D ERT, usually, the electrodes are placed in a squared grid keeping the distance between adjacent electrodes constant in the x and y directions. Another design employed, consists of a series of parallel lines whose space inter-lines must be smaller or equal to four times the electrode separation. The most common electrode arrays frequently employed for this type of studies are the pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole. Unfortunately, ERT surface sampling schemes are limited by physical conditions or obstacles, like buildings, highly populated urban zones, and geologic/topographic features, where the lines of electrodes cannot be set. However, it is always necessary to characterize the subsoil beneath such anthropogenic or natural features. The ‘L’ shaped array has the main purpose to overcome such difficulties by surrounding the study area with a square of electrode lines. The measurements are obtained by switching automatically current and potential electrodes from one line to the other. Each observation adds a level of information, from one profile to the other. Once the total levels of data are completed, the opposite ‘L’ array can be measured following the same process. The complete square is computed after the parallel profiles are observed as well. At the end, the computed resistivities are combined to form a 3D matrix of observations. Such set of data can be inverted to obtain the true resistivity distribution at depth in the form of a working cube, which can be interpreted. The method was tested with theoretical models, which included a set of two resistive cubes

  15. A fast nonlinear conjugate gradient based method for 3D concentrated frictional contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Vollebregt, Edwin A. H.; Oosterlee, Cornelis W.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a fast numerical solver for a nonlinear constrained optimization problem, arising from 3D concentrated frictional shift and rolling contact problems with dry Coulomb friction. The solver combines an active set strategy with a nonlinear conjugate gradient method. One novelty is to consider the tractions of each slip element in a polar coordinate system, using azimuth angles as variables instead of conventional traction variables. The new variables are scaled by the diagonal of the underlying Jacobian. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique accelerates all matrix-vector products encountered, exploiting the matrix' Toeplitz structure. Numerical tests demonstrate a significant reduction of the computational time compared to existing solvers for concentrated contact problems.

  16. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 describes effort performed under Task 4B, Special Finite Element Special Function Models, while Volume 2 concentrates on Task 4C, Advanced Special Functions Models.

  17. The Wavelet Element Method. Part 2; Realization and Additional Features in 2D and 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, Claudio; Tabacco, Anita; Urban, Karsten

    1998-01-01

    The Wavelet Element Method (WEM) provides a construction of multiresolution systems and biorthogonal wavelets on fairly general domains. These are split into subdomains that are mapped to a single reference hypercube. Tensor products of scaling functions and wavelets defined on the unit interval are used on the reference domain. By introducing appropriate matching conditions across the interelement boundaries, a globally continuous biorthogonal wavelet basis on the general domain is obtained. This construction does not uniquely define the basis functions but rather leaves some freedom for fulfilling additional features. In this paper we detail the general construction principle of the WEM to the 1D, 2D and 3D cases. We address additional features such as symmetry, vanishing moments and minimal support of the wavelet functions in each particular dimension. The construction is illustrated by using biorthogonal spline wavelets on the interval.

  18. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Bruce Weisman, R.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and

  19. Real-time rendering method and performance evaluation of composable 3D lenses for interactive VR.

    PubMed

    Borst, Christoph W; Tiesel, Jan-Phillip; Best, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    We present and evaluate a new approach for real-time rendering of composable 3D lenses for polygonal scenes. Such lenses, usually called "volumetric lenses," are an extension of 2D Magic Lenses to 3D volumes in which effects are applied to scene elements. Although the composition of 2D lenses is well known, 3D composition was long considered infeasible due to both geometric and semantic complexity. Nonetheless, for a scene with multiple interactive 3D lenses, the problem of intersecting lenses must be considered. Intersecting 3D lenses in meaningful ways supports new interfaces such as hierarchical 3D windows, 3D lenses for managing and composing visualization options, or interactive shader development by direct manipulation of lenses providing component effects. Our 3D volumetric lens approach differs from other approaches and is one of the first to address efficient composition of multiple lenses. It is well-suited to head-tracked VR environments because it requires no view-dependent generation of major data structures, allowing caching and reuse of full or partial results. A Composite Shader Factory module composes shader programs for rendering composite visual styles and geometry of intersection regions. Geometry is handled by Boolean combinations of region tests in fragment shaders, which allows both convex and nonconvex CSG volumes for lens shape. Efficiency is further addressed by a Region Analyzer module and by broad-phase culling. Finally, we consider the handling of order effects for composed 3D lenses.

  20. A 3D moving mesh Finite Element Method for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, G. R.; Borhani, N.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Thome, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    A 3D ALE Finite Element Method is developed to study two-phase flow phenomena using a new discretization method to compute the surface tension forces. The computational method is based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) and the Finite Element Method (FEM), creating a two-phase method with an improved model for the liquid-gas interface. An adaptive mesh update procedure is also proposed for effective management of the mesh to remove, add and repair elements, since the computational mesh nodes move according to the flow. The ALE description explicitly defines the two-phase interface position by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The proposed methodology for computing the curvature leads to accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational cost. Static and dynamic tests have been carried out to validate the method and the results have compared well to analytical solutions and experimental results found in the literature, demonstrating that the new proposed methodology provides good accuracy to describe the interfacial forces and bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on the description of the proposed methodology, with particular emphasis on the discretization of the surface tension force, the new remeshing technique, and the validation results. Additionally, a microchannel simulation in complex geometry is presented for two elongated bubbles.

  1. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  2. A Method for Developing 3D User Interfaces of Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleros, Juan Manuel González; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Arteaga, Jaime Muñoz

    A transformational method for developing tri-dimensional user interfaces of interactive information systems is presented that starts from a task model and a domain model to progressively derive a final user interface. This method consists of three steps: deriving one or many abstract user interfaces from a task model and a domain model, deriving one or many concrete user interfaces from each abstract interface, and producing the code of the final user interfaces corresponding to each concrete interface. To ensure the two first steps, trans-formations are encoded as graph transformations performed on the involved models expressed in their graph equivalent. In addition, a graph grammar gathers relevant graph transformations for accomplishing the sub-steps involved in each step. Once a concrete user interface is resulting from these two first steps, it is converted in a development environment for 3D user interfaces where it can be edited for fine tuning and personalization. From this environment, the user interface code is automatically generated. The method is defined by its steps, input/output, and exemplified on a case study. By expressing the steps of the method through transformations between models, the method adheres to Model-Driven Engineering paradigm where models and transformations are explicitly defined and used

  3. Integration of Petrophysical Methods and 3D Printing Technology to Replicate Reservoir Pore Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishutov, S.; Hasiuk, F.; Gray, J.; Harding, C.

    2014-12-01

    Pore-scale imaging and modeling are becoming routine geoscience techniques of reservoir analysis and simulation in oil and gas industry. Three-dimensional printing may facilitate the transformation of pore-space imagery into rock models, which can be compared to traditional laboratory methods and literature data. Although current methodologies for rapid rock modeling and printing obscure many details of grain geometry, computed tomography data is one route to refine pore networks and experimentally test hypotheses related to rock properties, such as porosity and permeability. This study uses three-dimensional printing as a novel way of interacting with x-ray computed tomography data from reservoir core plugs based on digital modeling of pore systems in coarse-grained sandstones and limestones. The advantages of using artificial rocks as a proxy are to better understand the contributions of pore system characteristics at various scales to petrophysical properties in oil and gas reservoirs. Pore radii of reservoir sandstones used in this study range from 1 to 100s of microns, whereas the pore radii for limestones vary from 0.01 to 10s of microns. The resolution of computed tomography imaging is ~10 microns; the resolution of 3D digital printing used in the study varies from 2.5 to 300 microns. For this technology to be useful, loss of pore network information must be minimized in the course of data acquisition, modeling, and production as well as verified against core-scale measurements. The ultimate goal of this study is to develop a reservoir rock "photocopier" that couples 3D scanning and modeling with 3D printing to reproduce a) petrophyscially accurate copies of reservoir pore systems and b) digitally modified pore systems for testing hypotheses about reservoir flow. By allowing us to build porous media with known properties (porosity, permeability, surface area), technology will also advance our understanding of the tools used to measure these quantities (e

  4. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  5. Optimized Finite-Difference Coefficients for Hydroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Responsible utilization of marine renewable energy sources through the use of current energy converter (CEC) and wave energy converter (WEC) devices requires an understanding of the noise generation and propagation from these systems in the marine environment. Acoustic noise produced by rotating turbines, for example, could adversely affect marine animals and human-related marine activities if not properly understood and mitigated. We are utilizing a 3-D finite-difference acoustic simulation code developed at Sandia that can accurately propagate noise in the complex bathymetry in the near-shore to open ocean environment. As part of our efforts to improve computation efficiency in the large, high-resolution domains required in this project, we investigate the effects of using optimized finite-difference coefficients on the accuracy of the simulations. We compare accuracy and runtime of various finite-difference coefficients optimized via criteria such as maximum numerical phase speed error, maximum numerical group speed error, and L-1 and L-2 norms of weighted numerical group and phase speed errors over a given spectral bandwidth. We find that those coefficients optimized for L-1 and L-2 norms are superior in accuracy to those based on maximal error and can produce runtimes of 10% of the baseline case, which uses Taylor Series finite-difference coefficients at the Courant time step limit. We will present comparisons of the results for the various cases evaluated as well as recommendations for utilization of the cases studied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Curvilinear Immersed Boundary Method for Simulating Fluid Structure Interaction with Complex 3D Rigid Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    The sharp-interface CURVIB approach of Ge and Sotiropoulos [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries, Journal of Computational Physics 225 (2007) 1782–1809] is extended to simulate fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems involving complex 3D rigid bodies undergoing large structural displacements. The FSI solver adopts the partitioned FSI solution approach and both loose and strong coupling strategies are implemented. The interfaces between immersed bodies and the fluid are discretized with a Lagrangian grid and tracked with an explicit front-tracking approach. An efficient ray-tracing algorithm is developed to quickly identify the relationship between the background grid and the moving bodies. Numerical experiments are carried out for two FSI problems: vortex induced vibration of elastically mounted cylinders and flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve at physiologic conditions. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with benchmark simulations and experimental measurements. The numerical experiments suggest that both the properties of the structure (mass, geometry) and the local flow conditions can play an important role in determining the stability of the FSI algorithm. Under certain conditions unconditionally unstable iteration schemes result even when strong coupling FSI is employed. For such cases, however, combining the strong-coupling iteration with under-relaxation in conjunction with the Aitken’s acceleration technique is shown to effectively resolve the stability problems. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the findings of the numerical experiments. It is shown that the ratio of the added mass to the mass of the structure as well as the sign of the local time rate of change of the force or moment imparted on the structure by the fluid determine the stability and convergence of the

  7. Novel, fast and efficient image-based 3D modeling method and its application in fracture risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Xiao, Zhitao; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Guoqing

    2014-06-01

    Constructing models based on computed tomography images for finite element analysis (FEA) is challenging under pathological conditions. In the present study, an innovative method was introduced that uses Siemens syngo(®) 3D software for processing models and Mimics software for further modeling. Compared with the slice-by-slice traditional manual margin discrimination, the new 3D modeling method utilizes automatic tissue margin determination and 3D cutting using syngo software. The modeling morphologies of the two methods were similar; however, the 3D modeling method was 8-10 times faster than the traditional method, particularly in cases with osteoporosis and osteophytes. A comparative FEA study of the lumbar spines of young and elderly patients, on the basis of the models constructed by the 3D modeling method, showed peak stress elevation in the vertebrae of elderly patients. Stress distribution was homogeneous in the entire vertebrae of young individuals. By contrast, stress redistribution in the vertebrae of the elderly was concentrated in the anterior cortex of the vertebrae, which explains the high fracture risk mechanism in elderly individuals. In summary, the new 3D modeling method is highly efficient, accurate and faster than traditional methods. The method also allows reliable FEA in pathological cases with osteoporosis and osteophytes.

  8. Novel, fast and efficient image-based 3D modeling method and its application in fracture risk evaluation

    PubMed Central

    LI, DAN; XIAO, ZHITAO; WANG, GANG; ZHAO, GUOQING

    2014-01-01

    Constructing models based on computed tomography images for finite element analysis (FEA) is challenging under pathological conditions. In the present study, an innovative method was introduced that uses Siemens syngo® 3D software for processing models and Mimics software for further modeling. Compared with the slice-by-slice traditional manual margin discrimination, the new 3D modeling method utilizes automatic tissue margin determination and 3D cutting using syngo software. The modeling morphologies of the two methods were similar; however, the 3D modeling method was 8–10 times faster than the traditional method, particularly in cases with osteoporosis and osteophytes. A comparative FEA study of the lumbar spines of young and elderly patients, on the basis of the models constructed by the 3D modeling method, showed peak stress elevation in the vertebrae of elderly patients. Stress distribution was homogeneous in the entire vertebrae of young individuals. By contrast, stress redistribution in the vertebrae of the elderly was concentrated in the anterior cortex of the vertebrae, which explains the high fracture risk mechanism in elderly individuals. In summary, the new 3D modeling method is highly efficient, accurate and faster than traditional methods. The method also allows reliable FEA in pathological cases with osteoporosis and osteophytes. PMID:24926348

  9. 3D magnetospheric parallel hybrid multi-grid method applied to planet–plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leclercq, L.; Mancini, M.

    2016-03-15

    We present a new method to exploit multiple refinement levels within a 3D parallel hybrid model, developed to study planet–plasma interactions. This model is based on the hybrid formalism: ions are kinetically treated whereas electrons are considered as a inertia-less fluid. Generally, ions are represented by numerical particles whose size equals the volume of the cells. Particles that leave a coarse grid subsequently entering a refined region are split into particles whose volume corresponds to the volume of the refined cells. The number of refined particles created from a coarse particle depends on the grid refinement rate. In order to conserve velocity distribution functions and to avoid calculations of average velocities, particles are not coalesced. Moreover, to ensure the constancy of particles' shape function sizes, the hybrid method is adapted to allow refined particles to move within a coarse region. Another innovation of this approach is the method developed to compute grid moments at interfaces between two refinement levels. Indeed, the hybrid method is adapted to accurately account for the special grid structure at the interfaces, avoiding any overlapping grid considerations. Some fundamental test runs were performed to validate our approach (e.g. quiet plasma flow, Alfven wave propagation). Lastly, we also show a planetary application of the model, simulating the interaction between Jupiter's moon Ganymede and the Jovian plasma.

  10. Seismic imaging using finite-differences and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    A key to reducing the risks and costs of associated with oil and gas exploration is the fast, accurate imaging of complex geologies, such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and overthrust regions in US onshore regions. Prestack depth migration generally yields the most accurate images, and one approach to this is to solve the scalar wave equation using finite differences. As part of an ongoing ACTI project funded by the US Department of Energy, a finite difference, 3-D prestack, depth migration code has been developed. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that massively parallel computers can be used efficiently for seismic imaging, and that sufficient computing power exists (or soon will exist) to make finite difference, prestack, depth migration practical for oil and gas exploration. Several problems had to be addressed to get an efficient code for the Intel Paragon. These include efficient I/O, efficient parallel tridiagonal solves, and high single-node performance. Furthermore, to provide portable code the author has been restricted to the use of high-level programming languages (C and Fortran) and interprocessor communications using MPI. He has been using the SUNMOS operating system, which has affected many of his programming decisions. He will present images created from two verification datasets (the Marmousi Model and the SEG/EAEG 3D Salt Model). Also, he will show recent images from real datasets, and point out locations of improved imaging. Finally, he will discuss areas of current research which will hopefully improve the image quality and reduce computational costs.

  11. Educational Material for 3D Visualization of Spine Procedures: Methods for Creation and Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Justin; Quigley, Edward; Hutchins, Troy; Shah, Lubdha

    2017-01-12

    Spine anatomy can be difficult to master and is essential for performing spine procedures. We sought to utilize the rapidly expanding field of 3D technology to create freely available, interactive educational materials for spine procedures. Our secondary goal was to convey lessons learned about 3D modeling and printing. This project involved two parallel processes: the creation of 3D-printed physical models and interactive digital models. We segmented illustrative CT studies of the lumbar and cervical spine to create 3D models and then printed them using a consumer 3D printer and a professional 3D printing service. We also included downloadable versions of the models in an interactive eBook and platform-independent web viewer. We then provided these educational materials to residents with a pretest and posttest to assess efficacy. The "Spine Procedures in 3D" eBook has been downloaded 71 times as of October 5, 2016. All models used in the book are available for download and printing. Regarding test results, the mean exam score improved from 70 to 86%, with the most dramatic improvement seen in the least experienced trainees. Participants reported increased confidence in performing lumbar punctures after exposure to the material. We demonstrate the value of 3D models, both digital and printed, in learning spine procedures. Moreover, 3D printing and modeling is a rapidly expanding field with a large potential role for radiologists. We have detailed our process for creating and sharing 3D educational materials in the hopes of motivating and enabling similar projects.

  12. A Computational Method for 3D Anisotropic Travel-time Tomography of Rocks in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofranitabari, Mehdi; Young, R. Paul

    2013-04-01

    True triaxial loading in the laboratory applies three principal stresses on a cubic rock specimen. Elliptical anisotropy and distributed heterogeneities are introduced in the rock due to closure and opening of the pre-existing cracks and creation and growth of the new aligned cracks. The rock sample is tested in a Geophysical Imaging Cell that is armed with an Acoustic Emission monitoring system which can perform transducer to transducer velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample during the experiment. Ultrasonic travel-time tomography as a non-destructive method outfits a map of wave propagation velocity in the sample in order to detect the uniformly distributed or localised heterogeneities and provide the spatial variation and temporal evolution of induced damages in rocks at various stages of loading. The rock sample is partitioned into cubic grid cells as model sp