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Sample records for 3d finite-difference time-domain

  1. Stochastic finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven Michael

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation presents the derivation of an approximate method to determine the mean and the variance of electro-magnetic fields in the body using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. Unlike Monte Carlo analysis, which requires repeated FDTD simulations, this method directly computes the variance of the fields at every point in space at every sample of time in the simulation. This Stochastic FDTD simulation (S-FDTD) has at its root a new wave called the Variance wave, which is computed in the time domain along with the mean properties of the model space in the FDTD simulation. The Variance wave depends on the electro-magnetic fields, the reflections and transmission though the different dielectrics, and the variances of the electrical properties of the surrounding materials. Like the electro-magnetic fields, the Variance wave begins at zero (there is no variance before the source is turned on) and is computed in the time domain until all fields reach steady state. This process is performed in a fraction of the time of a Monte Carlo simulation and yields the first two statistical parameters (mean and variance). The mean of the field is computed using the traditional FDTD equations. Variance is computed by approximating the correlation coefficients between the constituitive properties and the use of the S-FDTD equations. The impetus for this work was the simulation time it takes to perform 3D Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) FDTD analysis of the human head model for cell phone power absorption in the human head due to the proximity of a cell phone being used. In many instances, Monte Carlo analysis is not performed due to the lengthy simulation times required. With the development of S-FDTD, these statistical analyses could be performed providing valuable statistical information with this information being provided in a small fraction of the time it would take to perform a Monte Carlo analysis.

  2. 3D Time-domain wave modeling in fluid-solid coupled media: a cell-based finite-difference method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Min, D.; Lim, S.; Yang, J.; Kwon, B.; Yoo, H.

    2009-12-01

    In a conventional marine seismic data analysis, pressure data have been usually interpreted on the basis of acoustic wave equation. The acoustic wave equation, however, only deals with P-wave propagation, and it cannot correctly describe the wave propagation in acoustic-elastic (fluid-solid) coupled media. Recently, in 4C OBC survey (4-component ocean bottom cable), it is possible to acquire both pressure and 3-component displacements (measured at the sea-bottom). Combining pressure and displacement data allows us to interpret subsurface structures more accurately. In order to accurately simulate wave propagation in fluid-solid coupled media, we need an acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm, which deals with displacements in elastic region and pressure in acoustic region. For waveform inversion and reverse-time migration that require a great number of forward modeling, it is essential to develop an efficient scheme that reduces computing time and computer core memory. In this study, we present a 3D time-domain acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm on the basis of the cell-based finite difference method. The cell-based method has proven to properly describe the free-surface boundary, which indicates that it will also properly describe the fluid-solid interface boundaries. In the acoustic-elastic coupled modeling, we first compose cell-based finite differences individually for the 3D acoustic and elastic media, and then combine the differences using the fluid-solid interface boundary conditions. Considering that the 2D acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm gives numerical solutions comparable to analytic solutions, we expect that the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled modeling will correctly describe wave propagation in the fluid-solid coupled media. We apply our algorithm to 3D horizontal two- and three-layer models. Numerical experiments show that the cell-based coupled modeling algorithm properly describes S- and converted waves as well as P-waves. The

  3. Finite difference time domain grid generation from AMC helicopter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.

    1992-01-01

    A simple technique is presented which forms a cubic grid model of a helicopter from an Aircraft Modeling Code (AMC) input file. The AMC input file defines the helicopter fuselage as a series of polygonal cross sections. The cubic grid model is used as an input to a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) code to obtain predictions of antenna performance on a generic helicopter model. The predictions compare reasonably well with measured data.

  4. Finite difference time domain calculations of antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique was applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic analysis problems, including shielding and scattering. However, the method has not been exclusively applied to antennas. Here, calculations of self and mutual admittances between wire antennas are made using FDTD and compared with results obtained during the method of moments. The agreement is quite good, indicating the possibilities for FDTD application to antenna impedance and coupling.

  5. Finite difference time domain calculations of antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique has been applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic analysis problems, including shielding and scattering. However, the method has not been extensively applied to antennas. In this short paper calculations of self and mutual admittances between wire antennas are made using FDTD and compared with results obtained using the Method of Moments. The agreement is quite good, indicating the possibilities for FDTD application to antenna impedance and coupling.

  6. Finite difference time domain modeling of spiral antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, Christopher W.; Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives outlined in the original proposal for this project were to create a well-documented computer analysis model based on the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) method that would be capable of computing antenna impedance, far-zone radiation patterns, and radar cross-section (RCS). The ability to model a variety of penetrable materials in addition to conductors is also desired. The spiral antennas under study by this project meet these requirements since they are constructed of slots cut into conducting surfaces which are backed by dielectric materials.

  7. Finite difference time domain analysis of chirped dielectric gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochmuth, Diane H.; Johnson, Eric G.

    1993-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for solving Maxwell's time-dependent curl equations is accurate, computationally efficient, and straight-forward to implement. Since both time and space derivatives are employed, the propagation of an electromagnetic wave can be treated as an initial-value problem. Second-order central-difference approximations are applied to the space and time derivatives of the electric and magnetic fields providing a discretization of the fields in a volume of space, for a period of time. The solution to this system of equations is stepped through time, thus, simulating the propagation of the incident wave. If the simulation is continued until a steady-state is reached, an appropriate far-field transformation can be applied to the time-domain scattered fields to obtain reflected and transmitted powers. From this information diffraction efficiencies can also be determined. In analyzing the chirped structure, a mesh is applied only to the area immediately around the grating. The size of the mesh is then proportional to the electric size of the grating. Doing this, however, imposes an artificial boundary around the area of interest. An absorbing boundary condition must be applied along the artificial boundary so that the outgoing waves are absorbed as if the boundary were absent. Many such boundary conditions have been developed that give near-perfect absorption. In this analysis, the Mur absorbing boundary conditions are employed. Several grating structures were analyzed using the FDTD method.

  8. Three-dimensional finite difference time domain modeling of the Earth-ionosphere cavity resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heng; Pasko, Victor P.

    2005-02-01

    Comparison of results from a three-dimensional (3-D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) model of Schumann resonances (SR) with a set of classical eigenfrequency and quality factor solutions for laterally uniform spherically symmetric Earth-ionosphere cavity and recent SR observations during solar proton events (SPEs) and X-ray bursts demonstrate the potential and applicability of the FDTD technique for studies of realistic SR problems.

  9. Effects of sources on time-domain finite difference models.

    PubMed

    Botts, Jonathan; Savioja, Lauri

    2014-07-01

    Recent work on excitation mechanisms in acoustic finite difference models focuses primarily on physical interpretations of observed phenomena. This paper offers an alternative view by examining the properties of models from the perspectives of linear algebra and signal processing. Interpretation of a simulation as matrix exponentiation clarifies the separate roles of sources as boundaries and signals. Boundary conditions modify the matrix and thus its modal structure, and initial conditions or source signals shape the solution, but not the modal structure. Low-frequency artifacts are shown to follow from eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix, and previously reported artifacts are predicted from eigenvalue estimates. The role of source signals is also briefly discussed. PMID:24993210

  10. Finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Yee, Kane S.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are employed to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In the finite difference solution, they also can be utilized to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media throughout the solution volume. The standard approach is to approximate the surface impedance over a very small bandwidth by its value at the center frequency, and then use that result in the boundary condition. Here, two implementations of the surface impedance boundary condition are presented. One implementation is a constant surface impedance boundary condition and the other is a dispersive surface impedance boundary condition that is applicable over a very large frequency bandwidth and over a large range of conductivities. Frequency domain results are presented in one dimension for two conductivity values and are compared with exact results. Scattering width results from an infinite square cylinder are presented as a two dimensional demonstration. Extensions to three dimensions should be straightforward.

  11. Transient analysis of printed lines using finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Shahid

    2012-03-29

    Comprehensive studies of ultra-wideband pulses and electromagnetic coupling on printed coupled lines have been performed using full-wave 3D finite-difference time-domain analysis. Effects of unequal phase velocities of coupled modes, coupling between line traces, and the frequency dispersion on the waveform fidelity and crosstalk have been investigated in detail. To discriminate the contributions of different mechanisms into pulse evolution, single and coupled microstrip lines without (ϵr = 1) and with (ϵr > 1) dielectric substrates have been examined. To consistently compare the performance of the coupled lines with substrates of different permittivities and transients of different characteristic times, a generic metric similar to the electrical wavelength has been introduced. The features of pulse propagation on coupled lines with layered and pedestal substrates and on the irregular traces have been explored. Finally, physical interpretations of the simulation results are discussed in the paper.

  12. Finite-difference solutions of the 3-D eikonal equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Tong; Fehler, M.C.; Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Prestack Kirchhoff depth migration requires the computation of traveltimes from surface source and receiver locations to subsurface image locations. In 3-D problems, computational efficiency becomes important. Finite-difference solutions of the eikonal equation provide computationally efficient methods for generating the traveltime information. Here, a novel finite-difference solutions of the eikonal equation provide computationally efficient methods for generating the traveltime information. Here, a novel finite-difference method for computing the first arrival traveltime by solving the eikonal equation has been developed in Cartesian coordinates. The method, which is unconditionally stable and computationally efficient, can handle instabilities due to caustics and provide information about head waves. The comparison of finite-difference solutions of the acoustic wave equation with the traveltime solutions from the eikonal equation in various structure models demonstrate that the method developed here can provide correct first arrival traveltime information even in areas of complex velocity structure.

  13. Wideband finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions for good conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.; Yee, Kane S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are employed to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In a finite difference solution, they also can be utilized to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media, throughout the solution volume. A 1-D implementation for a surface impedance boundary condition for good conductors in the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique.

  14. Design and implementation of an efficient finite-difference, time-domain computer code for large problems

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.T. III; Taflove, A.; Stringer, J.C.; Kluge, R.F.

    1986-12-01

    As computers get larger and faster, demands upon electromagnetics codes increase. Ever larger volumes of space must be represented with increasingly more accuracy and detail. This requires continually more efficient EM codes. To meet present and future needs in DOE and DOD, we are developing FDTD3D, a three-dimensional finite-difference, time-domain EM solver. When complete, the code will efficiently solve problems with tens of millions of unknowns. It already operates faster than any other 3D, time-domain EM code, and we are using it to model linear coupling to a generic missile section. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we anticipate the ultimate need for such a code if we are to model EM threats to objects such as airplanes or missiles. This article describes the design and implementation of FDTD3D. The first section, ''Design of FDTD3D,'' contains a brief summary of other 3D time-domain EM codes at LLNL followed by a description of the efficiency of FDTD3D. The second section, ''Implementation of FDTD3D,'' discusses recent work and future plans.

  15. Unconditionally stable split-step finite difference time domain formulations for double-dispersive electromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Omar

    2014-12-01

    Systematic split-step finite difference time domain (SS-FDTD) formulations, based on the general Lie-Trotter-Suzuki product formula, are presented for solving the time-dependent Maxwell equations in double-dispersive electromagnetic materials. The proposed formulations provide a unified tool for constructing a family of unconditionally stable algorithms such as the first order split-step FDTD (SS1-FDTD), the second order split-step FDTD (SS2-FDTD), and the second order alternating direction implicit FDTD (ADI-FDTD) schemes. The theoretical stability of the formulations is included and it has been demonstrated that the formulations are unconditionally stable by construction. Furthermore, the dispersion relation of the formulations is derived and it has been found that the proposed formulations are best suited for those applications where a high space resolution is needed. Two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D numerical examples are included and it has been observed that the SS1-FDTD scheme is computationally more efficient than the ADI-FDTD counterpart, while maintaining approximately the same numerical accuracy. Moreover, the SS2-FDTD scheme allows using larger time step than the SS1-FDTD or ADI-FDTD and therefore necessitates less CPU time, while giving approximately the same numerical accuracy.

  16. Wideband finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions for good conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.; Yee, Kane S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are used to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In a finite difference solution, they also can be used to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media, throughout the solution volume. A one dimensional implementation is presented for a surface impedance boundary condition for good conductors in the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique. In order to illustrate the FDTD surface impedance boundary condition, a planar air-lossy dielectric interface is considered.

  17. Finite-Difference Time-Domain solution of Maxwell's equations for the dispersive ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickisch, L. J.; Franke, P. M.

    1992-10-01

    The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique is a conceptually simple, yet powerful, method for obtaining numerical solutions to electromagnetic propagation problems. However, the application of FDTD methods to problems in ionospheric radiowave propagation is complicated by the dispersive nature of the ionospheric plasma. In the time domain, the electric displacement is the convolution of the dielectric tensor with the electric field, and thus requires information from the entire signal history. This difficulty can be avoided by returning to the dynamical equations from which the dielectric tensor is derived. By integrating these differential equations simultaneously with the Maxwell equations, temporal dispersion is fully incorporated.

  18. Finite-difference, time-domain analysis of a folded acoustic transmission line.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charles M

    2005-03-01

    Recently designed, modern versions of renais sance woodwind instruments such as the recorder and serpent use square cross sections and a folded acoustic transmission line. Conventional microwave techniques would expect that this bend would cause unwanted reflections and impedance discontinuities. This paper analyses the folded acoustic transmission line using finite-difference, time-domain techniques and shows that the discontinuity can be compensated with by the use of a manufacturable method. PMID:15857045

  19. Full Wave Analysis of Passive Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit Devices Using a Generalized Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Faiza S.; Rascoe, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a modified Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique using a generalized conformed orthogonal grid. The use of the Conformed Orthogonal Grid, Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) enables the designer to match all the circuit dimensions, hence eliminating a major source o error in the analysis.

  20. Simulation of planar integrated photonics devices with the LLNL time- domain finite-difference code suite

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, R.; Hawkins, R.J.; Kallman, J.S.

    1991-04-01

    Interest has recently grown in applying microwave modeling techniques to optical circuit modeling. One of the simplest, yet most powerful, microwave simulation techniques is the finite-difference time-domain algorithm (FDTD). In this technique, the differential form of the time-domain Maxwell's equations are discretized and all derivatives are approximated as differences. Minor algebraic manipulations on the resulting equations produces a set of update equations that produce fields at a given time step from fields at the previous time step. The FDTD algorithm, then, is quite simple. Source fields are launched into the discrete grid by some means. The FDTD equations advance these fields in time. At the boundaries of the grid, special update equations called radiation conditions are applied that approximate a continuing, infinite space. Because virtually no assumptions are made in the development of the FDTD method, the algorithm is able to represent a wide-range of physical effects. Waves can propagate in any direction, multiple reflections within structures can cause resonances, multiple modes of various polarizations can be launched, each of which may generate within the device an infinite spectrum of bound and radiation modes. The ability to model these types of general physical effects is what makes the FDTD method interesting to the field of optics. In this paper, we discuss the application of the finite-difference time-domain technique to integrated optics. Animations will be shown of the simulations of a TE coupler, TM grating, and a TE integrated detector. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Finite difference time domain analysis of microwave ferrite devices and mobile antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Bahadir Suleyman

    This dissertation presents analysis and design of shielded mobile antenna systems and microwave ferrite devices using a finite-difference time-domain method. Novel shielded antenna structures suitable for cellular communications have been analyzed and designed with emphasize on reducing excessive radiated energy absorbed in user's head and hand, while keeping the antenna performance at its peak in the presence of user. These novel antennas include a magnetically shielded antenna, a dual-resonance shielded antenna and, a shorted and truncated microstrip antenna. The effect of magnetic coating on the performance of a shielded monopole antenna is studied extensively. A parametric study is performed to analyze the dual-resonance phenomenon observed in the dual-resonance shielded antenna, optimize the antenna design within the cellular communications band, and improve the antenna performance. Input impedance, near and far fields of the dual-resonance shielded antenna are calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method. Experimental validation is also presented. In addition, performance of a shorted and truncated microstrip antenna has been investigated over a wide range of substrate parameters and dimensions. Objectives of the research work also include development of a finite-difference time-domain technique to accurately model magnetically anisotropic media, including the effect of non-uniform magnetization within the finite-size ferrite material due to demagnetizing fields. A slow wave thin film isolator and a stripline disc junction circulator are analyzed. An extensive parametric study calculates wide-band frequency-dependent parameters of these devices for various device dimensions and material parameters. Finally, a ferrite-filled stripline configuration is analyzed to study the non- linear behaviour of ferrite by introducing a modified damping factor.

  2. Determine the Dispersion Relation of an A6 Magnetron Using Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Nieter, C.; Stoltz, P. H.; Smithe, D. N.

    2009-05-01

    This work introduces a conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) method to accurately determine the dispersion relation of an A6 relativistic magnetron. The accuracy is measured by comparing with accurate SUPERFISH calculations based on finite element method. The results show that an accuracy of 99.4% can be achieved by using only 10,000 mesh points with Dey-Mittra algorithm. By comparison, a mesh number of 360,000 is needed to preserve 99% accuracy using conventional FDTD method. This suggests one can efficiently and accurately study the hot tests of microwave tubes using CFDTD particle-in-cell method instead of conventional FDTD one.

  3. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline droplet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaho; Iwai, Yosuke; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Nishiyama, Norikazu

    2016-08-01

    We numerically analyzed the light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline (CLC) droplet array by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method successfully reproduced the experimental light path observed in the complicated photonic structure of the CLC droplet array more accurately than the analysis of CLC droplets by geometric optics with Bragg condition, and this method help us understand the polarization of the propagating light waves. The FDTD method holds great promise for the design of various photonic devices composed of curved photonic materials like CLC droplets and microcapsules.

  4. The electromagnetic modeling of thin apertures using the finite-difference time-domain technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    A technique which computes transient electromagnetic responses of narrow apertures in complex conducting scatterers was implemented as an extension of previously developed Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) computer codes. Although these apertures are narrow with respect to the wavelengths contained within the power spectrum of excitation, this technique does not require significantly more computer resources to attain the increased resolution at the apertures. In the report, an analytical technique which utilizes Babinet's principle to model the apertures is developed, and an FDTD computer code which utilizes this technique is described.

  5. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of thermal noise in open cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Cao Hui; Taflove, Allen; Kumar, Prem |; Cao Changqi

    2008-02-15

    A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is developed to simulate thermal noise in open cavities owing to output coupling. The absorbing boundary of the FDTD grid is treated as a blackbody, whose thermal radiation penetrates the cavity in the grid. The calculated amount of thermal noise in a one-dimensional dielectric cavity recovers the standard result of the quantum Langevin equation in the Markovian regime. Our FDTD simulation also demonstrates that in the non-Markovian regime the buildup of the intracavity noise field depends on the ratio of the cavity photon lifetime to the coherence time of thermal radiation. The advantage of our numerical method is that the thermal noise is introduced in the time domain without prior knowledge of cavity modes.

  6. Finite Difference Time Domain Electromagnetic Scattering from Frequency-Dependent Lossy Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    During this effort the tasks specified in the Statement of Work have been successfully completed. The extension of Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) to more complicated materials has been made. A three-dimensional FDTD code capable of modeling interactions with both dispersive dielectric and magnetic materials has been written, validated, and documented. This code is efficient and is capable of modeling interesting targets using a modest computer work station platform. However, in addition to the tasks in the Statement of Work, a significant number of other FDTD extensions and calculations have been made. RCS results for two different plate geometries have been reported. The FDTD method has been extended to computing far zone time domain results in two dimensions. Finally, the capability to model nonlinear materials has been incorporated into FDTD and validated. The FDTD computer codes developed have been supplied, along with documentation, and preprints describing the other FDTD advances have been included with this report as attachments.

  7. 3D finite-difference seismic migration with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Gjertsen, R.; Minkoff, S.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is essential for reducing the risk associated with oil exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive as datasets can be terabytes in size. Traditional ray-tracing migration methods cannot handle complex velocity variations commonly found near such salt structures. Instead the authors use the full 3D acoustic wave equation, discretized via a finite difference algorithm. They reduce the cost of solving the apraxial wave equation by a number of numerical techniques including the method of fractional steps and pipelining the tridiagonal solves. The imaging code, Salvo, uses both frequency parallelism (generally 90% efficient) and spatial parallelism (65% efficient). Salvo has been tested on synthetic and real data and produces clear images of the subsurface even beneath complicated salt structures.

  8. Finite difference time domain modeling of steady state scattering from jet engines with moving turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Deirdre A.; Langdon, H. Scott; Beggs, John H.; Steich, David J.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1992-01-01

    The approach chosen to model steady state scattering from jet engines with moving turbine blades is based upon the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method is a numerical electromagnetic program based upon the direct solution in the time domain of Maxwell's time dependent curl equations throughout a volume. One of the strengths of this method is the ability to model objects with complicated shape and/or material composition. General time domain functions may be used as source excitations. For example, a plane wave excitation may be specified as a pulse containing many frequencies and at any incidence angle to the scatterer. A best fit to the scatterer is accomplished using cubical cells in the standard cartesian implementation of the FDTD method. The material composition of the scatterer is determined by specifying its electrical properties at each cell on the scatterer. Thus, the FDTD method is a suitable choice for problems with complex geometries evaluated at multiple frequencies. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the FDTD method.

  9. Numerical analysis of polarization gratings using the finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chulwoo; Escuti, Michael J.

    2007-10-15

    We report the first full numerical analysis of polarization gratings (PGs), and study their most general properties and limits by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In this way, we avoid limiting assumptions on material properties or grating dimensions (e.g., no paraxial approximations) and provide a more complete understanding of PG diffraction behavior. We identify the fundamental delineation between diffraction regimes (thin versus thick) for anisotropic gratings and determine the conditions for {approx_equal}100% diffraction efficiency in the framework of the coupled-wave {rho} and Q parameters. Diffraction characteristics including the efficiency, spectral response, and polarization sensitivity are investigated for the two primary types of PGs with linear and circular birefringence. The angular response and finite-grating behavior (i.e., pixelation) are also examined. Comparisons with previous analytic approximations, where applicable, show good agreement.

  10. Application of the symplectic finite-difference time-domain scheme to electromagnetic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, Wei . E-mail: ws108@ahu.edu.cn; Huang, Zhixiang; Wu, Xianliang; Chen, Mingsheng

    2007-07-01

    An explicit fourth-order finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme using the symplectic integrator is applied to electromagnetic simulation. A feasible numerical implementation of the symplectic FDTD (SFDTD) scheme is specified. In particular, new strategies for the air-dielectric interface treatment and the near-to-far-field (NFF) transformation are presented. By using the SFDTD scheme, both the radiation and the scattering of three-dimensional objects are computed. Furthermore, the energy-conserving characteristic hold for the SFDTD scheme is verified under long-term simulation. Numerical results suggest that the SFDTD scheme is more efficient than the traditional FDTD method and other high-order methods, and can save computational resources.

  11. Finite Difference Time Domain Analysis for a Sound Field Including a Plate in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hideaki; Naoi, Jun; Kikuchi, Toshiaki

    2004-05-01

    In marine research, measures against self-noise of an observatory ship are important. Generally, the self-noise is measured after the completion of ships. It is difficult to predict this noise level beforehand. Then, an attempt is made to determine the noise emitted from various elements of a structure. The finite difference time domain method is applied to obtain sound fields, including that of a plate in water. The time behavior of the sound wave emitted from a sound source placed near the upper part of a plate is investigated. As a result, the reflected and re-radiated waves from the plate including the head wave resulting from the longitudinal and traverse waves in the plate are able to be visualized. In the case of the plate with a branch plate, the suppression of the wave which propagates at the inside of the plate with the length of the branch plate is shown.

  12. A finite difference-time domain technique for modeling narrow apertures in conducting scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    The finite difference-time domain (FDTD) technique has proven to be a valuable tool for the calculation of the transient and steady state scattering characteristics of relatively complex scatterer and source configurations. In spite of its usefulness, it exhibits serious deficiencies when used to analyze geometries that contain fine detail. An FDTD technique is described that utilizes Babinet's principle to decouple the regions on both sides of the aperture. The result is an FDTD technique that is capable of modeling apertures that are much smaller than the spatial grid used in the analysis and yet is not perturbed by numerical noise when used in the 'scattered field' mode. Numerical results are presented that show the field penetration through cavity-backed apertures that are much smaller than the spatial grid used during the solution.

  13. Full-wave finite-difference time-domain simulation of electromagnetic cloaking structures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Argyropoulos, Christos; Hao, Yang

    2008-04-28

    This paper proposes a radial dependent dispersive finite-difference time-domain method for the modeling of electromagnetic cloaking structures. The permittivity and permeability of the cloak are mapped to the Drude dispersion model and taken into account in dispersive FDTD simulations. Numerical simulations demonstrate that under ideal conditions, objects placed inside the cloak are 'invisible' to external electromagnetic fields. However for the simplified cloak based on linear transformations, the back scattering has a similar level to the case of a PEC cylinder without any cloak, rendering the object still being 'visible'. It is also demonstrated numerically that the simplified cloak based on high-order transformations can indeed improve the cloaking performance. PMID:18545374

  14. Comprehensive Numerical Analysis of Finite Difference Time Domain Methods for Improving Optical Waveguide Sensor Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Samak, M. Mosleh E. Abu; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Kashif, Muhammad; Zan, Mohd Saiful Dzulkifly

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses numerical analysis methods for different geometrical features that have limited interval values for typically used sensor wavelengths. Compared with existing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods, the alternating direction implicit (ADI)-FDTD method reduces the number of sub-steps by a factor of two to three, which represents a 33% time savings in each single run. The local one-dimensional (LOD)-FDTD method has similar numerical equation properties, which should be calculated as in the previous method. Generally, a small number of arithmetic processes, which result in a shorter simulation time, are desired. The alternating direction implicit technique can be considered a significant step forward for improving the efficiency of unconditionally stable FDTD schemes. This comparative study shows that the local one-dimensional method had minimum relative error ranges of less than 40% for analytical frequencies above 42.85 GHz, and the same accuracy was generated by both methods.

  15. Modeling laser-induced periodic surface structures: Finite-difference time-domain feedback simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Skolski, J. Z. P. Vincenc Obona, J.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Huis in 't Veld, A. J.

    2014-03-14

    A model predicting the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) is presented. That is, the finite-difference time domain method is used to study the interaction of electromagnetic fields with rough surfaces. In this approach, the rough surface is modified by “ablation after each laser pulse,” according to the absorbed energy profile, in order to account for inter-pulse feedback mechanisms. LIPSSs with a periodicity significantly smaller than the laser wavelength are found to “grow” either parallel or orthogonal to the laser polarization. The change in orientation and periodicity follow from the model. LIPSSs with a periodicity larger than the wavelength of the laser radiation and complex superimposed LIPSS patterns are also predicted by the model.

  16. Inclusion of lumped elements in finite difference time domain electromagnetic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.A.; Jones, M.E.; Mason, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    A general approach for including lumped circuit elements in a finite difference, time domain (FD-TD) solution of Maxwell`s equations is presented. The methodology allows the direct access to SPICE to model the lumped circuits, while the full 3-Dimensional solution to Maxwell`s equations provides the electromagnetic field evolution. This type of approach could be used to mode a pulsed power machine by using a SPICE model for the driver and using an electromagnetic PIC code for the plasma/electromagnetics calculation. The evolution of the driver can be made self consistent with the behavior of the plasma load. Other applications are also possible, including modeling of nonlinear microwave circuits (as long as the non-linearities may be expressed in terms of a lumped element) and self-consistent calculation of very high speed computer interconnections and digital circuits.

  17. Finite difference time domain calculation of transients in antennas with nonlinear loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.; Kunz, Karl S.; Chamberlin, Kent

    1991-01-01

    In this paper transient fields for antennas with more general geometries are calculated directly using Finite Difference Time Domain methods. In each FDTD cell which contains a nonlinear load, a nonlinear equation is solved at each time step. As a test case the transient current in a long dipole antenna with a nonlinear load excited by a pulsed plane wave is computed using this approach. The results agree well with both calculated and measured results previously published. The approach given here extends the applicability of the FDTD method to problems involving scattering from targets including nonlinear loads and materials, and to coupling between antennas containing nonlinear loads. It may also be extended to propagation through nonlinear materials.

  18. CUDA Fortran acceleration for the finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Mohammed F.; Esmaeili, Seyed A.

    2013-05-01

    A detailed description of programming the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to run on graphical processing units (GPUs) using CUDA Fortran is presented. Two FDTD-to-CUDA thread-block mapping designs are investigated and their performances compared. Comparative assessment of trade-offs between GPU's shared memory and L1 cache is also discussed. This presentation is for the benefit of FDTD programmers who work exclusively with Fortran and are reluctant to port their codes to C in order to utilize GPU computing. The derived CUDA Fortran code is compared with an optimized CPU version that runs on a workstation-class CPU to present a realistic GPU to CPU run time comparison and thus help in making better informed investment decisions on FDTD code redesigns and equipment upgrades. All analyses are mirrored with CUDA C simulations to put in perspective the present state of CUDA Fortran development.

  19. 2D time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a tradeoff between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second-order in time and fourth-order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  20. Accuracy issues in the finite difference time domain simulation of photomask scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistor, Thomas V.

    2001-09-01

    As the use of electromagnetic simulation in lithography increases, accuracy issues are uncovered and must be addressed. A proper understanding of these issues can allow the lithographer to avoid pitfalls in electromagnetic simulation and to know what can and can not be accurately simulated. This paper addresses the important accuracy issues related to the simulation of photomask scattering using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Errors related to discretization and periodic boundary conditions are discussed. Discretization-related issues arise when derivatives are replaced by finite differences and when integrals are replaced by summations. These approximations can lead to mask features that do not have exact dimensions. The effects of discretization error on phase wells and thin films are shown. The reflectivity of certain thin film layers is seen to be very sensitive to the layer thickness. Simulation experiments and theory are used to determine how fine a discretization is necessary and various discretization schemes that help minimize error are presented. Boundary-condition-related errors arise from the use of periodic boundary conditions when simulating isolated mask features. The effects of periodic boundary conditions are assessed through the use of simulation experiments. All errors are associated with an ever-present trade-off between accuracy and computational resources. However, choosing the cell size wisely can, in many cases, minimize error without significantly increasing computation resource requirements.

  1. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Body Area Networks Using the Finite-Difference-Time-Domain Method

    PubMed Central

    Bringuier, Jonathan N.; Mittra, Raj

    2012-01-01

    A rigorous full-wave solution, via the Finite-Difference-Time-Domain (FDTD) method, is performed in an attempt to obtain realistic communication channel models for on-body wireless transmission in Body-Area-Networks (BANs), which are local data networks using the human body as a propagation medium. The problem of modeling the coupling between body mounted antennas is often not amenable to attack by hybrid techniques owing to the complex nature of the human body. For instance, the time-domain Green's function approach becomes more involved when the antennas are not conformal. Furthermore, the human body is irregular in shape and has dispersion properties that are unique. One consequence of this is that we must resort to modeling the antenna network mounted on the body in its entirety, and the number of degrees of freedom (DoFs) can be on the order of billions. Even so, this type of problem can still be modeled by employing a parallel version of the FDTD algorithm running on a cluster. Lastly, we note that the results of rigorous simulation of BANs can serve as benchmarks for comparison with the abundance of measurement data. PMID:23012575

  2. Finite difference time domain calculation of transients in antennas with nonlinear loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.; Kunz, Karl S.; Chamberlin, Kent

    1991-01-01

    Determining transient electromagnetic fields in antennas with nonlinear loads is a challenging problem. Typical methods used involve calculating frequency domain parameters at a large number of different frequencies, then applying Fourier transform methods plus nonlinear equation solution techniques. If the antenna is simple enough so that the open circuit time domain voltage can be determined independently of the effects of the nonlinear load on the antennas current, time stepping methods can be applied in a straightforward way. Here, transient fields for antennas with more general geometries are calculated directly using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods. In each FDTD cell which contains a nonlinear load, a nonlinear equation is solved at each time step. As a test case, the transient current in a long dipole antenna with a nonlinear load excited by a pulsed plane wave is computed using this approach. The results agree well with both calculated and measured results previously published. The approach given here extends the applicability of the FDTD method to problems involving scattering from targets, including nonlinear loads and materials, and to coupling between antennas containing nonlinear loads. It may also be extended to propagation through nonlinear materials.

  3. 3D Finite Difference Modelling of Basaltic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell-Sørensen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The main purpose of the work was to generate realistic data to be applied for testing of processing and migration tools for basaltic regions. The project is based on the three - dimensional finite difference code (FD), TIGER, made by Sintef. The FD code was optimized (parallelized) by the author, to run on parallel computers. The parallel code enables us to model large-scale realistic geological models and to apply traditional seismic and micro seismic sources. The parallel code uses multiple processors in order to manipulate subsets of large amounts of data simultaneously. The general anisotropic code uses 21 elastic coefficients. Eight independent coefficients are needed as input parameters for the general TI medium. In the FD code, the elastic wave field computation is implemented by a higher order FD solution to the elastic wave equation and the wave fields are computed on a staggered grid, shifted half a node in one or two directions. The geological model is a gridded basalt model, which covers from 24 km to 37 km of a real shot line in horizontal direction and from the water surface to the depth of 3.5 km. The 2frac {1}{2}D model has been constructed using the compound modeling software from Norsk Hydro. The vertical parameter distribution is obtained from observations in two wells. At The depth of between 1100 m to 1500 m, a basalt horizon covers the whole sub surface layers. We have shown that it is possible to simulate a line survey in realistic (3D) geological models in reasonable time by using high performance computers. The author would like to thank Norsk Hydro, Statoil, GEUS, and SINTEF for very helpful discussions and Parallab for being helpful with the new IBM, p690 Regatta system.

  4. Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering and Absorption by Particles in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Fu, Q.

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique has been extended to simulate light scattering and absorption by nonspherical particles embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition is used to truncate the computational domain. When computing the single-scattering properties of a particle in an absorbing dielectric medium, we derive the single-scattering properties including scattering phase functions, extinction, and absorption efficiencies using a volume integration of the internal field. A Mie solution for light scattering and absorption by spherical particles in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD code. It is found that the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies from the 3-D UPML FDTD are less than similar to 2%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically less than similar to 5%. The errors in the asymmetry factors are less than similar to 0.l%. For light scattering by particles in free space, the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD scheme is similar to a previous model.

  5. Influence of voxelization on finite difference time domain simulations of head-related transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Prepeliță, Sebastian; Geronazzo, Michele; Avanzini, Federico; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-05-01

    The scattering around the human pinna that is captured by the Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) is a complex problem that creates uncertainties in both acoustical measurements and simulations. Within the simulation framework of Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) with axis-aligned staircase boundaries resulting from a voxelization process, the voxelization-based uncertainty propagating in the HRTF-captured sound field is quantified for one solid and two surface voxelization algorithms. Simulated results utilizing a laser-scanned mesh of Knowles Electronics Manikin for Acoustic Research (KEMAR) show that in the context of complex geometries with local topology comparable to grid spacing such as the human pinna, the voxelization-related uncertainties in simulations emerge at lower frequencies than the generally used accuracy bandwidths. Numerical simulations show that the voxelization process induces both random error and algorithm-dependent bias in the simulated HRTF spectral features. Frequencies fr below which the random error is bounded by various dB thresholds are estimated and predicted. Particular shortcomings of the used voxelization algorithms are identified and the influence of the surface impedance on the induced errors is studied. Simulations are also validated against measurements. PMID:27250145

  6. Finite-difference time-domain analysis for the dynamics and diffraction of exciton-polaritons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minfeng; Chang, Yia-Chung; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2015-10-01

    We adopted a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme to simulate the dynamics and diffraction of exciton-polaritons, governed by the coupling of polarization waves with electromagnetic waves. The polarization wave, an approximate solution to the Schrödinger's equation at low frequencies, essentially captures the exciton behavior. Numerical stability of the scheme is analyzed and simple examples are provided to prove its validity. The system considered is both temporally and spatially dispersive, for which the FDTD analysis has attracted less attention in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that the FDTD scheme could be useful for studying the optical response of the exciton-polariton and its dynamics. The diffraction of a polariton wave from a polaritonic grating is also considered, and many sharp resonances are found, which manifest the interference effect of polariton waves. This illustrates that the measurement of transmittance or reflectance near polariton resonance can reveal subwavelength features in semiconductors, which are sensitive to polariton scattering. PMID:26479940

  7. Light Scattering by Gaussian Particles: A Solution with Finite-Difference Time Domain Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Nousiainen, T.; Fu, Q.; Loeb, N. G.; Videen, G.; Muinonen, K.

    2003-01-01

    The understanding of single-scattering properties of complex ice crystals has significance in atmospheric radiative transfer and remote-sensing applications. In this work, light scattering by irregularly shaped Gaussian ice crystals is studied with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. For given sample particle shapes and size parameters in the resonance region, the scattering phase matrices and asymmetry factors are calculated. It is found that the deformation of the particle surface can significantly smooth the scattering phase functions and slightly reduce the asymmetry factors. The polarization properties of irregular ice crystals are also significantly different from those of spherical cloud particles. These FDTD results could provide a reference for approximate light-scattering models developed for irregular particle shapes and can have potential applications in developing a much simpler practical light scattering model for ice clouds angular-distribution models and for remote sensing of ice clouds and aerosols using polarized light. (copyright) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transfer-matrix approach for finite-difference time-domain simulation of periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Deinega, Alexei; Belousov, Sergei; Valuev, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Optical properties of periodic structures can be calculated using the transfer-matrix approach, which establishes a relation between amplitudes of the wave incident on a structure with transmitted or reflected waves. The transfer matrix can be used to obtain transmittance and reflectance spectra of finite periodic structures as well as eigenmodes of infinite structures. Traditionally, calculation of the transfer matrix is performed in the frequency domain and involves linear algebra. In this work, we present a technique for calculation of the transfer matrix using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and show the way of its implementation in FDTD code. To illustrate the performance of our technique we calculate the transmittance spectra for opal photonic crystal slabs consisting of multiple layers of spherical scatterers. Our technique can be used for photonic band structure calculations. It can also be combined with existing FDTD methods for the analysis of periodic structures at an oblique incidence, as well as for modeling point sources in a periodic environment. PMID:24329377

  9. Surface stress on the erythrocyte under laser irradiation with finite-difference time-domain calculation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Tong; Chen, Ji-Yao; Lin, Zhi-Fang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Pei-Nan; Gu, Min

    2005-01-01

    The surface stress on the real shape (biconcave disklike) of an erythrocyte under laser irradiation is theoretically studied according to the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The distribution of the surface stresses depends on the orientation of erythrocytes in the laser beam. Typically when the erythrocyte was irradiated from the side direction (the laser beam was perpendicular to the normal of the erythrocyte plane), the surface stresses were so asymmetrical and nonuniform that the magnitude of the surface stress on the back surface was three times higher than that on the front surface, and the highest-to-lowest ratio of the stress reached 16 times. For comparison, the surface stress was also calculated according to the ray optics (RO) method. The tendency of the stress distribution from the RO calculation was roughly similar to that of the FDTD method. However the RO calculation produced some unphysical results, such as the infinite stress on some surface region and the zero stress on the most parts of the erythrocyte surface, which is due to the neglecting of light diffraction. The results obtained from the FDTD calculation are believed quantitatively reliable, because the FDTD method automatically takes into account of the diffraction and interference effects of the light wave. Thus, the FDTD method is more suitable than the RO method for the stress study of erythrocytes. PMID:16409078

  10. Evaluation of a thin-slot formalism for finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.D.; Bacon, L.D.

    1987-03-01

    A thin-slot formalism for use with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetics codes has been evaluated in both two and three dimensions. This formalism allows narrow slots to be modeled in the wall of a scatterer without reducing the space grid size to the gap width. In two dimensions, the evaluation involves the calculation of the total fields near two infinitesimally thin coplanar strips separated by a gap. A method-of-moments (MoM) solution of the same problem is used as a benchmark for comparison. Results in two dimensions show that up to 10% error can be expected in total electric and magnetic fields both near (lambda/40) and far (1 lambda) from the slot. In three dimensions, the evaluation is similar. The finite-length slot is placed in a finite plate and an MoM surface patch solution is used for the benchmark. These results, although less extensive than those in two dimensions, show that slightly larger errors can be expected. Considering the approximations made near the slot in incorporating the formalism, the results are very promising. Possibilities also exist for applying this formalism to walls of arbitrary thickness and to other types of slots, such as overlapping joints. 11 refs., 25 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Finite-difference time-domain synthesis of infrasound propagation through an absorbing atmosphere.

    PubMed

    de Groot-Hedlin, C

    2008-09-01

    Equations applicable to finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation of infrasound propagation through an absorbing atmosphere are derived and examined in this paper. It is shown that over altitudes up to 160 km, and at frequencies relevant to global infrasound propagation, i.e., 0.02-5 Hz, the acoustic absorption in dB/m varies approximately as the square of the propagation frequency plus a small constant term. A second-order differential equation is presented for an atmosphere modeled as a compressible Newtonian fluid with low shear viscosity, acted on by a small external damping force. It is shown that the solution to this equation represents pressure fluctuations with the attenuation indicated above. Increased dispersion is predicted at altitudes over 100 km at infrasound frequencies. The governing propagation equation is separated into two partial differential equations that are first order in time for FDTD implementation. A numerical analysis of errors inherent to this FDTD method shows that the attenuation term imposes additional stability constraints on the FDTD algorithm. Comparison of FDTD results for models with and without attenuation shows that the predicted transmission losses for the attenuating media agree with those computed from synthesized waveforms. PMID:19045635

  12. Finite-difference time-domain studies of the optical properties of nanoshell dimers.

    PubMed

    Oubre, C; Nordlander, P

    2005-05-26

    The optical properties of metallic nanoshell dimers are investigated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We discuss issues of numerical convergence specific for the dimer system. We present results for both homodimers and heterodimers. The results show that retardation effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of realistic size nanoparticle dimers. The optical properties of the nanoshell dimer are found to be strongly polarization dependent. Maximal coupling between the nanoshells in a dimer occurs when the electric field of the incident pulse is aligned parallel to the dimer axis. The wavelengths of the peaks in the extinction cross section of the dimer are shown to vary by more than 100 nm, depending on the incident electric field polarization. The calculations show that electric field enhancements in the dimer junctions depend strongly on dimer separation. The maximum field enhancements occur in the dimer junction and at the expense of a reduced electric field enhancement in other regions of space. We investigate the usefulness of nanoshell dimers substrates for SERS by integrating the fourth power of the electric field enhancements around the surfaces of the nanoparticles as a function of dimer separation and wavelength. The SERS efficiency is shown to depend strongly on dimer separation but much weaker than the fourth power of the maximum electric field enhancement at a particular point. The SERS efficiency is also found to depend strongly on the wavelength of the incident light. Maximum SERS efficiency occurs for resonant excitation of the dimer plasmons. PMID:16852215

  13. An electromagnetic finite difference time domain analog treatment of small signal acoustic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, K.; Steich, D.; Lewis, K.; Landrum, C.; Barth, M.

    1994-03-01

    Hyperbolic partial differential equations encompass an extremely important set of physical phenomena including electromagnetics and acoustics. Small amplitude acoustic interactions behave much the same as electromagnetic interactions for longitudinal acoustic waves because of the similar nature of the governing hyperbolic equations. Differences appear when transverse acoustic waves are considered; nonetheless, the strong analogy between the acoustic and electromagnetic phenomena prompted the development of a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) acoustic analog to the existing electromagnetic FDTD technique. The advantages of an acoustic FDTD (AFDTD) code are as follows: (1) boundary condition-free treatment of the acoustic scatterer--only the intrinsic properties of the scatterer's material are needed, no shell treatment or other set of special equations describing the macroscopic behavior of a sheet of material or a junction, etc. are required; this allows completely general geometries and materials in the model. (2) Advanced outer radiation boundary condition analogs--in the electromagnetics arena, highly absorbing outer radiation boundary conditions were developed that can be applied with little modification to the acoustics arena with equal success. (3) A suite of preexisting capabilities related to electromagnetic modeling--this includes automated model generation and interaction visualization as its most important components and is best exemplified by the capabilities of the LLNL generated TSAR electromagnetic FDTD code.

  14. Finite-difference time-domain modelling of through-the-Earth radio signal propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralchenko, M.; Svilans, M.; Samson, C.; Roper, M.

    2015-12-01

    This research seeks to extend the knowledge of how a very low frequency (VLF) through-the-Earth (TTE) radio signal behaves as it propagates underground, by calculating and visualizing the strength of the electric and magnetic fields for an arbitrary geology through numeric modelling. To achieve this objective, a new software tool has been developed using the finite-difference time-domain method. This technique is particularly well suited to visualizing the distribution of electromagnetic fields in an arbitrary geology. The frequency range of TTE radio (400-9000 Hz) and geometrical scales involved (1 m resolution for domains a few hundred metres in size) involves processing a grid composed of millions of cells for thousands of time steps, which is computationally expensive. Graphics processing unit acceleration was used to reduce execution time from days and weeks, to minutes and hours. Results from the new modelling tool were compared to three cases for which an analytic solution is known. Two more case studies were done featuring complex geologic environments relevant to TTE communications that cannot be solved analytically. There was good agreement between numeric and analytic results. Deviations were likely caused by numeric artifacts from the model boundaries; however, in a TTE application in field conditions, the uncertainty in the conductivity of the various geologic formations will greatly outweigh these small numeric errors.

  15. Finite difference time domain model of ultrasound propagation in agarose scaffold containing collagen or chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Malo, Markus K H; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of ultrasound backscattering is a promising diagnostic technique for arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage. However, contribution of collagen and chondrocytes on ultrasound backscattering and speed of sound in cartilage is not fully understood and is experimentally difficult to study. Agarose hydrogels have been used in tissue engineering applications of cartilage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to simulate the propagation of high frequency ultrasound (40 MHz) in agarose scaffolds with varying concentrations of chondrocytes (1 to 32 × 10(6) cells/ml) and collagen (1.56-200 mg/ml) using transversely isotropic two-dimensional finite difference time domain method (FDTD). Backscatter and speed of sound were evaluated from the simulated pulse-echo and through transmission measurements, respectively. Ultrasound backscatter increased with increasing collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Furthermore, speed of sound increased with increasing collagen concentration. However, this was not observed with increasing chondrocyte concentrations. The present study suggests that the FDTD method may have some applicability in simulations of ultrasound scattering and propagation in constructs containing collagen and chondrocytes. Findings of this study indicate the significant role of collagen and chondrocytes as ultrasound scatterers and can aid in development of modeling approaches for understanding how cartilage architecture affects to the propagation of high frequency ultrasound. PMID:27475127

  16. Simulation of optical devices using parallel finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kang; Kong, Fanmin; Mei, Liangmo; Liu, Xin

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a new parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical method in a low-cost network environment to stimulate optical waveguide characteristics. The PC motherboard based cluster is used, as it is relatively low-cost, reliable and has high computing performance. Four clusters are networked by fast Ethernet technology. Due to the simplicity nature of FDTD algorithm, a native Ethernet packet communication mechanism is used to reduce the overhead of the communication between the adjacent clusters. To validate the method, a microcavity ring resonator based on semiconductor waveguides is chosen as an instance of FDTD parallel computation. Speed-up rate under different division density is calculated. From the result we can conclude that when the decomposing size reaches a certain point, a good parallel computing speed up will be maintained. This simulation shows that through the overlapping of computation and communication method and controlling the decomposing size, the overhead of the communication of the shared data will be conquered. The result indicates that the implementation can achieve significant speed up for the FDTD algorithm. This will enable us to tackle the larger real electromagnetic problem by the low-cost PC clusters.

  17. Three-dimensional viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference seismic modelling using the staggered Adams-Bashforth time integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Wittkamp, Florian

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the performance of a higher order accurate staggered viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference method, in which the staggered Adams-Bashforth (ABS) third-order and fourth-order accurate time integrators are used for temporal discretization. ABS is a multistep method that uses previously calculated wavefields to increase the order of accuracy in time. The analysis shows that the numerical dispersion is much lower than that of the widely used second-order leapfrog method. Numerical dissipation is introduced by the ABS method which is significantly smaller for fourth-order than third-order accuracy. In 1-D and 3-D simulation experiments, we verify the convincing improvements of simulation accuracy of the fourth-order ABS method. In a realistic elastic 3-D scenario, the computing time reduces by a factor of approximately 2.4, whereas the memory requirements increase by approximately a factor of 2.2. The ABS method thus provides an alternative strategy to increase the simulation accuracy in time by investing computer memory instead of computing time.

  18. Auralization of concert hall acoustics using finite difference time domain methods and wave field synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochgraf, Kelsey

    Auralization methods have been used for a long time to simulate the acoustics of a concert hall for different seat positions. The goal of this thesis was to apply the concept of auralization to a larger audience area that the listener could walk through to compare differences in acoustics for a wide range of seat positions. For this purpose, the acoustics of Rensselaer's Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) Concert Hall were simulated to create signals for a 136 channel wave field synthesis (WFS) system located at Rensselaer's Collaborative Research Augmented Immersive Virtual Environment (CRAIVE) Laboratory. By allowing multiple people to dynamically experience the concert hall's acoustics at the same time, this research gained perspective on what is important for achieving objective accuracy and subjective plausibility in an auralization. A finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation on a three-dimensional face-centered cubic grid, combined at a crossover frequency of 800 Hz with a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation, was found to have a reverberation time, direct to reverberant sound energy ratio, and early reflection pattern that more closely matched measured data from the hall compared to a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation and other hybrid simulations. In the CRAIVE lab, nine experienced listeners found all hybrid auralizations (with varying source location, grid resolution, crossover frequency, and number of loudspeakers) to be more perceptually plausible than the CATT-Acoustic(TM) auralization. The FDTD simulation required two days to compute, while the CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation required three separate TUCT(TM) computations, each taking four hours, to accommodate the large number of receivers. Given the perceptual advantages realized with WFS for auralization of a large, inhomogeneous sound field, it is recommended that hybrid simulations be used in the future to achieve more accurate and plausible auralizations. Predictions are made for a

  19. Use of the finite-difference time-domain method in electromagnetic dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Although there are acceptable methods for calculating whole body electromagnetic absorption, no completely acceptable method for calculating the local specific absorption rate (SAR) at points within the body has been developed. Frequency domain methods, such as the method of moments (MoM) have achieved some success; however, the MoM requires computer storage on the order of (3N)/sup 2/, and computation time on the order of (3N)/sup 3/ where N is the number of cells. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been employed extensively in calculating the scattering from metallic objects, and recently is seeing some use in calculating the interaction of EM fields with complex, lossy dielectric bodies. Since the FDTD method has storage and time requirements proportional to N, it presents an attractive alternative to calculating SAR distribution in large bodies. This dissertation describes the FDTD method and evaluates it by comparing its results with analytic solutions in 2 and 3 dimensions. The results obtained demonstrate that the FDTD method is capable of calculating internal SAR distribution with acceptable accuracy. The construction of a data base to provide detailed, inhomogeneous man models for use with the FDTD method is described. Using this construction method, a model of 40,000 1.31 cm. cells is developed for use at 350 MHz, and another model consisting of 5000 2.62 cm. cells is developed for use at 100 MHz. To add more realism to the problem, a ground plane is added to the FDTD software. The needed changes to the software are described, along with a test which confirms its accuracy. Using the CRAY II supercomputer, SAR distributions in human models are calculated using incident frequencies of 100 MHz and 350 MHz for three different cases: (1) A homogeneous man model in free space, (2) an inhomogeneous man model in free space, and (3) an inhomogeneous man model standing on a ground plane.

  20. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of heterostructures with inclusion of arbitrarily complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejdoubi, Abdelilah; Brosseau, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Currently, there is a great interest in tailoring the polarization properties of composite materials with the goal of controlling the dielectric behavior. This paper reports finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling of the dielectric behavior of two-dimensional (2D) lossless two-phase heterostructures. More specifically, we present extensive results of 2D FDTD computations on the quasistatic effective permittivity of a single inclusion, with arbitrarily complex geometry (regular polygons and fractals), embedded in a plane. The uniaxial perfectly matched layer-absorbing boundary condition is found adequate for truncating the boundary of the 2D space because it leads to only very small backreflections. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by the variety of geometries modeled, i.e., regular polygons and fractals, and permittivity contrast ratios which allows us to distinguish between effects of surface fraction and effects of morphology. Our calculations show that geometrical effects can give rise to significant modifications of the surface fraction dependence of the permittivity. The results are compared with Maxwell-Garnett (MG) and symmetric Bruggeman (SBG) formulas. As expected the effective permittivity in the situations considered here deviates from the MG and SBG results at high surface fractions and/or high permittivity ratios between the inclusion and the host medium. In addition, the results show that a two-phase composite containing a fractal-boundary inclusion, e.g., Koch's snowflake, can have a permittivity which is several tens of percent lower between the first and the fourth iteration of the structure at a fixed perimeter-to-surface ratio. This feature is consistent with the fact that as the surface fraction becomes higher, the inclusion rough boundaries dominate the overall geometry. We believe that simplified modeling such as the modeling done here can serve as a useful purpose in understanding the interplay between the structure and

  1. COMPARISON OF FINITE-DIFFERENCE TIME DOMAIN SAR CALCULATIONS WITH MEASUREMENT IN A HETEROGENEOUS MODEL OF MAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A finite-difference time-domain technique was used to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) at various sites in a heterogeneous block model of man. he block model represented a close approximation to a full-scale heterogeneous phantom model. oth models were comprised of a ...

  2. High-performance finite-difference time-domain simulations of C-Mod and ITER RF antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Smithe, David N.

    2015-12-01

    Finite-difference time-domain methods have, in recent years, developed powerful capabilities for modeling realistic ICRF behavior in fusion plasmas [1, 2, 3, 4]. When coupled with the power of modern high-performance computing platforms, such techniques allow the behavior of antenna near and far fields, and the flow of RF power, to be studied in realistic experimental scenarios at previously inaccessible levels of resolution. In this talk, we present results and 3D animations from high-performance FDTD simulations on the Titan Cray XK7 supercomputer, modeling both Alcator C-Mod's field-aligned ICRF antenna and the ITER antenna module. Much of this work focuses on scans over edge density, and tailored edge density profiles, to study dispersion and the physics of slow wave excitation in the immediate vicinity of the antenna hardware and SOL. An understanding of the role of the lower-hybrid resonance in low-density scenarios is emerging, and possible implications of this for the NSTX launcher and power balance are also discussed. In addition, we discuss ongoing work centered on using these simulations to estimate sputtering and impurity production, as driven by the self-consistent sheath potentials at antenna surfaces.

  3. High-performance finite-difference time-domain simulations of C-Mod and ITER RF antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G. Smithe, David N.

    2015-12-10

    Finite-difference time-domain methods have, in recent years, developed powerful capabilities for modeling realistic ICRF behavior in fusion plasmas [1, 2, 3, 4]. When coupled with the power of modern high-performance computing platforms, such techniques allow the behavior of antenna near and far fields, and the flow of RF power, to be studied in realistic experimental scenarios at previously inaccessible levels of resolution. In this talk, we present results and 3D animations from high-performance FDTD simulations on the Titan Cray XK7 supercomputer, modeling both Alcator C-Mod’s field-aligned ICRF antenna and the ITER antenna module. Much of this work focuses on scans over edge density, and tailored edge density profiles, to study dispersion and the physics of slow wave excitation in the immediate vicinity of the antenna hardware and SOL. An understanding of the role of the lower-hybrid resonance in low-density scenarios is emerging, and possible implications of this for the NSTX launcher and power balance are also discussed. In addition, we discuss ongoing work centered on using these simulations to estimate sputtering and impurity production, as driven by the self-consistent sheath potentials at antenna surfaces.

  4. 3D Vectorial Time Domain Computational Integrated Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Bond, T C; Koning, J M; Stowell, M L

    2007-02-16

    The design of integrated photonic structures poses considerable challenges. 3D-Time-Domain design tools are fundamental in enabling technologies such as all-optical logic, photonic bandgap sensors, THz imaging, and fast radiation diagnostics. Such technologies are essential to LLNL and WFO sponsors for a broad range of applications: encryption for communications and surveillance sensors (NSA, NAI and IDIV/PAT); high density optical interconnects for high-performance computing (ASCI); high-bandwidth instrumentation for NIF diagnostics; micro-sensor development for weapon miniaturization within the Stockpile Stewardship and DNT programs; and applications within HSO for CBNP detection devices. While there exist a number of photonics simulation tools on the market, they primarily model devices of interest to the communications industry. We saw the need to extend our previous software to match the Laboratory's unique emerging needs. These include modeling novel material effects (such as those of radiation induced carrier concentrations on refractive index) and device configurations (RadTracker bulk optics with radiation induced details, Optical Logic edge emitting lasers with lateral optical inputs). In addition we foresaw significant advantages to expanding our own internal simulation codes: parallel supercomputing could be incorporated from the start, and the simulation source code would be accessible for modification and extension. This work addressed Engineering's Simulation Technology Focus Area, specifically photonics. Problems addressed from the Engineering roadmap of the time included modeling the Auston switch (an important THz source/receiver), modeling Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs, which had been envisioned as part of fast radiation sensors), and multi-scale modeling of optical systems (for a variety of applications). We proposed to develop novel techniques to numerically solve the 3D multi-scale propagation problem for both the microchip

  5. Accurate computation of the radiation from simple antennas using the finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, James G.; Smith, Glenn S.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.

    1990-07-01

    Two antennas are considered, a cylindrical monopole and a conical monopole. Both are driven through an image plane from a coaxial transmission line. Each of these antennas corresponds to a well-posed theoretical electromagnetic boundary value problem and a realizable experimental model. These antennas are analyzed by a straightforward application of the time-domain finite-difference method. The computed results for these antennas are shown to be in excellent agreement with accurate experimental measurements for both the time domain and the frequency domain. The graphical displays presented for the transient near-zone and far-zone radiation from these antennas provide physical insight into the radiation process.

  6. Study of two-dimensional transient cavity fields using the finite-difference time-domain technique

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.L.

    1988-06-01

    This work is intended to be a study into the application of the finite-difference time-domain, or FD-TD technique, to some of the problems faced by designers of equipment used in modern accelerators. In particular it discusses using the FD-TD algorithm to study the field distribution of a simple two-dimensional cavity in both space and time. 18 refs.

  7. Memory cost of absorbing conditions for the finite-difference time-domain method.

    PubMed

    Chobeau, Pierre; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-07-01

    Three absorbing layers are investigated using standard rectilinear finite-difference schemes. The perfectly matched layer (PML) is compared with basic lossy layers terminated by two types of absorbing boundary conditions, all simulated using equivalent memory consumption. Lossy layers present the advantage of being scalar schemes, whereas the PML relies on a staggered scheme where both velocity and pressure are split. Although the PML gives the lowest reflection magnitudes over all frequencies and incidence angles, the most efficient lossy layer gives reflection magnitudes of the same order as the PML from mid- to high-frequency and for restricted incidence angles. PMID:27475200

  8. Finite difference time domain electromagnetic scattering from frequency-dependent lossy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Four different FDTD computer codes and companion Radar Cross Section (RCS) conversion codes on magnetic media are submitted. A single three dimensional dispersive FDTD code for both dispersive dielectric and magnetic materials was developed, along with a user's manual. The extension of FDTD to more complicated materials was made. The code is efficient and is capable of modeling interesting radar targets using a modest computer workstation platform. RCS results for two different plate geometries are reported. The FDTD method was also extended to computing far zone time domain results in two dimensions. Also the capability to model nonlinear materials was incorporated into FDTD and validated.

  9. Simulation of planar integrated photonics devices with the LLNL time-domain finite-difference code suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, R.; Hawkins, R. J.; Kallman, J. S.

    1991-04-01

    Interest has recently grown in applying microwave modeling techniques to optical circuit modeling. One of the simplest, yet most powerful, microwave simulation techniques is the finite-difference time-domain algorithm (FDTD). In this technique, the differential form of the time-domain Maxwell's equations are discretized and all derivatives are approximated as differences. Minor algebraic manipulations on the resulting equations produces a set of update equations that produce fields at a given time step from fields at the previous time step. The FDTD algorithm, then, is quite simple. Source fields are launched into the discrete grid by some means. The FDTD equations advance these fields in time. At the boundaries of the grid, special update equations called radiation conditions are applied that approximate a continuing, infinite space. Because virtually no assumptions are made in the development of the FDTD method, the algorithm is able to represent a wide-range of physical effects. Waves can propagate in any direction, multiple reflections within structures can cause resonances, multiple modes of various polarizations can be launched, each of which may generate within the device an infinite spectrum of bound and radiation modes. The ability to model these types of general physical effects is what makes the FDTD method interesting to the field of optics. In this paper, we discuss the application of the finite-difference time-domain technique to integrated optics. Animations will be shown of the simulations of a TE coupler, TM grating, and a TE integrated detector.

  10. Time domain topology optimization of 3D nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elesin, Y.; Lazarov, B. S.; Jensen, J. S.; Sigmund, O.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient parallel topology optimization framework for design of large scale 3D nanophotonic devices. The code shows excellent scalability and is demonstrated for optimization of broadband frequency splitter, waveguide intersection, photonic crystal-based waveguide and nanowire-based waveguide. The obtained results are compared to simplified 2D studies and we demonstrate that 3D topology optimization may lead to significant performance improvements.

  11. Development of a Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Model for Propagation of Transient Sounds in Very Shallow Water.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Mark W; Luczkovich, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    This finite-difference time domain (FDTD) model for sound propagation in very shallow water uses pressure and velocity grids with both 3-dimensional Cartesian and 2-dimensional cylindrical implementations. Parameters, including water and sediment properties, can vary in each dimension. Steady-state and transient signals from discrete and distributed sources, such as the surface of a vibrating pile, can be used. The cylindrical implementation uses less computation but requires axial symmetry. The Cartesian implementation allows asymmetry. FDTD calculations compare well with those of a split-step parabolic equation. Applications include modeling the propagation of individual fish sounds, fish aggregation sounds, and distributed sources. PMID:26611072

  12. Finite-difference time-domain methods to analyze ytterbium-doped Q-switched fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Haroldo T; Khaleque, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Q-switched lasers are widely used in material processing, laser ranging, medicine, and nonlinear optics--in particular, Q-switched lasers in optical fibers are important since they cannot only generate high peak powers but can also concentrate high peak powers in small areas. In this paper, we present new finite-difference time-domain methods that analyze the dynamics of Q-switched fiber lasers, which are more flexible and robust than previous methods. We extend the method to analyze fiber ring lasers and compare the results with our experiments. PMID:26974625

  13. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  14. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  15. Finite-difference algorithms for the time-domain Maxwell's equations - A numerical approach to RCS analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, Hoang; Dwyer, Harry A.; Van Dam, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    The applications of two CFD-based finite-difference methods to computational electromagnetics are investigated. In the first method, the time-domain Maxwell's equations are solved using the explicit Lax-Wendroff scheme and in the second method, the second-order wave equations satisfying the Maxwell's equations are solved using the implicit Crank-Nicolson scheme. The governing equations are transformed to a generalized curvilinear coordinate system and solved on a body-conforming mesh using the scattered-field formulation. The induced surface current and the bistatic radar cross section are computed and the results are validated for several two-dimensional test cases involving perfectly-conducting scatterers submerged in transverse-magnetic plane waves.

  16. Study of ITER plasma position reflectometer using a two-dimensional full-wave finite-difference time domain code

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, F. da

    2008-10-15

    The EU will supply the plasma position reflectometer for ITER. The system will have channels located at different poloidal positions, some of them obliquely viewing a plasma which has a poloidal density divergence and curvature, both adverse conditions for profile measurements. To understand the impact of such topology in the reconstruction of density profiles a full-wave two-dimensional finite-difference time domain O-mode code with the capability for frequency sweep was used. Simulations show that the reconstructed density profiles still meet the ITER radial accuracy specifications for plasma position (1 cm), except for the highest densities. Other adverse effects such as multireflections induced by the blanket, density fluctuations, and MHD activity were considered and a first understanding on their impact obtained.

  17. The finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method for electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taflove, A.; Umashankar, K. R.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation and recent applications of the finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method for the numerical modeling of electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems are considered. It is shown that improvements in FD-TD modeling concepts and software implementation often make it a preferable choice for structures which cannot be easily treated by conventional integral equations and asymptotic approaches. Recent FD-TD modeling validations in research areas including coupling to wires and wire bundles in free space and cavities, scattering from surfaces in relativistic motion, inverse scattering, and radiation condition theory, are reviewed. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of FD-TD, and guidelines concerning when FD-TD should and should not be used in high-frequency electromagnetic modeling problems, are summarized.

  18. Tomographic reconstruction of melanin structures of optical coherence tomography via the finite-difference time-domain simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shi-Hao; Wang, Shiang-Jiu; Tseng, Snow H.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high resolution, cross-sectional image of internal microstructure of biological tissue. We use the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method (FDTD) to analyze the data acquired by OCT, which can help us reconstruct the refractive index of the biological tissue. We calculate the refractive index tomography and try to match the simulation with the data acquired by OCT. Specifically, we try to reconstruct the structure of melanin, which has complex refractive indices and is the key component of human pigment system. The results indicate that better reconstruction can be achieved for homogenous sample, whereas the reconstruction is degraded for samples with fine structure or with complex interface. Simulation reconstruction shows structures of the Melanin that may be useful for biomedical optics applications.

  19. Sparkling feather reflections of a bird-of-paradise explained by finite-difference time-domain modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2014-01-01

    Birds-of-paradise are nature’s prime examples of the evolution of color by sexual selection. Their brilliant, structurally colored feathers play a principal role in mating displays. The structural coloration of both the occipital and breast feathers of the bird-of-paradise Lawes’ parotia is produced by melanin rodlets arranged in layers, together acting as interference reflectors. Light reflection by the silvery colored occipital feathers is unidirectional as in a classical multilayer, but the reflection by the richly colored breast feathers is three-directional and extraordinarily complex. Here we show that the reflection properties of both feather types can be quantitatively explained by finite-difference time-domain modeling using realistic feather anatomies and experimentally determined refractive index dispersion values of keratin and melanin. The results elucidate the interplay between avian coloration and vision and indicate tuning of the mating displays to the spectral properties of the avian visual system. PMID:24591592

  20. Sparkling feather reflections of a bird-of-paradise explained by finite-difference time-domain modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilts, Bodo D; Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2014-03-25

    Birds-of-paradise are nature's prime examples of the evolution of color by sexual selection. Their brilliant, structurally colored feathers play a principal role in mating displays. The structural coloration of both the occipital and breast feathers of the bird-of-paradise Lawes' parotia is produced by melanin rodlets arranged in layers, together acting as interference reflectors. Light reflection by the silvery colored occipital feathers is unidirectional as in a classical multilayer, but the reflection by the richly colored breast feathers is three-directional and extraordinarily complex. Here we show that the reflection properties of both feather types can be quantitatively explained by finite-difference time-domain modeling using realistic feather anatomies and experimentally determined refractive index dispersion values of keratin and melanin. The results elucidate the interplay between avian coloration and vision and indicate tuning of the mating displays to the spectral properties of the avian visual system. PMID:24591592

  1. Finite-difference time-domain-based optical microscopy simulation of dispersive media facilitates the development of optical imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Capoglu, Ilker; Li, Yue; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Chandler, John; Spicer, Graham; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-06-01

    Combining finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods and modeling of optical microscopy modalities, we previously developed an open-source software package called Angora, which is essentially a "microscope in a computer." However, the samples being simulated were limited to nondispersive media. Since media dispersions are common in biological samples (such as cells with staining and metallic biomarkers), we have further developed a module in Angora to simulate samples having complicated dispersion properties, thereby allowing the synthesis of microscope images of most biological samples. We first describe a method to integrate media dispersion into FDTD, and we validate the corresponding Angora dispersion module by applying Mie theory, as well as by experimentally imaging gold microspheres. Then, we demonstrate how Angora can facilitate the development of optical imaging techniques with a case study.

  2. A finite-difference time-domain simulation of high power microwave generated plasma at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Patrick J.; Beeson, Sterling R.; Krompholz, Hermann G.; Neuber, Andreas A.

    2012-07-15

    A finite-difference algorithm was developed to calculate several RF breakdown parameters, for example, the formative delay time that is observed between the initial application of a RF field to a dielectric surface and the formation of field-induced plasma interrupting the RF power flow. The analysis is focused on the surface being exposed to a background gas pressure above 50 Torr. The finite-difference algorithm provides numerical solutions to partial differential equations with high resolution in the time domain, making it suitable for simulating the time evolving interaction of microwaves with plasma; in lieu of direct particle tracking, a macroscopic electron density is used to model growth and transport. This approach is presented as an alternative to particle-in-cell methods due to its low complexity and runtime leading to more efficient analysis for a simulation of a microsecond scale pulse. The effect and development of the plasma is modeled in the simulation using scaling laws for ionization rates, momentum transfer collision rates, and diffusion coefficients, as a function of electric field, gas type and pressure. The incorporation of plasma material into the simulation involves using the Z-transform to derive a time-domain algorithm from the complex frequency-dependent permittivity of plasma. Therefore, the effect of the developing plasma on the instantaneous microwave field is calculated. Simulation results are compared with power measurements using an apparatus designed to facilitate surface flashover across a polycarbonate boundary in a controlled N{sub 2}, air, or argon environment at pressures exceeding 50 Torr.

  3. Audibility of dispersion error in room acoustic finite-difference time-domain simulation as a function of simulation distance.

    PubMed

    Saarelma, Jukka; Botts, Jonathan; Hamilton, Brian; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-04-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation has been a popular area of research in room acoustics due to its capability to simulate wave phenomena in a wide bandwidth directly in the time-domain. A downside of the method is that it introduces a direction and frequency dependent error to the simulated sound field due to the non-linear dispersion relation of the discrete system. In this study, the perceptual threshold of the dispersion error is measured in three-dimensional FDTD schemes as a function of simulation distance. Dispersion error is evaluated for three different explicit, non-staggered FDTD schemes using the numerical wavenumber in the direction of the worst-case error of each scheme. It is found that the thresholds for the different schemes do not vary significantly when the phase velocity error level is fixed. The thresholds are found to vary significantly between the different sound samples. The measured threshold for the audibility of dispersion error at the probability level of 82% correct discrimination for three-alternative forced choice is found to be 9.1 m of propagation in a free field, that leads to a maximum group delay error of 1.8 ms at 20 kHz with the chosen phase velocity error level of 2%. PMID:27106330

  4. Spatial parallelism of a 3D finite difference, velocity-stress elastic wave propagation code

    SciTech Connect

    Minkoff, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately, finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. The authors model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MPI library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speedup. Because I/O is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) the authors have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle I/O. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ghost cells. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, they observe excellent scaled speedup. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, they achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  5. Spatial Parallelism of a 3D Finite Difference, Velocity-Stress Elastic Wave Propagation Code

    SciTech Connect

    MINKOFF,SUSAN E.

    1999-12-09

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately. finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. We model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MP1 library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speed up. Because i/o is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) we have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle i/o. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ''ghost cells''. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, we observe excellent scaled speed up. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, we achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  6. Local Outer Radiating Boundary Conditions for the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method Applied to Maxwell's Equations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steich, David James

    1995-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is a simple yet powerful method for numerically solving electromagnetic wave phenomenon on computers. The FDTD technique discretizes Maxwell's equations with finite difference equations. These finite difference equations, which approximate local field behavior, are applied to large spatial lattices allowing calculation of a vast array of electromagnetical phenomenon. The greatest strengths of the FDTD method are in its simplicity, efficiency, and diversity. FDTD is capable of modeling the scattering and coupling to lossy dielectrics, lossy magnetics, anisotropic media, dispersive media, and nonlinear materials for general geometric shapes. Wideband frequency information can be obtained using FDTD for both near and far field observation points in a single computational run. However, along with all of its benefits, the FDTD algorithm has some deficiencies. For most problems of interest, poor accuracy at geometry interfaces of differing media and at outer problem space boundarys where the spatial lattice must be truncated are the two largest error sources of the FDTD algorithm. Although most accuracy issues can be circumvented by expending large amounts of computer memory and cpu time, using excessive computer resources is not always possible and is never appealing. The purpose of this thesis is to generalize, analyze, and test various mainstream local Outer Radiating Boundary Conditions (ORBCs) for the FDTD method applied to Maxwell's equations in order to help gain a better understanding of present ORBC limitations. A common mathematical model is presented for the boundary conditions. Boundary conditions shown to fit the model include Mur, Superabsorption, Liao, Higdon, and Lindman ORBCs of varying orders. Simple operators are defined and then used to generate the final discretized equations for each of the boundary conditions, automatically, without requiring complicated high order equations. The procedure also allows

  7. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Strong Ground Motion in the Upper Rhine Graben - 1356 Basel Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprsal, I.; Faeh, D.; Giardini, D.

    2002-12-01

    The disastrous Basel earthquake of October 18, 1356 (I0=X, M ≈ 6.9), appeared in, today seismically modest, Basel region (Upper Rhine Graben). The lack of strong ground motion seismic data can be effectively supplied by numerical modeling. We applied the 3D finite differences (FD) to predict ground motions which can be used for microzonation and hazard assessment studies. The FD method is formulated for topography models on irregular rectangular grids. It is a 3D explicit FD formulation of the hyperbolic partial differential equation (PDE). Elastodynamic PDE is solved in the time domain. The Hooke's isotropic inhomogeneous medium contains discontinuities and a topographic free surface. The 3D elastic FD modeling is applied on a newly established P and S-wave velocities structure model. This complex structure contains main interfaces and gradients inside some layers. It is adjacent to the earth surface and includes topography (Kind, Faeh and Giardini, 2002, A 3D Reference Model for the Area of Basel, in prep.). The first attempt was done for a double-couple point source and relatively simple source function. Numerical tests are planned for several finite-extent source histories because the 1356 Basel earthquake source features have not been well determined, yet. The presumed finite-extent source is adjacent to the free surface. The results are compared to the macroseismic information of the Basel area.

  8. Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) design of gold nanoparticle chains with specific surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tira, Cristian; Tira, Daniela; Simon, Timea; Astilean, Simion

    2014-08-01

    We employ Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulations to analyze the electromagnetic far- and near-field response of gold nanoparticles (NPs) organized in chain-like structures as function of the number of particles and inter-particle distance in structures. As a result an empirical formula to predict the position of collective localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) as function of number of particles in the chain is devised. On the other hand the experimental LSPR spectrum recorded from a colloidal solution exhibiting a certain degree of aggregation has been effectively reconstructed by linear combination of individual LSPR contribution as calculated for NP ensembles of different size (monomers, dimers, trimers, etc.). Notably, we find that the maximum of electric field intensity (E2) in between adjacent NPs increases from dimeric to trimeric and tetrameric ensembles, followed by a steady state decrease as the number of NPs per chain further increases. The central gap in a long chain of NPs accommodate the highest field enhancement (‘hot-spots'). Our findings are relevant for designing effective substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and plasmonic waveguides.

  9. An efficient locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method based on the conformal scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Shao, Wei; Shi, Sheng-Bing; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Bing-Zhong

    2015-07-01

    An efficient conformal locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (LOD-CFDTD) method is presented for solving two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic (EM) scattering problems. The formulation for the 2D transverse-electric (TE) case is presented and its stability property and numerical dispersion relationship are theoretically investigated. It is shown that the introduction of irregular grids will not damage the numerical stability. Instead of the staircasing approximation, the conformal scheme is only employed to model the curve boundaries, whereas the standard Yee grids are used for the remaining regions. As the irregular grids account for a very small percentage of the total space grids, the conformal scheme has little effect on the numerical dispersion. Moreover, the proposed method, which requires fewer arithmetic operations than the alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) CFDTD method, leads to a further reduction of the CPU time. With the total-field/scattered-field (TF/SF) boundary and the perfectly matched layer (PML), the radar cross section (RCS) of two 2D structures is calculated. The numerical examples verify the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61331007 and 61471105).

  10. Unidirectional transparent signal injection in finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic codes -application to reflectometry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, F. da; Hacquin, S.

    2005-03-01

    We present a novel numerical signal injection technique allowing unidirectional injection of a wave in a wave-guiding structure, applicable to 2D finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic codes, both Maxwell and wave-equation. It is particularly suited to continuous wave radar-like simulations. The scheme gives an unidirectional injection of a signal while being transparent to waves propagating in the opposite direction (directional coupling). The reflected or backscattered waves (returned) are separated from the probing waves allowing direct access to the information on amplitude and phase of the returned wave. It also facilitates the signal processing used to extract the phase derivative (or group delay) when simulating radar systems. Although general, the technique is particularly suited to swept frequency sources (frequency modulated) in the context of reflectometry, a fusion plasma diagnostic. The UTS applications presented here are restricted to fusion plasma reflectometry simulations for different physical situations. This method can, nevertheless, also be used in other dispersive media such as dielectrics, being useful, for example, in the simulation of plasma filled waveguides or directional couplers.

  11. Locally non-uniform finite-difference time domain with application to stealth, crosstalk, and narrow apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, D. J.

    1993-04-01

    A technique to integrate a dense, locally non-uniform mesh into finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) codes is presented. The method is designed for the full-wave analysis of multi-material layers that are physically thin, but perhaps electrically thick. Such layers are often used for the purpose of suppressing electromagnetic reflections from conducting surfaces. Throughout the non-uniform local mesh, average values for the conductivity and permittivity are used, where as variations in permeability are accommodated by splitting H-field line integrals and enforcing continuity of the normal B field. A unique interpolation scheme provides accuracy and late-time stability for mesh discontinuities as large as 1000 to 1. Application is made to resistive sheets, the absorbing Salisbury screen, crosstalk on printed circuit boards, and apertures that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to a uniform cell. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with the MoM code CARLOS and transmission-line theory. The hybrid mesh formulation has been highly optimized for both vector and parallel-processing on Cray Y-MP architectures.

  12. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of compact acousto-optic filters based on multireflection beam expanding

    SciTech Connect

    Tsarev, Andrei V

    2007-04-30

    The results of numerical simulation of acousto-optic (AO) tunable filters of a new type based on multireflection beam expanding in waveguide structures are discussed. Planar waveguide filters based on thin chalcogenide (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}) films of lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) are considered. The operation of filters is analysed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method by using the license FullWAVE software package (RSoft Design Group, Inc.). It is shown that AO filters have very good dispersion properties and AO filters of extremely small size provide a narrow filtration line within the tuning range of more than 100 nm (at a wavelength of 1.54 {mu}m). It is important that the normalised linewidth (measured in units of the reciprocal filter length) is an order of magnitude smaller than the theoretical limit for AO filters produced from the same material in the conventional way, without the use of multireflection beam expanding. (acoustooptics)

  13. The inclusion of wall loss in electromagnetic finite-difference time-domain thin-slot algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1990-09-01

    Sub-gridding techniques enable finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic codes to model apertures that are much narrower than the spatial resolution of the FDTD mesh. Previous thin-slot methods have assumed that the slot walls are perfectly conducting. As the slot depth-to-width ratio becomes large, interior wall losses for realistic materials can significantly affect the coupling through the slot, and therefore these loss effects should not be neglected. This paper presents two methods for incorporating loss for walls with good, but not perfect conductivity, into the FDTD calculations. The first method modifies an FDTD equation internal to the slot to include a surface-impedance contribution. This method is appropriate for the usual FDTD thin-slot formalisms. The second method includes the losses into a half-space'' integral equation that can be used by the recently introduced Hybrid Thin-Slot Algorithm. Results based on the two methods are compared for a variety of slot parameters and wall conductivities.

  14. 2004: Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering by an Infinite Dielectric Column Immersed in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Tanev, S.; Videen, G.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to calculate light scattering and absorption by an arbitrarily shaped infinite column embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. The single-scattering properties of the infinite column embedded in the absorbing medium, including scattering phase functions, extinction and absorption efficiencies, are derived using an area integration of the internal field. An exact solution for light scattering and absorption by a circular cylinder in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 2-D UPML FDTD code. With use of a cell size of 1/120 incident wavelength in the FDTD calculations, the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies and asymmetry factors from the 2-D UPML FDTD are generally smaller than approx .1%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically smaller than approx .4%. Using the 2-D UPML FDTD technique, light scattering and absorption by long noncircular columns embedded in absorbing media can be accurately solved.

  15. Modeling a thermionic energy converter using finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, F. S.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, P. S.; Ragan-Kelley, B.; Minnich, A.; Lin, M. C.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2014-02-15

    A thermionic energy converter (TEC) is a static device that converts heat directly into electricity by boiling electrons off a hot emitter surface across a small inter-electrode gap to a cooler collector surface. The main challenge in TECs is overcoming the space charge limit, which limits the current transmitted across a gap of a given voltage and width. We have verified the feasibility of studying and developing a TEC using a bounded finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell plasma simulation code, OOPD1, developed by Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, formerly at UC Berkeley and now at Michigan State University. In this preliminary work, a TEC has been modeled kinetically using OOPD1, and the accuracy has been verified by comparing with an analytically solvable case, giving good agreement. With further improvement of the code, one will be able to quickly and cheaply analyze space charge effects, and seek designs that mitigate the space charge effect, allowing TECs to become more efficient and cost-effective.

  16. Light scattering by hexagonal ice crystals: comparison of finite-difference time domain and geometric optics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liou, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method and a novel geometric ray-tracing model for the calculation of light scattering by hexagonal ice crystals. In the FDTD method we use a staggered Cartesian grid with the implementation of an efficient absorbing boundary condition for the truncation of the computation domain. We introduce the Maxwell-Garnett rule to compute the mean values of the dielectric constant at grid points to reduce the inaccuracy produced by the staircasing approximation. The phase matrix elements and the scattering efficiencies for the scattering of visible light by two-dimensional long circular ice cylinders match closely those computed from the exact solution for size parameters as large as 60, with maximum differences less than 5%. In the new ray-tracing model we invoke the principle of geometric optics to evaluate the reflection and the refraction of localized waves, from which the electric and magnetic fields at the particle surface (near field) can be computed. Based on the equivalence theorem, the near field can subsequently be transformed to the far field, in which the phase interferences are fully accounted for. The phase functions and the scattering efficiencies for hexagonal ice crystals computed from the new geometric ray-tracing method compare reasonably well with the FDTD results for size parameters larger than approximately 20. When absorption is involved in geometric ray tracing,

  17. Investigating the spectral characteristics of backscattering from heterogeneous spherical nuclei using broadband finite-difference time-domain simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Guo-Shan; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2010-01-01

    Reflectance spectra measured from epithelial tissue have been used to extract size distribution and refractive index of cell nuclei for noninvasive detection of precancerous changes. Despite many in vitro and in vivo experimental results, the underlying mechanism of sizing nuclei based on modeling nuclei as homogeneous spheres and fitting the measured data with Mie theory has not been fully explored. We describe the implementation of a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation tool using a Gaussian pulse as the light source to investigate the wavelength-dependent characteristics of backscattered light from a nuclear model consisting of a nucleolus and clumps of chromatin embedded in homogeneous nucleoplasm. The results show that small-sized heterogeneities within the nuclei generate about five times higher backscattering than homogeneous spheres. More interestingly, backscattering spectra from heterogeneous spherical nuclei show periodic oscillations similar to those from homogeneous spheres, leading to high accuracy of estimating the nuclear diameter by comparison with Mie theory. In addition to the application in light scattering spectroscopy, the reported FDTD method could be adapted to study the relations between measured spectral data and nuclear structures in other optical imaging and spectroscopic techniques for in vivo diagnosis.

  18. Investigating the spectral characteristics of backscattering from heterogeneous spheroidal nuclei using broadband finite-difference time-domain simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Guo-Shan; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2010-02-01

    Backscattered light spectra have been used to extract size distribution of cell nuclei in epithelial tissues for noninvasive detection of precancerous lesions. In existing experimental studies, size estimation is achieved by assuming nuclei as homogeneous spheres or spheroids and fitting the measured data with models based on Mie theory. However, the validity of simplifying nuclei as homogeneous spheres has not been thoroughly examined. In this study, we investigate the spectral characteristics of backscattering from models of spheroidal nuclei under plane wave illumination using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. A modulated Gaussian pulse is used to obtain wavelength dependent scattering intensity with a single FDTD run. The simulated model of nuclei consists of a nucleolus and randomly distributed chromatin condensation in homogeneous cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. The results show that backscattering spectra from spheroidal nuclei have similar oscillating patterns to those from homogeneous spheres with the diameter equal to the projective length of the spheroidal nucleus along the propagation direction. The strength of backscattering is enhanced in heterogeneous spheroids as compared to homogeneous spheroids. The degree of which backscattering spectra of heterogeneous nuclei deviate from Mie theory is highly dependent on the distribution of chromatin/nucleolus but not sensitive to nucleolar size, refractive index fluctuation or chromatin density.

  19. Locally non-uniform finite-difference time domain with application to stealth, crosstalk, and narrow apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    A technique to integrate a dense, locally non-uniform mesh into finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) codes is presented. The method is designed for the full-wave analysis of multi-material layers that are physically thin, but perhaps electrically thick. Such layers are often used for the purpose of suppressing electromagnetic reflections from conducting surfaces. Throughout the non-uniform local mesh, average values for the conductivity and permittivity are used, where as variations in permeability are accommodated by splitting H-field line integrals and enforcing continuity of the normal B field. A unique interpolation scheme provides accuracy and late-time stability for mesh discontinuities as large as 1000 to 1. Application is made to resistive sheets, the absorbing Salisbury screen, crosstalk on printed circuit boards, and apertures that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to a uniform cell. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with the MoM code CARLOS and transmission-line theory. The hybrid mesh formulation has been highly optimized for both vector and parallel-processing on Cray YMP architectures.

  20. A two dimensional finite difference time domain analysis of the quiet zone fields of an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Deirdre A.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Kunz, Karl S.; Steich, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Prediction of anechoic chamber performance is a difficult problem. Electromagnetic anechoic chambers exist for a wide range of frequencies but are typically very large when measured in wavelengths. Three dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of anechoic chambers is possible with current computers but at frequencies lower than most chamber design frequencies. However, two dimensional FDTD (2D-FTD) modeling enables much greater detail at higher frequencies and offers significant insight into compact anechoic chamber design and performance. A major subsystem of an anechoic chamber for which computational electromagnetic analyses exist is the reflector. First, an analysis of the quiet zone fields of a low frequency anechoic chamber produced by a uniform source and a reflector in two dimensions using the FDTD method is presented. The 2D-FDTD results are compared with results from a three dimensional corrected physical optics calculation and show good agreement. Next, a directional source is substituted for the uniform radiator. Finally, a two dimensional anechoic chamber geometry, including absorbing materials, is considered, and the 2D-FDTD results for these geometries appear reasonable.

  1. Study of High Robust Three Dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Modeling of Ground Penetrating Radar for a Heterogeneous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyuboglu, S.; Daniels, J. J.; Lee, R.; Yeh, J. T.

    2006-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a non-invasive tool commonly used to characterize the physical properties of the subsurface. The translation of the physical measurements of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions is the culmination of many geophysical investigations. When numerical modeling is applied parallel to GPR data, it allows understanding of the effects of complex electromagnetic phenomena by defining and solving problems, as well as predicting the performance of radar in a complex heterogeneous environment. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) has been widely used for numerical modeling of GPR, but most of the previous algorithms are limited in their ability to model the electrical conductivity and permittivity. In this research, a highly efficient robust algorithm was developed to enhance the effectiveness of the FDTD forward modeling in surroundings characterized by an arbitrary distribution of all electrical properties in three dimensional space. In the first part of this research, two different FDTD codes which include different absorbing boundary conditions, Enquist and Majda absorbing boundary condition (ABC) and perfectly matched layer (PML), were used and compared. In the second part, the modeling algorithm was developed for a heterogeneous half-space medium to facilitate statistical modeling of complex distributions of electrical properties in the subsurface. The results produced by the simulation compared with real GPR results reveal high accuracy using the robust algorithm to optimize three dimensional FDTD forward modeling of GPR responses in heterogeneous surroundings.

  2. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS)Calculation in Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Package: EELS-FDTD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, Nicolas; Cao, Yang; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Nordlander, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a unique tool that is extensively used to investigate the plasmonic response of metallic nanostructures since the early works in the '50s. To be able to interpret and theoretically investigate EELS results, a myriad of different numerical techniques have been developed for EELS simulations (BEM, DDA, FEM, GDTD, Green dyadic functions). Although these techniques are able to predict and reproduce experimental results, they possess significant drawbacks and are often limited to highly symmetrical geometries, non-penetrating trajectories, small nanostructures, and free standing nanostructures. We present here a novel approach for EELS calculations using the Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method: EELS-FDTD. We benchmark our approach by direct comparison with results from the well-established boundary element method (BEM) and published experimental results. In particular, we compute EELS spectra for spherical nanoparticles, nanoparticle dimers, nanodisks supported by various substrates, and gold bowtie antennas on a silicon nitride substrate. Our EELS-FDTD implementation can be easily extended to more complex geometries and configurations and can be directly implemented within other numerical methods. Work funded by the Welch Foundation (C-1222, L-C-004), and the NSF (CNS-0821727, OCI-0959097).

  3. Novel frequency domain techniques and advances in Finite Difference Time domain (FDTD) method for efficient solution of multiscale electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayappan, Kadappan

    With the advent of sub-micron technologies and increasing awareness of Electromagnetic Interference and Compatibility (EMI/EMC) issues, designers are often interested in full- wave solutions of complete systems, taking to account a variety of environments in which the system operates. However, attempts to do this substantially increase the complexities involved in computing full-wave solutions, especially when the problems involve multi- scale geometries with very fine features. For such problems, even the well-established numerical methods, such as the time domain technique FDTD and the frequency domain methods FEM and MoM, are often challenged to the limits of their capabilities. In an attempt to address such challenges, three novel techniques have been introduced in this work, namely Dipole Moment (DM) Approach, Recursive Update in Frequency Domain (RUFD) and New Finite Difference Time Domain ( vFDTD). Furthermore, the efficacy of the above techniques has been illustrated, via several examples, and the results obtained by proposed techniques have been compared with other existing numerical methods for the purpose of validation. The DM method is a new physics-based approach for formulating MoM problems, which is based on the use of dipole moments (DMs), as opposed to the conventional Green's functions. The absence of the Green's functions, as well as those of the vector and scalar potentials, helps to eliminate two of the key sources of difficulties in the conventional MoM formulation, namely the singularity and low-frequency problems. Specifically, we show that there are no singularities that we need to be concerned with in the DM formulation; hence, this obviates the need for special techniques for integrating these singularities. Yet another salutary feature of the DM approach is its ability to handle thin and lossy structures, or whether they are metallic, dielectric-type, or even combinations thereof. We have found that the DM formulation can handle these

  4. Three dimensional finite difference time domain modeling of Schumann resonances on Earth and other planets of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heng

    2007-12-01

    Resonance properties of the Earth-ionosphere cavity were predicted by W. O. Schumann in 1952. Since then observations of electromagnetic signals in the frequency range 1-500 Hz have become a powerful tool for variety of remote sensing applications, which in recent years included studies of thunderstorm related transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere and related lightning discharges. In this thesis, a three dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) model is developed to study the propagation of the extremely low frequency (ELF) waves in the Earth-ionosphere cavity and in similar cavities on other celestial bodies of the Solar System. A comparison of the results from this FDTD model with a set of classical eigen-frequency (fn) and quality factor ( Qn) solutions for laterally uniform spherically symmetric Earth-ionosphere cavity and with recent observations of Schumann resonance (SR) during solar proton events (SPEs) and X-ray bursts is provided. The FDTD fn and Qn solutions for the uniform cavity appear to be in excellent agreement (within several %) with well-known experimental results documented in the literature. The related analysis indicates that the frequency of the first SR mode decreases during SPEs and increases during X-ray bursts by a fraction of a Hz, in agreement with physical arguments presented in previously published literature and with observations. The FDTD model is extended to include the effects of the geomagnetic field on SR parameters. A higher penetration height of SR electric and magnetic components is found with the presence of the geomagnetic field. In a realistic cavity, the conductivity distribution is not laterally uniform and spherically symmetric, but varies with local time and seasons reflecting related variations in the effects of solar radiation on the conductivity of the lower ionosphere. The global lightning activity in the three main areas (Africa, South-East Asia, and South America) also has diurnal and seasonal

  5. Three-D Complex-Geometry Semi-Implicit Finite-Difference Time-Domain Simulation of Edge Plasma at RF Time-Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David N.; Hakim, Ammar H.

    2007-09-28

    Time domain simulation of plasmas in the rf time scale range is difficult because the time-scale is long compared to the electron plasma wave period, and in addition, the various cutoff and resonance behaviors within the plasma insure that any explicit finite-difference scheme would be numerically unstable. We resolve this dilemma with a new algorithm [1] based upon a semi-implicit method (e.g., explicit Maxwell, implicit plasma), such that all linear plasma dispersion behavior are faithfully reproduced at the available temporal and spatial resolution, despite the fact that the simulation time-step may exceed the electron gyro and electron plasma time scales by orders of magnitude. This new algorithm is now available in the Vorpal parallel computing simulation framework, which can provide complex boundary modeling of edge geometry such as antenna, limiters, and other 3-D structures. The result is a unified model joining the power delivery system to the bulk plasma. We report on benchmarking of the new capability for several classical benchmarks, including tunneling through low density edge plasma, cyclotron resonance, and mode-conversion to ICW (ion cyclotron wave). We also report on initial efforts to include 3-D edge geometry, including wave launcher with realistic edge density profiles.

  6. 3D time-domain airborne EM modeling for an arbitrarily anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain airborne EM data is currently interpreted based on an isotropic model. Sometimes, it can be problematic when working in the region with distinct dipping stratifications. In this paper, we simulate the 3D time-domain airborne EM responses over an arbitrarily anisotropic earth with topography by edge-based finite-element method. Tetrahedral meshes are used to describe the abnormal bodies with complicated shapes. We further adopt the Backward Euler scheme to discretize the time-domain diffusion equation for electric field, obtaining an unconditionally stable linear equations system. We verify the accuracy of our 3D algorithm by comparing with 1D solutions for an anisotropic half-space. Then, we switch attentions to effects of anisotropic media on the strengths and the diffusion patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses. For numerical experiments, we adopt three typical anisotropic models: 1) an anisotropic anomalous body embedded in an isotropic half-space; 2) an isotropic anomalous body embedded in an anisotropic half-space; 3) an anisotropic half-space with topography. The modeling results show that the electric anisotropy of the subsurface media has big effects on both the strengths and the distribution patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses; this effect needs to be taken into account when interpreting ATEM data in areas with distinct anisotropy.

  7. Ground motion simulations in Marmara (Turkey) region from 3D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ulrich, Thomas; Douglas, John

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European project MARSite (2012-2016), one of the main contributions from our research team was to provide ground-motion simulations for the Marmara region from various earthquake source scenarios. We adopted a 3D finite difference code, taking into account the 3D structure around the Sea of Marmara (including the bathymetry) and the sea layer. We simulated two moderate earthquakes (about Mw4.5) and found that the 3D structure improves significantly the waveforms compared to the 1D layer model. Simulations were carried out for different earthquakes (moderate point sources and large finite sources) in order to provide shake maps (Aochi and Ulrich, BSSA, 2015), to study the variability of ground-motion parameters (Douglas & Aochi, BSSA, 2016) as well as to provide synthetic seismograms for the blind inversion tests (Diao et al., GJI, 2016). The results are also planned to be integrated in broadband ground-motion simulations, tsunamis generation and simulations of triggered landslides (in progress by different partners). The simulations are freely shared among the partners via the internet and the visualization of the results is diffused on the project's homepage. All these simulations should be seen as a reference for this region, as they are based on the latest knowledge that obtained during the MARSite project, although their refinement and validation of the model parameters and the simulations are a continuing research task relying on continuing observations. The numerical code used, the models and the simulations are available on demand.

  8. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2012-07-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  9. Finite-difference time-domain modeling of infrasound from pulsating auroras and comparison with recent experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Larquier, S.; Pasko, V. P.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wilson, C. R.; Olson, J. V.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric infrasonic waves are acoustic waves with frequencies ranging from 0.02 to 10 Hz, slightly higher than the acoustic cut-off frequency (approximately 0.032 Hz), but lower than the audible frequencies (typically 20 Hz-15 kHz) [e.g., Blanc, Ann. Geophys., 3, 673, 1985]. A number of natural events have been identified as generating atmospheric infrasound, such as volcanoes, tornadoes, avalanches, earthquakes [e.g., Bedard and Georges, Physics Today, S3, 32, 2000], ocean surfaces [e.g., Gossard and Hooke, Waves in the Atmosphere, Elsevier, 1975, Ch. 9], lightning [e.g., Assink et al., GRL, 35, L15802, 2008; Pasko, JGR, 114, D08205, 2009], or transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere termed sprites [e.g., Farges, Lightning: Principles, Instruments and Applications, H.D. Betz et al. (eds), Springer, 2009, Ch. 18]. The importance of infrasound studies has been emphasized in the past ten years from the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification perspective [e.g., Le Pichon et al., JGR, 114, D08112, 2009]. A proper understanding of infrasound propagation in the atmosphere is required for identification and classification of different infrasonic waves and their sources [Drob et al., JGR, 108, D21, 4680, 2003]. The goal of the present work is to provide a quantitative interpretation and explanation of infrasonic signatures from pulsating auroras reported recently by Wilson et al. [GRL, 32, L14810, 2005]. The infrasound signals observed with an infrasonic array at Fairbanks, Alaska had a mean amplitude of 0.05 Pa, a delay of about 5 minutes from the pulsating aurora, and an almost normal incidence on the ground plane [Wilson et al., 2005]. We employ a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model of infrasound propagation in a realistic atmosphere. We use the absorption model of infrasound introduced by Sutherland and Bass [J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 115, 1012, 2004]. Classical absorption mechanisms as well as molecular relaxation mechanisms are taken into

  10. Acceleration of 3D Finite Difference AWP-ODC for seismic simulation on GPU Fermi Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Cui, Y.; Choi, D.

    2011-12-01

    AWP-ODC, a highly scalable parallel finite-difference application, enables petascale 3D earthquake calculations. This application generates realistic dynamic earthquake source description and detailed physics-based anelastic ground motions at frequencies pertinent to safe building design. In 2010, the code achieved M8, a full dynamical simulation of a magnitude-8 earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault up to 2-Hz, the largest-ever earthquake simulation. Building on the success of the previous work, we have implemented CUDA on AWP-ODC to accelerate wave propagation on GPU platform. Our CUDA development aims on aggressive parallel efficiency, optimized global and shared memory access to make the best use of GPU memory hierarchy. The benchmark on NVIDIA Tesla C2050 graphics cards demonstrated many tens of speedup in single precision compared to serial implementation at a testing problem size, while an MPI-CUDA implementation is in the progress to extend our solver to multi-GPU clusters. Our CUDA implementation has been carefully verified for accuracy.

  11. Rigorous interpolation near tilted interfaces in 3-D finite-difference EM modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantsev, Daniil V.; Maaø, Frank A.

    2015-02-01

    We present a rigorous method for interpolation of electric and magnetic fields close to an interface with a conductivity contrast. The method takes into account not only a well-known discontinuity in the normal electric field, but also discontinuity in all the normal derivatives of electric and magnetic tangential fields. The proposed method is applied to marine 3-D controlled-source electromagnetic modelling (CSEM) where sources and receivers are located close to the seafloor separating conductive seawater and resistive formation. For the finite-difference scheme based on the Yee grid, the new interpolation is demonstrated to be much more accurate than alternative methods (interpolation using nodes on one side of the interface or interpolation using nodes on both sides, but ignoring the derivative jumps). The rigorous interpolation can handle arbitrary orientation of interface with respect to the grid, which is demonstrated on a marine CSEM example with a dipping seafloor. The interpolation coefficients are computed by minimizing a misfit between values at the nearest nodes and linear expansions of the continuous field components in the coordinate system aligned with the interface. The proposed interpolation operators can handle either uniform or non-uniform grids and can be applied to interpolation for both sources and receivers.

  12. FDFD: A 3D Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Code for Electromagnetic Induction Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Nathan J.; Berryman, James G.; Buettner, H. Michael

    2001-07-01

    A new 3D code for electromagnetic induction tomography with intended applications to environmental imaging problems has been developed. The approach consists of calculating the fields within a volume using an implicit finite-difference frequency-domain formulation. The volume is terminated by an anisotropic perfectly matched layer region that simulates an infinite domain by absorbing outgoing waves. Extensive validation of this code has been done using analytical and semianalytical results from other codes, and some of those results are presented in this paper. The new code is written in Fortran 90 and is designed to be easily parallelized. Finally, an adjoint field method of data inversion, developed in parallel for solving the fully nonlinear inverse problem for electrical conductivity imaging (e.g., for mapping underground conducting plumes), uses this code to provide solvers for both forward and adjoint fields. Results obtained from this inversion method for high-contrast media are encouraging and provide a significant improvement over those obtained from linearized inversion methods.

  13. A Non-Dissipative Staggered Fourth-Order Accurate Explicit Finite Difference Scheme for the Time-Domain Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yefet, Amir; Petropoulos, Peter G.

    1999-01-01

    We consider a divergence-free non-dissipative fourth-order explicit staggered finite difference scheme for the hyperbolic Maxwell's equations. Special one-sided difference operators are derived in order to implement the scheme near metal boundaries and dielectric interfaces. Numerical results show the scheme is long-time stable, and is fourth-order convergent over complex domains that include dielectric interfaces and perfectly conducting surfaces. We also examine the scheme's behavior near metal surfaces that are not aligned with the grid axes, and compare its accuracy to that obtained by the Yee scheme.

  14. Finite-Difference Algorithm for Simulating 3D Electromagnetic Wavefields in Conductive Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wavefields are routinely used in geophysical exploration for detection and characterization of subsurface geological formations of economic interest. Recorded EM signals depend strongly on the current conductivity of geologic media. Hence, they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of saturated porous bodies. In order to enhance understanding of field-recorded data, we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating three-dimensional (3D) EM wave propagation and diffusion in heterogeneous conductive materials. Maxwell's equations are combined with isotropic constitutive relations to obtain a set of six, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing the electric and magnetic vectors. An advantage of this system is that it does not contain spatial derivatives of the three medium parameters electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, and current conductivity. Numerical solution methodology consists of explicit, time-domain finite-differencing on a 3D staggered rectangular grid. Temporal and spatial FD operators have order 2 and N, where N is user-selectable. We use an artificially-large electric permittivity to maximize the FD timestep, and thus reduce execution time. For the low frequencies typically used in geophysical exploration, accuracy is not unduly compromised. Grid boundary reflections are mitigated via convolutional perfectly matched layers (C-PMLs) imposed at the six grid flanks. A shared-memory-parallel code implementation via OpenMP directives enables rapid algorithm execution on a multi-thread computational platform. Good agreement is obtained in comparisons of numerically-generated data with reference solutions. EM wavefields are sourced via point current density and magnetic dipole vectors. Spatially-extended inductive sources (current carrying wire loops) are under development. We are particularly interested in accurate representation of high-conductivity sub-grid-scale features that are common

  15. 3D Non-destructive Imaging of Punctures in Polyethylene Composite Armor by THz Time Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, N.; Panowicz, R.; Ospald, F.; Beigang, R.

    2015-08-01

    An ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene composite sample totally punctured by a projectile was examined by THz TDS raster scanning method in reflection configuration. The scanning results correctly match the distribution of delaminations inside the sample, which was proven with cross-sectional and frontal views after waterjet cutting. For further analysis, a signal-processing algorithm based on the deconvolution method was developed and the modified reference signal was used to reduce disturbances. The complex refractive index of the sample was determined by transmission TDS technique and was later used for the simulation of pulse propagation by the finite difference time domain method. These simulations verified the correctness of the proposed method and showed its constraints. Using the proposed algorithm, the ambiguous raw THz image was converted into a binary 3D image of the sample, which consists only of two areas: sample—polyethylene and delamination—air. As a result, a clear image of the distribution of delaminations with their spatial extent was obtained which can be used for further comparative analysis. The limitation of the proposed method is that parts of the central area of the puncture cannot be analyzed because tilted layers deflect the incident signal.

  16. Optical properties of WO3 thin films modeled by finite-difference time-domain and fabricated by glancing angle deposition.

    PubMed

    Charles, Cédric; Martin, Nicolas; Devel, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Optical transmittance spectra between 1.55 eV (800 nm) and 3.10 eV (400 nm) of tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films nanostructured thanks to the Glancing Angle Deposition technique are investigated both experimentally and theoretically, as a function of geometrical parameters. A Finite-Difference Time-Domain code was used to numerically model the films structure and to calculate their optical properties. The corresponding optical index and porosity are considered. It is found that the optical index of columnar structures always follows Cauchy's law as a function of energy and is reduced as the incident angle increases (alpha = 0 to 80 degrees) from n633 = 2.2 to 1.98 for experimental data against 2.1 to 1.75 for those computed with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain code. For zigzag architectures, an increase of the zigzag number from 0.5 to 8, amplifies interference fringes and improves the measured refractive indices. It agrees with modeled optical characteristics since n633 increases from 2.18 to 2.30. PMID:23447966

  17. Propagation of premixed laminar flames in 3D narrow open ducts using RBF-generated finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayona, Victor; Kindelan, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    Laminar flame propagation is an important problem in combustion modelling for which great advances have been achieved both in its theoretical understanding and in the numerical solution of the governing equations in 2D and 3D. Most of these numerical simulations use finite difference techniques on simple geometries (channels, ducts, ...) with equispaced nodes. The objective of this work is to explore the applicability of the radial basis function generated finite difference (RBF-FD) method to laminar flame propagation modelling. This method is specially well suited for the solution of problems with complex geometries and irregular boundaries. Another important advantage is that the method is independent of the dimension of the problem and, therefore, it is very easy to apply in 3D problems with complex geometries. In this work we use the RBF-FD method to compute 2D and 3D numerical results that simulate premixed laminar flames with different Lewis numbers propagating in open ducts.

  18. Finite-difference model for 3-D flow in bays and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Peter E.; Larock, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a semi-implicit finite-difference model for the numerical solution of three-dimensional flow in bays and estuaries. The model treats the gravity wave and vertical diffusion terms in the governing equations implicitly, and other terms explicitly. The model achieves essentially second-order accurate and stable solutions in strongly nonlinear problems by using a three-time-level leapfrog-trapezoidal scheme for the time integration.

  19. Modeling of the angular tolerancing of an effective medium diffractive lens using combined finite difference time domain and radiation spectrum method algorithms.

    PubMed

    Raulot, Victorien; Gérard, Philippe; Serio, Bruno; Flury, Manuel; Kress, Bernard; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2010-08-16

    A new rigorous vector-based design and analysis approach of diffractive lenses is presented. It combines the use of two methods: the Finite-Difference Time-Domain for the study in the near field, and the Radiation Spectrum Method for the propagation in the far field. This approach is proposed to design and optimize effective medium cylindrical diffractive lenses for high efficiency structured light illumination systems. These lenses are realised with binary subwavelength features that cannot be designed using the standard scalar theory. Furthermore, because of their finite and high frequencies characteristics, such devices prevent the use of coupled wave theory. The proposed approach is presented to determine the angular tolerance in the cases of binary subwavelength cylindrical lenses by calculating the diffraction efficiency as a function of the incidence angle. PMID:20721184

  20. Systematic wave-equation finite difference time domain formulations for modeling electromagnetic wave-propagation in general linear and nonlinear dispersive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Omar

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, systematic wave-equation finite difference time domain (WE-FDTD) formulations are presented for modeling electromagnetic wave-propagation in linear and nonlinear dispersive materials. In the proposed formulations, the complex conjugate pole residue (CCPR) pairs model is adopted in deriving a unified dispersive WE-FDTD algorithm that allows modeling different dispersive materials, such as Debye, Drude and Lorentz, in the same manner with the minimal additional auxiliary variables. Moreover, the proposed formulations are incorporated with the wave-equation perfectly matched layer (WE-PML) to construct a material independent mesh truncating technique that can be used for modeling general frequency-dependent open region problems. Several numerical examples involving linear and nonlinear dispersive materials are included to show the validity of the proposed formulations.

  1. General implementation of thin-slot algorithms into the finite-difference time-domain code, TSAR, based on a slot data file

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1991-06-01

    Two methods for modeling arbitrary narrow apertures in finite- difference time-domain (FDTD) codes are presented in this paper. The first technique is based on the hybrid thin-slot algorithm (HTSA) which models the aperture physics using an integral equation approach. This method can model slots that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to the FDTD spatial cell, but is restricted to planar apertures. The second method is based on a contour technique that directly modifies the FDTD equations local to the aperture. The contour method is geometrically more flexible than the HTSA, but the depth of the aperture is restricted to the actual FDTD mesh. A technique to incorporate both narrow-aperture algorithms into the FDTD code, TSAR, based on a slot data file'' is presented in this paper. Results for a variety of complex aperture contours are provided, and limitations of the algorithms are discussed.

  2. Computational studies of optical textures of twist disclination loops in liquid-crystal films by using the finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Kun; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2006-02-01

    Optical images of textured liquid-crystal films containing various types of twist disclination loops are computed using an approximate matrix method and a direct numerical simulation based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The selected defects introduce large multidirectional spatial gradients in the optic axis, mimicking the orientation textures that arise in the construction and use of biosensors based on liquid-crystal vision. It is shown that under these experimentally relevant conditions, the matrix method fails to capture important signatures in the transmitted light intensity under crossed polarizers. The differences between the predictions by the two methods are analyzed with respect to gradients in the optic axis. We show that the FDTD method is a useful tool to perform computational optics of textured liquid-crystal films.

  3. Improved Field Emission Algorithms for Modeling Field Emission Devices Using a Conformal Finite-Difference Time-Domain Particle-in-Cell Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Loverich, J.; Stoltz, P. H.; Nieter, C.

    2013-10-01

    This work introduces a conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method with an improved field emission algorithm to accurately and efficiently study field emission devices. The CFDTD method is based on the Dey-Mittra algorithm or cut-cell algorithm, as implemented in the Vorpal code. For the field emission algorithm, we employ the elliptic function v(y) found by Forbes and a new fitting function t(y)2 for the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) equation. With these improved correction factors, field emission of electrons from a cathode surface is much closer to the prediction of the exact FN formula derived by Murphy and Good. This work was supported in part by both the U.S. Department of Defense under Grant No. FA9451-07-C-0025 and the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0004436.

  4. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of electromagnetic wave propagation in corrugated waveguide: Effect of miter bend/polarizer miter bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yoshihisa; Ikuno, Soichiro; Kubo, Shin; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the polarizer miter bend (PMB) reflector on polarization is numerically investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The Drude model is implemented to take into account the fact that the waveguide wall is prepared from a dispersive medium. In electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), the corrugated waveguide and miter bend are adopted for transmitting millimeter electromagnetic waves. In addition, PMB is employed to improve the plasma heating efficiency. The results of computations show that modes other than the input mode are also generated owing to the reflection at the miter bend mirror/PMB reflector. Moreover, it is found that elliptical polarization is observed after the linear polarization passes through PMB.

  5. Improvements to the ICRH antenna time-domain 3D plasma simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David N.; Jenkins, Thomas G.; King, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a summary of ongoing improvements to the 3D time-domain plasma modeling software that has been used to look at ICRH antennas on Alcator C-Mod, NSTX, and ITER [1]. Our past investigations have shown that in low density cases where the slow wave is propagating, strong amplitude lower hybrid resonant fields can occur. Such a scenario could result in significant parasitic power loss in the SOL. The primary resonance broadening in this case is likely collisions with neutral gas, and thus we are upgrading the model to include realistic neutral gas in the SOL, in order to provide a better understanding of energy balance in these situations. Related to this, we are adding a temporal variation capability to the local plasma density in front of the antenna in order to investigate whether the near fields of the antenna could modify the local density sufficiently to initiate a low density situation. We will start with a simple scalar ponderomotive potential density expulsion model [2] for the density evolution, but are also looking to eventually couple to a more complex fluid treatment that would include tensor pressures and convective physics and sources of neutrals and ionization. We also review continued benchmarking efforts, and ongoing and planned improvements to the computational algorithms, resulting from experience gained during our recent supercomputing runs on the Titan supercomputer, including GPU operations.

  6. Use of Finite Difference Time Domain Simulations and Debye Theory for Modelling the Terahertz Reflection Response of Normal and Tumour Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Anthony J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the capabilities of Debye theory combined with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods to simulate the terahertz (THz) response of breast tissues. Being able to accurately model breast tissues in the THz regime would facilitate the understanding of image contrast parameters used in THz imaging of breast cancer. As a test case, the model was first validated using liquid water and simulated reflection pulses were compared to experimental measured pulses with very good agreement (p = 1.00). The responses of normal and cancerous breast tissues were simulated with Debye properties and the correlation with measured data was still high for tumour (p = 0.98) and less so for normal breast (p = 0.82). Sections of the time domain pulses showed clear differences that were also evident in the comparison of pulse parameter values. These deviations may arise from the presence of adipose and other inhomogeneities in the breast tissue that are not accounted for when using the Debye model. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the power of the model for simulating THz reflection imaging; however, for biological tissues extra Debye terms or a more detailed theory may be required to link THz image contrast to physiological composition and structural changes of breast tissue associated with differences between normal and tumour tissues. PMID:25010734

  7. Accurate 3-D finite difference computation of traveltimes in strongly heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, M.; Gesret, A.; Belayouni, N.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic traveltimes and their spatial derivatives are the basis of many imaging methods such as pre-stack depth migration and tomography. A common approach to compute these quantities is to solve the eikonal equation with a finite-difference scheme. If many recently published algorithms for resolving the eikonal equation do now yield fairly accurate traveltimes for most applications, the spatial derivatives of traveltimes remain very approximate. To address this accuracy issue, we develop a new hybrid eikonal solver that combines a spherical approximation when close to the source and a plane wave approximation when far away. This algorithm reproduces properly the spherical behaviour of wave fronts in the vicinity of the source. We implement a combination of 16 local operators that enables us to handle velocity models with sharp vertical and horizontal velocity contrasts. We associate to these local operators a global fast sweeping method to take into account all possible directions of wave propagation. Our formulation allows us to introduce a variable grid spacing in all three directions of space. We demonstrate the efficiency of this algorithm in terms of computational time and the gain in accuracy of the computed traveltimes and their derivatives on several numerical examples.

  8. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Acoustic Radiation from Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chael, E. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Jensen, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow seismic events, earthquakes as well as explosions, often generate acoustic waves in the atmosphere observable at local or even regional distances. Recording both the seismic and acoustic signals can provide additional constraints on source parameters such as epicenter coordinates, depth, origin time, moment, and mechanism. Recent advances in finite-difference (FD) modeling methods enable accurate numerical treatment of wave propagation across the ground surface between the (solid) elastic and (fluid) acoustic domains. Using a fourth-order, staggered-grid, velocity-stress FD algorithm, we are investigating the effects of various source parameters on the acoustic (or infrasound) signals transmitted from the solid earth into the atmosphere. Compressional (P), shear (S), and Rayleigh waves all radiate some acoustic energy into the air at the ground surface. These acoustic wavefronts are typically conical in shape, since their phase velocities along the surface exceed the sound speed in air. Another acoustic arrival with a spherical wavefront can be generated from the vicinity of the epicenter of a shallow event, due to the strong vertical ground motions directly above the buried source. Images of acoustic wavefields just above the surface reveal the radiation patterns and relative amplitudes of the various arrivals. In addition, we compare the relative effectiveness of different seismic source mechanisms for generating acoustic energy. For point sources at a fixed depth, double-couples with almost any orientation produce stronger acoustic signals than isotropic explosions, due to higher-amplitude S and Rayleigh waves. Of course, explosions tend to be shallower than most earthquakes, which can offset the differences due to mechanism. Low-velocity material in the shallow subsurface acts to increase vertical seismic motions there, enhancing the coupling to acoustic waves in air. If either type of source breaks the surface (e.g., an earthquake with surface rupture

  9. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  10. Comparison of wave propagation studies in plasmas using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain and ray-tracing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhury, Bhaskar; Chaturvedi, Shashank

    2006-12-15

    Power-flow trajectories of electromagnetic waves through a spatially nonuniform plasma have been computed using direct solutions of Maxwell's equations using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. This method yields accurate information on refraction as well as absorption effects. The method can be used to compute power-flow trajectories for plasmas with arbitrarily varying density profiles, including effects due to arbitrarily shaped conducting or dielectric surfaces bounding the plasma. Furthermore, since FDTD is computationally expensive, especially for parametric studies, it is desirable to use ray tracing to estimate refraction effects. A quantitative comparison is performed between two different methods of obtaining exact and approximate solutions of Maxwell's equations in order to assess their relative utility in different situations. In the present work, we limit ourselves to a cold, collisional, unmagnetized plasma, where the response to electromagnetic waves is fully specified by a dispersion relation based on magnetoionic theory. It is shown that ray tracing in such plasmas yields accurate results only when two conditions are satisfied. Firstly, the density scale length should be long as compared to the free-space wavelength of the incident wave. Secondly, the conduction current should be small as compared to the displacement current in the medium. The second condition is one which has been identified for the first time.

  11. Variability analysis of SAR from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for different adult and child models using finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, E.; Hadjem, A.; Lacroux, F.; Wong, M. F.; Wiart, J.

    2008-03-01

    This paper deals with the variability of body models used in numerical dosimetry studies. Six adult anthropomorphic voxel models have been collected and used to build 5-, 8- and 12-year-old children using a morphing method respecting anatomical parameters. Finite-difference time-domain calculations of a specific absorption rate (SAR) have been performed for a range of frequencies from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for isolated models illuminated by plane waves. A whole-body-averaged SAR is presented as well as the average on specific tissues such as skin, muscles, fat or bones and the average on specific parts of the body such as head, legs, arms or torso. Results point out the variability of adult models. The standard deviation of whole-body-averaged SAR of adult models can reach 40%. All phantoms are exposed to the ICNIRP reference levels. Results show that for adults, compliance with reference levels ensures compliance with basic restrictions, but concerning children models involved in this study, the whole-body-averaged SAR goes over the fundamental safety limits up to 40%. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  12. Computational modeling of the propagation of light through liquid crystals containing twist disclinations based on the finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Kun; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2005-07-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to compute propagation of light through textured uniaxial nematic-liquid crystal (NLC) films containing various types of twist disclination (defect) lines. Computational modeling by the FDTD method provides an accurate prediction of the optical response in multidimensional and multiscale heterogeneities in NLC films in which significant spatial optic axis gradients are present. The computations based on the FDTD method are compared with those of the classic Berreman matrix-type method. As expected, significant deviations between predictions from the two methods are observed near the twist disclination line defects because lateral optic axis gradients are ignored in the matrix Berreman method. It is shown that the failure of Berreman's method to take into account lateral optic axis gradient effects leads to significant deviations in optical output. In addition, it is shown that the FDTD method is able to distinguish clearly different types of twist disclination lines. The FDTD optical simulation method can be used for understanding fundamental relationships between optical response and complex NLC defect textures in new liquid-crystal applications including liquid-crystal-based biosensors and rheo-optical characterization of flowing liquid crystals.

  13. Examination of Surface Roughness on Light Scattering by Long Ice Columns by Use of a Two-Dimensional Finite-Difference Time-Domain Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Videen, G.; Fu, Q.

    2004-01-01

    Natural particles such as ice crystals in cirrus clouds generally are not pristine but have additional micro-roughness on their surfaces. A two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) program with a perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition is developed to calculate the effect of surface roughness on light scattering by long ice columns. When we use a spatial cell size of 1/120 incident wavelength for ice circular cylinders with size parameters of 6 and 24 at wavelengths of 0.55 and 10.8 mum, respectively, the errors in the FDTD results in the extinction, scattering, and absorption efficiencies are smaller than similar to 0.5%. The errors in the FDTD results in the asymmetry factor are smaller than similar to 0.05%. The errors in the FDTD results in the phase-matrix elements are smaller than similar to 5%. By adding a pseudorandom change as great as 10% of the radius of a cylinder, we calculate the scattering properties of randomly oriented rough-surfaced ice columns. We conclude that, although the effect of small surface roughness on light scattering is negligible, the scattering phase-matrix elements change significantly for particles with large surface roughness. The roughness on the particle surface can make the conventional phase function smooth. The most significant effect of the surface roughness is the decay of polarization of the scattered light.

  14. Examination of surface roughness on light scattering by long ice columns by use of a two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenbo; Loeb, Norman G; Videen, Gorden; Fu, Qiang

    2004-03-20

    Natural particles such as ice crystals in cirrus clouds generally are not pristine but have additional microroughness on their surfaces. A two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) program with a perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition is developed to calculate the effect of surface roughness on light scattering by long ice columns. When we use a spatial cell size of 1/120 incident wavelength for ice circular cylinders with size parameters of 6 and 24 at wavelengths of 0.55 and 10.8 microm, respectively, the errors in the FDTD results in the extinction, scattering, and absorption efficiencies are smaller than approximately 0.5%. The errors in the FDTD results in the asymmetry factor are smaller than approximately 0.05%. The errors in the FDTD results in the phase-matrix elements are smaller than approximately 5%. By adding a pseudorandom change as great as 10% of the radius of a cylinder, we calculate the scattering properties of randomly oriented rough-surfaced ice columns. We conclude that, although the effect of small surface roughness on light scattering is negligible, the scattering phase-matrix elements change significantly for particles with large surface roughness. The roughness on the particle surface can make the conventional phase function smooth. The most significant effect of the surface roughness is the decay of polarization of the scattered light. PMID:15065727

  15. Variability analysis of SAR from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for different adult and child models using finite-difference time-domain.

    PubMed

    Conil, E; Hadjem, A; Lacroux, F; Wong, M F; Wiart, J

    2008-03-21

    This paper deals with the variability of body models used in numerical dosimetry studies. Six adult anthropomorphic voxel models have been collected and used to build 5-, 8- and 12-year-old children using a morphing method respecting anatomical parameters. Finite-difference time-domain calculations of a specific absorption rate (SAR) have been performed for a range of frequencies from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for isolated models illuminated by plane waves. A whole-body-averaged SAR is presented as well as the average on specific tissues such as skin, muscles, fat or bones and the average on specific parts of the body such as head, legs, arms or torso. Results point out the variability of adult models. The standard deviation of whole-body-averaged SAR of adult models can reach 40%. All phantoms are exposed to the ICNIRP reference levels. Results show that for adults, compliance with reference levels ensures compliance with basic restrictions, but concerning children models involved in this study, the whole-body-averaged SAR goes over the fundamental safety limits up to 40%. PMID:18367785

  16. Three Dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain Modeling of Ground Penetrating Radar with an Efficient and Robust Algorithm to Define and Predict Hydrologic Properties in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyuboglu, S.; Daniels, J. J.; Pyke, K.

    2005-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a commonly used non-invasive tool to characterize the physical properties of the subsurface. The translation of the physical measurements to geologic and hydrogeologic conditions is the culmination of many geophysical investigations. Numerical modeling increases the applicability of GPR in the geophysics area when applied parallel to the GPR data, allowing to understand the effects of complex electromagnetic phenomena by defining and solving problems, as well as predicting the performance of radar in a complex heterogeneous environment. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) has been widely used for numerical modeling of GPR, but most of the previous algorithms are limited in their ability to model the electrical conductivity and permittivity. In this research, a highly efficient robust algorithm was developed to enhance the effectiveness of the FDTD forward modeling in surroundings characterized by an arbitrary distribution of all electrical properties in three dimensional space. The modeling algorithm was developed for a heterogeneous half-space medium to facilitate statistical modeling of complex distributions of hydrologic properties in the subsurface. The results produced by the simulation reveal high accuracy using the robust algorithm to optimize three dimensional FDTD forward modeling of GPR responses in heterogeneous surroundings.

  17. Optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Han, B.; Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate an optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling. An anti-lumped mass strategy is incorporated to minimize the numerical dispersion. The optimal finite-difference coefficients and the mass weighting coefficients are obtained by minimizing the misfit between the normalized phase velocities and the unity. An iterative damped least-squares method, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, is utilized for the optimization. Dispersion analysis shows that the optimal fourth-order scheme presents less grid dispersion and anisotropy than the conventional fourth-order scheme with respect to different Poisson's ratios. Moreover, only 3.7 grid-points per minimum shear wavelength are required to keep the error of the group velocities below 1%. The memory cost is then greatly reduced due to a coarser sampling. A parallel iterative method named CARP-CG is used to solve the large ill-conditioned linear system for the frequency-domain modeling. Validations are conducted with respect to both the analytic viscoacoustic and viscoelastic solutions. Compared with the conventional fourth-order scheme, the optimal scheme generates wavefields having smaller error under the same discretization setups. Profiles of the wavefields are presented to confirm better agreement between the optimal results and the analytic solutions.

  18. Iterative methods for 3D implicit finite-difference migration using the complex Padé approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Carlos A. N.; Campos, Itamara S.; Costa, Jessé C.; Neto, Francisco A.; Schleicher, Jörg; Novais, Amélia

    2013-08-01

    Conventional implementations of 3D finite-difference (FD) migration use splitting techniques to accelerate performance and save computational cost. However, such techniques are plagued with numerical anisotropy that jeopardises the correct positioning of dipping reflectors in the directions not used for the operator splitting. We implement 3D downward continuation FD migration without splitting using a complex Padé approximation. In this way, the numerical anisotropy is eliminated at the expense of a computationally more intensive solution of a large-band linear system. We compare the performance of the iterative stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) and that of the multifrontal massively parallel direct solver (MUMPS). It turns out that the use of the complex Padé approximation not only stabilizes the solution, but also acts as an effective preconditioner for the BICGSTAB algorithm, reducing the number of iterations as compared to the implementation using the real Padé expansion. As a consequence, the iterative BICGSTAB method is more efficient than the direct MUMPS method when solving a single term in the Padé expansion. The results of both algorithms, here evaluated by computing the migration impulse response in the SEG/EAGE salt model, are of comparable quality.

  19. 3-D Waveguide Effects of Topographical Structural Variation on Full Waveform Propagation: 3-D Finite Difference Modeling Comparisons with Field Data From Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. S.; Miller, R.; Greenfield, R.; Fisk, D.

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of seismic waves through regions of complex topography is not thoroughly understood. Surface waves, are of particular interest, as they are large in amplitude and can characterize the source depth, magnitude, and frequency content. The amplitude and frequency content of seismic waves that propagate in regions with large topographical variations are affected by both the scattering and blockage of the wave energy. The ability to predict the 3-d scattering due to topography will improve the understanding of both regional scale surface wave magnitudes, and refine surface wave discriminants as well as at the local scale (<2 km ) where it will aid in the development of rule of thumb guide lines for array sensor placement for real time sensing technologies. Ideally, when validating the numerical accuracy of a propagation model against field data, the input geologic parameters would be known and thus eliminates geology as a source of error in the calculation. In March of 2001, Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) performed a detailed seismic site characterization at the Smart Weapons Test Range, Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The result of the KGS characterization study is a high-resolution 3-d model that is used in our seismic simulations. The velocities Vs, Vp are calculated by tomography and refraction, attenuation coefficients estimated from the surface wave and from p-waves and are provided in a model with attributes resolved in 3-d to 0.5 meters. In the present work, we present comparisons of synthetic data with seismic data collected at the Smart Weapons Test Range to benchmark the accuracy achieved in simulating 3-d wave propagation in the vicinity of a topographical anomaly (trench). Synthetic seismograms are generated using a 3-d 8th order staggered grid visco-elastic finite difference code that accounts for topography. The geologic model is based on the Yuma site characterization. The size of these calculations required use of the DoD High Performance

  20. Preliminary simulation of a M6.5 earthquake on the Seattle Fault using 3D finite-difference modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Frankel, Arthur D.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference simulation of a moderate-sized (M 6.5) thrust-faulting earthquake on the Seattle fault demonstrates the effects of the Seattle Basin on strong ground motion in the Puget lowland. The model area includes the cities of Seattle, Bremerton and Bellevue. We use a recently developed detailed 3D-velocity model of the Seattle Basin in these simulations. The model extended to 20-km depth and assumed rupture on a finite fault with random slip distribution. Preliminary results from simulations of frequencies 0.5 Hz and lower suggest amplification can occur at the surface of the Seattle Basin by the trapping of energy in the Quaternary sediments. Surface waves generated within the basin appear to contribute to amplification throughout the modeled region. Several factors apparently contribute to large ground motions in downtown Seattle: (1) radiation pattern and directivity from the rupture; (2) amplification and energy trapping within the Quaternary sediments; and (3) basin geometry and variation in depth of both Quaternary and Tertiary sediments

  1. 3D acoustic wave modelling with time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite-difference schemes and hybrid absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2011-09-01

    Most conventional finite-difference methods adopt second-order temporal and (2M)th-order spatial finite-difference stencils to solve the 3D acoustic wave equation. When spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the time-space domain dispersion relation are used to replace these conventional spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the space domain dispersion relation, the accuracy of modelling can be increased from second-order along any directions to (2M)th-order along 48 directions. In addition, the conventional high-order spatial finite-difference modelling accuracy can be improved by using a truncated finite-difference scheme. In this paper, we combine the time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme and the truncated finite-difference scheme to obtain optimised spatial finite-difference coefficients and thus to significantly improve the modelling accuracy without increasing computational cost, compared with the conventional space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme. We developed absorbing boundary conditions for the 3D acoustic wave equation, based on predicting wavefield values in a transition area by weighing wavefield values from wave equations and one-way wave equations. Dispersion analyses demonstrate that high-order spatial finite-difference stencils have greater accuracy than low-order spatial finite-difference stencils for high frequency components of wavefields, and spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have greater precision than those devised in the space domain under the same discretisation. The modelling accuracy can be improved further by using the truncated spatial finite-difference stencils. Stability analyses show that spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have better stability condition. Numerical modelling experiments for homogeneous, horizontally layered and Society of Exploration Geophysicists/European Association of

  2. TM01-mode microwave propagation property analysis for plasmas with disk-plate windows by a finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshito; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Taiki; Teramoto, Koji; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Kagami, Shin; Furukawa, Masakazu

    2007-07-15

    Numerical studies of microwave propagation properties in a conical horn and an adjustable waveguides, and for plasmas generated under disk-plate windows of a 220 mm diameter and in a vacuum chamber are studied by a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method including plasma equations. In the numerical studies, a TM01-mode microwave of 2.45 GHz at a power of 1 kW is supplied from the top of the conical horn waveguide. In addition, numerical results by the FDTD method are compared with experimental results, and a validity of the numerical results is investigated. From the numerical results, it is found that the TM01-mode microwave changes its field shape and propagates along inner surfaces of the conical horn and the adjustable waveguides. Then electromagnetic fields of the TM01-mode microwave concentrate at the center surfaces of the disk-plate windows [quartz ({epsilon}{sub r}=3.8), alumina ({epsilon}{sub r}=9.7), and WG20 ({epsilon}{sub r}=20.0)]. A diameter of higher concentration is within 80 mm, and the orientation of electric field is almost vertical to the disk-plate window. The diameters within 80 mm are equivalent to a diameter at a higher electron density in an oxygen plasma experiment in the volume mode at 1 kW and 133 Pa with a quartz window. When heights of the adjustable waveguide are changed from 64 to 244 mm, peaks of electric fields in the heights, where microwave power is estimated to be strongly absorbed into the plasmas, appear and peak positions of the electric fields are observed periodically in surface-wave mode plasmas as well as the volume mode plasmas. Heights of the peaks increase with increasing dielectric constant and peak-to-peak distances of the peak positions decrease with increasing dielectric constant. The peak positions agree to the minimum microwave power reflections tuned by a combination of an autotuning unit and adjustable waveguide heights in experiments. Furthermore, peak positions of relatively absorbed microwave powers in

  3. Use of Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method with AN Anatomically Based Model of a Human for Exposures to Far-Near Fields and Electromagnetic Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinyuan

    The three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been used to calculate local, layer-averaged and whole-body averaged specific absorption rates (SARs) and internal radio-frequency (RF) currents in an anatomically -based model of a human for plane-wave (far-field) exposures from 20 to 100 MHz and for spatially variable electromagnetic fields of a parallel-plate applicator representative of RF dielectric heaters used in industry (near-field). The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental data of Hill and others. While the existence of large foot currents has been known previously, substantial RF currents (600-800 mA) induced over much of the body are obtained for E-polarized fields suggested in the 1982 ANSI RF safety guideline. The FDTD method has also been used for simulating Annular Phased Array (APA) of dipole antennas for hyperthermia of deep-seated tumors. Anatomically-based models based on two different regions of the human body (14,417 and 13,133 cells) were used to calculated the SAR distributions with a resolution of 1.31 cm. Annular-phased arrays of eight dipole antennas couple to the human body through either a homogeneous or a tapered water bolus with air assumed outside the ring of dipoles. The objective of the calculations was to focus the energy to a couple of assumed tumor sites in the liver or the prostate. The geometrical optics approximation and principle of focused arrays were used to estimate the phases for individual dipoles to focus the electromagnetic energy into the tumor and its surrounding. Considerably focused power distributions with SARs on the order of 100 W/Kg for input powers of 400-700 W have been obtained for assumed tumor sites in the liver and the prostate using tapered boluses and optimized magnitudes and phases of power to the various dipoles. Lastly the FDTD technique is used to calculate the internal fields and the induced current densities in anatomically based models of a human using 5

  4. Massive parallelization of a 3D finite difference electromagnetic forward solution using domain decomposition methods on multiple CUDA enabled GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, A.

    2010-12-01

    describe our ongoing efforts to achieve massive parallelization on a novel hybrid GPU testbed machine currently configured with 12 Intel Westmere Xeon CPU cores (or 24 parallel computational threads) with 96 GB DDR3 system memory, 4 GPU subsystems which in aggregate contain 960 NVidia Tesla GPU cores with 16 GB dedicated DDR3 GPU memory, and a second interleved bank of 4 GPU subsystems containing in aggregate 1792 NVidia Fermi GPU cores with 12 GB dedicated DDR5 GPU memory. We are applying domain decomposition methods to a modified version of Weiss' (2001) 3D frequency domain full physics EM finite difference code, an open source GPL licensed f90 code available for download from www.OpenEM.org. This will be the core of a new hybrid 3D inversion that parallelizes frequencies across CPUs and individual forward solutions across GPUs. We describe progress made in modifying the code to use direct solvers in GPU cores dedicated to each small subdomain, iteratively improving the solution by matching adjacent subdomain boundary solutions, rather than iterative Krylov space sparse solvers as currently applied to the whole domain.

  5. Acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic air pump with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain analysis and comparison to the measurement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    The direct finite-difference fluid simulation of acoustic streaming on a fine-meshed three-dimensional model using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based calculation array is discussed. Airflows are induced by an acoustic traveling wave when an intense sound field is generated in a gap between a bending transducer and a reflector. The calculation results showed good agreement with measurements in a pressure distribution. Several flow vortices were observed near the boundary layer of the reflector and the transducer, which have often been observed near the boundary of acoustic tubes, but have not been observed in previous calculations for this type of ultrasonic air pump. PMID:25001051

  6. 3D Lithospheric Imaging by Time-Domain Full-Waveform Inversion of Teleseismic Body-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.; Combe, L.; Metivier, L.; Virieux, J.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Paul, A.

    2014-12-01

    With the deployment of dense seismic arrays and the continuous growth of computing facilities, full-waveform inversion (FWI) of teleseismic data has become a method of choice for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. FWI can be recast as a local optimization problem that seeks to estimate Earth's elastic properties by iteratively minimizing the misfit function between observed and modeled seismograms.In passive teleseismic configurations, the seismic source no longer corresponds to a point source embedded in the targeted medium but rather corresponds to a wavefront incoming from the outside of the model. We develop a 3-dimensional time-domain full-waveform inversion program that is more designed for this configuration. The gradient of the misfit function is efficiently computed with the adjoint-state method. A velocity-stress finite-difference time-domain modeling engine, which is interfaced with the so-called total-field/scattered-field method, is used to propagate in the targeted medium the incident wavefield inferred from a global Earth simulation (AxiSEM). Such interfacing is required to account for the multiple arrivals in the incoming wavefield and the sphericity of the Earth. Despite the limited number of nearly plane-wave sources, the interaction of the incident wavefield with the topography (P-Sv conversions and P-P reflections acting as secondary sources) provides a suitable framework to record both transmitted wavefields and reflected wavefields from lithospheric reflectors. These recordings of both transmitted and reflected waves makes FWI amenable to a broadband-wavenumber (i.e., high resolution) reconstruction of the lithosphere.Feasibility of the method is assessed with a realistic synthetic model representative of the Western Alps. One key issue is the estimation of the temporal source excitation, as there might be some trade-off between the source estimation and the subsurface update. To avoid being trapped in a local minimum, we follow a

  7. A parallel 3-D staggered grid pseudospectral time domain method for ground-penetrating radar wave simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Li, Zhanhui; Wang, Yanbin

    2010-12-01

    We presented a parallel 3-D staggered grid pseudospectral time domain (PSTD) method for simulating ground-penetrating radar (GPR) wave propagation. We took the staggered grid method to weaken the global effect in PSTD and developed a modified fast Fourier transform (FFT) spatial derivative operator to eliminate the wraparound effect due to the implicit periodical boundary condition in FFT operator. After the above improvements, we achieved the parallel PSTD computation based on an overlap domain decomposition method without any absorbing condition for each subdomain, which can significantly reduce the required grids in each overlap subdomain comparing with other proposed algorithms. We test our parallel technique for some numerical models and obtained consistent results with the analytical ones and/or those of the nonparallel PSTD method. The above numerical tests showed that our parallel PSTD algorithm is effective in simulating 3-D GPR wave propagation, with merits of saving computation time, as well as more flexibility in dealing with complicated models without losing the accuracy. The application of our parallel PSTD method in applied geophysics and paleoseismology based on GPR data confirmed the efficiency of our algorithm and its potential applications in various subdisciplines of solid earth geophysics. This study would also provide a useful parallel PSTD approach to the simulation of other geophysical problems on distributed memory PC cluster.

  8. Resonant frequency analysis of a Lamé-mode resonator on a quartz plate by the finite-difference time-domain method using the staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takashi; Hasegawa, Koji; Hirayama, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method using a staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities (SGCV) was formulated for elastic waves propagating in anisotropic solids and for a rectangular SGCV. Resonant frequency analysis of Lamé-mode resonators on a quartz plate was carried out to confirm the accuracy and validity of the proposed method. The resonant frequencies for the fundamental and higher-order Lamé-modes calculated by the proposed method agreed very well with their theoretical values.

  9. Real-Time Spectroscopic Monitoring of the Synthesis of Core and Core/Shell Upconversion Nanocrystals and Finite-Difference Time Domain Modeling of the Interaction Between Light and Spherical Microwell Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, John

    Nanocrystalline beta-NaYF4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er 3+ has significant potential for applications in a wide variety of fields including solar technologies, security printing, and biological imaging and sensing. In order to increase the potential of these nanocrystals for these applications, we have developed a method for the real-time, in situ, spectroscopic monitoring of nanocrystal growth and shell-addition. In situ real-time monitoring of upconversion emission is applied to study the reaction mechanism for the synthesis of beta-NaYF 4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er3++ nanoparticles in oleic acid and octadecene via the heat-up method. Transmission electron microscopy is used to correlate the spectroscopic signature of the reaction mixture with its composition. The power of real-time spectroscopic monitoring to precisely time the duration of the various stages of the reaction, and to accurately identify the transitions between those stages, including the completion of the reaction, is demonstrated. Real-time spectroscopic monitoring is used to study the effect of increasing the oleic acid concentration on the duration of these stages as well as the size and shape of resulting nanocrystals. The use of real-time spectroscopic monitoring to study shell-addition, specifically, the addition of an un-doped NaYF4 shell, is also discussed. Patterned gold surfaces are known to enhance the upconversion efficiency of lanthanide based upconversion materials, such as nanocrystalline beta-NaYF 4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er3+. Here, spherical microwell arrays are shown to provide up to a 40x enhancement of upconversion emission from beta-NaYF4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er 3+ nanocrystals. Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) is a method to solve, numerically, the Maxwell equations across a 3D simulation grid and has been used to simulate the interaction of light with a variety of materials, including metal surfaces and particles. FDTD simulations is used to investigate the nature of the enhancement from the patterned gold

  10. An efficient method of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion using a finite-difference injection method for time-lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Dmitry; Singh, Satish C.; Fuji, Nobuaki

    2015-09-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an objective method to estimate elastic properties of the subsurface and is an important area of research, particularly in seismic exploration community. It is a data-fitting approach, where the difference between observed and synthetic data is minimized iteratively. Due to a very high computational cost, the practical implementation of waveform inversion has so far been restricted to a 2-D geometry with different levels of physics incorporated in it (e.g. elasticity/viscoelasticity) or to a 3-D geometry but using an acoustic approximation. However, the earth is three-dimensional, elastic and heterogeneous and therefore a full 3-D elastic inversion is required in order to obtain more accurate and valuable models of the subsurface. Despite the recent increase in computing power, the application of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion to real-scale problems remains quite challenging on the current computer architecture. Here, we present an efficient method to perform 3-D elastic full waveform inversion for time-lapse seismic data using a finite-difference injection method. In this method, the wavefield is computed in the whole model and is stored on a surface above a finite volume where the model is perturbed and localized inversion is performed. Comparison of the final results using the 3-D finite-difference injection method and conventional 3-D inversion performed within the whole volume shows that our new method provides significant reductions in computational time and memory requirements without any notable loss in accuracy. Our approach shows a big potential for efficient reservoir monitoring in real time-lapse experiments.

  11. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 4; Numerical Simulation of the Nonlinear Acoustic Impedance of a Perforated Plate Single-Degree-of-Freedom Resonator Using a Time-Domain Finite Difference Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Single-degree-of-freedom resonators consisting of honeycomb cells covered by perforated facesheets are widely used as acoustic noise suppression liners in aircraft engine ducts. The acoustic resistance and mass reactance of such liners are known to vary with the intensity of the sound incident upon the panel. Since the pressure drop across a perforated liner facesheet increases quadratically with the flow velocity through the facesheet, this is known as the nonlinear resistance effect. In the past, two different empirical frequency domain models have been used to predict the Sound Pressure Level effect of the incident wave on the perforated liner impedance, one that uses the incident particle velocity in isolated narrowbands, and one that models the particle velocity as the overall velocity. In the absence of grazing flow, neither frequency domain model is entirely accurate in predicting the nonlinear effect that is measured for typical perforated sheets. The time domain model is developed in an attempt to understand and improve the model for the effect of spectral shape and amplitude of multi-frequency incident sound pressure on the liner impedance. A computer code for the time-domain finite difference model is developed and predictions using the models are compared to current frequency-domain models.

  12. A new 3D grid method for accurate electronic structure calculation of polyatomic molecules: The Voronoi-cell finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Chu, Shih-I.

    2008-05-01

    We introduce a new computational method on unstructured grids in the three-dimensional (3D) spaces to investigate the electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. The Voronoi-cell finite difference (VFD) method realizes a simple discrete Laplacian operator on unstructured grids based on Voronoi cells and their natural neighbors. The feature of unstructured grids enables us to choose intuitive pictures for an optimal molecular grid system. The new VFD method achieves highly adaptability by the Voronoi-cell diagram and yet simplicity by the finite difference scheme. It has no limitation in local refinement of grids in the vicinity of nuclear positions and provides an explicit expression at each grid without any integration. This method augmented by unstructured molecular grids is suitable for solving the Schr"odinger equation with the realistic 3D Coulomb potentials regardless of symmetry of molecules. For numerical examples, we test accuracies for electronic structures of one-electron polyatomic systems: linear H2^+ and triangular H3^++. We also extend VFD to the density functional theory (DFT) for many-electron polyatomic molecules.

  13. 3D pseudospectral time domain for modeling second-harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate ridge-type waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaux, Fabrice; Lantz, Eric; Chauvet, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    We report an application of the tri-dimensional pseudo-spectral time domain algorithm, that solves with accuracy the nonlinear Maxwell's equations, to predict second harmonic generation in lithium niobate ridge-type waveguides with high index contrast. Characteristics of the nonlinear process such as conversion efficiency as well as impact of the multimode character of the waveguide are investigated as a function of the waveguide geometry in uniformly and periodically poled medium.

  14. Study of cavity type antenna structure of large-area 915 MHz ultra-high frequency wave plasma device based on three-dimensional finite difference time-domain analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Xijiang; Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 ; Kunii, Kazuki; Liang, Rongqing; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University,3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8561

    2013-11-14

    A large-area planar plasma source with a resonant cavity type launcher driven by a 915 MHz ultra-high frequency wave was developed. Theoretical analysis with the three-dimensional finite difference time-domain simulation was carried out to determine the optimized launcher structure by analyzing the resonant transverse magnetic mode in the resonant cavity. Numerical result expects that the resonant electric field distribution inside the cavity dominantly consists of the TM{sub 410} mode. The resonant cavity type launcher having 8 holes in an octagonal geometry was designed to fit the resonant transverse magnetic mode. Adjusting 8 hole positions of the launcher to the field pattern of the resonant TM{sub 410} mode, we found that the plasma density increased about 40%∼50% from 1.0∼1.1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} to ∼1.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} at the same incident power of 2.5 kW, compared with the previous results with the launcher having 6 holes in the hexagonal geometry. It is also noted that the electron density changes almost linearly with the incident wave power without any mode jumps.

  15. Reconstruction for Time-Domain In Vivo EPR 3D Multigradient Oximetric Imaging—A Parallel Processing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dharmaraj, Christopher D.; Thadikonda, Kishan; Fletcher, Anthony R.; Doan, Phuc N.; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Matsumoto, Shingo; Johnson, Calvin A.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional Oximetric Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging using the Single Point Imaging modality generates unpaired spin density and oxygen images that can readily distinguish between normal and tumor tissues in small animals. It is also possible with fast imaging to track the changes in tissue oxygenation in response to the oxygen content in the breathing air. However, this involves dealing with gigabytes of data for each 3D oximetric imaging experiment involving digital band pass filtering and background noise subtraction, followed by 3D Fourier reconstruction. This process is rather slow in a conventional uniprocessor system. This paper presents a parallelization framework using OpenMP runtime support and parallel MATLAB to execute such computationally intensive programs. The Intel compiler is used to develop a parallel C++ code based on OpenMP. The code is executed on four Dual-Core AMD Opteron shared memory processors, to reduce the computational burden of the filtration task significantly. The results show that the parallel code for filtration has achieved a speed up factor of 46.66 as against the equivalent serial MATLAB code. In addition, a parallel MATLAB code has been developed to perform 3D Fourier reconstruction. Speedup factors of 4.57 and 4.25 have been achieved during the reconstruction process and oximetry computation, for a data set with 23 × 23 × 23 gradient steps. The execution time has been computed for both the serial and parallel implementations using different dimensions of the data and presented for comparison. The reported system has been designed to be easily accessible even from low-cost personal computers through local internet (NIHnet). The experimental results demonstrate that the parallel computing provides a source of high computational power to obtain biophysical parameters from 3D EPR oximetric imaging, almost in real-time. PMID:19672315

  16. Reconstruction for time-domain in vivo EPR 3D multigradient oximetric imaging--a parallel processing perspective.

    PubMed

    Dharmaraj, Christopher D; Thadikonda, Kishan; Fletcher, Anthony R; Doan, Phuc N; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Matsumoto, Shingo; Johnson, Calvin A; Cook, John A; Mitchell, James B; Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional Oximetric Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging using the Single Point Imaging modality generates unpaired spin density and oxygen images that can readily distinguish between normal and tumor tissues in small animals. It is also possible with fast imaging to track the changes in tissue oxygenation in response to the oxygen content in the breathing air. However, this involves dealing with gigabytes of data for each 3D oximetric imaging experiment involving digital band pass filtering and background noise subtraction, followed by 3D Fourier reconstruction. This process is rather slow in a conventional uniprocessor system. This paper presents a parallelization framework using OpenMP runtime support and parallel MATLAB to execute such computationally intensive programs. The Intel compiler is used to develop a parallel C++ code based on OpenMP. The code is executed on four Dual-Core AMD Opteron shared memory processors, to reduce the computational burden of the filtration task significantly. The results show that the parallel code for filtration has achieved a speed up factor of 46.66 as against the equivalent serial MATLAB code. In addition, a parallel MATLAB code has been developed to perform 3D Fourier reconstruction. Speedup factors of 4.57 and 4.25 have been achieved during the reconstruction process and oximetry computation, for a data set with 23 x 23 x 23 gradient steps. The execution time has been computed for both the serial and parallel implementations using different dimensions of the data and presented for comparison. The reported system has been designed to be easily accessible even from low-cost personal computers through local internet (NIHnet). The experimental results demonstrate that the parallel computing provides a source of high computational power to obtain biophysical parameters from 3D EPR oximetric imaging, almost in real-time. PMID:19672315

  17. Patient-Specific Carotid Plaque Progression Simulation Using 3D Meshless Generalized Finite Difference Models with Fluid-Structure Interactions Based on Serial In Vivo MRI Data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Atluri, Satya

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we introduced a computational procedure based on three-dimensional meshless generalized finite difference (MGFD) method and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to quantify patient-specific carotid atherosclerotic plaque growth functions and simulate plaque progression. Structure-only models were used in our previous report. In this paper, fluid-stricture interaction (FSI) was added to improve on prediction accuracy. One participating patient was scanned three times (T1, T2, and T3, at intervals of about 18 months) to obtain plaque progression data. Blood flow was assumed to laminar, Newtonian, viscous and incompressible. The Navier-Stokes equations with arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation were used as the governing equations. Plaque material was assumed to be uniform, homogeneous, isotropic, linear, and nearly incompressible. The linear elastic model was used. The 3D FSI plaque model was discretized and solved using a meshless generalized finite difference (GFD) method. Growth functions with a) morphology alone; b) morphology and plaque wall stress (PWS); morphology and flow shear stress (FSS), and d) morphology, PWS and FSS were introduced to predict future plaque growth based on previous time point data. Starting from the T2 plaque geometry, plaque progression was simulated by solving the FSI model and adjusting plaque geometry using plaque growth functions iteratively until T3 is reached. Numerically simulated plaque progression agreed very well with the target T3 plaque geometry with errors ranging from 8.62%, 7.22%, 5.77% and 4.39%, with the growth function including morphology, plaque wall stress and flow shear stress terms giving the best predictions. Adding flow shear stress term to the growth function improved the prediction error from 7.22% to 4.39%, a 40% improvement. We believe this is the first time 3D plaque progression FSI simulation based on multi-year patient-tracking data was reported. Serial MRI-based progression

  18. A 3D Finite-Difference BiCG Iterative Solver with the Fourier-Jacobi Preconditioner for the Anisotropic EIT/EEG Forward Problem

    PubMed Central

    Zherdetsky, Aleksej; Prakonina, Alena; Malony, Allen D.

    2014-01-01

    The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) and electroencephalography (EEG) forward problems in anisotropic inhomogeneous media like the human head belongs to the class of the three-dimensional boundary value problems for elliptic equations with mixed derivatives. We introduce and explore the performance of several new promising numerical techniques, which seem to be more suitable for solving these problems. The proposed numerical schemes combine the fictitious domain approach together with the finite-difference method and the optimally preconditioned Conjugate Gradient- (CG-) type iterative method for treatment of the discrete model. The numerical scheme includes the standard operations of summation and multiplication of sparse matrices and vector, as well as FFT, making it easy to implement and eligible for the effective parallel implementation. Some typical use cases for the EIT/EEG problems are considered demonstrating high efficiency of the proposed numerical technique. PMID:24527060

  19. A 3D finite-difference BiCG iterative solver with the Fourier-Jacobi preconditioner for the anisotropic EIT/EEG forward problem.

    PubMed

    Turovets, Sergei; Volkov, Vasily; Zherdetsky, Aleksej; Prakonina, Alena; Malony, Allen D

    2014-01-01

    The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) and electroencephalography (EEG) forward problems in anisotropic inhomogeneous media like the human head belongs to the class of the three-dimensional boundary value problems for elliptic equations with mixed derivatives. We introduce and explore the performance of several new promising numerical techniques, which seem to be more suitable for solving these problems. The proposed numerical schemes combine the fictitious domain approach together with the finite-difference method and the optimally preconditioned Conjugate Gradient- (CG-) type iterative method for treatment of the discrete model. The numerical scheme includes the standard operations of summation and multiplication of sparse matrices and vector, as well as FFT, making it easy to implement and eligible for the effective parallel implementation. Some typical use cases for the EIT/EEG problems are considered demonstrating high efficiency of the proposed numerical technique. PMID:24527060

  20. 3-D thermal analysis using finite difference technique with finite element model for improved design of components of rocket engine turbomachines for Space Shuttle Main Engine SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Kiho D.; Ip, Shek-Se P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element models were generated and transferred into three-dimensional finite difference models to perform transient thermal analyses for the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump's first stage nozzles and rotor blades. STANCOOL was chosen to calculate the heat transfer characteristics (HTCs) around the airfoils, and endwall effects were included at the intersections of the airfoils and platforms for the steady-state boundary conditions. Free and forced convection due to rotation effects were also considered in hollow cores. Transient HTCs were calculated by taking ratios of the steady-state values based on the flow rates and fluid properties calculated at each time slice. Results are presented for both transient plots and three-dimensional color contour isotherm plots; they were also converted into universal files to be used for FEM stress analyses.

  1. STEALTH: a Lagrange explicit finite-difference code for solid, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 8B. STEALTH/WHAMSE: a 3-D fluid-structure interaction code

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    STEALTH is a family of computer codes that can be used to calculate a variety of physical processes in which the dynamic behavior of a continuum is involved. The version of STEALTH described in this volume is designed for calculations of fluid-structure interaction. This version of the program consists of a hydrodynamic version of STEALTH which has been coupled to a finite-element code, WHAMSE. STEALTH computes the transient response of the fluid continuum, while WHAMSE computes the transient response of shell and beam structures under external fluid loadings. The coupling between STEALTH and WHAMSE is performed during each cycle or step of a calculation. Separate calculations of fluid response and structure response are avoided, thereby giving a more accurate model of the dynamic coupling between fluid and structure. This volume provides the theoretical background, the finite-difference equations, the finite-element equations, a discussion of several sample problems, a listing of the input decks for the sample problems, a programmer's manual and a description of the input records for the STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program.

  2. Onset of Time-Dependent 3-D spherical Mantle Convection using a Radial Basis Function-Pseudospectral Method ; Spectral-Finite Volume ; Spectral Higher-Order Finite- Difference Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G.; Flyer, N.; Yuen, D. A.; Monnereau, M.; Zhang, S.; Wang, S. M.

    2009-05-01

    Many numerical methods, such as finite-differences, finite-volume, their yin-yang variants, finite-elements and spectral methods have been employed to study 3-D mantle convection. All have their own strengths, but also serious weaknesses. Spectrally accurate methods do not practically allow for node refinement and often involve cumbersome algebra while finite difference, volume, or element methods are generally low-order, adding excessive numerical diffusion to the model. For the 3-D mantle convection problem, we have introduced a new mesh-free approach, using radial basis functions (RBF). This method has the advantage of being algorithmic simple, spectrally accurate for arbitrary node layouts in multi-dimensions and naturally allows for node-refinement. One virtue of the RBF scheme allows the user to use a simple Cartesian geometry, while implementing the required boundary conditions for the temperature, velocities and stress components on a spherical surface at both the planetary surface and the core-mantle boundary. We have studied time- dependent mantle convection, using both a RBF-pseudospectral code and a code which uses spherical- harmonics in the angular direction and second-order finite volume in the radial direction. We have employed a third code , which uses spherical harmonics and higher-order finite-difference method a la Fornberg in the radial coordinate.We first focus on the onset of time-dependence at Rayleigh number Ra of 70,000. We follow the development of stronger time-dependence to a Ra of one million, using high enough resolution with 120 to 200 points in the radial direction and 128 to 256 spherical harmonics.

  3. A modified and stable version of a perfectly matched layer technique for the 3-d second order wave equation in time domain with an application to aeroacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbacher, Barbara; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Sim, Imbo

    2013-01-01

    We consider the second order wave equation in an unbounded domain and propose an advanced perfectly matched layer (PML) technique for its efficient and reliable simulation. In doing so, we concentrate on the time domain case and use the finite-element (FE) method for the space discretization. Our un-split-PML formulation requires four auxiliary variables within the PML region in three space dimensions. For a reduced version (rPML), we present a long time stability proof based on an energy analysis. The numerical case studies and an application example demonstrate the good performance and long time stability of our formulation for treating open domain problems. PMID:23888085

  4. A modified and stable version of a perfectly matched layer technique for the 3-d second order wave equation in time domain with an application to aeroacoustics.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbacher, Barbara; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Sim, Imbo

    2013-02-15

    We consider the second order wave equation in an unbounded domain and propose an advanced perfectly matched layer (PML) technique for its efficient and reliable simulation. In doing so, we concentrate on the time domain case and use the finite-element (FE) method for the space discretization. Our un-split-PML formulation requires four auxiliary variables within the PML region in three space dimensions. For a reduced version (rPML), we present a long time stability proof based on an energy analysis. The numerical case studies and an application example demonstrate the good performance and long time stability of our formulation for treating open domain problems. PMID:23888085

  5. A modified and stable version of a perfectly matched layer technique for the 3-d second order wave equation in time domain with an application to aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, Barbara; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Sim, Imbo

    2013-02-01

    We consider the second order wave equation in an unbounded domain and propose an advanced perfectly matched layer (PML) technique for its efficient and reliable simulation. In doing so, we concentrate on the time domain case and use the finite-element (FE) method for the space discretization. Our un-split-PML formulation requires four auxiliary variables within the PML region in three space dimensions. For a reduced version (rPML), we present a long time stability proof based on an energy analysis. The numerical case studies and an application example demonstrate the good performance and long time stability of our formulation for treating open domain problems.

  6. Time-Domain Simulation of RF Couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David; Carlsson, Johan; Austin, Travis

    2009-11-26

    We have developed a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) fluid-like approach to integrated plasma-and-coupler simulation [1], and show how it can be used to model LH and ICRF couplers in the MST and larger tokamaks.[2] This approach permits very accurate 3-D representation of coupler geometry, and easily includes non-axi-symmetry in vessel wall, magnetic equilibrium, and plasma density. The plasma is integrated with the FDTD Maxwell solver in an implicit solve that steps over electron time-scales, and permits tenuous plasma in the coupler itself, without any need to distinguish or interface between different regions of vacuum and/or plasma. The FDTD algorithm is also generalized to incorporate a time-domain sheath potential [3] on metal structures within the simulation, to look for situations where the sheath potential might generate local sputtering opportunities. Benchmarking of the time-domain sheath algorithm has been reported in the references. Finally, the time-domain software [4] permits the use of particles, either as field diagnostic (test particles) or to self-consistently compute plasma current from the applied RF power.

  7. Local site-effects for the city of Thessaloniki (N. Greece) using a 3-D finite-difference method: a case of complex dependence on source and model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlatoudis, A. A.; Papazachos, C. B.; Theodoulidis, N.; Kristek, J.; Moczo, P.

    2010-07-01

    The site effects of seismic motion in the metropolitan area of the city of Thessaloniki (Northern Greece) are investigated using a 3-D finite-difference modelling approach. Three different seismic scenarios are assumed with two different focal mechanisms for each one. Standard spectral ratios (SSR) are calculated from 3-D synthetics and compared with the ratios from the recorded motion, as well as ratios obtained from 1-D and 2-D modelling by other researchers. The average SSR curves from the six scenarios are in good agreement with the empirical ones, whereas the SSR results from 3-D modelling are different from those from 1-D modelling, exhibiting higher fundamental frequencies and larger amplification amplitudes, in much better agreement with observed SSR ratios. Comparisons of Fourier amplitude spectra obtained for various scenarios for the broader area of Thessaloniki show considerable dependence of the site effects on the source properties (position, depth and fault-plane solution), as well as on the local structure.

  8. A two-dimensional time domain near zone to far zone transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Ryan, Deirdre; Beggs, John H.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    In a previous paper, a time domain transformation useful for extrapolating 3-D near zone finite difference time domain (FDTD) results to the far zone was presented. In this paper, the corresponding 2-D transform is outlined. While the 3-D transformation produced a physically observable far zone time domain field, this is not convenient to do directly in 2-D, since a convolution would be required. However, a representative 2-D far zone time domain result can be obtained directly. This result can then be transformed to the frequency domain using a Fast Fourier Transform, corrected with a simple multiplicative factor, and used, for example, to calculate the complex wideband scattering width of a target. If an actual time domain far zone result is required it can be obtained by inverse Fourier transform of the final frequency domain result.

  9. Accelerating a 3D finite-difference wave propagation code by a factor of 50 and a spectral-element code by a factor of 25 using a cluster of GPU graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Michéa, David; Erlebacher, Gordon; Göddeke, Dominik

    2010-05-01

    We first accelerate a three-dimensional finite-difference in the time domain (FDTD) wave propagation code by a factor of about 50 using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computing on a cheap NVIDIA graphics card with the CUDA programming language. We implement the code in CUDA in the case of the fully heterogeneous elastic wave equation. We also implement Convolution Perfectly Matched Layers (CPMLs) on the graphics card to efficiently absorb outgoing waves on the fictitious edges of the grid. We show that the code that runs on the graphics card gives the expected results by comparing our results to those obtained by running the same simulation on a classical processor core. The methodology that we present can be used for Maxwell's equations as well because their form is similar to that of the seismic wave equation written in velocity vector and stress tensor. We then implement a high-order finite-element (spectral-element) application, which performs the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation resulting for instance from earthquakes at the scale of a continent or from active seismic acquisition experiments in the oil industry, on a cluster of NVIDIA Tesla graphics cards using the CUDA programming language and non blocking message passing based on MPI. We compare it to the implementation in C language and MPI on a classical cluster of CPU nodes. We use mesh coloring to efficiently handle summation operations over degrees of freedom on an unstructured mesh, and we exchange information between nodes using non blocking MPI messages. Using non-blocking communications allows us to overlap the communications across the network and the data transfer between the GPU card and the CPU node on which it is installed with calculations on that GPU card. We perform a number of numerical tests to validate the single-precision CUDA and MPI implementation and assess its accuracy. We then analyze performance measurements and in average we obtain a speedup of 20x to 25x.

  10. LaMEM: a massively parallel 3D staggered-grid finite-difference code for coupled nonlinear themo-mechanical modeling of lithospheric deformation with visco-elasto-plastic rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Anton; Kaus, Boris

    2015-04-01

    This software project aims at bringing the 3D lithospheric deformation modeling to a qualitatively different level. Our code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is based on the following building blocks: * Massively-parallel data-distributed implementation model based on PETSc library * Light, stable and accurate staggered-grid finite difference spatial discretization * Marker-in-Cell pedictor-corector time discretization with Runge-Kutta 4-th order * Elastic stress rotation algorithm based on the time integration of the vorticity pseudo-vector * Staircase-type internal free surface boundary condition without artificial viscosity contrast * Geodynamically relevant visco-elasto-plastic rheology * Global velocity-pressure-temperature Newton-Raphson nonlinear solver * Local nonlinear solver based on FZERO algorithm * Coupled velocity-pressure geometric multigrid preconditioner with Galerkin coarsening Staggered grid finite difference, being inherently Eulerian and rather complicated discretization method, provides no natural treatment of free surface boundary condition. The solution based on the quasi-viscous sticky-air phase introduces significant viscosity contrasts and spoils the convergence of the iterative solvers. In LaMEM we are currently implementing an approximate stair-case type of the free surface boundary condition which excludes the empty cells and restores the solver convergence. Because of the mutual dependence of the stress and strain-rate tensor components, and their different spatial locations in the grid, there is no straightforward way of implementing the nonlinear rheology. In LaMEM we have developed and implemented an efficient interpolation scheme for the second invariant of the strain-rate tensor, that solves this problem. Scalable efficient linear solvers are the key components of the successful nonlinear problem solution. In LaMEM we have a range of PETSc-based preconditioning techniques that either employ a block factorization of

  11. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  12. Nonstandard finite difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    1995-01-01

    The major research activities of this proposal center on the construction and analysis of nonstandard finite-difference schemes for ordinary and partial differential equations. In particular, we investigate schemes that either have zero truncation errors (exact schemes) or possess other significant features of importance for numerical integration. Our eventual goal is to bring these methods to bear on problems that arise in the modeling of various physical, engineering, and technological systems. At present, these efforts are extended in the direction of understanding the exact nature of these nonstandard procedures and extending their use to more complicated model equations. Our presentation will give a listing (obtained to date) of the nonstandard rules, their application to a number of linear and nonlinear, ordinary and partial differential equations. In certain cases, numerical results will be presented.

  13. Finite difference discretization of semiconductor drift-diffusion equations for nanowire solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinega, Alexei; John, Sajeev

    2012-10-01

    We introduce a finite difference discretization of semiconductor drift-diffusion equations using cylindrical partial waves. It can be applied to describe the photo-generated current in radial pn-junction nanowire solar cells. We demonstrate that the cylindrically symmetric (l=0) partial wave accurately describes the electronic response of a square lattice of silicon nanowires at normal incidence. We investigate the accuracy of our discretization scheme by using different mesh resolution along the radial direction r and compare with 3D (x, y, z) discretization. We consider both straight nanowires and nanowires with radius modulation along the vertical axis. The charge carrier generation profile inside each nanowire is calculated using an independent finite-difference time-domain simulation.

  14. Time domain simulation and sound synthesis for the snare drum.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The snare drum is a complex system, relying on the interaction of multiple components: the drumheads, or membranes, a set of snares, the surrounding acoustic field and an internal cavity. Because these components are multidimensional, and due to a strong distributed non-linearity (the snare interaction), many techniques used frequently in physical modeling synthesis applications, such as digital waveguides and modal methods are difficult to apply. In this article, finite difference time domain techniques are applied to a full 3D system, and various features of interest, such as the coupling between membranes, and the interaction between the membranes and the snares, are examined in detail. Also discussed are various numerical features, such as spurious splitting of degenerate modes and bandwidth limitation, and estimates of computational complexity are provided. Sound examples are presented. PMID:22280714

  15. Mimetic finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method mimics fundamental properties of mathematical and physical systems including conservation laws, symmetry and positivity of solutions, duality and self-adjointness of differential operators, and exact mathematical identities of the vector and tensor calculus. This article is the first comprehensive review of the 50-year long history of the mimetic methodology and describes in a systematic way the major mimetic ideas and their relevance to academic and real-life problems. The supporting applications include diffusion, electromagnetics, fluid flow, and Lagrangian hydrodynamics problems. The article provides enough details to build various discrete operators on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes and summarizes the major convergence results for the mimetic approximations. Most of these theoretical results, which are presented here as lemmas, propositions and theorems, are either original or an extension of existing results to a more general formulation using polyhedral meshes. Finally, flexibility and extensibility of the mimetic methodology are shown by deriving higher-order approximations, enforcing discrete maximum principles for diffusion problems, and ensuring the numerical stability for saddle-point systems.

  16. Casimir forces in the time domain: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-07-15

    We present a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. The method involves the time evolution of electric and magnetic fields in response to a set of current sources, in a modified medium with frequency-independent conductivity. The advantage of this approach is that it allows one to exploit existing FDTD software, without modification, to compute Casimir forces. In this paper, we focus on the derivation, implementation choices, and essential properties of the time-domain algorithm, both considered analytically and illustrated in the simplest parallel-plate geometry.

  17. Efficient solution on solving 3D Maxwell equations using stable semi-implicit splitting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Wei; Gu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient solution on solving 3-dimensional (3D) time-domain Maxwell equations using the semi-implicit Crank-Nicholson (CN) method for time domain discretization with advantage of unconditional time stability. By applying the idea of fractional steps method (FSM) to the CN scheme, the proposed method provides a much simpler and efficient implementation than a direct implementation of the CN scheme. Compared with the alternating-direction implicit (ADI) method and explicit finite-difference time-domain approach (FDTD), it significantly saves the computational resource like memory and CPU time while remains similar numerical accuracy.

  18. THE PSTD ALGORITHM: A TIME-DOMAIN METHOD REQUIRING ONLY TWO CELLS PER WAVELENGTH. (R825225)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) method is developed for solutions of Maxwell's equations. It uses the fast Fourier transform (FFT), instead of finite differences on conventional finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) methods, to represent spatial derivatives. Because the Fourie...

  19. Time-domain imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolliver, C. L.

    1989-01-01

    The quest for the highest resolution microwave imaging and principle of time-domain imaging has been the primary motivation for recent developments in time-domain techniques. With the present technology, fast time varying signals can now be measured and recorded both in magnitude and in-phase. It has also enhanced our ability to extract relevant details concerning the scattering object. In the past, the interface of object geometry or shape for scattered signals has received substantial attention in radar technology. Various scattering theories were proposed to develop analytical solutions to this problem. Furthermore, the random inversion, frequency swept holography, and the synthetic radar imaging, have two things in common: (1) the physical optic far-field approximation, and (2) the utilization of channels as an extra physical dimension, were also advanced. Despite the inherent vectorial nature of electromagnetic waves, these scalar treatments have brought forth some promising results in practice with notable examples in subsurface and structure sounding. The development of time-domain techniques are studied through the theoretical aspects as well as experimental verification. The use of time-domain imaging for space robotic vision applications has been suggested.

  20. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Michael A.

    Finite-difference and finite-element methods for the computational analysis of EM scattering phenomena are examined in chapters contributed by leading experts. Topics addressed include an FEM for composite scatterers, coupled finite- and boundary-element methods for EM scattering, absorbing boundary conditions for the direct solution PDEs arising in EM scattering problems, application of the control-region approximation to two-dimensional EM scattering, coupled potentials for EM fields in inhomogeneous media, the method of conforming boundary elements for transient electromagnetics, and the finite-difference time-domain method for numerical modeling of EM wave interactions with arbitrary structures. Extensive diagrams and graphs of typical results are provided.

  1. Exponential Finite-Difference Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses use of explicit exponential finite-difference technique to solve various diffusion-type partial differential equations. Study extends technique to transient-heat-transfer problems in one dimensional cylindrical coordinates and two and three dimensional Cartesian coordinates and to some nonlinear problems in one or two Cartesian coordinates.

  2. Metallic and 3D-printed dielectric helical terahertz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Anthony, Jessienta; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2015-12-28

    We investigate guidance of Terahertz (THz) radiation in metallic and 3D-printed dielectric helical waveguides in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1 THz. Our experimental results obtained from THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements are in very good agreement with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. We observe single-mode, low loss and low dispersive propagation of THz radiation in metallic helical waveguides over a broad bandwidth. The 3D-printed dielectric helical waveguides have substantially extended the bandwidth of a low loss dielectric tube waveguide as observed from the experimental and simulation results. The high flexibility of the helical design allows an easy incorporation into bench top THz devices. PMID:26832000

  3. 3-D electromagnetic modeling of wakefields in accelerator components

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B.R.; Caporaso, G.J.; Ng, Wang C.; Shang, C.C.; Steich, D.

    1996-09-18

    We discuss the use of 3-D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic codes for modeling accelerator components. Computational modeling of cylindrically symmetric structures such as induction accelerator cells has been very successful in predicting the wake potential and wake impedances of these structures, but full 3-D modeling of complex structures has been limited due to substantial computer resources required for a full 3-D model. New massively parallel 3-D time domain electromagnetic codes now under development using conforming unstructured meshes allow a substantial increase in the geometric fidelity of the structures being modeled. Development of these new codes are discussed in context of applicability to accelerator problems. Various 3-D structures are tested with an existing cubical cell FDTD code and wake impedances compared with simple analytic models for the structures; results will be used as benchmarks for testing the new time time domain codes. Structures under consideration include a stripline beam position monitor as well as circular and elliptical apertures in circular waveguides. Excellent agreement for monopole and dipole impedances with models were found for these structures below the cutoff frequency of the beam line.

  4. 3-D electromagnetic modeling of wakefields in accelerator components

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, Brian R.; Caporaso, George J.; Ng, Wang C.; Shang, Clifford C.; Steich, David

    1997-02-01

    We discuss the use of 3-D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic codes for the modeling of accelerator components. Computational modeling of cylindrically symmetric structures such as induction accelerator cells has been extremely successful in predicting the wake potential and wake impedances of these structures, but fully 3-D modeling of complex structures has been limited due to the substantial computer resources required for a fully 3-D model. New massively parallel 3-D time domain electromagnetic codes now under development using conforming unstructured meshes allow a substantial increase in the geometric fidelity of the structures being modeled. Development of these new codes will be discussed in the context of their applicability to accelerator problems. A variety of 3-D structures are tested with an existing cubical cell FDTD code and the wake impedances are compared with simple analytic models for the structures. These results will provide a set of benchmarks for testing the new time domain codes. Structures under consideration include a stripline beam position monitor as well as circular and elliptical apertures in circular waveguides. Excellent agreement for the monopole and dipole impedances with the models are found for these structures below the cutoff frequency of the beam line.

  5. Numerical analysis of curved frequency selective surface by finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yi; Wang, Jian-bo; Chen, Gui-bo; Sun, Guan-cheng; Lu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Frequency selective surface is a monolayer or multilayer 2D periodic structure which is composed of multiple resonance units scattering by a two-dimensional periodic array on dielectric layer. FSS can't absorb radio frequency energy, but can filter the frequency which is therefore applied in microwave technique or stealth technology. The relative research on curved FSS is relatively scarce since the curved FSS structure can be obtained only when FSS is attached on the materials surfaces of curved structures in engineering application. However, curved FSS is widely applied in practical engineering; therefore, the research on curved FSS structure has important significance. In this paper, a curved FSS structure model of Y-pore unit is established and numerical simulated by means of FDTD. The influence of curvature on FSS transmission characteristics is studied according to the analysis on the changing of radar cross section (RCS). The results show: the center frequency point of the plane band pass FSS structure drifts after the curve surface deformation of the structure; the center frequency point of the curved band pass FSS structure drifts with the changing of the curvature radius, i. e. with the decreasing of curvature radius, the frequency point drifts towards high points and the transmittance decreases. The design of FSS radome demands of accurate and stable center resonance frequency; therefore, the actual situation of curved surface should be considered in practical engineering application when band pass FSS is made into frequency selection filtering radome. The curvature radius should be long enough to avoid center frequency drifting and transmittance deceasing.

  6. Finite-Difference Time-Domain Modeling of Infrasonic Waves Generated by Supersonic Auroral Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, V. P.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric infrasonic waves are acoustic waves with frequencies ranging from ˜0.02 to ˜10 Hz [e.g., Blanc, Ann. Geophys., 3, 673, 1985]. The importance of infrasound studies has been emphasized in the past ten years from the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification perspective [e.g., Le Pichon et al., JGR, 114, D08112, 2009]. A proper understanding of infrasound propagation in the atmosphere is required for identification and classification of different infrasonic waves and their sources [Drob et al., JGR, 108, D21, 4680, 2003]. In the present work we employ a FDTD model of infrasound propagation in a realistic atmosphere to provide quantitative interpretation of infrasonic waves produced by auroral arcs moving with supersonic speed. We have recently applied similar modeling approaches for studies of infrasonic waves generated from thunderstorms [e.g., Few, Handbook of Atmospheric Electrodynamics, H. Volland (ed.), Vol. 2, pp.1-31, CRC Press, 1995], quantitative interpretation of infrasonic signatures from pulsating auroras [Wilson et al., GRL, 32, L14810, 2005], and studies of infrasonic waves generated by transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere termed sprites [e.g., Farges, Lightning: Principles, Instruments and Applications, H.D. Betz et al. (eds.), Ch.18, Springer, 2009]. The related results have been reported in [Pasko, JGR, 114, D08205, 2009], [de Larquier et al., GRL, 37, L06804, 2010], and [de Larquier, MS Thesis, Penn State, Aug. 2010], respectively. In the FDTD model, the altitude and frequency dependent attenuation coefficients provided by Sutherland and Bass [J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 115, 1012, 2004] are included in classical equations of acoustics in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere using a decomposition technique recently proposed by de Groot-Hedlin [J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 124, 1430, 2008]. The auroral infrasonic waves (AIW) in the frequency range 0.1-0.01 Hz associated with the supersonic motion of auroral arcs have been extensively studied for over four decades [e.g., Wilson and Nichparenko, Nature, 214, 1299, 1967; Wilson, JGR, 74, 1813,1969; JGR, 77, 1820, 1972; JATP, 37, 973, 1975; Inframatics, (10), 1, 2005]. The Lorentz force and Joule heating are discussed in the existing literature as primary sources producing infrasound waves associated with auroral electrojet [Chimonas and Hines, Planet. Space Sci., 18, 565, 1970; Chimonas and Peltier, Planet. Space Sci., 18, 599, 1970; Wilson, 1972; Swift, JGR, 78, 8305, 1973; Wilson et al., Planet. Space Sci., 24, 1155, 1976; Chimonas, JATP, 39, 799, 1977; Brekke, JATP, 41, 475, 1979]. We emphasize that up to now no quantitative multi-dimensional modeling of infrasound generation and propagation in a realistic atmosphere in association with supersonic auroras has been conducted. Results indicate, in particular, that a body force ˜10-8 N/m3 acting in the electrojet volume with cross-sectional area 10 km by 10 km is fully sufficient to produce the observed pressure perturbations on the ground ˜0.2 Pa (2 dynes/cm2) [Wilson, 1969]. We will report quantitative modeling of complex infrasonic waveforms including direct shock and reflected shockwaves, which are refracted back to the earth by the thermosphere [Wilson, 1969].

  7. Coupled simulation of an electromagnetic heating process using the finite difference time domain method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Tang, Juming; Liu, Fang

    2007-01-01

    Due to the complexity of interactions between microwaves and food products, a reliable and efficient simulation model can be a very useful tool to guide the design of microwave heating systems and processes. This research developed a model to simulate coupled phenomena of electromagnetic heating and conventional heat transfer by combining commercial electromagnetic software with a customer built heat transfer model. Simulation results were presented and compared with experimental results for hot water and microwave heating in a single mode microwave system at 915 MHz. Good agreement was achieved, showing that this model was able to provide insight into industrial electromagnetic heating processes. PMID:18351003

  8. The Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Rafael; Stich, Daniel; Morales, Jose

    2015-07-01

    We introduce the Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method (CSFDM) as a generalization of the well-known Finite-Difference method (FDM) for solving the acoustic and elastic wave equations. We have found a direct relationship between modelling the second-order wave equation by the FDM and the first-order wave equation by the CSFDM in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D acoustic media. We present the numerical methodology in order to apply the introduced CSFDM and show an example for wave propagation in simple homogeneous and heterogeneous models. The CSFDM may be implemented as an extension into pre-existing numerical techniques in order to obtain fourth- or sixth-order accurate results with compact three time-level stencils. We compare advantages of imposing various types of initial motion conditions of the CSFDM and demonstrate its higher-order accuracy under the same computational cost and dispersion-dissipation properties. The introduced method can be naturally extended to solve different partial differential equations arising in other fields of science and engineering.

  9. Finite difference computation of head-related transfer function for human hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Tian; Huo Liu, Qing

    2003-05-01

    Modeling the head-related transfer function (HRTF) is a key to many applications in spatial audio. To understand and predict the effects of head geometry and the surrounding environment on the HRTF, a three-dimensional finite-difference time domain model (3D FDTD) has been developed to simulate acoustic wave interaction with a human head. A perfectly matched layer (PML) is used to absorb outgoing waves at the truncated boundary of an unbounded medium. An external source is utilized to reduce the computational domain size through the scattered-field/total-field formulation. This numerical model has been validated by analytical solutions for a spherical head model. The 3D FDTD code is then used as a computational tool to predict the HRTF for various scenarios. In particular, a simplified spherical head model is compared to a realistic head model up to about 7 kHz. The HRTF is also computed for a realistic head model in the presence of a wall. It is demonstrated that this 3D FDTD model can be a useful tool for spatial audio applications.

  10. Finite difference computation of head-related transfer function for human hearing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Tian; Liu, Qing Huo

    2003-05-01

    Modeling the head-related transfer function (HRTF) is a key to many applications in spatial audio. To understand and predict the effects of head geometry and the surrounding environment on the HRTF, a three-dimensional finite-difference time domain model (3D FDTD) has been developed to simulate acoustic wave interaction with a human head. A perfectly matched layer (PML) is used to absorb outgoing waves at the truncated boundary of an unbounded medium. An external source is utilized to reduce the computational domain size through the scattered-field/total-field formulation. This numerical model has been validated by analytical solutions for a spherical head model. The 3D FDTD code is then used as a computational tool to predict the HRTF for various scenarios. In particular, a simplified spherical head model is compared to a realistic head model up to about 7 kHz. The HRTF is also computed for a realistic head model in the presence of a wall. It is demonstrated that this 3D FDTD model can be a useful tool for spatial audio applications. PMID:12765362

  11. DSI3D-RCS: Theory manual

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Steich, D.; Cook, G.; Eme, B.

    1995-03-16

    The DSI3D-RCS code is designed to numerically evaluate radar cross sections on complex objects by solving Maxwell`s curl equations in the time-domain and in three space dimensions. The code has been designed to run on the new parallel processing computers as well as on conventional serial computers. The DSI3D-RCS code is unique for the following reasons: Allows the use of unstructured non-orthogonal grids, allows a variety of cell or element types, reduces to be the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method when orthogonal grids are used, preserves charge or divergence locally (and globally), is conditionally stable, is non-dissipative, is accurate for non-orthogonal grids. This method is derived using a Discrete Surface Integration (DSI) technique. As formulated, the DSI technique can be used with essentially arbitrary unstructured grids composed of convex polyhedral cells. This implementation of the DSI algorithm allows the use of unstructured grids that are composed of combinations of non-orthogonal hexahedrons, tetrahedrons, triangular prisms and pyramids. This algorithm reduces to the conventional FDTD method when applied on a structured orthogonal hexahedral grid.

  12. DSI3D - RCS user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Steich, D.; Cook, G.

    1995-08-23

    The DSI3D-RCS code is designed to numerically evaluate radar cross sections on complex objects by solving Maxwell`s curl equations in the time-domain and in three space dimensions. The code has been designed to run on the new parallel processing computers as well as on conventional serial computers. The DSI3D-RCS code is unique for the following reasons: Allows the use of unstructured non-orthogonal grids, allows a variety of cell or element types, reduces to be the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method when orthogonal grids are used, preserves charge or divergence locally (and globally), is conditionally stable, is selectively non-dissipative, and is accurate for non-orthogonal grids. This method is derived using a Discrete Surface Integration (DSI) technique. As formulated, the DSI technique can be used with essentially arbitrary unstructured grids composed of convex polyhedral cells. This implementation of the DSI algorithm allows the use of unstructured grids that are composed of combinations of non-orthogonal the use of unstructured grids that are composed of combinations of non-orthogonal hexahedrons, tetrahedrons, triangular prisms and pyramids. This algorithm reduces to the conventional FDTD method when applied on a structured orthogonal hexahedral grid.

  13. Generating meshes for finite-difference analysis using a solid modeler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna, G. W.; White, W. T.; Cabral, B. K.

    1987-09-01

    One tool used by the Engineering Research Division of LLNL to help analyze the behavior of electronic systems in hostile environments is 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation. FDTD codes solve Maxwell's equations,the differential equations of electromagnetism, on a uniform lattice of points. It is this uniform lattice, or mesh, that distinguishes finite-difference codes from other codes. The simple mesh makes FDTD codes computationally more efficient than other codes, which enables them to run larger problems and to run faster (up to thirty times faster than finite-element codes, for example). Therefore, within the Engineering Department at LLNL, Electronics Engineering (EE) has initiated a project to develop a mesh generator that will provide meshes suitable for FDTD analysis. This report describes the results of the first year of EE's FDTD Mesh Generation Project. During this year a preliminary version of an automated mesh generator was built and used to create a mesh of an object of interest to the High-Power Microwave Program, namely an electrically detonatable land mine. The code was verified by meshing basic solids such as spheres and cylinders. Because of the design of the code, there is no software limitation to the size of meshes that can be accommodated. The algorithm with a mesh space of approximately 500,000 cells has been demonstrated. The mesh generator can detect certain objects with walls that are thinner than the width of a cell. The code has internal graphics for viewing objects as they appear prior to being converted to a finite-difference representation. Additionally, via data files, the code is coupled to two external graphics packages for visually checking the meshes, namely TAURUS on the Cray and a new code, IMAGE, on the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  14. Generating meshes for finite-difference analysis using a solid modeler

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, G.W.; White, W.T.; Cabral, B.K.

    1987-09-01

    One tool used by the Engineering Research Division of LLNL to help analyze the behavior of electronic systems in hostile environments is 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation. FDTD codes solve Maxwell's equations,the differential equations of electromagnetism, on a uniform lattice of points. It is this uniform lattice, or ''mesh,'' that distinguishes finite-difference codes from other codes. The simple mesh makes FDTD codes computationally more efficient than other codes, which enables them to run larger problems and to run faster (up to thirty times faster than finite-element codes, for example). Therefore, within the Engineering Department at LLNL, Electronics Engineering (EE) has initiated a project to develop a mesh generator that will provide meshes suitable for FDTD analysis. This report describes the results of the first year of EE's FDTD Mesh Generation Project. During this year a preliminary version of an automated mesh generator was built and used to create a mesh of an object of interest to the High-Power Microwave Program, namely an electrically detonatable land mine. The code was verified by meshing basic solids such as spheres and cylinders. Because of the design of the code, there is no software limitation to the size of meshes that can be accommodated. The algorithm with a mesh space of approximately 500,000 cells has been demonstrated. The mesh generator can detect certain objects with walls that are thinner than the width of a cell. The code has internal graphics for viewing objects as they appear prior to being converted to a finite-difference representation. Additionally, via data files, the code is coupled to two external graphics packages for visually checking the meshes, namely TAURUS on the Cray and a new code, IMAGE, on the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  15. Time-Domain Computation Of Electromagnetic Fields In MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Faiza S.; Rascoe, Daniel L.

    1995-01-01

    Maxwell's equations solved on three-dimensional, conformed orthogonal grids by finite-difference techniques. Method of computing frequency-dependent electrical parameters of monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) involves time-domain computation of propagation of electromagnetic field in response to excitation by single pulse at input terminal, followed by computation of Fourier transforms to obtain frequency-domain response from time-domain response. Parameters computed include electric and magnetic fields, voltages, currents, impedances, scattering parameters, and effective dielectric constants. Powerful and efficient means for analyzing performance of even complicated MMIC.

  16. Frequency and time domain three-dimensional inversion of electromagnetic data for a grounded-wire source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Choi, Jihyang; Son, Jeong-Sul

    2015-01-01

    We present frequency- and time-domain three-dimensional (3-D) inversion approaches that can be applied to transient electromagnetic (TEM) data from a grounded-wire source using a PC. In the direct time-domain approach, the forward solution and sensitivity were obtained in the frequency domain using a finite-difference technique, and the frequency response was then Fourier-transformed using a digital filter technique. In the frequency-domain approach, TEM data were Fourier-transformed using a smooth-spectrum inversion method, and the recovered frequency response was then inverted. The synthetic examples show that for the time derivative of magnetic field, frequency-domain inversion of TEM data performs almost as well as time-domain inversion, with a significant reduction in computational time. In our synthetic studies, we also compared the resolution capabilities of the ground and airborne TEM and controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data resulting from a common grounded wire. An airborne TEM survey at 200-m elevation achieved a resolution for buried conductors almost comparable to that of the ground TEM method. It is also shown that the inversion of CSAMT data was able to detect a 3-D resistivity structure better than the TEM inversion, suggesting an advantage of electric-field measurements over magnetic-field-only measurements.

  17. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  18. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravitoacoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3-D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale, we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2-D or 3-D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  19. A parallel algorithm for solving the 3d Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Michael; Yager-Elorriaga, David

    2010-08-20

    We describe a parallel algorithm for solving the time-independent 3d Schroedinger equation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We introduce an optimized parallelization scheme that reduces communication overhead between computational nodes. We demonstrate that the compute time, t, scales inversely with the number of computational nodes as t {proportional_to} (N{sub nodes}){sup -0.95} {sup {+-} 0.04}. This makes it possible to solve the 3d Schroedinger equation on extremely large spatial lattices using a small computing cluster. In addition, we present a new method for precisely determining the energy eigenvalues and wavefunctions of quantum states based on a symmetry constraint on the FDTD initial condition. Finally, we discuss the usage of multi-resolution techniques in order to speed up convergence on extremely large lattices.

  20. From analytical solutions of solute transport equations to multidimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    In this study, new multi-dimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms are derived from approximate one-dimensional (1-D), two-dimensional (2-D), and three-dimensional (3-D) analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and from exact 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D analytical solutions of the pure-diffusion equation. These algorithms enable the calculation of both the time required for a particle to travel a specified distance in a homogeneous medium and the mass recovery at the observation point, which may be incomplete due to 2-D or 3-D transverse dispersion or diffusion. The method is extended to heterogeneous media, represented as a piecewise collection of homogeneous media. The particle motion is then decomposed along a series of intermediate checkpoints located on the medium interface boundaries. The accuracy of the multi-dimensional TDRW method is verified against (i) exact analytical solutions of solute transport in homogeneous media and (ii) finite-difference simulations in a synthetic 2-D heterogeneous medium of simple geometry. The results demonstrate that the method is ideally suited to purely diffusive transport and to advection-dispersion transport problems dominated by advection. Conversely, the method is not recommended for highly dispersive transport problems because the accuracy of the advection-dispersion TDRW algorithms degrades rapidly for a low Péclet number, consistent with the accuracy limit of the approximate analytical solutions. The proposed approach provides a unified methodology for deriving multi-dimensional time-domain particle equations and may be applicable to other mathematical transport models, provided that appropriate analytical solutions are available.

  1. System time-domain simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, C. T.; Eggleston, T. W.; Goris, A. C.; Fashano, M.; Paynter, D.; Tranter, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Complex systems are simulated by engineers without extensive computer experience. Analyst uses free-form engineering-oriented language to input "black box" description. System Time Domain (SYSTID) Simulation Program generates appropriate algorithms and proceeds with simulation. Program is easily linked to postprocessing routines. SYSTID program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on UNIVAC 1110 under control of EXEC 8, Level 31.

  2. Casimir forces in the time domain: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-15

    Our previous article [Phys. Rev. A 80, 012115 (2009)] introduced a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials that was based on a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. In this article, we focus on the efficient implementation of our method for geometries of practical interest and extend our previous proof-of-concept algorithm in one dimension to problems in two and three dimensions, introducing a number of new optimizations. We consider Casimir pistonlike problems with nonmonotonic and monotonic force dependence on sidewall separation, both for previously solved geometries to validate our method and also for new geometries involving magnetic sidewalls and/or cylindrical pistons. We include realistic dielectric materials to calculate the force between suspended silicon waveguides or on a suspended membrane with periodic grooves, also demonstrating the application of perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries and/or periodic boundaries. In addition, we apply this method to a realizable three-dimensional system in which a silica sphere is stably suspended in a fluid above an indented metallic substrate. More generally, the method allows off-the-shelf FDTD software, already supporting a wide variety of materials (including dielectric, magnetic, and even anisotropic materials) and boundary conditions, to be exploited for the Casimir problem.

  3. Time domain cyclostationarity signal-processing tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léonard, François

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes four different time-domain tools to estimate first-order time cyclostationary signals without the need of a keyphasor signal. Applied to gearbox signals, these tacho-less methods appear intuitively simple, offer user-friendly graphic interfaces to visualize a pattern and allow the retrieval and removal of the selected cyclostationarity components in order to process higher-order spectra. Two of these tools can deal with time-varying operating conditions since they use an adaptive resampled signal driven by the vibration signal itself for order tracking. Three coherency indicators are proposed, one for every sample of the time pattern, one for each impact (tooth shock) observed in the gear mesh pattern, and one for the whole pattern. These indicators are used to detect a cyclostationarity and analyze the pattern repeatability. A gear mesh graph is also proposed to illustrate the cyclostationarity in 3D.

  4. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  5. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the current and future potential of finite-difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advance-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  6. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    The current and future potential of finite difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism are demonstrated. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advanced-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  7. Characteristic-based time domain method for antenna analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Dan; Jin, Jian-Ming; Shang, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The characteristic-based time domain method, developed in the computational fluid dynamics community for solving the Euler equations, is applied to the antenna radiation problem. Based on the principle of the characteristic-based algorithm, a governing equation in the cylindrical coordinate system is formulated directly to facilitate the analysis of body-of-revolution antennas and also to achieve the exact Riemann problem. A finite difference scheme with second-order accuracy in both time and space is constructed from the eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis of the derived governing equation. Rigorous boundary conditions for all the field components are formulated to improve the accuracy of the characteristic-based finite difference scheme. Numerical results demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the proposed technique.

  8. Finite-difference modeling of commercial aircraft using TSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.

    1994-11-15

    Future aircraft may have systems controlled by fiber optic cables, to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. However, the digital systems associated with the fiber optic network could still experience upset due to powerful radio stations, radars, and other electromagnetic sources, with potentially serious consequences. We are modeling the electromagnetic behavior of commercial transport aircraft in support of the NASA Fly-by-Light/Power-by-Wire program, using the TSAR finite-difference time-domain code initially developed for the military. By comparing results obtained from TSAR with data taken on a Boeing 757 at the Air Force Phillips Lab., we hope to show that FDTD codes can serve as an important tool in the design and certification of U.S. commercial aircraft, helping American companies to produce safe, reliable air transportation.

  9. FDIPS: Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Gabor; van der Holst, Bartholomeus; Huang, Zhenguang

    2016-06-01

    FDIPS is a finite difference iterative potential-field solver that can generate the 3D potential magnetic field solution based on a magnetogram. It is offered as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach, as when the number of spherical harmonics is increased, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. FDIPS is written in Fortran 90 and uses the MPI library for parallel execution.

  10. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  11. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity. PMID:21342824

  12. Finite-difference modelling of wavefield constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertsson, Johan O. A.; van Manen, Dirk-Jan; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Van Renterghem, Cederic; Amundsen, Lasse

    2015-11-01

    The finite-difference method is among the most popular methods for modelling seismic wave propagation. Although the method has enjoyed huge success for its ability to produce full wavefield seismograms in complex models, it has one major limitation which is of critical importance for many modelling applications; to naturally output up- and downgoing and P- and S-wave constituents of synthesized seismograms. In this paper, we show how such wavefield constituents can be isolated in finite-difference-computed synthetics in complex models with high numerical precision by means of a simple algorithm. The description focuses on up- and downgoing and P- and S-wave separation of data generated using an isotropic elastic finite-difference modelling method. However, the same principles can also be applied to acoustic, electromagnetic and other wave equations.

  13. Applications of an exponential finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An exponential finite difference scheme first presented by Bhattacharya for one dimensional unsteady heat conduction problems in Cartesian coordinates was extended. The finite difference algorithm developed was used to solve the unsteady diffusion equation in one dimensional cylindrical coordinates and was applied to two and three dimensional conduction problems in Cartesian coordinates. Heat conduction involving variable thermal conductivity was also investigated. The method was used to solve nonlinear partial differential equations in one and two dimensional Cartesian coordinates. Predicted results are compared to exact solutions where available or to results obtained by other numerical methods.

  14. Calculation of nonzero-temperature Casimir forces in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kai; Reid, M. T. Homer; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob K.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-04-15

    We show how to compute Casimir forces at nonzero temperatures with time-domain electromagnetic simulations, for example, using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Compared to our previous zero-temperature time-domain method, only a small modification is required, but we explain that some care is required to properly capture the zero-frequency contribution. We validate the method against analytical and numerical frequency-domain calculations, and show a surprising high-temperature disappearance of a nonmonotonic behavior previously demonstrated in a pistonlike geometry.

  15. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul Samuel

    For many years, wiring has been treated as a system that could be installed and expected to work for the life of the aircraft. As aircraft age far beyond their original expected life span, this attitude is rapidly changing. Wiring problems have recently been identified as the cause of several tragic mishaps and hundreds of thousands of lost mission hours. Intermittent wiring faults have been and continue to be difficult to resolve. Test methods that pinpoint faults on the ground can miss intermittent failures. New test methods involving spread spectrum signals are investigated that could be used in flight to locate intermittent failures, including open circuits, short circuits, and arcs. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry (SSTDR) and sequence time domain reflectometry (STDR) are analyzed in light of the signals commonly present on aircraft wiring. Pseudo noise codes used for the generation of STDR and SSTDR signals are analyzed for application in a STDR/SSTDR test system in the presence of noise. The effects of Mil-Std 1553 and white noise on the STDR and SSTDR signals are discussed analytically, through simulations, and with the use of test hardware. A test system using STDR and SSTDR is designed, built, and used to collect STDR and SSTDR test data. The data collected with the STDR/SSTDR test hardware is analyzed and compared to the theoretical results. Experimental data for open and short circuits collected using SSTDR and a curve fitting algorithm shows a maximum range estimation error of +/-0.2 ft for 75O coaxial cable up to 100ft, and +/-0.6ft for a sample 32.5ft non-controlled impedance aircraft cable. Mil-Std 1553 is specified to operate reliably with a signal-to-noise ratio of 17.5dB, and the SSTDR test system was able to locate an open circuit on a cable also carrying simulated Mil-Std 1553 data where the SSTDR signal was 50dB below the Mil-Std 1553 signal. STDR and SSTDR are shown to be effective in detecting and locating dry and wet arcs on wires.

  16. Optimized Finite-Difference Coefficients for Hydroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Responsible utilization of marine renewable energy sources through the use of current energy converter (CEC) and wave energy converter (WEC) devices requires an understanding of the noise generation and propagation from these systems in the marine environment. Acoustic noise produced by rotating turbines, for example, could adversely affect marine animals and human-related marine activities if not properly understood and mitigated. We are utilizing a 3-D finite-difference acoustic simulation code developed at Sandia that can accurately propagate noise in the complex bathymetry in the near-shore to open ocean environment. As part of our efforts to improve computation efficiency in the large, high-resolution domains required in this project, we investigate the effects of using optimized finite-difference coefficients on the accuracy of the simulations. We compare accuracy and runtime of various finite-difference coefficients optimized via criteria such as maximum numerical phase speed error, maximum numerical group speed error, and L-1 and L-2 norms of weighted numerical group and phase speed errors over a given spectral bandwidth. We find that those coefficients optimized for L-1 and L-2 norms are superior in accuracy to those based on maximal error and can produce runtimes of 10% of the baseline case, which uses Taylor Series finite-difference coefficients at the Courant time step limit. We will present comparisons of the results for the various cases evaluated as well as recommendations for utilization of the cases studied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravito-acoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2D or 3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  18. Seismic imaging using finite-differences and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    A key to reducing the risks and costs of associated with oil and gas exploration is the fast, accurate imaging of complex geologies, such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and overthrust regions in US onshore regions. Prestack depth migration generally yields the most accurate images, and one approach to this is to solve the scalar wave equation using finite differences. As part of an ongoing ACTI project funded by the US Department of Energy, a finite difference, 3-D prestack, depth migration code has been developed. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that massively parallel computers can be used efficiently for seismic imaging, and that sufficient computing power exists (or soon will exist) to make finite difference, prestack, depth migration practical for oil and gas exploration. Several problems had to be addressed to get an efficient code for the Intel Paragon. These include efficient I/O, efficient parallel tridiagonal solves, and high single-node performance. Furthermore, to provide portable code the author has been restricted to the use of high-level programming languages (C and Fortran) and interprocessor communications using MPI. He has been using the SUNMOS operating system, which has affected many of his programming decisions. He will present images created from two verification datasets (the Marmousi Model and the SEG/EAEG 3D Salt Model). Also, he will show recent images from real datasets, and point out locations of improved imaging. Finally, he will discuss areas of current research which will hopefully improve the image quality and reduce computational costs.

  19. A two-dimensional time domain near zone to far zone transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Ryan, Deirdre; Beggs, John H.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    A time domain transformation useful for extrapolating three dimensional near zone finite difference time domain (FDTD) results to the far zone was presented. Here, the corresponding two dimensional transform is outlined. While the three dimensional transformation produced a physically observable far zone time domain field, this is not convenient to do directly in two dimensions, since a convolution would be required. However, a representative two dimensional far zone time domain result can be obtained directly. This result can then be transformed to the frequency domain using a Fast Fourier Transform, corrected with a simple multiplicative factor, and used, for example, to calculate the complex wideband scattering width of a target. If an actual time domain far zone result is required, it can be obtained by inverse Fourier transform of the final frequency domain result.

  20. Light scattering by irregular shaped cell-like objects using the finite difference time domain method (FDTD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Yeaton H.

    We simulated light scattering by objects similar to biological cells using the FDTD method. The characteristics of the cell-like objects were based on electron micrographs of cells grown in vitro. Three homogeneous cell-like objects were created from micrographs depicting normal prostate cells, and three from micrographs depicting malignant prostate cells. These six models used as the basis of our light scattering simulations led to the following conclusions: (1) The populations of normal and abnormal cell-like objects could be distinguished in terms of forward light scattering in a flow cytometry experiment; (2) The phase functions of light scattered by irregular objects averaged over several angles of incidence and several angles of observations are much smoother than the phase function of a perfect sphere; (3) There is a significant decrease in the ratio of scattering cross section of the non-spherical object to the scattering cross-section of the perfect sphere with equal volume, as the ratio of largest axis to smallest axis of the non-spherical object decreases; (4) For certain cell-like objects the phase functions of the scattered light obtained using the Henyey-Greenstein approximation or Mie theory are very different from those generated by FDTD calculations. Further calculations compared a homogeneous cell-like object, to a cell-like object of identical shape with heterogeneities added. The following are the results from the comparison of light scattering by a homogeneous cell-like object to heterogeneous cell-like object: (1) There are indications that there is a smoothing effect on the phase function data (for light scattered by the heterogeneous cell-like object) created by organelles both in data averaged over a range of orientations and in data collected at single orientations. This smoothing effect (unlike the one discussed for homogeneous cell-like objects) is observable from a single azimuth angle of observation and a single orientation of the cell relative to the direction incident light. (2) The light scattered by the homogeneous cell-like object based on normal cell A contained significant cross polarization. This effect was greatly suppressed by the introduction of organelles.

  1. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain modelling of photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Pavlo; Taylor, Richard J. E.; Li, Guangrui; Childs, David T. D.; Khamas, Salam; Sarma, Jayanta; Erdelyi, Robertus; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the beam divergence in far-field region, diffraction loss and optical confinement factors of all-semiconductor and void-semiconductor photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers (PCSELs), containing either InGaP/GaAs or InGaP/air photonic crystals using a three-dimensional FDTD model. We explore the impact of changing the PC hole shape, size, and lattice structure in addition to the choice of all-semiconductor or void-semiconductor designs. We discuss the determination of the threshold gain from the diffraction losses, and explore limitations to direct modulation of the PCSEL.

  2. Finite-difference migration to zero offset

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianchao

    1992-07-01

    Migration to zero offset (MZO), also called dip moveout (DMO) or prestack partial migration, transforms prestack offset seismic data into approximate zero-offset data so as to remove reflection point smear and obtain quality stacked results over a range of reflector dips. MZO has become an important step in standard seismic data processing, and a variety of frequency-wavenumber (f-k) and integral MZO algorithms have been used in practice to date. Here, I present a finite-difference MZO algorithm applied to normal-moveout (NMO)-corrected, common-offset sections. This algorithm employs a traditional poststack 15-degree finite-difference migration algorithm and a special velocity function rather than the true migration velocity. This paper shows results of implementation of this MZO algorithm when velocity varies with depth, and discusses the possibility of applying this algorithm to cases where velocity varies with both depth and horizontal distance.

  3. Finite-difference migration to zero offset

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianchao.

    1992-01-01

    Migration to zero offset (MZO), also called dip moveout (DMO) or prestack partial migration, transforms prestack offset seismic data into approximate zero-offset data so as to remove reflection point smear and obtain quality stacked results over a range of reflector dips. MZO has become an important step in standard seismic data processing, and a variety of frequency-wavenumber (f-k) and integral MZO algorithms have been used in practice to date. Here, I present a finite-difference MZO algorithm applied to normal-moveout (NMO)-corrected, common-offset sections. This algorithm employs a traditional poststack 15-degree finite-difference migration algorithm and a special velocity function rather than the true migration velocity. This paper shows results of implementation of this MZO algorithm when velocity varies with depth, and discusses the possibility of applying this algorithm to cases where velocity varies with both depth and horizontal distance.

  4. On the wavelet optimized finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Leland

    1994-01-01

    When one considers the effect in the physical space, Daubechies-based wavelet methods are equivalent to finite difference methods with grid refinement in regions of the domain where small scale structure exists. Adding a wavelet basis function at a given scale and location where one has a correspondingly large wavelet coefficient is, essentially, equivalent to adding a grid point, or two, at the same location and at a grid density which corresponds to the wavelet scale. This paper introduces a wavelet optimized finite difference method which is equivalent to a wavelet method in its multiresolution approach but which does not suffer from difficulties with nonlinear terms and boundary conditions, since all calculations are done in the physical space. With this method one can obtain an arbitrarily good approximation to a conservative difference method for solving nonlinear conservation laws.

  5. Quasi-Cartesian Finite-Difference Computation of Seismic Wave Propagation for a Three-Dimensional Sub-global Earth Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, H.; Komatsu, M.; Toyokuni, G.; Nakamura, T.; Okamoto, T.

    2015-12-01

    A simple and efficient finite-difference scheme is developed to compute seismic wave propagation for a partial spherical shell model of a three-dimensionally (3-D) heterogeneous global earth structure. This new scheme solves the elastodynamic equations in the "quasi-Cartesian" coordinate system similar to a local Cartesian one, instead of the spherical coordinate system, with a staggered-grid finite-difference method in time domain (FDTD) which is one of the most popular numerical methods in seismic motion simulations for local to regional scale models. The proposed scheme may be useful for modeling seismic wave propagation in a very large region of sub-global scale beyond regional and less than global ones, where the effects of roundness of earth cannot be ignored. In "quasi-Cartesian" coordinates, x, y, and z are set to be locally in directions of latitude, longitude and depth, respectively. The stencil for each of the x-derivatives then depends on the depth coordinate at the evaluation point, while the stencil for each of the y-derivatives varies with both coordinates of the depth and latitude. In order to reduce lateral variations of the horizontal finite-difference stencils over the computational domain, we move the target area to a location around the equator of the computational spherical coordinate system using a way similar to the conversion from equatorial coordinates to ecliptic coordinates. The developed scheme can be easily implemented in 3-D Cartesian FDTD codes for local to regional scale modeling by changing a very small part of the codes. Our scheme may be able to open a window for multi-scale modeling of seismic wave propagation in scales from sub-global to local one.

  6. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  7. Software suite for finite difference method models.

    PubMed

    Arola, T; Hannula, M; Narra, N; Malmivuo, J; Hyttinen, J

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a software suite for finite difference method (FDM) model construction, visualization and quasi-static simulation to be used in bioelectric field modeling. The aim of the software is to provide a full path from medical image data to simulation of bioelectric phenomena and results visualization. It is written in Java and can be run on various platforms while still supporting all features included. The software can be distributed across a network utilizing dedicated servers for calculation intensive tasks. Supported visualization modes are both two- and three-dimensional modes. PMID:17946057

  8. 3D CFDTD PIC Simulation Study on Low-Frequency Oscillations in a Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Smithe, D. N.

    2011-10-01

    Low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) have been observed in a high average power gyrotron and the trapped electron population contributing to the oscillation has been measured. As high average power gyrotrons are the most promising millimeter wave source for thermonuclear fusion research, it is important to get a better understanding of this parasitic phenomenon to avoid any deterioration of the electron beam quality thus reducing the gyrotron efficiency. However, understanding of the LFOs remains incomplete and a full picture of this parasitic phenomenon has not been seen yet. In this work, we use a 3D conformal finite-difference time-domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method to accurately and efficiently study the LFOs in a magnetron injection gun (MIG) of a high average power gyrotron. Employing a highly parallelized computation, the model can be simulated in time domain more realistically. LFOs have been obtained in a 3D time domain simulation for the first time. From our preliminary simulation studies, it is found that not only magnetic compression profile but initial velocity or velocity ratio play an important role in the operation of a MIG electron gun. In addition, the secondary emission effects on the LFOs are also studied. Detailed results will be presented. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0004436.

  9. TUNED FINITE-DIFFERENCE DIFFUSION OPERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, Jason; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2009-05-15

    Finite-difference simulations of fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics generally require an explicit diffusion operator, either to maintain stability by attenuating grid-scale structure, or to implement physical diffusivities such as viscosity or resistivity. If the goal is stability only, the diffusion must act at the grid scale, but should affect structure at larger scales as little as possible. For physical diffusivities the diffusion scale depends on the problem, and diffusion may act at larger scales as well. Diffusivity can undesirably limit the computational time step in both cases. We construct tuned finite-difference diffusion operators that minimally limit the time step while acting as desired near the diffusion scale. Such operators reach peak values at the diffusion scale rather than at the grid scale, but behave as standard operators at larger scales. These operators will be useful for simulations with high magnetic diffusivity or kinematic viscosity such as in the simulation of astrophysical dynamos with magnetic Prandtl number far from unity, or for numerical stabilization using hyperdiffusivity.

  10. 3D modelling of the electromagnetic response of geophysical targets using the FDTD method

    SciTech Connect

    Debroux, P.S.

    1996-05-01

    A publicly available and maintained electromagnetic finite-difference time domain (FDTD) code has been applied to the forward modelling of the response of 1D, 2D and 3D geophysical targets to a vertical magnetic dipole excitation. The FDTD method is used to analyze target responses in the 1 MHz to 100 MHz range, where either conduction or displacement currents may have the controlling role. The response of the geophysical target to the excitation is presented as changes in the magnetic field ellipticity. The results of the FDTD code compare favorably with previously published integral equation solutions of the response of 1D targets, and FDTD models calculated with different finite-difference cell sizes are compared to find the effect of model discretization on the solution. The discretization errors, calculated as absolute error in ellipticity, are presented for the different ground geometry models considered, and are, for the most part, below 10% of the integral equation solutions. Finally, the FDTD code is used to calculate the magnetic ellipticity response of a 2D survey and a 3D sounding of complicated geophysical targets. The response of these 2D and 3D targets are too complicated to be verified with integral equation solutions, but show the proper low- and high-frequency responses.

  11. A Fourier collocation time domain method for numerically solving Maxwell's equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1991-01-01

    A new method for solving Maxwell's equations in the time domain for arbitrary values of permittivity, conductivity, and permeability is presented. Spatial derivatives are found by a Fourier transform method and time integration is performed using a second order, semi-implicit procedure. Electric and magnetic fields are collocated on the same grid points, rather than on interleaved points, as in the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Numerical results are presented for the propagation of a 2-D Transverse Electromagnetic (TEM) mode out of a parallel plate waveguide and into a dielectric and conducting medium.

  12. Time domain scattering and radar cross section calculations for a thin, coated perfectly conducting plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) calculations for flat, perfectly conducting plates are readily available through the use of conventional frequency domain techniques such as the Method of Moments (MOM). However, if the plate is covered with a dielectric material that is relatively thick in comparison with the wavelength in the material, these frequency domain techniques become increasingly difficult to apply. We present the application of the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Technique to the problem of electromagnetic scattering and RCS calculations from a thin, perfectly conducting plate that is coated with a thick layer of lossless dielectric material. Both time domain and RCS calculations are presented and disclosed.

  13. Time domain scattering and radar cross section calculations for a thin, coated perfectly conducting plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) calculations for flat, perfectly conducting plates are readily available through the use of conventional frequency domain techniques such as the Method of Moments (MOM). However, if the plate is covered with a dielectric material that is relatively thick in comparison with the wavelength in the material, these frequency domain techniques become increasingly difficult to apply. The application is presented of the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique to the problem of electromagnetic scattering and RCS calculations from a thin, perfectly conducting plate that is coated with a thick layer of lossless dielectric material. Both time domain and RCS calculations are presented and discussed.

  14. Efficient discretization in finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Koussis, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) is a plausible and simple method for solving partial differential equations. The standard practice is to use an orthogonal discretization to form algebraic approximate formulations of the derivatives of the unknown function and a grid, much like raster maps, to represent the properties of the function domain. For example, for the solution of the groundwater flow equation, a raster map is required for the characterization of the discretization cells (flow cell, no-flow cell, boundary cell, etc.), and two raster maps are required for the hydraulic conductivity and the storage coefficient. Unfortunately, this simple approach to describe the topology comes along with the known disadvantages of the FDM (rough representation of the geometry of the boundaries, wasted computational resources in the unavoidable expansion of the grid refinement in all cells of the same column and row, etc.). To overcome these disadvantages, Hunt has suggested an alternative approach to describe the topology, the use of an array of neighbours. This limits the need for discretization nodes only for the representation of the boundary conditions and the flow domain. Furthermore, the geometry of the boundaries is described more accurately using a vector representation. Most importantly, graded meshes can be employed, which are capable of restricting grid refinement only in the areas of interest (e.g. regions where hydraulic head varies rapidly, locations of pumping wells, etc.). In this study, we test the Hunt approach against MODFLOW, a well established finite difference model, and the Finite Volume Method with Simplified Integration (FVMSI). The results of this comparison are examined and critically discussed.

  15. Time domain reflectometry for SLC BPM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.

    1985-03-01

    A maintenance manual for troubleshooting installed SLC Position Monitor stripline assemblies and the associated cabling, using time Domain Reflectometry is presented. Once a technician becomes familiar with this manual's procedures, the Table of Contents can serve as a checklist.

  16. Studying the TEM response of a 3-D conductor at a geological contact using the FDTD method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Tripp, A.C.; Hohmann, G.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many mineral targets are located near contact zones. Since the change of resistivity across the contact can distort or obscure the transient electromagnetic (TEM) response of the target, it is important to understand the possible effects. Previous investigators have examined similar problems using scale models. For example, Spies and Parker (1984) studied the TEM responses of fixed-loop and moving-loop configurations to geological contacts with lateral resistivity variations. More recently, Wilt (1991) systematically studied TEM soundings near a geological contact and observed that different survey systems respond to the contact in different ways. This paper will illustrate the use of the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) algorithm of Wang and Hohmann (1993) for calculating the TEM response of a 3-D conductive body at a geological contact. The algorithm is based on the Yee staggered grid FDTD method for solving the transient electrical nonmagnetic field responses of a 3-D model. On a suitable computer, a wide range of model responses can be readily calculated, a versatility that scale modeling does not share. This study uses a fixed transmitter loop, roving-receiver configuration. Many other configurations can be regarded as special cases of this survey. It is commonly employed, for instance, by the Newmont EMP (Body and Wiles, 1984), UTEM (West et al., 1984), and Geonics EM37 systems. The configuration also facilitates finite-difference, time-domain modeling because it does not require frequent movement of the source.

  17. A time domain technique for mechanism extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, Allen K.; Peters, Leon, Jr.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of scattered fields from a structure can be better evaluated from the characteristics of the individual scatterers. Decomposition techniques can be classified either as a matrix or an integral formulation. With either formulation, aspect pattern of frequency information of a scattering center can be obtained. Emphasis is placed on an integral (time domain) isolation extraction technique to obtain the frequency characteristics of scattering mechanisms. This technique has its origins in the time domain interpretation of scattered fields.

  18. Test of two methods for faulting on finite-difference calculations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Tests of two fault boundary conditions show that each converges with second order accuracy as the finite-difference grid is refined. The first method uses split nodes so that there are disjoint grids that interact via surface traction. The 3D version described here is a generalization of a method I have used extensively in 2D; it is as accurate as the 2D version. The second method represents fault slip as inelastic strain in a fault zone. Offset of stress from its elastic value is seismic moment density. Implementation of this method is quite simple in a finite-difference scheme using velocity and stress as dependent variables.

  19. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  20. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme.

  1. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  2. Time domain reflectometry in time variant plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherner, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of time-dependent electron density fluctuations on a synthesized time domain reflectometry response of a one-dimensional cold plasma sheath are considered. Numerical solutions of the Helmholtz wave equation, which describes the electric field of a normally incident plane wave in a specified static electron density profile, are used. A study of the effects of Doppler shifts resulting from moving density fluctuations in the electron density profile of the sheath is included. Varying electron density levels corrupt time domain and distance measurements. Reducing or modulating the electron density levels of a given electron density profile affects the time domain response of a plasma and results in motion of the turning point, and the effective motion has a significant effect on measuring electron density locations.

  3. Numerical stability analysis of the pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain PIC algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Brendan B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2014-02-01

    The pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain (PSATD) particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm solves the vacuum Maxwell's equations exactly, has no Courant time-step limit (as conventionally defined), and offers substantial flexibility in plasma and particle beam simulations. It is, however, not free of the usual numerical instabilities, including the numerical Cherenkov instability, when applied to relativistic beam simulations. This paper derives and solves the numerical dispersion relation for the PSATD algorithm and compares the results with corresponding behavior of the more conventional pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) and finite difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithms. In general, PSATD offers superior stability properties over a reasonable range of time steps. More importantly, one version of the PSATD algorithm, when combined with digital filtering, is almost completely free of the numerical Cherenkov instability for time steps (scaled to the speed of light) comparable to or smaller than the axial cell size.

  4. Two-dimensional time-domain volume integral equations for scattering of inhomogeneous objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianguo; Fan, Ruyu

    2003-08-01

    This paper proposes a time-domain volume integral equation based method for analyzing the transient scattering from a two-dimensional inhomogeneous cylinder by invoking the volume equivalence principle for both the transverse magnetic and electric cases. The cylinder is discretized into triangular cells, and the electric flux is chosen as the unknown. For the transverse magnetic case, the electric flux is defined on the surfaces of the triangles. For the transverse electric case, because of the electric charges induced inside and on the surface of the cylinder, the electric flux is defined on the edges of the triangles, and expanded in space in terms of two-dimensional surface roof-top basis functions. The time-domain volume integral equation is solved by using a marching-on-in-time scheme. Numerical results obtained using this method are in excellent agreement with the data obtained using the finite-difference time-domain method.

  5. Time-domain Raman analytical forward solvers.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Binzoni, Tiziano; Sekar, Sanathana Konugolu Venkata; Farina, Andrea; Cavalieri, Stefano; Pifferi, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    A set of time-domain analytical forward solvers for Raman signals detected from homogeneous diffusive media is presented. The time-domain solvers have been developed for two geometries: the parallelepiped and the finite cylinder. The potential presence of a background fluorescence emission, contaminating the Raman signal, has also been taken into account. All the solvers have been obtained as solutions of the time dependent diffusion equation. The validation of the solvers has been performed by means of comparisons with the results of "gold standard" Monte Carlo simulations. These forward solvers provide an accurate tool to explore the information content encoded in the time-resolved Raman measurements. PMID:27607645

  6. Tuning the 3D plasmon field of nanohole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, Maxime; Liang, Yuzhang; Poirier Richard, Hugo-Pierre; Faid, Rita; Peng, Wei; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2013-11-01

    Modern photonics is being revolutionized through the use of nanostructured plasmonic materials, which confine light to sub-diffraction limit resolution providing universal, sensitive, and simple transducers for molecular sensors. Understanding the mechanisms by which light interacts with plasmonic crystals is essential for developing application-focussed devices. The strong influence of grating coupling on electromagnetic field distribution, frequency and degeneracy of plasmon bands has now been characterized using hexagonal nanohole arrays. An equation for nanohole arrays was derived to demonstrate the strong influence of incidence and rotation angle on optical properties of 2D plasmonic crystals such as nanohole arrays. Consequently, we report experimental data that are in strong agreement with finite difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations that clearly demonstrate the influence of the grating coupling conditions on the optical properties (such as plasmon degeneracy and bandwidth), and on the distribution of the plasmon field around nanohole arrays (including tuneable penetration depths and highly localized fields). The tuneable 3D plasmon field allowed for controlled sensing properties and by increasing the angle of incidence to 30 degrees, the resonance wavelength was tuned from 1000 to 600 nm, and the sensitivity was enhanced by nearly 300% for a protein assay using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and by 40% with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors.Modern photonics is being revolutionized through the use of nanostructured plasmonic materials, which confine light to sub-diffraction limit resolution providing universal, sensitive, and simple transducers for molecular sensors. Understanding the mechanisms by which light interacts with plasmonic crystals is essential for developing application-focussed devices. The strong influence of grating coupling on electromagnetic field distribution, frequency and degeneracy of plasmon bands has now been

  7. D Multicomponent Time Domain Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, R. U.; De Basabe, J. D.; Gallardo, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The search of hydrocarbon reservoirs between the finest stratigraphic and structural traps relies on the detailed surveying and interpretation of multicomponent seismic waves. This need makes Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) one of the most active topics in seismic exploration research and there are a limited number of FWI algorithms that undertake the elastic approach required to model these multicomponent data. We developed an iterative Gauss-Newton 2D time-domain elastic FWI scheme that reproduces the vertical and horizontal particle velocity as measured by common seismic surveys and obtains simultaneously the distribution of three elastic parameters of our subsurface model (density ρ and the Lame parameters λ and μ). The elastic wave is propagated in a heterogeneous elastic media using a time domain 2D velocity-stress staggered grid finite difference method. Our code observes the necessary stability conditions and includes absorbing boundary conditions and basic multi-thread parallelization. The same forward modeling code is also used to calculate the Frechet's derivatives with respect to the three parameters of our model following the sensitivity equation approach and perturbation theory. We regularized our FWI algorithm applying two different criteria: (1) First order Tikhonov regularization (maximum smoothness) and (2) Minimum Gradient Support (MGS) that adopts an approximate zero-norm of the several property gradients. We applied our algorithm to various test models and demonstrated that their structural information resemble closely those of the original three synthetic model parameters (λ, µ and ρ). Finally, we compared the role of both regularization criteria in terms of data fit, model stability and structural resemblance.

  8. 3D-Printed Broadband Dielectric Tube Terahertz Waveguide with Anti-Reflection Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate broadband, low loss, and close-to-zero dispersion guidance of terahertz (THz) radiation in a dielectric tube with an anti-reflection structure (AR-tube waveguide) in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1.0 THz. The anti-reflection structure (ARS) consists of close-packed cones in a hexagonal lattice arranged on the outer surface of the tube cladding. The feature size of the ARS is in the order of the wavelength between 0.2 and 1.0 THz. The waveguides are fabricated with the versatile and cost efficient 3D-printing method. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements as well as 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations (FDTD) are performed to extensively characterize the AR-tube waveguides. Spectrograms, attenuation spectra, effective phase refractive indices, and the group-velocity dispersion parameters β 2 of the AR-tube waveguides are presented. Both the experimental and numerical results confirm the extended bandwidth and smaller group-velocity dispersion of the AR-tube waveguide compared to a low loss plain dielectric tube THz waveguide. The AR-tube waveguide prototypes show an attenuation spectrum close to the theoretical limit given by the infinite cladding tube waveguide.

  9. Comparison of finite-difference and analytic microwave calculation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, F.I.; Jackson, H.W.; Barmatz, M.; Wagner, P.

    1996-12-31

    Normal modes and power absorption distributions in microwave cavities containing lossy dielectric samples were calculated for problems of interest in materials processing. The calculations were performed both using a commercially available finite-difference electromagnetic solver and by numerical evaluation of exact analytic expressions. Results obtained by the two methods applied to identical physical situations were compared. The studies validate the accuracy of the finite-difference electromagnetic solver. Relative advantages of the analytic and finite-difference methods are discussed.

  10. One-node coarse-mesh finite difference algorithm for fine-mesh finite difference operator

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.C.; Kim, Y.H.; Kim, Y.B.

    1999-07-01

    This paper is concerned with speeding up the convergence of the fine-mesh finite difference (FMFD) method for the neutron diffusion problem. The basic idea of the new algorithm originates from the two-node coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) schemes for nodal methods, where the low-order CMFD operator is iteratively corrected through a global-local iteration so that the final solution of the CMFD problem is equivalent to the high-order nodal solution. Unlike conventional CMFD methods, the new CMFD algorithm is based on one-node local problems, and the high-order solution over the local problem is determined by using the FMFD operator. Nonlinear coupling of CMFD and FMFD operators was previously studied by Aragones and Ahnert. But, in their work, the coarse-mesh operator is corrected by the so-called flux discontinuity factors, and the local problem is defined differently in the sense of boundary conditions and the core dissection scheme.

  11. Efficient fabrication method of nano-grating for 3D holographic display with full parallax views.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenqiang; Qiao, Wen; Huang, Wenbin; Zhu, Ming; Fang, Zongbao; Pu, Donglin; Ye, Yan; Liu, Yanhua; Chen, Linsen

    2016-03-21

    Without any special glasses, multiview 3D displays based on the diffractive optics can present high resolution, full-parallax 3D images in an ultra-wide viewing angle. The enabling optical component, namely the phase plate, can produce arbitrarily distributed view zones by carefully designing the orientation and the period of each nano-grating pixel. However, such 3D display screen is restricted to a limited size due to the time-consuming fabricating process of nano-gratings on the phase plate. In this paper, we proposed and developed a lithography system that can fabricate the phase plate efficiently. Here we made two phase plates with full nano-grating pixel coverage at a speed of 20 mm2/mins, a 500 fold increment in the efficiency when compared to the method of E-beam lithography. One 2.5-inch phase plate generated 9-view 3D images with horizontal-parallax, while the other 6-inch phase plate produced 64-view 3D images with full-parallax. The angular divergence in horizontal axis and vertical axis was 1.5 degrees, and 1.25 degrees, respectively, slightly larger than the simulated value of 1.2 degrees by Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD). The intensity variation was less than 10% for each viewpoint, in consistency with the simulation results. On top of each phase plate, a high-resolution binary masking pattern containing amplitude information of all viewing zone was well aligned. We achieved a resolution of 400 pixels/inch and a viewing angle of 40 degrees for 9-view 3D images with horizontal parallax. In another prototype, the resolution of each view was 160 pixels/inch and the view angle was 50 degrees for 64-view 3D images with full parallax. As demonstrated in the experiments, the homemade lithography system provided the key fabricating technology for multiview 3D holographic display. PMID:27136814

  12. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  13. Time Domain Modelling of a Reciprocating Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Stone, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a time domain systems approach to the modelling of a reciprocating engine. The engine model includes the varying inertia effects resulting from the motion of the piston and con-rod. The cylinder pressure measured under operating conditions is used to force the model and the resulting motion compared with the measured response. The results obtained indicate that the model is very good.

  14. Time-Domain Filtering of Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    In general electromagnetic response of each material to a continuous wave does not vary in time domain if the frequency component remains the same. Recently, it turned out that integrating several circuit elements including schottky diodes with periodically metallised surfaces, or the so-called metasurfaces, leads to selectively absorbing specific types of waveforms or pulse widths even at the same frequency. These waveform-selective metasurfaces effectively showed different absorbing performances for different widths of pulsed sine waves by gradually varying their electromagnetic responses in time domain. Here we study time-filtering effects of such circuit-based metasurfaces illuminated by continuous sine waves. Moreover, we introduce extra circuit elements to these structures to enhance the time-domain control capability. These time-varying properties are expected to give us another degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves and thus contribute to developing new kinds of electromagnetic applications and technologies, e.g. time-windowing wireless communications and waveform conversion.

  15. Time-Domain Filtering of Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    In general electromagnetic response of each material to a continuous wave does not vary in time domain if the frequency component remains the same. Recently, it turned out that integrating several circuit elements including schottky diodes with periodically metallised surfaces, or the so-called metasurfaces, leads to selectively absorbing specific types of waveforms or pulse widths even at the same frequency. These waveform-selective metasurfaces effectively showed different absorbing performances for different widths of pulsed sine waves by gradually varying their electromagnetic responses in time domain. Here we study time-filtering effects of such circuit-based metasurfaces illuminated by continuous sine waves. Moreover, we introduce extra circuit elements to these structures to enhance the time-domain control capability. These time-varying properties are expected to give us another degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves and thus contribute to developing new kinds of electromagnetic applications and technologies, e.g. time-windowing wireless communications and waveform conversion. PMID:26564027

  16. Time-domain robotic vision application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolliver, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    The quest for the highest resolution microwaves imaging and the principle of time-domain imaging is the primary motivation for recent developments in time-domain techniques. With the present technology fast time varying signals can now be measured and recorded both in magnitude and in phase. It has also enhanced the ability to extract relevant details concerning the scattering object. In the past, the inference of object geometry or shape from scattered signals has received substantial attention in radar technology. Various inverse scattering theories were proposed to develop analytical solutions to this problem. Furthermore, the random inversion, frequenty swept holography, and the synthetic radar imaging, all of which have two things in common: the physical optic far-field approximation and the utilization of the channels as an extra physical dimension, were also advanced significantly. Despite the inherent vectorial nature of electromagnetic waves, these scalar treatments have brought forth some promising results in practice with notable examples in subsurface and structure sounding. The use of time-domain imaging for space robotic vision applications was proposed. A multisensor approach to vision was shown to have several advantages over the video-only approach.

  17. Time-Domain Filtering of Metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    In general electromagnetic response of each material to a continuous wave does not vary in time domain if the frequency component remains the same. Recently, it turned out that integrating several circuit elements including schottky diodes with periodically metallised surfaces, or the so-called metasurfaces, leads to selectively absorbing specific types of waveforms or pulse widths even at the same frequency. These waveform-selective metasurfaces effectively showed different absorbing performances for different widths of pulsed sine waves by gradually varying their electromagnetic responses in time domain. Here we study time-filtering effects of such circuit-based metasurfaces illuminated by continuous sine waves. Moreover, we introduce extra circuit elements to these structures to enhance the time-domain control capability. These time-varying properties are expected to give us another degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves and thus contribute to developing new kinds of electromagnetic applications and technologies, e.g. time-windowing wireless communications and waveform conversion. PMID:26564027

  18. Optical identification based on time domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Vishal; Semenov, Dmitry; Honkanen, Seppo; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method for optical identification, i.e., authenticating valuable documents such as a passport, credit cards, and bank notes, using optical coherence tomography (OCT). An OCT system can capture three-dimensional (3D) images and visualize the internal structure of an object. In our work, as an object, we consider a multilayered optical identification tag composed of a limited number of thin layers (10-100 μm thick). The thickness, width, and location of the layers in the tag encode a unique identification information. Reading of the tag is done using a time domain OCT (TD-OCT) system. Typically, a TD-OCT system requires continuous mechanical scanning in one or more directions to get a 3D volume image of an object. The continuous scanning implies a complicated optical setup, which makes an OCT system fragile and expensive. We propose to avoid the conventional scanning by (1) not requiring 3D imaging, and (2) utilizing the motion of the optical tag itself. The motion is introduced to the tag reader, for example, by a user, which replaces the need for conventional scanning. The absence of a conventional scanning mechanism makes the proposed OCT method very simple and suited for identification purposes; however, it also puts some constraints to the construction of the optical tag, which we discuss in this paper in detail. PMID:26368871

  19. Rheological Models in the Time-Domain Modeling of Seismic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.

    2004-12-01

    The time-domain stress-strain relation in a viscoelastic medium has a form of the convolutory integral which is numerically intractable. This was the reason for the oversimplified models of attenuation in the time-domain seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion modeling. In their pioneering work, Day and Minster (1984) showed the way how to convert the integral into numerically tractable differential form in the case of a general viscoelastic modulus. In response to the work by Day and Minster, Emmerich and Korn (1987) suggested using the rheology of their generalized Maxwell body (GMB) while Carcione et al. (1988) suggested using the generalized Zener body (GZB). The viscoelastic moduli of both rheological models have a form of the rational function and thus the differential form of the stress-strain relation is rather easy to obtain. After the papers by Emmerich and Korn and Carcione et al. numerical modelers decided either for the GMB or GZB rheology and developed 'non-communicating' algorithms. In the many following papers the authors using the GMB never commented the GZB rheology and the corresponding algorithms, and the authors using the GZB never related their methods to the GMB rheology and algorithms. We analyze and compare both rheologies and the corresponding incorporations of the realistic attenuation into the time-domain computations. We then focus on the most recent staggered-grid finite-difference modeling, mainly on accounting for the material heterogeneity in the viscoelastic media, and the computational efficiency of the finite-difference algorithms.

  20. On the Analysis Methods for the Time Domain and Frequency Domain Response of a Buried Objects*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poljak, Dragan; Šesnić, Silvestar; Cvetković, Mario

    2014-05-01

    There has been a continuous interest in the analysis of ground-penetrating radar systems and related applications in civil engineering [1]. Consequently, a deeper insight of scattering phenomena occurring in a lossy half-space, as well as the development of sophisticated numerical methods based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, Finite Element Method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM) and various hybrid methods, is required, e.g. [2], [3]. The present paper deals with certain techniques for time and frequency domain analysis, respectively, of buried conducting and dielectric objects. Time domain analysis is related to the assessment of a transient response of a horizontal straight thin wire buried in a lossy half-space using a rigorous antenna theory (AT) approach. The AT approach is based on the space-time integral equation of the Pocklington type (time domain electric field integral equation for thin wires). The influence of the earth-air interface is taken into account via the simplified reflection coefficient arising from the Modified Image Theory (MIT). The obtained results for the transient current induced along the electrode due to the transmitted plane wave excitation are compared to the numerical results calculated via an approximate transmission line (TL) approach and the AT approach based on the space-frequency variant of the Pocklington integro-differential approach, respectively. It is worth noting that the space-frequency Pocklington equation is numerically solved via the Galerkin-Bubnov variant of the Indirect Boundary Element Method (GB-IBEM) and the corresponding transient response is obtained by the aid of inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT). The results calculated by means of different approaches agree satisfactorily. Frequency domain analysis is related to the assessment of frequency domain response of dielectric sphere using the full wave model based on the set of coupled electric field integral

  1. Metrology for terahertz time-domain spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, John F.; Naftaly, Mira

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the terahertz time-domain spectrometer (THz TDS) [1] has emerged as a key measurement device for spectroscopic investigations in the frequency range of 0.1-5 THz. To date, almost every type of material has been studied using THz TDS, including semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, metal films, liquid crystals, glasses, pharmaceuticals, DNA molecules, proteins, gases, composites, foams, oils, and many others. Measurements with a TDS are made in the time domain; conversion from the time domain data to a frequency spectrum is achieved by applying the Fourier Transform, calculated numerically using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. As in many other types of spectrometer, THz TDS requires that the sample data be referenced to similarly acquired data with no sample present. Unlike frequency-domain spectrometers which detect light intensity and measure absorption spectra, a TDS records both amplitude and phase information, and therefore yields both the absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the sample material. The analysis of the data from THz TDS relies on the assumptions that: a) the frequency scale is accurate; b) the measurement of THz field amplitude is linear; and c) that the presence of the sample does not affect the performance characteristics of the instrument. The frequency scale of a THz TDS is derived from the displacement of the delay line; via FFT, positioning errors may give rise to frequency errors that are difficult to quantify. The measurement of the field amplitude in a THz TDS is required to be linear with a dynamic range of the order of 10 000. And attention must be given to the sample positioning and handling in order to avoid sample-related errors.

  2. Time-domain multiple-quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Weitekamp, D.P.

    1982-11-01

    The development of time-domain multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance is reviewed through mid 1982 and some prospects for future development are indicated. Particular attention is given to the problem of obtaining resolved, interpretable, many-quantum spectra for anisotropic magnetically isolated systems of coupled spins. New results are presented on a number of topics including the optimization of multiple-quantum-line intensities, analysis of noise in two-dimensional spectroscopy, and the use of order-selective excitation for cross polarization between nuclear-spin species.

  3. Solitons for optical time-domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanon, Amikam; Friberg, Stephen R.; Fujii, Yoichi

    1996-06-01

    We describe the propagation of solitons in an optical time-domain reflectometry geometry. Intense nonsolitons usually broaden nonlinearly as they propagate out to a scatterer and broaden linearly as they return to their origin. In contrast, solitons propagate with a fixed pulse width or narrow on their way out to the scatterer. Returning, they broaden or narrow depending on their chirp at the scattering point. For a fixed return-pulse timing resolution we find 2.6 times or more energy can be launched when solitons are used than for normal dispersion pulses.

  4. Architectures for Time-domain Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.; Allan, A.; Pierfederici, F.; Williams, R.

    2009-09-01

    Wonder at the changing sky predates recorded history. Empirical studies of time-varying celestial phenomena date back to Galileo and Tycho. Telegrams conveying news of transient and recurrent events have been key astronomical infrastructure since the nineteenth century. Recent micro-lensing, supernova and gamma-ray burst studies have lead to a succession of exciting discoveries, but massive new time-domain surveys will soon overwhelm our nineteenth century transient response technologies. Meeting this challenge demands new autonomous architectures for astronomy. These Architectures should reach from proposing new research, through experimental design and the scheduling of telescope operations, to the archiving and pipeline-processing of data to discover new transients, to the publishing of these events, through automated follow-up via robotic and ToO assets, and to the display and analysis of observational results. All will lead to adaptive adjustment of time-domain investigations. The IVOA VOEvent protocol provides an engine for purpose-built astronomical architectures.

  5. 3D Hot Test Simulations of a 220 GHz Folded Waveguide Traveling Wave Tube Using a CFDTD PIC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Chieh; Song, Heather

    2015-11-01

    Millimeter or sub-THz wave sources centered at 220 GHz is of interest due to the potential for its commercial and military applications including high resolution radar, remote sensing, and high-data-rate communications. It has been demonstrated via 3D cold test finite element method (FEM) simulations that a folded waveguide traveling wave tube (FWTWT) can be designed and optimized at this frequency range with a small signal gain of 18 dB over a comparatively broad (-3 dB) bandwidth of ~ 10%. On the other hand, 3D hot test simulations of a V-band ladder TWT have been successfully demonstrated using a conformal finite-difference time-domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method for center frequency of 50 GHz. In the present work, the 220 GHz FWTWT designs have been reviewed and studied. 3D Cold test simulations using both the CFDTD and FEM methods have been carried out and compared with each other as basis for 3D hot test CFDTD PIC simulations. The preliminary simulation result shows that the gain-bandwidth features at 220 GHz are achievable while carefully avoiding beam interceptions. Our study shows that the interaction characteristics are very sensitive to the operating beam parameters. Detail simulation results and discussions will be presented.

  6. In Situ Fabrication of 3D Ag@ZnO Nanostructures for Microfluidic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we develop an in situ method to grow highly controllable, sensitive, three-dimensional (3D) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates via an optothermal effect within microfluidic devices. Implementing this approach, we fabricate SERS substrates composed of Ag@ZnO structures at prescribed locations inside microfluidic channels, sites within which current fabrication of SERS structures has been arduous. Conveniently, properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO nanostructures such as length, packing density, and coverage can also be adjusted by tuning laser irradiation parameters. After exploring the fabrication of the 3D nanostructures, we demonstrate a SERS enhancement factor of up to ∼2 × 106 and investigate the optical properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures through finite-difference time-domain simulations. To illustrate the potential value of our technique, low concentrations of biomolecules in the liquid state are detected. Moreover, an integrated cell-trapping function of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures records the surface chemical fingerprint of a living cell. Overall, our optothermal-effect-based fabrication technique offers an effective combination of microfluidics with SERS, resolving problems associated with the fabrication of SERS substrates in microfluidic channels. With its advantages in functionality, simplicity, and sensitivity, the microfluidic-SERS platform presented should be valuable in many biological, biochemical, and biomedical applications. PMID:25402207

  7. Time domain characterization for the electric field considering a Chinese female physical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Recently, wireless communications around the human body, which are essential for wireless vital data monitoring, have been widely studied. Besides statistical channel modeling, characterization of time-varying electric field is also highly necessary to understand the communication mechanism in this area; however, few studies have been conducted. In this paper, time-varying electric fields, both on the digital human body and in the two-dimensional space around the human body, were studied through the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical analysis.

  8. Time-domain representation of frequency-dependent foundation impedance functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2006-01-01

    Foundation impedance functions provide a simple means to account for soil-structure interaction (SSI) when studying seismic response of structures. Impedance functions represent the dynamic stiffness of the soil media surrounding the foundation. The fact that impedance functions are frequency dependent makes it difficult to incorporate SSI in standard time-history analysis software. This paper introduces a simple method to convert frequency-dependent impedance functions into time-domain filters. The method is based on the least-squares approximation of impedance functions by ratios of two complex polynomials. Such ratios are equivalent, in the time-domain, to discrete-time recursive filters, which are simple finite-difference equations giving the relationship between foundation forces and displacements. These filters can easily be incorporated into standard time-history analysis programs. Three examples are presented to show the applications of the method.

  9. Conservative properties of finite difference schemes for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinishi, Youhei

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to construct accurate finite difference schemes for incompressible unsteady flow simulations such as LES (large-eddy simulation) or DNS (direct numerical simulation). In this report, conservation properties of the continuity, momentum, and kinetic energy equations for incompressible flow are specified as analytical requirements for a proper set of discretized equations. Existing finite difference schemes in staggered grid systems are checked for satisfaction of the requirements. Proper higher order accurate finite difference schemes in a staggered grid system are then proposed. Plane channel flow is simulated using the proposed fourth order accurate finite difference scheme and the results compared with those of the second order accurate Harlow and Welch algorithm.

  10. Techniques for correcting approximate finite difference solutions. [considering transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D.

    1978-01-01

    A method of correcting finite-difference solutions for the effect of truncation error or the use of an approximate basic equation is presented. Applications to transonic flow problems are described and examples are given.

  11. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems. PMID:10949130

  12. Three-dimensional parallel UNIPIC-3D code for simulations of high-power microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianguo; Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui; Liu, Chunliang; Li, Yongdong; Wang, Hongguang; Qiao, Hailiang; Fu, Meiyan; Yuan, Yuan

    2010-07-01

    This paper introduces a self-developed, three-dimensional parallel fully electromagnetic particle simulation code UNIPIC-3D. In this code, the electromagnetic fields are updated using the second-order, finite-difference time-domain method, and the particles are moved using the relativistic Newton-Lorentz force equation. The electromagnetic field and particles are coupled through the current term in Maxwell's equations. Two numerical examples are used to verify the algorithms adopted in this code, numerical results agree well with theoretical ones. This code can be used to simulate the high-power microwave (HPM) devices, such as the relativistic backward wave oscillator, coaxial vircator, and magnetically insulated line oscillator, etc. UNIPIC-3D is written in the object-oriented C++ language and can be run on a variety of platforms including WINDOWS, LINUX, and UNIX. Users can use the graphical user's interface to create the complex geometric structures of the simulated HPM devices, which can be automatically meshed by UNIPIC-3D code. This code has a powerful postprocessor which can display the electric field, magnetic field, current, voltage, power, spectrum, momentum of particles, etc. For the sake of comparison, the results computed by using the two-and-a-half-dimensional UNIPIC code are also provided for the same parameters of HPM devices, the numerical results computed from these two codes agree well with each other.

  13. Practical aspects of prestack depth migration with finite differences

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Oldfield, R.A.; Womble, D.E.; Romero, L.A.; Burch, C.C.

    1997-07-01

    Finite-difference, prestack, depth migrations offers significant improvements over Kirchhoff methods in imaging near or under salt structures. The authors have implemented a finite-difference prestack depth migration algorithm for use on massively parallel computers which is discussed. The image quality of the finite-difference scheme has been investigated and suggested improvements are discussed. In this presentation, the authors discuss an implicit finite difference migration code, called Salvo, that has been developed through an ACTI (Advanced Computational Technology Initiative) joint project. This code is designed to be efficient on a variety of massively parallel computers. It takes advantage of both frequency and spatial parallelism as well as the use of nodes dedicated to data input/output (I/O). Besides giving an overview of the finite-difference algorithm and some of the parallelism techniques used, migration results using both Kirchhoff and finite-difference migration will be presented and compared. The authors start out with a very simple Cartoon model where one can intuitively see the multiple travel paths and some of the potential problems that will be encountered with Kirchhoff migration. More complex synthetic models as well as results from actual seismic data from the Gulf of Mexico will be shown.

  14. Papyrus imaging with terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, J.; Jackson, J. B.; Pagès-Camagna, S.; Duling, I. N.; Menu, M.; Mourou, G. A.

    2010-09-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopic imaging (THz-TDSI) is a non-ionizing, non-contact and non-destructive measurement technique that has been recently utilized to study cultural heritage artifacts. We will present this technique and the results of non-contact measurements of papyrus texts, including images of hidden papyri. Inks for modern papyrus specimens were prepared using the historical binder, Arabic gum, and two common pigments used to write ancient texts, carbon black and red ochre. The samples were scanned in reflection at normal incidence with a pulse with a spectral range between 0.1 and 1.5 THz. Temporal analysis of the signals provides the depths of the layers, and their frequency spectra give information about the inks.

  15. Gravitational Waves and Time Domain Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  16. Study on Low-Frequency Oscillations in a Gyrotron Using a 3D CFDTD PIC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Smithe, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    Low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) have been observed in a high average power gyrotron and the trapped electron population contributing to the oscillation has been measured. As high average power gyrotrons are the most promising millimeter wave source for thermonuclear fusion research, it is important to get a better understanding of this parasitic phenomenon to avoid any deterioration of the electron beam quality thus reducing the gyrotron efficiency. 2D Particle-in-cell simulations quasi-statically model the development of oscillations of the space charge in the adiabatic trap, but the physics of the electron dynamics in the adiabatic trap is only partially understood. Therefore, understanding of the LFOs remains incomplete and a full picture of this parasitic phenomenon has not been seen yet. In this work, we use a 3D conformal finite-difference time-domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method to accurately and efficiently study the LFOs in a high average power gyrotron. As the CFDTD method exhibits a second order accuracy, complicated structures, such as a magnetron injection gun, can be well described. Employing a highly parallelized computation, the model can be simulated in time domain more realistically.

  17. An implicit finite-difference code for a two-equation turbulence model for three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, U. K.

    1985-01-01

    An implicit finite difference code was developed which solves the transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate in generalized coordinates in three dimensions. The finite difference equations are solved using the Beam-Warming algorithm. The kinetic energy-dissipation code, KEM, provides the closure; i.e., the turbulent viscosity for calculation of either compressible or incompressible flows. Turbulent internal flow over a backward-facing step has been calculated using the present code in conjunction with the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Code, INS3D. The results are in good agreement with experiments and two dimensional computations of other researchers.

  18. Full waveform time domain solutions for source and induced magnetotelluric and controlled-source electromagnetic fields using quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition and GPU parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, N.; Schultz, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a full waveform time domain solution has been developed for the magnetotelluric (MT) and controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods. The ultimate goal of this approach is to obtain a computationally tractable direct waveform joint inversion for source fields and earth conductivity structure in three and four dimensions. This is desirable on several grounds, including the improved spatial resolving power expected from use of a multitude of source illuminations of non-zero wavenumber, the ability to operate in areas of high levels of source signal spatial complexity and non-stationarity, etc. This goal would not be obtainable if one were to adopt the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) approach for the forward problem. This is particularly true for the case of MT surveys, since an enormous number of degrees of freedom are required to represent the observed MT waveforms across the large frequency bandwidth. It means that for FDTD simulation, the smallest time steps should be finer than that required to represent the highest frequency, while the number of time steps should also cover the lowest frequency. This leads to a linear system that is computationally burdensome to solve. We have implemented our code that addresses this situation through the use of a fictitious wave domain method and GPUs to speed up the computation time. We also substantially reduce the size of the linear systems by applying concepts from successive cascade decimation, through quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition. By combining these refinements, we have made good progress toward implementing the core of a full waveform joint source field/earth conductivity inverse modeling method. From results, we found the use of previous generation of CPU/GPU speeds computations by an order of magnitude over a parallel CPU only approach. In part, this arises from the use of the quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition, which shrinks the size of the linear system dramatically.

  19. A fully nonlinear, mixed spectral and finite difference model for thermally driven, rotating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; Lu, Huei-Iin; Butler, Karen A.

    1992-01-01

    Finite difference in time and the meridional plane, in conjunction with a spectral technique in the azimuthal direction, are used to approximate the Navier-Stokes equations in a model that can simulate a variety of thermally driven rotating flows in cylindrical and spherical geometries. Axisymmetric flow, linearized waves relative to a fixed or changing axisymmetric flow, nonlinear waves without wave-wave interaction, and fully nonlinear 3D flow, can in this way be calculated. A reexamination is conducted of the steady baroclinic wave case previously treated by Williams (1971) and Quon (1976).

  20. Application of the pseudospectral time-domain method to the scattering of light by nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W

    2008-03-01

    The pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) method is a powerful approach for computing the single-scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped particles with small-to-moderate-sized parameters. In the PSTD method, the spatial derivative approximation based on the spectral method is more accurate than its counterpart based on the finite-difference technique. Additionally, the PSTD method can substantially diminish accumulated errors that increase with the spatial scale and temporal duration of simulation. We report on the application of the PSTD method to the scattering of light by nonspherical ice particles. The applicability of the PSTD method is validated against the Lorenz-Mie theory and the T-matrix method. The phase functions computed from the PSTD method and the Lorenz-Mie theory agree well for size parameters as large as 80. Furthermore, the PSTD code is also applied to the scattering of light by nonspherical ice crystals, namely, hollow hexagonal columns and aggregates, which are frequently observed in cirrus clouds. The phase functions computed from the PSTD method are compared with the counterparts computed from the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for a size parameter of 20 and an incident wavelength of 3.7 microm. The comparisons show good agreement between the two methods. PMID:18311250

  1. Modeling of tension-modulated strings using finite difference and digital waveguide techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, Jyri

    2005-09-01

    Tension modulation is a nonlinear phenomenon where large-amplitude string vibrations cause the tension of the string to vary. This results in an initial pitch glide and energy coupling between modes, causing for example the generation of missing harmonics. The presentation discusses two methods for numerical simulation of the tension modulation nonlinearity from the sound synthesis point of view. The tension modulation is assumed to propagate instantaneously along the string. In the digital waveguide approach, spatially distributed fractional delay filters are used in modulating the string length during run time. Energy-preserving techniques can be used in implementing the fractional delays. In the finite difference approach, time-domain interpolation is used to artificially modulate the wave propagation velocity. The generation of missing harmonics is implemented in the finite difference model by creating an additional excitation point at the string termination. In the waveguide model, the same effect can be obtained by using suitable approximations in the string elongation calculation. Synthesis results for both techniques are presented. Also, a brief comparison of the models with a discussion on stability issues is provided. [This research has been funded by the Academy of Finland (Project No. 104934), S3TK graduate school, and Tekniikan edistamissaatio.

  2. How Swift is redefining time domain astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2015-09-01

    NASA's Swift satellite has completed ten years of amazing discoveries in time domain astronomy. Its primary mission is to chase gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), but due to its scheduling flexibility it has subsequently become a prime discovery machine for new types of behavior. The list of major discoveries in GRBs and other transients includes the long-lived X-ray afterglows and flares from GRBs, the first accurate localization of short GRBs, the discovery of GRBs at high redshift (z > 8), supernova shock break-out from SN Ib, a jetted tidal disruption event, an ultra-long class of GRBs, high energy emission from flare stars, novae and supernovae with unusual characteristics, magnetars with glitches in their spin periods, and a short GRB with evidence of an accompanying kilonova. Swift has developed a dynamic synergism with ground based observatories. In a few years gravitational wave observatories will come on-line and provide exciting new transient sources for Swift to study.

  3. Reengineering observatory operations for the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Robert L.; Vestrand, W. T.; Hessman, Frederic V.

    2014-07-01

    Observatories are complex scientific and technical institutions serving diverse users and purposes. Their telescopes, instruments, software, and human resources engage in interwoven workflows over a broad range of timescales. These workflows have been tuned to be responsive to concepts of observatory operations that were applicable when various assets were commissioned, years or decades in the past. The astronomical community is entering an era of rapid change increasingly characterized by large time domain surveys, robotic telescopes and automated infrastructures, and - most significantly - of operating modes and scientific consortia that span our individual facilities, joining them into complex network entities. Observatories must adapt and numerous initiatives are in progress that focus on redesigning individual components out of the astronomical toolkit. New instrumentation is both more capable and more complex than ever, and even simple instruments may have powerful observation scripting capabilities. Remote and queue observing modes are now widespread. Data archives are becoming ubiquitous. Virtual observatory standards and protocols and astroinformatics data-mining techniques layered on these are areas of active development. Indeed, new large-aperture ground-based telescopes may be as expensive as space missions and have similarly formal project management processes and large data management requirements. This piecewise approach is not enough. Whatever challenges of funding or politics facing the national and international astronomical communities it will be more efficient - scientifically as well as in the usual figures of merit of cost, schedule, performance, and risks - to explicitly address the systems engineering of the astronomical community as a whole.

  4. Improved finite-difference vibration analysis of pretwisted, tapered beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure based upon second order central differences is developed. Several difficulties encountered in earlier works with fictitious stations that arise in using second order central differences, are eliminated by developing certain recursive relations. The need for forward or backward differences at the beam boundaries or other similar procedures is eliminated in the present theory. By using this improved theory, the vibration characteristics of pretwisted and tapered blades are calculated. Results of the second order theory are compared with published theoretical and experimental results and are found to be in good agreement. The present method generally produces close lower bound solutions and shows fast convergence. Thus, extrapolation procedures that are customary with first order finite-difference methods are unnecessary. Furthermore, the computational time and effort needed for this improved method are almost the same as required for the conventional first order finite-difference approach.

  5. Fast analysis of wide-band scattering from electrically large targets with time-domain parabolic equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zi; Chen, Ru-Shan

    2016-03-01

    An efficient three-dimensional time domain parabolic equation (TDPE) method is proposed to fast analyze the narrow-angle wideband EM scattering properties of electrically large targets. The finite difference (FD) of Crank-Nicolson (CN) scheme is used as the traditional tool to solve the time-domain parabolic equation. However, a huge computational resource is required when the meshes become dense. Therefore, the alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme is introduced to discretize the time-domain parabolic equation. In this way, the reduced transient scattered fields can be calculated line by line in each transverse plane for any time step with unconditional stability. As a result, less computational resources are required for the proposed ADI-based TDPE method when compared with both the traditional CN-based TDPE method and the finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method. By employing the rotating TDPE method, the complete bistatic RCS can be obtained with encouraging accuracy for any observed angle. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. Compact finite difference method for American option pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jichao; Davison, Matt; Corless, Robert M.

    2007-09-01

    A compact finite difference method is designed to obtain quick and accurate solutions to partial differential equation problems. The problem of pricing an American option can be cast as a partial differential equation. Using the compact finite difference method this problem can be recast as an ordinary differential equation initial value problem. The complicating factor for American options is the existence of an optimal exercise boundary which is jointly determined with the value of the option. In this article we develop three ways of combining compact finite difference methods for American option price on a single asset with methods for dealing with this optimal exercise boundary. Compact finite difference method one uses the implicit condition that solutions of the transformed partial differential equation be nonnegative to detect the optimal exercise value. This method is very fast and accurate even when the spatial step size h is large (h[greater-or-equal, slanted]0.1). Compact difference method two must solve an algebraic nonlinear equation obtained by Pantazopoulos (1998) at every time step. This method can obtain second order accuracy for space x and requires a moderate amount of time comparable with that required by the Crank Nicolson projected successive over relaxation method. Compact finite difference method three refines the free boundary value by a method developed by Barone-Adesi and Lugano [The saga of the American put, 2003], and this method can obtain high accuracy for space x. The last two of these three methods are convergent, moreover all the three methods work for both short term and long term options. Through comparison with existing popular methods by numerical experiments, our work shows that compact finite difference methods provide an exciting new tool for American option pricing.

  7. Time domain spectral method and its application on antenna array and PCB trace with periodic roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minshen

    The primary interest of the electromagnetic behavior of a periodic structure is in its near field and far field. However, it is still numerically difficult to analyze either one in the time domain. The primary goal of this dissertation is to develop corresponding time domain technique to analyze two topics. The first one is to evaluate the far field of a realistic, large antenna array using an efficient method. The second one is to evaluate the propagation characteristic of a commercially available printed circuit board (PCB) with intentional roughness. Both of which are hot topics in the antenna and signal integrity (SI) society respectively; however, none of them have ever been solved in the time domain. To efficiently evaluate the far field pattern of a realistically large antenna array, the spectral domain method and the reciprocity theorem are implemented in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique to avoid the simulation of the near field. By taking advantage of the periodic boundary condition (PBC), the proposed method demonstrates its capability to speed up far field evaluation from hours to minutes. Good agreement of the results is provided for various cases: circular antenna array, arbitrary feeding array, and highly directional leaky wave antenna, etc. Periodic structure modeling with finite sized feedings is developed by the array scanning method (ASM) implemented in the FDTD technique. The minimally coupled electric and magnetic co-mingled antenna array is evaluated by the method. Moreover, a commercially available PCB with very small roughness is modeled by the ASM-FDTD and the propagation characteristic is evaluated. Both are evaluated by time domain method for the first time. Efficiency in terms of memory and computing time is shown for this method and parallelization in the future is proposed.

  8. Finite-Difference Algorithms For Computing Sound Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    Governing equations considered as matrix system. Method variant of method described in "Scheme for Finite-Difference Computations of Waves" (ARC-12970). Present method begins with matrix-vector formulation of fundamental equations, involving first-order partial derivatives of primitive variables with respect to space and time. Particular matrix formulation places time and spatial coordinates on equal footing, so governing equations considered as matrix system and treated as unit. Spatial and temporal discretizations not treated separately as in other finite-difference methods, instead treated together by linking spatial-grid interval and time step via common scale factor related to speed of sound.

  9. Finite difference modeling of rotor flows including wake effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Desopper, A.; Tung, C.

    1982-01-01

    Rotary wing finite difference methods are investigated. The main concern is the specification of boundary conditions to properly account for the effect of the wake on the blade. Examples are given of an approach where wake effects are introduced by specifying an equivalent angle of attack. An alternate approach is also given where discrete vortices are introduced into the finite difference grid. The resulting computations of hovering and high advance ratio cases compare well with experiment. Some consideration is also given to the modeling of low to moderate advance ratio flows.

  10. Shim3d Helmholtz Solution Package

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes solves the Helmholtz Equation for the steady-state propagation of single-frequency electromagnetic radiation in an arbitrary 2D or 3D dielectric medium. Materials can be either transparent or absorptive (including metals) and are described entirely by their shape and complex dielectric constant. Dielectric boundaries are assumed to always fall on grid boundaries and the material within a single grid cell is considered to be uniform. Input to the problem is in the formmore » of a Dirichlet boundary condition on a single boundary, and may be either analytic (Gaussian) in shape, or a mode shape computed using a separate code (such as the included eigenmode solver vwave20), and written to a file. Solution is via the finite difference method using Jacobi iteration for 3D problems or direct matrix inversion for 2D problems. Note that 3D problems that include metals will require different iteration parameters than described in the above reference. For structures with curved boundaries not easily modeled on a rectangular grid, the auxillary codes helmholtz11(2D), helm3d (semivectoral), and helmv3d (full vectoral) are provided. For these codes the finite difference equations are specified on a topological regular triangular grid and solved using Jacobi iteration or direct matrix inversion as before. An automatic grid generator is supplied.« less

  11. Miniature terahertz time-domain spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulkin, Brian

    This thesis focuses on the design, development and evaluation of novel concepts which enable the miniaturization of terahertz (THz) time-domain spectrometry. Portable THz spectrometry is applied to research and industrial domains for immediate, short and long term applications in nondestructive evaluation, homeland security, and biomedicine respectively. Due to the previous limitation of THz devices for public uses, in particular, the lack of access to a THz spectrometer, applications of THz science and technology have only recently expanded beyond the laboratory. There is an urgent need for compact, even handheld THz time-domain spectrometry (THz-TDS) platforms which can carry out proven-to-be-useful applications developed and tested in laboratory conditions. There are three major challenges restricting THz-TDS to laboratories. Atmospheric absorption severely limits the propagation distance of the THz beam and confines systems to low-moisture environments. The sample's surface roughness, grain size and geometry severely limit the bandwidth of the measurement. Physical size and weight of THz systems are generally limited by large laser sources and optomechanics. The sensitivity and selectivity of THz-TDS systems are the two most significant parameters used to describe the quality of the system. Sensitivity is directly related to the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and dynamic range, which may be improved by either lowering the noise floor or increasing the THz signal. On the other hand, selectivity is far more complex as it is related to the sensitivity, sample preparation, baseline correction, and selection method. Sensitivity is gauged using industrial statistical methods, such as Gauge Repeatability and Reproducibility (GR&R), and can transform a not-so-useful SNR value to an extremely useful measure of the minimum detectable amount of a certain material. It is shown that the GR&R value is inversely proportional to the square root of the number of averaged waveforms

  12. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme optimized in the time-space domain for modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-11-01

    For modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems using finite-difference schemes, optimizing the coefficients of the finite-difference operators can reduce numerical dispersion. Most optimized finite-difference schemes for modeling seismic-wave propagation suppress only spatial but not temporal dispersion errors. We develop a novel optimized finite-difference scheme for numerical scalar-wave modeling to control dispersion errors not only in space but also in time. Our optimized scheme is based on a new stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. We design an objective function for minimizing relative errors of phase velocities of waves propagating in all directions within a given range of wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis and numerical examples demonstrate that our optimized finite-difference scheme is computationally up to 2.5 times faster than the optimized schemes using the standard stencil to achieve the similar modeling accuracy for a given 2D or 3D problem. Compared with the high-order finite-difference scheme using the same new stencil, our optimized scheme reduces 50 percent of the computational cost to achieve the similar modeling accuracy. This new optimized finite-difference scheme is particularly useful for large-scale 3D scalar-wave modeling and inversion.

  13. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme optimized in the time–space domain for modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-11-01

    For modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems using finite-difference schemes, optimizing the coefficients of the finite-difference operators can reduce numerical dispersion. Most optimized finite-difference schemes for modeling seismic-wave propagation suppress only spatial but not temporal dispersion errors. We develop a novel optimized finite-difference scheme for numerical scalar-wave modeling to control dispersion errors not only in space but also in time. Our optimized scheme is based on a new stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. We design an objective function for minimizing relative errors of phase velocities of waves propagating in all directions within a given range of wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis and numerical examples demonstrate that our optimized finite-difference scheme is computationally up to 2.5 times faster than the optimized schemes using the standard stencil to achieve the similar modeling accuracy for a given 2D or 3D problem. Compared with the high-order finite-difference scheme using the same new stencil, our optimized scheme reduces 50 percent of the computational cost to achieve the similar modeling accuracy. This new optimized finite-difference scheme is particularly useful for large-scale 3D scalar-wave modeling and inversion.

  14. Rasterizing geological models for parallel finite difference simulation using seismic simulation as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehner, Björn; Hellwig, Olaf; Linke, Maik; Görz, Ines; Buske, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    3D geological underground models are often presented by vector data, such as triangulated networks representing boundaries of geological bodies and geological structures. Since models are to be used for numerical simulations based on the finite difference method, they have to be converted into a representation discretizing the full volume of the model into hexahedral cells. Often the simulations require a high grid resolution and are done using parallel computing. The storage of such a high-resolution raster model would require a large amount of storage space and it is difficult to create such a model using the standard geomodelling packages. Since the raster representation is only required for the calculation, but not for the geometry description, we present an algorithm and concept for rasterizing geological models on the fly for the use in finite difference codes that are parallelized by domain decomposition. As a proof of concept we implemented a rasterizer library and integrated it into seismic simulation software that is run as parallel code on a UNIX cluster using the Message Passing Interface. We can thus run the simulation with realistic and complicated surface-based geological models that are created using 3D geomodelling software, instead of using a simplified representation of the geological subsurface using mathematical functions or geometric primitives. We tested this set-up using an example model that we provide along with the implemented library.

  15. Computer-Oriented Calculus Courses Using Finite Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    The so-called discrete approach in calculus instruction involves introducing topics from the calculus of finite differences and finite sums, both for motivation and as useful tools for applications of the calculus. In particular, it provides an ideal setting in which to incorporate computers into calculus courses. This approach has been…

  16. Using the Finite Difference Calculus to Sum Powers of Integers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zia, Lee

    1991-01-01

    Summing powers of integers is presented as an example of finite differences and antidifferences in discrete mathematics. The interrelation between these concepts and their analogues in differential calculus, the derivative and integral, is illustrated and can form the groundwork for students' understanding of differential and integral calculus.…

  17. Scheme For Finite-Difference Computations Of Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1992-01-01

    Compact algorithms generating and solving finite-difference approximations of partial differential equations for propagation of waves obtained by new method. Based on concept of discrete dispersion relation. Used in wave propagation to relate frequency to wavelength and is key measure of wave fidelity.

  18. Direct Finite-Difference Simulations Of Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Moin, Parviz

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses use of upwind-biased finite-difference numerical-integration scheme to simulate evolution of small disturbances and fully developed turbulence in three-dimensional flow of viscous, incompressible fluid in channel. Involves use of computational grid sufficiently fine to resolve motion of fluid at all relevant length scales.

  19. Finite difference methods for the solution of unsteady potential flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.

    1982-01-01

    Various problems which are confronted in the development of an unsteady finite difference potential code are reviewed mainly in the context of what is done for a typical small disturbance and full potential method. The issues discussed include choice of equations, linearization and conservation, differencing schemes, and algorithm development. A number of applications, including unsteady three dimensional rotor calculations, are demonstrated.

  20. Multigrid methods and high order finite difference for flow in transition - Effects of isolated and distributed roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The high order finite difference and multigrid methods have been successfully applied to direct numerical simulation (DNS) for flow transition in 3D channels and 3D boundary layers with 2D and 3D isolated and distributed roughness in a curvilinear coordinate system. A fourth-order finite difference technique on stretched and staggered grids, a fully-implicit time marching scheme, a semicoarsening multigrid method associated with line distributive relaxation scheme, and a new treatment of the outflow boundary condition, which needs only a very short buffer domain to damp all wave reflection, are developed. These approaches make the multigrid DNS code very accurate and efficient. This makes us not only able to do spatial DNS for the 3D channel and flat plate at low computational costs, but also able to do spatial DNS for transition in the 3D boundary layer with 3D single and multiple roughness elements. Numerical results show good agreement with the linear stability theory, the secondary instability theory, and a number of laboratory experiments.

  1. Development of a GPU-Accelerated 3-D Full-Wave Code for Reflectometry Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, K. S.; Kubota, S.; Feibush, E.; Johnson, I.

    2013-10-01

    1-D and 2-D full-wave codes used as synthetic diagnostics in microwave reflectometry are standard tools for understanding electron density fluctuations in fusion plasmas. The accuracy of the code depends on how well the wave properties along the ignored dimensions can be pre-specified or neglected. In a toroidal magnetic geometry, such assumptions are never strictly correct and ray tracing has shown that beam propagation is inherently a 3-D problem. Previously, we reported on the application of GPGPU's (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) to a 2-D FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) code ported to utilize the parallel processing capabilities of the NVIDIA C870 and C1060. Here, we report on the development of a FDTD code for 3-D problems. Initial tests will use NVIDIA's M2070 GPU and concentrate on the launching and propagation of Gaussian beams in free space. If available, results using a plasma target will also be presented. Performance will be compared with previous generations of GPGPU cards as well as with NVIDIA's newest K20C GPU. Finally, the possibility of utilizing multiple GPGPU cards in a cluster environment or in a single node will also be discussed. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99-ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the DoE National Undergraduate Fusion Fellowship.

  2. Quantitative validation of the 3D SAR profile of hyperthermia applicators using the gamma method.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, Maarten; Samaras, Theodoros; Chavannes, Nicolas; van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2007-06-01

    For quality assurance of hyperthermia treatment planning systems, quantitative validation of the electromagnetic model of an applicator is essential. The objective of this study was to validate a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model implementation of the Lucite cone applicator (LCA) for superficial hyperthermia. The validation involved (i) the assessment of the match between the predicted and measured 3D specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution, and (ii) the assessment of the ratio between model power and real-world power. The 3D SAR distribution of seven LCAs was scanned in a phantom bath using the DASY4 dosimetric measurement system. The same set-up was modelled in SEMCAD X. The match between the predicted and the measured SAR distribution was quantified with the gamma method, which combines distance-to-agreement and dose difference criteria. Good quantitative agreement was observed: more than 95% of the measurement points met the acceptance criteria 2 mm/2% for all applicators. The ratio between measured and predicted power absorption ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 (mean 0.85). This study shows that quantitative validation of hyperthermia applicator models is feasible and is worth considering as a part of hyperthermia quality assurance procedures. PMID:17505090

  3. Time-Domain Terahertz Computed Axial Tomography NDE System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimdars, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified the need for advanced non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to characterize aging and durability in aircraft materials to improve the safety of the nation's airline fleet. 3D THz tomography can play a major role in detection and characterization of flaws and degradation in aircraft materials, including Kevlar-based composites and Kevlar and Zylon fabric covers for soft-shell fan containment where aging and durability issues are critical. A prototype computed tomography (CT) time-domain (TD) THz imaging system has been used to generate 3D images of several test objects including a TUFI tile (a thermal protection system tile used on the Space Shuttle and possibly the Orion or similar capsules). This TUFI tile had simulated impact damage that was located and the depth of damage determined. The CT motion control gan try was designed and constructed, and then integrated with a T-Ray 4000 control unit and motion controller to create a complete CT TD-THz imaging system prototype. A data collection software script was developed that takes multiple z-axis slices in sequence and saves the data for batch processing. The data collection software was integrated with the ability to batch process the slice data with the CT TD-THz image reconstruction software. The time required to take a single CT slice was decreased from six minutes to approximately one minute by replacing the 320 ps, 100-Hz waveform acquisition system with an 80 ps, 1,000-Hz waveform acquisition system. The TD-THZ computed tomography system was built from pre-existing commercial off-the-shelf subsystems. A CT motion control gantry was constructed from COTS components that can handle larger samples. The motion control gantry allows inspection of sample sizes of up to approximately one cubic foot (.0.03 cubic meters). The system reduced to practice a CT-TDTHz system incorporating a COTS 80- ps/l-kHz waveform scanner. The incorporation of this scanner in the system allows acquisition of 3D

  4. GE simplified boiling water reactor stability analysis in time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shanlai

    1997-12-01

    General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) was designed as a next generation light water reactor. It uses natural circulation to remove the heat from the reactor core. Because of this unique in-vessel circulation feature, SBWR is expected to exhibit different stability behaviors. The main emphasis of this thesis is to study the SBWR stability behavior in the time domain. The best-estimate BWR accident/transient analysis computer code, TRAC-BF1, is employed to analyze the SBWR stability behavior. A detailed TRAC-BF1 SBWR model has been developed, which has the capability to model the in-vessel natural circulation and the reactor core kinetics. The model is used to simulate three slow depressurization processes. The simulation results show that the reactor is stable under low pressure and nominal downcomer water level conditions. However, when the downcomer water level is raised to about 19.2 m above the bottom of the reactor vessel, an unstable power oscillation is observed. The identified power oscillation is further analyzed using TRAC-BF1 1-D kinetics and the new TRAC-BF1 3-D kinetics code developed in this thesis. The effects of different time step sizes and vessel model nodalizations are examined. It is found that the power oscillation is in-phase and has a frequency of 0.3 HZ. In order to further explore the physical instabilty initiation mechanisms, a simplified dynamic model consisting of six simple differential equations is developed. The simplified model is able to predict the dominant physical phenomenon identified by the TRAC-BF1 analysis. The results indicate that the system instability is possibly caused by the steam separator hydro-static head oscillation under the high water level condition. In order to explore the higher order spacial effect of power oscillation, a 3-D reactor core kinetics code is coupled with the TRAC-BF1 computer code in the PVM parallel processing environment. A new coupling scheme and a multiple time step marching

  5. Nano Ag-enhanced energy conversion efficiency in standard commercial pc-Si solar cells and numerical simulations with finite difference time domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Shao, Weijia; Zhou, Yao; Wang, Huijie; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2013-11-01

    Nano Ag-enhanced energy conversion efficiency (ECE) in one standard commercial pc-Si solar cell utilizing the forward scattering by Ag nanoparticles on surface has been researched experimentally and simulatively in this paper. Directly assembling Ag nanoparticles (with size about 100 nm) on the surface, it is found when the particle surface coverage is 10%, the ECE and the short circuit current density are increased by 2.8% and 1.4%, respectively. Without changing any existing structure of the ready-made solar cell, this facile and efficient method has huger applications than other methods.

  6. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  7. Finite-difference lattice-Boltzmann methods for binary fluids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aiguo

    2005-06-01

    We investigate two-fluid Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) kinetic methods for binary fluids. The developed theory works for asymmetric as well as symmetric systems. For symmetric systems it recovers Sirovich's theory and is summarized in models A and B. For asymmetric systems it contributes models C, D, and E which are especially useful when the total masses and/or local temperatures of the two components are greatly different. The kinetic models are discretized based on an octagonal discrete velocity model. The discrete-velocity kinetic models and the continuous ones are required to describe the same hydrodynamic equations. The combination of a discrete-velocity kinetic model and an appropriate finite-difference scheme composes a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. The validity of the formulated methods is verified by investigating (i) uniform relaxation processes, (ii) isothermal Couette flow, and (iii) diffusion behavior. PMID:16089910

  8. Selecting step sizes in sensitivity analysis by finite differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iott, J.; Haftka, R. T.; Adelman, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with methods for obtaining near-optimum step sizes for finite difference approximations to first derivatives with particular application to sensitivity analysis. A technique denoted the finite difference (FD) algorithm, previously described in the literature and applicable to one derivative at a time, is extended to the calculation of several simultaneously. Both the original and extended FD algorithms are applied to sensitivity analysis for a data-fitting problem in which derivatives of the coefficients of an interpolation polynomial are calculated with respect to uncertainties in the data. The methods are also applied to sensitivity analysis of the structural response of a finite-element-modeled swept wing. In a previous study, this sensitivity analysis of the swept wing required a time-consuming trial-and-error effort to obtain a suitable step size, but it proved to be a routine application for the extended FD algorithm herein.

  9. Finite difference seismic modeling of axial magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, S.A.; Dougherty, M.E.; Stephen, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors tested the feasibility of using finite difference methods to model seismic propagation at {approximately}10 Hx through a two-dimensional representation of an axial magma chamber with a thin, liquid lid. This technique produces time series of displacement or pressure at seafloor receivers to mimic a seismic refraction experiment and snapshots of P and S energy propagation. The results indicate that the implementation is stable for models with sharp velocity contrasts and complex geometries. The authors observe a high-energy, downward-traveling shear phase, observable only with borehole receivers, that would be useful in studying the nature and shape of magma chambers. The ability of finite difference methods to model high-order wave phenomena makes this method ideal for testing velocity models of spreading axes and for planning near-axis drilling of the East Pacific Rise in order to optimize the benefits from shear wave imaging of sub-axis structure.

  10. Calculation of sensitivity derivatives in thermal problems by finite differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Malkus, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    The optimum design of a structure subject to temperature constraints is considered. When mathematical optimization techniques are used, derivatives of the temperature constraints with respect to the design variables are usually required. In the case of large aerospace structures, such as the Space Shuttle, the computation of these derivatives can become prohibitively expensive. Analytical methods and a finite difference approach have been considered in studies conducted to improve the efficiency of the calculation of the derivatives. The present investigation explores two possibilities for enhancing the effectiveness of the finite difference approach. One procedure involves the simultaneous solution of temperatures and derivatives. The second procedure makes use of the optimum selection of the magnitude of the perturbations of the design variables to achieve maximum accuracy.

  11. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  12. Experimentally constructing finite difference algorithms in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Matzner, Richard

    2002-04-01

    Computational studies of gravitational waves require numerical algorithms with long-term stability (necessary for convergence). However, constructing stable finite difference algorithms (FDA) for the ADM formulation of the Einstein equations, especially in multiple dimensions, has proven difficult. Most FDA's are constructed using rules of thumb gained from experience with simple model equations. To search for FDA's with improved stability, we adopt a brute-force approach, where we systematically test thousands of numerical schemes. We sort the spatial derivatives of the Einstein equations into groups, and parameterize each group by finite difference type (centered or upwind) and order. Furthermore, terms proportional to the constraints are added to the evolution equations with additional parameters. A spherically symmetric, excised Schwarzschild black hole (one dimension) and linearized waves in multiple dimensions are used as model systems to evaluate the different numerical schemes.

  13. Semianalytical computation of path lines for finite-difference models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A semianalytical particle tracking method was developed for use with velocities generated from block-centered finite-difference ground-water flow models. Based on the assumption that each directional velocity component varies linearly within a grid cell in its own coordinate directions, the method allows an analytical expression to be obtained describing the flow path within an individual grid cell. Given the intitial position of a particle anywhere in a cell, the coordinates of any other point along its path line within the cell, and the time of travel between them, can be computed directly. For steady-state systems, the exit point for a particle entering a cell at any arbitrary location can be computed in a single step. By following the particle as it moves from cell to cell, this method can be used to trace the path of a particle through any multidimensional flow field generated from a block-centered finite-difference flow model. -Author

  14. Finite difference discretisation of a model for biological nerve conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aderogba, A. A.; Chapwanya, M.; Jejeniwa, O. A.

    2016-06-01

    A nonstandard finite difference method is proposed for the discretisation of the semilinear FitzHugh-Nagumo reaction diffusion equation. The equation has been useful in describing, for example, population models, biological models, heat and mass transfer models, and many other applications. The proposed approach involves splitting the equation into the space independent and the time independent sub equation. Numerical simulations for the full equation are presented.

  15. Calculating rotordynamic coefficients of seals by finite-difference techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzen, F. J.; Nordmann, R.

    1987-01-01

    For modelling the turbulent flow in a seal the Navier-Stokes equations in connection with a turbulence (kappa-epsilon) model are solved by a finite-difference method. A motion of the shaft round the centered position is assumed. After calculating the corresponding flow field and the pressure distribution, the rotor-dynamic coefficients of the seal can be determined. These coefficients are compared with results obtained by using the bulk flow theory of Childs and with experimental results.

  16. Finite difference methods for the solution of unsteady potential flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is presented of various problems which are confronted in the development of an unsteady finite difference potential code. This review is conducted mainly in the context of what is done for a typical small disturbance and full potential methods. The issues discussed include choice of equation, linearization and conservation, differencing schemes, and algorithm development. A number of applications including unsteady three-dimensional rotor calculation, are demonstrated.

  17. Finite difference schemes for long-time integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haras, Zigo; Taasan, Shlomo

    1993-01-01

    Finite difference schemes for the evaluation of first and second derivatives are presented. These second order compact schemes were designed for long-time integration of evolution equations by solving a quadratic constrained minimization problem. The quadratic cost function measures the global truncation error while taking into account the initial data. The resulting schemes are applicable for integration times fourfold, or more, longer than similar previously studied schemes. A similar approach was used to obtain improved integration schemes.

  18. Dispersion-relation-preserving finite difference schemes for computational acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Webb, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    Time-marching dispersion-relation-preserving (DRP) schemes can be constructed by optimizing the finite difference approximations of the space and time derivatives in wave number and frequency space. A set of radiation and outflow boundary conditions compatible with the DRP schemes is constructed, and a sequence of numerical simulations is conducted to test the effectiveness of the DRP schemes and the radiation and outflow boundary conditions. Close agreement with the exact solutions is obtained.

  19. High Order Finite Difference Methods for Multiscale Complex Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H. C.

    2002-01-01

    The classical way of analyzing finite difference schemes for hyperbolic problems is to investigate as many as possible of the following points: (1) Linear stability for constant coefficients; (2) Linear stability for variable coefficients; (3) Non-linear stability; and (4) Stability at discontinuities. We will build a new numerical method, which satisfies all types of stability, by dealing with each of the points above step by step.

  20. Introduction to finite-difference methods for numerical fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, E.; Harlow, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    This work is intended to be a beginner`s exercise book for the study of basic finite-difference techniques in computational fluid dynamics. It is written for a student level ranging from high-school senior to university senior. Equations are derived from basic principles using algebra. Some discussion of partial-differential equations is included, but knowledge of calculus is not essential. The student is expected, however, to have some familiarity with the FORTRAN computer language, as the syntax of the computer codes themselves is not discussed. Topics examined in this work include: one-dimensional heat flow, one-dimensional compressible fluid flow, two-dimensional compressible fluid flow, and two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow with additions of the equations of heat flow and the {Kappa}-{epsilon} model for turbulence transport. Emphasis is placed on numerical instabilities and methods by which they can be avoided, techniques that can be used to evaluate the accuracy of finite-difference approximations, and the writing of the finite-difference codes themselves. Concepts introduced in this work include: flux and conservation, implicit and explicit methods, Lagrangian and Eulerian methods, shocks and rarefactions, donor-cell and cell-centered advective fluxes, compressible and incompressible fluids, the Boussinesq approximation for heat flow, Cartesian tensor notation, the Boussinesq approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor, and the modeling of transport equations. A glossary is provided which defines these and other terms.

  1. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  2. Development of a GPU-Accelerated 3-D Full-Wave Code for Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in a Cold Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, D.; Kubota, S.; Johnson, I.

    2014-10-01

    Computer simulations of electromagnetic wave propagation in magnetized plasmas are an important tool for both plasma heating and diagnostics. For active millimeter-wave and microwave diagnostics, accurately modeling the evolution of the beam parameters for launched, reflected or scattered waves in a toroidal plasma requires that calculations be done using the full 3-D geometry. Previously, we reported on the application of GPGPU (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) to a 3-D vacuum Maxwell code using the FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) method. Tests were done for Gaussian beam propagation with a hard source antenna, utilizing the parallel processing capabilities of the NVIDIA K20M. In the current study, we have modified the 3-D code to include a soft source antenna and an induced current density based on the cold plasma approximation. Results from Gaussian beam propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic plasma, along with comparisons to ray- and beam-tracing calculations will be presented. Additional enhancements, such as advanced coding techniques for improved speedup, will also be investigated. Supported by U.S. DoE Grant DE-FG02-99-ER54527 and in part by the U.S. DoE, Office of Science, WDTS under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship program.

  3. Recovering Complex Conductivity from Frequency and Time Domain Geophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KANG, S.; Marchant, D.; Oldenburg, D.

    2013-12-01

    The electrical conductivity of earth materials can be frequency dependent. The bulk conductivity decreases with decreasing frequency because of the build-up of electric charges that occur under the application of an electric field. Effectively, the rock is electrically polarized. Finding the polarization response (often referred to as IP, Induced Polarization) can lead to economic benefits, as in the case of discovering sulphide minerals, but there is applicability in environmental problems, groundwater flow, and site characterization. We have the ability to model Maxwell's equations in 3D for complex conductivity in either the time or frequency domain. The challenge therefore is to invert the EM (electromagnetic) data to recover a four-dimensional conductivity (σ (ω, x, y, z)) using limited EM data generally acquired on, or above, the surface of the earth. At late times (or low frequencies) the static Maxwell's equation are valid and, if a background conductivity is known, then chargeability can be extracted. Unfortunately the static assumption is often violated and EM induction processes contaminate the sought signal. For example, signals in the time domain have three parts: a static on-time, an early-time inductive portion, and a late-time IP signal. Information about conductivity using the appropriate Maxwell's equations is available from each of these segments. The potential contamination of the IP from EM induction (often referred to as EM coupling) and the potential contamination of the EM signal from the IP data (IP coupling) can cause deleterious effects and must be addressed. The goal of this talk is to address such issues and outline a practical procedure for extracting IP information from existing time and frequency domain surveys.

  4. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  5. Numerical Solutions of Electromagnetic Problems by Integral Equation Methods and Finite-Difference Time - Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Xiaoyi

    This thesis first presents the study of the interaction of electromagnetic waves with three-dimensional heterogeneous, dielectric, magnetic, and lossy bodies by surface integral equation modeling. Based on the equivalence principle, a set of coupled surface integral equations is formulated and then solved numerically by the method of moments. Triangular elements are used to model the interfaces of the heterogeneous body, and vector basis functions are defined to expand the unknown current in the formulation. The validity of this formulation is verified by applying it to concentric spheres for which an exact solution exists. The potential applications of this formulation to a partially coated sphere and a homogeneous human body are discussed. Next, this thesis also introduces an efficient new set of integral equations for treating the scattering problem of a perfectly conducting body coated with a thin magnetically lossy layer. These electric field integral equations and magnetic field integral equations are numerically solved by the method of moments (MoM). To validate the derived integral equations, an alternative method to solve the scattering problem of an infinite circular cylinder coated with a thin magnetic lossy layer has also been developed, based on the eigenmode expansion. Results for the radar cross section and current densities via the MoM and the eigenmode expansion method are compared. The agreement is excellent. The finite difference time domain method is subsequently implemented to solve a metallic object coated with a magnetic thin layer and numerical results are compared with that by the MoM. Finally, this thesis presents an application of the finite-difference time-domain approach to the problem of electromagnetic receiving and scattering by a cavity -backed antenna situated on an infinite conducting plane. This application involves modifications of Yee's model, which applies the difference approximations of field derivatives to differential

  6. Global 3-D FDTD Maxwell's-Equations Modeling of Ionospheric Disturbances Associated with Earthquakes Using an Optimized Geodesic Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. J.; Taflove, A.

    2005-12-01

    We report a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computational solution of Maxwell's equations [1] that models the possibility of detecting and characterizing ionospheric disturbances above seismic regions. Specifically, we study anomalies in Schumann resonance spectra in the extremely low frequency (ELF) range below 30 Hz as observed in Japan caused by a hypothetical cylindrical ionospheric disturbance above Taiwan. We consider excitation of the global Earth-ionosphere waveguide by lightning in three major thunderstorm regions of the world: Southeast Asia, South America (Amazon region), and Africa. Furthermore, we investigate varying geometries and characteristics of the ionospheric disturbance above Taiwan. The FDTD technique used in this study enables a direct, full-vector, three-dimensional (3-D) time-domain Maxwell's equations calculation of round-the-world ELF propagation accounting for arbitrary horizontal as well as vertical geometrical and electrical inhomogeneities and anisotropies of the excitation, ionosphere, lithosphere, and oceans. Our entire-Earth model grids the annular lithosphere-atmosphere volume within 100 km of sea level, and contains over 6,500,000 grid-points (63 km laterally between adjacent grid points, 5 km radial resolution). We use our recently developed spherical geodesic gridding technique having a spatial discretization best described as resembling the surface of a soccer ball [2]. The grid is comprised entirely of hexagonal cells except for a small fixed number of pentagonal cells needed for completion. Grid-cell areas and locations are optimized to yield a smoothly varying area difference between adjacent cells, thereby maximizing numerical convergence. We compare our calculated results with measured data prior to the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan as reported by Hayakawa et. al. [3]. Acknowledgement This work was suggested by Dr. Masashi Hayakawa, University of Electro-Communications, Chofugaoka, Chofu Tokyo. References [1] A

  7. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for Aircraft Acoustic Nacelle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  8. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for the Convective Wave Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Kreider, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in ducts. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  9. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  10. Application of a finite difference technique to thermal wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for thermal wave propagation resulting from periodic heat sources. The numerical technique can handle complex problems that might result from variable thermal diffusivity, such as heat flow in the earth with ice and snow layers. In the numerical analysis, the continuous temperature field is represented by a series of grid points at which the temperature is separated into real and imaginary terms. Next, computer routines previously developed for acoustic wave propagation are utilized in the solution for the temperatures. The calculation procedure is illustrated for the case of thermal wave propagation in a uniform property semi-infinite medium.

  11. Application of a finite difference technique to thermal wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for thermal wave propagation resulting from periodic heat sources. The numerical technique can handle complex problems that might result from variable thermal diffusivity, such as heat flow in the earth with ice and snow layers. In the numerical analysis, the continuous temperature field is represented by a series of grid points at which the temperature is separated into real and imaginary terms. Computer routines previously developed for acoustic wave propagation are utilized in the solution for the temperatures. The calculation procedure is illustrated for the case of thermal wave propagation in a uniform property semi-infinite medium.

  12. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-10-29

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis.

  13. Compact finite difference schemes with spectral-like resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lele, Sanjiva K.

    1992-01-01

    The present finite-difference schemes for the evaluation of first-order, second-order, and higher-order derivatives yield improved representation of a range of scales and may be used on nonuniform meshes. Various boundary conditions may be invoked, and both accurate interpolation and spectral-like filtering can be accomplished by means of schemes for derivatives at mid-cell locations. This family of schemes reduces to the Pade schemes when the maximal formal accuracy constraint is imposed with a specific computational stencil. Attention is given to illustrative applications of these schemes in fluid dynamics.

  14. Explicit Finite Difference Methods for the Delay Pseudoparabolic Equations

    PubMed Central

    Amirali, I.; Amiraliyev, G. M.; Cakir, M.; Cimen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Finite difference technique is applied to numerical solution of the initial-boundary value problem for the semilinear delay Sobolev or pseudoparabolic equation. By the method of integral identities two-level difference scheme is constructed. For the time integration the implicit rule is being used. Based on the method of energy estimates the fully discrete scheme is shown to be absolutely stable and convergent of order two in space and of order one in time. The error estimates are obtained in the discrete norm. Some numerical results confirming the expected behavior of the method are shown. PMID:24688392

  15. Explicit finite difference methods for the delay pseudoparabolic equations.

    PubMed

    Amirali, I; Amiraliyev, G M; Cakir, M; Cimen, E

    2014-01-01

    Finite difference technique is applied to numerical solution of the initial-boundary value problem for the semilinear delay Sobolev or pseudoparabolic equation. By the method of integral identities two-level difference scheme is constructed. For the time integration the implicit rule is being used. Based on the method of energy estimates the fully discrete scheme is shown to be absolutely stable and convergent of order two in space and of order one in time. The error estimates are obtained in the discrete norm. Some numerical results confirming the expected behavior of the method are shown. PMID:24688392

  16. Macroscopic traffic modeling with the finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.; Azarm, A.; Stock, D.

    1996-03-15

    A traffic congestion forecasting model (ATOP), developed in the present investigation, is described briefly. Several macroscopic models, based on the solution of the partial differential equation of conservation of vehicles by the finite difference method, were tested using actual traffic data. The functional form, as well as the parameters, of the equation of state which describes the relation between traffic speed and traffic density, were determined for a section of the Long Island Expressway. The Lax method and the forward difference technique were applied. The results of extensive tests showed that the Lax method, in addition to giving very good agreement with the traffic data, produces stable solutions.

  17. A finite difference approach to microstrip antenna design

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, M.J.; Bevensee, R.M.; Pennock, S.T.

    1986-12-01

    Microstrip antennas have received increased attention in recent years, due to their size and cost advantages. Analysis of the microstrip structure has proved difficult due to the presence of the dielectric substrate, particularly for complex geometries. One possible approach to a solution is the use of a finite difference computer code to model a proposed microstrip antenna design. The models are easily constructed and altered, and code versions are available which allow input impedance or far-field patterns to be calculated. Results for some simple antenna geometries will be presented.

  18. Time-domain implementation of an impedance boundary condition with boundary layer correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambley, E. J.; Gabard, G.

    2016-09-01

    A time-domain boundary condition is derived that accounts for the acoustic impedance of a thin boundary layer over an impedance boundary, based on the asymptotic frequency-domain boundary condition of Brambley (2011) [25]. A finite-difference reference implementation of this condition is presented and carefully validated against both an analytic solution and a discrete dispersion analysis for a simple test case. The discrete dispersion analysis enables the distinction between real physical instabilities and artificial numerical instabilities. The cause of the latter is suggested to be a combination of the real physical instabilities present and the aliasing and artificial zero group velocity of finite-difference schemes. It is suggested that these are general properties of any numerical discretization of an unstable system. Existing numerical filters are found to be inadequate to remove these artificial instabilities as they have a too wide pass band. The properties of numerical filters required to address this issue are discussed and a number of selective filters are presented that may prove useful in general. These filters are capable of removing only the artificial numerical instabilities, allowing the reference implementation to correctly reproduce the stability properties of the analytic solution.

  19. A class of staggered grid algorithms and analysis for time-domain Maxwell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlesworth, Alexander E.

    We describe, implement, and analyze a class of staggered grid algorithms for efficient simulation and analysis of time-domain Maxwell systems in the case of heterogeneous, conductive, and nondispersive, isotropic, linear media. We provide the derivation of a continuous mathematical model from the Maxwell equations in vacuum; however, the complexity of this system necessitates the use of computational methods for approximately solving for the physical unknowns. The finite difference approximation has been used for partial differential equations and the Maxwell Equations in particular for many years. We develop staggered grid based finite difference discrete operators as a class of approximations to continuous operators based on second order in time and various order approximations to the electric and magnetic field at staggered grid locations. A generalized parameterized operator which can be specified to any of this class of discrete operators is then applied to the Maxwell system and hence we develop discrete approximations through various choices of parameters in the approximation. We describe analysis of the resulting discrete system as an approximation to the continuous system. Using the comparison of dispersion analysis for the discrete and continuous systems, we derive a third difference approximation, in addition to the known (2, 2) and (2, 4) schemes. We conclude by providing the comparison of these three methods by simulating the Maxwell system for several choices of parameters in the system.

  20. A microwave imaging-based 3D localization algorithm for an in-body RF source as in wireless capsule endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rohit; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2015-08-01

    A microwave imaging-based technique for 3D localization of an in-body RF source is presented. Such a technique can be useful for localization of an RF source as in wireless capsule endoscopes for positioning of any abnormality in the gastrointestinal tract. Microwave imaging is used to determine the dielectric properties (relative permittivity and conductivity) of the tissues that are required for a precise localization. A 2D microwave imaging algorithm is used for determination of the dielectric properties. Calibration method is developed for removing any error due to the used 2D imaging algorithm on the imaging data of a 3D body. The developed method is tested on a simple 3D heterogeneous phantom through finite-difference-time-domain simulations. Additive white Gaussian noise at the signal-to-noise ratio of 30 dB is added to the simulated data to make them more realistic. The developed calibration method improves the imaging and the localization accuracy. Statistics on the localization accuracy are generated by randomly placing the RF source at various positions inside the small intestine of the phantom. The cumulative distribution function of the localization error is plotted. In 90% of the cases, the localization accuracy was found within 1.67 cm, showing the capability of the developed method for 3D localization. PMID:26737194

  1. Wide-area assessment of topographical and meteorological effects on sound propagation by time-domain modeling.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Dietrich

    2013-05-01

    Noise mapping with a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model over larger areas suffers from its high computational demand. This study shows that an FDTD model in combination with a meteorological model can be used for at least qualitative assessments of topographical and meteorological effects on sound propagation in domains of even some kilometers extension. This is achieved by restricting the acoustical simulations to low frequencies which allow the use of a rather large numerical grid spacing. PMID:23656103

  2. Finite Difference Elastic Wave Field Simulation On GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation is considered as a basic and important aspect in investigation of the Earth's structure, and earthquake phenomenon. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is considered one of the most efficient tools for the wave field simulation. However, with the increment of computing scale, the power of computing has becoming a bottleneck. With the development of hardware, in recent years, GPU shows powerful computational ability and bright application prospects in scientific computing. Many works using GPU demonstrate that GPU is powerful . Recently, GPU has not be used widely in the simulation of wave field. In this work, we present forward finite difference simulation of acoustic and elastic seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media on NVIDIA graphics cards with the CUDA programming language. We also implement perfectly matched layers on the graphics cards to efficiently absorb outgoing waves on the fictitious edges of the grid Simulations compared with the results on CPU platform shows reliable accuracy and remarkable efficiency. This work proves that GPU can be an effective platform for wave field simulation, and it can also be used as a practical tool for real-time strong ground motion simulation.

  3. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  4. Arrayed waveguide grating using the finite difference beam propagation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, M. C. F.; Alayo, M. I.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyze by simulation the coupling effects occurring in Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) using the finite difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM). Conventional FD-BPM techniques do not immediately lend themselves to the analysis of large structures such as AWG. Cooper et al.1 introduced a description of the coupling between the interface of arrayed waveguides and star couplers using the numerically-assisted coupled-mode theory. However, when the arrayed waveguides are spatially close, such that, there is strong coupling between them, and coupled-mode theory is not adequate. On the other hand, Payne2 developed an exact eigenvalue equation for the super modes of a straight arrayed waveguide which involve a computational overhead. In this work, an integration of both methods is accomplished in order to describe the behavior of the propagation of light in guided curves. This new method is expected to reduce the necessary effort for simulation while also enabling the simulation of large and curved arrayed waveguides using a fully vectorial finite difference technique.

  5. Investigation on broadband propagation characteristic of terahertz electromagnetic wave in anisotropic magnetized plasma in frequency and time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yuan; Han, Yiping; Ai, Xia; Liu, Xiuxiang

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave in an anisotropic magnetized plasma by JE convolution-finite difference time domain method. The anisotropic characteristic of the plasma, which leads to right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) and right-hand circularly polarized (LCP) waves, has been taken into account. The interaction between electromagnetic waves and magnetized plasma is illustrated by reflection and transmission coefficients for both RCP and LCP THz waves. The effects of both the magnetized plasma thickness and the external magnetized field are analyzed and numerical results demonstrate that the two factors could influence the THz wave greatly. It is worthy to note that besides the reflection and transmission coefficients in the frequency domain, the waveform of the electric field in the time domain varying with thicknesses and external magnetic fields for different polarized direction has been studied.

  6. Time Domain Propagation of Quantum and Classical Systems using a Wavelet Basis Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardini, Richard; Nowara, Ewa; Johnson, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    The use of an orthogonal wavelet basis set (Optimized Maximum-N Generalized Coiflets) to effectively model physical systems in the time domain, in particular the electromagnetic (EM) pulse and quantum mechanical (QM) wavefunction, is examined in this work. Although past research has demonstrated the benefits of wavelet basis sets to handle computationally expensive problems due to their multiresolution properties, the overlapping supports of neighboring wavelet basis functions poses problems when dealing with boundary conditions, especially with material interfaces in the EM case. Specifically, this talk addresses this issue using the idea of derivative matching creating fictitious grid points (T.A. Driscoll and B. Fornberg), but replaces the latter element with fictitious wavelet projections in conjunction with wavelet reconstruction filters. Two-dimensional (2D) systems are analyzed, EM pulse incident on silver cylinders and the QM electron wave packet circling the proton in a hydrogen atom system (reduced to 2D), and the new wavelet method is compared to the popular finite-difference time-domain technique.

  7. The Gouy phase anomaly for harmonic and time-domain paraxial Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Robert L.; Kainkaryam, Sribharath M.

    2011-02-01

    The Gouy phase anomaly resulting from the focusing of wave solutions is illustrated using 2-D paraxial Gaussian beams. For harmonic Gaussian beams, this gives rise to a continuous variation of the Gouy phase as a function of propagation distance. This is in contrast to the discontinuous phase anomaly at caustics for ray solutions. However, as the beam-width of a Gaussian beam at a focus gets smaller, the Gouy phase anomaly becomes more concentrated near the focus and approaches that of the ray solution. The Gouy phase for a harmonic Gaussian beam is first illustrated in a homogeneous medium, and then in a quadratic velocity waveguide where the beam can pass through multiple focus points. However for multiple focus points, care must be taken to ensure that the phase remains continuous. Finally, an example is shown of the Gouy phase for a time-domain signal using a Gabor wavelet. This is validated using the finite difference method, and illustrates the progressive phase advance of a time-domain signal modifying the pulse shape with distance. Intuitively, as a wave solution gets `squeezed' at a focus, it `squirts' forward by slightly increasing its apparent speed in the propagation direction and modifying the pulse shape. However, this is a phase advance and not a group or energy advance and does not violate causality. Nonetheless, this could potentially influence the interpretation of travel-times using correlation techniques when using sources that generate beamed signals, for example from transducer sources in the laboratory.

  8. Finite-difference modeling of Biot's poroelastic equations across all frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, Y.J.; Pride, S.R.

    2009-10-22

    An explicit time-stepping finite-difference scheme is presented for solving Biot's equations of poroelasticity across the entire band of frequencies. In the general case for which viscous boundary layers in the pores must be accounted for, the time-domain version of Darcy's law contains a convolution integral. It is shown how to efficiently and directly perform the convolution so that the Darcy velocity can be properly updated at each time step. At frequencies that are low enough compared to the onset of viscous boundary layers, no memory terms are required. At higher frequencies, the number of memory terms required is the same as the number of time points it takes to sample accurately the wavelet being used. In practice, we never use more than 20 memory terms and often considerably fewer. Allowing for the convolution makes the scheme even more stable (even larger time steps might be used) than it is when the convolution is entirely neglected. The accuracy of the scheme is confirmed by comparing numerical examples to exact analytic results.

  9. Finite-difference modeling of the monopole acoustic logs in a horizontally stratified porous formation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wei; Hu, Hengshan; He, Xiao

    2009-04-01

    Monopole acoustic logs in a homogeneous fluid-saturated porous formation can be simulated by the real-axis integration (RAI) method to analytically solve Biot's equations [(1956a) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 28, 168-178; (1956b) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 28, 179-191; (1962) J. Appl. Phys. 33, 1482-1498], which govern the wave propagation in poro-elastic media. Such analytical solution generally is impossible for horizontally stratified formations which are common in reality. In this paper, a velocity-stress finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm is proposed to solve the problem. This algorithm considers both the low-frequency viscous force and the high-frequency inertial force in poro-elastic media, extending its application to a wider frequency range compared to existing algorithms which are only valid in the low-frequency limit. The perfectly matched layer (PML) is applied as an absorbing boundary condition to truncate the computational region. A PML technique without splitting the fields is extended to the poro-elastic wave problem. The FDTD algorithm is validated by comparisons against the RAI method in a variety of formations with different velocities and permeabilities. The acoustic logs in a horizontally stratified porous formation are simulated with the proposed FDTD algorithm. PMID:19354370

  10. Application of a finite-difference technique to the human radiofrequency dosimetry problem.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, R J; Fatmi, M B; Kunz, K S

    1985-01-01

    A powerful finite-difference numerical technique has been applied to the human radiofrequency dosimetry problem. The method possesses inherent advantages over the method-of-moments approach in that its implementation requires much less computer memory. Consequently, it has the capability to calculate specific absorption rates (SARs) at higher frequencies and provides greater spatial resolution. The method is illustrated by the calculation of the time-domain and frequency-domain SAR responses at selected locations in the chest. The model for the human body is comprised of rectangular cells with dimensions of 4X4X6 cm and dielectric properties that simulate average tissue (2/3 muscle). Additionally, the upper torso (chest) is configured by both homogeneous and inhomogeneous models in which this region is subdivided into 20,736 cells with dimensions of 1X1X1 cm. The homogeneous model of the chest consists of cells with average tissue properties, and the calculated results are compared with measurements acquired from a homogeneous phantom model when the exposure frequency is 350 MHz. For the inhomogeneous chest model the lungs and surrounding region (ribs, spine, sternum, fat, and muscle) are modeled with as much spatial resolution as allowed by the 1X1X1 cm cells. Computed results from the inhomogeneous chest model are compared with the homogeneous model. PMID:3854056

  11. An inverse acoustic waveguide problem in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monk, Peter; Selgas, Virginia

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of locating an obstacle in a waveguide from time domain measurements of causal waves. More precisely, we assume that we are given the scattered field due to point sources placed on a surface located inside the waveguide away from the obstacle, where the scattered field is measured on the same surface. From this multi-static scattering data we wish to determine the position and shape of an obstacle in the waveguide. To deal with this inverse problem, we adapt and analyze the time domain linear sampling method. This involves proving new time domain estimates for the forward problem, as well as analyzing several time domain operators arising in the inversion scheme. We also implement the inversion algorithm and provide numerical results in two-dimensions using synthetic data.

  12. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  13. Curvilinear Grid Finite-Difference Method to Simulate Seismic Wave Propagation with Topographic Fluid-Solid Interface at Sea Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Zhang, W.; Chen, X.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a curvilinear grid finite difference method for modeling seismic wave propagation with topographic fluid (acoustic) and solid (elastic) interface. The curvilinear grid finite difference method has been successfully used for seismic wave simulation with free surface topography and earthquake dynamics with complex falut geometry. For seismic wave simulation with topographic sea bottom, we use the curvilinear grid to conform the grid to the sea bottom to avoid artifical scatterings due to stair-case approximation. We solve the acoustic wave equation in the water layer and the elastic wave equation in the solid below the sea bottom. The fluid-solid interface condition is implemented by decomposing velocity and stress components to normal and parallel directions of the sea bottom. The results exhibit high accuracy by comparsion with analytical solutions for flat interfaces and also work very well when the fluid-solid interface is topographic. The scheme can be easily extended to 3-D situation.

  14. Time domain referencing in intensity modulation fiber optic sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory

    1986-01-01

    Intensity modulation sensors are classified by the way in which the reference and signal channels are separated: in space, wavelength, or time domains. To implement the time-domain referencing, different types of fiber-optic loops have been used. A pulse of short duration sent into the loop results in a series of pulses of different amplitudes. The information about the measured parameter is retrieved from the relative amplitudes of pulses in the same train.

  15. Viscoelastic Finite Difference Modeling Using Graphics Processing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabien-Ouellet, G.; Gloaguen, E.; Giroux, B.

    2014-12-01

    Full waveform seismic modeling requires a huge amount of computing power that still challenges today's technology. This limits the applicability of powerful processing approaches in seismic exploration like full-waveform inversion. This paper explores the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPU) to compute a time based finite-difference solution to the viscoelastic wave equation. The aim is to investigate whether the adoption of the GPU technology is susceptible to reduce significantly the computing time of simulations. The code presented herein is based on the freely accessible software of Bohlen (2002) in 2D provided under a General Public License (GNU) licence. This implementation is based on a second order centred differences scheme to approximate time differences and staggered grid schemes with centred difference of order 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 for spatial derivatives. The code is fully parallel and is written using the Message Passing Interface (MPI), and it thus supports simulations of vast seismic models on a cluster of CPUs. To port the code from Bohlen (2002) on GPUs, the OpenCl framework was chosen for its ability to work on both CPUs and GPUs and its adoption by most of GPU manufacturers. In our implementation, OpenCL works in conjunction with MPI, which allows computations on a cluster of GPU for large-scale model simulations. We tested our code for model sizes between 1002 and 60002 elements. Comparison shows a decrease in computation time of more than two orders of magnitude between the GPU implementation run on a AMD Radeon HD 7950 and the CPU implementation run on a 2.26 GHz Intel Xeon Quad-Core. The speed-up varies depending on the order of the finite difference approximation and generally increases for higher orders. Increasing speed-ups are also obtained for increasing model size, which can be explained by kernel overheads and delays introduced by memory transfers to and from the GPU through the PCI-E bus. Those tests indicate that the GPU memory size

  16. Unraveling near-field and far-field relationships for 3D SERS substrates--a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Large, Nicolas; Chiang, Naihao; Greeneltch, Nathan; Carron, Keith T; Seideman, Tamar; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-03-01

    Simplicity and low cost has positioned inkjet paper- and fabric-based 3D substrates as two of the most commonly used surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) platforms for the detection and the identification of chemical and biological analytes down to the nanogram and femtogram levels. The relationship between far-field and near-field properties of these 3D SERS platforms remains poorly understood and warrants more detailed characterization. Here, we investigate the extremely weak optical scattering observed from commercial and home-fabricated paper-, as well as fabric-based 3D SERS substrates. Using wavelength scanned surface-enhanced Raman excitation spectroscopy (WS-SERES) and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations we were able to determine their near-field SERS properties and correlate them with morphological and far-field properties. It was found that nanoparticle dimers, trimers, and higher order nanoparticle clusters primarily determine the near-field properties of these substrates. At the same time, the far-field response of 3D SERS substrates either originates primarily from the monomers or cannot be clearly defined. Using FDTD we demonstrate that LSPR bands of nanoparticle aggregates near perfectly overlap with the maxima of the near-field surface-enhanced Raman scattering responses of the 3D SERS substrates. This behaviour of far-field spectroscopic properties and near-field surface-enhanced Raman scattering has not been previously observed for 2D SERS substrates, known as nanorod arrays. The combination of these analytical approaches provides a full spectroscopic characterization of 3D SERS substrates, while FDTD simulation can be used to design new 3D SERS substrates with tailored spectral characteristics. PMID:26858996

  17. Finite difference modeling of Biot's poroelastic equations atseismic frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, Y.J.; Pride, S.R.; Nihei, K.T.

    2006-02-24

    Across the seismic band of frequencies (loosely defined as<10 kHz), a seismic wave propagating through a porous material willcreate flow in the pore space that is laminar; that is, in thislow-frequency "seismic limit," the development of viscous boundary layersin the pores need not be modeled. An explicit time steppingstaggered-grid finite difference scheme is presented for solving Biot'sequations of poroelasticity in this low-frequency limit. A key part ofthis work is the establishment of rigorous stability conditions. It isdemonstrated that over a wide range of porous material properties typicalof sedimentary rock and despite the presenceof fluid pressure diffusion(Biot slow waves), the usual Courant condition governs the stability asif the problem involved purely elastic waves. The accuracy of the methodis demonstrated by comparing to exact analytical solutions for both fastcompressional waves and slow waves. Additional numerical modelingexamples are also presented.

  18. A finite-difference method for transonic airfoil design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Klineberg, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes an inverse method for designing transonic airfoil sections or for modifying existing profiles. Mixed finite-difference procedures are applied to the equations of transonic small disturbance theory to determine the airfoil shape corresponding to a given surface pressure distribution. The equations are solved for the velocity components in the physical domain and flows with embedded shock waves can be calculated. To facilitate airfoil design, the method allows alternating between inverse and direct calculations to obtain a profile shape that satisfies given geometric constraints. Examples are shown of the application of the technique to improve the performance of several lifting airfoil sections. The extension of the method to three dimensions for designing supercritical wings is also indicated.

  19. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  20. Visualization of elastic wavefields computed with a finite difference code

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, S.; Harris, D.

    1994-11-15

    The authors have developed a finite difference elastic propagation model to simulate seismic wave propagation through geophysically complex regions. To facilitate debugging and to assist seismologists in interpreting the seismograms generated by the code, they have developed an X Windows interface that permits viewing of successive temporal snapshots of the (2D) wavefield as they are calculated. The authors present a brief video displaying the generation of seismic waves by an explosive source on a continent, which propagate to the edge of the continent then convert to two types of acoustic waves. This sample calculation was part of an effort to study the potential of offshore hydroacoustic systems to monitor seismic events occurring onshore.

  1. Parallelization of implicit finite difference schemes in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Naomi H.; Naik, Vijay K.; Nicoules, Michel

    1990-01-01

    Implicit finite difference schemes are often the preferred numerical schemes in computational fluid dynamics, requiring less stringent stability bounds than the explicit schemes. Each iteration in an implicit scheme involves global data dependencies in the form of second and higher order recurrences. Efficient parallel implementations of such iterative methods are considerably more difficult and non-intuitive. The parallelization of the implicit schemes that are used for solving the Euler and the thin layer Navier-Stokes equations and that require inversions of large linear systems in the form of block tri-diagonal and/or block penta-diagonal matrices is discussed. Three-dimensional cases are emphasized and schemes that minimize the total execution time are presented. Partitioning and scheduling schemes for alleviating the effects of the global data dependencies are described. An analysis of the communication and the computation aspects of these methods is presented. The effect of the boundary conditions on the parallel schemes is also discussed.

  2. An optimized finite-difference scheme for wave propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Lomax, H.; Jurgens, H.

    1993-01-01

    Two fully-discrete finite-difference schemes for wave propagation problems are presented, a maximum-order scheme and an optimized (or spectral-like) scheme. Both combine a seven-point spatial operator and an explicit six-stage time-march method. The maximum-order operator is fifth-order in space and is sixth-order in time for a linear problem with periodic boundary conditions. The phase and amplitude errors of the schemes obtained using Fourier analysis are given and compared with a second-order and a fourth-order method. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of the schemes for a range of problems. For some problems, the optimized scheme leads to a reduction in global error compared to the maximum-order scheme with no additional computational expense.

  3. Application of a new finite difference algorithm for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic problems have become extremely important in recent years because of research efforts such as the High Speed Civil Transport program. Computational aeroacoustics (CAA) requires a faithful representation of wave propagation over long distances, and needs algorithms that are accurate and boundary conditions that are unobtrusive. This paper applies a new finite difference method and boundary algorithm to the Linearized Euler Equations (LEE). The results demonstrate the ability of a new fourth order propagation algorithm to accurately simulate the genuinely multidimensional wave dynamics of acoustic propagation in two space dimensions with the LEE. The results also show the ability of a new outflow boundary condition and fourth order algorithm to pass the evolving solution from the computational domain with no perceptible degradation of the solution remaining within the domain.

  4. Improved finite difference schemes for transonic potential calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Osher, S.; Whitlow, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Engquist and Osher (1980) have introduced a finite difference scheme for solving the transonic small disturbance equation, taking into account cases in which only compression shocks are admitted. Osher et al. (1983) studied a class of schemes for the full potential equation. It is proved that these schemes satisfy a new discrete 'entropy inequality' which rules out expansion shocks. However, the conducted analysis is restricted to steady two-dimensional flows. The present investigation is concerned with the adoption of a heuristic approach. The full potential equation in conservation form is solved with the aid of a modified artificial density method, based on flux biasing. It is shown that, with the current scheme, expansion shocks are not possible.

  5. Three-dimensional time domain model of lightning including corona effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podgorski, Andrew S.

    1991-01-01

    A new 3-D lightning model that incorporates the effect of corona is described for the first time. The new model is based on a Thin Wire Time Domain Lightning (TWTDL) Code developed previously. The TWTDL Code was verified during the 1985 and 1986 lightning seasons by the measurements conducted at the 553 m CN Tower in Toronto, Ontario. The inclusion of corona in the TWTDL code allowed study of the corona effects on the lightning current parameters and the associated electric field parameters.

  6. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown via 3-D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. H.; Mege, P.; Morchoisne, Y.

    1990-06-01

    The long term goal is the modeling of vortex breakdown that occurs in some aerodynamic configurations at high angle of attack, (i.e., fighters with highly swept delta wings or missiles). A numerical simulation was made based on solving the 3-D Euler equations for an usteady incompressible flow. Preliminary results were obtained using a pressure-velocity formulation with periodic boundary conditions, the Euler equations being discretized by 2nd order finite difference schemes. The continuation to this work by implementing more realistic boundary conditions and 4th order finite difference discretization schemes are presented.

  7. Probing the intrinsic optical Bloch-mode emission from a 3D photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Bur, James A; Du, Qingguo; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-10-14

    We report experimental observation of intrinsic Bloch-mode emission from a 3D tungsten photonic crystal at low thermal excitation. After the successful removal of conventional metallic emission (normal emission), it is possible to make an accurate comparison of the Bloch-mode and the normal emission. For all biases, we found that the emission intensity of the Bloch-mode is higher than that of the normal emission. The Bloch-mode emission also exhibits a slower dependence on [Formula: see text] than that of the normal emission. The observed higher emission intensity and a different T-dependence is attributed to Bloch-mode assisted emission where emitters have been located into a medium having local density of states different than the isotropic case. Furthermore, our finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation shows the presence of localized spots at metal-air boundaries and corners, having intense electric field. The enhanced plasmonic field and local non-equilibrium could induce a strong thermally stimulated emission and may be the cause of our unusual observation. PMID:27606574

  8. Polyethylenimine-interlayered core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres as versatile SERS substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongwen; Li, Ping; Wang, Junfeng; Rong, Zhen; Pang, Yuanfeng; Xu, Jiawen; Dong, Peitao; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2015-11-28

    Precise fabrication of subtle nanogaps amid individual nanoparticles or between adjacent ones to obtain the highest SERS enhancement is still a challenge. Here, we reported a novel approach for fabricating core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres (CSSM), that easily form a porous 1.5 nm PEI interlayer to accommodate molecules and create sufficient hotspots between the inner Fe3O4@Ag core and outer assembled Au@Ag satellites. Experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation demonstrated that the enhancement factor (EF) was about 2.03 × 10(8) and 6.25 × 10(6), respectively. In addition, the micro-scale magnetic core endowed the CSSM with a superior magnetic nature, which enabled easy separation and further enhanced Raman signals due to enrichment of targeted analytes and abundant interparticle hotspots created by magnetism-induced aggregation. Our results further demonstrated that the CSSM is expected to be a versatile SERS substrate, which has been verified by the detection of the adsorbed pesticide thiram and the non-adsorbed pesticide paraquat with a detection limit as low as 5 × 10(-12) M and 1 × 10(-10) M, respectively. The novel CSSM can overcome the long-standing limitations of SERS for the trace characterization of various analytes in different solutions and promises to transform SERS into a practical analytical technique. PMID:26502285

  9. Comparison of a 3-D GPU-Assisted Maxwell Code and Ray Tracing for Reflectometry on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gady, Sarah; Kubota, Shigeyuki; Johnson, Irena

    2015-11-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering in magnetized plasmas are important diagnostics for high temperature plasmas. 1-D and 2-D full-wave codes are standard tools for measurements of the electron density profile and fluctuations; however, ray tracing results have shown that beam propagation in tokamak plasmas is inherently a 3-D problem. The GPU-Assisted Maxwell Code utilizes the FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) method for solving the Maxwell equations with the cold plasma approximation in a 3-D geometry. Parallel processing with GPGPU (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) is used to accelerate the computation. Previously, we reported on initial comparisons of the code results to 1-D numerical and analytical solutions, where the size of the computational grid was limited by the on-board memory of the GPU. In the current study, this limitation is overcome by using domain decomposition and an additional GPU. As a practical application, this code is used to study the current design of the ITER Low Field Side Reflectometer (LSFR) for the Equatorial Port Plug 11 (EPP11). A detailed examination of Gaussian beam propagation in the ITER edge plasma will be presented, as well as comparisons with ray tracing. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FG02-99-ER54527.

  10. Experimental investigation and 3D-simulation of the ablated morphology of titanium surface using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Chuansong; Man, Baoyuan; Meng, Xue; Sun, Yanna; Li, Feifei

    2015-12-01

    The femtosecond laser ablated morphology on titanium surface is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A three dimensional two temperature model (3D-TTM) is used to simulate the surface morphology of titanium sample which is irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. The electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling coefficient of titanium (transition metal) are complex temperature dependent, so the two parameters are corrected based on the theory of electron density of states (DOS). The model is solved by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The 3D temperature field near the target surface is achieved. The radius and depth of the ablated crater are obtained based on the temperature field. The evolutions of the crate's radius and depth with laser fluence are discussed and compared with the experimental results. It is found that the back-flow of the molten material and the deposition of the material vapor should be responsible for the little discrepancy between the simulated and experimental results. The present work makes a better understanding of the thermodynamic process of femtosecond laser ablating metal and meanwhile provides an effective method tool to predict the micro manufacturing process on metals with femtosecond laser.

  11. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  12. Time-Domain Filtering for Spatial Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    An approach to large-eddy simulation (LES) is developed whose subgrid-scale model incorporates filtering in the time domain, in contrast to conventional approaches, which exploit spatial filtering. The method is demonstrated in the simulation of a heated, compressible, axisymmetric jet, and results are compared with those obtained from fully resolved direct numerical simulation. The present approach was, in fact, motivated by the jet-flow problem and the desire to manipulate the flow by localized (point) sources for the purposes of noise suppression. Time-domain filtering appears to be more consistent with the modeling of point sources; moreover, time-domain filtering may resolve some fundamental inconsistencies associated with conventional space-filtered LES approaches.

  13. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  14. Nonlinear triggered lightning models for use in finite difference calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Terence; Perala, Rodney A.; Ng, Poh H.

    1989-01-01

    Two nonlinear triggered lightning models have been developed for use in finite difference calculations. Both are based on three species of air chemistry physics and couple nonlinearly calculated air conductivity to Maxwell's equations. The first model is suitable for use in three-dimensional modeling and has been applied to the analysis of triggered lightning on the NASA F106B Thunderstorm Research Aircraft. The model calculates number densities of positive ions, negative ions, and electrons as a function of time and space through continuity equations, including convective derivative terms. The set of equations is closed by using experimentally determined mobilities, and the mobilities are also used to determine the air conductivity. Results from the model's application to the F106B are shown. The second model is two-dimensional and incorporates an enhanced air chemistry formulation. Momentum conservation equations replace the mobility assumption of the first model. Energy conservation equations for neutrals, heavy ions, and electrons are also used. Energy transfer into molecular vibrational modes is accounted for. The purpose for the enhanced model is to include the effects of temperature into the air breakdown, a necessary step if the model is to simulate more than the very earliest stages of breakdown. Therefore, the model also incorporates a temperature-dependent electron avalanche rate. Results from the model's application to breakdown around a conducting ellipsoid placed in an electric field are shown.

  15. Contraction pre-conditioner in finite-difference electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavich, Nikolay; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to constructing an effective pre-conditioner for finite-difference (FD) electromagnetic modelling in geophysical applications. This approach is based on introducing an FD contraction operator, similar to one developed for integral equation formulation of Maxwell's equation. The properties of the FD contraction operator were established using an FD analogue of the energy equality for the anomalous electromagnetic field. A new pre-conditioner uses a discrete Green's function of a 1-D layered background conductivity. We also developed the formulae for an estimation of the condition number of the system of FD equations pre-conditioned with the introduced FD contraction operator. Based on this estimation, we have established that the condition number is bounded by the maximum conductivity contrast between the background conductivity and actual conductivity. When there are both resistive and conductive anomalies relative to the background, the new pre-conditioner is advantageous over using the 1-D discrete Green's function directly. In our numerical experiments with both resistive and conductive anomalies, for a land geoelectrical model with 1:10 contrast, the method accelerates convergence of an iterative method (BiCGStab) by factors of 2-2.5, and in a marine example with 1:50 contrast, by a factor of 4.6, compared to direct use of the discrete 1-D Green's function as a pre-conditioner.

  16. Assessment of Linear Finite-Difference Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2009-01-01

    CPU time and memory usage are two vital issues that any numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation have to face in biomolecular applications. In this study we systematically analyzed the CPU time and memory usage of five commonly used finite-difference solvers with a large and diversified set of biomolecular structures. Our comparative analysis shows that modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient and geometric multigrid are the most efficient in the diversified test set. For the two efficient solvers, our test shows that their CPU times increase approximately linearly with the numbers of grids. Their CPU times also increase almost linearly with the negative logarithm of the convergence criterion at very similar rate. Our comparison further shows that geometric multigrid performs better in the large set of tested biomolecules. However, modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient is superior to geometric multigrid in molecular dynamics simulations of tested molecules. We also investigated other significant components in numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It turns out that the time-limiting step is the free boundary condition setup for the linear systems for the selected proteins if the electrostatic focusing is not used. Thus, development of future numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation should balance all aspects of the numerical procedures in realistic biomolecular applications. PMID:20063271

  17. A hybrid finite-difference and analytic element groundwater model.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H M; Feinstein, D T; Hunt, R J; Gusyev, M A

    2010-01-01

    Regional finite-difference models tend to have large cell sizes, often on the order of 1-2 km on a side. Although the regional flow patterns in deeper formations may be adequately represented by such a model, the intricate surface water and groundwater interactions in the shallower layers are not. Several stream reaches and nearby wells may occur in a single cell, precluding any meaningful modeling of the surface water and groundwater interactions between the individual features. We propose to replace the upper MODFLOW layer or layers, in which the surface water and groundwater interactions occur, by an analytic element model (GFLOW) that does not employ a model grid; instead, it represents wells and surface waters directly by the use of point-sinks and line-sinks. For many practical cases it suffices to provide GFLOW with the vertical leakage rates calculated in the original coarse MODFLOW model in order to obtain a good representation of surface water and groundwater interactions. However, when the combined transmissivities in the deeper (MODFLOW) layers dominate, the accuracy of the GFLOW solution diminishes. For those cases, an iterative coupling procedure, whereby the leakages between the GFLOW and MODFLOW model are updated, appreciably improves the overall solution, albeit at considerable computational cost. The coupled GFLOW-MODFLOW model is applicable to relatively large areas, in many cases to the entire model domain, thus forming an attractive alternative to local grid refinement or inset models. PMID:20132324

  18. Assessment of linear finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann solvers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2010-06-01

    CPU time and memory usage are two vital issues that any numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation have to face in biomolecular applications. In this study, we systematically analyzed the CPU time and memory usage of five commonly used finite-difference solvers with a large and diversified set of biomolecular structures. Our comparative analysis shows that modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient and geometric multigrid are the most efficient in the diversified test set. For the two efficient solvers, our test shows that their CPU times increase approximately linearly with the numbers of grids. Their CPU times also increase almost linearly with the negative logarithm of the convergence criterion at very similar rate. Our comparison further shows that geometric multigrid performs better in the large set of tested biomolecules. However, modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient is superior to geometric multigrid in molecular dynamics simulations of tested molecules. We also investigated other significant components in numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It turns out that the time-limiting step is the free boundary condition setup for the linear systems for the selected proteins if the electrostatic focusing is not used. Thus, development of future numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation should balance all aspects of the numerical procedures in realistic biomolecular applications. PMID:20063271

  19. Performance of Nonlinear Finite-Difference Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qin; Hsieh, Meng-Juei; Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2010-01-12

    We implemented and optimized seven finite-difference solvers for the full nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation in biomolecular applications, including four relaxation methods, one conjugate gradient method, and two inexact Newton methods. The performance of the seven solvers was extensively evaluated with a large number of nucleic acids and proteins. Worth noting is the inexact Newton method in our analysis. We investigated the role of linear solvers in its performance by incorporating the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient and the geometric multigrid into its inner linear loop. We tailored and optimized both linear solvers for faster convergence rate. In addition, we explored strategies to optimize the successive over-relaxation method to reduce its convergence failures without too much sacrifice in its convergence rate. Specifically we attempted to adaptively change the relaxation parameter and to utilize the damping strategy from the inexact Newton method to improve the successive over-relaxation method. Our analysis shows that the nonlinear methods accompanied with a functional-assisted strategy, such as the conjugate gradient method and the inexact Newton method, can guarantee convergence in the tested molecules. Especially the inexact Newton method exhibits impressive performance when it is combined with highly efficient linear solvers that are tailored for its special requirement. PMID:24723843

  20. A finite difference model for free surface gravity drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Couri, F.R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The unconfined gravity flow of liquid with a free surface into a well is a classical well test problem which has not been well understood by either hydrologists or petroleum engineers. Paradigms have led many authors to treat an incompressible flow as compressible flow to justify the delayed yield behavior of a time-drawdown test. A finite-difference model has been developed to simulate the free surface gravity flow of an unconfined single phase, infinitely large reservoir into a well. The model was verified with experimental results in sandbox models in the literature and with classical methods applied to observation wells in the Groundwater literature. The simulator response was also compared with analytical Theis (1935) and Ramey et al. (1989) approaches for wellbore pressure at late producing times. The seepage face in the sandface and the delayed yield behavior were reproduced by the model considering a small liquid compressibility and incompressible porous medium. The potential buildup (recovery) simulated by the model evidenced a different- phenomenon from the drawdown, contrary to statements found in the Groundwater literature. Graphs of buildup potential vs time, buildup seepage face length vs time, and free surface head and sand bottom head radial profiles evidenced that the liquid refills the desaturating cone as a flat moving surface. The late time pseudo radial behavior was only approached after exaggerated long times.

  1. Elastic finite-difference method for irregular grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oprsal, I.; Zahradnik, J.

    1999-01-01

    Finite-difference (FD) modeling of complicated structures requires simple algorithms. This paper presents a new elastic FD method for spatially irregular grids that is simple and, at the same time, saves considerable memory and computing time. Features like faults, low-velocity layers, cavities, and/or nonplanar surfaces are treated on a fine grid, while the remaining parts of the model are, with equal accuracy, represented on a coarse grid. No interpolation is needed between the fine and coarse parts due to the rectangular grid cells. Relatively abrupt transitions between the small and large grid steps produce no numerical artifacts in the present method. Planar or nonplanar free surfaces, including underground cavities, are treated in a way similar to internal grid points but with consideration of the zero-valued elastic parameters and density outside the free surface (vacuum formalism). A theoretical proof that vacuum formalism fulfills the free-surface conditions is given. Numerical validation is performed through comparison with independent methods, comparing FD with explicitly prescribed boundary conditions and finite elements. Memory and computing time needed in the studied models was only about 10 to 40% of that employing regular square grids of equal accuracy. A practical example of a synthetic seismic section, showing clear signatures of a coal seam and cavity, is presented. The method can be extended to three dimensions.

  2. Asymptotically Correct Finite Difference Schemes for Highly Oscillatory ODEs

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Anton; Geier, Jens

    2010-09-30

    We are concerned with the numerical integration of ODE-initial value problems of the form {epsilon}{sup 2{phi}}{sub xx}+a(x){phi} = 0 with given a(x){>=}a{sub 0}>0 in the highly oscillatory regime 0<{epsilon}(appearing as a stationary Schroedinger equation, e.g.). In two steps we derive an accurate finite difference scheme that does not need to resolve each oscillation: With a WKB-ansatz the dominant oscillations are ''transformed out'', yielding a much smoother ODE. For the resulting oscillatory integrals we devise an asymptotic expansion both in {epsilon} and h. The resulting scheme typically has a step size restriction of h = o({radical}({epsilon})). If the phase of the WKB-transformation can be computed explicitly, then the scheme is asymptotically correct with an error bound of the order o({epsilon}{sup 3}h{sup 2}). As an application we present simulations of a 1D-model for ballistic quantum transport in a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor).

  3. A time-domain finite element boundary integration method for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fan; Choi, Wonjae; Skelton, Elizabeth A; Lowe, Michael J S; Craster, Richard V

    2014-12-01

    A 2-D and 3-D numerical modeling approach for calculating the elastic wave scattering signals from complex stress-free defects is evaluated. In this method, efficient boundary integration across the complex boundary of the defect is coupled with a time-domain finite element (FE) solver. The model is designed to simulate time-domain ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation in bulk media. This approach makes use of the hybrid concept of linking a local numerical model to compute the near-field scattering behavior and theoretical mathematical formulas for postprocessing to calculate the received signals. It minimizes the number of monitoring signals from the FE calculation so that the computation effort in postprocessing decreases significantly. In addition, by neglecting the conventional regular monitoring box, the region for FE calculation can be made smaller. In this paper, the boundary integral method is implemented in a commercial FE code, and it is validated by comparing the scattering signals with results from corresponding full FE models. The coupled method is then implemented in real inspection scenarios in both 2-D and 3-D, and the accuracy and the efficiency are demonstrated. The limitations of the proposed model and future works are also discussed. PMID:25474780

  4. Time-Domain Impedance Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Auriault, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    It is an accepted practice in aeroacoustics to characterize the properties of an acoustically treated surface by a quantity known as impedance. Impedance is a complex quantity. As such, it is designed primarily for frequency-domain analysis. Time-domain boundary conditions that are the equivalent of the frequency-domain impedance boundary condition are proposed. Both single frequency and model broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions are provided. It is shown that the proposed boundary conditions, together with the linearized Euler equations, form well-posed initial boundary value problems. Unlike ill-posed problems, they are free from spurious instabilities that would render time-marching computational solutions impossible.

  5. Eulerian Time-Domain Filtering for Spatial LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    Eulerian time-domain filtering seems to be appropriate for LES (large eddy simulation) of flows whose large coherent structures convect approximately at a common characteristic velocity; e.g., mixing layers, jets, and wakes. For these flows, we develop an approach to LES based on an explicit second-order digital Butterworth filter, which is applied in,the time domain in an Eulerian context. The approach is validated through a priori and a posteriori analyses of the simulated flow of a heated, subsonic, axisymmetric jet.

  6. New frontiers in time-domain diffuse optics, a review.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in time-domain diffuse optics that rely on physical concepts (e.g., time-gating and null distance) and advanced photonic components (e.g., vertical cavity source-emitting laser as light sources, single photon avalanche diode, and silicon photomultipliers as detectors, fast-gating circuits, and time-to-digital converters for acquisition) are focused. This study shows how these tools could lead on one hand to compact and wearable time-domain devices for point-of-care diagnostics down to the consumer level and on the other hand to powerful systems with exceptional depth penetration and sensitivity. PMID:27311627

  7. Time Domain Measurement of Moving Object Speed Using Acceleration Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazunori; Noro, Mitsuo; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    In this study, we proposed a time-domain measurement method of moving object speed with a commercially available acceleration sensor. The sensor of this kind is normally used to measure the acceleration of a stationary vibration object, while it is not applicable to the measurement of a transient moving object due to the frequency response of the sensor itself. An impulsive sensor response was derived from the free-drop movement of a metallic sphere. The deconvolution allows the sensor to measure the acceleration in the time domain, which was validated through the measurement of the speed of a hand-held metal piece approaching a target.

  8. Frequency and time domain modeling of high speed amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalska, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the lumped model of high speed amplifier useful for frequency and time domain (also large signal) simulation. Model is constructed on the basis of two-domain device measurements, namely small signal frequency parameters and time response to the input step of varying amplitude. Rational approximation of frequency domain data leads to small signal model composed of RLC subcircuits and controlled sources. Next, the model is complimented with the nonlinearities identified from time-domain measurements, including those taken for large input signals. Final amplifier model implemented in SPICE simulator is shown to correctly render the behavior of the device over the wide variety of operating conditions.

  9. Time-domain simulation of constitutive relations for nonlinear acoustics including relaxation for frequency power law attenuation media modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Camarena, Francisco; Redondo, Javier; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-10-01

    We report a numerical method for solving the constitutive relations of nonlinear acoustics, where multiple relaxation processes are included in a generalized formulation that allows the time-domain numerical solution by an explicit finite differences scheme. Thus, the proposed physical model overcomes the limitations of the one-way Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) type models and, due to the Lagrangian density is implicitly included in the calculation, the proposed method also overcomes the limitations of Westervelt equation in complex configurations for medical ultrasound. In order to model frequency power law attenuation and dispersion, such as observed in biological media, the relaxation parameters are fitted to both exact frequency power law attenuation/dispersion media and also empirically measured attenuation of a variety of tissues that does not fit an exact power law. Finally, a computational technique based on artificial relaxation is included to correct the non-negligible numerical dispersion of the finite difference scheme, and, on the other hand, improve stability trough artificial attenuation when shock waves are present. This technique avoids the use of high-order finite-differences schemes leading to fast calculations. The present algorithm is especially suited for practical configuration where spatial discontinuities are present in the domain (e.g. axisymmetric domains or zero normal velocity boundary conditions in general). The accuracy of the method is discussed by comparing the proposed simulation solutions to one dimensional analytical and k-space numerical solutions.

  10. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  11. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  12. Improved time-space method for 3-D heat transfer problems including global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Wakashima, Shinichiro

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the Time-Space Method (TSM) which has been proposed for solving general heat transfer and fluid flow problems was improved in order to cover global and urban warming. The TSM is effective in almost all-transient heat transfer and fluid flow problems, and has been already applied to the 2-D melting problems (or moving boundary problems). The computer running time will be reduced to only 1/100th--1/1000th of the existing schemes for 2-D and 3-D problems. However, in order to apply to much larger-scale problems, for example, global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, the SOR method (or other iterative methods) in four dimensions is somewhat tedious and provokingly slow. Motivated by the above situation, the authors improved the speed of iteration of the previous TSM by introducing the following ideas: (1) Timewise chopping: Time domain is chopped into small peaches to save memory requirement; (2) Adaptive iteration: Converged region is eliminated for further iteration; (3) Internal selective iteration: Equation with slow iteration speed in iterative procedure is selectively iterated to accelerate entire convergence; and (4) False transient integration: False transient term is added to the Poisson-type equation and the relevant solution is regarded as a parabolic equation. By adopting the above improvements, the higher-order finite different schemes and the hybrid mesh, the computer running time for the TSM is reduced to some 1/4600th of the conventional explicit method for a typical 3-D natural convection problem in a closed cavity. The proposed TSM will be more efficacious for large-scale environmental problems, such as global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, in which a tremendous computing time would be required.

  13. Optimising GPR modelling: A practical, multi-threaded approach to 3D FDTD numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millington, T. M.; Cassidy, N. J.

    2010-09-01

    The demand for advanced interpretational tools has lead to the development of highly sophisticated, computationally demanding, 3D GPR processing and modelling techniques. Many of these methods solve very large problems with stepwise methods that utilise numerically similar functions within iterative computational loops. Problems of this nature are readily parallelised by splitting the computational domain into smaller, independent chunks for direct use on cluster-style, multi-processor supercomputers. Unfortunately, the implications of running such facilities, as well as time investment needed to develop the parallel codes, means that for most researchers, the use of these advanced methods is too impractical. In this paper, we propose an alternative method of parallelisation which exploits the capabilities of the modern multi-core processors (upon which today's desktop PCs are built) by multi-threading the calculation of a problem's individual sub-solutions. To illustrate the approach, we have applied it to an advanced, 3D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) GPR modelling tool in which the calculation of the individual vector field components is multi-threaded. To be of practical use, the FDTD scheme must be able to deliver accurate results with short execution times and we, therefore, show that the performance benefits of our approach can deliver runtimes less than half those of the more conventional, serial programming techniques. We evaluate implementations of the technique using different programming languages (e.g., Matlab, Java, C++), which will facilitate the construction of a flexible modelling tool for use in future GPR research. The implementations are compared on a variety of typical hardware platforms, having between one and eight processing cores available, and also a modern Graphical Processing Unit (GPU)-based computer. Our results show that a multi-threaded xyz modelling approach is easy to implement and delivers excellent results when implemented

  14. 3D Simulation of Ultrasound in the Ultra-Distal Human Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jonathan J.; Luo, Gangming; Siffert, Robert S.

    The overall objective of this research is to develop an ultrasonic method for non-invasive assessment of the ultradistal radius (UDR). The specific objective of this study was to examine the propagation of ultrasound through the UDR and determine the relationships between bone mass and ultrasound, as well as the ability of ultrasound to discriminate between fracture and non-fracture cases. High-resolution peripheral-QCT (HR-pQCT) images were obtained from a set of 110 subjects that were part of a larger study on osteoporosis. Twenty-three of the subjects had experienced a UDR fracture within the past 2 years; the other 87 subjects served as controls. Each 3D image was used to simulate ultrasound measurements that would result from propagation through the UDR, from its anterior to its posterior surfaces. The simulation was carried out using Wave3000 (CyberLogic, Inc., New York, USA), which solves the full 3D viscoelastic wave equation using a finite difference time domain method. Bone mineral density associated with each radius was computed for each subject, and an ultrasound parameter known as net time delay (NTD) was evaluated. NTD has been shown to be highly correlated with total bone mass in both in vitro and clinical studies. Significant correlations were found between NTD and total bone mass (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.001). The data also showed a statistically significant difference in the NTD for the fracture and non-fracture cases (i.e., a decrease in mean NTD of 14% (P < 0.001), with a t-test statistic of 3.8). The study shows that ultrasound is correlated with bone mass at the UDR, as well as with fracture incidence. Therefore ultrasound may prove useful as a simple and convenient method for non-invasive assessment of osteoporosis and fracture risk. Work is ongoing to compare the simulated ultrasound data with clinical ultrasound measurements made on the same individuals.

  15. Time domain reflectometry for SLC BPM system. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.R.

    1985-03-01

    This document is intended for use as a maintenance manual for troubleshooting installed SLC Beam Position Monitor stripline assemblies and the associated cabling, using Time Domain Reflectometry. Once a technician becomes familiar with this manual's procedures, the Table of Contents can serve as a checklist.

  16. Application of Time Domain Reflectometers in Urban Settings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time domain reflectometers (TDRs) are sensors that measure the volumetric water content of soils and porous media. The sensors consist of stainless steel rods connected to a circuit board in an epoxy housing. An electromagnetic pulse is propagated along the rods. The time, or per...

  17. Application of Time Domain Reflectometers in Urban Settings

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a poster for the Million Trees NYC research symposium in New York City, NY, March 5-6, 2010. The poster gives a summary of how time domain reflectometers can be installed in urban fill soil, engineered bioretention media, and recycled concrete aggregate to document the ...

  18. Application of Time Domain Reflectometers to Urban Settings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time domain reflectometers (TDRs) are in-situ monitoring probes that produce a temperature-compensated signal proportional to soil moisture content of the surrounding material when calibrated to a particular media. Typically used in agricultural settings, TDRs may also be applied...

  19. Data Management, Infrastructure and Archiving for Time-Domain Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, David

    2012-04-01

    The workshop on Data Management issues for Time-Domain Astronomy was conceived as a forward-looking discussion of the primary issues that need to be addressed for science in the time domain. The very broad diversity of the science areas presented in the main Symposium made it clear that most of the general issues for astronomy data management-for example, large data volumes, the need for timely processing and network performance-would be pertinent in the time domain. In addition, there might be other tight time constraints on data processing when the output was required to trigger rapid follow-up observations, while science based on very long time-baselines might require careful consideration of long-term data preservation and availability issues. But broadly speaking, data management challenges in the time domain are not at variance to any significant degree with those for astronomy or data-intensive research in general. The workshop framed and debated a number of questions: What is the biggest challenge faced by future projects? How do grid and cloud computing figure in data management plans? Is the Virtual Observatory important to future projects? How are the issues of data life cycle being addressed?

  20. Quality control of leather by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Serrano, A I; Corzo-Garcia, S C; Garcia-Sanchez, E; Alfaro, M; Castro-Camus, E

    2014-11-20

    We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, combined with effective-medium theory, to measure the moisture content and thickness of leather simultaneously. These results demonstrate that this method could become a standard quality control test for the industrial tanning process. PMID:25607861

  1. Advanced propeller noise prediction in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, M. H.; Spence, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The time domain code ASSPIN gives acousticians a powerful technique of advanced propeller noise prediction. Except for nonlinear effects, the code uses exact solutions of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with exact blade geometry and kinematics. By including nonaxial inflow, periodic loading noise, and adaptive time steps to accelerate computer execution, the development of this code becomes complete.

  2. Directly coupled vs conventional time domain reflectometry in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR), a technique for estimation of soil water, measures the travel time of an electromagnetic pulse on electrodes embedded in the soil, but has limited application in commercial agriculture due to costs, labor, and sensing depth. Conventional TDR systems have employed ana...

  3. A Partial Cylindrical Thermo-Time Domain Reflectometry Sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermo-time domain reflectometry (T-TDR) sensors are multi-functional devices that can be used to measure soil thermal properties and water content. These sensors can also be used to obtain indirect estimates of bulk density, air-filled porosity and percent saturation. However, the small size of the...

  4. Time domain measurement of frequency stability: A tutorial introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.; Tetu, M.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical basis behind the definition of frequency stability in the time domain is outlined. Various types of variances were examined. Their differences and interrelation are pointed out. Systems that are generally used in the measurement of these variances are described.

  5. Finite-difference-based dynamic modeling of MEMS bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Aron; Yu, Kevin; Kwok, Chee Yee

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we present a finite difference based one-dimensional dynamic modeling, which includes electro-thermal coupled with thermo-mechanical behavior of a multi-layered micro-bridge. The electro-thermal model includes the heat transfer from the joule-heated layer to the other layers, and establishes the transient temperature gradient through the thickness of the bridge. The thermal moment and axial load resulting from the transient temperature gradient are used to couple electro-thermal with thermo-mechanical behavior. The dynamic modeling takes into account buckling, and damping effects, asymmetry residual stresses in the layers, and lateral movement at the support ends. The proposed model is applied to a tri-layer micro-bridge of 1000μm length, made of 2μm silicon dioxide sandwiched in between 2μm thick epi-silicon, and 2μm thick poly silicon, with four 400μm long legs, and springs at the four corners the bridge. The beam, and legs are 40μm, and 10μm wide respectively. Results demonstrate the bi-stability of the structure, and a large movement of 40μm between the up and down stable states can easily be obtained. Application of only 21mA electrical current for 15μs to the legs is required to switch buckled-up position to buckled-down position. An additional trapezoidal waveform electrical current of 100mA amplitude for 4μs, and 100μs falling time needs to be applied for the reverse actuation. The switching speed in both cases is less than 500μs.

  6. Optimizations on Designing High-Resolution Finite-Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Koomullil, George; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We describe a general optimization procedure for both maximizing the resolution characteristics of existing finite differencing schemes as well as designing finite difference schemes that will meet the error tolerance requirements of numerical solutions. The procedure is based on an optimization process. This is a generalization of the compact scheme introduced by Lele in which the resolution is improved for single, one-dimensional spatial derivative, whereas in the present approach the complete scheme, after spatial and temporal discretizations, is optimized on a range of parameters of the scheme and the governing equations. The approach is to linearize and Fourier analyze the discretized equations to check the resolving power of the scheme for various wave number ranges in the solution and optimize the resolution to satisfy the requirements of the problem. This represents a constrained nonlinear optimization problem which can be solved to obtain the nodal weights of discretization. An objective function is defined in the parametric space of wave numbers, Courant number, Mach number and other quantities of interest. Typical criterion for defining the objective function include the maximization of the resolution of high wave numbers for acoustic and electromagnetic wave propagations and turbulence calculations. The procedure is being tested on off-design conditions of non-uniform mesh, non-periodic boundary conditions, and non-constant wave speeds for scalar and system of equations. This includes the solution of wave equations and Euler equations using a conventional scheme with and without optimization and the design of an optimum scheme for the specified error tolerance.

  7. A finite-difference contrast source inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, A.; Hu, W.; van den Berg, P. M.; Habashy, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    We present a contrast source inversion (CSI) algorithm using a finite-difference (FD) approach as its backbone for reconstructing the unknown material properties of inhomogeneous objects embedded in a known inhomogeneous background medium. Unlike the CSI method using the integral equation (IE) approach, the FD-CSI method can readily employ an arbitrary inhomogeneous medium as its background. The ability to use an inhomogeneous background medium has made this algorithm very suitable to be used in through-wall imaging and time-lapse inversion applications. Similar to the IE-CSI algorithm the unknown contrast sources and contrast function are updated alternately to reconstruct the unknown objects without requiring the solution of the full forward problem at each iteration step in the optimization process. The FD solver is formulated in the frequency domain and it is equipped with a perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition. The FD operator used in the FD-CSI method is only dependent on the background medium and the frequency of operation, thus it does not change throughout the inversion process. Therefore, at least for the two-dimensional (2D) configurations, where the size of the stiffness matrix is manageable, the FD stiffness matrix can be inverted using a non-iterative inversion matrix approach such as a Gauss elimination method for the sparse matrix. In this case, an LU decomposition needs to be done only once and can then be reused for multiple source positions and in successive iterations of the inversion. Numerical experiments show that this FD-CSI algorithm has an excellent performance for inverting inhomogeneous objects embedded in an inhomogeneous background medium.

  8. Time-Domain Simulation of Three Dimensional Quantum Wires.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Dennis M; Mossman, Sean; Kuzyk, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of quantum wires. This is a true three-dimensional method based on a direct implementation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. It makes no approximations to the Schrödinger equation other than the finite-difference approximation of the space and time derivatives. The accuracy of our method is tested by comparing it to analytical results in a cylindrical wire. PMID:27124603

  9. Solution of electromagnetic scattering problems using time domain techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    New methods are developed to calculate the electromagnetic diffraction or scattering characteristics of objects of arbitrary material and shape. The methods extend the efforts of previous researchers in the use of finite-difference and pulse response techniques. Examples are given of the scattering from infinite conducting and nonconducting cylinders, open channel, sphere, cone, cone sphere, coated disk, open boxes, and open and closed finite cylinders with axially incident waves.

  10. Time-Domain Simulation of Three Dimensional Quantum Wires

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, Sean; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of quantum wires. This is a true three-dimensional method based on a direct implementation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. It makes no approximations to the Schrödinger equation other than the finite-difference approximation of the space and time derivatives. The accuracy of our method is tested by comparing it to analytical results in a cylindrical wire. PMID:27124603

  11. Hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and finite-difference simulation of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, Kannan; Ganguly, Suvankar; Feichtinger, Christian; Rüde, Ulrich

    2011-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) transient mathematical model is developed to simulate electroosmotic flows (EOFs) in a homogeneous, square cross-section microchannel, with and without considering the effects of axial pressure gradients. The general governing equations for electroosmotic transport are incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for electric potential distribution within the channel. In the present numerical approach, the hydrodynamic equations are solved using a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) algorithm and the PB equation is solved using a finite-difference (FD) method. The hybrid LB-FD numerical scheme is implemented on an iterative framework solving the system of coupled time-dependent partial differential equations subjected to the pertinent boundary conditions. Transient behavior of the EOF and effects due to the variations of different physicochemical parameters on the electroosmotic velocity profile are investigated. Transport characteristics for the case of combined electroosmotic- and pressure-driven microflows are also examined with the present model. For the sake of comparison, the cases of both favorable and adverse pressure gradients are considered. EOF behaviors of the non-Newtonian fluid are studied through implementation of the power-law model in the 3D LB algorithm devised for the fluid flow analysis. Numerical simulations reveal that the rheological characteristic of the fluid changes the EOF pattern to a considerable extent and can have significant consequences in the design of electroosmotically actuated bio-microfluidic systems. To improve the performance of the numerical solver, the proposed algorithm is implemented for parallel computing architectures and the overall parallel performance is found to improve with the number of processors.

  12. Finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes with constrained transport for ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, Andrew J.; Rossmanith, James A.; Tang, Qi

    2014-07-01

    In this work we develop a class of high-order finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (FD-WENO) schemes for solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D and 3D. The philosophy of this work is to use efficient high-order WENO spatial discretizations with high-order strong stability-preserving Runge-Kutta (SSP-RK) time-stepping schemes. Numerical results have shown that with such methods we are able to resolve solution structures that are only visible at much higher grid resolutions with lower-order schemes. The key challenge in applying such methods to ideal MHD is to control divergence errors in the magnetic field. We achieve this by augmenting the base scheme with a novel high-order constrained transport approach that updates the magnetic vector potential. The predicted magnetic field from the base scheme is replaced by a divergence-free magnetic field that is obtained from the curl of this magnetic potential. The non-conservative weakly hyperbolic system that the magnetic vector potential satisfies is solved using a version of FD-WENO developed for Hamilton-Jacobi equations. The resulting numerical method is endowed with several important properties: (1) all quantities, including all components of the magnetic field and magnetic potential, are treated as point values on the same mesh (i.e., there is no mesh staggering); (2) both the spatial and temporal orders of accuracy are fourth-order; (3) no spatial integration or multidimensional reconstructions are needed in any step; and (4) special limiters in the magnetic vector potential update are used to control unphysical oscillations in the magnetic field. Several 2D and 3D numerical examples are presented to verify the order of accuracy on smooth test problems and to show high-resolution on test problems that involve shocks.

  13. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. J.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation, a new non-hydrostatic (NH) dynamical core using the spectral element method (SEM) in the horizontal discretization and the finite difference method (FDM) in the vertical discretization will be presented. By using horizontal SEM, which decomposes the physical domain into smaller pieces with a small communication stencil, we can achieve a high level of scalability. Also by using vertical FDM, we provide an easy way for coupling the dynamics and existing physics packages. The Euler equations used here are in a flux form based on the hybrid sigma hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate, which are similar to those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Within these Euler equations, we use a time-split third-order Runge-Kutta (RK3) for the time discretization. In order to establish robustness, firstly the NH dynamical core is verified in a simplified two dimensional (2D) slice framework by conducting widely used standard benchmark tests, and then we verify the global three dimensional (3D) dynamical core on the cubed-sphere grid with several test cases introduced by Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP).

  14. High-Accuracy Finite Difference Equations for Simulation of Photonic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.

    1999-04-23

    Progress towards the development of such algorithms as been reported for waveguide analysis'-3and vertical-cavity laser simulation. In all these cases, the higher accuracy order was obtained for a single spatial dimension. More recently, this concept was extended to differencing of the Helmholtz Equation on a 2-D grid, with uniform regions treated to 4th order and dielectric interfaces to 3'd order5. No attempt was made to treat corners properly. In this talk I will describe the extension of this concept to allow differencing of the Helmholtz Equation on a 2-D grid to 6* order in uniform regions and 5* order at dielectric interfaces. In addition, the first known derivation of a finite difference equation for a dielectric comer that allows correct satisfaction of all boundary conditions will be presented. This equation is only accurate to first order, but as will be shown, results in simulations that are third-order-accurate. In contrast to a previous approach3 that utilized a generalized Douglas scheme to increase the accuracy order of the difference second derivative, the present method invokes the Helmholtz Equation itself to convert derivatives of high order in a single direction into mixed

  15. A finite difference method with reciprocity used to incorporate anisotropy in electroencephalogram dipole source localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallez, Hans; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Hese, Peter; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Van de Walle, Rik

    2005-08-01

    Many implementations of electroencephalogram (EEG) dipole source localization neglect the anisotropical conductivities inherent to brain tissues, such as the skull and white matter anisotropy. An examination of dipole localization errors is made in EEG source analysis, due to not incorporating the anisotropic properties of the conductivity of the skull and white matter. First, simulations were performed in a 5 shell spherical head model using the analytical formula. Test dipoles were placed in three orthogonal planes in the spherical head model. Neglecting the skull anisotropy results in a dipole localization error of, on average, 13.73 mm with a maximum of 24.51 mm. For white matter anisotropy these values are 11.21 mm and 26.3 mm, respectively. Next, a finite difference method (FDM), presented by Saleheen and Kwong (1997 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 44 800-9), is used to incorporate the anisotropy of the skull and white matter. The FDM method has been validated for EEG dipole source localization in head models with all compartments isotropic as well as in a head model with white matter anisotropy. In a head model with skull anisotropy the numerical method could only be validated if the 3D lattice was chosen very fine (grid size <=2 mm).

  16. A software implementation for detailed volume conductor modelling in electrophysiology using finite difference method.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P; Hyttinen, J; Laarne, P; Malmivuo, J

    1999-02-01

    There is an evolving need for new information available by employing patient tailored anatomically accurate computer models of the electrical properties of the human body. Because construction of a computer model can be difficult and laborious to perform sufficiently well, devised models have varied greatly in the level of anatomical accuracy incorporated in them. This has restricted the validity of conducted simulations. In the present study, a versatile software package was developed to transform anatomic voxel data into accurate finite difference method volume conductor models conveniently and in a short time. The package includes components for model construction, simulation, visualisation and detailed analysis of simulation output based on volume conductor theory. Due to the methods developed, models can comprise more anatomical details than the prior computer models. Several models have been constructed, for example, a highly detailed 3-D anatomically accurate computer model of the human thorax as a volume conductor utilising the US National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Visible Human Man (VHM) digital anatomy data. Based on the validation runs the developed software package is readily applicable in analysis of a wide range of bioelectric field problems. PMID:10092033

  17. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  18. Improved time-domain accuracy standards for model gravitational waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, Lee; Baker, John G.

    2010-10-15

    Model gravitational waveforms must be accurate enough to be useful for detection of signals and measurement of their parameters, so appropriate accuracy standards are needed. Yet these standards should not be unnecessarily restrictive, making them impractical for the numerical and analytical modelers to meet. The work of Lindblom, Owen, and Brown [Phys. Rev. D 78, 124020 (2008)] is extended by deriving new waveform accuracy standards which are significantly less restrictive while still ensuring the quality needed for gravitational-wave data analysis. These new standards are formulated as bounds on certain norms of the time-domain waveform errors, which makes it possible to enforce them in situations where frequency-domain errors may be difficult or impossible to estimate reliably. These standards are less restrictive by about a factor of 20 than the previously published time-domain standards for detection, and up to a factor of 60 for measurement. These new standards should therefore be much easier to use effectively.

  19. Time Domain Partitioning of Electricity Production Cost Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, C.; Hummon, M.; Jones, W.; Hale, E.

    2014-01-01

    Production cost models are often used for planning by simulating power system operations over long time horizons. The simulation of a day-ahead energy market can take several weeks to compute. Tractability improvements are often made through model simplifications, such as: reductions in transmission modeling detail, relaxation of commitment variable integrality, reductions in cost modeling detail, etc. One common simplification is to partition the simulation horizon so that weekly or monthly horizons can be simulated in parallel. However, horizon partitions are often executed with overlap periods of arbitrary and sometimes zero length. We calculate the time domain persistence of historical unit commitment decisions to inform time domain partitioning of production cost models. The results are implemented using PLEXOS production cost modeling software in an HPC environment to improve the computation time of simulations while maintaining solution integrity.

  20. THz time domain spectroscopy of biomolecular conformational modes.

    PubMed

    Markelz, Andrea; Whitmire, Scott; Hillebrecht, Jay; Birge, Robert

    2002-11-01

    We discuss the use of terahertz time domain spectroscopy for studies of conformational flexibility and conformational change in biomolecules. Protein structural dynamics are vital to biological function with protein flexibility affecting enzymatic reaction rates and sensory transduction cycling times. Conformational mode dynamics occur on the picosecond timescale and with the collective vibrational modes associated with these large scale structural motions in the 1-100 cm(-1) range. We have performed THz time domain spectroscopy (TTDS) of several biomolecular systems to explore the sensitivity of TTDS to distinguish different molecular species, different mutations within a single species and different conformations of a given biomolecule. We compare the measured absorbances to normal mode calculations and find that the TTDS absorbance reflects the density of normal modes determined by molecular mechanics calculations, and is sensitive to both conformation and mutation. These early studies demonstrate some of the advantages and limitations of using TTDS for the study of biomolecules. PMID:12452570

  1. Technical and Observational Challenges for Future Time-Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Joshua S.

    2012-04-01

    By the end of the last decade, robotic telescopes were established as effective alternatives to the traditional role of astronomer in planning, conducting and reducing time-domain observations. By the end of this decade, machines will play a much more central role in the discovery and classification of time-domain events observed by such robots. While this abstraction of humans away from the real-time loop (and the nightly slog of the nominal scientific process) is inevitable, just how we will get there as a community is uncertain. I discuss the importance of machine learning in astronomy today, and project where we might consider heading in the future. I will also touch on the role of people and organisations in shaping and maximising the scientific returns of the coming data deluge.

  2. Broadband Trailing Edge Noise Predictions in the Time Domain. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay; Farassat, Fereidoun

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed analytic result in acoustics, "Formulation 1B," is used to compute broadband trailing edge noise from an unsteady surface pressure distribution on a thin airfoil in the time domain. This formulation is a new solution of the Ffowcs Willliams-Hawkings equation with the loading source term, and has been shown in previous research to provide time domain predictions of broadband noise that are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, this formulation lends itself readily to rotating reference frames and statistical analysis of broadband trailing edge noise. Formulation 1B is used to calculate the far field noise radiated from the trailing edge of a NACA 0012 airfoil in low Mach number flows, by using both analytical and experimental data on the airfoil surface. The acoustic predictions are compared with analytical results and experimental measurements that are available in the literature. Good agreement between predictions and measurements is obtained.

  3. Using the VO to Study the Time Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Rob; Williams, Roy; Graham, Matthew; Murphy, Tara

    2012-04-01

    Just as the astronomical ``Time Domain'' is a catch-phrase for a diverse group of different science objectives involving time-varying phenomena in all astrophysical régimes from the solar system to cosmological scales, so the ``Virtual Observatory'' is a complex set of community-wide activities from archives to astroinformatics. This workshop touched on some aspects of adapting and developing those semantic and network technologies in order to address transient and time-domain research challenges. It discussed the VOEvent format for representing alerts and reports on celestial transient events, the SkyAlert and ATELstream facilities for distributing these alerts, and the IVOA time-series protocol and time-series tools provided by the VAO. Those tools and infrastructure are available today to address the real-world needs of astronomers.

  4. THz time-domain spectroscopy imaging for mail inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liquan; Wang, Zhongdong; Ma, Yanmei; Hao, Erjuan

    2011-08-01

    Acquiring messages from the mail but not destroying the envelope is a big challenge in the war of intelligence. If one can read the message of the mail when the envelope is closed, he will benefit from the message asymmetry and be on a good wicket in the competition. In this paper, we presented a transmitted imaging system using THz time-domain spectroscopy technology. We applied the system to image the mail inside an envelope by step-scanning imaging technology. The experimental results show that the THz spectroscopy can image the mail in an envelope. The words in the paper can be identified easily from the background. We also present the THz image of a metal blade in the envelope, in which we can see the metal blade clearly. The results show that it is feasible of THz Time-Domain Spectroscopy Imaging for mail inspection applications.

  5. Broadband trailing edge noise predictions in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, J.; Farassat, F.

    2004-03-01

    A recently developed analytic result in acoustics, "Formulation 1B," is used to compute broadband trailing edge noise from an unsteady surface pressure distribution on a thin airfoil in the time domain. This formulation is a new solution of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with the loading source term, and has been shown in previous research to provide time domain predictions of broadband noise that are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, this formulation lends itself readily to rotating reference frames and statistical analysis of broadband trailing edge noise. In the present work, Formulation 1B is used to calculate the farfield noise radiated from the trailing edge of a NACA 0012 airfoil in a low Mach number flow, using both analytical and experimental data on the airfoil surface. The acoustic predictions are compared with analytical results and experimental measurements that are available in the literature. Good agreement between predictions and measurements is obtained.

  6. Picosecond time-domain electromagnetic scattering from conducting cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, W. M.; Kopcsay, G. V.; Arjavalingam, G.

    1991-12-01

    The microwave scattering properties of conducting cylinders are characterized by measuring their response to picosecond-duration electromagnetic pulses. The ultrafast electromagnetic transients are generated and detected with optoelectronically pulsed antennas. The time-domain response gives physical insight into the scattering process. In addition, Fourier analysis is used to obtain the frequency dependence of the scattered amplitude and phase from 15 to 140 GHz.

  7. Photonic-crystal time-domain simulations using Wannier functions.

    PubMed

    Blum, Christian; Wolff, Christian; Busch, Kurt

    2011-01-15

    We present a Wannier-function-based time-domain method for photonic-crystal integrated optical circuits. In contrast to other approaches, this method allows one to trade CPU time against memory consumption and therefore is particularly well suited for the treatment of large-scale systems. As an illustration, we apply the method to the design of a photonic-crystal-based sensor, which utilizes a dual Mach-Zehnder-Fano interferometer. PMID:21263535

  8. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of gases, liquids, and solids.

    PubMed

    Theuer, Michael; Harsha, Srikantaiah Sree; Molter, Daniel; Torosyan, Garik; Beigang, René

    2011-10-24

    The techniques and methods employed in the spectroscopic characterization of gases, liquids, and solids in the terahertz frequency range are reviewed. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to address a broadband frequency range between 100 GHz and 5 THz with a sub-10 GHz frequency resolution. The unique spectral absorption features measured can be efficiently used in material identification and sensing. Possibilities and limitations of fundamental and industrial applications are discussed. PMID:21735510

  9. Historical Time-Domain: Data Archives, Processing, and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Griffin, R. Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The workshop on Historical Time-Domain Astronomy (TDA) was attended by a near-capacity gathering of ~30 people. From information provided in turn by those present, an up-to-date overview was created of available plate archives, progress in their digitization, the extent of actual processing of those data, and plans for data distribution. Several recommendations were made for prioritising the processing and distribution of historical TDA data.

  10. A first-order time-domain Green's function approach to supersonic unsteady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. I.; Tseng, K.

    1985-01-01

    A time-domain Green's Function Method for unsteady supersonic potential flow around complex aircraft configurations is presented. The focus is on the supersonic range wherein the linear potential flow assumption is valid. The Green's function method is employed in order to convert the potential-flow differential equation into an integral one. This integral equation is then discretized, in space through standard finite-element technique, and in time through finite-difference, to yield a linear algebraic system of equations relating the unknown potential to its prescribed co-normalwash (boundary condition) on the surface of the aircraft. The arbitrary complex aircraft configuration is discretized into hyperboloidal (twisted quadrilateral) panels. The potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly within each panel. Consistent with the spatial linear (first-order) finite-element approximations, the potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly in time. The long range goal of our research is to develop a comprehensive theory for unsteady supersonic potential aerodynamics which is capable of yielding accurate results even in the low supersonic (i.e., high transonic) range.

  11. Transverse Mode Dynamics of VCSELs Through Space-Time Domain Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Modeling and simulation are important to understand laser operation and to optimize and design device functions. Numerical simulation of VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers) has been largely based on solving time-independent Helmholtz equation or time dependent coupled mode equations. There are various advantages for choosing these approaches. However, the disadvantages are also apparent. The former cannot handle dynamical mode competition seen in VCSELs, while the latter assumes a given type and number of modes a priori. Furthermore, the microscopic physics of heterstructures and electron-hole plasma is very often represented by a few parameters such as linear gain coefficients and the linewidth enhancement factor. These are over simplification of space and frequency (wavelength) dependent gain and refractive index functions. When the space-time dynamical operation of VCSELs becomes important, these simple approximations become questionable. In this paper, we apply a recently developed model for edge-emitting lasers to a gain guided VCSEL for space-time domain simulation. This model takes into account the actual nonlinear dependence of gain and refractive index on frequency and carrier density within the frame work of the effective Bloch equations. The corresponding partial differential equations are solved directly by finite difference methods. Laser behavior with increasing pumping current is investigated in detail. Special attention is paid to the dynamical competition of the transverse modes.

  12. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  13. Terahertz-bandwidth pulses for coherent time-domain spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, J.F.; Gao, F.; Liu, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Ultrashort pulses of electromagnetic radiation propagating through free space are used to perform coherent time-domain spectroscopy by probing the complex index of refraction of various materials, in particular thin films of high-critical-temperature superconductors and the microwave substrates the support them. The terahertz beam system utilizes Hertz ion-dipole-like antennas consisting of a dc-biased photoconductive gap in a coplanar stripline as a transmitter, and an identical receiver with a photoconductive gap biased by the THz radiation. The transmitter is driven to produce the short radiation bursts by a 100-fs optical pulse from a Ti:sapphire self-mode-locked laser, while the receiver is synchronously gated by laser pulses split from the original beam. By performing measurements in the time domain and transforming data to the frequency domain, both the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction of dielectrics and the conductivity of superconductors are determined over the entire range from {approximately}200 GHz to several terahertz. This technique allows the direct broadband determination of these quantities in the millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave regimes from the measurement of only a few time-domain waveforms and without the need for Kramers-Kroenig analysis or complicated processing.

  14. High frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy

    2013-12-01

    A new method for the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is developed based on the characteristic matrix method. This method is useful for studying planar samples or stack of planar samples. The terahertz radiation was generated by optical rectification in a ZnTe crystal and detected by another ZnTe crystal via electro-optic sampling method. In this new characteristic matrix based method, the spectra of the sample and reference waveforms will be modeled by using characteristic matrices. We applied this new method to measure the optical constants of air. The terahertz transmission through the layered systems air-Teflon-air-Quartz-air and Nitrogen gas-Teflon-Nitrogen gas-Quartz-Nitrogen gas was modeled by the characteristic matrix method. A transmission coefficient is derived from these models which was optimized to fit the experimental transmission coefficient to extract the optical constants of air. The optimization of an error function involving the experimental complex transmission coefficient and the theoretical transmission coefficient was performed using patternsearch algorithm of MATLAB. Since this method takes account of the echo waveforms due to reflections in the layered samples, this method allows analysis of longer time-domain waveforms giving rise to very high frequency resolution in the frequency-domain. We have presented the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of air and compared the results with the literature values. We have also fitted the complex susceptibility of air to the Lorentzian and Gaussian functions to extract the linewidths.

  15. A post-processing algorithm for time domain pitch trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specker, P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a powerful post-processing algorithm for time-domain pitch trackers. On two successive passes, the post-processing algorithm eliminates errors produced during a first pass by a time-domain pitch tracker. During the second pass, incorrect pitch values are detected as outliers by computing the distribution of values over a sliding 80 msec window. During the third pass (based on artificial intelligence techniques), remaining pitch pulses are used as anchor points to reconstruct the pitch train from the original waveform. The algorithm produced a decrease in the error rate from 21% obtained with the original time domain pitch tracker to 2% for isolated words and sentences produced in an office environment by 3 male and 3 female talkers. In a noisy computer room errors decreased from 52% to 2.9% for the same stimuli produced by 2 male talkers. The algorithm is efficient, accurate, and resistant to noise. The fundamental frequency micro-structure is tracked sufficiently well to be used in extracting phonetic features in a feature-based recognition system.

  16. A multilevel Cartesian non-uniform grid time domain algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Jun; Boag, Amir; Lomakin, Vitaliy; Michielssen, Eric

    2010-11-01

    A multilevel Cartesian non-uniform grid time domain algorithm (CNGTDA) is introduced to rapidly compute transient wave fields radiated by time dependent three-dimensional source constellations. CNGTDA leverages the observation that transient wave fields generated by temporally bandlimited and spatially confined source constellations can be recovered via interpolation from appropriately delay- and amplitude-compensated field samples. This property is used in conjunction with a multilevel scheme, in which the computational domain is hierarchically decomposed into subdomains with sparse non-uniform grids used to obtain the fields. For both surface and volumetric source distributions, the computational cost of CNGTDA to compute the transient field at N{sub s} observation locations from N{sub s} collocated sources for N{sub t} discrete time instances scales as O(N{sub t}N{sub s}logN{sub s}) and O(N{sub t}N{sub s}log{sup 2}N{sub s}) in the low- and high-frequency regimes, respectively. Coupled with marching-on-in-time (MOT) time domain integral equations, CNGTDA can facilitate efficient analysis of large scale time domain electromagnetic and acoustic problems.

  17. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  18. Three-Dimensional Finite Difference Simulation of Ground Motions from the August 24, 2014 South Napa Earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, Arthur J.; Dreger, Douglas S.; Pitarka, Arben

    2015-06-15

    We performed three-dimensional (3D) anelastic ground motion simulations of the South Napa earthquake to investigate the performance of different finite rupture models and the effects of 3D structure on the observed wavefield. We considered rupture models reported by Dreger et al. (2015), Ji et al., (2015), Wei et al. (2015) and Melgar et al. (2015). We used the SW4 anelastic finite difference code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Petersson and Sjogreen, 2013) and distributed by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics. This code can compute the seismic response for fully 3D sub-surface models, including surface topography and linear anelasticity. We use the 3D geologic/seismic model of the San Francisco Bay Area developed by the United States Geological Survey (Aagaard et al., 2008, 2010). Evaluation of earlier versions of this model indicated that the structure can reproduce main features of observed waveforms from moderate earthquakes (Rodgers et al., 2008; Kim et al., 2010). Simulations were performed for a domain covering local distances (< 25 km) and resolution providing simulated ground motions valid to 1 Hz.

  19. High-order entropy stable finite difference schemes for nonlinear conservation laws: Finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference operators including boundary closure stencils, for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A comparison technique is used to derive a new Entropy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (SSWENO) finite difference method, appropriate for simulations of problems with shocks. Viscous terms are approximated using conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference operators. The efficacy of the new discrete operators is demonstrated using both smooth and discontinuous test cases.

  20. A total variation diminishing finite difference algorithm for sonic boom propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.

    1993-01-01

    It is difficult to accurately model the rise phases of sonic boom waveforms with traditional finite difference algorithms because of finite difference phase dispersion. This paper introduces the concept of a total variation diminishing (TVD) finite difference method as a tool for accurately modeling the rise phases of sonic booms. A standard second order finite difference algorithm and its TVD modified counterpart are both applied to the one-way propagation of a square pulse. The TVD method clearly outperforms the non-TVD method, showing great potential as a new computational tool in the analysis of sonic boom propagation.

  1. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  2. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  3. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  4. A low-power time-domain VCO-based ADC in 65 nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenluan, Wang; Shengxi, Diao; Fujiang, Lin

    2014-10-01

    A low-power, high-FoM (figure of merit), time-domain VCO (voltage controlled oscillator)-based ADC (analog-to-digital converter) in 65 nm CMOS technology is proposed. An asynchronous sigma—delta modulator (ASDM) is used to convert the voltage input signal to a square wave time signal, where the information is contained in its pulse-width. A time-domain quantizer, which uses VCO to convert voltage to frequency, is adopted, while the XOR (exclusive-OR) gate circuits convert the frequency information to digital representatives. The ASDM does not need an external clock, so there is no quantization noise. At the same time, the ASDM applies a harmonic-distortion-cancellation technique to its transconductance stage, which increases the SNDR (signal to noise and distortion ratio) performance of the ASDM. Since the output of the ASDM is a two-level voltage signal, the VCO's V—F (voltage to frequency) conversion curve is always linear. The XOR phase quantizer has an inherent feature of first-order noise-shaping. It puts the ADC's low-frequency output noise to high-frequency which is further filtered out by a low-pass filter. The proposed ADC achieves an SNR/SNDR of 54. dB/54.3 dB in the 8 MHz bandwidth, while consuming 2.8 mW. The FoM of the proposed ADC is a 334 fJ/conv-step.

  5. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  6. Non-linear Conjugate Gradient Time-Domain Controlled Inversion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Commer, Michael

    2006-11-16

    Software that simulates and inverts time-domain electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a step-wise source signal from either galvanic (grounded wires) or inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria. The software is an upgrade from the code TEM3D ver. 2.0. The upgrade includes the following components: (1) Improved (faster)memory access during gradient computation. (2) Data parellelization scheme: Multiple transmitters (sources) can be distributed accross several banks of processors (daa-planes). Similarly, the receivers of each source are also distributed accross the corresponding data-plane. (3) Improved data-IO.

  7. Non-linear Conjugate Gradient Time-Domain Controlled Inversion Source

    2006-11-16

    Software that simulates and inverts time-domain electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a step-wise source signal from either galvanic (grounded wires) or inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code TEM3D ver. 2.0. The upgrade includes the following components: (1) Improved (faster)memory access during gradient computation. (2) Data parellelization scheme: Multiple transmitters (sources) can be distributed accross several banks of processors (daa-planes). Similarly, the receivers of each source are also distributed accross the corresponding data-plane. (3) Improved data-IO.« less

  8. Approximate analytical time-domain Green's functions for the Caputo fractional wave equation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, James F; McGough, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    The Caputo fractional wave equation [Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 13, 529-539 (1967)] models power-law attenuation and dispersion for both viscoelastic and ultrasound wave propagation. The Caputo model can be derived from an underlying fractional constitutive equation and is causal. In this study, an approximate analytical time-domain Green's function is derived for the Caputo equation in three dimensions (3D) for power law exponents greater than one. The Green's function consists of a shifted and scaled maximally skewed stable distribution multiplied by a spherical spreading factor 1/(4πR). The approximate one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) Green's functions are also computed in terms of stable distributions. Finally, this Green's function is decomposed into a loss component and a diffraction component, revealing that the Caputo wave equation may be approximated by a coupled lossless wave equation and a fractional diffusion equation. PMID:27586735

  9. GPR simulation based on complex frequency shifted recursive integration PML boundary of 3D high order FDTD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Zeng, Zhaofa; Huang, Ling; Liu, Fengshan

    2012-12-01

    When applying the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) simulation, the absorbing boundary conditions (ABC) are used to mitigate undesired reflection that can arise at the model's truncation boundaries. The classical PML boundary can make spurious reflection for the waves, such as reaching to the PML interface with near-grazing angles, low frequency waves or evanescent waves. The non-split complex frequency shifted PML which base on recursive integration (CFS-RIPML) has a good absorption effect for these interference waves. Meanwhile, the recursive integration, which does not need split field component, can overcome the shortcoming of CFS technique that needs more intermediate variable and large memory. In addition, the high-order FDTD can improve calculation accuracy and reduce the error caused by numerical dispersion effectively. In this paper, we derive the 3D high-order FDTD method with CFS-RIPML boundary and apply it in GPR simulation. The results show that the CFS-RIPML has significantly better absorption effect and lower reflections error than UPML and PML boundary. Compared with the two-order, the high-order FDTD can improve calculation accuracy effectively with the same grid size. Combination with CFS-RIPML boundary and high-order FDTD can improve the reliability and calculation accuracy of GPR and other geophysics numerical simulation.

  10. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, F.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Montaldo, G.; Marsac, L.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-05-01

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  11. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers. However, the closely spaced transmission lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and measured characteristics of novel shielding structures that significantly reduce coupling between embedded microstrip lines are presented.

  12. Detailed analysis of the effects of stencil spatial variations with arbitrary high-order finite-difference Maxwell solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, H.; Vay, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    Very high order or pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers are the method of choice to reduce discretization effects (e.g. numerical dispersion) that are inherent to low order Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) schemes. However, due to their large stencils, these solvers are often subject to truncation errors in many electromagnetic simulations. These truncation errors come from non-physical modifications of Maxwell's equations in space that may generate spurious signals affecting the overall accuracy of the simulation results. Such modifications for instance occur when Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) are used at simulation domain boundaries to simulate open media. Another example is the use of arbitrary order Maxwell solver with domain decomposition technique that may under some condition involve stencil truncations at subdomain boundaries, resulting in small spurious errors that do eventually build up. In each case, a careful evaluation of the characteristics and magnitude of the errors resulting from these approximations, and their impact at any frequency and angle, requires detailed analytical and numerical studies. To this end, we present a general analytical approach that enables the evaluation of numerical errors of fully three-dimensional arbitrary order finite-difference Maxwell solver, with arbitrary modification of the local stencil in the simulation domain. The analytical model is validated against simulations of domain decomposition technique and PMLs, when these are used with very high-order Maxwell solver, as well as in the infinite order limit of pseudo-spectral solvers. Results confirm that the new analytical approach enables exact predictions in each case. It also confirms that the domain decomposition technique can be used with very high-order Maxwell solvers and a reasonably low number of guard cells with negligible effects on the whole accuracy of the simulation.

  13. Optical characteristics of pesticides measured by terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Giyoung; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we measured the optical characteristics of pesticides by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Pesticide samples were prepared as pellets that were mixed with polyethylene powder and placed in the center of the path of a terahertz electromagnetic (EM) wave in the spectroscopy system. The absorbance of each sample showed obvious differences in absorption peaks. From this result, we showed that these pesticide products had resonance modes in the terahertz range, and this method can be used to make a sensor that is able to measure low concentrations of pesticides in farm produce.

  14. Time-domain simulation of nonlinear radiofrequency phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Austin, Travis M.; Smithe, David N.; Loverich, John; Hakim, Ammar H.

    2013-01-15

    Nonlinear effects associated with the physics of radiofrequency wave propagation through a plasma are investigated numerically in the time domain, using both fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) methods. We find favorable comparisons between parametric decay instability scenarios observed on the Alcator C-MOD experiment [J. C. Rost, M. Porkolab, and R. L. Boivin, Phys. Plasmas 9, 1262 (2002)] and PIC models. The capability of fluid models to capture important nonlinear effects characteristic of wave-plasma interaction (frequency doubling, cyclotron resonant absorption) is also demonstrated.

  15. Far-infrared terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of flames.

    PubMed

    Cheville, R A; Grischkowsky, D

    1995-08-01

    We present what is to our knowledge the first comprehensive far-infrared absorption measurement of flames. These measurements, covering the region of 7-88 wave numbers (0.2-2.65 THz) are only now made possible by the technique of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We observe a large number of absorption lines-including those of water, CH, and NH(3)-in a stationary, premixed, propane-air flame. The absorption strength permits the determination of species concentration along the beam path. The f lame temperature is determined by comparison of the relative strengths of the water vapor lines. PMID:19862111

  16. Astrophysics in the Era of Massive Time-Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, G.

    Synoptic sky surveys are now the largest data producers in astronomy, entering the Petascale regime, opening the time domain for a systematic exploration. A great variety of interesting phenomena, spanning essentially all subfields of astronomy, can only be studied in the time domain, and these new surveys are producing large statistical samples of the known types of objects and events for further studies (e.g., SNe, AGN, variable stars of many kinds), and have already uncovered previously unknown subtypes of these (e.g., rare or peculiar types of SNe). These surveys are generating a new science, and paving the way for even larger surveys to come, e.g., the LSST; our ability to fully exploit such forthcoming facilities depends critically on the science, methodology, and experience that are being accumulated now. Among the outstanding challenges, the foremost is our ability to conduct an effective follow-up of the interesting events discovered by the surveys in any wavelength regime. The follow-up resources, especially spectroscopy, are already and, for the predictable future, will be severely limited, thus requiring an intelligent down-selection of the most astrophysically interesting events to follow. The first step in that process is an automated, real-time, iterative classification of events, that incorporates heterogeneous data from the surveys themselves, archival and contextual information (spatial, temporal, and multiwavelength), and the incoming follow-up observations. The second step is an optimal automated event prioritization and allocation of the available follow-up resources that also change in time. Both of these challenges are highly non-trivial, and require a strong cyber-infrastructure based on the Virtual Observatory data grid, and the various astroinformatics efforts. Time domain astronomy is inherently an astronomy of telescope-computational systems, and will increasingly depend on novel machine learning and artificial intelligence tools

  17. A time domain, weighted residual formulation of Maxwell's equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Jeffrey L.; Brueckner, Frank P.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element model is developed and used to simulate two-dimensional electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering. The spatial discretization of the time-domain electrodynamic equations is accomplished by a Galerkin approach. The semi-discrete equations are solved explicitly using a second-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Both the electric and magnetic fields are discretized using a single grid, with the divergence-free conditions satisfied through a correction approach. Examples depicting the scattering of plane waves in 2D geometries are given to demonstrate the validity of the methodology.

  18. A multi-variance analysis in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Todd

    1993-01-01

    Recently a new technique for characterizing the noise processes affecting oscillators was introduced. This technique minimizes the difference between the estimates of several different variances and their values as predicted by the standard power law model of noise. The method outlined makes two significant advancements: it uses exclusively time domain variances so that deterministic parameters such as linear frequency drift may be estimated, and it correctly fits the estimates using the chi-square distribution. These changes permit a more accurate fitting at long time intervals where there is the least information. This technique was applied to both simulated and real data with excellent results.

  19. Detection of iron corrosion by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Wu, Di-bo; Zhan, Hong-lei; Sun, Qing; Zhao, Kun

    2015-11-01

    The iron tablets, which were exposed in salt spray with different periods, were investigated in the 0.2~2.0 THz using reflection-type terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in vacuum environment at room temperature. The sample signals are attenuated in comparison to the reference signals with increasing the corrosion time. The THz spectroscopy peak EP and reflectivity (R) of samples strongly depended on corrosion time t with EP ∝ t-1 and R ∝ t-1. The THz characteristics of iron sheets in salt spray indicate that reflection THz-TDS will contribute to the development of non-destructive testing of corrosion in pipelines.

  20. Time domain analysis of scattering by a water droplet.

    PubMed

    Laven, Philip

    2011-10-01

    Rainbows, coronas and glories are caused by the scattering of sunlight from water droplets in the atmosphere. Although these optical phenomena are seen fairly frequently, even scientifically minded people sometimes struggle to provide explanations for their formation. This paper offers explanations of these phenomena based on numerical computations of the scattering of a 5 fs pulse of red light by a spherical droplet of water. The results reveal the intricate details of the various scattering mechanisms, some of which are essentially undetectable except in the time domain. PMID:22016243

  1. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  2. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  3. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  4. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  5. Prediction of acoustic scattering in the time domain and its applications to rotorcraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seongkyu

    the numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observer cases. The formulation for the pressure gradient is first used to predict acoustic scattering in the frequency domain. The prediction is validated with the exact solution for acoustic scattering generated by a monopole source by a stationary sphere. A Bo105 helicopter and a notional heavy lift quad tilt rotor are considered to demonstrate a potential significance of acoustic scattering of rotorcraft noise. NASA's Fast Scattering Code is used for the frequency-domain scattering solver. Secondly, a new and efficient time domain acoustic scattering method using a moving equivalent source is developed to predict acoustic scattering in the time domain efficiently. The time-domain method provides entire frequency solutions in a single computation and is able to predict acoustic scattering of aperiodic signals. The method assumes an acoustically rigid surface for a scattering body and neglects the refraction effect by non-uniform flow around the scattering body. The pressure-gradient boundary condition is determined on a scattering surface and then the scattered field is calculated by using equivalent sources located within the scattering surface. Linear shape functions are used to discretize the strength of the equivalent sources in time and singular value decomposition is used to overcome potential numerical instability. The detailed numerical algorithm is addressed in the thesis. The method is more efficient numerically and easier to implement than other time-domain methods using a finite difference scheme or boundary integral equations because it is not necessary to find the solution in the entire domain, it uses a fewer number of equivalent sources than the surface mesh points, and it does not involve surface integrals. The method is validated against exact solutions for various cases including a single frequency monopole source, a dipole source, multiple sources, beat, and broadband noise sources

  6. The Benard problem: A comparison of finite difference and spectral collocation eigen value solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee; Mccaughan, Frances E.; Fitzmaurice, Nessan

    1995-01-01

    The application of spectral methods, using a Chebyshev collocation scheme, to solve hydrodynamic stability problems is demonstrated on the Benard problem. Implementation of the Chebyshev collocation formulation is described. The performance of the spectral scheme is compared with that of a 2nd order finite difference scheme. An exact solution to the Marangoni-Benard problem is used to evaluate the performance of both schemes. The error of the spectral scheme is at least seven orders of magnitude smaller than finite difference error for a grid resolution of N = 15 (number of points used). The performance of the spectral formulation far exceeded the performance of the finite difference formulation for this problem. The spectral scheme required only slightly more effort to set up than the 2nd order finite difference scheme. This suggests that the spectral scheme may actually be faster to implement than higher order finite difference schemes.

  7. Polyethylenimine-interlayered core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres as versatile SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongwen; Li, Ping; Wang, Junfeng; Rong, Zhen; Pang, Yuanfeng; Xu, Jiawen; Dong, Peitao; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2015-11-01

    Precise fabrication of subtle nanogaps amid individual nanoparticles or between adjacent ones to obtain the highest SERS enhancement is still a challenge. Here, we reported a novel approach for fabricating core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres (CSSM), that easily form a porous 1.5 nm PEI interlayer to accommodate molecules and create sufficient hotspots between the inner Fe3O4@Ag core and outer assembled Au@Ag satellites. Experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation demonstrated that the enhancement factor (EF) was about 2.03 × 108 and 6.25 × 106, respectively. In addition, the micro-scale magnetic core endowed the CSSM with a superior magnetic nature, which enabled easy separation and further enhanced Raman signals due to enrichment of targeted analytes and abundant interparticle hotspots created by magnetism-induced aggregation. Our results further demonstrated that the CSSM is expected to be a versatile SERS substrate, which has been verified by the detection of the adsorbed pesticide thiram and the non-adsorbed pesticide paraquat with a detection limit as low as 5 × 10-12 M and 1 × 10-10 M, respectively. The novel CSSM can overcome the long-standing limitations of SERS for the trace characterization of various analytes in different solutions and promises to transform SERS into a practical analytical technique.Precise fabrication of subtle nanogaps amid individual nanoparticles or between adjacent ones to obtain the highest SERS enhancement is still a challenge. Here, we reported a novel approach for fabricating core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres (CSSM), that easily form a porous 1.5 nm PEI interlayer to accommodate molecules and create sufficient hotspots between the inner Fe3O4@Ag core and outer assembled Au@Ag satellites. Experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation demonstrated that the enhancement factor (EF) was about 2.03 × 108 and 6.25 × 106, respectively. In addition, the micro

  8. LIMSAT: An Ultra-violet Time Domain Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinney, E. S.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ofek, E.; Waxman, E.; Scargle, J.; Worden, S.; Murthy, J.

    2013-01-01

    LIMSAT is a proposed joint US-Israel mini satellite aimed at systematic time domain studies of the UV Universe. The satellite consists of eight 12cm telescopes with a total instantaneous field of view of about 1100 square degrees in the spectral band 200-240nm. A sun-synchronous orbit allows continuous viewing of the anti-sun equatorial region. In one year LIMSAT would have covered an equatorial band (about 2.5% of the sky), providing about one month of continuous photometry of all objects in this field, with all data downlinked within 10 minutes of acquisition. While the primary objective of LIMSAT is the detection of shock breakout, secondary objectives include searches for tidal disruption of stars passing perilously close to nuclear black holes, systematic study of variability of AGN, cataclysmic variables, activity studies of young stars and late type stars, unique studies of extra-solar planets and eclipsing binaries. LIMSAT working along with ground-based synoptic surveys will usher in a new era of time domain studies.

  9. Time-domain spectroscopy in the mid-infrared

    PubMed Central

    Lanin, A. A.; Voronin, A. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    When coupled to characteristic, fingerprint vibrational and rotational motions of molecules, an electromagnetic field with an appropriate frequency and waveform offers a highly sensitive, highly informative probe, enabling chemically specific studies on a broad class of systems in physics, chemistry, biology, geosciences, and medicine. The frequencies of these signature molecular modes, however, lie in a region where accurate spectroscopic measurements are extremely difficult because of the lack of efficient detectors and spectrometers. Here, we show that, with a combination of advanced ultrafast technologies and nonlinear-optical waveform characterization, time-domain techniques can be advantageously extended to the metrology of fundamental molecular motions in the mid-infrared. In our scheme, the spectral modulation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses, induced by rovibrational motions of molecules, gives rise to interfering coherent dark waveforms in the time domain. These high-visibility interference patterns can be read out by cross-correlation frequency-resolved gating of the field in the visible generated through ultrabroadband four-wave mixing in a gas phase. PMID:25327294

  10. Time-domain diffuse optics: towards next generation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, Davide; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Arridge, Simon; Martelli, Fabrizio; Tosi, Alberto; Boso, Gianluca; Farina, Andrea; Durduran, Turgut; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse optics is a powerful tool for clinical applications ranging from oncology to neurology, but also for molecular imaging, and quality assessment of food, wood and pharmaceuticals. We show that ideally time-domain diffuse optics can give higher contrast and a higher penetration depth with respect to standard technology. In order to completely exploit the advantages of a time-domain system a distribution of sources and detectors with fast gating capabilities covering all the sample surface is needed. Here, we present the building block to build up such system. This basic component is made of a miniaturised source-detector pair embedded into the probe based on pulsed Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSEL) as sources and Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD) or Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as detectors. The possibility to miniaturized and dramatically increase the number of source detectors pairs open the way to an advancement of diffuse optics in terms of improvement of performances and exploration of new applications. Furthermore, availability of compact devices with reduction in size and cost can boost the application of this technique.

  11. A Time Domain Fluorescence Tomography System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Scott B.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the application of a time domain diffuse fluorescence tomography system for whole body small animal imaging. The key features of the system are the use of point excitation in free space using ultrashort laser pulses and noncontact detection using a gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Mouse shaped epoxy phantoms, with embedded fluorescent inclusions, were used to verify the performance of a recently developed asymptotic lifetime-based tomography algorithm. The asymptotic algorithm is based on a multiexponential analysis of the decay portion of the data. The multiexponential model is shown to enable the use of a global analysis approach for a robust recovery of the lifetime components present within the imaging medium. The surface boundaries of the imaging volume were acquired using a photogrammetric camera integrated with the imaging system, and implemented in a Monte-Carlo model of photon propagation in tissue. The tomography results show that the asymptotic approach is able to separate axially located fluorescent inclusions centered at depths of 4 and 10 mm from the surface of the mouse phantom. The fluorescent inclusions had distinct lifetimes of 0.5 and 0.95 ns. The inclusions were nearly overlapping along the measurement axis and shown to be not resolvable using continuous wave (CW) methods. These results suggest the practical feasibility and advantages of a time domain approach for whole body small animal fluorescence molecular imaging, particularly with the use of lifetime as a contrast mechanism. PMID:18672432

  12. Time-domain analysis of scrotal thermoregulatory impairment in varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Enas; Orlando, Giuseppe; Pompa, Paolo; Gabrielli, Daniela; Di Donato, Luigino; Cardone, Daniela; Merla, Arcangelo

    2014-01-01

    Varicocele is a common male disease defined as the pathological dilatation of the pampiniform plexus and scrotal veins with venous blood reflux. Varicocele usually impairs the scrotal thermoregulation via a hemodynamic alteration, thus inducing an increase in cutaneous temperature. The investigation of altered scrotal thermoregulation by means of thermal infrared imaging has been proved to be useful in the study of the functional thermal impairment. In this study, we use the Control System Theory to analyze the time-domain dynamics of the scrotal thermoregulation in response to a mild cold challenge. Four standard time-domain dynamic parameters of a prototype second order control system (Delay Time, Rise Time, closed poles locations, steady state error) and the static basal temperatures were directly estimated from thermal recovery curves. Thermal infrared imaging data from 31 healthy controls (HCS) and 95 varicocele patients were processed. True-positive predictions, by comparison with standard echo color Doppler findings, higher than 87% were achieved into the proper classification of the disease stage. The proposed approach could help to understand at which specific level the presence of the disease impacts the scrotal thermoregulation, which is also involved into normal spermatogenesis process. PMID:25278903

  13. Time-domain fitting of battery electrochemical impedance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, S. M. M.; Birkl, C. R.; Howey, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is an effective technique for diagnosing the behaviour of electrochemical devices such as batteries and fuel cells, usually by fitting data to an equivalent circuit model (ECM). The common approach in the laboratory is to measure the impedance spectrum of a cell in the frequency domain using a single sine sweep signal, then fit the ECM parameters in the frequency domain. This paper focuses instead on estimation of the ECM parameters directly from time-domain data. This may be advantageous for parameter estimation in practical applications such as automotive systems including battery-powered vehicles, where the data may be heavily corrupted by noise. The proposed methodology is based on the simplified refined instrumental variable for continuous-time fractional systems method ('srivcf'), provided by the Crone toolbox [1,2], combined with gradient-based optimisation to estimate the order of the fractional term in the ECM. The approach was tested first on synthetic data and then on real data measured from a 26650 lithium-ion iron phosphate cell with low-cost equipment. The resulting Nyquist plots from the time-domain fitted models match the impedance spectrum closely (much more accurately than when a Randles model is assumed), and the fitted parameters as separately determined through a laboratory potentiostat with frequency domain fitting match to within 13%.

  14. Time-domain spectroscopy in the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    Lanin, A A; Voronin, A A; Fedotov, A B; Zheltikov, A M

    2014-01-01

    When coupled to characteristic, fingerprint vibrational and rotational motions of molecules, an electromagnetic field with an appropriate frequency and waveform offers a highly sensitive, highly informative probe, enabling chemically specific studies on a broad class of systems in physics, chemistry, biology, geosciences, and medicine. The frequencies of these signature molecular modes, however, lie in a region where accurate spectroscopic measurements are extremely difficult because of the lack of efficient detectors and spectrometers. Here, we show that, with a combination of advanced ultrafast technologies and nonlinear-optical waveform characterization, time-domain techniques can be advantageously extended to the metrology of fundamental molecular motions in the mid-infrared. In our scheme, the spectral modulation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses, induced by rovibrational motions of molecules, gives rise to interfering coherent dark waveforms in the time domain. These high-visibility interference patterns can be read out by cross-correlation frequency-resolved gating of the field in the visible generated through ultrabroadband four-wave mixing in a gas phase. PMID:25327294

  15. Time-Dependent Parabolic Finite Difference Formulation for Harmonic Sound Propagation in a Two-Dimensional Duct with Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreider, Kevin L.; Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference real time iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for future large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable for a harmonic monochromatic sound field, a parabolic (in time) approximation is introduced to reduce the order of the governing equation. The analysis begins with a harmonic sound source radiating into a quiescent duct. This fully explicit iteration method then calculates stepwise in time to obtain the 'steady state' harmonic solutions of the acoustic field. For stability, applications of conventional impedance boundary conditions requires coupling to explicit hyperbolic difference equations at the boundary. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  16. Three-dimensional finite-difference modeling of non-linear ground notion

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1997-08-01

    We present a hybrid finite-difference technique capable of modeling non-linear soil amplification from the 3-D finite-fault radiation pattern for earthquakes in arbitrary earth models. The method is applied to model non-linear effects in the soils of the San Fernando Valley (SFV) from the 17 January 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquake. 0-7 Hz particle velocities are computed for an area of 17 km by 19 km immediately above the causative fault and 5 km below the surface where peak strike-parallel, strike-perpendicular, vertical, and total velocities reach values of 71 cm/s, 145 cm/s, 152 cm/s, and 180 cm/s, respectively. Selected Green`s functions and a soil model for the SFV are used to compute the approximate stress level during the earthquake, and comparison to the values for near-surface alluvium at the U.S. Nevada Test Site suggests that the non-linear regime may have been entered. We use selected values from the simulated particle velocity distribution at 5 km depth to compute the non-linear response in a soil column below a site within the Van Norman Complex in SFV, where the strongest ground motion was recorded. Since site-specific non- linear material parameters from the SFV are currently unavailable, values are taken from analyses of observed Test Site ground motions. Preliminary results show significant reduction of spectral velocities at the surface normalized to the peak source velocity due to non-linear effects when the peak velocity increases from 32 cm/s (approximately linear case) to 64 cm/s (30-92%), 93 cm/s (7-83%), and 124 cm/s (2-70%). The largest reduction occurs for frequencies above 1 Hz.

  17. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  19. A global multilevel atmospheric model using a vector semi-Lagrangian finite-difference scheme. I - Adiabatic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. R.; Moorthi, S.; Higgins, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    An adiabatic global multilevel primitive equation model using a two time-level, semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit finite-difference integration scheme is presented. A Lorenz grid is used for vertical discretization and a C grid for the horizontal discretization. The momentum equation is discretized in vector form, thus avoiding problems near the poles. The 3D model equations are reduced by a linear transformation to a set of 2D elliptic equations, whose solution is found by means of an efficient direct solver. The model (with minimal physics) is integrated for 10 days starting from an initialized state derived from real data. A resolution of 16 levels in the vertical is used, with various horizontal resolutions. The model is found to be stable and efficient, and to give realistic output fields. Integrations with time steps of 10 min, 30 min, and 1 h are compared, and the differences are found to be acceptable.

  20. Investigation of contact acoustic nonlinearity in delaminations by shearographic imaging, laser doppler vibrometric scanning and finite difference modeling.

    PubMed

    Sarens, Bart; Verstraeten, Bert; Glorieux, Christ; Kalogiannakis, Georgios; Van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2010-06-01

    Full-field dynamic shearography and laser Doppler vibrometric scanning are used to investigate the local contact acoustic nonlinear generation of delamination-induced effects on the vibration of a harmonically excited composite plate containing an artificial defect. Nonlinear elastic behavior caused by the stress-dependent boundary conditions at the delamination interfaces of a circular defect is also simulated by a 3-D second-order, finite-difference, staggered-grid model (displacement-stress formulation). Both the experimental and simulated data reveal an asymmetric motion of the layer above the delamination, which acts as a membrane vibrating with enhanced displacement amplitude around a finite offset displacement. The spectrum of the membrane motion is enriched with clapping-induced harmonics of the excitation frequency. In case of a sufficiently thin and soft membrane, the simulations reveal clear modal behavior at sub-harmonic frequencies caused by inelastic clapping. PMID:20529713

  1. Quantitative modeling of ICRF antennas with integrated time domain RF sheath and plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David N.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.; Myra, James R.

    2014-02-01

    Significant efforts have been made to quantitatively benchmark the sheath sub-grid model used in our time-domain simulations of plasma-immersed antenna near fields, which includes highly detailed three-dimensional geometry, the presence of the slow wave, and the non-linear evolution of the sheath potential. We present both our quantitative benchmarking strategy, and results for the ITER antenna configuration, including detailed maps of electric field, and sheath potential along the entire antenna structure. Our method is based upon a time-domain linear plasma model [1], using the finite-difference electromagnetic Vorpal/Vsim software [2]. This model has been augmented with a non-linear rf-sheath sub-grid model [3], which provides a self-consistent boundary condition for plasma current where it exists in proximity to metallic surfaces. Very early, this algorithm was designed and demonstrated to work on very complicated three-dimensional geometry, derived from CAD or other complex description of actual hardware, including ITER antennas. Initial work with the simulation model has also provided a confirmation of the existence of propagating slow waves [4] in the low density edge region, which can significantly impact the strength of the rf-sheath potential, which is thought to contribute to impurity generation. Our sheath algorithm is based upon per-point lumped-circuit parameters for which we have estimates and general understanding, but which allow for some tuning and fitting. We are now engaged in a careful benchmarking of the algorithm against known analytic models and existing computational techniques [5] to insure that the predictions of rf-sheath voltage are quantitatively consistent and believable, especially where slow waves share in the field with the fast wave. Currently in progress, an addition to the plasma force response accounting for the sheath potential, should enable the modeling of sheath plasma waves, a predicted additional root to the dispersion

  2. Quantitative modeling of ICRF antennas with integrated time domain RF sheath and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David N.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.; Myra, James R.

    2014-02-12

    Significant efforts have been made to quantitatively benchmark the sheath sub-grid model used in our time-domain simulations of plasma-immersed antenna near fields, which includes highly detailed three-dimensional geometry, the presence of the slow wave, and the non-linear evolution of the sheath potential. We present both our quantitative benchmarking strategy, and results for the ITER antenna configuration, including detailed maps of electric field, and sheath potential along the entire antenna structure. Our method is based upon a time-domain linear plasma model, using the finite-difference electromagnetic Vorpal/Vsim software. This model has been augmented with a non-linear rf-sheath sub-grid model, which provides a self-consistent boundary condition for plasma current where it exists in proximity to metallic surfaces. Very early, this algorithm was designed and demonstrated to work on very complicated three-dimensional geometry, derived from CAD or other complex description of actual hardware, including ITER antennas. Initial work with the simulation model has also provided a confirmation of the existence of propagating slow waves in the low density edge region, which can significantly impact the strength of the rf-sheath potential, which is thought to contribute to impurity generation. Our sheath algorithm is based upon per-point lumped-circuit parameters for which we have estimates and general understanding, but which allow for some tuning and fitting. We are now engaged in a careful benchmarking of the algorithm against known analytic models and existing computational techniques to insure that the predictions of rf-sheath voltage are quantitatively consistent and believable, especially where slow waves share in the field with the fast wave. Currently in progress, an addition to the plasma force response accounting for the sheath potential, should enable the modeling of sheath plasma waves, a predicted additional root to the dispersion, existing at the

  3. Three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography with full multi-view time-domain data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouza Domınguez, Jorge; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2013-03-01

    In this work, synthetic time-domain data are generated as if it were collected with a state-of-the-art multi-view experimental optical scanner developed in our group for small animal imaging, and used in a tomographic image reconstruction algorithm. The collected data comprises full time-dependent optical signals leaving the biological medium and acquired all around the medium. The diffuse optical tomography (DOT) algorithm relies on the time dependent parabolic simplified spherical harmonics (TD-pSPN) equations as the forward model to recover the 3D absorption and diffusion coefficient maps of the medium. The inverse problem is casted and solved as an iterative constrained optimization problem where an objective function determines the accuracy of the forward model predictions at each iteration. Time-dependent adjoint variables are introduced to accelerate the calculation of the gradient of the objective function. A three-dimensional case involving an absorption heterogeneity in a homogeneous medium is presented, reproducing practical situations encountered in our lab. The results support our hypothesis that accurate quantitative 3D maps of optical properties of biological tissues can be retrieved using intrinsic measurements obtained with our experimental scanner along with our DOT algorithm.

  4. Frequency and Time Domain Modeling of Acoustic Liner Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program directed at the acoustics of advanced subsonic propulsion systems undertaken at NASA Langley, Duke University was funded to develop a boundary condition model for bulk-reacting nacelle liners. The overall objective of the Langley program was to understand and predict noise from advanced subsonic transport engines and to develop related noise control technology. The overall technical areas included: fan and propeller source noise, acoustics of ducts and duct liners, interior noise, subjective acoustics, and systems noise prediction. The Duke effort was directed toward duct liner acoustics for the development of analytical methods to characterize liner behavior in both frequency domain and time domain. A review of duct acoustics and liner technology can be found in Reference [1]. At that time, NASA Langley was investigating the propulsion concept of an advanced ducted fan, with a large diameter housed inside a relatively short duct. Fan diameters in excess of ten feet were proposed. The lengths of both the inlet and exhaust portions of the duct were to be short, probably less than half the fan diameter. The nacelle itself would be relatively thin-walled for reasons of aerodynamic efficiency. The blade-passage frequency was expected to be less than I kHz, and very likely in the 200 to 300 Hz range. Because of the design constraints of a short duct, a thin nacelle, and long acoustic wavelengths, the application of effective liner technology would be especially challenging. One of the needs of the NASA Langley program was the capability to accurately and efficiently predict the behavior of the acoustic liner. The traditional point impedance method was not an adequate model for proposed liner designs. The method was too restrictive to represent bulk reacting liners and to allow for the characterization of many possible innovative liner concepts. In the research effort at Duke, an alternative method, initially developed to handle bulk

  5. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t = 0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t = 0 to - tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory

  6. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t=0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t=0 to -tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory enables

  7. Elimination of numerical dispersion in finite-difference modeling and migration by flux-corrected transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, T.; Larner, K.

    1995-11-01

    Finite-difference acoustic-wave modeling and reverse-time depth migration based on the full wave equation are general approaches that can take into account arbitrary variations in velocity and density and can handle turning waves as well. However, conventional finite-difference methods for solving the acoustic- or elastic-wave equation suffer from numerical dispersion when too few samples per wavelength are used. The flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm, adapted from hydrodynamics, reduces the numerical dispersion in finite-difference wavefield continuation. The flux-correction procedure endeavors to incorporate diffusion into the wavefield continuation process only where needed to suppress the numerical dispersion. Incorporating the flux-correction procedure in conventional finite-difference modeling or reverse-time migration can provide finite-difference solutions with no numerical dispersion even for impulsive sources. The FCT correction, which can be applied to finite-difference approximations of any order in space and time, is an efficient alternative to use for finite-difference approximations of increasing order. Through demonstrations of modeling and migration on both synthetic and field data, the authors show the benefits of the FCT algorithm, as well as its inability to fully recover resolution lost when the spatial sampling becomes too coarse.

  8. Application of Novel High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method to Photonic Band-Gap Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R; White, D; Rodrigue, G

    2004-01-13

    In this paper we motivate the use of a novel high order time domain vector finite element method that is of arbitrary order accuracy in space and up to 5th order accurate in time; and in particular, we apply it to the case of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. Such structures have been extensively studied in the literature with several practical applications; in particular, for the low loss transmission of electromagnetic energy around sharp 90 degree bends [1]. Typically, such structures are simulated via a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations either in the frequency domain or directly in the time domain over a computational grid. The majority of numerical simulations performed for such structures make use of the widely popular finite difference time domain (FDTD) method [2], where the time dependent electric and magnetic fields are discretized over a ''dual'' grid to second order accuracy in space and time. However, such methods do not generalize to unstructured, non-orthogonal grids or to higher order spatial discretization schemes. To simulate more complicated structures with curved boundaries, such as the structure of [3], a cell based finite element method with curvilinear elements is preferred over standard stair-stepped Cartesian meshes; and to more efficiently reduce the effects of numerical dispersion, a higher order method is highly desirable. In this paper, the high order basis functions of [5] are used in conjunction with the high order energy conserving symplectic time integration algorithms of [6] resulting in a high order, fully mimetic, mixed vector finite element method.

  9. Detecting Rare Events in the Time-Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, A; Garg, A

    2008-10-31

    One of the biggest challenges in current and future time-domain surveys is to extract the objects of interest from the immense data stream. There are two aspects to achieving this goal: detecting variable sources and classifying them. Difference imaging provides an elegant technique for identifying new transients or changes in source brightness. Much progress has been made in recent years toward refining the process. We discuss a selection of pitfalls that can afflict an automated difference imagine pipeline and describe some solutions. After identifying true astrophysical variables, we are faced with the challenge of classifying them. For rare events, such as supernovae and microlensing, this challenge is magnified because we must balance having selection criteria that select for the largest number of objects of interest against a high contamination rate. We discuss considerations and techniques for developing classification schemes.

  10. Monitoring oil-water mixture separation by time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruvik, E. M.; Hjertaker, B. T.; Folgerø, K.; Meyer, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Effective separation of water and oil is an essential part of petroleum production. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) can be used to profile the separation of hydrocarbon oil-water mixtures. In such two-component systems, metal electrodes will become oil-coated due to their affinity to oil. This coating layer will impact water content measurements. By combining the TDR signals from two probes in a novel configuration, the thickness of the oil layer on the electrodes can be estimated and its effect on the TDR measurements corrected for. The probes consist of two rods of different diameter and spacing to a common ground/guard electrode. The measurement principle is demonstrated using a light fuel oil and a thicker organic oil. The results indicate that oil and water levels can be monitored during separation if the metal electrode oil-coating effect is accounted for.

  11. Characterization of Wheat Varieties Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hongyi; Jiang, Yuying; Lian, Feiyu; Zhang, Yuan; Xia, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis were explored to discriminate eight wheat varieties. The absorption spectra were measured using THz time-domain spectroscopy from 0.2 to 2.0 THz. Using partial least squares (PLS), a regression model for discriminating wheat varieties was developed. The coefficient of correlation in cross validation (R) and root-mean-square error of cross validation (RMSECV) were 0.985 and 1.162, respectively. In addition, interval PLS was applied to optimize the models by selecting the most appropriate regions in the spectra, improving the prediction accuracy (R = 0.992 and RMSECV = 0.967). Results demonstrate that THz spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis can provide rapid, nondestructive discrimination of wheat varieties. PMID:26024421

  12. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Liang, C.; Bitzer, P.; Christian, H.

    2015-06-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism.

  13. Temporal phase conjugation based on time-domain holography.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, María R; Azaña, José

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple method for wavelength-preserving temporal phase conjugation (TPC) of complex optical waveforms is proposed and experimentally validated. The method is based on the concept of time-domain holography; it requires direct photo-detection of the original waveform mixed with a CW light beam (temporal hologram recording), followed by intensity-only modulation of a second CW light source with the photo-detected interference-like pattern. The conjugated signal is directly obtained from the modulated light through an optical bandpass filtering process, without requiring any further processing on the detected interferogram. The proposed scheme is successfully demonstrated by conjugating a train of arbitrarily chirped Gaussian-like pulses and a 3 Gbps 16-QAM data stream. PMID:25531626

  14. Technologies For A Superconducting Sampling Oscilloscope/Time Domain Reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, S. R.; Hanson, E. R.; Hohenwarter, G. K. G.; Kuo, F.; Faris, S. M.

    1988-09-01

    HYPRES, Inc. has introduced to the commercial marketplace a Sampling Oscilloscope/Time Domain Reflectometer (TDR) based on Josephson junction technology. The unit offers measurement performance commensurate with the inherent high speed of the Josephson elements, e.g., bandwidths in excess of 70 GHz and rise times on the order of 5 ps. A Josephson {rigger recognizer and delay circuit allows triggering of the sampling oscilloscope from the signal itself, with full view of the trigger point. Input modules offering different sensitivities or TDR capability are quickly interchangeable, and operating temperature is achieved in less than one minute. The technical details of the cooling technique and the chip circuitry will be described in this paper .

  15. Time Domain Simulations of Arm Locking in LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; Maghami, P.; Livas, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Arm locking is a technique that has been proposed for reducing laser frequency fluctuations in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). a gravitational-wave observatory sensitive' in the milliHertz frequency band. Arm locking takes advantage of the geometric stability of the triangular constellation of three spacecraft that comprise LISA to provide a frequency reference with a stability in the LISA measurement band that exceeds that available from a standard reference such as an optical cavity or molecular absorption line. We have implemented a time-domain simulation of arm locking including the expected limiting noise sources (shot noise, clock noise. spacecraft jitter noise. and residual laser frequency noise). The effect of imperfect a priori knowledge of the LISA heterodyne frequencies and associated "pulling" of an arm locked laser is included. We find that our implementation meets requirements both on the noise and dynamic range of the laser frequency.

  16. Spots and Flares: Stellar Activity in the Time Domain Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    Time domain photometric surveys for large numbers of stars have ushered in a new era of statistical studies of astrophysics. This new parameter space allows us to observe how stars behave and change on a human timescale, and facilitates ensemble studies to understand how stars change over cosmic timescales. With current and planned time domain stellar surveys, we will be able to put the Sun in a Galactic context, and discover how typical or unique our parent star truly is. The goal of this thesis is to develop techniques for detecting and analyzing the most prominent forms of magnetic activity from low-mass stars in modern time domain surveys: starspots and flares. Magnetic field strength is a fundamental property that decays over a star's life. As a result, flux modulations from both flares and starspots become smaller amplitude and more infrequent in light curves. Methods for detecting these forms of magnetic activity will be extensible to future time domain surveys, and helpful in characterizing the properties of stars as they age. Flares can be detected in sparsely sampled wide field surveys by searching for bright single-point outliers in light curves. Using both red optical and near infrared data from ground-based surveys over many years, I have constrained the rate of flares in multiple wavelengths for an ensemble of M dwarfs. Studying flares in these existing ground-based datasets will enable predictions for future survey yields. Space-based photometry enables continuous and precise monitoring of stars for many years, which is crucial for obtaining a complete census of flares from a single star. Using 11 months of 1-minute photometry for the M dwarf GJ 1243, I have amassed over 6100 flare events, the largest sample of white light flares for any low-mass star. I have also created the first high fidelity empirical white light flare template, which shows three distinct phases in typical flare light curves. With this template, I demonstrate that complex multi

  17. Time domain analysis of the weighted distributed order rheological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lili; Pu, Hai; Li, Yan; Li, Ming

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the fundamental solution and relevant properties of the weighted distributed order rheological model in the time domain. Based on the construction of distributed order damper and the idea of distributed order element networks, this paper studies the weighted distributed order operator of the rheological model, a generalization of distributed order linear rheological model. The inverse Laplace transform on weighted distributed order operators of rheological model has been obtained by cutting the complex plane and computing the complex path integral along the Hankel path, which leads to the asymptotic property and boundary discussions. The relaxation response to weighted distributed order rheological model is analyzed, and it is closely related to many physical phenomena. A number of novel characteristics of weighted distributed order rheological model, such as power-law decay and intermediate phenomenon, have been discovered as well. And meanwhile several illustrated examples play important role in validating these results.

  18. Detection of explosives using THz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Châteauneuf, Marc; Dubois, Jacques; Allard, Jean-François; Houde, Daniel; Morris, Denis

    2007-06-01

    Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are a major threat to Canadian and allies troups involved in peacekeeping and minor conflict operations and despite their relative low technology they represent a major challenge in terms of detection and countermeasures. In order to provide tools to detect these threats, Defence Research & Development Canada - Valcartier initiated a research project to the feasibility of using terahertz (THz) radiations to detect and identify the presence of commonly used explosives and concealed weapons in a standoff method. This paper presents the initial results of the first year of the project and the future directions. A compact THz time domain spectroscopy was developed to build a THz signature table of commonly used explosives.

  19. Time-domain control of ultrahigh-frequency nanomechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Giesen, F; Belov, M; Losby, J; Moroz, J; Fraser, A E; McKinnon, G; Clement, T J; Sauer, V; Hiebert, W K; Freeman, M R

    2008-12-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems could have applications in fields as diverse as ultrasensitive mass detection and mechanical computation, and can also be used to explore fundamental phenomena such as quantized heat conductance and quantum-limited displacement. Most nanomechanical studies to date have been performed in the frequency domain. However, applications in computation and information storage will require transient excitation and high-speed time-domain operation of nanomechanical systems. Here we show a time-resolved optical approach to the transduction of ultrahigh-frequency nanoelectromechanical systems, and demonstrate that coherent control of nanomechanical oscillation is possible through appropriate pulse programming. A series of cantilevers with resonant frequencies ranging from less than 10 MHz to over 1 GHz are characterized using the same pulse parameters. PMID:19057589

  20. Time domain BEM for sound radiation of tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banz, Lothar; Gimperlein, Heiko; Nezhi, Zouhair; Stephan, Ernst P.

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates a time domain boundary element method for the acoustic wave equation in an exterior domain in the half-space mathbb {R}^3_+. The Neumann problem is formulated as a boundary integral equation of the second kind, and the convergence and stability of conforming Galerkin approximations is studied in the complex geometry of a car or truck tire above a street. After a validation experiment, numerical results are presented in time or frequency domain for realistic benchmarks in traffic noise: the sound emission of vibrating tires, noise amplification in the horn-like geometry between the tire and the road, as well as the Doppler effect of a moving tire. The results are compared with calculations in frequency domain.