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Sample records for 3d finite-element model

  1. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  2. Modeling electromagnetic rail launchers at speed using 3D finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P.J.; Eastham, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a new finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in moving conductors is described. This has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis. The application of the technique to railgun launchers is illustrated.

  3. An efficient finite-element algorithm for 3D layered complex structure modelling.

    PubMed

    Sahalos, J N; Kyriacou, G A; Vafiadis, E

    1994-05-01

    In this paper an efficient finite-element method (FEM) algorithm for complicated three-dimensional (3D) layered type models has been developed. Its unique feature is that it can handle, with memory requirements within the abilities of a simple PC, arbitrarily shaped 3D elements. This task is achieved by storing only the non-zero coefficients of the sparse FEM system of equations. The algorithm is applied to the solution of the Laplace equation in models with up to 79 layers of trilinear general hexahedron elements. The system of equations is solved with the Gauss-Seidel iterative technique.

  4. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  5. The modelling of VLF Trimpis using both finite element and 3D Born Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, K.; Nunn, D.; Hayakawa, M.

    This paper investigates the numerical modelling of VLF Trimpis produced by a D region inhomogeneity on the Great Circle Path. Two different codes are used. The first is a 2D finite element method (FEM) code, whose solutions are valid in the non-Born limit. The second is a 3D model that invokes the Born approximation. The predicted Trimpis from these codes compare closely, thus confirming the validity of both models. The modal scattering matrices have a comparable structure, and indicate strong scattering between the dominant TM modes. Analysis of the scattering matrix from the FEM code delineates the Born regime. For a LIE with a radius of 100kms, the Born approximation becomes invalid at an electron density perturbation of about 8 el/cc.

  6. 3-D finite element modelling of facial soft tissue and preliminary application in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Lou, Hangdi; Guo, Liang; Rong, Qiguo; Liu, Yi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of soft tissue aesthetics is important for achieving an optimal outcome in orthodontic treatment planning. Previously, applicable procedures were mainly restricted to 2-D profile prediction. In this study, a generic 3-D finite element (FE) model of the craniofacial soft and hard tissue was constructed, and individualisation of the generic model based on cone beam CT data and mathematical transformation was investigated. The result indicated that patient-specific 3-D facial FE model including different layers of soft tissue could be obtained through mathematical model transformation. Average deviation between the transformed model and the real reconstructed one was 0.47 ± 0.77 mm and 0.75 ± 0.84 mm in soft and hard tissue, respectively. With boundary condition defined according to treatment plan, such FE model could be used to predict the result of orthodontic treatment on facial soft tissue.

  7. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    This annual status report presents the results of work performed during the fourth year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes permitting more accurate and efficient 3-D analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of math models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. Volume 1 of this report discusses the special finite element models developed during the fourth year of the contract.

  8. Finite element modeling of a 3D coupled foot-boot model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, musculoskeletal models of the human body are used as powerful tools to study biological structures. The lower limb, and in particular the foot, is of interest because it is the primary physical interaction between the body and the environment during locomotion. The goal of this paper is to adopt the finite element (FE) modeling and analysis approaches to create a state-of-the-art 3D coupled foot-boot model for future studies on biomechanical investigation of stress injury mechanism, foot wear design and parachute landing fall simulation. In the modeling process, the foot-ankle model with lower leg was developed based on Computed Tomography (CT) images using ScanIP, Surfacer and ANSYS. Then, the boot was represented by assembling the FE models of upper, insole, midsole and outsole built based on the FE model of the foot-ankle, and finally the coupled foot-boot model was generated by putting together the models of the lower limb and boot. In this study, the FE model of foot and ankle was validated during balance standing. There was a good agreement in the overall patterns of predicted and measured plantar pressure distribution published in literature. The coupled foot-boot model will be fully validated in the subsequent works under both static and dynamic loading conditions for further studies on injuries investigation in military and sports, foot wear design and characteristics of parachute landing impact in military.

  9. Towards automated 3D finite element modeling of direct fiber reinforced composite dental bridge.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing; Steven, Grant P

    2005-07-01

    An automated 3D finite element (FE) modeling procedure for direct fiber reinforced dental bridge is established on the basis of computer tomography (CT) scan data. The model presented herein represents a two-unit anterior cantilever bridge that includes a maxillary right incisor as an abutment and a maxillary left incisor as a cantilever pontic bonded by adhesive and reinforced fibers. The study aims at gathering fundamental knowledge for design optimization of this type of innovative composite dental bridges. To promote the automatic level of numerical analysis and computational design of new dental biomaterials, this report pays particular attention to the mathematical modeling, mesh generation, and validation of numerical models. To assess the numerical accuracy and to validate the model established, a convergence test and experimental verification are also presented.

  10. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 describes effort performed under Task 4B, Special Finite Element Special Function Models, while Volume 2 concentrates on Task 4C, Advanced Special Functions Models.

  11. Parallel 3D Finite Element Numerical Modelling of DC Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Prudencio, E.; Candel, A.; Ge, L.; Kabel, A.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; /SLAC

    2008-02-04

    In this paper we present Gun3P, a parallel 3D finite element application that the Advanced Computations Department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is developing for the analysis of beam formation in DC guns and beam transport in klystrons. Gun3P is targeted specially to complex geometries that cannot be described by 2D models and cannot be easily handled by finite difference discretizations. Its parallel capability allows simulations with more accuracy and less processing time than packages currently available. We present simulation results for the L-band Sheet Beam Klystron DC gun, in which case Gun3P is able to reduce simulation time from days to some hours.

  12. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis.

  13. 3D finite element model of the diabetic neuropathic foot: a gait analysis driven approach.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-09-22

    Diabetic foot is an invalidating complication of diabetes that can lead to foot ulcers. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) allows characterizing the loads developed in the different anatomical structures of the foot in dynamic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a subject specific 3D foot FE model (FEM) of a diabetic neuropathic (DNS) and a healthy (HS) subject, whose subject specificity can be found in term of foot geometry and boundary conditions. Kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressure (PP) data were extracted from the gait analysis trials of the two subjects with this purpose. The FEM were developed segmenting bones, cartilage and skin from MRI and drawing a horizontal plate as ground support. Materials properties were adopted from previous literature. FE simulations were run with the kinematics and kinetics data of four different phases of the stance phase of gait (heel strike, loading response, midstance and push off). FEMs were then driven by group gait data of 10 neuropathic and 10 healthy subjects. Model validation focused on agreement between FEM-simulated and experimental PP. The peak values and the total distribution of the pressures were compared for this purpose. Results showed that the models were less robust when driven from group data and underestimated the PP in each foot subarea. In particular in the case of the neuropathic subject's model the mean errors between experimental and simulated data were around the 20% of the peak values. This knowledge is crucial in understanding the aetiology of diabetic foot.

  14. A goal-oriented adaptive finite-element approach for plane wave 3-D electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a novel goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement approach for finite-element methods to model plane wave electromagnetic (EM) fields in 3-D earth models based on the electric field differential equation. To handle complicated models of arbitrary conductivity, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity involving curved boundaries and surface topography, we employ an unstructured grid approach. The electric field is approximated by linear curl-conforming shape functions which guarantee the divergence-free condition of the electric field within each tetrahedron and continuity of the tangential component of the electric field across the interior boundaries. Based on the non-zero residuals of the approximated electric field and the yet to be satisfied boundary conditions of continuity of both the normal component of the total current density and the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior interfaces, three a-posterior error estimators are proposed as a means to drive the goal-oriented adaptive refinement procedure. The first a-posterior error estimator relies on a combination of the residual of the electric field, the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density and the discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior faces shared by tetrahedra. The second a-posterior error estimator is expressed in terms of the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density (conduction plus displacement current). The discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field forms the third a-posterior error estimator. Analytical solutions for magnetotelluric (MT) and radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) fields impinging on a homogeneous half-space model are used to test the performances of the newly developed goal-oriented algorithms using the above three a-posterior error estimators. A trapezoidal topographical model, using normally incident EM waves

  15. 3-d finite element model development for biomechanics: a software demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Ashby, E.

    1997-03-01

    Finite element analysis is becoming an increasingly important part of biomechanics and orthopedic research, as computational resources become more powerful, and data handling algorithms become more sophisticated. Until recently, tools with sufficient power did not exist or were not accessible to adequately model complicated, three-dimensional, nonlinear biomechanical systems. In the past, finite element analyses in biomechanics have often been limited to two-dimensional approaches, linear analyses, or simulations of single tissue types. Today, we have the resources to model fully three-dimensional, nonlinear, multi-tissue, and even multi-joint systems. The authors will present the process of developing these kinds of finite element models, using human hand and knee examples, and will demonstrate their software tools.

  16. A majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian-based finite element method for 3D restoration of geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peipei; Wang, Chengjing; Dai, Xiaoxia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian-based finite element method for 3D elastic frictionless contact problems. In this scheme, we discretize the restoration problem via the finite element method and reformulate it to a constrained optimization problem. Then we apply the majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian method to solve the optimization problem, which is very suitable for the ill-conditioned case. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method is a very efficient algorithm for various large-scale 3D restorations of geological models, especially for the restoration of geological models with complicated faults.

  17. Efficient finite element modeling of scattering for 2D and 3D problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Velichko, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    The scattering of waves by defects is central to ultrasonic NDE and SHM. In general, scattering problems must be modeled using direct numerical methods such as finite elements (FE), which is very computationally demanding. The most efficient way is to only model the scatterer itself and a minimal region of the surrounding host medium, and this was previously demonstrated for 2-dimensional (2D) bulk wave scattering problems in isotropic media. An encircling array of monopole and dipole sources is used to inject an arbitrary wavefront onto the scatterer and the scattered field is monitored by a second encircling array of monitoring points. From this data, the scattered field can be projected out to any point in space. If the incident wave is chosen to be a plane wave incident from a given angle and the scattered field is projected to distant points in the far-field of the scatterer, the far-field scattering or S-matrix may be obtained, which encodes all the available scattering information. In this paper, the technique is generalized to any elastic wave geometry in both 2D and 3D, where the latter can include guided wave scattering problems. A further refinement enables the technique to be employed with free FE meshes of triangular or tetrahedral elements.

  18. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment.

  19. A 3D discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method for teleseismic modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    monteiller, vadim; Beller, Stephen; Nolet, Guust; Operto, Stephane; Virieux, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The massive development of dense seismic arrays and the rapide increase in computing capacity allow today to consider application of full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. We present an hybrid numerical method that allows for the modelling of short period telesismic waves in 3D lithospheric target with the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements method, opennig the possibility to perform waveform inversion of seismograms recorded by dense regional broadband arrays. In order to reduce the computational cost of the forward-problem, we developed a method that relies on multi-core parallel computing and computational-domain reduction. We defined two nested levels for parallelism based on MPI library, which are managed by two MPI communicators. Firstly, we use a domain partitionning strategy, assigning one subdomain to one cpu and, secondly we distribute telesismic sources on different copies of the partitioned domain. However, despite the supercomputer ability, the forward-problem remains expensive for telesismic configuration especially when 3D numerical methods are considered. In order to perform the forward problem in a reasonable amount of time, we reduce the computational domain in which full waveform modelling is performed. We defined a 3D regional domain located below the seismological network that is embeded in a background homogeneous or axisymetric model, in which the seismic wavefield can be computed efficiently. The background wavefield is used to compute the full wavefield in the 3D regional domain using the so-called total-field/scattered-field technique (Alterman & Karal (1968),Taflove & Hagness (2005)), which relies on the decomposition of the wavefield into a background and a scattered wavefields. The computational domain is subdivided intro three subdomains: an outer domain formed by the perfectly-mathed absorbing layers, an intermediate zone in which only the outgoing wavefield scattered by the

  20. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  1. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased

  2. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  3. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  4. An efficient 3D finite element method model based on the T-A formulation for superconducting coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiming; Zhang, Min; Yuan, Weijia

    2017-02-01

    An efficient three dimensional (3D) finite element method numerical model is proposed for superconducting coated conductors. The model is based on the T-A formulation and can be used to tackle 3D computational challenges for superconductors with high aspect ratios. By assuming a sheet approximation for the conductors, the model can speed up the computational process. The model has been validated by established analytical solutions. Two examples with complex geometries, which can hardly be simulated by the 2D model, are given. The model could be used to characterise and design large-scale applications using superconducting coated conductors, such as high field magnets and other electrical devices.

  5. Parallelized 3D CSEM modeling using edge-based finite element with total field formulation and unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Hu, Xiangyun; Li, Jianhui; Endo, Masashi; Xiong, Bin

    2017-02-01

    We solve the 3D controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) problem using the edge-based finite element method. The modeling domain is discretized using unstructured tetrahedral mesh. We adopt the total field formulation for the quasi-static variant of Maxwell's equation and the computation cost to calculate the primary field can be saved. We adopt a new boundary condition which approximate the total field on the boundary by the primary field corresponding to the layered earth approximation of the complicated conductivity model. The primary field on the modeling boundary is calculated using fast Hankel transform. By using this new type of boundary condition, the computation cost can be reduced significantly and the modeling accuracy can be improved. We consider that the conductivity can be anisotropic. We solve the finite element system of equations using a parallelized multifrontal solver which works efficiently for multiple source and large scale electromagnetic modeling.

  6. 3D finite element modelling of guided wave scattering at delaminations in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murat, Bibi Intan Suraya; Fromme, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Carbon fiber laminate composites are increasingly used for aerospace structures as they offer a number of advantages including a good strength to weight ratio. However, impact during the operation and servicing of the aircraft can lead to barely visible and difficult to detect damage. Depending on the severity of the impact, delaminations can occur, reducing the load carrying capacity of the structure. Efficient nondestructive testing of composite panels can be achieved using guided ultrasonic waves propagating along the structure. The guided wave (A0 Lamb wave mode) scattering at delaminations was modeled using full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) simulations. The influence of the delamination size was systematically investigated from a parameter study. A significant influence of the delamination width on the guided wave scattering was found, especially on the angular dependency of the scattered guided wave amplitude. The sensitivity of guided ultrasonic waves for the detection of delamination damage in composite panels is discussed.

  7. Stabilized Finite Elements in FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Newman, James C.; Karman, Steve L.

    2017-01-01

    A Streamlined Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) stabilized finite-element discretization has been implemented as a library into the FUN3D unstructured-grid flow solver. Motivation for the selection of this methodology is given, details of the implementation are provided, and the discretization for the interior scheme is verified for linear and quadratic elements by using the method of manufactured solutions. A methodology is also described for capturing shocks, and simulation results are compared to the finite-volume formulation that is currently the primary method employed for routine engineering applications. The finite-element methodology is demonstrated to be more accurate than the finite-volume technology, particularly on tetrahedral meshes where the solutions obtained using the finite-volume scheme can suffer from adverse effects caused by bias in the grid. Although no effort has been made to date to optimize computational efficiency, the finite-element scheme is competitive with the finite-volume scheme in terms of computer time to reach convergence.

  8. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  9. VLF Trimpi modelling on the path NWC-Dunedin using both finite element and 3D Born modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, D.; Hayakawa, K. B. M.

    1998-10-01

    This paper investigates the numerical modelling of VLF Trimpis, produced by a D region inhomogeneity on the great circle path. Two different codes are used to model Trimpis on the path NWC-Dunedin. The first is a 2D Finite Element Method Code (FEM), whose solutions are rigorous and valid in the strong scattering or non-Born limit. The second code is a 3D model that invokes the Born approximation. The predicted Trimpis from these codes compare very closely, thus confirming the validity of both models. The modal scattering matrices for both codes are analysed in some detail and are found to have a comparable structure. They indicate strong scattering between the dominant TM modes. Analysis of the scattering matrix from the FEM code shows that departure from linear Born behaviour occurs when the inhomogeneity has a horizontal scale size of about 100 km and a maximum electron density enhancement at 75 km altitude of about 6 electrons.

  10. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  11. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  12. 3D Finite Element Electrical Model of Larval Zebrafish ECG Signals.

    PubMed

    Crowcombe, James; Dhillon, Sundeep Singh; Hurst, Rhiannon Mary; Egginton, Stuart; Müller, Ferenc; Sík, Attila; Tarte, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of heart function in zebrafish larvae using electrocardiography (ECG) is a potentially useful tool in developing cardiac treatments and the assessment of drug therapies. In order to better understand how a measured ECG waveform is related to the structure of the heart, its position within the larva and the position of the electrodes, a 3D model of a 3 days post fertilisation (dpf) larval zebrafish was developed to simulate cardiac electrical activity and investigate the voltage distribution throughout the body. The geometry consisted of two main components; the zebrafish body was modelled as a homogeneous volume, while the heart was split into five distinct regions (sinoatrial region, atrial wall, atrioventricular band, ventricular wall and heart chambers). Similarly, the electrical model consisted of two parts with the body described by Laplace's equation and the heart using a bidomain ionic model based upon the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. Each region of the heart was differentiated by action potential (AP) parameters and activation wave conduction velocities, which were fitted and scaled based on previously published experimental results. ECG measurements in vivo at different electrode recording positions were then compared to the model results. The model was able to simulate action potentials, wave propagation and all the major features (P wave, R wave, T wave) of the ECG, as well as polarity of the peaks observed at each position. This model was based upon our current understanding of the structure of the normal zebrafish larval heart. Further development would enable us to incorporate features associated with the diseased heart and hence assist in the interpretation of larval zebrafish ECGs in these conditions.

  13. 3D Finite Element Electrical Model of Larval Zebrafish ECG Signals

    PubMed Central

    Crowcombe, James; Dhillon, Sundeep Singh; Hurst, Rhiannon Mary; Egginton, Stuart; Müller, Ferenc; Sík, Attila; Tarte, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of heart function in zebrafish larvae using electrocardiography (ECG) is a potentially useful tool in developing cardiac treatments and the assessment of drug therapies. In order to better understand how a measured ECG waveform is related to the structure of the heart, its position within the larva and the position of the electrodes, a 3D model of a 3 days post fertilisation (dpf) larval zebrafish was developed to simulate cardiac electrical activity and investigate the voltage distribution throughout the body. The geometry consisted of two main components; the zebrafish body was modelled as a homogeneous volume, while the heart was split into five distinct regions (sinoatrial region, atrial wall, atrioventricular band, ventricular wall and heart chambers). Similarly, the electrical model consisted of two parts with the body described by Laplace’s equation and the heart using a bidomain ionic model based upon the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. Each region of the heart was differentiated by action potential (AP) parameters and activation wave conduction velocities, which were fitted and scaled based on previously published experimental results. ECG measurements in vivo at different electrode recording positions were then compared to the model results. The model was able to simulate action potentials, wave propagation and all the major features (P wave, R wave, T wave) of the ECG, as well as polarity of the peaks observed at each position. This model was based upon our current understanding of the structure of the normal zebrafish larval heart. Further development would enable us to incorporate features associated with the diseased heart and hence assist in the interpretation of larval zebrafish ECGs in these conditions. PMID:27824910

  14. The Distributed Lambda (?) Model (DLM): A 3-D, Finite-Element Muscle Model Based on Feldman's ? Model; Assessment of Orofacial Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors aimed to design a distributed lambda model (DLM), which is well adapted to implement three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element descriptions of muscles. Method: A muscle element model was designed. Its stress-strain relationships included the active force-length characteristics of the ? model along the muscle fibers, together…

  15. 3D Finite Element Modelling of Cutting Forces in Drilling Fibre Metal Laminates and Experimental Hole Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giasin, Khaled; Ayvar-Soberanis, Sabino; French, Toby; Phadnis, Vaibhav

    2017-02-01

    Machining Glass fibre aluminium reinforced epoxy (GLARE) is cumbersome due to distinctively different mechanical and thermal properties of its constituents, which makes it challenging to achieve damage-free holes with the acceptable surface quality. The proposed work focuses on the study of the machinability of thin ( 2.5 mm) GLARE laminate. Drilling trials were conducted to analyse the effect of feed rate and spindle speed on the cutting forces and hole quality. The resulting hole quality metrics (surface roughness, hole size, circularity error, burr formation and delamination) were assessed using surface profilometry and optical scanning techniques. A three dimensional (3D) finite-element (FE) model of drilling GLARE laminate was also developed using ABAQUS/Explicit to help understand the mechanism of drilling GLARE. The homogenised ply-level response of GLARE laminate was considered in the FE model to predict cutting forces in the drilling process.

  16. 3D finite element model for writing long-period fiber gratings by CO2 laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João M P; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-08-12

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented.

  17. 3D Finite Element Model for Writing Long-Period Fiber Gratings by CO2 Laser Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, João M. P.; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented. PMID:23941908

  18. A new 3D finite element model of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear: II. Experimental and numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Agustín; Barham, Richard; Ruiz, Mariano; López, Juan Manuel; De Arcas, Guillermo; Alonso, Jesus

    2012-12-01

    In part I, the feasibility of using three-dimensional (3D) finite elements (FEs) to model the acoustic behaviour of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear was studied and the numerical approach compared with classical lumped elements modelling. It was shown that by using a more complex acoustic model that took account of thermo-viscous effects, geometric shapes and dimensions, it was possible to develop a realistic model. This model then had clear advantages in comparison with the models based on equivalent circuits using lumped parameters. In fact results from FE modelling produce a better understanding about the physical phenomena produced inside ear simulator couplers, facilitating spatial and temporal visualization of the sound fields produced. The objective of this study (part II) is to extend the investigation by validating the numerical calculations against measurements on an ear simulator conforming to IEC 60318-1. For this purpose, an appropriate commercially available device is taken and a complete 3D FE model developed for it. The numerical model is based on key dimensional data obtained with a non-destructive x-ray inspection technique. Measurements of the acoustic transfer impedance have been carried out on the same device at a national measurement institute using the method embodied in IEC 60318-1. Having accounted for the actual device dimensions, the thermo-viscous effects inside narrow slots and holes and environmental conditions, the results of the numerical modelling were found to be in good agreement with the measured values.

  19. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  20. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures

    PubMed Central

    Pavarino, E.; Neves, L. A.; Machado, J. M.; de Godoy, M. F.; Shiyou, Y.; Momente, J. C.; Zafalon, G. F. D.; Pinto, A. R.; Valêncio, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  1. 3D Finite Element Modelling for the investigation of the cavity effect in extensometric rock-deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, M.; Detzky, G.; Koppán, A.

    2012-04-01

    phenomenon in general. Authors calculated the deformations of a simple-geometry 3D cavity, which is caused by variable gravity loads. Dependence of the cavity effect on changing of distinct elastic properties in categorized models has been investigated. Authors introduced qualifying parameter fields calculated using the results of the FE modelling (nodal displacements as a model answer for the gravity load), in order to characterize the effect. Modelling results can be used as an estimation not only for the absolute cavity effect rate of the intended arrangement, furthermore the sensitivity of the given system against a particular geometric property. As an application example finite element modelling were carried out in order to estimate the influence of the complicated cavity system surrounding the "Budapest-Matyashegy" Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory of the Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary.

  2. Algebraic multigrid preconditioning within parallel finite-element solvers for 3-D electromagnetic modelling problems in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldan, Jelena; Puzyrev, Vladimir; de la Puente, Josep; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Cela, José María

    2014-06-01

    We present an elaborate preconditioning scheme for Krylov subspace methods which has been developed to improve the performance and reduce the execution time of parallel node-based finite-element (FE) solvers for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) numerical modelling in exploration geophysics. This new preconditioner is based on algebraic multigrid (AMG) that uses different basic relaxation methods, such as Jacobi, symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) and Gauss-Seidel, as smoothers and the wave front algorithm to create groups, which are used for a coarse-level generation. We have implemented and tested this new preconditioner within our parallel nodal FE solver for 3-D forward problems in EM induction geophysics. We have performed series of experiments for several models with different conductivity structures and characteristics to test the performance of our AMG preconditioning technique when combined with biconjugate gradient stabilized method. The results have shown that, the more challenging the problem is in terms of conductivity contrasts, ratio between the sizes of grid elements and/or frequency, the more benefit is obtained by using this preconditioner. Compared to other preconditioning schemes, such as diagonal, SSOR and truncated approximate inverse, the AMG preconditioner greatly improves the convergence of the iterative solver for all tested models. Also, when it comes to cases in which other preconditioners succeed to converge to a desired precision, AMG is able to considerably reduce the total execution time of the forward-problem code-up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the tests have confirmed that our AMG scheme ensures grid-independent rate of convergence, as well as improvement in convergence regardless of how big local mesh refinements are. In addition, AMG is designed to be a black-box preconditioner, which makes it easy to use and combine with different iterative methods. Finally, it has proved to be very practical and efficient in the

  3. A 3D finite element model of an implanted scapula: importance of a multiparametric validation using experimental data.

    PubMed

    Maurel, N; Diop, A; Grimberg, J

    2005-09-01

    In order to help to understand the loosening phenomenon around glenoïd prostheses, a 3D finite element model of a previously tested implanted scapula has been developed. The construction of the model was done using CT scans of the tested scapula. Different bone material properties were tested and shell elements or 8 nodes hexaedric elements were used to model the cortical bone. Surface contact elements were introduced on one hand between the bone and the lower part of the plate of the implant, and on the other, between the loading metallic ball and the upper surface of the implant. The results of the model were compared with those issued from in vitro experiments carried out on the same scapula. The evaluation of the model was done for nine cases of loading of 500 N distributed on the implant, in terms of strains (principal strains of six spots around peripheral cortex of the glenoïd) and displacement of four points positioned on the implant. The best configuration of the model presented here, fits with experiments for most of the strains (difference lower than 150microdef) but it seems to be still too stiff (mainly in the lower part). Nevertheless, we want, in this paper, to underline the importance of doing a multiparametric validation for such a model. Indeed, some models can give correct results for one case of loading but bad results for another kind of loading, some others can give good results for one kind of compared parameters (like strains for instance) but bad results for the other one (like displacements).

  4. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  5. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  6. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  7. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  8. 3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1999-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

  9. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  10. 3D reconstruction of bony elements of the knee joint and finite element analysis of total knee prosthesis obtained from the reconstructed model

    PubMed Central

    Djoudi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Two separate themes are presented in this paper. Aims The first theme is to present a graphical modeling approach of human anatomical structures namely, the femur and the tibia. The second theme involves making a finite element analysis of stresses, displacements and deformations in prosthetic implants (the femoral implant and the polyethylene insert). Objectives The graphical modeling approach comes in two parts. The first is the segmentation of MRI scanned images, retrieved in DICOM format for edge detection. In the second part, 3D-CAD models are generated from the results of the segmentation stage. The finite element analysis is done by first extracting the prosthetic implants from the reconstructed 3D-CAD model, then do a finite element analysis of these implants under objectively determined conditions such as; forces, allowed displacements, the materials composing implant, and the coefficient of friction. Conclusion The objective of this work is to implement an interface for exchanging data between 2D MRI images obtained from a medical diagnosis of a patient and the 3D-CAD model used in various applications, such as; the extraction of the implants, stress analysis at the knee joint and can serve as an aid to surgery, also predict the behavior of the prosthetic implants vis-a-vis the forces acting on the knee joints. PMID:24396234

  11. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  12. A Comprehensive 3D Finite Element Model of a Thermoelectric Module Used in a Power Generator: A Transient Performance Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangxi; Yu, Xiong

    2015-06-01

    Thermoelectric power generator has potential for small-scale and distributed power generation because of its high durability and scalability. It is very important to realize that the transient behavior of thermoelectric modules (TEM) affects a thermoelectric generator's response to dynamic working environments. Traditionally, researchers have used simplified models to describe the behavior of thermoelectric modules. In this paper we propose a comprehensive mathematical model that considers the effect of variations of chemical potential and carrier density, which are ignored by traditional models. Finite element models based on this new model are used to simulate the transient behavior of a thermoelectric module subjected to rapid changes in boundary temperature or working load. Simulation results show that transition times of thermoelectric modules affected by temperature change are much longer than those of modules affected by changes in electrical load resistance. Sudden changes in working temperature cause voltage overshoot of the TEM output, which, however, is not observed in responses to sudden changes of load resistance. Comparisons also show there are significant differences between the behavior of TEM predicted by use of this new comprehensive model and that predicted by use of traditional models, particularly for the high-temperature intrinsic ionization region and the low-temperature weak ionization region. This implies that chemical potential and carrier density variations, which are taken into account by this new model but ignored by traditional models, have major effects on the performance of TEM.

  13. 3-D diffusion tensor MRI anisotropy content-adaptive finite element head model generation for bioelectromagnetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; Kim, T S; Kim, Andrew T; Lee, S Y

    2008-01-01

    Realistic finite element (FE) head models have been successfully applied to bioelectromagnetic problems due to a realistic representation of arbitrary head geometry with inclusion of anisotropic material properties. In this paper, we propose a new automatic FE mesh generation scheme to generate a diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) white matter anisotropy content-adaptive FE head model. We term this kind of mesh as wMesh. With this meshing technique, the anisotropic electrical conductivities derived from DT-MRIs can be best incorporated into the model. The influence of the white matter anisotropy on the EEG forward solutions has been studied via our wMesh head models. The scalp potentials computed from the anisotropic wMesh models against those of the isotropic models have been compared. The results describe that there are substantial changes in the scalp electrical potentials between the isotropic and anisotropic models, indicating that the inclusion of the white matter anisotropy is critical for accurate computation of E/MEG forward and inverse solutions. This fully automatic anisotropy-adaptive wMesh meshing scheme could be useful for modeling of individual-specific FE head models with better incorporation of the white matter anisotropic property towards bioelectromagnetic imaging.

  14. Calibration of 3D ALE finite element model from experiments on friction stir welding of lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourment, Lionel; Gastebois, Sabrina; Dubourg, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    In order to support the design of such a complex process like Friction Stir Welding (FSW) for the aeronautic industry, numerical simulation software requires (1) developing an efficient and accurate Finite Element (F.E.) formulation that allows predicting welding defects, (2) properly modeling the thermo-mechanical complexity of the FSW process and (3) calibrating the F.E. model from accurate measurements from FSW experiments. This work uses a parallel ALE formulation developed in the Forge® F.E. code to model the different possible defects (flashes and worm holes), while pin and shoulder threads are modeled by a new friction law at the tool / material interface. FSW experiments require using a complex tool with scroll on shoulder, which is instrumented for providing sensitive thermal data close to the joint. Calibration of unknown material thermal coefficients, constitutive equations parameters and friction model from measured forces, torques and temperatures is carried out using two F.E. models, Eulerian and ALE, to reach a satisfactory agreement assessed by the proper sensitivity of the simulation to process parameters.

  15. A reduced-order model based on the coupled 1D-3D finite element simulations for an efficient analysis of hemodynamics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudah, Eduardo; Rossi, Riccardo; Idelsohn, Sergio; Oñate, Eugenio

    2014-10-01

    A reduced-order model for an efficient analysis of cardiovascular hemodynamics problems using multiscale approach is presented in this work. Starting from a patient-specific computational mesh obtained by medical imaging techniques, an analysis methodology based on a two-step automatic procedure is proposed. First a coupled 1D-3D Finite Element Simulation is performed and the results are used to adjust a reduced-order model of the 3D patient-specific area of interest. Then, this reduced-order model is coupled with the 1D model. In this way, three-dimensional effects are accounted for in the 1D model in a cost effective manner, allowing fast computation under different scenarios. The methodology proposed is validated using a patient-specific aortic coarctation model under rest and non-rest conditions.

  16. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongle; Li, Q. M.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band) of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi) may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE) simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress) and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point) are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation is found to

  17. A 3-D Finite Element Model of Anterior Vaginal Wall Support to Evaluate Mechanisms Underlying Cystocele Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luyun; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To develop a 3D computer model of the anterior vaginal wall and its supports, validate that model, and then use it to determine the combinations of muscle and connective tissue impairments that result in cystocele formation, as observed on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A subject-specific 3D model of the anterior vaginal wall and its supports was developed based on MRI geometry from a healthy nulliparous woman. It included simplified representations of the anterior vaginal wall, levator muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, arcus tendineus fascia pelvis and levator ani, paravaginal attachments, and the posterior compartment. This model was then imported into ABAQUS™ and tissue properties were assigned from the literature. An iterative process was used to refine anatomical assumptions until convergence was obtained between model behavior under increases of abdominal pressure up to 168 cmH2O and deformations observed on dynamic MRI. Results Cystocele size was sensitive to abdominal pressure and impairment of connective tissue and muscle. Larger cystocele formed in the presence of impairments in muscular and apical connective tissue support compared to either support element alone. Apical impairment resulted in a larger cystocele than paravaginal impairment. Levator ani muscle impairment caused a larger urogenital hiatus size, longer length of the distal vagina exposed to a pressure differential, larger apical descent and resulted in a larger cystocele size. Conclusions Development of a cystocele requires a levator muscle impairment, an increase in abdominal pressure, and apical and paravaginal support defects. PMID:19481208

  18. Mechanical performance of endodontic restorations with prefabricated posts: sensitivity analysis of parameters with a 3D finite element model.

    PubMed

    González-Lluch, Carmen; Pérez-González, Antonio; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Pablo-Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have investigated the effect of different parameters of the endodontically restored tooth on its final strength, using in vitro tests and model simulations. However, the differences in the experimental set-up or modelling conditions and the limited number of parameters studied in each case prevent us from obtaining clear conclusions about the relative importance of each parameter. In this study, a validated 3D biomechanical model of the restored tooth was used for an exhaustive sensitivity analysis. The individual influence of 20 different parameters on the mechanical performance of an endodontic restoration with prefabricated posts was studied. The results bring up the remarkable importance of the loading angle on the final restoration strength. Flexural loads are more critical than compressive or tensile loads. Young's modulus of the post and its length and diameter are the most influential parameters for strength, whereas other parameters such as ferrule geometry or core and crown characteristics are less significant.

  19. Can the modeling for simplification of a dental implant surface affect the accuracy of 3D finite element analysis?

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido de Araújo; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess stress/strain of different implant modeling simplifications by 3D-FEA. Three variation of external hexagon implant (Ø3.75 × 10 mm) supporting one molar crown were simulated: A (no threads); B (slightly threads simplification); C (original design). 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique) were applied. Cortical bone was evaluated by maximum principal stress and microstrain qualitatively and quantitatively (ANOVA and Tukey post hoc (p < 0.05)). Higher stress levels (p < 0.05) were observed in model A. Models B and C presented similar stress transmission. It was possible to conclude that slightly simplification should be used for studies evaluating stress transferring for bone tissue.

  20. The GPRIME approach to finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, D. R.; Mckee, J. H.; Hurwitz, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    GPRIME, an interactive modeling system, runs on the CDC 6000 computers and the DEC VAX 11/780 minicomputer. This system includes three components: (1) GPRIME, a user friendly geometric language and a processor to translate that language into geometric entities, (2) GGEN, an interactive data generator for 2-D models; and (3) SOLIDGEN, a 3-D solid modeling program. Each component has a computer user interface of an extensive command set. All of these programs make use of a comprehensive B-spline mathematics subroutine library, which can be used for a wide variety of interpolation problems and other geometric calculations. Many other user aids, such as automatic saving of the geometric and finite element data bases and hidden line removal, are available. This interactive finite element modeling capability can produce a complete finite element model, producing an output file of grid and element data.

  1. Non-invasive measurement of cholesterol in human blood by impedance technique: an investigation by 3D finite element field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, Ekaterina; Khan, Sanowar

    2013-06-01

    This paper concerns detection of particle concentration (e.g. cholesterol) in conductive media (e.g. human blood) by impedance technique. The technique is based on changes in the impedance measurement across a given conducting medium due to changes in the particle concentration. The impedance is calculated by calculating the current through the conducting media produced by electric field distribution between two electrodes. This is done by modelling and computation of 3D electric fields between the electrodes for known voltages applied between them using the well-known finite element method (FEM). The complexity of such FE models is attributed to particle distribution, their geometric and material parameters, and their shape and size which can be of many orders of magnitude smaller than the overall problem domain under investigation. This paper overcomes this problem by adopting an effective particle coagulation (aggregation) strategy in FE modelling without significantly affecting the accuracy of field computation.

  2. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  3. Higher Order Lagrange Finite Elements In M3D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Chen; H.R. Strauss; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; L.E. Sugiyama; G. Fu; J. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    The M3D code has been using linear finite elements to represent multilevel MHD on 2-D poloidal planes. Triangular higher order elements, up to third order, are constructed here in order to provide M3D the capability to solve highly anisotropic transport problems. It is found that higher order elements are essential to resolve the thin transition layer characteristic of the anisotropic transport equation, particularly when the strong anisotropic direction is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinates. The transition layer is measured by the profile width, which is zero for infinite anisotropy. It is shown that only higher order schemes have the ability to make this layer converge towards zero when the anisotropy gets stronger and stronger. Two cases are considered. One has the strong transport direction partially aligned with one of the element edges, the other doesn't have any alignment. Both cases have the strong transport direction misaligned with the grid line by some angles.

  4. Simulation of hip fracture in sideways fall using a 3D finite element model of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex with simplified representation of whole body.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Roychowdhury, Amit; Pal, Subrata

    2007-12-01

    Hip fractures due to sideways falls are a worldwide health problem, especially among the elderly population. The objective of this study was to simulate a real life sideways fall leading to hip fracture. To achieve this a computed tomography (CT) scan based three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the pelvis-femur complex was developed using a wide range of mechanical properties in the bone of the complex. For impact absorption through large deformation, surrounding soft tissue was also included in the FE model from CT scan data. To incorporate the inertia effect, the whole body was represented by a spring-mass-dashpot system. For trochanteric soft tissue thickness of 14 mm, body weight of 77.47 kg and average hip impact velocity of 3.17 m/s, this detailed FE model could approximately simulate a sideways fall configuration and examine femoral fracture situation. At the contact surface, the peak impact load was 8331 N. In spite of the presence of 14 mm thick trochanteric soft tissue, within the trochanteric zone the most compressive peak principal strain was 3.5% which exceeds ultimate compressive strain. The modeled trochanteric fracture was consistent with clinical findings and with the findings of previous studies. Further, this detailed FE model may be used to find the effect of trochanteric soft tissue thickness variations on peak impact force, peak strain in sideways fall, and to simulate automobile side impact and backward fall situations.

  5. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  6. Effects of body configuration on pelvic injury in backward fall simulation using 3D finite element models of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Roychowdhury, Amit; Pal, Subrata

    2009-07-22

    Injuries due to backward fall apart from sideways fall are a major health problem, particularly among the aged populations. The objectives of this study was to evaluate the responses to changing body configurations (angle between the trunk and impacting floor as 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 45 degrees and 80 degrees) during backward fall, based on a previously developed CT-scan-derived 3D non-linear and non-homogeneous finite element (FE) model of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex with simplified biomechanical representation of the whole body. Under constant impact energy, these FE models evaluated the pelvic injury situations on the basis of peak impact force (7.64-16.74 kN) and peak principal compressive strain (more than 1.5%), consistent with the clinically observed injuries (sacral insufficiency, coccydynia). Also the change in location of peak strain and increase in peak impact force for changing configurations from 0 degrees to 80 degrees indicated the effect of whole body inertia during backward fall. It was also concluded that the inclusion of sacro-iliac and acetabular cartilages in the above FE models will further reduce above findings marginally (9.2% for 15 degrees fall). These quantifications would also be helpful for a better design and development of safety structures such as safety floor for the nursing home or home for the aged persons.

  7. Patient-specific geometrical modeling of orthopedic structures with high efficiency and accuracy for finite element modeling and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Xiang, Chunling; Zeng, Canjun; Ouyang, Hanbin; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-12-01

    We improved the geometrical modeling procedure for fast and accurate reconstruction of orthopedic structures. This procedure consists of medical image segmentation, three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction, and assignment of material properties. The patient-specific orthopedic structures reconstructed by this improved procedure can be used in the virtual surgical planning, 3D printing of real orthopedic structures and finite element analysis. A conventional modeling consists of: image segmentation, geometrical reconstruction, mesh generation, and assignment of material properties. The present study modified the conventional method to enhance software operating procedures. Patient's CT images of different bones were acquired and subsequently reconstructed to give models. The reconstruction procedures were three-dimensional image segmentation, modification of the edge length and quantity of meshes, and the assignment of material properties according to the intensity of gravy value. We compared the performance of our procedures to the conventional procedures modeling in terms of software operating time, success rate and mesh quality. Our proposed framework has the following improvements in the geometrical modeling: (1) processing time: (femur: 87.16 ± 5.90 %; pelvis: 80.16 ± 7.67 %; thoracic vertebra: 17.81 ± 4.36 %; P < 0.05); (2) least volume reduction (femur: 0.26 ± 0.06 %; pelvis: 0.70 ± 0.47, thoracic vertebra: 3.70 ± 1.75 %; P < 0.01) and (3) mesh quality in terms of aspect ratio (femur: 8.00 ± 7.38 %; pelvis: 17.70 ± 9.82 %; thoracic vertebra: 13.93 ± 9.79 %; P < 0.05) and maximum angle (femur: 4.90 ± 5.28 %; pelvis: 17.20 ± 19.29 %; thoracic vertebra: 3.86 ± 3.82 %; P < 0.05). Our proposed patient-specific geometrical modeling requires less operating time and workload, but the orthopedic structures were generated at a higher rate of success as compared with the conventional method. It is expected to benefit the surgical planning of orthopedic

  8. A comparison of 1D analytical model and 3D finite element analysis with experiments for a rosen-type piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Boukazouha, F; Poulin-Vittrant, G; Tran-Huu-Hue, L P; Bavencoffe, M; Boubenider, F; Rguiti, M; Lethiecq, M

    2015-07-01

    This article is dedicated to the study of Piezoelectric Transformers (PTs), which offer promising solutions to the increasing need for integrated power electronics modules within autonomous systems. The advantages offered by such transformers include: immunity to electromagnetic disturbances; ease of miniaturisation for example, using conventional micro fabrication processes; and enhanced performance in terms of voltage gain and power efficiency. Central to the adequate description of such transformers is the need for complex analytical modeling tools, especially if one is attempting to include combined contributions due to (i) mechanical phenomena owing to the different propagation modes which differ at the primary and secondary sides of the PT; and (ii) electrical phenomena such as the voltage gain and power efficiency, which depend on the electrical load. The present work demonstrates an original one-dimensional (1D) analytical model, dedicated to a Rosen-type PT and simulation results are successively compared against that of a three-dimensional (3D) Finite Element Analysis (COMSOL Multiphysics software) and experimental results. The Rosen-type PT studied here is based on a single layer soft PZT (P191) with corresponding dimensions 18 mm × 3 mm × 1.5 mm, which operated at the second harmonic of 176 kHz. Detailed simulational and experimental results show that the presented 1D model predicts experimental measurements to within less than 10% error of the voltage gain at the second and third resonance frequency modes. Adjustment of the analytical model parameters is found to decrease errors relative to experimental voltage gain to within 1%, whilst a 2.5% error on the output admittance magnitude at the second resonance mode were obtained. Relying on the unique assumption of one-dimensionality, the present analytical model appears as a useful tool for Rosen-type PT design and behavior understanding.

  9. TAURUS96. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.; Hallquist, J.O.; Spelce, T.E.

    1993-11-30

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  10. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  11. Modeling the steady-state ISV (in situ vitrification) process: A 3-D finite element analysis of coupled thermal-electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Langerman, M.A.

    1990-09-01

    Steady-state modeling considerations for simulating the in situ vitrification (ISV) process are documented based upon the finite element numerical approach. Recommendations regarding boundary condition specifications and mesh discretization are presented. The effects of several parameters on the ISV process response are calculated and the results discussed. The parameters investigated include: (1) electrode depth, (2) ambient temperature, (3) supplied current, (4) electrical conductivity, (5) electrode separation, and (6) soil/waste characterization. 13 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  13. An augmented Lagrangian finite element formulation for 3D contact of biphasic tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongqiang; Spilker, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic contact analysis is essential to obtain a complete understanding of soft tissue biomechanics, and the importance of physiological structure on the joint biomechanics has long been recognised; however, up to date, there are no successful developments of biphasic finite element contact analysis for three-dimensional (3D) geometries of physiological joints. The aim of this study was to develop a finite element formulation for biphasic contact of 3D physiological joints. The augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The biphasic contact method was implemented in the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2(®) (COMSOL, Inc., Burlington, MA). The accuracy of the implementation was verified using 3D biphasic contact problems, including indentation with a flat-ended indenter and contact of glenohumeral cartilage layers. The ability of the method to model multibody biphasic contact of physiological joints was proved by a 3D knee model. The 3D biphasic finite element contact method developed in this study can be used to study the biphasic behaviours of the physiological joints.

  14. A new 3-D finite-element model based on thin-film approximation for microelectrode array recording of extracellular action potential.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Céline; Glière, Alain; Barbier, Daniel; Joucla, Sebastien; Yvert, Blaise; Mailley, Pascal; Guillemaud, Régis

    2008-02-01

    A transient finite-element model has been developed to simulate an extracellular action potential recording in a tissue slice by a planar microelectrode array. The thin-film approximation of the active neuron membrane allows the simulation within single finite-element software of the intracellular and extracellular potential fields. In comparison with a compartmental neuron model, it is shown that the thin-film approximation-based model is able to properly represent the neuron bioelectrical behavior in terms of transmembrane current and potential. Moreover, the model is able to simulate extracellular action potential recordings with properties similar to those observed in biological experiments. It is demonstrated that an ideal measurement system model can be used to represent the recording microelectrode, provided that the electronic recording system adapts to the electrode-tissue interface impedance. By comparing it with a point source approximated neuron, it is also shown that the neuron three-dimensional volume should be taken into account to simulate the extracellular action potential recording. Finally, the influence of the electrode size on the signal amplitude is evaluated. This parameter, together with the microelectrode noise, should be taken into account in order to optimize future microelectrode designs in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Modeling the impact of prostate edema on LDR brachytherapy: a Monte Carlo dosimetry study based on a 3D biphasic finite element biomechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountris, K. A.; Bert, J.; Noailly, J.; Rodriguez Aguilera, A.; Valeri, A.; Pradier, O.; Schick, U.; Promayon, E.; Gonzalez Ballester, M. A.; Troccaz, J.; Visvikis, D.

    2017-03-01

    Prostate volume changes due to edema occurrence during transperineal permanent brachytherapy should be taken under consideration to ensure optimal dose delivery. Available edema models, based on prostate volume observations, face several limitations. Therefore, patient-specific models need to be developed to accurately account for the impact of edema. In this study we present a biomechanical model developed to reproduce edema resolution patterns documented in the literature. Using the biphasic mixture theory and finite element analysis, the proposed model takes into consideration the mechanical properties of the pubic area tissues in the evolution of prostate edema. The model’s computed deformations are incorporated in a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate their effect on post-operative dosimetry. The comparison of Day1 and Day30 dosimetry results demonstrates the capability of the proposed model for patient-specific dosimetry improvements, considering the edema dynamics. The proposed model shows excellent ability to reproduce previously described edema resolution patterns and was validated based on previous findings. According to our results, for a prostate volume increase of 10–20% the Day30 urethra D10 dose metric is higher by 4.2%–10.5% compared to the Day1 value. The introduction of the edema dynamics in Day30 dosimetry shows a significant global dose overestimation identified on the conventional static Day30 dosimetry. In conclusion, the proposed edema biomechanical model can improve the treatment planning of transperineal permanent brachytherapy accounting for post-implant dose alterations during the planning procedure.

  16. Model Reduction of Viscoelastic Finite Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. H.; Inman, D. J.; Lam, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines a method of adding viscoelastic properties to finite element models by using additional co-ordinates to account for the frequency dependence usually associated with such damping materials. Several such methods exist and all suffer from an increase in order of the final finite model which is undesirable in many applications. Here we propose to combine one of these methods, the GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method, with model reduction techniques to remove the objection of increased model order. The result of combining several methods is an ability to add the effects of visoelastic components to finite element or other analytical models without increasing the order of the system. The procedure is illustrated by a numerical example. The method proposed here results in a viscoelastic finite element of a structure without increasing the order of the original model.

  17. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  18. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  19. Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-in-Cell Simulations with Pic3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code Pic3P. Designed for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space charge effects, Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations self-consistently and includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects from first principles. Higher-order Finite Element methods with adaptive refinement on conformal unstructured meshes lead to highly efficient use of computational resources. Massively parallel processing with dynamic load balancing enables large-scale modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of next-generation accelerator facilities. Applications include the LCLS RF gun and the BNL polarized SRF gun.

  20. Content-Adaptive Finite Element Mesh Generation of 3-D Complex MR Volumes for Bioelectromagnetic Problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kim, T-S; Cho, M; Lee, S

    2005-01-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element method offers several advantages over other conventional methods such as boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropy. Mesh generation is the first requirement in the finite element analysis and there are many different approaches in mesh generation. However conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes, resulting in numerous elements in the smaller volume regions, thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present an improved content-adaptive mesh generation scheme that is efficient and fast along with options to change the contents of meshes. For demonstration, mesh models of the head from a volume MRI are presented in 2-D and 3-D.

  1. Implementation of Deterministically-Derived Hydrostatigraphic Units into a 3D Finite Element Model at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mansoor, K; Maley, M; Demir, Z; Hoffman, F

    2001-08-08

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large Superfund site in California that is implementing an extensive ground water remediation program. The site is underlain by a thick sequence of heterogeneous alluvial sediments. Defining ground-water flow pathways in this complex geologic setting is difficult. To better evaluate these pathways, a deterministic approach was applied to define hydrostratigraphic units (HSUS) on the basis of identifiable hydraulic behavior and contaminant migration trends. The conceptual model based on this approach indicates that groundwater flow and contaminant transport occurs within packages of sediments bounded by thin, low-permeability confining layers. To aid in the development of the remediation program, a three-dimensional finite-element model was developed for two of the HSUS at LLNL. The primary objectives of this model are to test the conceptual model with a numerical model, and provide well field management support for the large ground-water remediation system. The model was successfully calibrated to 12 years of ground water flow and contaminant transport data. These results confirm that the thin, low-permeability confining layers within the heterogeneous alluvial sediments are the dominant hydraulic control to flow and transport. This calibrated model is currently being applied to better manage the large site-wide ground water extraction system by optimizing the location of new extraction wells, managing pumping rates for extraction wells, and providing performance estimates for long-term planning and budgeting.

  2. A Novel Rat Model of Orthodontic Tooth Movement Using Temporary Skeletal Anchorage Devices: 3D Finite Element Analysis and In Vivo Validation.

    PubMed

    Kaipatur, Neelambar; Wu, Yuchin; Adeeb, Samer; Stevenson, Thomas; Major, Paul; Doschak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this animal study was to develop a model of orthodontic tooth movement using a microimplant as a TSAD in rodents. A finite element model of the TSAD in alveolar bone was built using μCT images of rat maxilla to determine the von Mises stresses and displacement in the alveolar bone surrounding the TSAD. For in vivo validation of the FE model, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 25) were used and a Stryker 1.2 × 3 mm microimplant was inserted in the right maxilla and used to protract the right first permanent molar using a NiTi closed coil spring. Tooth movement measurements were taken at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. At 8 weeks, animals were euthanized and tissues were analyzed by histology and EPMA. FE modeling showed maximum von Mises stress of 45 Mpa near the apex of TSAD but the average von Mises stress was under 25 Mpa. Appreciable tooth movement of 0.62 ± 0.04 mm at 4 weeks and 1.99 ± 0.14 mm at 8 weeks was obtained. Histological and EPMA results demonstrated no active bone remodeling around the TSAD at 8 weeks depicting good secondary stability. This study provided evidence that protracted tooth movement is achieved in small animals using TSADs.

  3. A detailed 3D finite element analysis of the peeling behaviour of a gecko spatula.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Roger A; Holl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed finite element analysis of the adhesion of a gecko spatula. The gecko spatulae form the tips of the gecko foot hairs that transfer the adhesional and frictional forces between substrate and foot. The analysis is based on a parameterised description of the 3D geometry of the spatula that only requires 12 parameters. The adhesion is described by a nonlinear computational contact formulation that accounts for the van der Waals interaction between spatula and substrate. The spatula adhesion model is implemented using an enriched contact finite element formulation recently developed by the first author. The finite element model is then used to simulate the peeling behaviour of the gecko spatula under applied vertical and rotational loading for various model parameters. Variations of the material stiffness, adhesional strength and range, stiction, spatula size and spatula inclination are considered to account for the natural variation of spatula properties. The study demonstrates that the spatula can function over a wide range of conditions. The computed pull-off forces are in agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The study also examines the energy required for the spatula pull-off. The proposed model is ideal to study the influence of substrate roughness on the spatula adhesion, as is finally demonstrated.

  4. Investigating the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy using finite element models derived from high-resolution 3D MRI.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M; House, M; Jambawalikar, S; Zork, N; Vink, J; Wapner, R; Myers, K

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is a strong contributor to perinatal mortality, and preterm infants that survive are at risk for long-term morbidities. During most of pregnancy, appropriate mechanical function of the cervix is required to maintain the developing fetus in utero. Premature cervical softening and subsequent cervical shortening are hypothesized to cause preterm birth. Presently, there is a lack of understanding of the structural and material factors that influence the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy. In this study we build finite element models of the pregnant uterus, cervix, and fetal membrane based on magnetic resonance imagining data in order to examine the mechanical function of the cervix under the physiologic loading conditions of pregnancy. We calculate the mechanical loading state of the cervix for two pregnant patients: 22 weeks gestational age with a normal cervical length and 28 weeks with a short cervix. We investigate the influence of (1) anatomical geometry, (2) cervical material properties, and (3) fetal membrane material properties, including its adhesion properties, on the mechanical loading state of the cervix under physiologically relevant intrauterine pressures. Our study demonstrates that membrane-uterus interaction, cervical material modeling, and membrane mechanical properties are factors that must be deliberately and carefully handled in order to construct a high quality mechanical simulation of pregnancy.

  5. 3D Finite Element Study on: Bar Splinted Implants Supporting Partial Denture in the Reconstructed Mandible

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohamed; Ghali, Rami; Aboelnagga, Mona

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to estimate the stress patterns induced by the masticatory loads on a removable prosthesis supported and retained by bar splinted implants placed in the reconstructed mandible with two different clip materials and without clip, in the fibula-jaw bone and prosthesis using finite element analysis. METHODS: Two 3D finite element models were constructed, that models components were modeled on commercial CAD/CAM software then assembled into finite element package. Vertical loads were applied simulating the masticatory forces unilaterally in the resected site and bilaterally in the central fossa of the lower first molar as 100N (tension and compression). Analysis was based on the assumption full osseointegration between different types of bones, and between implants and fibula while fixing the top surface of the TMJ in place. RESULTS: The metallic bar connecting the three implants is insensitive to the clips material. Its supporting implants showed typical behavior with maximum stress values at the neck region. Fibula and jaw bone showed stresses within physiologic, while clips material effect seems to be very small due to its relatively small size. CONCLUSION: Switching loading force direction from tensile to compression did-not change the stresses and deformations distribution, but reversed their sign from positive to negative. PMID:27275353

  6. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  7. A 2D magnetic and 3D mechanical coupled finite element model for the study of the dynamic vibrations in the stator of induction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.; Belahcen, A.; Detoni, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled Finite Element Model in order to study the vibrations in induction motors under steady-state. The model utilizes a weak coupling strategy between both magnetic and elastodynamic fields on the structure. Firstly, the problem solves the magnetic vector potential in an axial cut and secondly the former solution is coupled to a three dimensional model of the stator. The coupling is performed using projection based algorithms between the computed magnetic solution and the three-dimensional mesh. The three-dimensional model of the stator includes both end-windings and end-shields in order to give a realistic picture of the motor. The present model is validated using two steps. Firstly, a modal analysis hammer test is used to validate the material characteristic of this complex structure and secondly an array of accelerometer sensors is used in order to study the rotating waves using multi-dimensional spectral techniques. The analysis of the radial vibrations presented in this paper firstly concludes that slot harmonic components are visible when the motor is loaded. Secondly, the multidimensional spectrum presents the most relevant mechanical waves on the stator such as the ones produced by the space harmonics or the saturation of the iron core. The direct retrieval of the wave-number in a multi-dimensional spectrum is able to show the internal current distribution in a non-intrusive way. Experimental results for healthy induction motors are showing mechanical imbalances in a multi-dimensional spectrum in a more straightforward form.

  8. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  9. Finite element modeling and analysis of tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Predicting the response of tires under various loading conditions using finite element technology is addressed. Some of the recent advances in finite element technology which have high potential for application to tire modeling problems are reviewed. The analysis and modeling needs for tires are identified. Reduction methods for large-scale nonlinear analysis, with particular emphasis on treatment of combined loads, displacement-dependent and nonconservative loadings; development of simple and efficient mixed finite element models for shell analysis, identification of equivalent mixed and purely displacement models, and determination of the advantages of using mixed models; and effective computational models for large-rotation nonlinear problems, based on a total Lagrangian description of the deformation are included.

  10. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  11. Higher Order Finite Element Methods for Compositional Simulation in 3D Multiphase Multicomponent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, E.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D model for fully compositional multi-phase multi-component flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. Phase properties are modeled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Because phase properties may exhibit strong discontinuities, we approximate the mass transport update by the means of discontinuous Galerkin method. Pressure and velocity fields are continuous across the whole domain of solution, which is guaranteed by using the mixed hybrid finite element method. Complexity of the flow necessitates the use of either very fine mesh or higher-order schemes. The use of higher-order finite element methods significantly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects that plague traditional finite difference methods. We have shown that in 3D the convergence rate of our scheme is twice as first order method and the CPU time may improve up to three orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Our numerical model facilitates accurate simulation of delicate feature of compositional flow like fingering and CO2 injection in complex reservoirs for a broad range of applications, including CO2 sequestration in finite aquifer and water flooded reservoirs with transfer of all species between the phases.

  12. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  13. 3D finite element analysis of porous Ti-based alloy prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mircheski, Ile; Gradišar, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, novel designs of porous acetabular cups are created and tested with 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The aim is to develop a porous acetabular cup with low effective radial stiffness of the structure, which will be near to the architectural and mechanical behavior of the natural bone. For the realization of this research, a 3D-scanner technology was used for obtaining a 3D-CAD model of the pelvis bone, a 3D-CAD software for creating a porous acetabular cup, and a 3D-FEA software for virtual testing of a novel design of the porous acetabular cup. The results obtained from this research reveal that a porous acetabular cup from Ti-based alloys with 60 ± 5% porosity has the mechanical behavior and effective radial stiffness (Young's modulus in radial direction) that meet and exceed the required properties of the natural bone. The virtual testing with 3D-FEA of a novel design with porous structure during the very early stage of the design and the development of orthopedic implants, enables obtaining a new or improved biomedical implant for a relatively short time and reduced price.

  14. Finite Element Model to Reduce Fire and Blast Vulnerability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Finite Element Analysis FEM Finite Element Model NAVAIR...and probabilistic analysis are need to address these challenges. The objective of this effort is to develop a finite element model of a soldier to...UNCLASSIFIED FINITE ELEMENT MODEL TO REDUCE FIRE AND BLAST VULNERABILITY INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 439 by W. Loren Francis

  15. 3D mechanical analysis of aeronautical plain bearings: Validation of a finite element model from measurement of displacement fields by digital volume correlation and optical scanning tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Peyruseigt, F.; Mistou, S.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    On Airbus aircraft, spherical plain bearings are used on many components; in particular to link engine to pylon or pylon to wing. Design of bearings is based on contact pressure distribution on spherical surfaces. To determine this distribution, a 3D analysis of the mechanical behaviour of aeronautical plain bearing is presented in this paper. A numerical model has been built and validated from a comparison with 3D experimental measurements of kinematic components. For that, digital volume correlation (DVC) coupled with optical scanning tomography (OST) is employed to study the mechanical response of a plain bearing model made in epoxy resin. Experimental results have been compared with the ones obtained from the simulated model. This comparison enables us to study the influence of various boundary conditions to build the FE model. Some factors have been highlighted like the fitting behaviour which can radically change contact pressure distribution. This work shows the contribution of a representative mechanical environment to study precisely mechanical response of aeronautical plain bearings.

  16. GENSURF: A mesh generator for 3D finite element analysis of surface and corner cracks in finite thickness plates subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A computer program that generates three-dimensional (3D) finite element models for cracked 3D solids was written. This computer program, gensurf, uses minimal input data to generate 3D finite element models for isotropic solids with elliptic or part-elliptic cracks. These models can be used with a 3D finite element program called surf3d. This report documents this mesh generator. In this manual the capabilities, limitations, and organization of gensurf are described. The procedures used to develop 3D finite element models and the input for and the output of gensurf are explained. Several examples are included to illustrate the use of this program. Several input data files are included with this manual so that the users can edit these files to conform to their crack configuration and use them with gensurf.

  17. Unilateral Outer Bow Expanded Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Mortezai, Omid; Esmaily, Masomeh; Darvishpour, Hojat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Headgears are among the effective orthodontic appliances to achieve treatment goals. Unilateral molar distal movement is sometimes needed during an orthodontic treatment, which can be achieved by an asymmetric headgear. Different unilateral headgears have been introduced. The main goal of this study was to analyze the force system of unilateral expanded outer bow asymmetric headgears by the finite element method (FEM). Materials and Methods: Six 3D finite element models of a mesiodistal slice of the maxilla containing upper first molars, their periodontal ligaments (PDLs), cancellous bone, cortical bone, and a cervical headgear with expanded outer bow attached to maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 and meshed in ANSYS Workbench ver. 12.1. The models were the same except for the degree of outer bow expansion. The outer bow ends were loaded with 2 N force. The distal driving force and the net moment were evaluated. Results: A decrease in the distalizing force in the normal side molar from 1.69 N to 1.37 N was shown by increasing the degree of unilateral expansion. At the same time, the force increased from 2.19 N to 2.49 N in the expanded side molar. A net moment increasing from 2.26 N.mm to 4.64 N.mm was also shown. Conclusion: Unilateral outer bow expansion can produce different distalizing forces in molars, which increase by increasing the expansion. PMID:26622282

  18. Finite element modelling of SAW correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikka, Ajay C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Abbott, Derek

    2007-12-01

    Numerical simulations of SAW correlators so far are limited to delta function and equivalent circuit models. These models are not accurate as they do not replicate the actual behaviour of the device. Manufacturing a correlator to specifically realise a different configuration is both expensive and time consuming. With the continuous improvement in computing capacity, switching to finite element modelling would be more appropriate. In this paper a novel way of modelling a SAW correlator using finite element analysis is presented. This modelling approach allows the consideration of different code implementation and device structures. This is demonstrated through simulation results for a 5×2-bit Barker sequence encoded SAW correlator. These results show the effect of both bulk and leaky modes on the device performance at various operating frequencies. Moreover, the ways in which the gain of the correlator can be optimised though variation of design parameters will also be outlined.

  19. Finite element micro-modelling of a human ankle bone reveals the importance of the trabecular network to mechanical performance: new methods for the generation and comparison of 3D models.

    PubMed

    Parr, W C H; Chamoli, U; Jones, A; Walsh, W R; Wroe, S

    2013-01-04

    Most modelling of whole bones does not incorporate trabecular geometry and treats bone as a solid non-porous structure. Some studies have modelled trabecular networks in isolation. One study has modelled the performance of whole human bones incorporating trabeculae, although this required considerable computer resources and purpose-written code. The difference between mechanical behaviour in models that incorporate trabecular geometry and non-porous models has not been explored. The ability to easily model trabecular networks may shed light on the mechanical consequences of bone loss in osteoporosis and remodelling after implant insertion. Here we present a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of a human ankle bone that includes trabecular network geometry. We compare results from this model with results from non-porous models and introduce protocols achievable on desktop computers using widely available softwares. Our findings show that models including trabecular geometry are considerably stiffer than non-porous whole bone models wherein the non-cortical component has the same mass as the trabecular network, suggesting inclusion of trabecular geometry is desirable. We further present new methods for the construction and analysis of 3D models permitting: (1) construction of multi-property, non-porous models wherein cortical layer thickness can be manipulated; (2) maintenance of the same triangle network for the outer cortical bone surface in both 3D reconstruction and non-porous models allowing exact replication of load and restraint cases; and (3) creation of an internal landmark point grid allowing direct comparison between 3D FE Models (FEMs).

  20. A 3D moving mesh Finite Element Method for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, G. R.; Borhani, N.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Thome, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    A 3D ALE Finite Element Method is developed to study two-phase flow phenomena using a new discretization method to compute the surface tension forces. The computational method is based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) and the Finite Element Method (FEM), creating a two-phase method with an improved model for the liquid-gas interface. An adaptive mesh update procedure is also proposed for effective management of the mesh to remove, add and repair elements, since the computational mesh nodes move according to the flow. The ALE description explicitly defines the two-phase interface position by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The proposed methodology for computing the curvature leads to accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational cost. Static and dynamic tests have been carried out to validate the method and the results have compared well to analytical solutions and experimental results found in the literature, demonstrating that the new proposed methodology provides good accuracy to describe the interfacial forces and bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on the description of the proposed methodology, with particular emphasis on the discretization of the surface tension force, the new remeshing technique, and the validation results. Additionally, a microchannel simulation in complex geometry is presented for two elongated bubbles.

  1. Finite element modeling of permanent magnet devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, J. R.; Larkin, L. A.; Overbye, V. D.

    1984-03-01

    New techniques are presented for finite element modeling of permanent magnets in magnetic devices such as motors and generators. These techniques extend a previous sheet-current permanent magnet model that applies only for straight line B-H loops and rectangular-shaped magnets. Here Maxwell's equations are used to derive the model of a permanent magnet having a general curved B-H loop and any geometric shape. The model enables a nonlinear magnetic finite element program to use Newton-Raphson iteration to solve for saturable magnetic fields in a wide variety of devices containing permanent magnets and steels. The techniques are applied to a brushless dc motor with irregular-shaped permanent magnets. The calculated motor torque agrees well with measured torque.

  2. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  3. BOPACE 3-D (the Boeing Plastic Analysis Capability for 3-dimensional Solids Using Isoparametric Finite Elements)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The BOPACE 3-D is a finite element computer program, which provides a general family of three-dimensional isoparametric solid elements, and includes a new algorithm for improving the efficiency of the elastic-plastic-creep solution procedure. Theoretical, user, and programmer oriented sections are presented to describe the program.

  4. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Moeller, Knut

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT.

  5. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  6. Low-Velocity Impact Response and Finite Element Analysis of Four-Step 3-D Braided Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baozhong; Zhang, Yan; Gu, Bohong

    2013-08-01

    The low-velocity impact characters of 3-D braided carbon/epoxy composites were investigated from experimental and finite element simulation approaches. The quasi-static tests were carried out at a constant velocity of 2 mm/min on MTS 810.23 material tester system to obtain the indentation load-displacement curves and indentation damages. The low-velocity tests were conducted at the velocities from 1 m/s to 6 m/s (corresponding to the impact energy from 3.22 J to 116 J) on Instron Dynatup 9250 impact tester. The peak force, energy for peak force, time to peak force, and total energy absorption were obtained to determine the impact responses of 3-D braided composites. A unit cell model was established according to the microstructure of 3-D braided composites to derive the constitutive equation. Based on the model, a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT) has been compiled by FORTRAN and connected with commercial finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit to calculate the impact damage. The unit cell model successfully predicted the impact response of 3-D braided composites. Furthermore, the stress wave propagation and failure mechanisms have been revealed from the finite element simulation results and ultimate damage morphologies of specimens.

  7. Numerical Analysis of Three-Dimensional Cervical Behaviors in Posterior-Oblique Car Collisions Using 3-D Human Whole Body Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yu-Bong; Jung, Duk-Young; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Nobuyuki; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Ikeuchi, Ken

    Whiplash injuries are most common disorders in rear-end car accidents, while the injury mechanism is yet unknown. Many numerical and experimental approaches have conducted to investigate the cervical behaviors with solely two-dimensional analyses in the sagittal plane. In real accidents, however, as impacts may affect several directions, the cervical behaviors should be evaluated three-dimensionally. Therefore, we evaluated the cervical behaviors under assumption of the posterior-oblique impacts depending on the impact angles with 3-D FE analysis. In addition, we analyzed the stresses occurred in the facet joints considering the relationship with a whiplash disorders. The cervical behaviors showed complex motion combined with axial torsion and lateral bending. The bending angle peaked in the impact at the angle of 15°, and the peak compressive and shear stress on the facet cartilage at C6-C7 increased by 11% and 14%. In the impact at the angle of 30°, the torsion angle peaked at C2-C3, the peak shear stress in the facet cartilage increased by 27%. It showed that the torsion and lateral bending affected the cervical behaviors, and caused the increase of peak stresses on the soft tissues. It is assumed as one of important causes of whiplash injury.

  8. 3D hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method: Implementation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Ahmadian, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    A hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method (HIFEM) is proposed for the mesh-independent treatment of 3D problems with intricate morphologies. The HIFEM implements a recursive algorithm for creating enrichment functions that capture gradient discontinuities in nonconforming finite elements cut by arbitrary number and configuration of materials interfaces. The method enables the mesh-independent simulation of multiphase problems with materials interfaces that are in close proximity or contact while providing a straightforward general approach for evaluating the enrichments. In this manuscript, we present a detailed discussion on the implementation issues and required computational geometry considerations associated with the HIFEM approximation of thermal and mechanical responses of 3D problems. A convergence study is provided to investigate the accuracy and convergence rate of the HIFEM and compare them with standard FEM benchmark solutions. We will also demonstrate the application of this mesh-independent method for simulating the thermal and mechanical responses of two composite materials systems with complex microstructures.

  9. Finite Element Based Anisotropic 3D Inversion of Marine CSEM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Y.; Byun, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order to interpret three-dimensional (3D) marine controlled-source electromagnetic (MCSEM) data, it is critical to accurately determine electrical anisotropy because ignoring anisotropy can produce misleading artifacts. In this study, we present an inversion method for 3D subsurface imaging in media with an inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution. Direct solvers are incorporated both in the forward and inverse problems, For the forward problem, the vector Helmholtz equation for the secondary electric field is discretized on a hexahedral mesh using edge finite elements, then a direct sparse-matrix solver is chosen to effectively reuse its factorization both in the survey simulation and Jacobian computation. The inversion method is formulated as a functional optimization with an objective functional containing terms measuring data misfit and model structure by means of smoothness and anisotropy. These measures are efficiently incorporated through the use of an iteratively reweighted least-squares scheme. The objective functional is minimized by a Gauss-Newton approach using a direct dense-matrix solver. We demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of the algorithm by testing it on synthetic data sets.

  10. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  11. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth.

  12. Non-planar interconnects in double-sided flexible Cu-PET substrates using a laser-assisted maskless microdeposition process: 3D finite element modeling and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabari, Elahe; Tong, Steven; Azhari, Amir; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    Non-planar (3D) interconnects have an important role in the electronic packaging industry these days. These unconventional interconnects allow manufacturers to save materials and space while connecting circuit components on flexible and non-planar substrates. Among a variety of flexible boards, double-sided flexible substrates have attracted the electronic industry to effectively and compactly develop miniaturized flexible devices such as sensors-on-chips. This study reports our developmental procedure for the creation of non-planar silver interconnects on the edge of double-sided copper substrates separated by a layer of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) using laser-assisted maskless microdeposition (LAMM). The article consists of the characterization of the LAMM process to effectively deposit Ag nanoparticles for production of conductive interconnects. Several parameters, including the deposition and laser processing parameters, are optimized to achieve interconnects free of pores, cracks and delamination. For investigating the topography and microstructure of interconnects, various analytical tools, such as SEM, XRD, Profilometery, and EDS were used. Furthermore, a 3D finite element numerical model was developed to predict the laser processing of silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The model includes a coupled thermal and structural governing physics to derive the temperature history throughout the simulation as well as strain/displacement within the substrate, which is identified the major source of cark formation in Ag tracks. The SEM micrographs of the laser processed nanoparticles suggest that a minimum of 1.24 W laser power was needed for an effective nanoparticles sintering to obtain conductive 3D interconnects with minimum amount of cracks whereas a 1.7 W laser power caused PET to decompose.

  13. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  14. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30-50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in treating

  15. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar–canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30–50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in

  16. Plasmonics of 3-D Nanoshell Dimers Using Multipole Expansion and Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Christopher G.; Norton, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and spectral responses of the plasmonic fields induced in the gap of 3-D Nanoshell Dimers of gold and silver are comprehensively investigated and compared via theory and simulation, using the Multipole Expansion (ME) and the Finite Element Method (FEM) in COMSOL, respectively. The E-field in the dimer gap was evaluated and compared as a function of shell thickness, inter-particle distance, and size. The E-field increased with decreasing shell thickness, decreasing interparticle distance, and increasing size, with the error between the two methods ranging from 1 to 10%, depending on the specific combination of these three variables. This error increases several fold with increasing dimer size, as the quasi-static approximation breaks down. A consistent overestimation of the plasmon’s FWHM and red-shifting of the plasmon peak occurs with FEM, relative to ME, and it increases with decreasing shell thickness and inter-particle distance. The size-effect that arises from surface scattering of electrons is addressed and shown to be especially prominent for thin shells, for which significant damping, broadening and shifting of the plasmon band is observed; the size-effect also affects large nanoshell dimers, depending on their relative shell thickness, but to a lesser extent. This study demonstrates that COMSOL is a promising simulation environment to quantitatively investigate nanoscale electromagnetics for the modeling and designing of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrates. PMID:19678677

  17. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  18. Patient-specific finite element modeling of bones.

    PubMed

    Poelert, Sander; Valstar, Edward; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2013-04-01

    Finite element modeling is an engineering tool for structural analysis that has been used for many years to assess the relationship between load transfer and bone morphology and to optimize the design and fixation of orthopedic implants. Due to recent developments in finite element model generation, for example, improved computed tomography imaging quality, improved segmentation algorithms, and faster computers, the accuracy of finite element modeling has increased vastly and finite element models simulating the anatomy and properties of an individual patient can be constructed. Such so-called patient-specific finite element models are potentially valuable tools for orthopedic surgeons in fracture risk assessment or pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement. The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of current themes in patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. In addition, the state-of-the-art in patient-specific modeling of bones is compared with the requirements for a clinically applicable patient-specific finite element method, and judgment is passed on the feasibility of application of patient-specific finite element modeling as a part of clinical orthopedic routine. It is concluded that further development in certain aspects of patient-specific finite element modeling are needed before finite element modeling can be used as a routine clinical tool.

  19. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  20. Feeding biomechanics of Late Triassic metoposaurids (Amphibia: Temnospondyli): a 3D finite element analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Josep; Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Konietzko-Meier, Dorota

    2017-03-29

    The Late Triassic freshwater ecosystems were occupied by different tetrapod groups including large-sized anamniotes, such as metoposaurids. Most members of this group of temnospondyls acquired gigantic sizes (up to 5 m long) with a nearly worldwide distribution. The paleoecology of metoposaurids is controversial; they have been historically considered passive, bottom-dwelling animals, waiting for prey on the bottom of rivers and lakes, or they have been suggested to be active mid-water feeders. The present study aims to expand upon the paleoecological interpretations of these animals using 3D finite element analyses (FEA). Skulls from two taxa, Metoposaurus krasiejowensis, a gigantic taxon from Europe, and Apachesaurus gregorii, a non-gigantic taxon from North America, were analyzed under different biomechanical scenarios. Both 3D models of the skulls were scaled to allow comparisons between them and reveal that the general stress distribution pattern found in both taxa is clearly similar in all scenarios. In light of our results, both previous hypotheses about the paleoecology of these animals can be partly merged: metoposaurids probably were ambush and active predators, but not the top predators of these aquatic environments. The FEA results demonstrate that they were particularly efficient at bilateral biting, and together with their characteristically anteropositioned orbits, optimal for an ambush strategy. Nonetheless, the results also show that these animals were capable of lateral strikes of the head, suggesting active hunting of prey. Regarding the important skull size differences between the taxa analyzed, our results suggest that the size reduction in the North American taxon could be related to drastic environmental changes or the increase of competitors. The size reduction might have helped them expand into new ecological niches, but they likely remained fully aquatic, as are all other metoposaurids.

  1. Finite element modeling and experimentation of bone drilling forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lughmani, W. A.; Bouazza-Marouf, K.; Ashcroft, I.

    2013-07-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. This paper presents a 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Finite element model calibration of a nonlinear perforated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.; Beberniss, Timothy J.; Neild, Simon A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a case study in which the finite element model for a curved circular plate is calibrated to reproduce both the linear and nonlinear dynamic response measured from two nominally identical samples. The linear dynamic response is described with the linear natural frequencies and mode shapes identified with a roving hammer test. Due to the uncertainty in the stiffness characteristics from the manufactured perforations, the linear natural frequencies are used to update the effective modulus of elasticity of the full order finite element model (FEM). The nonlinear dynamic response is described with nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) measured using force appropriation and high speed 3D digital image correlation (3D-DIC). The measured NNMs are used to update the boundary conditions of the full order FEM through comparison with NNMs calculated from a nonlinear reduced order model (NLROM). This comparison revealed that the nonlinear behavior could not be captured without accounting for the small curvature of the plate from manufacturing as confirmed in literature. So, 3D-DIC was also used to identify the initial static curvature of each plate and the resulting curvature was included in the full order FEM. The updated models are then used to understand how the stress distribution changes at large response amplitudes providing a possible explanation of failures observed during testing.

  3. Least-squares finite element solution of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, Tsung-Liang; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1992-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the finite element solution of incompressible viscous flow problems. Development of more efficient methods is still needed before large-scale computation of 3D problems becomes feasible. This paper presents such a development. The most popular finite element method for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is the classic Galerkin mixed method based on the velocity-pressure formulation. The mixed method requires the use of different elements to interpolate the velocity and the pressure in order to satisfy the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition for the existence of the solution. On the other hand, due to the lack of symmetry and positive definiteness of the linear equations arising from the mixed method, iterative methods for the solution of linear systems have been hard to come by. Therefore, direct Gaussian elimination has been considered the only viable method for solving the systems. But, for three-dimensional problems, the computer resources required by a direct method become prohibitively large. In order to overcome these difficulties, a least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) has been developed. This method is based on the first-order velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. In this paper the LSFEM is extended for the solution of three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in the following first-order quasi-linear velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation.

  4. Finite element modelling of fabric shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hua; Clifford, Mike J.; Long, Andrew C.; Sherburn, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a finite element model to predict shear force versus shear angle for woven fabrics is developed. The model is based on the TexGen geometric modelling schema, developed at the University of Nottingham and orthotropic constitutive models for yarn behaviour, coupled with a unified displacement-difference periodic boundary condition. A major distinction from prior modelling of fabric shear is that the details of picture frame kinematics are included in the model, which allows the mechanisms of fabric shear to be represented more accurately. Meso- and micro-mechanisms of deformation are modelled to determine their contributions to energy dissipation during shear. The model is evaluated using results obtained for a glass fibre plain woven fabric, and the importance of boundary conditions in the analysis of deformation mechanisms is highlighted. The simulation results show that the simple rotation boundary condition is adequate for predicting shear force at large deformations, with most of the energy being dissipated at higher shear angles due to yarn compaction. For small deformations, a detailed kinematic analysis is needed, enabling the yarn shear and rotation deformation mechanisms to be modelled accurately.

  5. Characteristics Analysis on Various Kinds of Hybrid Stepping Motors Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Maki, Kohji; Miyata, Kenji; Oonishi, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Masafumi; Abukawa, Toshimi

    We have presented a powerful scheme of investigating hybrid stepping motor characteristics by using 3D finite element method. A linear magnetic field analysis is effectively applicable to predict relative performance of several motors in an extremely short computing time. The waveforms of cogging torque by linear and nonlinear analysis resemble each other, while the wave amplitude in the linear analysis is about 2 times larger than one in the nonlinear analysis in the presented example. The overestimation factor of cogging torque is approximately constant for the same material composition.

  6. Building Finite Element Models to Investigate Zebrafish Jaw Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Roddy, Karen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal morphogenesis occurs through tightly regulated cell behaviors during development; many cell types alter their behavior in response to mechanical strain. Skeletal joints are subjected to dynamic mechanical loading. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational method, frequently used in engineering that can predict how a material or structure will respond to mechanical input. By dividing a whole system (in this case the zebrafish jaw skeleton) into a mesh of smaller 'finite elements', FEA can be used to calculate the mechanical response of the structure to external loads. The results can be visualized in many ways including as a 'heat map' showing the position of maximum and minimum principal strains (a positive principal strain indicates tension while a negative indicates compression. The maximum and minimum refer the largest and smallest strain). These can be used to identify which regions of the jaw and therefore which cells are likely to be under particularly high tensional or compressional loads during jaw movement and can therefore be used to identify relationships between mechanical strain and cell behavior. This protocol describes the steps to generate Finite Element models from confocal image data on the musculoskeletal system, using the zebrafish lower jaw as a practical example. The protocol leads the reader through a series of steps: 1) staining of the musculoskeletal components, 2) imaging the musculoskeletal components, 3) building a 3 dimensional (3D) surface, 4) generating a mesh of Finite Elements, 5) solving the FEA and finally 6) validating the results by comparison to real displacements seen in movements of the fish jaw. PMID:28060270

  7. Efficient finite element modeling of elastodynamic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Velichko, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by defects is the physical basis of ultrasonic NDE. Although analytical models exist for some canonical problems, the general case of scattering from an arbitrarily-shaped defect requires numerical methods such as finite elements (FE). In this paper, a robust and efficient FE technique is presented that is based on the premise of meshing a relatively small domain sufficient to enclose the scatterer. Plane waves are then excited from a particular direction by a numerical implementation of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral that uses an encircling array of uni-modal point sources. The scattered field displacements are recorded at the same points and the field decomposed into plane waves of different modes at different angles. By repeating this procedure for different incident angles it is possible to generate the scattering- or S-matrix for the scatterer. For a given size of scatterer, all the information in an S-matrix can be represented in the Fourier domain by a limited number of complex coefficients. Thus the complete scattering behavior of an arbitrary-shaped scatterer can be characterized by a finite number of complex coefficients, that can be obtained from a relatively small number of FE model executions.

  8. Intra Plate Stresses Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalakshmi, S.; Raghukanth, S. T. G.

    2016-10-01

    One of the most challenging problems in the estimation of seismic hazard is the ability to quantify seismic activity. Empirical models based on the available earthquake catalogue are often used to obtain activity of source regions. The major limitation with this approach is the lack of sufficient data near a specified source. The non-availability of data poses difficulties in obtaining distribution of earthquakes with large return periods. Such events recur over geological time scales during which tectonic processes, including mantle convection, formation of faults and new plate boundaries, are likely to take place. The availability of geometries of plate boundaries, plate driving forces, lithospheric stress field and GPS measurements has provided numerous insights on the mechanics of tectonic plates. In this article, a 2D finite element model of Indo-Australian plate is developed with the focus of representing seismic activity in India. The effect of large scale geological features including sedimentary basins, fold belts and cratons on the stress field in India is explored in this study. In order to address long term behaviour, the orientation of stress field and tectonic faults of the present Indo- Australian plate are compared with a reconstructed stress field from the early Miocene (20 Ma).

  9. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  10. Generating Finite-Element Models Of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Program starts at micromechanical level, from simple inputs supplied by user. COMGEN, COmposite Model GENerator, is interactive FORTRAN program used to create wide variety of finite-element models of continuous-fiber composite materials at micromechanical level. Quickly generates batch or "session files" to be submitted to finite-element preprocessor and postprocessor program, PATRAN. COMGEN requires PATRAN to complete model.

  11. Finite element 3D reconstruction of the pulmonary acinus imaged by synchrotron X-ray tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, A.; Filipovic, N.; Haberthür, D.; Dickie, R.; Matsui, Y.; Stampanoni, M.; Schittny, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The alveolated structure of the pulmonary acinus plays a vital role in gas exchange function. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the parenchymal region is fundamental to understanding this structure-function relationship, but only a limited number of attempts have been conducted in the past because of technical limitations. In this study, we developed a new image processing methodology based on finite element (FE) analysis for accurate 3D structural reconstruction of the gas exchange regions of the lung. Stereologically well characterized rat lung samples (Pediatr Res 53: 72–80, 2003) were imaged using high-resolution synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy. A stack of 1,024 images (each slice: 1024 × 1024 pixels) with resolution of 1.4 μm3 per voxel were generated. For the development of FE algorithm, regions of interest (ROI), containing ∼7.5 million voxels, were further extracted as a working subunit. 3D FEs were created overlaying the voxel map using a grid-based hexahedral algorithm. A proper threshold value for appropriate segmentation was iteratively determined to match the calculated volume density of tissue to the stereologically determined value (Pediatr Res 53: 72–80, 2003). The resulting 3D FEs are ready to be used for 3D structural analysis as well as for subsequent FE computational analyses like fluid dynamics and skeletonization. PMID:18583378

  12. Finite element meshing of ANSYS (trademark) solid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    A large scale, general purpose finite element computer program, ANSYS, developed and marketed by Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc. is discussed. ANSYS was perhaps the first commercially available program to offer truly interactive finite element model generation. ANSYS's purpose is for solid modeling. This application is briefly discussed and illustrated.

  13. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  14. Fixed versus Removable Appliance for Palatal Expansion; A 3D Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Geramy, Allahyar; Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several appliances have been used for palatal expansion for treatment of posterior cross bite. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress induced in the apical and crestal alveolar bone and the pattern of tooth displacement following expansion via removable expansion plates or fixed-banded palatal expander using the finite element method (FEM) analysis. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM models were designed from a mesio-distal slice of the maxilla containing the upper first molars, their periodontium and alveolar bone. Two palatal expanders (removable and fixed) were modeled. The models were designed in SolidWorks 2006 and then transferred to ANSYS Workbench. The appliance halves were displaced 0.1 mm laterally. The von Mises stress in the apical, crestal, and PDL areas and also the vertical displacement of the cusps (palatal and buccal) was were evaluated. Results: The total PDL stress was 0.40003 MPa in the removable appliance (RA) model and 4.88e-2 MPa in the fixed appliance (FA) model and the apical stress was 9.9e-2 and 1.17e-2 MPa, respectively. The crestal stress was 2.99e-1 MPa in RA and 7.62e-2 MPa in the FA. The stress in the cortical bone crest was 0.30327 and 7.9244e-2 MPa for RA and FA, respectively and 3.7271 and 7.4373e-2 MPa in crestal area of spongy bone, respectively. The vertical displacement of the buccal cusp and palatal cusp was 1.64e-2 and 5.90e-2 mm in RA and 1.05e-4 and 1.7e-4 mm in FA, respectively. Conclusion: The overall stress as well as apical and crestal stress in periodontium of anchor teeth was higher in RA than FA; RA elicited higher stress in both cortical and spongy bone. The vertical displacement of molar cusps was more in removable than fixed palatal expander model. PMID:24910679

  15. Experimental validation of 3D printed patient-specific implants using digital image correlation and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Miller, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    With the dawn of 3D printing technology, patient-specific implant designs are set to have a paradigm shift. A topology optimization method in designing patient-specific craniofacial implants has been developed to ensure adequate load transfer mechanism and restore the form and function of the mid-face. Patient-specific finite element models are used to design these implants and to validate whether they are viable for physiological loading such as mastication. Validation of these topology optimized finite element models using mechanical testing is a critical step. Instead of inserting the implants into a cadaver or patient, we embed the implants into the computer-aided skull model of a patient and, fuse them together to 3D print the complete skull model with the implant. Masticatory forces are applied in the molar region to simulate chewing and measure the stress-strain trajectory. Until recently, strain gages have been used to measure strains for validation. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method is a relatively new technique for full-field strain measurement which provides a continuous deformation field data. The main objective of this study is to validate the finite element model of patient-specific craniofacial implants against the strain data from the DIC obtained during the mastication simulation and show that the optimized shapes provide adequate load-transfer mechanism. Patient-specific models are obtained from CT scans. The principal maximum and minimum strains are compared. The computational and experimental approach to designing patient-specific implants proved to be a viable technique for mid-face craniofacial reconstruction.

  16. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problem results are presented.

  17. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  18. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  19. Efficient Finite Element Modelling of Elastodynamic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-02-01

    A robust and efficient technique for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped defect is presented that can be implemented in a commercial FE package. The spatial size of the modeling domain around the defect is as small as possible to minimize computational expense and a minimum number of models are executed. Example results for 2D and 3D scattering in isotropic material and guided wave scattering are presented.

  20. Validation of a finite element model of the human metacarpal.

    PubMed

    Barker, D S; Netherway, D J; Krishnan, J; Hearn, T C

    2005-03-01

    Implant loosening and mechanical failure of components are frequently reported following metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint replacement. Studies of the mechanical environment of the MCP implant-bone construct are rare. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive ability of a finite element model of the intact second human metacarpal to provide a validated baseline for further mechanical studies. A right index human metacarpal was subjected to torsion and combined axial/bending loading using strain gauge (SG) and 3D finite element (FE) analysis. Four different representations of bone material properties were considered. Regression analyses were performed comparing maximum and minimum principal surface strains taken from the SG and FE models. Regression slopes close to unity and high correlation coefficients were found when the diaphyseal cortical shell was modelled as anisotropic and cancellous bone properties were derived from quantitative computed tomography. The inclusion of anisotropy for cortical bone was strongly influential in producing high model validity whereas variation in methods of assigning stiffness to cancellous bone had only a minor influence. The validated FE model provides a tool for future investigations of current and novel MCP joint prostheses.

  1. Coseismic and postseismic Coulomb stress changes on intra-continental dip-slip faults and the role of viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust: insights from 3D finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge, Meike; Hampel, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Investigating the stress interaction of faults plays a crucial role for assessing seismic hazard of a region. The calculation of Coulomb stress changes allows quantifying stress changes on so-called receiver faults in the surrounding of a source fault that was ruptured during an earthquake. Positive Coulomb stress changes bring receiver faults closer to failure, while a negative value indicates a delay of the next earthquake. Besides the coseismic ('static') stress changes, postseismic ('transient') stress changes induced by postseismic viscoelastic relaxation occur. Here we use 3D finite-element models with arrays of normal or thrust faults to study the coseismic stress changes and the stress changes arising from postseismic relaxation in the lower crust. The lithosphere is divided into an elastic upper crust, a viscoelastic lower crust and a viscoelastic lithospheric mantle. Gravity is included in the models. Driven by extension or shortening of the model, slip on the fault planes develops in a self-consistent way. We modelled an earthquake on a 40-km-long source fault with a coseismic slip of 2 m and calculated the displacement fields and Coulomb stress changes during the coseismic and postseismic phases. The results for the coseismic phase (Bagge and Hampel, Tectonophysics in press) show that synthetic receiver faults in the hanging wall and footwall of the source fault exhibit a symmetric distribution of the coseismic Coulomb stress changes on each fault, with large areas of negative stress changes but also some smaller areas of positive values. In contrast, faults positioned in along-strike prolongation of the source fault and outside of its hanging wall and footwall undergo mostly positive stress changes. Postseismic stress changes caused by viscous flow modify the static stress changes in a way that the net Coulomb stress changes on the receiver faults change significantly through space and time. Our models allow deciphering the combined effect of stress

  2. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  3. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  4. Demonstration of finite element simulations in MOOSE using crystallographic models of irradiation hardening and plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Anirban; Wen, Wei; Martinez Saez, Enrique; Tome, Carlos

    2016-05-31

    This report describes the implementation of a crystal plasticity framework (VPSC) for irradiation hardening and plastic deformation in the finite element code, MOOSE. Constitutive models for irradiation hardening and the crystal plasticity framework are described in a previous report [1]. Here we describe these models briefly and then describe an algorithm for interfacing VPSC with finite elements. Example applications of tensile deformation of a dog bone specimen and a 3D pre-irradiated bar specimen performed using MOOSE are demonstrated.

  5. Finite Element Modeling for Ultrasonic Transducers (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-27

    virtual prototyping of transducers . Fig. 18 shows a 3D model of a Tonpilz device for low frequency sensing in air. This classical design is usually used...coupled Tonpilz transducer . A thick, flexible matching layer is bonded to the face of the conical head-mass. 7. CONCLUSIONS This paper was intended as a...This is a preprint of a paper published in Proc. SPIE Int. Symp. Medical Imaging 1998, San Diego, Feb 21-27, 1998 Ultrasonic Transducer Engineering

  6. North Atlantic Finite Element Ocean Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluthedathekuzhiyil, Praveen

    This thesis presents a modified version of the Finite Element Ocean Model (FEOM) developed at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) for the North Atlantic Ocean. A reasonable North Atlantic Ocean simulation is obtained against the observational data sets in a Control simulation (CS) where the surface boundary conditions are relaxed to a climatology. The vertical mixing in the model was tuned to represent convection in the model, also the horizontal mixing and diffusion coefficients to represent the changes in the resolution of the model’s unstructured grid. In addition, the open boundaries in the model are treated with a sponge layer where tracers are relaxed to climatology. The model is then further modified to accept the atmospheric flux forcing at the surface boundary with an added net heat flux correction and freshwater forcing from major rivers that are flowing into the North Atlantic Ocean. The impact of this boundary condition on the simulation results is then analyzed and shows many improvements albeit the drift in tracer properties around the Gulf Stream region remains as that of the CS case. However a comparison of the vertical sections at Cape Desolation and Cape Farewell with the available observational data sets shows many improvements in this simulation compared to that of the CS case. But the freshwater content in the Labrador Sea interior shows a continued drift as that of the CS case with an improvement towards the 10th model year. A detailed analysis of the boundary currents around the Labrador Sea shows the weak offshore transport of freshwater from the West Greenland Current (WGC) as one of the causes. To further improve the model and reasonably represent the boundary currents and associated sub-grid scale eddies in the model, a modified sub-grid scale parameterization based on Gent and McWilliams, (1990) is adopted. The sensitivity of using various approaches in the thickness diffusion parameter ( Kgm) for this

  7. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  8. Non-Linear Finite Element Modeling of THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-01-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (THin Layer UNimorph Ferroelectric DrivER) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  9. surf3d: A 3-D finite-element program for the analysis of surface and corner cracks in solids subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program, surf3d, that uses the 3D finite-element method to calculate the stress-intensity factors for surface, corner, and embedded cracks in finite-thickness plates with and without circular holes, was developed. The cracks are assumed to be either elliptic or part eliptic in shape. The computer program uses eight-noded hexahedral elements to model the solid. The program uses a skyline storage and solver. The stress-intensity factors are evaluated using the force method, the crack-opening displacement method, and the 3-D virtual crack closure methods. In the manual the input to and the output of the surf3d program are described. This manual also demonstrates the use of the program and describes the calculation of the stress-intensity factors. Several examples with sample data files are included with the manual. To facilitate modeling of the user's crack configuration and loading, a companion program (a preprocessor program) that generates the data for the surf3d called gensurf was also developed. The gensurf program is a three dimensional mesh generator program that requires minimal input and that builds a complete data file for surf3d. The program surf3d is operational on Unix machines such as CRAY Y-MP, CRAY-2, and Convex C-220.

  10. Modelling the electromagnetic performance of moving rail gun launchers using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in 'smooth rotor' conductors moving at constant velocity is described. A method for joining discontinuous A fields at the interface between conductors in sliding electrical contact has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis.

  11. Finite element analysis to model complex mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Labrosse, Michel; Mesana, Thierry; Baxter, Ian; Chan, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Although finite element analysis has been used to model simple mitral repair, it has not been used to model complex repair. A virtual mitral valve model was successful in simulating normal and abnormal valve function. Models were then developed to simulate an edge-to-edge repair and repair employing quadrangular resection. Stress contour plots demonstrated increased stresses along the mitral annulus, corresponding to the annuloplasty. The role of finite element analysis in guiding clinical practice remains undetermined.

  12. Validation of high displacement piezoelectric actuator finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.

    2000-08-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness and important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN and ANSYS used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN, a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  13. Validation of High Displacement Piezoelectric Actuator Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Regitered Trademark) finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness are important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Registered Trademark) used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN(Registered Trademark), a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS(Registered Trademark) processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  14. 3-D finite element cyclic symmetric and contact stress analysis for a complete gear train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zeyong; Xu, Youliang; Gao, Xiangqun; Wei, Gang

    1992-10-01

    A complete gear train of a reduction gearbox is the object of finite element stress analysis. One of the basic segments of the complete gear train is taken as the computational model in the light of the cyclic symmetry of the gear train; meanwhile, the contact transmission forces between the corresponding meshed teeth are considered in the analysis of the model. For simplicity, the corresponding meshed lines are used instead of the actual contact surfaces. Both torque and centrifugal loads are involved in the analysis. The stresses in all the parts of a complete gear train can be determined by one analysis. The computed results show that the contact force on a meshed tooth is correlative not only to the length of the meshed line, but also to its position. It is shown that the neglect of the stress resulted from centrifugal load is inappropriate to a high speed gear train.

  15. Finite Elements Modeling in Diagnostics of Small Closed Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, J; Mrzygłód, M; Grzegorowska, O

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic pneumothorax still remains to be a serious clinical problem and requires a comprehensive diagnostic and monitoring during treatment. The aim of this paper is to present a computer method of modeling of small closed pneumothorax. Radiological images of 34 patients of both sexes with small closed pneumothorax were taken into consideration. The control group consisted of X-rays of 22 patients treated because of tension pneumothorax. In every single case the model was correlated with the clinical manifestations. The procedure of computational rapid analysis (CRA) for in silico analysis of surgical intervention was introduced. It included implementation of computerize tomography images and their automatic conversion into 3D finite elements model (FEM). In order to segmentize the 3D model, an intelligent procedure of domain recognition was used. In the final step, a computer simulation project of fluid-structure interaction was built, using the ANSYS\\Workbench environment of multi-physics analysis. The FEM model and computer simulation project were employed in the analysis in order to optimize surgical intervention. The model worked out well and was compatible with the clinical manifestations of pneumothorax. We conclude that the created FEM model is a promising tool for facilitation of diagnostic procedures and prognosis of treatment in the case of small closed pneumothorax.

  16. Finite element simulation of HIP-process to produce 3d near net shape parts

    SciTech Connect

    Zadeh, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    One of the major problems when producing powder metallurgy parts through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is the non homogeneous shrinkage of HIP-capsule during the process. This leads to time and cost consuming machining of the HIP parts. In order to reduce the machining to a minimum, one can try to simulate the HIP-process by means of numerical methods. Hereby, the part distortion can be predicted, and hence a new HIP-capsule can be designed in such a way to prevent the distortion partly or even completely. In the following, a finite element method is used, on one hand, to simulate part shrinkage during HIP process; on the other hand a method is integrated in this simulation to optimize the HIP-capsule geometry. For the determination of material dependent parameters, a mixture of theoretical and experimental methods is used. Results of simulation are verified for a complex 3d HIP part out of TiAl6V4.

  17. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  18. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  19. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  20. 3D finite element analysis of nutrient distributions and cell viability in the intervertebral disc: effects of deformation and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alicia R; Huang, Chun-Yuh C; Brown, Mark D; Gu, Wei Yong

    2011-09-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) receives important nutrients, such as glucose, from surrounding blood vessels. Poor nutritional supply is believed to play a key role in disc degeneration. Several investigators have presented finite element models of the IVD to investigate disc nutrition; however, none has predicted nutrient levels and cell viability in the disc with a realistic 3D geometry and tissue properties coupled to mechanical deformation. Understanding how degeneration and loading affect nutrition and cell viability is necessary for elucidating the mechanisms of disc degeneration and low back pain. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of disc degeneration and static deformation on glucose distributions and cell viability in the IVD using finite element analysis. A realistic 3D finite element model of the IVD was developed based on mechano-electrochemical mixture theory. In the model, the cellular metabolic activities and viability were related to nutrient concentrations, and transport properties of nutrients were dependent on tissue deformation. The effects of disc degeneration and mechanical compression on glucose concentrations and cell density distributions in the IVD were investigated. To examine effects of disc degeneration, tissue properties were altered to reflect those of degenerated tissue, including reduced water content, fixed charge density, height, and endplate permeability. Two mechanical loading conditions were also investigated: a reference (undeformed) case and a 10% static deformation case. In general, nutrient levels decreased moving away from the nutritional supply at the disc periphery. Minimum glucose levels were at the interface between the nucleus and annulus regions of the disc. Deformation caused a 6.2% decrease in the minimum glucose concentration in the normal IVD, while degeneration resulted in an 80% decrease. Although cell density was not affected in the undeformed normal disc, there was a decrease in cell

  1. Differentiating a Finite Element Biodegradation Simulation Model for Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, Barbara S.; Shoemaker, Christine A.

    1996-01-01

    An optimal control model for improving the design of in situ bioremediation of groundwater has been developed. The model uses a finite element biodegradation simulation model called Bio2D to find optimal pumping strategies. Analytical derivatives of the bioremediation finite element model are derived; these derivatives must be computed for the optimal control algorithm. The derivatives are complex and nonlinear; the bulk of the computational effort in solving the optimal control problem is required to calculate the derivatives. An overview of the optimal control and simulation model formulations is also given.

  2. Bone stress and strain modification in diastema closure: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Bouserhal, Joseph; Martin, Domingo; Baghaeian, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the stress and strain distribution in the alveolar bone between two central incisors in the process of diastema closure with a constant force. A 3-dimensional computer modeling based on finite element techniques was used for this purpose. A model of an anterior segment of the mandible containing cortical bone, spongy bone, gingivae, PDL and two central incisors with a bracket in the labial surface of each tooth were designed. The von Mises stress and strain was evaluated in alveolar bone along a path of nodes defined in a cresto-apical direction in the midline between two teeth. It was observed that stress and strain of alveolar bone increased in midline with a constant force to close the diastema regardless of the type of movement in gradual steps of diastema closure, however the stress was higher in the tipping movement than the bodily so it can be suggested that a protocol of force system modification should be introduced to compensate for the stress and strain changes caused by the reduced distance to avoid the unwanted stress alteration during the diastema closure.

  3. Study of Multi Pass Equal Channel Angular Pressing Using 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setia, Rajat; Sharma, Rahul Swarup; Sharma, Shanti Swarup; Raj, K. Hans

    2011-01-01

    Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) has emerged as most prominent Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) technique used to produce an ultrafine grained (UFG) structure in metals in order to improve their mechanical and physical properties. In this work Finite Element modeling of ECAP is attempted in FORGE 2007 environment. Four passes of the ECAP process of 10mm square shaped AL 6061 billet were carried out for routes A, BA and C for different channel angles and values of coefficient of friction to investigate their influence on the billet. The models were developed assuming a range of friction conditions at the billet-die contact region considering eight distinct friction coefficient (μ) values of 0.0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, 0.35 and 0.40, respectively. The simulations are carried out using three distinct situations of die channel angles (Φ), 90°, 105°, and 120° respectively. Route `BA' emerged as a better method among the three routes studied and 90° channel angle appeared to be optimal in terms of producing high equivalent strain.

  4. Finite Element Model Development For Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results.

  5. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  6. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. A. S.; Rokosz, M. K.; Correia, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  7. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  8. C1 finite elements on non-tensor-product 2d and 3d manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Geometrically continuous (Gk) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are Ck also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C1 geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G1 surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson’s equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O(h3) convergence in the L∞ norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis. PMID:26594070

  9. C(1) finite elements on non-tensor-product 2d and 3d manifolds.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Geometrically continuous (G(k) ) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are C(k) also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C(1) geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G(1) surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson's equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O(h(3)) convergence in the L(∞) norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis.

  10. Influence of bicortical techniques in internal connection placed in premaxillary area by 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araújo; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2017-02-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the stress distribution in implant-supported prostheses and peri-implant bone using internal hexagon (IH) implants in the premaxillary area, varying surgical techniques (conventional, bicortical and bicortical in association with nasal floor elevation), and loading directions (0°, 30° and 60°) by three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. Three models were designed with Invesalius, Rhinoceros 3D and Solidworks software. Each model contained a bone block of the premaxillary area including an implant (IH, Ø4 × 10 mm) supporting a metal-ceramic crown. 178 N was applied in different inclinations (0°, 30°, 60°). The results were analyzed by von Mises, maximum principal stress, microstrain and displacement maps including ANOVA statistical test for some situations. Von Mises maps of implant, screws and abutment showed increase of stress concentration as increased loading inclination. Bicortical techniques showed reduction in implant apical area and in the head of fixation screws. Bicortical techniques showed slight increase stress in cortical bone in the maximum principal stress and microstrain maps under 60° loading. No differences in bone tissue regarding surgical techniques were observed. As conclusion, non-axial loads increased stress concentration in all maps. Bicortical techniques showed lower stress for implant and screw; however, there was slightly higher stress on cortical bone only under loads of higher inclinations (60°).

  11. Edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs applied to 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    An edge based finite element formulation with vector absorbing boundary conditions is presented for scattering by composite structures having boundaries satisfying impedance and/or transition conditions. Remarkably accurate results are obtained by placing the mesh a small fraction of a wavelength away from the scatterer.

  12. Rigorous joining of advanced reduced-dimensional beam models to three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huimin

    In the aerospace and automotive industries, many finite element analyses use lower-dimensional finite elements such as beams, plates and shells, to simplify the modeling. These simplified models can greatly reduce the computation time and cost; however, reduced-dimensional models may introduce inaccuracies, particularly near boundaries and near portions of the structure where reduced-dimensional models may not apply. Another factor in creation of such models is that beam-like structures frequently have complex geometry, boundaries and loading conditions, which may make them unsuitable for modeling with single type of element. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a method that can accurately and efficiently capture the response of a structure by rigorous combination of a reduced-dimensional beam finite element model with a model based on full two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) finite elements. The first chapter of the thesis gives the background of the present work and some related previous work. The second chapter is focused on formulating a system of equations that govern the joining of a 2D model with a beam model for planar deformation. The essential aspect of this formulation is to find the transformation matrices to achieve deflection and load continuity on the interface. Three approaches are provided to obtain the transformation matrices. An example based on joining a beam to a 2D finite element model is examined, and the accuracy of the analysis is studied by comparing joint results with the full 2D analysis. The third chapter is focused on formulating the system of equations for joining a beam to a 3D finite element model for static and free-vibration problems. The transition between the 3D elements and beam elements is achieved by use of the stress recovery technique of the variational-asymptotic method as implemented in VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis). The formulations for an interface transformation matrix and

  13. A feasibility study of a 3-D finite element solution scheme for aeroengine duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The advantage from development of a 3-D model of aeroengine duct acoustics is the ability to analyze axial and circumferential liner segmentation simultaneously. The feasibility of a 3-D duct acoustics model was investigated using Galerkin or least squares element formulations combined with Gaussian elimination, successive over-relaxation, or conjugate gradient solution algorithms on conventional scalar computers and on a vector machine. A least squares element formulation combined with a conjugate gradient solver on a CDC Star vector computer initially appeared to have great promise, but severe difficulties were encountered with matrix ill-conditioning. These difficulties in conditioning rendered this technique impractical for realistic problems.

  14. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2015-12-21

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying a series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.

  15. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2015-12-21

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  16. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  17. Multiphasic finite element modeling of concrete hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Buffo-Lacarriere, L.; Sellier, A. . E-mail: alain.sellier@insa-toulouse.fr; Escadeillas, G.; Turatsinze, A.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents a model predicting the development of hydration and its consequences on temperature and water content. As it considers the effects of climatic conditions, the proposed model is a promising tool to evaluate the temperature, hydric and hydration fields of structures in situ. The hydration model predicts the hydration evolution of several main species (not only clinker but also mineral additions like fly ash or silica fume for instance). For each component, the modeling considers hydration development and chemical interaction between reactions. It also takes into account temperature and water content effects on reaction kinetics through thermal and hydric activation. Hydration development in turn modifies the thermal and hydric states of material. The result is a numerical model coupling hydration, and the thermal and hydric states of cement-based material. The model was tested on a 27 m{sup 3} concrete block in situ equipped with temperature sensors situated in the core and close to the face exposed to solar radiation.

  18. Superconvergence of mixed finite element approximations to 3-D Maxwell's equations in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunqing; Li, Jichun; Yang, Wei; Sun, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation of metamaterials has attracted more and more attention since 2000, after the first metamaterial with negative refraction index was successfully constructed. In this paper we construct a fully-discrete leap-frog type finite element scheme to solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Maxwell's equations when metamaterials are involved. First, we obtain some superclose results between the interpolations of the analytical solutions and finite element solutions obtained using arbitrary orders of Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec mixed spaces on regular cubic meshes. Then we prove the superconvergence result in the discrete l2 norm achieved for the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec space. To our best knowledge, such superconvergence results have never been obtained elsewhere. Finally, we implement the leap-frog scheme and present numerical results justifying our theoretical analysis.

  19. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  20. Modelling of orbital deformation using finite-element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Lindqvist, Christian; Kontio, Risto

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a three-dimensional finite-element model (FEM) of the human orbit, containing the globe, to predict orbital deformation in subjects following a blunt injury. This study investigated the hypothesis that such deformation could be modelled using finite-element techniques. One patient who had CT-scan examination to the maxillofacial skeleton including the orbits, as part of her treatment, was selected for this study. A FEM of one of the orbits containing the globe was constructed, based on CT-scan images. Simulations were performed with a computer using the finite-element software NISA (EMRC, Troy, USA). The orbit was subjected to a blunt injury of a 0.5 kg missile with 30 m s−1 velocity. The FEM was then used to predict principal and shear stresses or strains at each node position. Two types of orbital deformation were predicted during different impact simulations: (i) horizontal distortion and (ii) rotational distortion. Stress values ranged from 213.4 to 363.3 MPa for the maximum principal stress, from −327.8 to −653.1 MPa for the minimum principal stress, and from 212.3 to 444.3 MPa for the maximum shear stress. This is the first finite-element study, which demonstrates different and concurrent patterns of orbital deformation in a subject following a blunt injury. Finite element modelling is a powerful and invaluable tool to study the multifaceted phenomenon of orbital deformation. PMID:16849235

  1. Finite element analysis of a 3D moving vacuum arc for transverse magnetic field contacts based on Gundlach's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Chang-Seob; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Se-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A systematic numerical method for analyzing a 3D moving vacuum arc was proposed and tested in this research by using a transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact. The analysis was carried out by employing the finite element method and the experimental energy equation defined by Gundlach's formula. In the literature, the vacuum interrupter has been widely applied to medium-voltage switching circuits. TMF-type contacts use the Lorentz force density to move a high-temperature arc so as to prevent the contacts from being melted and damaged. The material erosion caused by the arc on the electrode's surface is an important process that results in the interruptive capabilities of these vacuum interrupters. In a classical arc model, to move the vacuum arc, it is required that the magneto-hydrodynamics be analyzed in the arc region at each step. However, with this approach convergence is difficult, resulting in a very time-consuming. Therefore, we propose a new technique to predict the behaviors of vacuum arc between two electrodes. This new approach adopts the experimental arc voltage equation between two electrodes defined by Gundlach's formula. We verify our proposed model by comparing its results with the arcing behaviors obtained from earlier experiments.

  2. Finite Element Treatment of Vortex States in 3D Cubic Superconductors in a Tilted Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Cai, Chuanbing

    2017-03-01

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations have been solved numerically by a finite element analysis for superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field. We obtain different vortex patterns as a function of the external magnetic field. With a magnetic field not parallel to the x- or y-axis, the vortices attempt to change their orientation accordingly. Our analysis of the corresponding changes in the magnetic response in different directions can provide information not only about vorticity but also about the three-dimensional vortex arrangement, even about the very subtle changes for the superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field.

  3. Splinting effect on posterior implants under various loading modes: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Hauchard, Erwan; Fournier, Benjamin Philippe; Jacq, Romain; Bouton, Antoine; Pierrisnard, Laurent; Naveau, Adrien

    2011-09-01

    This three-dimensional finite element study compared stresses, intensities and displacements of three mandibular posterior implants restored with cemented crowns (two molars and a premolar in straight line), splinted versus non-splinted. Hundred newton occlusal loads were vertically or horizontally applied, either on one single crown or on all of them. Maximal stresses and implants displacements were higher under horizontal loading. Splinting major effects appeared under single horizontal load with a decrease in stresses (34-49%) and displacements (16-19%) of the loaded crown. Splinting seems more appropriate for implant-supported restorations submitted to frequent single horizontal or oblique loads than vertical ones.

  4. Design Optimization of Coronary Stent Based on Finite Element Models

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhu, Bao; Wu, Jinying

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an effective optimization method using the Kriging surrogate model combing with modified rectangular grid sampling to reduce the stent dogboning effect in the expansion process. An infilling sampling criterion named expected improvement (EI) is used to balance local and global searches in the optimization iteration. Four commonly used finite element models of stent dilation were used to investigate stent dogboning rate. Thrombosis models of three typical shapes are built to test the effectiveness of optimization results. Numerical results show that two finite element models dilated by pressure applied inside the balloon are available, one of which with the artery and plaque can give an optimal stent with better expansion behavior, while the artery and plaque unincluded model is more efficient and takes a smaller amount of computation. PMID:24222743

  5. Finite Element Modelling of Fluid Coupling in the Coiled Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Saba, R.

    2011-11-01

    A finite element model is first used to calculate the modal pressure difference for a box model of the cochlea, which shows that the number of fluid elements across the width of the cochlea determines the accuracy with which the near field, or short wavenumber, component of the fluid coupling is reproduced. Then results are compared with the analytic results to validate the accuracy of the FE model. It is, however, the far field, or long wavelength, component of the fluid coupling that is most affected by the geometry. A finite element model of the coiled cochlea is then used to calculate fluid coupling in this case, which has similar characteristics to the uncoiled model.

  6. A fast hidden line algorithm for plotting finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Effective plotting of finite element models requires the use of fast hidden line plot techniques that provide interactive response. A high speed hidden line technique was developed to facilitate the plotting of NASTRAN finite element models. Based on testing using 14 different models, the new hidden line algorithm (JONES-D) appears to be very fast: its speed equals that for normal (all lines visible) plotting and when compared to other existing methods it appears to be substantially faster. It also appears to be very reliable: no plot errors were observed using the new method to plot NASTRAN models. The new algorithm was made part of the NPLOT NASTRAN plot package and was used by structural analysts for normal production tasks.

  7. An atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 1. Formulation of the finite elements.

    PubMed

    Gleadall, Andrew; Pan, Jingzhe; Ding, Lifeng; Kruft, Marc-Anton; Curcó, David

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to analyse materials at the atomic scale. However, MD has high computational demands, which may inhibit its use for simulations of structures involving large numbers of atoms such as amorphous polymer structures. An atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) is presented in this study with significantly lower computational demands than MD. Due to the reduced computational demands, AFEM is suitable for the analysis of Young's modulus of amorphous polymer structures. This is of particular interest when studying the degradation of bioresorbable polymers, which is the topic of an accompanying paper. AFEM is derived from the inter-atomic potential energy functions of an MD force field. The nonlinear MD functions were adapted to enable static linear analysis. Finite element formulations were derived to represent interatomic potential energy functions between two, three and four atoms. Validation of the AFEM was conducted through its application to atomic structures for crystalline and amorphous poly(lactide).

  8. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  9. Visualization methods for high-resolution, transient, 3-D, finite element situations

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-01-10

    Scientific visualization is the process whereby numerical data is transformed into a visual form to augment the process of discovery and understanding. Visualizing the data generated by large-scale, transient, three-dimensional finite element simulations poses many challenges due to geometric complexity, the presence of multiple materials and multiple element types, and the inherent unstructured nature of the meshes. In this paper, the direct use of finite element data structures, nodal assembly procedures, and element interpolants for volumetric adaptive surface extraction, surface rendering, vector grids and particle tracing is discussed. A brief description of a {open_quotes}direct-to-disk{close_quotes} animation system is presented, and case studies which demonstrate the use of isosurfaces, vector plots, cutting planes, reference surfaces and particle tracing are then discussed in the context of several case studies for transient incompressible viscous flow, and acoustic fluid-structure interaction simulations. An overview of the implications of massively parallel computers on visualization is presented to highlight the issues in parallel visualization methodology, algorithms. data locality and the ultimate requirements for temporary and archival data storage and network bandwidth.

  10. Finite Element Modeling and Exploration of Double Hearing Protection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-10

    broad frequency range were determined from this method. The elastomeric rubber material was cut into small wafers of 2 to 5mm thickness. A mass was... material (being 0.1 for soft elastomeric foams), G and E are the shear and elastic moduli of the material , respectively, D is the diameter of the...and to investigate the behavior of the modeled system. The foam earplug material properties for the finite element model are required in the same shear

  11. Faster, Easier Finite-Element Modeling Of Weld Offsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, C. Chen; Lichwala, Bradley E.

    1993-01-01

    In faster, easier technique, material in weld zone fictitiously softened to negligibly low modulus of elasticity, and material considered deformed to specified offset. Displacements caused by deformation computed by analysis of static stresses and strains in fictitiously deformed material, using specified offset as displacement boundary condition. Resulting displacements added to coordinates of corresponding nodes of original (nonoffset) mathematical model of welded part. Technique used to modify large finite-element mathematical model to any desired weld offset configuration in short time.

  12. A verification procedure for MSC/NASTRAN Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    Finite Element Models (FEM's) are used in the design and analysis of aircraft to mathematically describe the airframe structure for such diverse tasks as flutter analysis and actively controlled landing gear design. FEM's are used to model the entire airplane as well as airframe components. The purpose of this document is to describe recommended methods for verifying the quality of the FEM's and to specify a step-by-step procedure for implementing the methods.

  13. Finite Element Modeling of Tire-Terrain Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    cent advancements in the contact formulations of general-purpose finite element codes (e.g. ABAQUS , HKS 1998) and increases in computer processing...are based on the models as implemented in ABAQUS (HKS 1998). Additional information on soil plasticity and critical state soil mechanics is given...snow interaction, however, the model must simulate snow deformation in a three-dimensional stress field. Initial simulations using the ABAQUS

  14. A finite element model of ferroelectric/ferroelastic polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    HWANG,STEPHEN C.; MCMEEKING,ROBERT M.

    2000-02-17

    A finite element model of polarization switching in a polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic is developed. It is assumed that a crystallite switches if the reduction in potential energy of the polycrystal exceeds a critical energy barrier per unit volume of switching material. Each crystallite is represented by a finite element with the possible dipole directions assigned randomly subject to crystallographic constraints. The model accounts for both electric field induced (i.e. ferroelectric) switching and stress induced (i.e. ferroelastic) switching with piezoelectric interactions. Experimentally measured elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants are used consistently, but different effective critical energy barriers are selected phenomenologically. Electric displacement versus electric field, strain versus electric field, stress versus strain, and stress versus electric displacement loops of a ceramic lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) are modeled well below the Curie temperature.

  15. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  16. Finite Element Modeling, Simulation, Tools, and Capabilities at Superform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Hari; Barnes, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    Over the past thirty years Superform has been a pioneer in the SPF arena, having developed a keen understanding of the process and a range of unique forming techniques to meet varying market needs. Superform’s high-profile list of customers includes Boeing, Airbus, Aston Martin, Ford, and Rolls Royce. One of the more recent additions to Superform’s technical know-how is finite element modeling and simulation. Finite element modeling is a powerful numerical technique which when applied to SPF provides a host of benefits including accurate prediction of strain levels in a part, presence of wrinkles and predicting pressure cycles optimized for time and part thickness. This paper outlines a brief history of finite element modeling applied to SPF and then reviews some of the modeling tools and techniques that Superform have applied and continue to do so to successfully superplastically form complex-shaped parts. The advantages of employing modeling at the design stage are discussed and illustrated with real-world examples.

  17. Finite Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Pritchard, Joselyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC configurations were compared with experimental modal survey data. The finite element models were updated and refined, using physical parameters, to increase correlation with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement, within an average 1.5% to 2.9%, was obtained between the predicted and measured modal frequencies of the stringer, frame and dome components. The predictions for the modal frequencies of the assembled component Configurations I through V were within an average 2.9% and 9.1%. Finite element modal analyses were performed for comparison with 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions in Configuration VI. The modal frequencies were predicted by applying differential stiffness to the elements with pressure loading and creating reduced matrices for beam elements with offsets inside external superelements. The average disagreement between the measured and predicted differences for the 0 psi and 6 psi internal pressure conditions was less than 0.5%. Comparably good agreement was obtained for the differences between the 0 psi and 3 psi measured and predicted internal pressure conditions.

  18. 3D strain measurement in soft tissue: demonstration of a novel inverse finite element model algorithm on MicroCT images of a tissue phantom exposed to negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, R; Zhao, Y; Cunningham, K; Kieswetter, K; Haridas, B

    2009-07-01

    This study describes a novel system for acquiring the 3D strain field in soft tissue at sub-millimeter spatial resolution during negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Recent research in advanced wound treatment modalities theorizes that microdeformations induced by the application of sub-atmospheric (negative) pressure through V.A.C. GranuFoam Dressing, a reticulated open-cell polyurethane foam (ROCF), is instrumental in regulating the mechanobiology of granulation tissue formation [Saxena, V., Hwang, C.W., Huang, S., Eichbaum, Q., Ingber, D., Orgill, D.P., 2004. Vacuum-assisted closure: Microdeformations of wounds and cell proliferation. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114, 1086-1096]. While the clinical response is unequivocal, measurement of deformations at the wound-dressing interface has not been possible due to the inaccessibility of the wound tissue beneath the sealed dressing. Here we describe the development of a bench-test wound model for microcomputed tomography (microCT) imaging of deformation induced by NPWT and an algorithm set for quantifying the 3D strain field at sub-millimeter resolution. Microdeformations induced in the tissue phantom revealed average tensile strains of 18%-23% at sub-atmospheric pressures of -50 to -200 mmHg (-6.7 to -26.7 kPa). The compressive strains (22%-24%) and shear strains (20%-23%) correlate with 2D FEM studies of microdeformational wound therapy in the reference cited above. We anticipate that strain signals quantified using this system can then be used in future research aimed at correlating the effects of mechanical loading on the phenotypic expression of dermal fibroblasts in acute and chronic ulcer models. Furthermore, the method developed here can be applied to continuum deformation analysis in other contexts, such as 3D cell culture via confocal microscopy, full scale CT and MRI imaging, and in machine vision.

  19. Tissue Modeling and Analyzing with Finite Element Method: A Review for Cranium Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xianfang; Wang, Li; Wang, Ruonan

    2013-01-01

    For the structure mechanics of human body, it is almost impossible to conduct mechanical experiments. Then the finite element model to simulate mechanical experiments has become an effective tool. By introducing several common methods for constructing a 3D model of cranial cavity, this paper carries out systematically the research on the influence law of cranial cavity deformation. By introducing the new concepts and theory to develop the 3D cranial cavity model with the finite-element method, the cranial cavity deformation process with the changing ICP can be made the proper description and reasonable explanation. It can provide reference for getting cranium biomechanical model quickly and efficiently and lay the foundation for further biomechanical experiments and clinical applications. PMID:23476630

  20. Finite element methods of analysis for 3D inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime

    1990-01-01

    The applicants have developed a finite element based approach for the solution of three-dimensional compressible flows. The procedure enables flow solutions to be obtained on tetrahedral discretizations of computational domains of complex form. A further development was the incorporation of a solution adaptive mesh strategy in which the adaptivity is achieved by complete remeshing of the solution domain. During the previous year, the applicants were working with the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center with an implementation of the basic meshing and solution procedure. The objective of the work to be performed over this twelve month period was the transfer of the adaptive mesh technology and also the undertaking of basic research into alternative flow algorithms for the Euler equations on unstructured meshes.

  1. Finite element modeling of the deformation of magnetoelastic film

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, Matthew I.; White, Daniel A.; Steigmann, David J.

    2010-09-01

    Recently a new class of biocompatible elastic polymers loaded with small ferrous particles, a magnetoelastic polymer, has been developed. This engineered material is formed into a thin film using spin casting. An applied magnetic field will deform the film. The magnetic deformation of this film has many possible applications, particularly in microfluidic pumps and pressure regulators. In this paper a finite element method suitable for the transient simulation of arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional magnetoelastic polymers subjected to time-varying magnetic fields is developed. The approach is similar to that employed in finite elment magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the key difference is a more complex hyperelastic material model. In order to confirm the validity of the approach, finite element solutions for an axially symmetric thin film are compared to an analytical solution based on the membrane (infinitely thin) approximation. For this particular problem the two approaches give qualitatively similar results and converge as the film thickness approaches zero.

  2. Efficient triple-grid multiscale finite element method for 3D groundwater flow simulation in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yifan; Wu, Jichun; Nan, Tongchao; Xue, Yuqun; Xie, Chunhong; Ji, Haifeng

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an efficient triple-grid multiscale finite element method (ETMSFEM) is proposed for 3D groundwater simulation in heterogeneous porous media. The main idea of this method is to employ new 3D linear base functions and the domain decomposition technique to solve the local reduced elliptical problem, thereby simplifying the base function construction process and improving the efficiency. Furthermore, by using the ETMSFEM base functions, this method can solve Darcy's equation with high efficiency to obtain a continuous velocity field. Therefore, this method can considerably reduce the computational cost of solving for heads and velocities, which is crucial for large-scale 3D groundwater simulations. In the application section, we present numerical examples to compare the ETMSFEM with several classical methods to demonstrate its efficiency and effectiveness.

  3. Dynamic Characteristics Analysis of a Small-Sized Linear Oscillatory Actuator Employing the 3-D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Noritaka; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Ueyama, Kenji; Hashimoto, Eiichiro; Takagi, Takahiro

    Recently, linear oscillatory actuators have been used in a wide range of applications because of their advantages, such as high efficiency, simple structure, and easy control. Small linear oscillatory actuators are expected to be used in haptic devices and the vibration system of mobile phones. In this paper, we propose a new structure of a small linear oscillatory actuator. The static and dynamic characteristics of the actuator are calculated by the 3-D finite element method. The effectiveness of this method is shown by the comparison of the calculated results with the experimental results.

  4. Development and validation of a weight-bearing finite element model for total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Woiczinski, M; Steinbrück, A; Weber, P; Müller, P E; Jansson, V; Schröder, Ch

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful procedure for osteoarthritis. However, some patients (19%) do have pain after surgery. A finite element model was developed based on boundary conditions of a knee rig. A 3D-model of an anatomical full leg was generated from magnetic resonance image data and a total knee prosthesis was implanted without patella resurfacing. In the finite element model, a restarting procedure was programmed in order to hold the ground reaction force constant with an adapted quadriceps muscle force during a squat from 20° to 105° of flexion. Knee rig experimental data were used to validate the numerical model in the patellofemoral and femorotibial joint. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses of Young's modulus of the patella cartilage, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) stiffness, and patella tendon origin were performed. Pearson's correlations for retropatellar contact area, pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were near to 1. Lowest root mean square error for retropatellar pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were found for the baseline model setup with Young's modulus of 5 MPa for patella cartilage, a downscaled PCL stiffness of 25% compared to the literature given value and an anatomical origin of the patella tendon. The results of the conducted finite element model are comparable with the experimental results. Therefore, the finite element model developed in this study can be used for further clinical investigations and will help to better understand the clinical aspects after TKA with an unresurfaced patella.

  5. Finite element modeling of the higher harmonic controlled OH-6A helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferg, Douglas; Toossi, Mostafa

    1990-01-01

    An MSC/NASTRAN finite element model of the higher harmonic control configured OH-6A helicopter fuselage was developed. This finite element model was verified by performing various model checkouts and correlation with results from a ground vibration test.

  6. Structural stability of posterior retainer design for resin-bonded prostheses: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Shinya, Akikazu; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Botelho, Michael George; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the stress distribution and natural frequency of different shape and thickness retainer designs for maxillary posterior resin-bonded prostheses using finite element (FE) method. A 3D FE model of a three unit posterior resin-bonded prosthesis analysis model was generated. Three different shaped retainer designs, viz. C-shaped (three axial surface wraparounds), D-shaped (three axial surface wraparounds with central groove) and O-shaped (360° wraparounds), and three different thicknesses, viz., 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mm, resin-bonded prostheses were used in this study. The resin-bonded prosthesis analysis model was imported into an FE analysis software (ANSYS 10.0, ANSYS, USA) and attribution of material properties. The nodes at the bottom surface of the roots were assigned fixed zero displacement in the three spatial dimensions. A simulated angle of 45° loading of a 100 N force was applied to the node of the pontic lingual cusp surface. The stress distributions and corresponding natural frequencies were analyzed and resolved. The C-shaped retainer for 0.4 mm thickness recorded the greatest von Mises stresses of 71.4 MPa for all three groups. C-shaped, D-shaped and O-shaped retainer presented natural frequencies 3,988, 7,754, and 10,494 Hz, respectively. D-shaped retainer and O-shaped retainer increased natural frequencies and structural rigidity over the traditional C-shaped retainer. The maximum von Mises stresses values of the remaining tooth and prosthesis decreased with greater retainer thickness. D-shaped retainer and O-shaped retainer increased natural frequencies and structural rigidity over the traditional C-shaped retainer.

  7. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Armando Yukio; Maruo, Hiroshi; Argenta, Marco André; Maruo, Ivan Toshio; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1); bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2); bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3); bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4). Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution. PMID:27007765

  8. Stress distribution on external hexagon implant system using 3d finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo, Regênio M H; Oshima, Hugo M S; Silva, Isaac N L; Júnior, Luis H B; Mota, Eduardo G; Coelho, Luiz F B

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate strain distribution on dental implant, abutment, screw and crown virtual models in the posterior region. The analysis was performed by means of a 3D virtual model developed by the PRO-ENGINEER System (PRO-ENGINEER, PTC, Needham, MA, USA ) with an external butt joint (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), square headed Gold Tite abutment retainer screw (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), STA abutment (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), metal infrastructure of Ag-Pd alloy and feldspatic ceramic. The standard load was 382N at 15 degree angle to the implant axis, applied at 6 mm from the implant center at different observation points on the implant-screw set. The data showed that on the implant virtual model, the highest strain concentration was found at the interface between the implant platform and the abutment, and in the middle point of the 1st screw thread internal diameter on the load application side.

  9. Nonlinear structural finite element model updating and uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, Hamed; Astroza, Rodrigo; Conte, Joel P.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a framework for nonlinear finite element (FE) model updating, in which state-of-the-art nonlinear structural FE modeling and analysis techniques are combined with the maximum likelihood estimation method (MLE) to estimate time-invariant parameters governing the nonlinear hysteretic material constitutive models used in the FE model of the structure. The estimation uncertainties are evaluated based on the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) theorem. A proof-of-concept example, consisting of a cantilever steel column representing a bridge pier, is provided to verify the proposed nonlinear FE model updating framework.

  10. Finite-element model for phase-change recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusche, J. H.; Segal, A.; Urbach, H. P.

    2005-04-01

    The finite-element method is applied to model phase-change recording in a grooved recording stack. A rigorous model for the scattering of a three-dimensional focused spot by a one-dimensional periodic grating is used to determine the absorbed light in a three-dimensional region inside the phase-change layer. The optical model is combined with a three-dimensional thermal model to compute the temperature distribution. Land and groove recording and polarization dependence are studied, and the model is applied to the Blu-ray Disc.

  11. FEMHD: An adaptive finite element method for MHD and edge modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the code FEMHD, an adaptive finite element MHD code, which is applied in a number of different manners to model MHD behavior and edge plasma phenomena on a diverted tokamak. The code uses an unstructured triangular mesh in 2D and wedge shaped mesh elements in 3D. The code has been adapted to look at neutral and charged particle dynamics in the plasma scrape off region, and into a full MHD-particle code.

  12. The sensitivity method in finite element model updating: A tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.; Link, Michael; Friswell, Michael I.

    2011-10-01

    The sensitivity method is probably the most successful of the many approaches to the problem of updating finite element models of engineering structures based on vibration test data. It has been applied successfully to large-scale industrial problems and proprietary codes are available based on the techniques explained in simple terms in this article. A basic introduction to the most important procedures of computational model updating is provided, including tutorial examples to reinforce the reader's understanding and a large scale model updating example of a helicopter airframe.

  13. Finite element model for brittle fracture and fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wei; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin; ...

    2016-06-01

    A new computational model for brittle fracture and fragmentation has been developed based on finite element analysis of non-linear elasticity equations. The proposed model propagates the cracks by splitting the mesh nodes alongside the most over-strained edges based on the principal direction of strain tensor. To prevent elements from overlapping and folding under large deformations, robust geometrical constraints using the method of Lagrange multipliers have been incorporated. In conclusion, the model has been applied to 2D simulations of the formation and propagation of cracks in brittle materials, and the fracture and fragmentation of stretched and compressed materials.

  14. Space-time formulation for finite element modeling of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, Stephen P; Grilli, Francesco; Sirois, Frederic; Laforest, Marc

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new model for computing the current density and field distributions in superconductors by means of a periodic space-time formulation for finite elements (FE). By considering a space dimension as time, we can use a static model to solve a time dependent problem. This allows overcoming one of the major problems of FE modeling of superconductors: the length of simulations, even for relatively simple cases. We present our first results and compare them to those obtained with a 'standard' time-dependent method and with analytical solutions.

  15. On domain decomposition preconditioner of BPS type for finite element discretizations of 3D elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. G.

    2012-09-01

    BPS is a well known an efficient and rather general domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioner, suggested in the famous series of papers Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz (1986-1989). Since then, it has been serving as the origin for the whole family of domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioners-solvers as for h so hp discretizations of elliptic problems. For its original version, designed for h discretizations, the named authors proved the bound O(1 + log2 H/ h) for the relative condition number under some restricting conditions on the domain decomposition and finite element discretization. Here H/ h is the maximal relation of the characteristic size H of a decomposition subdomain to the mesh parameter h of its discretization. It was assumed that subdomains are images of the reference unite cube by trilinear mappings. Later similar bounds related to h discretizations were proved for more general domain decompositions, defined by means of coarse tetrahedral meshes. These results, accompanied by the development of some special tools of analysis aimed at such type of decompositions, were summarized in the book of Toselli and Widlund (2005). This paper is also confined to h discretizations. We further expand the range of admissible domain decompositions for constructing BPS preconditioners, in which decomposition subdomains can be convex polyhedrons, satisfying some conditions of shape regularity. We prove the bound for the relative condition number with the same dependence on H/ h as in the bound given above. Along the way to this result, we simplify the proof of the so called abstract bound for the relative condition number of the domain decomposition preconditioner. In the part, related to the analysis of the interface sub-problem preconditioning, our technical tools are generalization of those used by Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz.

  16. Finite Element Model Calibration Approach for Ares I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Lazor, Daniel R.; Gaspar, James L.; Parks, Russel A.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ares I-X is a pathfinder vehicle concept under development by NASA to demonstrate a new class of launch vehicles. Although this vehicle is essentially a shell of what the Ares I vehicle will be, efforts are underway to model and calibrate the analytical models before its maiden flight. Work reported in this document will summarize the model calibration approach used including uncertainty quantification of vehicle responses and the use of nonconventional boundary conditions during component testing. Since finite element modeling is the primary modeling tool, the calibration process uses these models, often developed by different groups, to assess model deficiencies and to update parameters to reconcile test with predictions. Data for two major component tests and the flight vehicle are presented along with the calibration results. For calibration, sensitivity analysis is conducted using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). To reduce the computational burden associated with ANOVA calculations, response surface models are used in lieu of computationally intensive finite element solutions. From the sensitivity studies, parameter importance is assessed as a function of frequency. In addition, the work presents an approach to evaluate the probability that a parameter set exists to reconcile test with analysis. Comparisons of pre-test predictions of frequency response uncertainty bounds with measured data, results from the variance-based sensitivity analysis, and results from component test models with calibrated boundary stiffness models are all presented.

  17. Finite Element Model Calibration Approach for Area I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Gaspar, James L.; Lazor, Daniel R.; Parks, Russell A.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ares I-X is a pathfinder vehicle concept under development by NASA to demonstrate a new class of launch vehicles. Although this vehicle is essentially a shell of what the Ares I vehicle will be, efforts are underway to model and calibrate the analytical models before its maiden flight. Work reported in this document will summarize the model calibration approach used including uncertainty quantification of vehicle responses and the use of non-conventional boundary conditions during component testing. Since finite element modeling is the primary modeling tool, the calibration process uses these models, often developed by different groups, to assess model deficiencies and to update parameters to reconcile test with predictions. Data for two major component tests and the flight vehicle are presented along with the calibration results. For calibration, sensitivity analysis is conducted using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). To reduce the computational burden associated with ANOVA calculations, response surface models are used in lieu of computationally intensive finite element solutions. From the sensitivity studies, parameter importance is assessed as a function of frequency. In addition, the work presents an approach to evaluate the probability that a parameter set exists to reconcile test with analysis. Comparisons of pretest predictions of frequency response uncertainty bounds with measured data, results from the variance-based sensitivity analysis, and results from component test models with calibrated boundary stiffness models are all presented.

  18. PC Windows finite element modeling of landfill gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mull, S.R.; Lang, R.J.; Vigil, S.A.; Cota, H.

    1996-09-01

    A two dimensional demonstration program, GAS, has been developed for the solution of landfill gas (LFG) flow problems on a personal computer (PC). The program combines a Windows{trademark} graphical user interface, object oriented programming (OOP) techniques, and finite element modeling (FEM) to demonstrate the practicality of performing LFG flow modeling on the PC. GAS is demonstrated on a sample LFG problem consisting of a landfill, one gas extraction well, the landfill liner, cap, and surrounding soil. Analyses of the program results are performed for successively finer grid resolutions. Element flux imbalance, execution time, and required memory are characterized as a function of grid resolution.

  19. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  20. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  1. Evaluation of a Kinematically-Driven Finite Element Footstrike Model.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Iain; Harland, Andy; Price, Dan; Schlarb, Heiko; Lucas, Tim

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic finite element model of a shod running footstrike was developed and driven with 6 degree of freedom foot segment kinematics determined from a motion capture running trial. Quadratic tetrahedral elements were used to mesh the footwear components with material models determined from appropriate mechanical tests. Model outputs were compared with experimental high-speed video (HSV) footage, vertical ground reaction force (GRF), and center of pressure (COP) excursion to determine whether such an approach is appropriate for the development of athletic footwear. Although unquantified, good visual agreement to the HSV footage was observed but significant discrepancies were found between the model and experimental GRF and COP readings (9% and 61% of model readings outside of the mean experimental reading ± 2 standard deviations, respectively). Model output was also found to be highly sensitive to input kinematics with a 120% increase in maximum GRF observed when translating the force platform 2 mm vertically. While representing an alternative approach to existing dynamic finite element footstrike models, loading highly representative of an experimental trial was not found to be achievable when employing exclusively kinematic boundary conditions. This significantly limits the usefulness of employing such an approach in the footwear development process.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of Transient Thermography Inspection of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1998-01-01

    Several finite element models of defects such as debond and void have been developed for composite panels subjected to transient thermography inspection. Since the exact nature of the heat generated from the flash lamps is unknown, direct comparison between FEA and experimental results is not possible. However, some similarity of the results has been observed. The shape of the time curve that simulates the heat flux from the flash lamps has minimal effect on the temperature profiles. Double the number of flash lamps could increase the contrast of thermal image and define the shape of defect better.

  3. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  4. Finite element modelling of a rotating piezoelectric ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Frangi, A; Corigliano, A; Binci, M; Faure, P

    2005-10-01

    The evaluation of the performance of ultrasonic motors as a function of input parameters such as the driving frequency, voltage input and pre-load on the rotor is of key importance to their development and is here addressed by means of a finite element three-dimensional model. First the stator is simulated as a fully deformable elastic body and the travelling wave dynamics is accurately reproduced; secondly the interaction through contact between the stator and the rotor is accounted for by assuming that the rotor behaves as a rigid surface. Numerical results for the whole motor are finally compared to available experimental data.

  5. DYNA3D: A nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics, User manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report is the User Manual for the 1993 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as a User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems.

  6. Generalized Potential Energy Finite Elements for Modeling Molecular Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chatzieleftheriou, Stavros; Adendorff, Matthew R; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2016-10-24

    The potential energy of molecules and nanostructures is commonly calculated in the molecular mechanics formalism by superimposing bonded and nonbonded atomic energy terms, i.e. bonds between two atoms, bond angles involving three atoms, dihedral angles involving four atoms, nonbonded terms expressing the Coulomb and Lennard-Jones interactions, etc. In this work a new, generalized numerical simulation is presented for studying the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional nanostructures at the atomic scale. The energy gradient and Hessian matrix of such assemblies are usually computed numerically; a potential energy finite element model is proposed herein where these two components are expressed analytically. In particular, generalized finite elements are developed that express the interactions among atoms in a manner equivalent to that invoked in simulations performed based on the molecular dynamics method. Thus, the global tangent stiffness matrix for any nanostructure is formed as an assembly of the generalized finite elements and is directly equivalent to the Hessian matrix of the potential energy. The advantages of the proposed model are identified in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. In the case of popular force fields (e.g., CHARMM), the computation of the Hessian matrix by implementing the proposed method is of the same order as that of the gradient. This analysis can be used to minimize the potential energy of molecular systems under nodal loads in order to derive constitutive laws for molecular systems where the entropy and solvent effects are neglected and can be approximated as solids, such as double stranded DNA nanostructures. In this context, the sequence dependent stretch modulus for some typical base pairs step is calculated.

  7. Method for patient-specific finite element modeling and simulation of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Zrinzo, Ludvic U; Tisch, Stephen; Tripoliti, Elina; Hariz, Marwan I; Wårdell, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. Success of DBS is highly dependent on electrode location and electrical parameter settings. The aim of this study was to develop a general method for setting up patient-specific 3D computer models of DBS, based on magnetic resonance images, and to demonstrate the use of such models for assessing the position of the electrode contacts and the distribution of the electric field in relation to individual patient anatomy. A software tool was developed for creating finite element DBS-models. The electric field generated by DBS was simulated in one patient and the result was visualized with isolevels and glyphs. The result was evaluated and it corresponded well with reported effects and side effects of stimulation. It was demonstrated that patient-specific finite element models and simulations of DBS can be useful for increasing the understanding of the clinical outcome of DBS.

  8. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  9. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  10. A Finite Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

    2015-07-23

    We present a hydro-mechanical model, followed by stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account of the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process. Analytical solutions for pressure and deformation fields were derived for a typical geological sequestration scenario in our previous work. A finite element approach is introduced here for numerically solving the hydro-mechanical model with arbitrary boundary conditions. The numerical approach was built on an open-source finite element code Elmer, and results were compared to the analytical solutions. The shear-slip failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where the potential failure zone is identified. Information is relevant to the prediction of the maximum sustainable injection rate or pressure. The effects of caprock permeability on the fluid pressure, deformation, stress, and the shear-slip failure zone were also quantitatively studied. It was shown that a larger permeability in caprock and base rock leads to a larger uplift but a smaller shear-slip failure zone.

  11. Leukocyte deformability: finite element modeling of large viscoelastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R

    1992-09-21

    An axisymmetric deformation of a viscoelastic sphere bounded by a prestressed elastic thin shell in response to external pressure is studied by a finite element method. The research is motivated by the need for understanding the passive behavior of human leukocytes (white blood cells) and interpreting extensive experimental data in terms of the mechanical properties. The cell at rest is modeled as a sphere consisting of a cortical prestressed shell with incompressible Maxwell fluid interior. A large-strain deformation theory is developed based on the proposed model. General non-linear, large strain constitutive relations for the cortical shell are derived by neglecting the bending stiffness. A representation of the constitutive equations in the form of an integral of strain history for the incompressible Maxwell interior is used in the formulation of numerical scheme. A finite element program is developed, in which a sliding boundary condition is imposed on all contact surfaces. The mathematical model developed is applied to evaluate experimental data of pipette tests and observations of blood flow.

  12. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  13. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  14. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of the Posterior Eye in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Mulugeta, Lealem; Gleason, Rudolph; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity experienced during spaceflight affects astronauts in various ways, including weakened muscles and loss of bone density. Recently, visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome has become a major concern for space missions lasting longer than 30 days. Astronauts suffering from VIIP syndrome have changes in ocular anatomical and visual impairment that persist after returning to earth. It is hypothesized that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity may increase the intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to an altered biomechanical environment of the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath (ONS).Currently, there is a lack of knowledge of how elevated ICP may lead to vision impairment and connective tissue changes in VIIP. Our goal was to develop a finite element model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. We used a finite element (FE) analysis approach to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve to the elevations in ICP thought to occur in microgravity and to identify which tissue components have the greatest impact on strain experienced by optic nerve head tissues.

  16. HIFU Induced Heating Modelling by Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, R.; Vera, A.; Leija, L.

    High intensity focused ultrasound is a thermal therapy method used to treat malignant tumors and other medical conditions. Focused ultrasound concentrates acoustic energy at a focal zone. There, temperature rises rapidly over 56 °C to provoke tissue necrosis. Device performance depends on its fabrication placing computational modeling as a powerful tool to anticipate experimentation results. Finite element method allows modeling of multiphysics systems. Therefore, induced heating was modeled considering the acoustic field produced by a concave radiator excited with electric potentials from 5 V to 20 V. Nonlinear propagation was neglected and a linear response between the acoustic fields and pressure distribution was obtained. Finally, the results showed that acoustic propagation and heating models should be improved and validated with experimental measurements.

  17. Computation of Schenberg response function by using finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frajuca, C.; Bortoli, F. S.; Magalhaes, N. S.

    2016-05-01

    Schenberg is a detector of gravitational waves resonant mass type, with a central frequency of operation of 3200 Hz. Transducers located on the surface of the resonating sphere, according to a distribution half-dodecahedron, are used to monitor a strain amplitude. The development of mechanical impedance matchers that act by increasing the coupling of the transducers with the sphere is a major challenge because of the high frequency and small in size. The objective of this work is to study the Schenberg response function obtained by finite element modeling (FEM). Finnaly, the result is compared with the result of the simplified model for mass spring type system modeling verifying if that is suitable for the determination of sensitivity detector, as the conclusion the both modeling give the same results.

  18. Finite element modeling of pulsed eddy current NDT phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Ida, N.; Lord, W.

    1985-05-15

    Transient fields for nondestructive testing (pulsed eddy current methods) have been used experimentally for such applications as coating thickness measurements and the inspection of reactor fuel tubing. The lack of suitable models to facilitate understanding of the interaction of the pulsed field with the test specimen has hindered a wider acceptance of the method as a tool in NDT. Two models, based on the finite element technique are described. The first model, used for repetitive pulse train sources makes use of the Fourier series of the source current to solve a steady state problem for each significant harmonic. The harmonic solutions are then summed to produce the total EMF in the pickup coil. The second model is used for single pulse application. The response is calculated using an iterative time stepping solution. In both cases axisymmetric geometries are studied using a magnetic vector potential formulation. Solutions are compared with experimental results. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Finite element implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskovitz, I.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Saleeb, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models is made in a general purpose finite element code for structural applications of metals deformed at elevated temperatures. Two constitutive models, Walker's and Robinson's models, are studied in conjunction with two implicit integration methods: the trapezoidal rule with Newton-Raphson iterations and an asymptotic integration algorithm. A comparison is made between the two integration methods, and the latter method appears to be computationally more appealing in terms of numerical accuracy and CPU time. However, in order to make the asymptotic algorithm robust, it is necessary to include a self adaptive scheme with subincremental step control and error checking of the Jacobian matrix at the integration points. Three examples are given to illustrate the numerical aspects of the integration methods tested.

  20. A Finite element model of tactile flow for softness perception.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Edoardo; Bianchi, Matteo; D'Angelo, Maria Laura; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Cannella, Ferdinando; Scilingo, Enzo P; Bicchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Touch is an extremely dynamic sense. To take into account this aspect, it has been hypothesized that there are mechanisms in the brain that specialize in processing dynamic tactile stimuli, in a way not too dissimilar from what happens for optical flow in dynamic vision. The concept of tactile flow, related to the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes in the human fingerpad, was used to explain some perceptual illusions as well as mechanisms of human softness perception. In this paper we describe a computational model of tactile flow, and apply it to a finite element model of interaction between deformable bodies. The shape and material properties of the bodies are modeled from those of a human fingertip interacting with specimens with different softness properties. Results show that the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes can be used to discriminate different materials in terms of their softness characteristics.

  1. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  2. An alternative to Guyan reduction of finite-element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jiguan Gene

    1988-01-01

    Structural modeling is a key part of structural system identification for large space structures. Finite-element structural models are commonly used in practice because of their general applicability and availability. The initial models generated by using a standard computer program such as NASTRAN, ANSYS, SUPERB, STARDYNE, STRUDL, etc., generally contain tens of thousands of degrees of freedom. The models must be reduced for purposes of identification. Not only does the magnitude of the identification effort grow exponentially as a function of the number of degrees of freedom, but numerical procedures may also break down because of accumulated round-off errors. Guyan reduction is usually applied after a static condensation. Misapplication of Guyan reduction can lead to serious modeling errors. It is quite unfortunate and disappointing, since the accuracy of the original detailed finite-element model one tries very hard to achieve is lost by the reduction. First, why and how Guyan reduction always causes loss of accuracy is examined. An alternative approach is then introduced. The alternative can be thought of as an improvement of Guyan reduction, the Rayleigh-Ritz method, and in particular the recent algorithm of Wilson, Yuan, and Dickens. Unlike Guyan reduction, the use of the alternative does not need any special insight, experience, or skill for partitioning the structural degrees of freedom. In addition to model condensation, this alternative approach can also be used for predicting analytically, quickly, and economically, what are those structural modes that are excitable by a force actuator at a given trial location. That is, in the excitation of the structural modes for identification, it can be used for guiding the placement of the force actuators.

  3. An efficient formulation of the coupled finite element-integral equation technique for solving large 3D scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1993-01-01

    It is often desirable to calculate the electromagnetic fields inside and about a complicated system of scattering bodies, as well as in their far-field region. The finite element method (FE) is well suited to solving the interior problem, but the domain has to be limited to a manageable size. At the truncation of the FE mesh one can either impose approximate (absorbing) boundary conditions or set up an integral equation (IE) for the fields scattered from the bodies. The latter approach is preferable since it results in higher accuracy. Hence, the two techniques can be successfully combined by introducing a surface that encloses the scatterers, applying a FE model to the inner volume and setting up an IE for the tangential fields components on the surface. Here the continuity of the tangential fields is used bo obtain a consistent solution. A few coupled FE-IE methods have recently appeared in the literature. The approach presented here has the advantage of using edge-based finite elements, a type of finite elements with degrees of freedom associated with edges of the mesh. Because of their properties, they are better suited than the conventional node based elements to represent electromagnetic fields, particularly when inhomogeneous regions are modeled, since the node based elements impose an unnatural continuity of all field components across boundaries of mesh elements. Additionally, our approach is well suited to handle large size problems and lends itself to code parallelization. We will discuss the salient features that make our approach very efficient from the standpoint of numerical computation, and the fields and RCS of a few objects are illustrated as examples.

  4. Thermal buoyancy on Venus: Preliminary results of finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Enhanced surface temperatures and a thinner lithosphere on Venus relative to Earth have been cited as leading to increased lithospheric buoyancy. This would limit or prevent subduction on Venus and favor the construction of thickened crust through underthrusting. In order to evaluate the conditions distinguishing between underthrusting and subduction, we have modeled the thermal and buoyancy consequences of the subduction end member. This study considers the fate of a slab from the time it starts to subduct, but bypasses the question of subduction initiation. Thermal changes in slabs subducting into a mantle having a range of initial geotherms are used to predict density changes and thus their overall buoyancy. Finite element modeling is then applied in a first approximation of the assessment of the relative rates of subduction as compared to the buoyant rise of the slab through a viscous mantle.

  5. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  6. Finite Element Modelling and Residual Stress Prediction in End Milling of Ti6Al4Valloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, P.; Sripathi, J.; Vijay, P.; Ramachandran, K. I.

    2016-09-01

    Titanium and its alloys are materials that exhibit unique combination of mechanical and physical properties that enable their usage in various fields. In spite of having a lot of advantages, their usage is limited because they are difficult to machine due to their inherent properties of high specific heat capacity, reactivity with tool and low thermal conductivity thereby causing excessive tool wear. To facilitate the process of machining, it becomes necessary to find out and relieve the residual stress caused during machining. Since experiments cannot be performed for each instance, creation of an FE model is desirable. In this paper a finite element analysis (FEA) of the machining of Ti6Al4V for different cutting speeds is presented. A 3D finite element model is developed with the Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) as the workpiece and a four flute carbide tip end mill cutter as the tool to predict the residual stress developed within the titanium alloy after machining. The finite element model utilises the Johnson-Cook model to depict the plasticity and the damage criteria and implements the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation to increase the accuracy of the model. The FE model has been developed and the findings are presented. The results indicate that residual stresses are maximum at the surface and decrease linearly along the depth and increase as the cutting speed and depth of cut are increased.

  7. A three-dimensional finite element model for biomechanical analysis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Xing; Yang, Liu; Li, Kai; He, Rui; Yang, Bin; Zhan, Yan; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Yu, Bing-Nin; Jian, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the hip. The images of the hip were obtained from Chinese visible human dataset. The hip model includes acetabular bone, cartilage, labrum, and bone. The cartilage of femoral head was constructed using the AutoCAD and Solidworks software. The hip model was imported into ABAQUS analysis system. The contact surface of the hip joint was meshed. To verify the model, the single leg peak force was loaded, and contact area of the cartilage and labrum of the hip and pressure distribution in these structures were observed. The constructed 3D hip model reflected the real hip anatomy. Further, this model reflected biomechanical behavior similar to previous studies. In conclusion, this 3D finite element hip model avoids the disadvantages of other construction methods, such as imprecision of cartilage construction and the absence of labrum. Further, it provides basic data critical for accurately modeling normal and abnormal loads, and the effects of abnormal loads on the hip.

  8. Finite element modeling of 129Xe diffusive gas exchange NMR in the human alveoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Neil J.; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M.

    2016-10-01

    Existing models of 129Xe diffusive exchange for lung microstructural modeling with time-resolved MR spectroscopy data have considered analytical solutions to one-dimensional, homogeneous models of the lungs with specific assumptions about the alveolar geometry. In order to establish a model system for simulating the effects of physiologically-realistic changes in physical and microstructural parameters on 129Xe exchange NMR, we have developed a 3D alveolar capillary model for finite element analysis. To account for the heterogeneity of the alveolar geometry across the lungs, we have derived realistic geometries for finite element analysis based on 2D histological samples and 3D micro-CT image volumes obtained from ex vivo biopsies of lung tissue from normal subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. The 3D alveolar capillary model permits investigation of the impact of alveolar geometrical parameters and diffusion and perfusion coefficients on the in vivo measured 129Xe CSSR signal response. The heterogeneity of alveolar microstructure that is accounted for in image-based models resulted in considerable alterations to the shape of the 129Xe diffusive uptake curve when compared to 1D models. Our findings have important implications for the future design and optimization of 129Xe MR experiments and in the interpretation of lung microstructural changes from this data.

  9. Workshop on the Integration of Finite Element Modeling with Geometric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozny, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The workshop on the Integration of Finite Element Modeling with Geometric Modeling was held on 12 May 1987. It was held to discuss the geometric modeling requirements of the finite element modeling process and to better understand the technical aspects of the integration of these two areas. The 11 papers are presented except for one for which only the abstract is given.

  10. Finite Element Modeling and Optimization of Mechanical Joining Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenot, Jean-Loup; Bouchard, Pierre-Olivier; Massoni, Elisabeth; Mocellin, Katia; Lasne, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    The main scientific ingredients are recalled for developing a general finite element code and model accurately large plastic deformation of metallic materials during joining processes. Multi material contact is treated using the classical master and slave approach. Rupture may occur in joining processes or even be imposed in self piercing riveting and it must be predicted to evaluate the ultimate strength of joins. Damage is introduced with a generalized uncoupled damage criterion, or by utilizing a coupled formulation with a Lemaître law. Several joining processes are briefly analyzed in term of specific scientific issues: riveting, self piercing riveting, clinching, crimping, hemming and screwing. It is shown that not only the joining process can be successfully simulated and optimized, but also the strength of the assembly can be predicted in tension and in shearing.

  11. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR TIDES AND CURRENTS WITH FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element model, based upon the shallow water equations, is used to calculate tidal amplitudes and currents for two field-scale test problems. Because tides are characterized by line spectra, the governing equations are subjected to harmonic decomposition. Thus the solution variables are the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude of sea level and velocity rather than a time series of these variables. The time series is recovered through synthesis. This scheme, coupled with a modified form of the governing equations, leads to high computational efficiency and freedom from excessive numerical noise. Two test-cases are presented. The first is a solution for eleven tidal constituents in the English Channel and southern North Sea, and three constituents are discussed. The second is an analysis of the frequency response and tidal harmonics for south San Francisco Bay.

  12. NPLOT: an Interactive Plotting Program for NASTRAN Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.; Mcentire, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    The NPLOT (NASTRAN Plot) is an interactive computer graphics program for plotting undeformed and deformed NASTRAN finite element models. Developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the program provides flexible element selection and grid point, ASET and SPC degree of freedom labelling. It is easy to use and provides a combination menu and command driven user interface. NPLOT also provides very fast hidden line and haloed line algorithms. The hidden line algorithm in NPLOT proved to be both very accurate and several times faster than other existing hidden line algorithms. A fast spatial bucket sort and horizon edge computation are used to achieve this high level of performance. The hidden line and the haloed line algorithms are the primary features that make NPLOT different from other plotting programs.

  13. A responsive finite element method to aid interactive geometric modeling.

    PubMed

    Umetani, N; Takayama, K; Mitani, J; Igarashi, T

    2011-01-01

    Current computer-aided engineering systems use numerical-simulation methods mainly as offline verification tools to reject designs that don't satisfy the required constraints, rather than as tools to guide users toward better designs. However, integrating real-time finite element method (FEM) into interactive geometric modeling can provide user guidance. During interactive editing, real-time feedback from numerical simulation guides users toward an improved design without tedious trial-and-error iterations. Careful reuse of previous computation results, such as meshes and matrices, on the basis of speed and accuracy trade-offs, have helped produce fast FEM analysis during interactive editing. Several 2D example applications and informal user studies show this approach's effectiveness. Such tools could help nonexpert users design objects that satisfy physical constraints and help those users understand the underlying physical properties.

  14. Scaling/LER study of Si GAA nanowire FET using 3D finite element Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmessary, Muhammad A.; Nagy, Daniel; Aldegunde, Manuel; Seoane, Natalia; Indalecio, Guillermo; Lindberg, Jari; Dettmer, Wulf; Perić, Djordje; García-Loureiro, Antonio J.; Kalna, Karol

    2017-02-01

    3D Finite Element (FE) Monte Carlo (MC) simulation toolbox incorporating 2D Schrödinger equation quantum corrections is employed to simulate ID-VG characteristics of a 22 nm gate length gate-all-around (GAA) Si nanowire (NW) FET demonstrating an excellent agreement against experimental data at both low and high drain biases. We then scale the Si GAA NW according to the ITRS specifications to a gate length of 10 nm predicting that the NW FET will deliver the required on-current of above 1 mA/ μ m and a superior electrostatic integrity with a nearly ideal sub-threshold slope of 68 mV/dec and a DIBL of 39 mV/V. In addition, we use a calibrated 3D FE quantum corrected drift-diffusion (DD) toolbox to investigate the effects of NW line-edge roughness (LER) induced variability on the sub-threshold characteristics (threshold voltage (VT), OFF-current (IOFF), sub-threshold slope (SS) and drain-induced-barrier-lowering (DIBL)) for the 22 nm and 10 nm gate length GAA NW FETs at low and high drain biases. We simulate variability with two LER correlation lengths (CL = 20 nm and 10 nm) and three root mean square values (RMS = 0.6, 0.7 and 0.85 nm).

  15. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m-1 to 697.41 Fμ m-1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m-1 to 566.11 Fμ m-1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  16. Intervertebral disc biomechanical analysis using the finite element modeling based on medical images.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyun; Wang, Zheng

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D geometric model of the intervertebral and lumbar disks has been presented, which integrated the spine CT and MRI data-based anatomical structure. Based on the geometric model, a 3D finite element model of an L1-L2 segment was created. Loads, which simulate the pressure from above were applied to the FEM, while a boundary condition describing the relative L1-L2 displacement is imposed on the FEM to account for 3D physiological states. The simulation calculation illustrates the stress and strain distribution and deformation of the spine. The method has two characteristics compared to previous studies: first, the finite element model of the lumbar are based on the data directly derived from medical images such as CTs and MRIs. Second, the result of analysis will be more accurate than using the data of geometric parameters. The FEM provides a promising tool in clinical diagnosis and for optimizing individual therapy in the intervertebral disc herniation.

  17. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  18. Finite element modelling and analysis of composites toecaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. C.; Duhovic, M.; Lin, R. J. T.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2009-08-01

    Composite toe-caps have attracted considerable attention due to their advantageous properties over traditional metallic toe-caps. However, the anisotropic properties of composite materials also make the toe-cap performance more complex to analyse. This project aims at developing a Finite Element (FE) model for composite toe-caps with the aid of compression testing data. The geometry of the toe-cap was first scanned and imported into an FEA software package to create a workable FE model. The method was then validated by comparing the FE model with experimental results of steel toe-caps. Manufacturing, modelling and testing of custom-made composite toe-cap samples were then carried out. Modelling outputs of composite toe-caps were compared with compression test data for validation. The stress distributions and deformations of the toe-caps were also analysed. Modelling of the steel and composite toe-caps was realized using LS-DYNA Solver and PrePost®. All FE analyses were modelled with reference to European Standards. The developed FE models can in the future be used to model toe-caps with various materials to determine the effects of fibre orientation relating to structural strength, and to achieve structural optimisation.

  19. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  20. Finite Element Models for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) is a member of an emerging class of direct manufacturing processes known as solid freeform fabrication (SFF); another member of the class is the laser deposition process. Successful application of the EBF3 process requires precise control of a number of process parameters such as the EB power, speed, and metal feed rate in order to ensure thermal management; good fusion between the substrate and the first layer and between successive layers; minimize part distortion and residual stresses; and control the microstructure of the finished product. This is the only effort thus far that has addressed computer simulation of the EBF3 process. The models developed in this effort can assist in reducing the number of trials in the laboratory or on the shop floor while making high-quality parts. With some modifications, their use can be further extended to the simulation of laser, TIG (tungsten inert gas), and other deposition processes. A solid mechanics-based finite element code, ABAQUS, was chosen as the primary engine in developing these models whereas a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, Fluent, was used in a support role. Several innovative concepts were developed, some of which are highlighted below. These concepts were implemented in a number of new computer models either in the form of stand-alone programs or as user subroutines for ABAQUS and Fluent codes. A database of thermo-physical, mechanical, fluid, and metallurgical properties of stainless steel 304 was developed. Computing models for Gaussian and raster modes of the electron beam heat input were developed. Also, new schemes were devised to account for the heat sink effect during the deposition process. These innovations, and others, lead to improved models for thermal management and prediction of transient/residual stresses and distortions. Two approaches for the prediction of microstructure were pursued. The first was an empirical approach involving the

  1. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  2. Development of a finite element model of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Lazoglu, Ismail; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2014-01-01

    The finite element model has been used as an effective tool in human spine biomechanics. Biomechanical finite element models have provided basic insights into the workings of the cervical spine system. Advancements in numerical methods during the last decade have enabled researchers to propose more accurate models of the cervical spine. The new finite element model of the cervical spine considers the accurate representation of each tissue regarding the geometry and material. The aim of this paper is to address the new advancements in the finite element model of the human cervical spine. The procedures for creating a finite element model are introduced, including geometric construction, material-property assignment, boundary conditions and validation. The most recent and published finite element models of the cervical spine are reviewed.

  3. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model - Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts which reflect every detail of the finished product. Ideally, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) they must provide numerical control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) they must enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in space missions. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. The research performed during the fellowship period investigated the transition process from the solid CAD model to the FEA stress analysis model with the final goal of creating an automatic interface between the two. During the period of the fellowship a detailed multi-year program for the development of such an interface was created. The ultimate goal of this program will be the development of a fully parameterized automatic ProE/FEA translator for parts and assemblies, with the incorporation of data base management into the solution, and ultimately including computational fluid dynamics and thermal modeling in the interface.

  4. 3D Finite Element Modeling of Sliding Wear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    observed in a micrograph of the recovered slipper. This methodology assumes that one can correlate the number of asperities per unit of area on the...thickness along its length (Figure IV-17) correlate to the three sled system acceleration stages. The higher the slipper acceleration the greater...can conclude that the greater the speed the greater the strain rate contribution. However, higher speeds typically correlate with higher skin

  5. Finite element models of wire rope for vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Fitz-Coy, N. G.; Cutchins, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of wire rope in shock and vibration isolation is briefly reviewed and its modeling for the purpose of vibration analysis is addressed. A model of a nominally straight segment of wire rope is described in which the rope structure is represented by a maiden, or central, strand of wire with one (or more) strand(s) wrapped around it in a helix (helices). The individual strands are modeled using finite elements and MSC NASTRAN. Small linear segments of each wire are modeled mathematically by dividing them lengthwise into triangular prisms representing each prism by a solid NASTRAN element. To model pretensioning and allow for extraction of internal force information from the NASTRAN model, the wound strands are connected to the maiden strand and each other using spring (scalar elastic) elements. Mode shapes for a length of wire rope with one and fixed to a moving base and the other attached to a point mass, are presented. The use of the NASTRAN derived mode shapes to approximate internal normal forces in equations of motion for vibration analyses is considered.

  6. Three-dimensional finite element modeling of a magnet array spinning above a conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Lorimer, W.L.; Lieu, D.K.; Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rossing, T.D.

    1993-12-31

    Drag forces due to eddy currents induced by the relative motion of a conductor and a magnetic field occur in many practical devices: motors, brakes, magnetic bearings, and magnetically levitated vehicles. Recently, finite element codes have included solvers for 3-D eddy current geometries and have the potential to be very useful in the design and analysis of these devices. In this paper, numerical results from three-dimensional modeling of a magnet array spinning above a conductor are compared to experimental results in order to assess the capabilities of these codes.

  7. Assessment of stochastically updated finite element models using reliability indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, X. G.; Wen, Q.; Ni, Y. Q.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Finite element (FE) model updating techniques have been a viable approach to correcting an initial mathematical model based on test data. Validation of the updated FE models is usually conducted by comparing model predictions with independent test data that have not been used for model updating. This approach of model validation cannot be readily applied in the case of a stochastically updated FE model. In recognizing that structural reliability is a major decision factor throughout the lifecycle of a structure, this study investigates the use of structural reliability as a measure for assessing the quality of stochastically updated FE models. A recently developed perturbation method for stochastic FE model updating is first applied to attain the stochastically updated models by using the measured modal parameters with uncertainty. The reliability index and failure probability for predefined limit states are computed for the initial and the stochastically updated models, respectively, and are compared with those obtained from the 'true' model to assess the quality of the two models. Numerical simulation of a truss bridge is provided as an example. The simulated modal parameters involving different uncertainty magnitudes are used to update an initial model of the bridge. It is shown that the reliability index obtained from the updated model is much closer to true reliability index than that obtained from the initial model in the case of small uncertainty magnitude; in the case of large uncertainty magnitude, the reliability index computed from the initial model rather than from the updated model is closer to the true value. The present study confirms the usefulness of measurement-calibrated FE models and at the same time also highlights the importance of the uncertainty reduction in test data for reliable model updating and reliability evaluation.

  8. Finite-element modeling of soft tissue rolling indentation.

    PubMed

    Sangpradit, Kiattisak; Liu, Hongbin; Dasgupta, Prokar; Althoefer, Kaspar; Seneviratne, Lakmal D

    2011-12-01

    We describe a finite-element (FE) model for simulating wheel-rolling tissue deformations using a rolling FE model (RFEM). A wheeled probe performing rolling tissue indentation has proven to be a promising approach for compensating for the loss of haptic and tactile feedback experienced during robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery (H. Liu, D. P. Noonan, B. J. Challacombe, P. Dasgupta, L. D. Seneviratne, and K. Althoefer, "Rolling mechanical imaging for tissue abnormality localization during minimally invasive surgery, " IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 404-414, Feb. 2010; K. Sangpradit, H. Liu, L. Seneviratne, and K. Althoefer, "Tissue identification using inverse finite element analysis of rolling indentation," in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom. , Kobe, Japan, 2009, pp. 1250-1255; H. Liu, D. Noonan, K. Althoefer, and L. Seneviratne, "The rolling approach for soft tissue modeling and mechanical imaging during robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery," in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom., May 2008, pp. 845-850; H. Liu, P. Puangmali, D. Zbyszewski, O. Elhage, P. Dasgupta, J. S. Dai, L. Seneviratne, and K. Althoefer, "An indentation depth-force sensing wheeled probe for abnormality identification during minimally invasive surgery," Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., H, vol. 224, no. 6, pp. 751-63, 2010; D. Noonan, H. Liu, Y. Zweiri, K. Althoefer, and L. Seneviratne, "A dual-function wheeled probe for tissue viscoelastic property identification during minimally invasive surgery," in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom. , 2008, pp. 2629-2634; H. Liu, J. Li, Q. I. Poon, L. D. Seneviratne, and K. Althoefer, "Miniaturized force indentation-depth sensor for tissue abnormality identification," IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom., May 2010, pp. 3654-3659). A sound understanding of wheel-tissue rolling interaction dynamics will facilitate the evaluation of signals from rolling indentation. In this paper, we model the dynamic interactions between a wheeled probe and a

  9. Manual for automatic generation of finite element models of spiral bevel gears in mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Reddy, S.; Kumar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop computer programs that generate finite element models suitable for doing 3D contact analysis of faced milled spiral bevel gears in mesh. A pinion tooth and a gear tooth are created and put in mesh. There are two programs: Points.f and Pat.f to perform the analysis. Points.f is based on the equation of meshing for spiral bevel gears. It uses machine tool settings to solve for an N x M mesh of points on the four surfaces, pinion concave and convex, and gear concave and convex. Points.f creates the file POINTS.OUT, an ASCI file containing N x M points for each surface. (N is the number of node points along the length of the tooth, and M is nodes along the height.) Pat.f reads POINTS.OUT and creates the file tl.out. Tl.out is a series of PATRAN input commands. In addition to the mesh density on the tooth face, additional user specified variables are the number of finite elements through the thickness, and the number of finite elements along the tooth full fillet. A full fillet is assumed to exist for both the pinion and gear.

  10. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  11. A finite element musculoskeletal model of the shoulder mechanism.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, F C

    1994-05-01

    The finite element method described in this study provides an easy method to simulate the kinetics of multibody mechanisms. It is used in order to develop a musculoskeletal model of the shoulder mechanism. Each relevant morphological structure has been represented by an appropriate element. For the shoulder mechanism two special-purpose elements have been developed: a SURFACE element representing the scapulothoracic gliding plane and a CURVED-TRUSS element to represent muscles which are wrapped around bony contours. The model contains four bones, three joints, three extracapsular ligaments, the scapulothoracic gliding plane and 20 muscles and muscle parts. In the model, input variables are the positions of the shoulder girdle and humerus and the external load on the humerus. Output variables are muscles forces subject to an optimization procedure in which the mechanical stability of the glenohumeral joint is one of the constraints. Four different optimization criteria are compared. For 12 muscles, surface EMG is used to verify the model. Since the optimum muscle length and force-length relationship are unknown, and since maximal EMG amplitude is length dependent, verification is only possible in a qualitative sense. Nevertheless, it is concluded that a detailed model of the shoulder mechanism has been developed which provides good insight into the function of morphological structures.

  12. Finite element code development for modeling detonation of HMX composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Adam V.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a hydrodynamics code for modeling shock and detonation waves in HMX. A stable efficient solution strategy based on a Taylor-Galerkin finite element (FE) discretization was developed to solve the reactive Euler equations. In our code, well calibrated equations of state for the solid unreacted material and gaseous reaction products have been implemented, along with a chemical reaction scheme and a mixing rule to define the properties of partially reacted states. A linear Gruneisen equation of state was employed for the unreacted HMX calibrated from experiments. The JWL form was used to model the EOS of gaseous reaction products. It is assumed that the unreacted explosive and reaction products are in both pressure and temperature equilibrium. The overall specific volume and internal energy was computed using the rule of mixtures. Arrhenius kinetics scheme was integrated to model the chemical reactions. A locally controlled dissipation was introduced that induces a non-oscillatory stabilized scheme for the shock front. The FE model was validated using analytical solutions for SOD shock and ZND strong detonation models. Benchmark problems are presented for geometries in which a single HMX crystal is subjected to a shock condition.

  13. Calibration under uncertainty for finite element models of masonry monuments

    SciTech Connect

    Atamturktur, Sezer,; Hemez, Francois,; Unal, Cetin

    2010-02-01

    Historical unreinforced masonry buildings often include features such as load bearing unreinforced masonry vaults and their supporting framework of piers, fill, buttresses, and walls. The masonry vaults of such buildings are among the most vulnerable structural components and certainly among the most challenging to analyze. The versatility of finite element (FE) analyses in incorporating various constitutive laws, as well as practically all geometric configurations, has resulted in the widespread use of the FE method for the analysis of complex unreinforced masonry structures over the last three decades. However, an FE model is only as accurate as its input parameters, and there are two fundamental challenges while defining FE model input parameters: (1) material properties and (2) support conditions. The difficulties in defining these two aspects of the FE model arise from the lack of knowledge in the common engineering understanding of masonry behavior. As a result, engineers are unable to define these FE model input parameters with certainty, and, inevitably, uncertainties are introduced to the FE model.

  14. Customized Finite Element Modelling of the Human Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Simonini, Irene; Pandolfi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aim To construct patient-specific solid models of human cornea from ocular topographer data, to increase the accuracy of the biomechanical and optical estimate of the changes in refractive power and stress caused by photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Method Corneal elevation maps of five human eyes were taken with a rotating Scheimpflug camera combined with a Placido disk before and after refractive surgery. Patient-specific solid models were created and discretized in finite elements to estimate the corneal strain and stress fields in preoperative and postoperative configurations and derive the refractive parameters of the cornea. Results Patient-specific geometrical models of the cornea allow for the creation of personalized refractive maps at different levels of IOP. Thinned postoperative corneas show a higher stress gradient across the thickness and higher sensitivity of all geometrical and refractive parameters to the fluctuation of the IOP. Conclusion Patient-specific numerical models of the cornea can provide accurate quantitative information on the refractive properties of the cornea under different levels of IOP and describe the change of the stress state of the cornea due to refractive surgery (PRK). Patient-specific models can be used as indicators of feasibility before performing the surgery. PMID:26098104

  15. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  16. Physical Constraint Finite Element Model for Medical Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingya; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Xiuying; Gao, Xin; Feng, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    Due to being derived from linear assumption, most elastic body based non-rigid image registration algorithms are facing challenges for soft tissues with complex nonlinear behavior and with large deformations. To take into account the geometric nonlinearity of soft tissues, we propose a registration algorithm on the basis of Newtonian differential equation. The material behavior of soft tissues is modeled as St. Venant-Kirchhoff elasticity, and the nonlinearity of the continuum represents the quadratic term of the deformation gradient under the Green- St.Venant strain. In our algorithm, the elastic force is formulated as the derivative of the deformation energy with respect to the nodal displacement vectors of the finite element; the external force is determined by the registration similarity gradient flow which drives the floating image deforming to the equilibrium condition. We compared our approach to three other models: 1) the conventional linear elastic finite element model (FEM); 2) the dynamic elastic FEM; 3) the robust block matching (RBM) method. The registration accuracy was measured using three similarities: MSD (Mean Square Difference), NC (Normalized Correlation) and NMI (Normalized Mutual Information), and was also measured using the mean and max distance between the ground seeds and corresponding ones after registration. We validated our method on 60 image pairs including 30 medical image pairs with artificial deformation and 30 clinical image pairs for both the chest chemotherapy treatment in different periods and brain MRI normalization. Our method achieved a distance error of 0.320±0.138 mm in x direction and 0.326±0.111 mm in y direction, MSD of 41.96±13.74, NC of 0.9958±0.0019, NMI of 1.2962±0.0114 for images with large artificial deformations; and average NC of 0.9622±0.008 and NMI of 1.2764±0.0089 for the real clinical cases. Student’s t-test demonstrated that our model statistically outperformed the other methods in comparison (p

  17. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  18. Examination of Buoyancy-Reduction Effect in Induction-Heating Cookers by Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Tanaka, Kazufumi; Hara, Takehisa

    In recent years, induction-heating (IH) cookers that can be used to heat nonmagnetic metals such as aluminum have been produced. Occasionally, a light pan moves on a glass plate due to buoyancy when heated by an IH cooker. In some IH cookers, an aluminum plate is mounted between the glass plate and the coil in order to reduce the buoyancy effect. The objective of this research is to evaluate the buoyancy-reduction effect and the heating effect of buoyancy-reduction plates. Eddy current analysis is carried out by 3D finite element method, and the electromagnetic force and the heat distribution on the heating plate are calculated. After this calculation is performed, the temperature distribution of the heating plate is calculated by heat transfer analysis. It is found that the shape, area, and the position of the buoyancy reduction plate strongly affect the buoyancy and the heat distribution. The impact of the shape, area, and position of the buoyancy reduction plate was quantified. The phenomena in the heating were elucidated qualitatively.

  19. Crystallographic effects during micromachining — A finite-element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shin-Hyung; Choi, Woo Chun

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical micromachining is a powerful and effective way for manufacturing small sized machine parts. Even though the micromachining process is similar to the traditional machining, the material behavior during the process is much different. In particular, many researchers report that the basic mechanics of the work material is affected by microstructures and their crystallographic orientations. For example, crystallographic orientations of the work material have significant influence on force response, chip formation and surface finish. In order to thoroughly understand the effect of crystallographic orientations on the micromachining process, finite-element model (FEM) simulating orthogonal cutting process of single crystallographic material was presented. For modeling the work material, rate sensitive single crystal plasticity of face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal was implemented. For the chip formation during the simulation, element deletion technique was used. The simulation model is developed using ABAQUS/explicit with user material subroutine via user material subroutine (VUMAT). Simulations showed that variation of the specific cutting energy at different crystallographic orientations of work material shows significant anisotropy. The developed FEM model can be a useful prediction tool of micromachining of crystalline materials.

  20. Finite-element model of the active organ of Corti

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Baumgart, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The cochlear amplifier that provides our hearing with its extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity is thought to be the result of an active biomechanical process within the sensory auditory organ, the organ of Corti. Although imaging techniques are developing rapidly, it is not currently possible, in a fully active cochlea, to obtain detailed measurements of the motion of individual elements within a cross section of the organ of Corti. This motion is predicted using a two-dimensional finite-element model. The various solid components are modelled using elastic elements, the outer hair cells (OHCs) as piezoelectric elements and the perilymph and endolymph as viscous and nearly incompressible fluid elements. The model is validated by comparison with existing measurements of the motions within the passive organ of Corti, calculated when it is driven either acoustically, by the fluid pressure or electrically, by excitation of the OHCs. The transverse basilar membrane (BM) motion and the shearing motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina are calculated for these two excitation modes. The fully active response of the BM to acoustic excitation is predicted using a linear superposition of the calculated responses and an assumed frequency response for the OHC feedback. PMID:26888950

  1. Finite Element Modeling for Infrared Thermography of Gfrp Bridge Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, Cheng L.; Halabe, Udaya B.

    2008-02-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) composite bridge decks are increasingly being used as replacements for old concrete decks and for new construction. The service performance of the GFRP bridge decks can be adversely affected by the formation of debonds between the wearing surface and the underlying bridge deck. Past experimental studies by the authors have shown the usefulness of the infrared thermography technique in detecting the subsurface debonds prior to maintenance and rehabilitation work. This paper investigates the use of finite element (FE) heat transfer modeling to predict infrared thermography images from GFRP bridge decks with subsurface debonds. The paper includes measurement of thermal properties of the GFRP bridge deck and the wearing surface, and heat transfer FE modeling of decks with debonds of different thicknesses. The results show that FE modeling can be a useful tool for predicting surface temperature profile under different heating conditions and debond sizes. Such predictions can help determine the required heat intensity and detectable debond sizes prior to experimental data acquisition in the field using an infrared camera.

  2. A Successive Selection Method for finite element model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Baiyong; Zhang, Weijie; Lu, Qiuhai; Wang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Finite Element (FE) model can be updated effectively and efficiently by using the Response Surface Method (RSM). However, it often involves performance trade-offs such as high computational cost for better accuracy or loss of efficiency for lots of design parameter updates. This paper proposes a Successive Selection Method (SSM), which is based on the linear Response Surface (RS) function and orthogonal design. SSM rewrites the linear RS function into a number of linear equations to adjust the Design of Experiment (DOE) after every FE calculation. SSM aims to interpret the implicit information provided by the FE analysis, to locate the Design of Experiment (DOE) points more quickly and accurately, and thereby to alleviate the computational burden. This paper introduces the SSM and its application, describes the solution steps of point selection for DOE in detail, and analyzes SSM's high efficiency and accuracy in the FE model updating. A numerical example of a simply supported beam and a practical example of a vehicle brake disc show that the SSM can provide higher speed and precision in FE model updating for engineering problems than traditional RSM.

  3. Finite element modeling of superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Naceur, Ines Ben; Charfi, Amin; Bouraoui, Tarak; Elleuch, Khaled

    2014-11-28

    Thanks to its good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, superelastic Ni–Ti wire alloys have been successfully used in orthodontic treatment. Therefore, it is important to quantify and evaluate the level of orthodontic force applied to the bracket and teeth in order to achieve tooth movement. In this study, three dimensional finite element models with a Gibbs-potential-based-formulation and thermodynamic principles were used. The aim was to evaluate the influence of possible intraoral temperature differences on the forces exerted by NiTi orthodontic arch wires with different cross sectional shapes and sizes. The prediction made by this phenomenological model, for superelastic tensile and bending tests, shows good agreement with the experimental data. A bending test is simulated to study the force variation of an orthodontic NiTi arch wire when it loaded up to the deflection of 3 mm, for this task one half of the arch wire and the 3 adjacent brackets were modeled. The results showed that the stress required for the martensite transformation increases with the increase of cross-sectional dimensions and temperature. Associated with this increase in stress, the plateau of this transformation becomes steeper. In addition, the area of the mechanical hysteresis, measured as the difference between the forces of the upper and lower plateau, increases.

  4. Multiphase poroelastic finite element models for soft tissue structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, B.R.

    1992-12-01

    During the last two decades, biological structures with soft tissue components have been modeled using poroelastic or mixture-based constitutive laws, i.e., the material is viewed as a deformable (porous) solid matrix that is saturated by mobile tissue fluid. These structures exhibit a highly nonlinear, history-dependent material behavior; undergo finite strains; and may swell or shrink when tissue ionic concentrations are altered. Give the geometric and material complexity of soft tissue structures and that they are subjected to complicated initial and boundary conditions, finite element models (FEMs) have been very useful for quantitative structural analyses. This paper surveys recent applications of poroelastic and mixture-based theories and the associated FEMs for the study of the biomechanics of soft tissues, and indicates future directions for research in this area. Equivalent finite-strain poroelastic and mixture continuum biomechanical models are presented. Special attention is given to the identification of material properties using a porohyperelastic constitutive law ans a total Lagrangian view for the formulation. The associated FEMs are then formulated to include this porohyperelastic material response and finite strains. Extensions of the theory are suggested in order to include inherent viscoelasticity, transport phenomena, and swelling in soft tissue structures. A number of biomechanical research areas are identified, and possible applications of the porohyperelastic and mixture-based FEMs are suggested. 62 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Multiphase poroelastic finite element models for soft tissue structure

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, B.R.

    1992-06-01

    During the last two decades. biological structures with soft tissue components have been modeled using poroelastic or mixture-based constitutive laws, i.e., the material is viewed as a deformable (porous) solid matrix that is saturated by mobile tissue fluid. These structures exhibit a highly nonlinear, history-dependent material behavior; undergo finite strains-, and may swell or shrink when tissue ionic concentrations are altered. Given the geometric and material complexity of soft tissue structures and that they are subjected to complicated initial and boundary conditions, finite element models (FEMs) have been very useful for quantitative structural analyses. This paper surveys recent applications of poroelastic and mixture-based theories and the associated FEMs for the study of the biomechanics of soft tissues, and indicates future directions for research in this area. Equivalent finite-strain poroelastic and mixture continuum biomechanical models are presented. Special attention is given to the identification of material properties using a porohyperelastic constitutive law and a total Lagrangian view for the formulation. The associated FEMS are then formulated to include this porohyperelastic material response and finite strains. Extensions of the theory are suggested in order to include inherent viscoelasticity, transport phenomena, and swelling in soft tissue structures. A number of biomechanical research areas are identified, and possible applications of the porohyperelastic and mixture-based FEMs are suggested.

  6. Lower extremity finite element model for crash simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Perfect, S.A.

    1996-03-01

    A lower extremity model has been developed to study occupant injury mechanisms of the major bones and ligamentous soft tissues resulting from vehicle collisions. The model is based on anatomically correct digitized bone surfaces of the pelvis, femur, patella and the tibia. Many muscles, tendons and ligaments were incrementally added to the basic bone model. We have simulated two types of occupant loading that occur in a crash environment using a non-linear large deformation finite element code. The modeling approach assumed that the leg was passive during its response to the excitation, that is, no active muscular contraction and therefore no active change in limb stiffness. The approach recognized that the most important contributions of the muscles to the lower extremity response are their ability to define and modify the impedance of the limb. When nonlinear material behavior in a component of the leg model was deemed important to response, a nonlinear constitutive model was incorporated. The accuracy of these assumptions can be verified only through a review of analysis results and careful comparison with test data. As currently defined, the model meets the objective for which it was created. Much work remains to be done, both from modeling and analysis perspectives, before the model can be considered complete. The model implements a modeling philosophy that can accurately capture both kinematic and kinetic response of the lower limb. We have demonstrated that the lower extremity model is a valuable tool for understanding the injury processes and mechanisms. We are now in a position to extend the computer simulation to investigate the clinical fracture patterns observed in actual crashes. Additional experience with this model will enable us to make a statement on what measures are needed to significantly reduce lower extremity injuries in vehicle crashes. 6 refs.

  7. FEMA: a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the construction, verification, and demonstration of a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The particular features of FEMA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Mechanisms included in FEMA are: carrier fluid advection, hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion, radioactive decay, sorption, source/sinks, and degradation due to biological, chemical as well as physical processes. Three optional sorption models are embodied in FEMA. These are linear isotherm and Freundlich and Langmuir nonlinear isotherms. Point as well as distributed source/sinks are included to represent artificial injection/withdrawals and natural infiltration of precipitation. All source/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed concentration on the Dirichlet boundary, given gradient on the Neumann boundary segment, and flux at each Cauchy boundary segment can vary independently of each other. The aquifer may consist of as many formations as desired. Either completely confined or completely unconfined or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. FEMA also includes transient leakage to or from the aquifer of interest through confining beds from or to aquifers lying below and/or above.

  8. Finite element analysis of structural engineering problems using a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses and a drag strength is investigated for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural engineering problems. To demonstrate suitability for nonlinear structural analyses, the model is implemented into a finite element program and analyses for several uniaxial and multiaxial problems are performed. Good agreement is shown between the results obtained using the finite element implementation and those obtained experimentally. The advantages of using advanced viscoplastic models for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural components are indicated.

  9. Finite element modeling of a progressively expanding shape memory stent.

    PubMed

    Thériault, Philippe; Terriault, Patrick; Brailovski, Vladimir; Gallo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular stents are small cylindrical devices introduced in stenosed arteries to reopen the lumen and restore blood flow. However, this treatment presents complications, including restenosis, which is the reclosing of the artery's diameter after the insertion of a stent. The structure of the prosthesis penetrates into and injures the walls of the patient's artery. There then follows a proliferation of cells and the formation of scar tissue around the injury, similar to the scarring of other organic tissues. This reaction to the trauma subjects the artery to close. The proposed solution is to develop a Nitinol stent with a progressive expansion device made of polyethylene, allowing smooth and gradual contact between the stent and the artery's wall by creep effect. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technology and methodology for the numerical study of this kind of stent through the finite element method. ANSYS 8.0 software is used to perform the analysis. The Nitinol is modeled with a superelastic law and the polyethylene with a yield hardening law. A first simulation determines the final geometry of the stent laser cut from a small tube. A second simulation examines the behavior of the prosthesis during surgery and over the 4 weeks following the operation. The results demonstrate that a compromise can be reached between a limited expansion prior the inflation of the expandable balloon and a significant expansion by creep of the polymer rings.

  10. Finite-element model for endometrial ablation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Platt, Robert C.; Humphries, Stanley, Jr.

    1998-04-01

    Ablation of the endometrium has become a viable treatment for dysfunctional bleeding of the uterus in women. Surgical applications of thermal ablation utilized a rolling electrode to ablate the inner uterine lining, but required practiced surgical skills and made it difficult to assess subsurface damage. Recently, various energy systems have been applied to the endometrium such as lasers, microwaves, RF electrodes, hot water balloons, and cryotherapy. A finite element model is presented to compare a multi-electrode, multiplexed RF device with a balloon containing hot fluid. The temperature fields in the uterine wall are plotted over time for various blood flow values. Assumptions of constant electrical conductivity are compared to temperature- dependent electrical conductivity. Temperatures are shown to be a maximum of about 10 - 20 degree(s)C higher when varying electrical conductivity is used. Results are also shown for cases with a 2 mm blood vessel in the field and how each device adjusts its operation to compensate for this heat sink. Damage integral results will be shown according to the time and temperature of the treatments.

  11. Stress concentration around an atelectatic region: a finite element model.

    PubMed

    Makiyama, A M; Gibson, L J; Harris, R S; Venegas, J G

    2014-09-15

    Lung parenchyma surrounding an atelectatic region is thought to be subjected to increased stress compared with the rest of the lung. Using 37 hexagonal cells made of linear springs, Mead et al. (1970) measured a stress concentration greater than 30% in the springs surrounding a stiffer central cell. We re-examine the problem using a 2D finite element model of 500 cells made of thin filaments with a non-linear stress-strain relationship. We study the consequences of increasing the central stiff region from one to nine contiguous cells in regular hexagonal honeycombs and random Voronoi honeycombs. The honeycomb structures were uniformly expanded with strains of 15%, 30%, 45% and 55% above their resting, non-deformed geometry. The curve of biaxial stress vs. fractional area change has a similar shape to that of the pressure-volume curve of the lung, showing an initial regime with relatively flat slope and a final regime with decreasing slope, tending toward an asymptote. Regular honeycombs had little variability in the maximum stress in radially oriented filaments adjacent to the central stiff region. In contrast, some filaments in random Voronoi honeycombs were subjected to stress concentration approximately 16 times the average stress concentration in the radially oriented filaments adjacent to the stiff region. These results may have implications in selecting the appropriate strategy for mechanical ventilation in ARDS and defining a "safe" level of alveolar pressure for ventilating atelectatic lungs.

  12. Finite Element Model and Validation of Nasal Tip Deformation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Cyrus T; Harb, Rani; Badran, Alan; Ho, David; Wong, Brian J F

    2017-03-01

    Nasal tip mechanical stability is important for functional and cosmetic nasal airway surgery. Palpation of the nasal tip provides information on tip strength to the surgeon, though it is a purely subjective assessment. Providing a means to simulate nasal tip deformation with a validated model can offer a more objective approach in understanding the mechanics and nuances of the nasal tip support and eventual nasal mechanics as a whole. Herein we present validation of a finite element (FE) model of the nose using physical measurements recorded using an ABS plastic-silicone nasal phantom. Three-dimensional photogrammetry was used to capture the geometry of the phantom at rest and while under steady state load. The silicone used to make the phantom was mechanically tested and characterized using a linear elastic constitutive model. Surface point clouds of the silicone and FE model were compared for both the loaded and unloaded state. The average Hausdorff distance between actual measurements and FE simulations across the nose were 0.39 ± 1.04 mm and deviated up to 2 mm at the outermost boundaries of the model. FE simulation and measurements were in near complete agreement in the immediate vicinity of the nasal tip with millimeter accuracy. We have demonstrated validation of a two-component nasal FE model, which could be used to model more complex modes of deformation where direct measurement may be challenging. This is the first step in developing a nasal model to simulate nasal mechanics and ultimately the interaction between geometry and airflow.

  13. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  14. Finite Element Modelling and Analysis of Conventional Pultrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishin, P.; Barkanov, E.; Bondarchuk, A.

    2015-11-01

    Pultrusion is one of many composite manufacturing techniques and one of the most efficient methods for producing fiber reinforced polymer composite parts with a constant cross-section. Numerical simulation is helpful for understanding the manufacturing process and developing scientific means for the pultrusion tooling design. Numerical technique based on the finite element method has been developed for the simulation of pultrusion processes. It uses the general purpose finite element software ANSYS Mechanical. It is shown that the developed technique predicts the temperature and cure profiles, which are in good agreement with those published in the open literature.

  15. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Dental application of novel finite element analysis software for three-dimensional finite element modeling of a dentulous mandible from its computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ker-Kong; Nagamatsu, Yuki; Kakigawa, Hiroshi; Masumi, Shin-ich

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on the application of novel finite-element analysis software for constructing a finite-element model from the computed tomography data of a human dentulous mandible. The finite-element model is necessary for evaluating the mechanical response of the alveolar part of the mandible, resulting from occlusal force applied to the teeth during biting. Commercially available patient-specific general computed tomography-based finite-element analysis software was solely applied to the finite-element analysis for the extraction of computed tomography data. The mandibular bone with teeth was extracted from the original images. Both the enamel and the dentin were extracted after image processing, and the periodontal ligament was created from the segmented dentin. The constructed finite-element model was reasonably accurate using a total of 234,644 nodes and 1,268,784 tetrahedral and 40,665 shell elements. The elastic moduli of the heterogeneous mandibular bone were determined from the bone density data of the computed tomography images. The results suggested that the software applied in this study is both useful and powerful for creating a more accurate three-dimensional finite-element model of a dentulous mandible from the computed tomography data without the need for any other software.

  17. Biomechanical influence of crown-to-implant ratio on stress distribution over internal hexagon short implant: 3-D finite element analysis with statistical test.

    PubMed

    Ramos Verri, Fellippo; Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Oliveira, Guilherme Bérgamo Brandão; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Marques Honório, Heitor; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2015-01-02

    The study of short implants is relevant to the biomechanics of dental implants, and research on crown increase has implications for the daily clinic. The aim of this study was to analyze the biomechanical interactions of a singular implant-supported prosthesis of different crown heights under vertical and oblique force, using the 3-D finite element method. Six 3-D models were designed with Invesalius 3.0, Rhinoceros 3D 4.0, and Solidworks 2010 software. Each model was constructed with a mandibular segment of bone block, including an implant supporting a screwed metal-ceramic crown. The crown height was set at 10, 12.5, and 15 mm. The applied force was 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique). We performed an ANOVA statistical test and Tukey tests; p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The increase of crown height did not influence the stress distribution on screw prosthetic (p>0.05) under axial load. However, crown heights of 12.5 and 15 mm caused statistically significant damage to the stress distribution of screws and to the cortical bone (p<0.001) under oblique load. High crown to implant (C/I) ratio harmed microstrain distribution on bone tissue under axial and oblique loads (p<0.001). Crown increase was a possible deleterious factor to the screws and to the different regions of bone tissue.

  18. Prediction of denosumab effects on bone remodeling: A combined pharmacokinetics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Boughattas, Mohamed Hafedh; Daniel, Jean-Luc; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-07-01

    Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits receptor activator of nuclearfactor-kappa B ligand (RANKL). This key mediator of osteoclast activities has been shown to inhibit osteoclast differentiation and hence, to increase bone mineral density (BMD) in treated patients. In the current study, we develop a computer model to simulate the effects of denosumab treatments (dose and duration) on the proximal femur bone remodeling process quantified by the variation in proximal femur BMD. The simulation model is based on a coupled pharmacokinetics model of denosumab with a pharmacodynamics model consisting of a mechanobiological finite element remodeling model which describes the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed which controls the level of bone cell autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.׳s (2003) dynamic law which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cell dynamics rather than by adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed finite element model was implemented in the finite element code Abaqus (UMAT routine). In order to perform a preliminary validation, in vivo human proximal femurs were selected and scanned at two different time intervals (at baseline and at a 36-month interval). Then, a 3D FE model was generated and the denosumab-remodeling algorithm was applied to the scans at t0 simulating daily walking activities for a duration of 36 months. The predicted results (density variation) were compared to existing published ones performed on a human cohort (FREEDOM).

  19. Finite Element Modelling of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J.; Siegler, M. A.; Williams, J.

    2013-12-01

    The heat flow experiments sent on Apollo missions 15 and 17 were designed to measure the temperature gradient of the lunar regolith in order to determine the heat flux of the moon. Major problems in these experiments arose from the fact that the astronauts were not able to insert the probes below the thermal skin depth. Compounding the problem, anomalies in the data have prevented scientists from conclusively determining the temperature dependent conductivity of the soil, which enters as a linear function into the heat flow calculation, thus stymieing them in their primary goal of constraining the global heat production of the Moon. Different methods of determining the thermal conductivity have yielded vastly different results resulting in downward corrections of up to 50% in some cases from the original calculations. Along with problems determining the conductivity, the data was inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the temperature variation over time, leading some to suspect that the Apollo experiment itself changed the thermal properties of the localised area surrounding the probe. The average temperature of the regolith, according to the data, increased over time, a phenomenon that makes calculating the thermal conductivity of the soil and heat flux impossible without knowing the source of error and accounting for it. The changes, possibly resulting from as varied sources as the imprint of the Astronauts boots on the lunar surface, compacted soil around the bore stem of the probe or even heat radiating down the inside of the tube, have convinced many people that the recorded data is unusable. In order to shed some light on the possible causes of this temperature rise, we implemented a finite element model of the probe using the program COMSOL Multi-physics as well as Matlab. Once the cause of the temperature rise is known then steps can be taken to account for the failings of the experiment and increase the data's utility.

  20. NIKE3D a nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics user's manual update summary

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Maker, B N; Ferencz, R M; Hallquist, J O

    2000-03-24

    This report provides the NIKE3D user's manual update summary for changes made from version 3.0.0 April 24, 1995 to version 3.3.6 March 24,2000. The updates are excerpted directly from the code printed output file (hence the Courier font and formatting), are presented in chronological order and delineated by NIKE3D version number. NIKE3D is a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Thirty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a direct factorization method.

  1. Patient specific finite element model of the face soft tissues for computer-assisted maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Chabanas, Matthieu; Luboz, Vincent; Payan, Yohan

    2003-06-01

    This paper addresses the prediction of face soft tissue deformations resulting from bone repositioning in maxillofacial surgery. A generic 3D Finite Element model of the face soft tissues was developed. Face muscles are defined in the mesh as embedded structures, with different mechanical properties (transverse isotropy, stiffness depending on muscle contraction). Simulations of face deformations under muscle actions can thus be performed. In the context of maxillofacial surgery, this generic soft-tissue model is automatically conformed to patient morphology by elastic registration, using skin and skull surfaces segmented from a CT scan. Some elements of the patient mesh could be geometrically distorted during the registration, which disables Finite Element analysis. Irregular elements are thus detected and automatically regularized. This semi-automatic patient model generation is robust, fast and easy to use. Therefore it seems compatible with clinical use. Six patient models were successfully built, and simulations of soft tissue deformations resulting from bone displacements performed on two patient models. Both the adequation of the models to the patient morphologies and the simulations of post-operative aspects were qualitatively validated by five surgeons. Their conclusions are that the models fit the morphologies of the patients, and that the predicted soft tissue modifications are coherent with what they would expect.

  2. Flexible Finite-Element Modeling of Global Geomagnetic Depth Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, Joseph Thomas

    Time-varying primary magnetic fields generated outside Earth by the magnetospheric ring current induce electrical currents in Earth's interior, which give rise to secondary magnetic fields with a complementary geometry. Geomagnetic depth sounding involves the analysis of magnetic field data to compute frequency-dependent response functions which yield information about the electrical conductivity of Earth's interior. I explore methods and results of forward-modeling global electromagnetic induction under a variety of assumptions about Earth conductivity and the spatial structure of the primary field. I begin by developing computational tools to perform time- and frequency-domain simulations of global induction in models with arbitrary conductivity and primary field structure using FlexPDE, a general-purpose software package that employs the finite-element method to solve partial differential equations. The method is shown to produce solutions with better than 1% accuracy when the simulated fields and response functions are compared to analytic solutions for a variety of problems in electromagnetic induction, and to qualitatively reproduce fields and response functions measured by satellites and observatories. The technique is employed in combination with analytic methods to explore the effect on the response of Earth models to primary fields with asymmetric structure. Standard methods of producing response functions from scalar and vector magnetic data are compared, and scalar methods are found to generate responses with significantly greater spatial bias for models with non-zonal fields. I develop the mathematical formulation for including Earth-rotation in the forward models, and use it to calculate frequency-dependent estimates of the amount of non-zonal structure required to produce previously reported local-time bias in empirical satellite response functions. Because it is difficult to validate solutions to induction problems that lack analytic solutions, we

  3. Finite Element Modeling of Intermuscular Interactions and Myofascial Force Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    obtained explain force differences at the distal and proximal tendons of muscles that have mechanical interaction. This is in agreement with experimental...consequence is that active force generated within one muscle may be exerted at the tendon of another muscle. Keywords- Finite element method...7]. Therefore, in vivo there is an additional route for force transmission out off the muscle, which completely bypasses the tendon of the muscle

  4. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  5. Stress analysis of a complete maxillary denture under various drop impact conditions: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Complete maxillary dentures are one of the most economic and easy ways of treatment for edentulous patients and are still widely used. However, their survival rate is slightly above three years. It is presumed that the failure reasons are not only due to normal fatigue but also emerge from damage based on unavoidable improper usage. Failure types other than long-term fatigue, such as over-deforming, also influence the effective life span of dentures. A hypothesis is presumed, stating that the premature/unexpected failures may be initiated by impact on dentures, which can be related to dropping them on the ground or other effects such as biting crispy food. Thus, the behavior of a complete maxillary denture under impact loading due to drop on a rigid surface was investigated using the finite element method utilizing explicit time integration and a rate-sensitive elastoplastic material model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Local permanent deformations have been observed along with an emphasis on frenulum region of the denture, regardless of the point of impact. Contact stresses at the tooth-denture base were also investigated. The spread of energy within the structure via wave propagation is seen to play a critical role in this fact. Stress-wave propagation is also seen to be an important factor that decreases the denture's fatigue life.

  6. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D’Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate ‘space-frame’ skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics. PMID:18510503

  7. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D'Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-06-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate 'space-frame' skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics.

  8. Homogenized stiffness matrices for mineralized collagen fibrils and lamellar bone using unit cell finite element models.

    PubMed

    Vercher, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Tarancón, José E; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2014-04-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils have been usually analyzed like a two-phase composite material where crystals are considered as platelets that constitute the reinforcement phase. Different models have been used to describe the elastic behavior of the material. In this work, it is shown that when Halpin-Tsai equations are applied to estimate elastic constants from typical constituent properties, not all crystal dimensions yield a model that satisfy thermodynamic restrictions. We provide the ranges of platelet dimensions that lead to positive definite stiffness matrices. On the other hand, a finite element model of a mineralized collagen fibril unit cell under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed. By applying six canonical load cases, homogenized stiffness matrices are numerically calculated. Results show a monoclinic behavior of the mineralized collagen fibril. In addition, a 5-layer lamellar structure is also considered where crystals rotate in adjacent layers of a lamella. The stiffness matrix of each layer is calculated applying Lekhnitskii transformations, and a new finite element model under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed to calculate the homogenized 3D anisotropic stiffness matrix of a unit cell of lamellar bone. Results are compared with the rule-of-mixtures showing in general good agreement.

  9. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times

  10. Finite element modeling of the left atrium to facilitate the design of an endoscopic atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, S R; Buckner, G D; Eischen, J W; Cormier, D R

    2007-12-01

    With the worldwide prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, much attention has been focused on simulating the characteristics of the human heart to better understand and treat cardiac disorders. The purpose of this study is to build a finite element model of the left atrium (LA) that incorporates detailed anatomical features and realistic material characteristics to investigate the interaction of heart tissue and surgical instruments. This model is used to facilitate the design of an endoscopically deployable atrial retractor for use in minimally invasive, robotically assisted mitral valve repair. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a pressurized explanted porcine heart were taken to provide a 3D solid model of the heart geometry, while uniaxial tensile tests of porcine left atrial tissue were conducted to obtain realistic material properties for noncontractile cardiac tissue. A finite element model of the LA was constructed using ANSYS Release 9.0 software and the MRI data. The Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model was chosen to characterize the passive left atrial tissue; material constants were derived from tensile test data. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of a CardioVations Port Access retractor and a prototype endoscopic retractor were constructed to simulate interaction between each instrument and the LA. These contact simulations were used to compare the quality of retraction between the two instruments and to optimize the design of the prototype retractor. Model accuracy was verified by comparing simulated cardiac wall deflections to those measured by MRI. FEA simulations revealed that peak forces of approximately 2.85 N and 2.46 N were required to retract the LA using the Port Access and prototype retractors, respectively. These forces varied nonlinearly with retractor blade displacement. Dilation of the atrial walls and rigid body motion of the chamber were approximately the same for both retractors. Finite element analysis is shown to be an

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Bulk-Acoustic-Wave Devices: Model Setup and Applications.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Robert; Larson, John

    2016-04-20

    In this work, the principles of finite element modeling for the electro-acoustic simulation of bulk-acoustic- wave devices will be summarized. We will outline model setup including governing equations and boundary conditions, as well as its efficient computer implementation. Particular emphasis will be given to tailoring the model dimension to the specific requirements of the desired investigation. As 3D simulations still require a major effort, it will be illustrated that various aspects of device physics and design can be addressed already by fast and efficient 2D simulations. Multiple theoretical and experimental evidence will be presented to demonstrate the validity of the modeling concepts. Based on various examples it will be sketched how to benefit from numerical simulations for understanding fundamental effects, designing devices for actual products, and exploring novel technologies.

  12. Finite Element Models and Properties of a Stiffened Floor-Equipped Composite Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2010-01-01

    Finite element models were developed of a floor-equipped, frame and stringer stiffened composite cylinder including a coarse finite element model of the structural components, a coarse finite element model of the acoustic cavities above and below the beam-supported plywood floor, and two dense models consisting of only the structural components. The report summarizes the geometry, the element properties, the material and mechanical properties, the beam cross-section characteristics, the beam element representations and the boundary conditions of the composite cylinder models. The expressions used to calculate the group speeds for the cylinder components are presented.

  13. Drilling in cortical bone: a finite element model and experimental investigations.

    PubMed

    Lughmani, Waqas A; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Ashcroft, Ian

    2015-02-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill-bit breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. An experimental and computational study of drilling in cortical bone has been conducted. A 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling has been developed. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with geometrical considerations. An elastic-plastic material model is used to predict the behaviour of cortical bone during drilling. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Modeling of coal stockpiles using a finite elements method

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Sensogut, C.

    2008-07-01

    In the case of coal stockpiles finding suitable environmental conditions, spontaneous combustion phenomenon will be unavoidable. In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile having a shape of triangle prism was constituted in a coal stockyard of Western Lignite Corporation (WLC), Turkey. The parameters of time, humidity and temperature of air, atmospheric pressure, velocity and direction of wind values that are effective on coal stockpile were measured in a continuous manner. These experimental works were transferred into a computer media in order to obtain similar outcomes by carrying out 2-dimensional analysis of the stockpile with Finite Elements Method (FEM). The performed experimental studies and obtained results were then compared.

  15. Finite Element Modeling Techniques for Analysis of VIIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, J.; Gleason, R.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major health concern for long-duration space missions. Currently, it is thought that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity causes elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) that is transmitted along the optic nerve sheath (ONS). We hypothesize that this in turn leads to alteration and remodeling of connective tissue in the posterior eye which impacts vision. Finite element (FE) analysis is a powerful tool for examining the effects of mechanical loads in complex geometries. Our goal is to build a FE analysis framework to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve head to elevations in ICP in VIIP.

  16. Modeling Progressive Failure of Bonded Joints Using a Single Joint Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution which can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh-independent finite element analysis. In the present study, an enhanced finite element is applied to generate a general framework capable of modeling an array of joint types. The joint field equations are derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and the resulting solutions for the displacement fields are used to generate shape functions and a stiffness matrix for a single joint finite element. This single finite element thus captures the detailed stress and strain fields within the bonded joint, but it can function within a broader structural finite element model. The costs associated with a fine mesh of the joint can thus be avoided while still obtaining a detailed solution for the joint. Additionally, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior has been included within the method, and progressive failure of the adhesive can be modeled by using a strain-based failure criteria and re-sizing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results of the model compare favorably with experimental and finite element results.

  17. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  18. Finite element model reduction application to parametric studies and optimization of rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, M.; Toossi, M.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of this work, a reduction procedure has been developed which can be applied to large finite element model of airframe type structures. This procedure, which is tailored to be used with MSC/NASTRAN finite element code, is applied to the full airframe dynamic finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The applicability of the resulting reduced model to parametric and optimization studies is examined. Through application of the design sensitivity analysis, the viability and efficiency of this reduction technique has been demonstrated in a vibration reduction study.

  19. FEMFLOW3D; a finite-element program for the simulation of three-dimensional aquifers; version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durbin, Timothy J.; Bond, Linda D.

    1998-01-01

    This document also includes model validation, source code, and example input and output files. Model validation was performed using four test problems. For each test problem, the results of a model simulation with FEMFLOW3D were compared with either an analytic solution or the results of an independent numerical approach. The source code, written in the ANSI x3.9-1978 FORTRAN standard, and the complete input and output of an example problem are listed in the appendixes.

  20. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  1. 3-D finite element analysis of the influence of synovial condition in sacroiliac joint on the load transmission in human pelvic system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dufang; Wang, Fang; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Xiaoqin; Wang, Qiugen

    2014-06-01

    The anterior part of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a synovial joint, with little gliding and rotary movement between the contact surfaces of SIJ during locomotion. Due to its complex structure, especially when considering the surrounding ligaments, it is difficult to construct an accurate three-dimensional (3-D) finite element model for the human pelvis. Most of the pelvic models in the previous studies were simplified with either SIJ fusing together or without the sacral bone. However, the influence of those simplifications on the load transmission in human pelvis has not been studied, so the reliability of those studies remains unclear. In this study, two 3-D pelvic models were constructed: an SIJ fusing model and an SIJ contacting model. In the SIJ fusing model, the SIJ interfaces were fused together. In the SIJ contacting model, the SIJ interfaces were just in contact with each other without fusion. Compared with the SIJ contacting model, the SIJ fusing model have smaller movements in the SIJ. The stress distribution area in the SIJ fusing model on sacroiliac cartilages was also different. Those differences contributed to the decline of tensile force in the SIJ surrounding ligaments and the re-distribution of stress in the pelvic bones. In addition, the SIJ fusing model was far less sensitive to the increase in modulus of the sacroiliac cartilages, and decrease in stiffness of the ligaments surrounding the SIJ. The presence of synovia in the SIJ had greater influence on the load transmission in the human pelvic system. Therefore, the effect of the presence of synovia should not be neglected when the biomechanical behavior of human pelvis is being studied, especially for those studies related to clinical applications.

  2. Development and application of a technique for reducing airframe finite element models for dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, Mostafa; Toossi, Mostafa

    1990-01-01

    A computational procedure for the reduction of large finite element models was developed. This procedure is used to obtain a significantly reduced model while retaining the essential global dynamic characteristics of the full-size model. This reduction procedure is applied to the airframe finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The resulting reduced model is then validated by application to a vibration reduction study.

  3. A Finite Element Model of the THOR-K Dummy for Aerospace and Aircraft Impact Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Jacob; Untaroiu, Costin D.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Pellettiere, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    1) Update and Improve the THOR Finite Element (FE) model to specifications of the latest mod kit (THOR-K). 2) Evaluate the kinematic and kinetic response of the FE model in frontal, spinal, and lateral impact loading conditions.

  4. On the Finite Element Implementation of the Generalized Method of Cells Micromechanics Constitutive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), a micromechanics based constitutive model, is implemented into the finite element code MARC using the user subroutine HYPELA. Comparisons in terms of transverse deformation response, micro stress and strain distributions, and required CPU time are presented for GMC and finite element models of fiber/matrix unit cell. GMC is shown to provide comparable predictions of the composite behavior and requires significantly less CPU time as compared to a finite element analysis of the unit cell. Details as to the organization of the HYPELA code are provided with the actual HYPELA code included in the appendix.

  5. 3D numerical simulation for the transient electromagnetic field excited by the central loop based on the vector finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Zeng, S. H.

    2011-12-01

    Based on the principle of abnormal field algorithms, Helmholtz equations for electromagnetic field have been deduced. We made the electric field Helmholtz equation the governing equation, and derived the corresponding system of vector finite element method equations using the Galerkin method. For solving the governing equation using the vector finite element method, we divided the computing domain into homogenous brick elements, and used Whitney-type vector basis functions. After obtaining the electric field's anomaly field in the Laplace domain using the vector finite element method, we used the Gaver-Stehfest algorithm to transform the electric field's anomaly field to the time domain, and obtained the impulse response of magnetic field's anomaly field through the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction. By comparing 1D analytic solutions of quasi-H-type geoelectric models, the accuracy of the vector finite element method is tested. For the low resistivity brick geoelectric model, the plot shape of electromotive force computed using the vector finite element method coincides with that of the integral equation method and finite difference in time domain solutions.

  6. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  7. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  8. Finite element analysis and equivalent parallel-resistance model for conductive multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Yi; Juang, Jia-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The standard collinear four-point probe method is an indispensable tool and has been extensively used for characterizing conductive thin films with homogeneous and isotropic electrical properties. In this paper, we conduct three-dimensional (3D) finite element simulations on conductive multilayer films to study the relationship between the reading of the four-point probe and the conductivity of the individual layers. We find that a multilayer film may be modeled as a simple equivalent circuit with multiple resistances, connected in parallel for a wide range of resistivity and thickness ratios, as long as its total thickness is smaller than approximately half of the probe spacing. As a result, we may determine the resistivity of each layer sequentially by applying the four-point probe, with the original correction factor π/ln(2), after deposition of each layer.

  9. In vitro assessment of Function Graded (FG) artificial Hip joint stem in terms of bone/cement stresses: 3D Finite Element (FE) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress shielding in the cemented hip prosthesis occurs due to the mismatching in the mechanical properties of metallic stem and bone. This mismatching in properties is considered as one of the main reasons for implant loosening. Therefore, a new stem material in orthopedic surgery is still required. In the present study, 3D finite element modeling is used for evaluating the artificial hip joint stem that is made of Function Graded (FG) material in terms of joint stress distributions and stem length. Method 3D finite element models of different stems made of two types of FG materials and traditional stems made of Cobalt Chromium alloy (CoCrMo) and Titanium alloy (Ti) were developed using the ANSYS Code. The effects on the total artificial hip joint stresses (Shear stress and Von Mises stresses at bone cement, Von Mises stresses at bone and stem) due to using the proposed FG materials stems were investigated. The effects on the total artificial hip joint system stresses due to using different stem lengths were investigated. Results Using FG stem (with low stiffness at stem distal end and high stiffness at its proximal end) resulted in a significant reduction in shear stress at the bone cement/stem interface. Also, the Von Mises stresses at the bone cement and stem decrease significantly when using FG material instead of CoCrMo and Ti alloy. The stresses’ distribution along the bone cement length when using FG material was found to be more uniform along the whole bone cement compared with other stem materials. These more uniform stresses will help in the reduction of the artificial hip joint loosening rate and improve its short and long term performance. Conclusion FE results showed that using FG stem increases the resultant stresses at the femur bone (reduces stress shielding) compared to metallic stem. The results showed that the stem length has significant effects on the resultant shear and Von Mises stresses at bone, stem and bone cement for all types

  10. Role of gastrocnemius-soleus muscle in forefoot force transmission at heel rise - A 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Park, Jaeyoung; Park, Seung-Bum; Shim, Victor Phyau-Wui; Lee, Taeyong

    2012-06-26

    The functions of the gastrocnemius-soleus (G-S) complex and other plantar flexor muscles are to stabilize and control major bony joints, as well as to provide primary coordination of the foot during the stance phase of gait. Geometric positioning of the foot and transferring of plantar loads can be adversely affected when muscular control is abnormal (e.g., equinus contracture). Although manipulation of the G-S muscle complex by surgical intervention (e.g., tendo-Achilles lengthening) is believed to be effective in restoring normal plantar load transfer in the foot, there is lack of quantitative data supporting that notion. Thus, the objective of this study is to formulate a three-dimensional musculoskeletal finite element model of the foot to quantify the precise role of the G-S complex in terms of biomechanical response of the foot. The model established corresponds to a muscle-demanding posture during heel rise, with simulated activation of major extrinsic plantar flexors. In the baseline (reference) case, required muscle forces were determined from what would be necessary to generate the targeted resultant ground reaction forces. The predicted plantar load transfer through the forefoot plantar surface, as indicated by plantar pressure distribution, was verified by comparison with experimental observations. This baseline model served as a reference for subsequent parametric analysis, where muscle forces applied by the G-S complex were decreased in a step-wise manner. Adaptive changes of the foot mechanism, in terms of internal joint configurations and plantar stress distributions, in response to altered muscular loads were analyzed. Movements of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as forefoot plantar pressure peaks and pressure distribution under the metatarsal heads (MTHs), were all found to be extremely sensitive to reduction in the muscle load in the G-S complex. A 40% reduction in G-S muscle stabilization can result in dorsal-directed rotations

  11. NIKE3D: an implicit, finite-deformation, finite element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation static and dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node constant pressure solid elements. Bandwidth minimization is optional. Post-processors for NIKE3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories.

  12. Finite element modeling of electromagnetic fields and waves using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. Thomas, Jr.; Schroeder, Erwin

    1989-01-01

    The various formulations of Maxwell's equations are reviewed with emphasis on those formulations which most readily form analogies with Navier's equations. Analogies involving scalar and vector potentials and electric and magnetic field components are presented. Formulations allowing for media with dielectric and conducting properties are emphasized. It is demonstrated that many problems in electromagnetism can be solved using the NASTRAN finite element code. Several fundamental problems involving time harmonic solutions of Maxwell's equations with known analytic solutions are solved using NASTRAN to demonstrate convergence and mesh requirements. Mesh requirements are studied as a function of frequency, conductivity, and dielectric properties. Applications in both low frequency and high frequency are highlighted. The low frequency problems demonstrate the ability to solve problems involving media inhomogeneity and unbounded domains. The high frequency applications demonstrate the ability to handle problems with large boundary to wavelength ratios.

  13. Modeling bistable behaviors in morphing structures through finite element simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiaohang; Zheng, Huang; Chen, Wenzhe; Chen, Zi

    2014-01-01

    Bistable structures, exemplified by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelets, can transit between different configurations upon certain external stimulation. Here we study, through three-dimensional finite element simulations, the bistable behaviors in elastic plates in the absence of terminate loads, but with pre-strains in one (or both) of the two composite layers. Both the scenarios with and without a given geometric mis-orientation angle are investigated, the results of which are consistent with recent theoretical and experimental studies. This work can open ample venues for programmable designs of plant/shell structures with large deformations, with applications in designing bio-inspired robotics for biomedical research and morphing/deployable structures in aerospace engineering.

  14. Stabilized plane and axisymmetric Lobatto finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. C.; Sze, K. Y.; Zhou, Y. X.

    2015-11-01

    High order elements are renowned for their high accuracy and convergence. Among them, Lobatto spectral finite elements are commonly used in explicit dynamic analyses as their mass matrices when evaluated by the Lobatto integration rule are diagonal. While there are numerous advanced first and second order elements, advanced high order elements are rarely seen. In this paper, generic stabilization schemes are devised for the reduced integrated plane and axisymmetric elements. Static and explicit dynamic tests are considered for evaluating the relatively merits of the stabilized and conventional elements. The displacement errors of the stabilized elements are less than those of the conventional Lobatto elements. When the material is nearly incompressible, the stabilized elements are also more accurate in terms of the energy error norm. This advantage is of practical importance for bio-tissue and hydrated soil analyses.

  15. Finite-element modeling and analysis in nanomedicine and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andy H; Conway, Richard C; Ben-Nissan, Besim

    2014-08-01

    This article aims to provide a brief background to the current applications of finite-element analysis (FEA) in nanomedicine and dentistry. FEA was introduced in orthopedic biomechanics in the 1970s in order to assess the stresses and deformation in human bones during functional loadings and in the design and analysis of implants. Since then, it has been applied with great frequency in orthopedics and dentistry in order to analyze issues such as implant design, bone remodeling and fracture healing, the mechanical properties of biomedical coatings on implants and the interactions at the bone-implant interface. More recently, FEA has been used in nanomedicine to study the mechanics of a single cell and to gain fundamental insights into how the particulate nature of blood influences nanoparticle delivery.

  16. Free body analysis, beam mechanics, and finite element modeling of the mandible of Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Porro, Laura B; Holliday, Casey M; Anapol, Fred; Ontiveros, Lupita C; Ontiveros, Lolita T; Ross, Callum F

    2011-08-01

    The mechanical behavior of mammalian mandibles is well-studied, but a comprehensive biomechanical analysis (incorporating detailed muscle architecture, accurate material properties, and three-dimensional mechanical behavior) of an extant archosaur mandible has never been carried out. This makes it unclear how closely models of extant and extinct archosaur mandibles reflect reality and prevents comparisons of structure-function relationships in mammalian and archosaur mandibles. We tested hypotheses regarding the mechanical behavior of the mandible of Alligator mississippiensis by analyzing reaction forces and bending, shear, and torsional stress regimes in six models of varying complexity. Models included free body analysis using basic lever arm mechanics, 2D and 3D beam models, and three high-resolution finite element models of the Alligator mandible, incorporating, respectively, isotropic bone without sutures, anisotropic bone with sutures, and anisotropic bone with sutures and contact between the mandible and the pterygoid flange. Compared with the beam models, the Alligator finite element models exhibited less spatial variability in dorsoventral bending and sagittal shear stress, as well as lower peak values for these stresses, suggesting that Alligator mandibular morphology is in part designed to reduce these stresses during biting. However, the Alligator models exhibited greater variability in the distribution of mediolateral and torsional stresses than the beam models. Incorporating anisotropic bone material properties and sutures into the model reduced dorsoventral and torsional stresses within the mandible, but led to elevated mediolateral stresses. These mediolateral stresses were mitigated by the addition of a pterygoid-mandibular contact, suggesting important contributions from, and trade-offs between, material properties and external constraints in Alligator mandible design. Our results suggest that beam modeling does not accurately represent the

  17. Finite element modelling of woven composite failure modes at the mesoscopic scale: deterministic versus stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roirand, Q.; Missoum-Benziane, D.; Thionnet, A.; Laiarinandrasana, L.

    2017-01-01

    Textile composites are composed of 3D complex architecture. To assess the durability of such engineering structures, the failure mechanisms must be highlighted. Examinations of the degradation have been carried out thanks to tomography. The present work addresses a numerical damage model dedicated to the simulation of the crack initiation and propagation at the scale of the warp yarns. For the 3D woven composites under study, loadings in tension and combined tension and bending were considered. Based on an erosion procedure of broken elements, the failure mechanisms have been modelled on 3D periodic cells by finite element calculations. The breakage of one element was determined using a failure criterion at the mesoscopic scale based on the yarn stress at failure. The results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data for the two kinds of macroscopic loadings. The deterministic approach assumed a homogeneously distributed stress at failure all over the integration points in the meshes of woven composites. A stochastic approach was applied to a simple representative elementary periodic cell. The distribution of the Weibull stress at failure was assigned to the integration points using a Monte Carlo simulation. It was shown that this stochastic approach allowed more realistic failure simulations avoiding the idealised symmetry due to the deterministic modelling. In particular, the stochastic simulations performed have shown several variations of the stress as well as strain at failure and the failure modes of the yarn.

  18. COMGEN: A computer program for generating finite element models of composite materials at the micro level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    1990-01-01

    COMGEN (Composite Model Generator) is an interactive FORTRAN program which can be used to create a wide variety of finite element models of continuous fiber composite materials at the micro level. It quickly generates batch or session files to be submitted to the finite element pre- and postprocessor PATRAN based on a few simple user inputs such as fiber diameter and percent fiber volume fraction of the composite to be analyzed. In addition, various mesh densities, boundary conditions, and loads can be assigned easily to the models within COMGEN. PATRAN uses a session file to generate finite element models and their associated loads which can then be translated to virtually any finite element analysis code such as NASTRAN or MARC.

  19. Models and finite element approximations for interacting nanosized piezoelectric bodies and acoustic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasedkin, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    This research presents the new size-dependent models of piezoelectric materials oriented to finite element applications. The proposed models include the facilities of taking into account different mechanisms of damping for mechanical and electric fields. The coupled models also incorporate the equations of the theory of acoustics for viscous fluids. In particular cases, these models permit to use the mode superposition method with full separation of the finite element systems into independent equations for the independent modes for transient and harmonic problems. The main boundary conditions were supplemented with the facilities of taking into account the coupled surface effects, allowing to explore the nanoscale piezoelectric materials in the framework of theories of continuous media with surface stresses and their generalizations. For the considered problems we have implemented the finite element technologies and various numerical algorithms to maintain a symmetrical structure of the finite element quasi-definite matrices (matrix structure for the problems with a saddle point).

  20. Finite element analysis of structural components using viscoplastic models with application to a cowl lip problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.

    1990-01-01

    The viability of advanced viscoplastic models for nonlinear finite element analyses of structural components is investigated. Several uniaxial and a multiaxial problem are analyzed using the finite element implementation of Freed's viscoplastic model. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated uniaxial results validates the finite element implementation and gives confidence to apply it to more complex multiaxial problems. A comparison of results for a sample structural component (the cowl lip of a hypersonic engine inlet) with the earlier elastic, elastic-plastic, and elastic-plastic-creep analyses available in the literature shows that the elastic-viscoplastic analyses yield more reasonable stress and strain distributions. Finally, the versatility of the finite-element-based solution technology presented herein is demonstrated by applying it to another viscoplastic model.

  1. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. During the pulse buckling tests, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using PRONTO, a Sandia developed transient dynamics analysis code, and ABAQUS/Explicit with both shell and continuum elements. The calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history.

  2. Effectiveness of Selected Fitness Exercises on Stress of Femoral Neck using Musculoskeletal Dynamics Simulations and Finite Element Model.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing-Guang; Li, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Hong; Bian, Rong; Zhang, Songning

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the study was to establish a dynamics model and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model to analyze loading characteristics of femoral neck during walking, squat, single-leg standing, and forward and lateral lunges. One male volunteer performed three trials of the five movements. The 3D kinematic data were captured and imported into the LifeMOD to establish a musculoskeletal dynamics model to obtain joint reaction and muscle forces of iliacus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, psoas major and adductor magnus. The loading data LfeMOD were imported and transformed into a hip finite-element model. The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc. In addition, the trabecular bone and tension lines of the Ward's triangle also demonstrated high stress. The compact bone received the greatest peak stress in the forward lunge and the least stress in the squat. However, the spongy bone in the femoral neck region had the greatest stress during the walk and the least stress in the squat. The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures. Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture.

  3. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Tooth Restored with High Performance Polymer PEKK Post-Core System: A 3D Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joo-Hee; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Won-Chang; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior and long-term safety of high performance polymer PEKK as an intraradicular dental post-core material through comparative finite element analysis (FEA) with other conventional post-core materials. A 3D FEA model of a maxillary central incisor was constructed. A cyclic loading force of 50 N was applied at an angle of 45° to the longitudinal axis of the tooth at the palatal surface of the crown. For comparison with traditionally used post-core materials, three materials (gold, fiberglass, and PEKK) were simulated to determine their post-core properties. PEKK, with a lower elastic modulus than root dentin, showed comparably high failure resistance and a more favorable stress distribution than conventional post-core material. However, the PEKK post-core system showed a higher probability of debonding and crown failure under long-term cyclic loading than the metal or fiberglass post-core systems. PMID:28386547

  4. DynEarthSol3D: An Efficient and Flexible Unstructured Finite Element Method to Study Long-Term Tectonic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E.; Choi, E.; Lavier, L. L.; Calo, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many tectonic problems treat the lithosphere as a compressible elastic material, which can also flow viscously or break in a brittle fashion depending on the stress level applied and the temperature conditions. We present a flexible methodology to address the resulting complex material response, which imposes severe challenges on the discretization and rheological models used. This robust, adaptive, multidimensional, finite element method solves the momentum balance and the heat equation in Lagrangian form with unstructured simplicial mesh (triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D). The mesh locking problem is avoided by using averaged volumetric strain rate to update the stress. The solver uses contingent mesh adaptivity in places where shear strain is focused (localization) during remeshing. A simple scheme of mesh coarsening is employed to prevent tiny elements during remeshing. Lagrangian markers are used to track multiple compositions of rocks. The code is parallelized via OpenMP with graph coloring. We detail the solver and verify it in a number of benchmark problems against analytic and numerical solutions from the literature.

  5. Experimental validation of finite element modelling of a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Wang, Ling; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Fisher, John

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models are becoming increasingly useful tools to conduct parametric analysis, design optimisation and pre-clinical testing for hip joint replacements. However, the verification of the finite element model is critically important. The purposes of this study were to develop a three-dimensional anatomic finite element model for a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement for predicting its contact mechanics and to conduct experimental validation for a simple finite element model which was simplified from the anatomic finite element model. An anatomic modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement model (anatomic model) was first developed and then simplified with reasonable accuracy to a simple modular total hip replacement model (simplified model) for validation. The contact areas on the articulating surface of three polyethylene liners of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement bearings with different clearances were measured experimentally in the Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator under a series of loading conditions and different cup inclination angles. The contact areas predicted from the simplified model were then compared with that measured experimentally under the same conditions. The results showed that the simplification made for the anatomic model did not change the predictions of contact mechanics of the modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement substantially (less than 12% for contact stresses and contact areas). Good agreements of contact areas between the finite element predictions from the simplified model and experimental measurements were obtained, with maximum difference of 14% across all conditions considered. This indicated that the simplification and assumptions made in the anatomic model were reasonable and the finite element predictions from the simplified model were valid.

  6. Evaluating Topographic Effects on Ground Deformation: Insights from Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan

    2015-07-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assume the Earth's surface as flat. However, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals generated by a spherical pressure source embedded in an elastic homogeneous media and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g., slope, aspect, curvature). For this, we bring together the results presented in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D finite element (FE) model results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas due to diverse topographic features (e.g., collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars).

  7. Towards Realistic Global Geomagnetic Induction Modeling Using Scripted Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, J. T.; Constable, C. G.

    2008-12-01

    We present recent progress in forward modeling the global induction problem with realistic external field structure, 3D Earth conductivity, and rotation. The modeling is performed in the time and frequency domains via a commercially-available, general-purpose, finite element modeling package called FlexPDE, and has been validated against known solutions to 3D steady state and time-dependent problems. The induction problem is formulated in terms of the magnetic vector potential and electric scalar potential, and mesh density is managed both explicitly and through adaptive mesh refinement. The modeling routine allows for arbitrary conductivity and external field structure. The strength of the external magnetic field generated by the magnetospheric ring current is known to vary as a function of local time, giving it an asymmetric spatial structure. Electromagnetic c-responses estimated from satellite data are known to be biased with respect to local time. We investigate the influence that Earth's rotation through the non-uniform external field should have on these c-responses.

  8. Finite element surface registration incorporating curvature, volume preservation, and statistical model information.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Thomas; Dedner, Andreas; Lüthi, Marcel; Vetter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for nonrigid registration of 3D surfaces and images. The method can be used to register surfaces by means of their distance images, or to register medical images directly. It is formulated as a minimization problem of a sum of several terms representing the desired properties of a registration result: smoothness, volume preservation, matching of the surface, its curvature, and possible other feature images, as well as consistency with previous registration results of similar objects, represented by a statistical deformation model. While most of these concepts are already known, we present a coherent continuous formulation of these constraints, including the statistical deformation model. This continuous formulation renders the registration method independent of its discretization. The finite element discretization we present is, while independent of the registration functional, the second main contribution of this paper. The local discontinuous Galerkin method has not previously been used in image registration, and it provides an efficient and general framework to discretize each of the terms of our functional. Computational efficiency and modest memory consumption are achieved thanks to parallelization and locally adaptive mesh refinement. This allows for the first time the use of otherwise prohibitively large 3D statistical deformation models.

  9. Finite Element Surface Registration Incorporating Curvature, Volume Preservation, and Statistical Model Information

    PubMed Central

    Lüthi, Marcel; Vetter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for nonrigid registration of 3D surfaces and images. The method can be used to register surfaces by means of their distance images, or to register medical images directly. It is formulated as a minimization problem of a sum of several terms representing the desired properties of a registration result: smoothness, volume preservation, matching of the surface, its curvature, and possible other feature images, as well as consistency with previous registration results of similar objects, represented by a statistical deformation model. While most of these concepts are already known, we present a coherent continuous formulation of these constraints, including the statistical deformation model. This continuous formulation renders the registration method independent of its discretization. The finite element discretization we present is, while independent of the registration functional, the second main contribution of this paper. The local discontinuous Galerkin method has not previously been used in image registration, and it provides an efficient and general framework to discretize each of the terms of our functional. Computational efficiency and modest memory consumption are achieved thanks to parallelization and locally adaptive mesh refinement. This allows for the first time the use of otherwise prohibitively large 3D statistical deformation models. PMID:24187581

  10. Finite Element Modeling of a Cylindrical Contact Using Hertzian Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The turbine blades in the high-pressure fuel turbopump/alternate turbopump (HPFTP/AT) are subjected to hot gases rapidly flowing around them. This flow excites vibrations in the blades. Naturally, one has to worry about resonance, so a damping device was added to dissipate some energy from the system. The foundation is now laid for a very complex problem. The damper is in contact with the blade, so now there are contact stresses (both normal and tangential) to contend with. Since these stresses can be very high, it is not all that difficult to yield the material. Friction is another non-linearity and the blade is made out of a Nickel-based single-crystal superalloy that is orthotropic. A few approaches exist to solve such a problem and computer models, using contact elements, have been built with friction, plasticity, etc. These models are quite cumbersome and require many hours to solve just one load case and material orientation. A simpler approach is required. Ideally, the model should be simplified so the analysis can be conducted faster. When working with contact problems determining the contact patch and the stresses in the material are the main concerns. Closed-form solutions for non-conforming bodies, developed by Hertz, made out of isotropic materials are readily available. More involved solutions for 3-D cases using different materials are also available. The question is this: can Hertzian1 solutions be applied, or superimposed, to more complicated problems-like those involving anisotropic materials? That is the point of the investigation here. If these results agree with the more complicated computer models, then the analytical solutions can be used in lieu of the numerical solutions that take a very long time to process. As time goes on, the analytical solution will eventually have to include things like friction and plasticity. The models in this report use no contact elements and are essentially an applied load problem using Hertzian assumptions to

  11. Image-Based Macro-Micro Finite Element Models of a Canine Femur with Implant Design Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Krishnan, Ganapathi; Dyce, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model of a bone-cement-implant assembly is developed for a canine cemented femoral prosthesis system. Various steps in this development entail profiling the canine femur contours by computed tomography (CT) scanning, computer aided design (CAD) reconstruction of the canine femur from CT images, CAD modeling of the implant from implant blue prints and CAD modeling of the interface cement. Finite element analysis of the macroscopic assembly is conducted for stress analysis in individual components of the system, accounting for variation in density and material properties in the porous bone material. A sensitivity analysis is conducted with the macroscopic model to investigate the effect of implant design variables on the stress distribution in the assembly. Subsequently, rigorous microstructural analysis of the bone incorporating the morphological intricacies is conducted. Various steps in this development include acquisition of the bone microstructural data from histological serial sectioning, stacking of sections to obtain 3D renderings of void distributions, microstructural characterization and determination of properties and, finally, microstructural stress analysis using a 3D Voronoi cell finite element method. Generation of the simulated microstructure and analysis by the 3D Voronoi cell finite element model provides a new way of modeling complex microstructures and correlating to morphological characteristics. An inverse calculation of the material parameters of bone by combining macroscopic experiments with microstructural characterization and analysis provides a new approach to evaluating properties without having to do experiments at this scale. Finally, the microstructural stresses in the femur are computed using the 3D VCFEM to study the stress distribution at the scale of the bone porosity. Significant difference is observed between the macroscopic stresses and the peak microscopic stresses at different locations.

  12. Plan, formulate, discuss and correlate a NASTRAN finite element vibrations model of the Boeing Model 360 helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, R.; Lang, P. F.; Smith, L. A.; Reed, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing Helicopter, together with other United States helicopter manufacturers, participated in a finite element applications program to emplace in the United States a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models in support of helicopter airframe design. The activities relating to planning and creating a finite element vibrations model of the Boeing Model 36-0 composite airframe are summarized, along with the subsequent analytical correlation with ground shake test data.

  13. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  14. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ.

  15. A paradigm for human body finite element model integration from a set of regional models.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A B; Gayzik, F S; Moreno, D P; Rhyne, A C; Vavalle, N A; Stitzel, J D

    2012-01-01

    Computational modeling offers versatility, scalability, and cost advantages to researchers in the trauma and injury biomechanics communities. The Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) is a group of government, industry, and academic researchers developing human body models (HBMs) that aim to become the standard tool to meet this growing research need. The objective of this study is to present the methods used to develop the average seated male occupant model (M50, weight = 78 kg, height = 175 cm) from five separately validated body region models (BRMs). BRMs include the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and a combined pelvis and lower extremity model. Modeling domains were split at the atlanto-occipital joint, C7-T1 boundary, diaphragm, abdominal cavity (peritoneum/retroperitoneum), and the acetabulum respectively. BRM meshes are based on a custom CAD model of the seated male built from a multi-modality imaging protocol of a volunteer subject found in literature.[1] Various meshing techniques were used to integrate the full body model (FBM) including 1-D beam and discrete element connections (e.g. ligamentous structures), 2D shell nodal connections (e.g. inferior vena cava to right atrium), 3D hexahedral nodal connections (e.g. soft tissue envelope connections between regions), and contact definitions varying from tied (muscle insertions) to sliding (liver and diaphragm contact). The model was developed in a general-purpose finite element code, LS-Dyna (LTSC, Livermore, CA) R4.2.1., and consists of 1.95 million elements and 1.3 million nodes. The element breakdown by type is 41% hexahedral, 33.7% tetrahedral, 19.5% quad shells and 5% tria shell. The integration methodology presented highlights the viability of using a collaborative development paradigm for the construction of HBMs, and will be used as template for expanding the suite of GHBMC models.

  16. Stress analysis of a rectangular implant in laminated composites using 2-D and 3-D finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Wai T.; Graves, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis method using the FEM based on the Hellinger-Reissner variation principle has been developed to determine the 3-D stresses and displacements near a rectangular implant inside a laminated composite material. Three-dimensional elements are employed in regions where the interlaminar stress is considered to be significant; 2-D elements are used in other areas. Uniaxially loaded graphite-epoxy laminates have been analyzed; the implant was modeled as four plies of 3501/6 epoxy located in the middle of the laminate. It is shown that the interlaminar stresses are an order of magnitude lower than the stress representing the applied far-field load. The stress concentration factors of both the interlaminar and in-plane stresses depend on the stacking sequence of the laminate.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics of planetary gears using analytical and finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambarisha, Vijaya Kumar; Parker, Robert G.

    2007-05-01

    Vibration-induced gear noise and dynamic loads remain key concerns in many transmission applications that use planetary gears. Tooth separations at large vibrations introduce nonlinearity in geared systems. The present work examines the complex, nonlinear dynamic behavior of spur planetary gears using two models: (i) a lumped-parameter model, and (ii) a finite element model. The two-dimensional (2D) lumped-parameter model represents the gears as lumped inertias, the gear meshes as nonlinear springs with tooth contact loss and periodically varying stiffness due to changing tooth contact conditions, and the supports as linear springs. The 2D finite element model is developed from a unique finite element-contact analysis solver specialized for gear dynamics. Mesh stiffness variation excitation, corner contact, and gear tooth contact loss are all intrinsically considered in the finite element analysis. The dynamics of planetary gears show a rich spectrum of nonlinear phenomena. Nonlinear jumps, chaotic motions, and period-doubling bifurcations occur when the mesh frequency or any of its higher harmonics are near a natural frequency of the system. Responses from the dynamic analysis using analytical and finite element models are successfully compared qualitatively and quantitatively. These comparisons validate the effectiveness of the lumped-parameter model to simulate the dynamics of planetary gears. Mesh phasing rules to suppress rotational and translational vibrations in planetary gears are valid even when nonlinearity from tooth contact loss occurs. These mesh phasing rules, however, are not valid in the chaotic and period-doubling regions.

  18. Fault Slip Rate of the Kazerun Fault System (KFS), Iran, Investigated Using Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoorcheh, Bijan; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2015-10-01

    A 3D non-homogenous finite element model (FEM) is developed to investigate the spatial variations of interseismic deformation for the Kazerun Fault System (KFS) in the Zagros Mountains of Iran. The model includes 19 fault segments that were extracted from geological maps and previous studies, and the average slips in the dip and strike directions on these segments were computed. The contemporary surface deformation is simulated using a free horizontal detachment surface. The dip angles of the faults in the model are varied at 90°, 70°, 50° and 30° to simulate different 3D representations of the fault systems. Tectonic loading at the boundaries of the region is applied using predicted GPS velocity vectors to the north (southern part of the Central Iran Block) and south (southern region of the Zagros mountain belt), which were obtained by solving inverse and forward problems. Where possible, the fault slip rates that are obtained using our non-homogeneous finite element model are validated using the long-term geologic and instantaneous GPS slip rates. The model is then used to estimate the dip- and strike-slip rates of the fault segments of the KFS for which no a priori information was available. We derive an upper bound of 1 mm/year for the average dip-slip rate in the region, which is consistent with estimates from geomorphologic observations. The modeling results show that in addition to the 4 main faults (Dena, Kazerun, Kareh Bas and Main Recent), other faults, such as the Zagros Front, Main Front, High Zagros and Mishan faults, accommodate up to 2.5 mm/year of the differential movement between the North and Central Zagros. We also investigated the contrast in rigidity between the southern and northern areas of the Zagros mountain belt and found that a rigidity contrast of 2 best explains the GPS data of contemporary surface deformation. Neglecting to account for the rigidity contrast in the model can lead to biased estimates of the fault slip rate of up to

  19. Development of an Equivalent Composite Honeycomb Model: A Finite Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenackers, G.; Peeters, J.; Ribbens, B.; Vuye, C.

    2016-12-01

    Finite element analysis of complex geometries such as honeycomb composites, brings forth several difficulties. These problems are expressed primarily as high calculation times but also memory issues when solving these models. In order to bypass these issues, the main goal of this research paper is to define an appropriate equivalent model in order to minimize the complexity of the finite element model and thus minimize computation times. A finite element study is conducted on the design and analysis of equivalent layered models, substituting the honeycomb core in sandwich structures. A comparison is made between available equivalent models. An equivalent model with the right set of material property values is defined and benchmarked, consisting of one continuous layer with orthotropic elastic properties based on different available approximate formulas. This way the complex geometry does not need to be created while the model yields sufficiently accurate results.

  20. Analytical model and finite element computation of braking torque in electromagnetic retarder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lezhi; Yang, Guangzhao; Li, Desheng

    2014-12-01

    An analytical model has been developed for analyzing the braking torque in electromagnetic retarder by flux tube and armature reaction method. The magnetic field distribution in air gap, the eddy current induced in the rotor and the braking torque are calculated by the developed model. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element models for retarder have also been developed. Results from the analytical model are compared with those from finite element models. The validity of these three models is checked by the comparison of the theoretical predictions and the measurements from an experimental prototype. The influencing factors of braking torque have been studied.

  1. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  2. Integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model of human proximal femur behavior.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Lespessailles, Eric; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model allowing for the combined simulation of (i) simulation of a human proximal femur remodeling under a given boundary conditions, (ii) followed by the simulation of its fracture behavior (force-displacement curve and fracture pattern) under quasi-static load. The combination of remodeling and fracture simulation into one unified model consists in considering that the femur properties resulting from the remodeling simulation correspond to the initial state for the fracture prediction. The remodeling model is based on phenomenological one based on a coupled strain and fatigue damage stimulus. The fracture model is based on continuum damage mechanics in order to predict the progressive fracturing process which allows to predict the fracture pattern and the complete force-displacement curve under quasi-static load. To prevent mesh-dependence that generally affects the damage propagation rate, regularization technique was applied in the current work. To investigate the potential of the proposed unified remodeling-to-fracture model, we performed remodeling simulations on a 3D proximal femur model for a duration of 365 days under five different daily loading conditions followed by a side fall fracture simulation reproducing previously published experimental tests (de Bakker et al. (2009), case C, male, 72 years old). We show here that the implementation of an integrated remodeling-to-fracture model provides more realistic prediction strategy to assess the bone remodeling effects on the fracture risk of bone.

  3. Validation of finite element models of liver tissue using micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongjian; Farag, Aly A; Fahmi, Rachid; Chen, Dongqing

    2008-03-01

    In this work, we aim at validating some soft tissue deformation models using high-resolution micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) images. The imaging technique plays a key role in detecting the tissue deformation details in the contact region between the tissue and the surgical tool (probe) for small force loads and provides good capabilities of creating accurate 3-D models of soft tissues. Surgical simulations rely on accurate representation of the mechanical response of soft tissues subjected to surgical manipulations. Several finite-element models have been suggested to characterize soft tissues. However, validating these models for specific tissues still remain a challenge. In this study, ex vivo lamb liver tissue is chosen to validate the linear elastic model (LEM), the linear viscoelastic model (LVEM), and the neo-Hooke hyperelastic model (NHM). We find that the LEM is more applicable to lamb liver than the LVEM for smaller force loads (< 20 g) and that the NHM is closer to reality than the LVEM for the range of force loads from 5 to 40 g.

  4. Three-dimensional finite element modeling of the human external ear: simulation study of the bone conduction occlusion effect.

    PubMed

    Brummund, Martin K; Sgard, Franck; Petit, Yvan; Laville, Frédéric

    2014-03-01

    A linear three-dimensional (3D) elasto-acoustic finite element model was used to simulate the occlusion effect following mechanical vibration at the mastoid process. The ear canal and the surrounding soft and bony tissues were reconstructed using images of a female cadaver head (Visible Human Project(®)). The geometrical model was coupled to a 3D earplug model and imported into comsol Multiphysics (COMSOL(®), Sweden). The software was used to solve for the sound pressure at the eardrum. Finite element modeling of the human external ear and of the occlusion effect has several qualities that can complement existing measuring and modeling techniques. First, geometrically complex structures such as the external ear can be reconstructed. Second, various material behavioral laws and complex loading can be accounted for. Last, 3D analyses of external ear substructures are possible allowing for the computation of a broad range of acoustic indicators. The model simulates consistent occlusion effects (e.g., insertion depth variability). Comparison with an experimental dataset, kindly provided by Stenfelt and Reinfeldt [Int. J. Audiol. 46, 595-608 (2007)], further demonstrates the model's accuracy. Power balances were used to analyze occlusion effect differences obtained for a silicone earplug and to examine the increase in sound energy when the ear canal is occluded (e.g., high-pass filter removal).

  5. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  6. Singularity-free finite element model of bone through automated voxel-based reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Esposito, L; Bifulco, P; Gargiulo, P; Fraldi, M

    2016-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides both anatomical and density information about tissues. Bone is segmented by raw images and Finite Element Method (FEM) voxel-based meshing technique is achieved by matching each CT voxel to a single finite element (FE). As a consequence of the automated model reconstruction, unstable elements - i.e. elements insufficiently anchored to the whole model and thus potentially involved in partial rigid body motion - can be generated, a crucial problem in obtaining consistent FE models, hindering mechanical analyses. Through the classification of instabilities on topological connections between elements, a numerical procedure is proposed in order to avoid unconstrained models.

  7. Numerical solution of an elastic and viscoelastic gravitational models by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjona Almodóvar, A.; Chacón Rebollo, T.; Gómez Marmol, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic areas present a lower effective viscosity than usually in the Earth's crust. Both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models allow the computation of gravity, deformation, and gravitational potential changes in order to investigate crustal deformations of Earth (see for instance Battaglia & Segall, 2004; Fernández et al. 1999, 2001; Rundle 1980 and 1983). These models can be represented by a coupled system of linear parabolic (for the elastic deformations), hyperbolic (for the viscoelastic deformations) and elliptic partial differential equations (for gravitational potential changes) (see for instance Arjona et al. 2008 and 2010). The existence and uniqueness of weak solutions for both the elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational problem was demonstrated in Arjona et al. (2008 and 2014). The stabilization to solutions of the associated stationary system was proved in Arjona and Díaz (2007). Here we consider the internal source as response to the effect of a pressurized magma reservoir into a multilayered, elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational earth model. We introduce the numerical analysis of a simplified steady elastic-gravitational model, solved by means of the finite element method. We also present some numerical tests in realistic situations that confirm the predictions of theoretical order of convergence. Finally, we describe the methodology for both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models using 2D and 3D test examples performed with FreeFEM++.

  8. Ultrasonically assisted drilling: A finite-element model incorporating acoustic softening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonically assisted drilling (UAD) is a novel machining technique suitable for drilling in hard-to-machine quasi-brittle materials such as carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites (CFRP). UAD has been shown to possess several advantages compared to conventional drilling (CD), including reduced thrust forces, diminished burr formation at drill exit and an overall improvement in roundness and surface finish of the drilled hole. Recently, our in-house experiments of UAD in CFRP composites demonstrated remarkable reductions in thrust-force and torque measurements (average force reductions in excess of 80%) when compared to CD with the same machining parameters. In this study, a 3D finite-element model of drilling in CFRP is developed. In order to model acoustic (ultrasonic) softening effects, a phenomenological model, which accounts for ultrasonically induced plastic strain, was implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit. The model also accounts for dynamic frictional effects, which also contribute to the overall improved machining characteristics in UAD. The model is validated with experimental findings, where an excellent correlation between the reduced thrust force and torque magnitude was achieved.

  9. Simplified versus geometrically accurate models of forefoot anatomy to predict plantar pressures: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Scott; Erdemir, Ahmet; Woodburn, James; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2016-01-25

    Integration of patient-specific biomechanical measurements into the design of therapeutic footwear has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in patients with diabetic foot disease. The addition of numerical simulations intended to optimise intervention design may help to build on these advances, however at present the time and labour required to generate and run personalised models of foot anatomy restrict their routine clinical utility. In this study we developed second-generation personalised simple finite element (FE) models of the forefoot with varying geometric fidelities. Plantar pressure predictions from barefoot, shod, and shod with insole simulations using simplified models were compared to those obtained from CT-based FE models incorporating more detailed representations of bone and tissue geometry. A simplified model including representations of metatarsals based on simple geometric shapes, embedded within a contoured soft tissue block with outer geometry acquired from a 3D surface scan was found to provide pressure predictions closest to the more complex model, with mean differences of 13.3kPa (SD 13.4), 12.52kPa (SD 11.9) and 9.6kPa (SD 9.3) for barefoot, shod, and insole conditions respectively. The simplified model design could be produced in <1h compared to >3h in the case of the more detailed model, and solved on average 24% faster. FE models of the forefoot based on simplified geometric representations of the metatarsal bones and soft tissue surface geometry from 3D surface scans may potentially provide a simulation approach with improved clinical utility, however further validity testing around a range of therapeutic footwear types is required.

  10. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  11. Effect of fibre posts, bone losses and fibre content on the biomechanical behaviour of endodontically treated teeth: 3D-finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Pagano, Stefano; Cianetti, Stefano; Lombardo, Guido; Kenny, José M; Torre, Luigi

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the stress distribution inside endodontically treated teeth restored with different posts (glass fibre, carbon fibre and steel posts) under different loading conditions by using a 3D-finite element analysis. The effect of masticatory and impact forces on teeth with different degrees of bone loss was analysed. The model consists of: dentine, post, cement, gutta-percha, core and crown. Four simulations were conducted with two static forces (170N horizontal and 100N oblique) and two sections constrained: 1mm (alveolar bone position in a normal periodontium) and 6mm (middle of root) below the crown. Von Mises and the principal stresses were evaluated and analysed with a 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05) and the effect of fibre percentage analysed. Significant differences were found among the stress values for all conditions (p<0.05). Impact load was always responsible for the most critical situation especially when the bone loss was more evident. The system with steel posts showed the highest principal stresses at the post-cement interface with horizontal load and top constraints (compressive stress of 121MPa and tensile stress of 115MPa). The use of glass posts provides a more homogeneous behaviour of the system with lower stresses. Higher fibre percentages gave higher stress in the posts. Moreover, larger bone losses are responsible for important increase in stress. Thus, this work demonstrated that periodontal disease has an important role in the success of tooth restoration after endodontic therapy, influencing the choice of post material and depth.

  12. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  13. Application of a data base management system to a finite element model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In today's software market, much effort is being expended on the development of data base management systems (DBMS). Most commercially available DBMS were designed for business use. However, the need for such systems within the engineering and scientific communities is becoming apparent. A potential DBMS application that appears attractive is the handling of data for finite element engineering models. The applications of a commercially available, business-oriented DBMS to a structural engineering, finite element model is explored. The model, DBMS, an approach to using the DBMS, advantages and disadvantages are described. Plans for research on a scientific and engineering DBMS are discussed.

  14. Experimental measurement of tympanic membrane response for finite element model validation of a human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Soo; Baek, Moo-Jin; Lee, Dooho

    2013-01-01

    The middle ear consists of a tympanic membrane, ligaments, tendons, and three ossicles. An important function of the tympanic membrane is to deliver exterior sound stimulus to the ossicles and inner ear. In this study, the responses of the tympanic membrane in a human ear were measured and compared with those of a finite element model of the middle ear. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of the tympanic membrane, which had the measurement point on the cone of light of the tympanic membrane. The measured subjects were five Korean male adults and a cadaver. The tympanic membranes were stimulated using pure-tone sine waves at 18 center frequencies of one-third octave band over a frequency range of 200 Hz ~10 kHz with 60 and 80 dB sound pressure levels. The measured responses were converted into the umbo displacement transfer function (UDTF) with a linearity assumption. The measured UDTFs were compared with the calculated UDTFs using a finite element model for the Korean human middle ear. The finite element model of the middle ear consists of three ossicles, a tympanic membrane, ligaments, and tendons. In the finite element model, the umbo displacements were calculated under a unit sound pressure on the tympanic membrane. The UDTF of the finite element model exhibited good agreement with that of the experimental one in low frequency range, whereas in higher frequency band, the two response functions deviated from each other, which demonstrates that the finite element model should be updated with more accurate material properties and/or a frequency dependent material model.

  15. Strength Evaluation and Failure Prediction of Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Nylon Spur Gears by Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhong; Hossan, Mohammad Robiul

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, short carbon fiber reinforced nylon spur gear pairs, and steel and unreinforced nylon spur gear pairs have been selected for study and comparison. A 3D finite element model was developed to simulate the multi-axial stress-strain behaviors of the gear tooth. Failure prediction has been conducted based on the different failure criteria, including Tsai-Wu criterion. The tooth roots, where has stress concentration and the potential for failure, have been carefully investigated. The modeling results show that the short carbon fiber reinforced nylon gear fabricated by properly controlled injection molding processes can provide higher strength and better performance.

  16. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Model of the Radiocarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald D; Deshpande, Balachandra R; Daniel, Thomas E; Baratz, Mark E

    2005-01-01

    Displaced intra-articular distal radius fractures are difficult to treat, with numerous associated complications. The potential onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA) is a major concern. The relationship between malreduced intra-articular fracture of the distal radius and subsequent early onset of radiocarpal OA is clinically important, yet poorly understood. To better understand this presumed mechanical relationship, detailed information regarding joint loading, kinematics and associated stress distributions must be obtained. Toward this end, a three-dimensional finite element (3D FE) contact model of the radiocarpal joint has been developed, including the radius, lunate, scaphoid, articulations between these bones and selected soft tissues near the joint. FE model geometry was derived from cryomicrotome sections of a cadaver wrist. Radiocarpal contact stress distributions in the intact and simulated malreduced fracture conditions, previously collected using a cadaveric intra-articular fracture model, are used to establish validity of the computational model. Finally, a section of the distal radius constituting the entire lunate fossa was displaced 1, 2 and 3 mm to represent a depressed lunate die-punch fracture. PMID:16089082

  17. Finite Element Modeling to Simulate the Elasto-Plastic Behavior of Polycrystalline in 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifaz, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D strain gradient plasticity finite element model was developed to simulate the elasto-plastic behavior of polycrystalline IN 718 alloys. The proposed model constructed in the basis of the so-called Kocks-Mecking model is used to determine the influence of microstructure attributes on the inelastic stress-strain distribution. Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) of different edge size but similar grain morphology and affordable computational meshes were tested to investigate the link between micro and macro variables of deformation and stress. The virtual specimens subjected to continuous monotonic straining loading conditions were constrained with random periodic boundary conditions. The difference in crystallographic orientation (which evolves in the process of straining) and the incompatibility of deformation between neighboring grains were accounted by the introduction of averaged Taylor factors and the evolution of geometrically necessary dislocation density. The effect of plastic deformation gradients imposed by the microstructure is clearly observed. Results demonstrate a strong dependence of flow stress and plastic strain on phase type and grain size. A main strategy for constitutive modeling of individual bulk grains is presented. The influence of the grain size on the aggregate response, in terms of local stress variations and aggregate elastic moduli was analyzed. It was observed that the elastic modulus in the bulk material is not dependent on grain size.

  18. Influence of Material Models Used in Finite Element Modeling on Cutting Forces in Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivishov, Vusal; Rzayev, Elchin

    2016-08-01

    Finite element modeling of machining is significantly influenced by various modeling input parameters such as boundary conditions, mesh size and distribution, as well as properties of workpiece and tool materials. The flow stress model of the workpiece material is the most critical input parameter. However, it is very difficult to obtain experimental values under the same conditions as in machining operations.. This paper analyses the influence of different material models for two steels (AISI 1045 and hardened AISI 52100) in finite element modelling of cutting forces. In this study, the machining process is scaled by a constant ratio of the variable depth of cut h and cutting edge radius rβ. The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. This comparison illustrates some of the capabilities and limitations of FEM modelling.

  19. On finite element implementation and computational techniques for constitutive modeling of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Wilt, T.; Iskovitz, I.

    1989-01-01

    The research work performed during the past year on finite element implementation and computational techniques pertaining to high temperature composites is outlined. In the present research, two main issues are addressed: efficient geometric modeling of composite structures and expedient numerical integration techniques dealing with constitutive rate equations. In the first issue, mixed finite elements for modeling laminated plates and shells were examined in terms of numerical accuracy, locking property and computational efficiency. Element applications include (currently available) linearly elastic analysis and future extension to material nonlinearity for damage predictions and large deformations. On the material level, various integration methods to integrate nonlinear constitutive rate equations for finite element implementation were studied. These include explicit, implicit and automatic subincrementing schemes. In all cases, examples are included to illustrate the numerical characteristics of various methods that were considered.

  20. A new approach to finite element modeling, analysis and post-processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Gil

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in both hardware and software have opened the door to a new generation of finite element modeling systems. INTERGRAPH CORP has combined an innovative programming concept with a stand alone workstation hardware platform to produce a new standard in finite element modeling called I/FEM. The system offers the COSMIC NASTRAN user full integration between design and analysis. I/FEM not only addresses the needs of the NASTRAN user of today, it also provides for continued evolution of the COSMIC NASTRAN product.

  1. Measuring morphological parameters of the pelvic floor for finite element modelling purposes.

    PubMed

    Janda, Stepán; van der Helm, Frans C T; de Blok, Sjoerd B

    2003-06-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain a complete data set needed for studying the complex biomechanical behaviour of the pelvic floor muscles using a computer model based on the finite element (FE) theory. The model should be able to predict the effect of surgical interventions and give insight into the function of pelvic floor muscles. Because there was a lack of any information concerning morphological parameters of the pelvic floor muscle structures, we performed an experimental measurement to uncover those morphological parameters. Geometric parameters as well as muscle parameters of the pelvic floor muscles were measured on an embalmed female cadaver. A three-dimensional (3D) geometric data set of the pelvic floor including muscle fibre directions was obtained using a palpator device. A 3D surface model based on the experimental data, needed for mathematical modelling of the pelvic floor, was created. For all parts of the diaphragma pelvis, the optimal muscle fibre length was determined by laser diffraction measurements of the sarcomere length. In addition, other muscle parameters such as physiological cross-sectional area and total muscle fibre length were determined. Apart from these measurements we obtained a data set of the pelvic floor structures based on nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the same cadaver specimen. The purpose of this experiment was to discover the relationship between the MRI morphology and geometrical parameters obtained from the previous measurements. The produced data set is not only important for biomechanical modelling of the pelvic floor muscles, but it also describes the geometry of muscle fibres and is useful for functional analysis of the pelvic floor in general. By the use of many reference landmarks all these morphologic data concerning fibre directions and optimal fibre length can be morphed to the geometrical data based on segmentation from MRI scans. These data can be directly used as an input for building a

  2. Finite Element-Derived Surrogate Models of Locked Plate Fracture Fixation Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Wee, Hwabok; Reid, J Spence; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Lewis, Gregory S

    2017-03-01

    Internal fixation of bone fractures using plates and screws involves many choices-implant type, material, sizes, and geometric configuration-made by the surgeon. These decisions can be important for providing adequate stability to promote healing and prevent implant mechanical failure. The purpose of this study was to develop mathematical models of the relationships between fracture fixation construct parameters and resulting 3D biomechanics, based on parametric computer simulations. Finite element models of hundreds of different locked plate fixation constructs for midshaft diaphyseal fractures were systematically assembled using custom algorithms, and axial, torsional, and bending loadings were simulated. Multivariate regression was used to fit response surface polynomial equations relating fixation design parameters to outputs including maximum implant stresses, axial and shear strain at the fracture site, and construct stiffness. Surrogate models with as little as three regressors showed good fitting (R (2) = 0.62-0.97). Inner working length was the strongest predictor of maximum plate and screw stresses, and a variety of quadratic and interaction terms influenced resulting biomechanics. The framework presented in this study can be applied to additional types of bone fractures to provide clinicians and implant designers with clinical insight, surgical optimization, and a comprehensive mathematical description of biomechanics.

  3. Axisymmetric versus three-dimensional finite element models for predicting the attenuation of earplugs in rigid walled ear canals.

    PubMed

    Viallet, Guilhem; Sgard, Franck; Laville, Frédéric; Boutin, Jérôme

    2013-12-01

    The axisymmetric hypothesis of the earplug-ear canal system geometry is commonly used. The validity of this hypothesis is investigated numerically in the case of a simplified configuration where the system is embedded in a rigid baffle and for fixed boundary conditions on the earplug lateral walls. This investigation is discussed for both individual and averaged insertion loss predictions of molded silicon earplugs. The insertion losses of 15 earplug-ear canal systems with realistic geometries are calculated using three-dimensional (3D) finite element models and compared with the insertion losses provided by two-dimensional equivalent axisymmetric finite element models using 6 different geometry reconstruction methods [all the models are solved using COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL, Sweden)]. These methods are then compared in order to find the most reliable ones in terms of insertion loss predictions in this simplified configuration. Two methods have emerged: The usage of a variable cross section (with the same area values as the 3D case) or the usage of a constant cross section (with the same length and volume as the 3D case).

  4. The validation and application of a finite element human head model for frontal skull fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Z; Baumgartner, D; Willinger, R; Graw, M; Peldschus, S

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic head injuries can result from vehicular accidents, sports, falls or assaults. The current advances in computational methods and the detailed finite element models of the human head provide a significant opportunity for biomechanical study of human head injuries. The biomechanical characteristics of the human head through head impact scenarios can be studied in detail by using the finite element models. Skull fracture is one of the most frequent occurring types of head injuries. The purpose of this study is to analyse the experimental head impacts on cadavers by means of the Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model (SUFEHM). The results of the numerical model and experimental data are compared for validation purpose. The finite element model has also been applied to predict the skull bone fracture in frontal impacts. The head model includes the scalp, the facial bone, the skull, the cerebral spinal fluid, the meninges, the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The model is used to simulate the experimental frontal head impact tests using a cylindrical padded impactor. Results of the computational simulation shows that the model correlated well with a number of experimental data and a global fracture pattern has been predicted well by the model. Therefore the presented numerical model could be used for reconstruction of head impacts in different impact conditions also the forensic application of the head model would provide a tool for investigation of the causes and mechanism of head injuries.

  5. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  6. Simulation of the cabling process for Rutherford cables: An advanced finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, J.; Garlasche, M.; Bordini, B.; Dallocchio, A.

    2016-12-01

    In all existing large particle accelerators (Tevatron, HERA, RHIC, LHC) the main superconducting magnets are based on Rutherford cables, which are characterized by having: strands fully transposed with respect to the magnetic field, a significant compaction that assures a large engineering critical current density and a geometry that allows efficient winding of the coils. The Nb3Sn magnets developed in the framework of the HL-LHC project for improving the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are also based on Rutherford cables. Due to the characteristics of Nb3Sn wires, the cabling process has become a crucial step in the magnet manufacturing. During cabling the wires experience large plastic deformations that strongly modify the geometrical dimensions of the sub-elements constituting the superconducting strand. These deformations are particularly severe on the cable edges and can result in a significant reduction of the cable critical current as well as of the Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of the stabilizing copper. In order to understand the main parameters that rule the cabling process and their impact on the cable performance, CERN has developed a 3D Finite Element (FE) model based on the LS-Dyna® software that simulates the whole cabling process. In the paper the model is presented together with a comparison between experimental and numerical results for a copper cable produced at CERN.

  7. An Integrated Magnetic Circuit Model and Finite Element Model Approach to Magnetic Bearing Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenza, Andrew J.; Kenny, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan B.

    2003-01-01

    A code for designing magnetic bearings is described. The code generates curves from magnetic circuit equations relating important bearing performance parameters. Bearing parameters selected from the curves by a designer to meet the requirements of a particular application are input directly by the code into a three-dimensional finite element analysis preprocessor. This means that a three-dimensional computer model of the bearing being developed is immediately available for viewing. The finite element model solution can be used to show areas of magnetic saturation and make more accurate predictions of the bearing load capacity, current stiffness, position stiffness, and inductance than the magnetic circuit equations did at the start of the design process. In summary, the code combines one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling methods for designing magnetic bearings.

  8. Automated finite element modeling of the lumbar spine: Using a statistical shape model to generate a virtual population of models.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Q; Petrella, A J

    2016-09-06

    Population-based modeling of the lumbar spine has the potential to be a powerful clinical tool. However, developing a fully parameterized model of the lumbar spine with accurate geometry has remained a challenge. The current study used automated methods for landmark identification to create a statistical shape model of the lumbar spine. The shape model was evaluated using compactness, generalization ability, and specificity. The primary shape modes were analyzed visually, quantitatively, and biomechanically. The biomechanical analysis was performed by using the statistical shape model with an automated method for finite element model generation to create a fully parameterized finite element model of the lumbar spine. Functional finite element models of the mean shape and the extreme shapes (±3 standard deviations) of all 17 shape modes were created demonstrating the robust nature of the methods. This study represents an advancement in finite element modeling of the lumbar spine and will allow population-based modeling in the future.

  9. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    PubMed

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials.

  10. Finite element modeling of truss structures with frequency-dependent material damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A.

    1991-01-01

    A physically motivated modelling technique for structural dynamic analysis that accommodates frequency dependent material damping was developed. Key features of the technique are the introduction of augmenting thermodynamic fields (AFT) to interact with the usual mechanical displacement field, and the treatment of the resulting coupled governing equations using finite element analysis methods. The AFT method is fully compatible with current structural finite element analysis techniques. The method is demonstrated in the dynamic analysis of a 10-bay planar truss structure, a structure representative of those contemplated for use in future space systems.

  11. Evaluating topographic effects on ground deformation: Insights from finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Marti, Joan

    2015-04-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assumed the Earth's surface as flat. In the last years, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g. slope, aspect, curvature, etc.). For this, we bring together the results exposed in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D Finite Elements (FE) models results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas considering their diverse topographic features (e.g. collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars, etc.). Final conclusions may be also useful for the design of an optimal geodetic monitoring network. This research was partially funded by the European Commission (FP7 Theme: ENV.2011.1.3.3-1; Grant 282759: "VUELCO")and RYC-2012-11024.

  12. Creating a Test Validated Structural Dynamic Finite Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the Multi Utility Technology Test-bed, X-56A aircraft, is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, while other properties such as center of gravity location, total weight, and offdiagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was a more improved and desirable structural dynamic finite element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  13. Dynamic and thermal response finite element models of multi-body space structural configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edighoffer, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is structural dynamics modeling of two multibody space structural configurations. The first configuration is a generic space station model of a cylindrical habitation module, two solar array panels, radiator panel, and central connecting tube. The second is a 15-m hoop-column antenna. Discussed is the special joint elimination sequence used for these large finite element models, so that eigenvalues could be extracted. The generic space station model aided test configuration design and analysis/test data correlation. The model consisted of six finite element models, one of each substructure and one of all substructures as a system. Static analysis and tests at the substructure level fine-tuned the finite element models. The 15-m hoop-column antenna is a truss column and structural ring interconnected with tension stabilizing cables. To the cables, pretensioned mesh membrane elements were attached to form four parabolic shaped antennae, one per quadrant. Imposing thermal preloads in the cables and mesh elements produced pretension in the finite element model. Thermal preload variation in the 96 control cables was adjusted to maintain antenna shape within the required tolerance and to give pointing accuracy.

  14. Finite-element model for three-dimensional optical scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiuhong; Wachters, Arthur J; Urbach, H Paul

    2007-03-01

    We present a three-dimensional model based on the finite-element method for solving the time-harmonic Maxwell equation in optics. It applies to isotropic or anisotropic dielectrics and metals and to many configurations such as an isolated scatterer in a multilayer, bi-gratings, and crystals. We discuss the application of the model to near-field optical recording.

  15. A Finite-Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

    2014-09-01

    Herein, we present a coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide followed by the stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis. This fully coupled model considers the geomechanical response, fluid flow, and thermal transport relevant to geological sequestration. Both analytical solutions and numerical approach via finite element model are introduced for solving the thermal-hydro-mechanical model. Analytical solutions for pressure, temperature, deformation, and stress field were obtained for a simplified typical geological sequestration scenario. The finite element model is more general and can be used for arbitrary geometry. It was built on an open-source finite element code, Elmer, and was designed to simulate the entire period of CO2 injection (up to decades) both stably and accurately—even for large time steps. The shear-slip failure analysis was implemented based on the numerical results from the finite element model. The analysis reveals the potential failure zone caused by the fluid injection and thermal effect. From the simulation results, the thermal effect is shown to enhance well injectivity, especially at the early time of the injection. However, it also causes some side effects, such as the appearance of a small failure zone in the caprock. The coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model improves prediction of displacement, stress distribution, and potential failure zone compared to the model that neglects non-isothermal effects, especially in an area with high geothermal gradient.

  16. Creating a Test-Validated Finite-Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in a finite-element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression and, therefore, in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground-vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model-tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, whereas other properties such as c.g. location, total weight, and off-diagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was an improved structural dynamic finite-element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  17. Design and Implementation of a Numerical Technique to Inform Anisotropic Hyperelastic Finite Element Models using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Design and Implementation of a Numerical Technique to Inform Anisotropic Hyperelastic Finite Element Models using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging by...Implementation of a Numerical Technique to Inform Anisotropic Hyperelastic Finite Element Models using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Reuben H. Kraft and Amy M. Dagro...Implementation of a Numerical Technique to Inform Anisotropic Hyperelastic Finite Element Models using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging AH80Reuben H. Kraft and

  18. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite element model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model in finite element (SIMFE) is presented to enable the simulation of flow circulations and pollutant transport and dispersion in natural or artificial lakes, reservoirs or ponds with any number of islands. This surface impoundment model consists of two sub-models: hydrodynamic and pollutant transport models. Both submodels are simulated by the finite element method. While the hydrodynamic model is solved by the standard Galerkin finite element scheme, the pollutant transport model can be solved by any of the twelve optional finite element schemes built in the program. Theoretical approximations and the numerical algorithm of SIMFE are described. Detail instruction of the application are given and listing of FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given. One is for an idealized system with a known solution to show the accuracy and partial validation of the models. The other is applied to Prairie Island for a set of hypothetical input data, typifying a class of problems to which SIMFE may be applied.

  19. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B; Cook, Mark J; Wolters, Carsten H; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery.

  20. Finite element modeling of hyper-viscoelasticity of peripheral nerve ultrastructures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Tao; Chen, Yu-Hsing; Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2015-07-16

    The mechanical characteristics of ultrastructures of rat sciatic nerves were investigated through animal experiments and finite element analyses. A custom-designed dynamic testing apparatus was used to conduct in vitro transverse compression experiments on the nerves. The optical coherence tomography (OCT) was utilized to record the cross-sectional images of nerve during the dynamic testing. Two-dimensional finite element models of the nerves were built based on their OCT images. A hyper-viscoelastic model was employed to describe the elastic and stress relaxation response of each ultrastructure of the nerve, namely the endoneurium, the perineurium and the epineurium. The first-order Ogden model was employed to describe the elasticity of each ultrastructure and a generalized Maxwell model for the relaxation. The inverse finite element analysis was used to estimate the material parameters of the ultrastructures. The results show the instantaneous shear modulus of the ultrastructures in decreasing order is perineurium, endoneurium, and epineurium. The FE model combined with the first-order Ogden model and the second-order Prony series is good enough for describing the compress-and-hold response of the nerve ultrastructures. The integration of OCT and the nonlinear finite element modeling may be applicable to study the viscoelasticity of peripheral nerve down to the ultrastructural level.

  1. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B.; Cook, Mark J.; Wolters, Carsten H.; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  2. A combined dislocation fan-finite element (DF-FE) method for stress field simulation of dislocations emerging at the free surfaces of 3D elastically anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balusu, K.; Huang, H.

    2017-04-01

    A combined dislocation fan-finite element (DF-FE) method is presented for efficient and accurate simulation of dislocation nodal forces in 3D elastically anisotropic crystals with dislocations intersecting the free surfaces. The finite domain problem is decomposed into half-spaces with singular traction stresses, an infinite domain, and a finite domain with non-singular traction stresses. As such, the singular and non-singular parts of the traction stresses are addressed separately; the dislocation fan (DF) method is introduced to balance the singular traction stresses in the half-spaces while the finite element method (FEM) is employed to enforce the non-singular boundary conditions. The accuracy and efficiency of the DF method is demonstrated using a simple isotropic test case, by comparing it with the analytical solution as well as the FEM solution. The DF-FE method is subsequently used for calculating the dislocation nodal forces in a finite elastically anisotropic crystal, which produces dislocation nodal forces that converge rapidly with increasing mesh resolutions. In comparison, the FEM solution fails to converge, especially for nodes closer to the surfaces.

  3. Progress in Finite Element Modeling of the Lower Extremities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT  Human body modeling efforts for the purpose of Soldier protection need to address the current threats...as well as have a vision for the future. Modeling the human body is a challenging endeavor due to its geometric complexity, numerous interacting...has the capability to take a collection of source body part meshes that may have different resolutions, deform the meshes based on the individual to

  4. Anisotropic constitutive model for nickel base single crystal alloys: Development and finite element implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    A tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel base single crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components is developed. This is achieved by a rate dependent anisotropic constitutive model implemented in a nonlinear three dimensional finite element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurigical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. A non Schmid's law formulation is used to model the tension/compression asymmetry and orientation dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is a good approximation to the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response, and strain rate sensitivity of these alloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are presented. The finite element implementation utilizes an initial strain method and twenty noded isoparametric solid elements. The ability to model piecewise linear load histories is included in the finite element code. The constitutive equations are accurately and economically integrated using a second order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method with a dynamic time incrementing procedure. Computed results from the finite element code are compared with experimental data for tensile, creep and cyclic tests at 760 deg C. The strain rate sensitivity and stress relaxation capabilities of the model are evaluated.

  5. Tooth fracture risk analysis based on a new finite element dental structure models using micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Fan, W; Mishra, S; El-Atem, A; Schuetz, M A; Xiao, Y

    2012-10-01

    The finite element (FE) analysis is an effective method to study the strength and predict the fracture risk of endodontically-treated teeth. This paper presents a rapid method developed to generate a comprehensive tooth FE model using data retrieved from micro-computed tomography (μCT). With this method, the inhomogeneity of material properties of teeth was included into the model without dividing the tooth model into different regions. The material properties of the tooth were assumed to be related to the mineral density. The fracture risk at different tooth portions was assessed for root canal treatments. The micro-CT images of a tooth were processed by a Matlab software programme and the CT numbers were retrieved. The tooth contours were obtained with thresholding segmentation using Amira. The inner and outer surfaces of the tooth were imported into Solidworks and a three-dimensional (3D) tooth model was constructed. An assembly of the tooth model with the periodontal ligament (PDL) layer and surrounding bone was imported into ABAQUS. The material properties of the tooth were calculated from the retrieved CT numbers via ABAQUS user's subroutines. Three root canal geometries (original and two enlargements) were investigated. The proposed method in this study can generate detailed 3D finite element models of a tooth with different root canal enlargements and filling materials, and would be very useful for the assessment of the fracture risk at different tooth portions after root canal treatments.

  6. Evaluation of the finite element software ABAQUS for biomechanical modelling of biphasic tissues.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Z; Herzog, W; Epstein, M

    1998-02-01

    The biphasic cartilage model proposed by Mow et al. (1980) has proven successful to capture the essential mechanical features of articular cartilage. In order to analyse the joint contact mechanics in real, anatomical joints, the cartilage model needs to be implemented into a suitable finite element code to approximate the irregular surface geometries of such joints. However, systematic and extensive evaluation of the capacity of commercial software for modelling the contact mechanics with biphasic cartilage layers has not been made. This research was aimed at evaluating the commercial finite element software ABAQUS for analysing biphasic soft tissues. The solutions obtained using ABAQUS were compared with those obtained using other finite element models and analytical solutions for three numerical tests: an unconfined indentation test, a test with the contact of a spherical cartilage surface with a rigid plate, and an axi-symmetric joint contact test. It was concluded that the biphasic cartilage model can be implemented into the commercial finite element software ABAQUS to analyse practical joint contact problems with biphasic articular cartilage layers.

  7. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  8. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-02-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  9. Finite element modelling of internal and multiple localized cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloustros, Savvas; Pelà, Luca; Cervera, Miguel; Roca, Pere

    2017-02-01

    Tracking algorithms constitute an efficient numerical technique for modelling fracture in quasi-brittle materials. They succeed in representing localized cracks in the numerical model without mesh-induced directional bias. Currently available tracking algorithms have an important limitation: cracking originates either from the boundary of the discretized domain or from predefined "crack-root" elements and then propagates along one orientation. This paper aims to circumvent this drawback by proposing a novel tracking algorithm that can simulate cracking starting at any point of the mesh and propagating along one or two orientations. This enhancement allows the simulation of structural case-studies experiencing multiple cracking. The proposed approach is validated through the simulation of a benchmark example and an experimentally tested structural frame under in-plane loading. Mesh-bias independency of the numerical solution, computational cost and predicted collapse mechanisms with and without the tracking algorithm are discussed.

  10. Feasibility Study of a Knowledge Based Finite Element Modeling Assistant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    girders interact with floor slabs, the ways in which an inside core interacts with outside frames, or the ways ini which two beams on top of each other...hierarchically decomposed into descriptions in two orthogonal directions (e.g, frames, walls), and then into components (e.g, beams , columns... diagonals ). The top level gravity description representing the alternate overall gravity functional models (e.g., one-way reinforced concrete slab, two way

  11. Meso-damage modelling of polymer based particulate composites using finite element technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Chi Pong

    To develop a new particulate polymer composite (PPC) with desired mechanical properties is usually accomplished by an experimental trial-and-error approach. A new technique, which predicts the damage mechanism and its effects on the mechanical properties of PPC, has been proposed. This meso-mechanical modelling technique, which offers a means to bridge the micro-damage mechanism and the macro-structural behaviour, has been implemented in a finite element code. A three-dimensional finite element meso-cell model has been designed and constructed to simulate the damage mechanism of PPC. The meso-cell model consists of a micro-particle, an interface, and a matrix. The initiation of the particle/polymer matrix debonding process has been predicted on the basis of a tensile criterion. By considering the meso-cell model as a representative volume element (RVE), the effects of damage on the macro-structural constitutive behaviour of PPC have been determined. An experimental investigation has been made on glass beads (GB) reinforced polyphenylene oxides (PPO) for verification of the meso-cell model and the meso-mechanical finite element technique. The predicted constitutive relation has been found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The results of the in-situ microscopic test also verify the correctness of the meso-cell model. The application of the meso-mechanical finite element modelling technique has been extended to a macro-structural analysis to simulate the response an engineering structure made of PPC under a static load. In the simulation, a damage variable has been defined in terms of the computational results of the cell model in meso-scale. Hence, the damage-coupled constitutive relation of the GB/PPO composite could be derived. A user-defined subroutine VUMAT in FORTRAN language describing the damage-coupled constitutive behaviour has then been incorporated into the ABAQUS finite element code. On a macro-scale, the ABAQUS finite element code

  12. Correlation of experimental data and three-dimensional finite element modeling of a spinning quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, W. L.; Lieu, D. K.; Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Rossing, T. D.

    A permanent magnet quadrupole spinning over an aluminum disk was constructed, and drag torque was measured for various speeds and gap sizes. The experiment was modeled using a three-dimensional finite element program. Experimental and analytical results were compared, and the effect of magnet polarity was determined.

  13. An efficient finite element approach for modeling fibrotic clefts in the heart.

    PubMed

    Costa, Caroline Mendonca; Campos, Fernando O; Prassl, Anton J; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Ahammer, Helmut; Hofer, Ernst; Plank, Gernot

    2014-03-01

    Advanced medical imaging technologies provide a wealth of information on cardiac anatomy and structure at a paracellular resolution, allowing to identify microstructural discontinuities which disrupt the intracellular matrix. Current state-of-the-art computer models built upon such datasets account for increasingly finer anatomical details, however, structural discontinuities at the paracellular level are typically discarded in the model generation process, owing to the significant costs which incur when using high resolutions for explicit representation. In this study, a novel discontinuous finite element (dFE) approach for discretizing the bidomain equations is presented, which accounts for fine-scale structures in a computer model without the need to increase spatial resolution. In the dFE method, this is achieved by imposing infinitely thin lines of electrical insulation along edges of finite elements which approximate the geometry of discontinuities in the intracellular matrix. Simulation results demonstrate that the dFE approach accounts for effects induced by microscopic size scale discontinuities, such as the formation of microscopic virtual electrodes, with vast computational savings as compared to high resolution continuous finite element models. Moreover, the method can be implemented in any standard continuous finite element code with minor effort.

  14. Assessment of the performance of rigid pavement back-calculation through finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Samir N.; William, Gergis W.; Martinelli, David R.

    1999-02-01

    This study focuses on examining the behavior of rigid pavement layers during the Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) test. Factors affecting the design of a concrete slab, such as whether the joints are doweled or undoweled and the spacing between the transverse joints, were considered in this study. Explicit finite element analysis was employed to investigate pavement layers' responses to the action of the impulse of the FWD test. Models of various dimensions were developed to satisfy the factors under consideration. The accuracy of the finite element models developed in this investigation was verified by comparing the finite element- generated deflection basin with that experimentally measured during an actual test. The results showed that the measured deflection basin can be reproduced through finite element modeling of the pavement structure. The resulting deflection basins from the use FE modeling was processed in order to backcalculate pavement layer moduli. This approach provides a method for the evaluation of the performance of existing backcalculation programs which are based on static elastic layer analysis. Based upon the previous studies conducted for the selection of software, three different backcalculation programs were chosen for the evaluation: MODULUS5.0, EVERCALC4.0, and MODCOMP3. The results indicate that ignoring the dynamic nature of the load may lead to crude results, especially during backcalculation procedures.

  15. An Efficient Finite Element Approach for Modeling Fibrotic Clefts in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Caroline Mendonca; Campos, Fernando O.; Prassl, Anton J.; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Ahammer, Helmut; Hofer, Ernst; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging technologies provide a wealth of information on cardiac anatomy and structure at a paracellular resolution, allowing to identify micro-structural discontinuities which disrupt the intracellular matrix. Current state-of-the-art computer models built upon such datasets account for increasingly finer anatomical details, however, structural discontinuities at the paracellular level are typically discarded in the model generation process, owing to the significant costs which incur when using high resolutions for explicit representation. In this study, a novel discontinuous finite element (dFE) approach for discretizing the bidomain equations is presented, which accounts for fine-scale structures in a computer model without the need to increase spatial resolution. In the dFE method this is achieved by imposing infinitely thin lines of electrical insulation along edges of finite elements which approximate the geometry of discontinuities in the intracellular matrix. Simulation results demonstrate that the dFE approach accounts for effects induced by microscopic size scale discontinuities, such as the formation of microscopic virtual electrodes, with vast computational savings as compared to high resolution continuous finite element models. Moreover, the method can be implemented in any standard continuous finite element code with minor effort. PMID:24557691

  16. Development and experimental validation of a finite element model of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Alexandre; Larrea, Xabier; Guerdat, Jonas; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-02-07

    Total ankle replacement remains a less satisfactory solution compared to other joint replacements. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model of total ankle replacement, for future testing of hypotheses related to clinical issues. To validate the finite element model, an experimental setup was specifically developed and applied on 8 cadaveric tibias. A non-cemented press fit tibial component of a mobile bearing prosthesis was inserted into the tibias. Two extreme anterior and posterior positions of the mobile bearing insert were considered, as well as a centered one. An axial force of 2kN was applied for each insert position. Strains were measured on the bone surface using digital image correlation. Tibias were CT scanned before implantation, after implantation, and after mechanical tests and removal of the prosthesis. The finite element model replicated the experimental setup. The first CT was used to build the geometry and evaluate the mechanical properties of the tibias. The second CT was used to set the implant position. The third CT was used to assess the bone-implant interface conditions. The coefficient of determination (R-squared) between the measured and predicted strains was 0.91. Predicted bone strains were maximal around the implant keel, especially at the anterior and posterior ends. The finite element model presented here is validated for future tests using more physiological loading conditions.

  17. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K.; Rainsberger, R.

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  18. Application of physical parameter identification to finite-element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronowicki, Allen J.; Lukich, Michael S.; Kuritz, Steven P.

    1987-01-01

    The time domain parameter identification method described previously is applied to TRW's Large Space Structure Truss Experiment. Only control sensors and actuators are employed in the test procedure. The fit of the linear structural model to the test data is improved by more than an order of magnitude using a physically reasonable parameter set. The electro-magnetic control actuators are found to contribute significant damping due to a combination of eddy current and back electro-motive force (EMF) effects. Uncertainties in both estimated physical parameters and modal behavior variables are given.

  19. Numerical modeling of shallow magma intrusions with finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tielin; Cheng, Shaozhen; Fang, Qian; Zhou, Cheng

    2017-03-01

    A numerical approach for simulation of magma intrusion process, considering the couplings of the stress distribution, the viscous fluid flow of magma, and the fracturing of host rock, has been developed to investigate the mechanisms of fracture initiation and propagation in host rock during magma intrusion without pre-placing a set of fractures. The study focused on the dike intrusions filled with injected viscous magma in shallow sediments. A series of numerical modellings were carried out to simulate the process of magma intrusion in host rocks, with particular attention on the magma propagation processes and the formation of intrusion shapes. The model materials were Mohr-Coulomb materials with tension failure and shear failure. The scenarios of both stochastically heterogeneous host rocks and layered host rocks were analyzed. The injected magma formed intrusions shapes of (a) dyke, (b) sill, (c) cup-shaped intrusion, (d) saucer-shaped intrusion. The numerical results were in agreement with the experimental and field observed results, which confirmed the adequacy and the power of the numerical approach.

  20. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C. A.; Knepley, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.6) can be used for quasi-static viscoelastic modeling, dynamic spontaneous rupture and/or ground-motion modeling. Unstructured and structured finite-element discretizations allow for spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales in dynamic problems ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales in quasi-static problems ranging from minutes to thousands of years. PyLith development is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and the software runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). Binaries (Linux, Darwin, and Windows systems) and source code are available from geodynamics.org. PyLith uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current PyLith features include prescribed fault ruptures with multiple earthquakes and aseismic creep, spontaneous fault ruptures with a variety of fault constitutive models, time-dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, absorbing boundary conditions, time-dependent point forces, and gravitational body forces. PyLith supports infinitesimal and small strain formulations for linear elastic rheologies, linear and generalized Maxwell viscoelastic rheologies, power-law viscoelastic rheologies, and Drucker-Prager elastoplastic rheologies. Current software development focuses on coupling quasi-static and dynamic simulations to resolve multi-scale deformation across the entire seismic cycle and the coupling of elasticity to heat and/or fluid flow.

  1. Micromechanical Failure Analyses for Finite Element Polymer Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    CHAMBERS,ROBERT S.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LO,CHI S.; ADOLF,DOUGLAS B.; GUESS,TOMMY R.

    2000-11-01

    Polymer stresses around sharp corners and in constrained geometries of encapsulated components can generate cracks leading to system failures. Often, analysts use maximum stresses as a qualitative indicator for evaluating the strength of encapsulated component designs. Although this approach has been useful for making relative comparisons screening prospective design changes, it has not been tied quantitatively to failure. Accurate failure models are needed for analyses to predict whether encapsulated components meet life cycle requirements. With Sandia's recently developed nonlinear viscoelastic polymer models, it has been possible to examine more accurately the local stress-strain distributions in zones of likely failure initiation looking for physically based failure mechanisms and continuum metrics that correlate with the cohesive failure event. This study has identified significant differences between rubbery and glassy failure mechanisms that suggest reasonable alternatives for cohesive failure criteria and metrics. Rubbery failure seems best characterized by the mechanisms of finite extensibility and appears to correlate with maximum strain predictions. Glassy failure, however, seems driven by cavitation and correlates with the maximum hydrostatic tension. Using these metrics, two three-point bending geometries were tested and analyzed under variable loading rates, different temperatures and comparable mesh resolution (i.e., accuracy) to make quantitative failure predictions. The resulting predictions and observations agreed well suggesting the need for additional research. In a separate, additional study, the asymptotically singular stress state found at the tip of a rigid, square inclusion embedded within a thin, linear elastic disk was determined for uniform cooling. The singular stress field is characterized by a single stress intensity factor K{sub a} and the applicable K{sub a} calibration relationship has been determined for both fully bonded and

  2. Prediction of Colles' fracture load in human radius using cohesive finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani

    2009-01-05

    Osteoporotic and age-related fractures are a significant public health problem. One of the most common osteoporotic fracture sites in the aging population is distal radius. There is evidence in the literature that distal radius fractures (Colles' fracture) are an indicative of increased risk of future spine and hip fractures. In this study, a nonlinear fracture mechanics-based finite element method is applied to human radius to assess its fracture load as a function of cortical bone geometry and material properties. Seven three-dimensional finite element models of radius were created and the fracture loads were determined by using cohesive finite element modeling which explicitly represents the crack and the fracture process zone behavior. The fracture loads found in the simulations (731-6793 N) were in the range of experimental values reported in the literature. The fracture loads predicted by the simulations decreased by 4-5% per decade based only on material level changes and by 6-20% per decade when geometrical changes were also included. Cortical polar moment of inertia at 15% distal radius showed the highest correlation to fracture load (r(2)=0.97). These findings demonstrate the strength of fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling and show that combining geometrical and material properties provides a better assessment of fracture risk in human radius.

  3. Solute transport in intervertebral disc: experiments and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Das, D B; Welling, A; Urban, J P G; Boubriak, O A

    2009-04-01

    Loss of nutrient supply to the human intervertebral disc (IVD) cells is thought to be a major cause of disc degeneration in humans. To address this issue, transport of molecules of different size have been analyzed by a combination of experimental and modeling studies. Solute transport has been compared for steady-state and transient diffusion of several different solutes with molecular masses in the range 3-70 kDa, injected into parts of the disc where degeneration is thought most likely to occur first and into the blood supply to the disc. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescently tagged dextran molecules of different molecular weights have been measured in vitro using the concentration gradient technique in thin specimens of disc outer annulus and nucleus pulposus. Diffusion coefficients were found to decrease with molecular weight following a nonlinear relationship. Diffusion coefficients changed more rapidly for solutes with molecular masses less than 10 kDa. Although unrealistic or painful, solutes injected directly into the disc achieve the largest disc coverage with concentrations that would be high enough to be of practical use. Although more practical, solutes injected into the blood supply do not penetrate to the central regions of the disc and their concentrations dissipate more rapidly. Injection into the disc would be the best method to get drugs or growth factors to regions of degeneration in IVDs quickly; else concentrations of solute must be kept at a high value for several hours in the blood supply to the discs.

  4. Finite Element Modeling of a Microhotplate for Microfluidic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Manginell, R.P.; Rosato, D.A.

    1999-03-09

    A hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab) is being developed that utilizes a silicon- nitride-supported microhotplate in the front-end, gas sampling and preconcentration stage. Device constraints include low-power (<200mW at 5V), rapid heating (<20msec), and a relatively uniform temperature distribution throughout the heated area ({approximately}3mm{sup 2}). To optimize for these criteria, the electro-thermal behavior of the microhotplate was modeled using Thermal Analysis System (TAS). Predicted steady-state and transient behavior agree well with infrared (IR) microscope data and measured transient response for a low-stress silicon nitride thermal conductivity of k{sub n} = 6.4 x 10{sup {minus}2} W x (cm x {degree}C){sup {minus}1} and a convection coefficient of h{sub cv} = 3.5 x 10{sup {minus}3} W x (cm{sup 2} x {degree}C){sup {minus}1}. The magnitude of h{sub cv} is framed in the context of vacuum measurements and empirical data. Details and limitations of the IR measurement are discussed. Finally, the efficacy of methods for reducing thermal gradients in the microhotplate's active area is presented.

  5. Finite-element modeling of bones from CT data: sensitivity to geometry and material uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Fulvia; Martelli, Saulo; Reggiani, Barbara; Cristofolini, Luca; Viceconti, Marco

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze how the uncertainties in modelling the geometry and the material properties of a human bone affect the predictions of a finite-element model derived from computed tomography (CT) data. A sensitivity analysis, based on a Monte Carlo method, was performed using three femur models generated from in vivo CT datasets, each subjected to two different loading conditions. The geometry, the density and the mechanical properties of the bone tissue were considered as random input variables. Finite-element results typically used in biomechanics research were considered as statistical output variables, and their sensitivity to the inputs variability assessed. The results showed that it is not possible to define a priori the influence of the errors related to the geometry definition process and to the material assignment process on the finite-element analysis results. The errors in the geometric representation of the bone are always the dominant variables for the stresses, as was expected. However, for all the variables, the results seemed to be dependent on the loading condition and to vary from subject to subject. The most interesting result is, however, that using the proposed method to build a finite-element model of a femur from a CT dataset of the quality typically achievable in the clinical practice, the coefficients of variation of the output variables never exceed the 9%. The presented method is hence robust enough to be used for investigating the mechanical behavior of bones with subject-specific finite-element models derived from CT data taken in vivo.

  6. A progress report on estuary modeling by the finite-element method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, William G.

    1978-01-01

    Various schemes are investigated for finite-element modeling of two-dimensional surface-water flows. The first schemes investigated combine finite-element spatial discretization with split-step time stepping schemes that have been found useful in finite-difference computations. Because of the large number of numerical integrations performed in space and the large sparse matrices solved, these finite-element schemes were found to be economically uncompetitive with finite-difference schemes. A very promising leapfrog scheme is proposed which, when combined with a novel very fast spatial integration procedure, eliminates the need to solve any matrices at all. Additional problems attacked included proper propagation of waves and proper specification of the normal flow-boundary condition. This report indicates work in progress and does not come to a definitive conclusion as to the best approach for finite-element modeling of surface-water problems. The results presented represent findings obtained between September 1973 and July 1976. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Improved Finite Element Modeling of the Turbofan Engine Inlet Radiation Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Indranil Danda; Eversman, Walter; Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    Improvements have been made in the finite element model of the acoustic radiated field from a turbofan engine inlet in the presence of a mean flow. The problem of acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet is difficult to model numerically because of the large domain and high frequencies involved. A numerical model with conventional finite elements in the near field and wave envelope elements in the far field has been constructed. By employing an irrotational mean flow assumption, both the mean flow and the acoustic perturbation problem have been posed in an axisymmetric formulation in terms of the velocity potential; thereby minimizing computer storage and time requirements. The finite element mesh has been altered in search of an improved solution. The mean flow problem has been reformulated with new boundary conditions to make it theoretically rigorous. The sound source at the fan face has been modeled as a combination of positive and negative propagating duct eigenfunctions. Therefore, a finite element duct eigenvalue problem has been solved on the fan face and the resulting modal matrix has been used to implement a source boundary condition on the fan face in the acoustic radiation problem. In the post processing of the solution, the acoustic pressure has been evaluated at Gauss points inside the elements and the nodal pressure values have been interpolated from them. This has significantly improved the results. The effect of the geometric position of the transition circle between conventional finite elements and wave envelope elements has been studied and it has been found that the transition can be made nearer to the inlet than previously assumed.

  8. Establishment of a three-dimensional finite element model of severe kyphotic deformity secondary to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Li, Hui; Ma, Junyi; Ma, Yong; Ma, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To establish a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) kyphosis that is a digital platform for further studies. Methods A 30-year-old man with AS kyphosis underwent computed tomography transverse scanning from T1 to the sacrococcyx. The images were imported into Mimics® 17.0 software to establish a 3D model of the posterior spine, which was then imported into Studio Geomagic 2013 software. Posterior spine convex geometry was established on the 3D geometric model for subsequent optimization of image processing. Unigraphics NX 8.5 produced the spinal kyphosis surface model. Modeled calcification of ligaments and partial resection of useless sacral bone were added. The model was imported into ANSYS 15.0 FE analysis software. Ligaments were added. Parameters were set to generate a 3D FE model of AS. Results and Conclusion A 3D FE model of AS was successfully established, providing a reliable digital platform for subsequent biomechanical analysis.

  9. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system.

  10. Dynamic Modelling of Tooth Deformation Using Occlusal Kinematics and Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh Nhu; Kullmer, Ottmar; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2016-01-01

    Background Dental biomechanics based on finite element (FE) analysis is attracting enormous interest in dentistry, biology, anthropology and palaeontology. Nonetheless, several shortcomings in FE modeling exist, mainly due to unrealistic loading conditions. In this contribution we used kinematics information recorded in a virtual environment derived from occlusal contact detection between high resolution models of an upper and lower human first molar pair (M1 and M1, respectively) to run a non-linear dynamic FE crash colliding test. Methodology MicroCT image data of a modern human skull were segmented to reconstruct digital models of the antagonistic right M1 and M1 and the dental supporting structures. We used the Occlusal Fingerprint Analyser software to reconstruct the individual occlusal pathway trajectory during the power stroke of the chewing cycle, which was applied in a FE simulation to guide the M1 3D-path for the crash colliding test. Results FE analysis results showed that the stress pattern changes considerably during the power stroke, demonstrating that knowledge about chewing kinematics in conjunction with a morphologically detailed FE model is crucial for understanding tooth form and function under physiological conditions. Conclusions/Significance Results from such advanced dynamic approaches will be applicable to evaluate and avoid mechanical failure in prosthodontics/endodontic treatments, and to test material behavior for modern tooth restoration in dentistry. This approach will also allow us to improve our knowledge in chewing-related biomechanics for functional diagnosis and therapy, and it will help paleoanthropologists to illuminate dental adaptive processes and morphological modifications in human evolution. PMID:27031836

  11. Cochlear Pharmacokinetics with Local Inner Ear Drug Delivery Using a Three-Dimensional Finite-Element Computer Model

    PubMed Central

    Plontke, Stefan K.; Siedow, Norbert; Wegener, Raimund; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Salt, Alec N.

    2006-01-01

    Hypothesis: Cochlear fluid pharmacokinetics can be better represented by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element simulations of drug dispersal. Background: Local drug deliveries to the round window membrane are increasingly being used to treat inner ear disorders. Crucial to the development of safe therapies is knowledge of drug distribution in the inner ear with different delivery methods. Computer simulations allow application protocols and drug delivery systems to be evaluated, and may permit animal studies to be extrapolated to the larger cochlea of the human. Methods: A finite-element 3D model of the cochlea was constructed based on geometric dimensions of the guinea pig cochlea. Drug propagation along and between compartments was described by passive diffusion. To demonstrate the potential value of the model, methylprednisolone distribution in the cochlea was calculated for two clinically relevant application protocols using pharmacokinetic parameters derived from a prior one-dimensional (1D) model. In addition, a simplified geometry was used to compare results from 3D with 1D simulations. Results: For the simplified geometry, calculated concentration profiles with distance were in excellent agreement between the 1D and the 3D models. Different drug delivery strategies produce very different concentration time courses, peak concentrations and basal-apical concentration gradients of drug. In addition, 3D computations demonstrate the existence of substantial gradients across the scalae in the basal turn. Conclusion: The 3D model clearly shows the presence of drug gradients across the basal scalae of guinea pigs, demonstrating the necessity of a 3D approach to predict drug movements across and between scalae with larger cross-sectional areas, such as the human, with accuracy. This is the first model to incorporate the volume of the spiral ligament and to calculate diffusion through this structure. Further development of the 3D model will have to incorporate a more

  12. Finite element analysis and modeling of water absorption by date pits during a soaking process.

    PubMed

    Waezi-Zadeh, Motahareh; Ghazanfari, Ahmad; Noorbakhsh, Shahin

    2010-07-01

    Date pits for feed preparation or oil extraction are soaked in water to soften before milling or extrusion. Knowledge of water absorption by the date pits helps in better managing the soaking duration. In this research, the process of water absorption by date pits was modeled and analyzed using Fick's second law of diffusion, finite element approach, and Peleg model. The moisture content of the pits reached to its saturation level of 41.5% (wet basis) after 10 d. The estimated coefficient of diffusion was 9.89x10(-12) m(2)/s. The finite element model with a proposed ellipsoid geometry for a single date pit and the analytical model fitted better to the experimental data with R(2) of 0.98. The former model slightly overestimated the moisture content of the pits during the initial stages of the soaking and the latter model generally underestimated this variable through the entire stages of soaking process.

  13. A Strategy for Integrating a Large Finite Element Model: X-33 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGhee, David S.

    2000-01-01

    The X-33 vehicle is an advanced technology demonstrator sponsored by NASA. For the past three years the Structural Dynamics & Loads Group of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has had the task of integrating the X-33 vehicle structural finite element model. In that time, five versions of the integrated vehicle model have been produced and a strategy has evolved that would benefit anyone given the task of integrating structural finite element models that have been generated by various modelers and companies. The strategy that has been presented here consists of six decisions that need to be made. These six decisions are: purpose of model, units, common material list, model numbering, interface control, and archive format. This strategy has been proved and expanded from experience on the X-33 vehicle.

  14. Bayesian model selection for a finite element model of a large civil aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, F. M.; Rutherford, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Nine aircraft stiffness parameters have been varied and used as inputs to a finite element model of an aircraft to generate natural frequency and deflection features (Goge, 2003). This data set (147 input parameter configurations and associated outputs) is now used to generate a metamodel, or a fast running surrogate model, using Bayesian model selection methods. Once a forward relationship is defined, the metamodel may be used in an inverse sense. That is, knowing the measured output frequencies and deflections, what were the input stiffness parameters that caused them?

  15. AQUIFEM-SALT; a finite-element model for aquifers containing a seawater interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, C.I.

    1984-01-01

    Described are modifications to AQUIFEM, a finite element areal ground-water flow model for aquifer evaluation. The modified model, AQUIFEM-SALT, simulates an aquifer containing a freshwater body that freely floats on seawater. Parts of the freshwater lens may be confined above and below by less permeable units. Theory, code modifications, and model verification are discussed. A modified input data list is included. This report is intended as a companion to the original AQUIFEM documentation. (USGS)

  16. A Finite-Element Model for Evaluation of Middle Ear Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    function. The computer model will be used for implant design. Keywords- Ossicular chain, finite element modeling, middle ear I. INTRODUCTION Defects...sound pressure level (SPL) was uniformly applied across the surface of the eardrum. The cochlear load was not modeled. III. RESULTS A. Displacement...ligamental attachments and the cochlear load. Eardrum displacement is found to be higher than stapes displacement, as expected. The simulated stapes

  17. Plan, formulate, and discuss a NASTRAN finite element model of the AH-64A helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christ, Richard A.; Ferg, Douglas A.; Kilroy, Kevin A.; Toossi, Mostafa; Weisenburger, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of modeling plan objectives, followed by a description of the AH-64A aircraft including all general features, major components, and primary and structure definitions are presented. Following the aircraft description, a discussion of the modeling guidelines and model checkout procedure are provided. The NASTRAN finite element analysis is set up to be suitable to predict both static internal loads and vibrations. Finally, the results, schedule, and planned versus actual manhours for this work are presented.

  18. A comparison of two finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics using a North Sea data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Werner, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    Using the region of the English Channel and the southern bight of the North Sea, we systematically compare the results of two independent finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics. The model intercomparison provides a means for increasing our understanding of the relevant physical processes in the region in question as well as a means for the evaluation of certain algorithmic procedures of the two models. ?? 1989.

  19. Finite element modelling of non-linear magnetic circuits using Cosmic NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    The general purpose Finite Element Program COSMIC NASTRAN currently has the ability to model magnetic circuits with constant permeablilities. An approach was developed which, through small modifications to the program, allows modelling of non-linear magnetic devices including soft magnetic materials, permanent magnets and coils. Use of the NASTRAN code resulted in output which can be used for subsequent mechanical analysis using a variation of the same computer model. Test problems were found to produce theoretically verifiable results.

  20. Equivalent Continuum Finite Element Modelling of Plate-Like Space Lattice Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    regulation cost of the structure as a function of the structural design parameters. A micropolar plate continuum model of large plate-like repetitive space...lattice structures with rigid joints is derived. A plate finite element is derived based on this continuum model with micropolar rotations and transverse...by rigid joints which makes use of the higher order micropolar beam continuum formulation. 8 Detailed Models For this research the baseline against

  1. Material Models and Properties in the Finite Element Analysis of Knee Ligaments: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Galbusera, Fabio; Freutel, Maren; Dürselen, Lutz; D’Aiuto, Marta; Croce, Davide; Villa, Tomaso; Sansone, Valerio; Innocenti, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Knee ligaments are elastic bands of soft tissue with a complex microstructure and biomechanics, which are critical to determine the kinematics as well as the stress bearing behavior of the knee joint. Their correct implementation in terms of material models and properties is therefore necessary in the development of finite element models of the knee, which has been performed for decades for the investigation of both its basic biomechanics and the development of replacement implants and repair strategies for degenerative and traumatic pathologies. Indeed, a wide range of element types and material models has been used to represent knee ligaments, ranging from elastic unidimensional elements to complex hyperelastic three-dimensional structures with anatomically realistic shapes. This paper systematically reviews literature studies, which described finite element models of the knee, and summarizes the approaches, which have been used to model the ligaments highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:25478560

  2. Frequency-dependent damping model for the hydroacoustic finite element analysis of fluid-filled pipes with diameter changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Jan; Koreck, Jürgen; Maess, Matthias; Gaul, Lothar; von Estorff, Otto

    2011-04-01

    The integration of a model for longitudinal hydroacoustic fluid damping in thin hydraulic pipes in 3D finite element models is presented in this paper. In order to perform quantitative prediction of the vibroacoustic behavior and resulting noise levels of such fluid-structure coupled system due to hydraulic excitation, an accurate frequency-dependent fluid damping model including friction effects near the pipe wall is required. This step is achieved by matching complex wave numbers from analytical derivation into a parameterized damped wave equation and consecutive translation into finite element modeling. Since the friction effect close to the pipe wall changes locally with the inner pipe radius, the fluid damping model is applied segment-wise in order to model the influence of cross-sectional discontinuity, such as orifices, on the oscillating pressure pulsations. A component synthesis approach, which uses pipe segments as substructures, allows a simple model generation and fast computation times. The numerical harmonic results are compared to experimental frequency response functions, which are performed on a hydraulic test bench driven by a dynamic pressure source in the kHz-range.

  3. Finite Element Model for Failure Study of Two-Dimensional Triaxially Braided Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuetao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    A new three-dimensional finite element model of two-dimensional triaxially braided composites is presented in this paper. This meso-scale modeling technique is used to examine and predict the deformation and damage observed in tests of straight sided specimens. A unit cell based approach is used to take into account the braiding architecture as well as the mechanical properties of the fiber tows, the matrix and the fiber tow-matrix interface. A 0 deg / plus or minus 60 deg. braiding configuration has been investigated by conducting static finite element analyses. Failure initiation and progressive degradation has been simulated in the fiber tows by use of the Hashin failure criteria and a damage evolution law. The fiber tow-matrix interface was modeled by using a cohesive zone approach to capture any fiber-matrix debonding. By comparing the analytical results to those obtained experimentally, the applicability of the developed model was assessed and the failure process was investigated.

  4. Planning, creating and documenting a NASTRAN finite element model of a modern helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabal, R.; Reed, D.; Ricks, R.; Kesack, W.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical models based on the finite element method of structural analysis as embodied in the NASTRAN computer code are widely used by the helicopter industry to calculate static internal loads and vibration of airframe structure. The internal loads are routinely used for sizing structural members. The vibration predictions are not yet relied on during design. NASA's Langley Research Center sponsored a program to conduct an application of the finite element method with emphasis on predicting structural vibration. The Army/Boeing CH-47D helicopter was used as the modeling subject. The objective was to engender the needed trust in vibration predictions using these models and establish a body of modeling guides which would enable confident future prediction of airframe vibration as part of the regular design process.

  5. Planning, creating and documenting a NASTRAN finite element model of a modern-helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, R.; Reed, D.; Ricks, R.; Kesack, W.

    1984-01-01

    Mathematical models based on the finite element method of structural analysis as embodied in the NASTRAN computer code are widely used by the helicopter industry to calculate static internal loads and vibration of airframe structure. The internal loads are routinely used for sizing structural members. The vibration predictions are not yet relied on during design. NASA's Langley Research Center sponsored a program to conduct an application of the finite element method with emphasis on predicting structural vibration. The Army/Boeing CH-47D helicopter was used as the modeling subject. The objective was used to engender the needed trust in vibration predictions using these models and establish a body of modeling guides which would enable confident future prediction of airframe vibration as part of the regular design process.

  6. Coupled multiphysics finite element model and experimental testing of a thermo-magnetically triggered piezoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon-Hernandez, Adrian; Basrour, Skandar

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with the coupled multiphysics finite element modeling and the experimental testing of a thermo-magnetically triggered piezoelectric generator. The model presented here, which has been developed in ANSYS software and experimentally validated, promotes a better understanding of the dynamic behavior of proposed generator. Special attention was put into the coupled multiphysics interactions, for instance, the thermal-dependent demagnetization of soft magnetic material, the piezoelectric transduction and the output power. In order to characterize the power generator, many finite element simulations were conducted, included modal and transient analysis. To verify the effectiveness of the model, a prototype was built and tested. The findings thus obtained were compared with simulation results. Obtained results describe for the first time a fully coupled model of an innovative approach for thermomagnetic energy harvesting. Moreover, the total volume of our harvester (length × width × height: 20 × 4 × 2 mm) is 85 times lower than that of previous experimental harvester.

  7. Finite element modeling of mitral leaflet tissue using a layered shell approximation

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Guccione, Julius M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study presents a finite element model of mitral leaflet tissue, which incorporates the anisotropic material response and approximates the layered structure. First, continuum mechanics and the theory of layered composites are used to develop an analytical representation of membrane stress in the leaflet material. This is done with an existing anisotropic constitutive law from literature. Then, the concept is implemented in a finite element (FE) model by overlapping and merging two layers of transversely isotropic membrane elements in LS-DYNA, which homogenizes the response. The FE model is then used to simulate various biaxial extension tests and out-of-plane pressure loading. Both the analytical and FE model show good agreement with experimental biaxial extension data, and show good mutual agreement. This confirms that the layered composite approximation presented in the current study is able to capture the exponential stiffening seen in both the circumferential and radial directions of mitral leaflets. PMID:22971896

  8. A Computational Framework to Model Degradation of Biocorrodible Metal Stents Using an Implicit Finite Element Solver.

    PubMed

    Debusschere, Nic; Segers, Patrick; Dubruel, Peter; Verhegghe, Benedict; De Beule, Matthieu

    2016-02-01

    Bioresorbable stents represent an emerging technological development within the field of cardiovascular angioplasty. Their temporary presence avoids long-term side effects of non-degradable stents such as in-stent restenosis, late stent thrombosis and fatigue induced strut fracture. Several numerical modelling strategies have been proposed to evaluate the transitional mechanical characteristics of biodegradable stents using a continuum damage framework. However, these methods rely on an explicit finite-element integration scheme which, in combination with the quasi-static nature of many simulations involving stents and the small element size needed to model corrosion mechanisms, results in a high computational cost. To reduce the simulation times and to expand the general applicability of these degradation models, this paper investigates an implicit finite element solution method to model degradation of biodegradable stents.

  9. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  10. Elastic-Plastic J-Integral Solutions or Surface Cracks in Tension Using an Interpolation Methodology. Appendix C -- Finite Element Models Solution Database File, Appendix D -- Benchmark Finite Element Models Solution Database File

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wells, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    No closed form solutions exist for the elastic-plastic J-integral for surface cracks due to the nonlinear, three-dimensional nature of the problem. Traditionally, each surface crack must be analyzed with a unique and time-consuming nonlinear finite element analysis. To overcome this shortcoming, the authors have developed and analyzed an array of 600 3D nonlinear finite element models for surface cracks in flat plates under tension loading. The solution space covers a wide range of crack shapes and depths (shape: 0.2 less than or equal to a/c less than or equal to 1, depth: 0.2 less than or equal to a/B less than or equal to 0.8) and material flow properties (elastic modulus-to-yield ratio: 100 less than or equal to E/ys less than or equal to 1,000, and hardening: 3 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 20). The authors have developed a methodology for interpolating between the goemetric and material property variables that allows the user to reliably evaluate the full elastic-plastic J-integral and force versus crack mouth opening displacement solution; thus, a solution can be obtained very rapidly by users without elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modeling experience. Complete solutions for the 600 models and 25 additional benchmark models are provided in tabular format.

  11. Development and applications of two finite element groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: FEWA and FEMA

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Wong, K.V.; Craig, P.M.; Davis, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the construction, verification, and application of two groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: A Finite Element Model of Water Flow through Aquifers (FEWA) and A Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The construction is based on the finite element approximation of partial differential equations of groundwater flow (FEWA) and of solute movement (FEMA). The particular features of FEWA and FEMA are their versatility and flexibility for dealing with nearly all vertically integrated two-dimensional problems. The models were verified against both analytical solutions and widely used US Geological Survey finite difference approximations. They were then applied for calibration and validation, using data obtained in experiments at the Engineering Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results indicated that the models are valid for this specific site. To demonstrate the versatility anf flexibility of the models, they were applied to two hypothetical, but realistic, complex problems and three field sites across the United States. In these applications the models yielded good agreement with the field data for all three sites. Finally, the predictive capabilities of the models were demonstrated using data obtained at the Hialeah Preston site in Florida. This case illustrates the capability of FEWA and FEMA as predictive tools and their usefulness in the management of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. 25 refs.

  12. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  13. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the aerostructures test wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  14. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  15. Finite element structural model of a large, thin, completely free, flat plate. [for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element structural model of a 30.48 m x 30.48 m x 2.54 mm completely free aluminum plate is described and modal frequencies and mode shape data for the first 44 modes are presented. An explanation of the procedure for using the data is also presented. The model should prove useful for the investigation of controller design approaches for large flexible space structures.

  16. A Monte Carlo-finite element model for strain energy controlled microstructural evolution - 'Rafting' in superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a specialized microstructural lattice model, MCFET (Monte Carlo finite element technique), which simulates microstructural evolution in materials in which strain energy has an important role in determining morphology. The model is capable of accounting for externally applied stress, surface tension, misfit, elastic inhomogeneity, elastic anisotropy, and arbitrary temperatures. The MCFET analysis was found to compare well with the results of analytical calculations of the equilibrium morphologies of isolated particles in an infinite matrix.

  17. Optimizing for minimum weight when two different finite element models and analyses are required

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.

    1989-01-01

    The Finite Element Structural Optimization Program's (FESOP) ability to perform minimum weight optimization using two different finite element analyses and models is discussed. FESOP uses the ADS optimizer developed by Dr. Garret Vanderplaats to solve the nonlinear constrained optimization problem. The design optimization problem requires a response spectrum analysis and model to evaluate the stress and displacement constraints. However, the problem needs a frequency analysis and model to calculate the natural frequencies used to evaluate the frequency range constraints. The results of both the successful and unsuccessful approaches used to solve this difficult weight minimization problem are summarized. The results show that no one ADS optimization algorithm worked in all cases. However, the Sequential Convex Programming and Modified Method of Feasible Directions algorithms were the most successful.

  18. 2-D magnetotelluric modeling using finite element method incorporating unstructured quadrilateral elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakorn, Weerachai

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the finite element (FE) method incorporating quadrilateral elements for solving 2-D MT modeling was presented. The finite element software was developed, employing a paving algorithm to generate the unstructured quadrilateral mesh. The accuracy, efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of our FE forward modeling are presented, compared and discussed. The numerical results indicate that our FE codes using an unstructured quadrilateral mesh provide good accuracy when the local mesh refinement is applied around sites and in the area of interest, with superior results when compared to other FE methods. The reliability of the developed codes was also confirmed when comparing both analytical solutions and COMMEMI2D model. Furthermore, our developed FE codes incorporating an unstructured quadrilateral mesh showed useful and powerful features such as handling irregular and complex subregions and providing local refinement of the mesh for a 2-D domain as closely as unstructured triangular mesh but it requires less number of elements in a mesh.

  19. A novel arterial constitutive model in a commercial finite element package: Application to balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2011-10-07

    Recently, a novel linearized constitutive model with a new strain measure that absorbs the material nonlinearity was validated for arteries. In this study, the linearized arterial stress-strain relationship is implemented into a finite element method package, ANSYS, via the user subroutine USERMAT. The reference configuration is chosen to be the closed cylindrical tube (no-load state) rather than the open sector (zero-stress state). The residual strain is taken into account by analytic calculation and the incompressibility condition is enforced with Lagrange penalty method. Axisymmetric finite element analyses are conducted to demonstrate potential applications of this approach in a complex boundary value problem where angioplasty balloon interacts with the vessel wall. The model predictions of transmural circumferential and compressive radial stress distributions were also validated against an exponential-type Fung model, and the mean error was found to be within 6%.

  20. Analysis of Uncertainty and Variability in Finite Element Computational Models for Biomedical Engineering: Characterization and Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Mangado, Nerea; Piella, Gemma; Noailly, Jérôme; Pons-Prats, Jordi; Ballester, Miguel Ángel González

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling has become a powerful tool in biomedical engineering thanks to its potential to simulate coupled systems. However, real parameters are usually not accurately known, and variability is inherent in living organisms. To cope with this, probabilistic tools, statistical analysis and stochastic approaches have been used. This article aims to review the analysis of uncertainty and variability in the context of finite element modeling in biomedical engineering. Characterization techniques and propagation methods are presented, as well as examples of their applications in biomedical finite element simulations. Uncertainty propagation methods, both non-intrusive and intrusive, are described. Finally, pros and cons of the different approaches and their use in the scientific community are presented. This leads us to identify future directions for research and methodological development of uncertainty modeling in biomedical engineering. PMID:27872840

  1. Analysis of Uncertainty and Variability in Finite Element Computational Models for Biomedical Engineering: Characterization and Propagation.

    PubMed

    Mangado, Nerea; Piella, Gemma; Noailly, Jérôme; Pons-Prats, Jordi; Ballester, Miguel Ángel González

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling has become a powerful tool in biomedical engineering thanks to its potential to simulate coupled systems. However, real parameters are usually not accurately known, and variability is inherent in living organisms. To cope with this, probabilistic tools, statistical analysis and stochastic approaches have been used. This article aims to review the analysis of uncertainty and variability in the context of finite element modeling in biomedical engineering. Characterization techniques and propagation methods are presented, as well as examples of their applications in biomedical finite element simulations. Uncertainty propagation methods, both non-intrusive and intrusive, are described. Finally, pros and cons of the different approaches and their use in the scientific community are presented. This leads us to identify future directions for research and methodological development of uncertainty modeling in biomedical engineering.

  2. Numerical implementation of energy-based models in finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattonjai, Piyachat

    2016-06-01

    Soil is one of the most complex materials including several characteristics which are not only effect on stress-strain relationship but also volume changed such as contraction and dilation. Those characteristics depend on so many factors such as stress history, drained condition, current effective stress state, stress paths as well as void ratio, etc. In finite element analysis, the relevant constitutive model which includes relevant factors as mentioned above is one of the main key that will provide the accurate predicting of strength and deformation characteristic of geotechnical structure. For modern finite element program, the user-defined material subroutines have been provided when the material models included in the material library could not accurately predict the rather complex behavior of material. The objective of this study is to implement the elasto-plastic work-hardening-softening constitutive model into ABAQUS via VUMAT subroutine. The simulated results were verified by the experimental results of Toyoura sand under plane strain condition.

  3. An assessment of finite-element modeling techniques for thick-solid/thin-shell joints analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    The subject of finite-element modeling has long been of critical importance to the practicing designer/analyst who is often faced with obtaining an accurate and cost-effective structural analysis of a particular design. Typically, these two goals are in conflict. The purpose is to discuss the topic of finite-element modeling for solid/shell connections (joints) which are significant for the practicing modeler. Several approaches are currently in use, but frequently various assumptions restrict their use. Such techniques currently used in practical applications were tested, especially to see which technique is the most ideally suited for the computer aided design (CAD) environment. Some basic thoughts regarding each technique are also discussed. As a consequence, some suggestions based on the results are given to lead reliable results in geometrically complex joints where the deformation and stress behavior are complicated.

  4. Finite element modelling of the foot for clinical application: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Behforootan, Sara; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis; Naemi, Roozbeh; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2017-01-01

    Over the last two decades finite element modelling has been widely used to give new insight on foot and footwear biomechanics. However its actual contribution for the improvement of the therapeutic outcome of different pathological conditions of the foot, such as the diabetic foot, remains relatively limited. This is mainly because finite element modelling has only been used within the research domain. Clinically applicable finite element modelling can open the way for novel diagnostic techniques and novel methods for treatment planning/optimisation which would significantly enhance clinical practice. In this context this review aims to provide an overview of modelling techniques in the field of foot and footwear biomechanics and to investigate their applicability in a clinical setting. Even though no integrated modelling system exists that could be directly used in the clinic and considerable progress is still required, current literature includes a comprehensive toolbox for future work towards clinically applicable finite element modelling. The key challenges include collecting the information that is needed for geometry design, the assignment of material properties and loading on a patient-specific basis and in a cost-effective and non-invasive way. The ultimate challenge for the implementation of any computational system into clinical practice is to ensure that it can produce reliable results for any person that belongs in the population for which it was developed. Consequently this highlights the need for thorough and extensive validation of each individual step of the modelling process as well as for the overall validation of the final integrated system.

  5. Subject specific finite element modeling of periprosthetic femoral fracture using element deactivation to simulate bone failure.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Shi, Angela; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology could predict peri-prosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) for cementless hip arthoplasty in the early postoperative period. This study develops methodology for subject-specific finite element modeling by using the element deactivation technique to simulate bone failure and validate with experimental testing, thereby predicting peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in the early postoperative period. Material assignments for biphasic and triphasic models were undertaken. Failure modeling with the element deactivation feature available in ABAQUS 6.9 was used to simulate a crack initiation and propagation in the bony tissue based upon a threshold of fracture strain. The crack mode for the biphasic models was very similar to the experimental testing crack mode, with a similar shape and path of the crack. The fracture load is sensitive to the friction coefficient at the implant-bony interface. The development of a novel technique to simulate bone failure by element deactivation of subject-specific finite element models could aid prediction of fracture load in addition to fracture risk characterization for PFF.

  6. [Valid constructing method of three-dimensional finite element human foot model and experimental analysis on its rationality].

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenxin; Yang, Yunfeng; Yu, Guangrong; Ding, Zuquan

    2009-02-01

    To provide a digital simulation platform for foot-ankle biomechanics research, a 3-D finite element model was established through helical CT images under the principle of RE (reverse engineering) and meshed in FEM software. In the process of modeling cartilage, ligaments, tendons and plantar soft tissue, many anatomic data and results of cadaver specimen experiment were referenced; LINE elements and SHELL elements were used skillfully to simplify the model and resemble the physiological state. The model was then validated by specimen experimentation, which was done on seven fresh cadaver foot specimens, and digital speckle correlation method (DSCM) was used to measure their displacements. Upon the comparison with experimentation and others models, this study also testified that the model, of which the plantar fascia is linked to the heads of metatarsus, is more reasonable to clinical application.

  7. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  8. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  9. Validation of scaffold design optimization in bone tissue engineering: finite element modeling versus designed experiments.

    PubMed

    Uth, Nicholas; Mueller, Jens; Smucker, Byran; Yousefi, Azizeh-Mitra

    2017-02-21

    This study reports the development of biological/synthetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering (TE) via 3D bioplotting. These scaffolds were composed of poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), type I collagen, and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) in an attempt to mimic the extracellular matrix of bone. The solvent used for processing the scaffolds was 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol. The produced scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, microcomputed tomography, thermogravimetric analysis, and unconfined compression test. This study also sought to validate the use of finite-element optimization in COMSOL Multiphysics for scaffold design. Scaffold topology was simplified to three factors: nHA content, strand diameter, and strand spacing. These factors affect the ability of the scaffold to bear mechanical loads and how porous the structure can be. Twenty four scaffolds were constructed according to an I-optimal, split-plot designed experiment (DE) in order to generate experimental models of the factor-response relationships. Within the design region, the DE and COMSOL models agreed in their recommended optimal nHA (30%) and strand diameter (460 μm). However, the two methods disagreed by more than 30% in strand spacing (908 μm for DE; 601 μm for COMSOL). Seven scaffolds were 3D-bioplotted to validate the predictions of DE and COMSOL models (4.5-9.9 MPa measured moduli). The predictions for these scaffolds showed relative agreement for scaffold porosity (mean absolute percentage error of 4% for DE and 13% for COMSOL), but were substantially poorer for scaffold modulus (51% for DE; 21% for COMSOL), partly due to some simplifying assumptions made by the models. Expanding the design region in future experiments (e.g., higher nHA content and strand diameter), developing an efficient solvent evaporation method, and exerting a greater control over layer overlap could allow developing PLGA-nHA-collagen scaffolds to meet the mechanical requirements for

  10. Sensitivity and ex vivo validation of finite element models of the domestic pig cranium

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2011-01-01

    A finite element (FE) validation and sensitivity study was undertaken on a modern domestic pig cranium. Bone strain data were collected ex vivo from strain gauges, and compared with results from specimen-specific FE models. An isotropic, homogeneous model was created, then input parameters were altered to investigate model sensitivity. Heterogeneous, isotropic models investigated the effects of a constant-thickness, stiffer outer layer (representing cortical bone) atop a more compliant interior (representing cancellous bone). Loading direction and placement of strain gauges were also varied, and the use of 2D membrane elements at strain gauge locations as a method of projecting 3D model strains into the plane of the gauge was investigated. The models correctly estimate the loading conditions of the experiment, yet at some locations fail to reproduce correct principal strain magnitudes, and hence strain ratios. Principal strain orientations are predicted well. The initial model was too stiff by approximately an order of magnitude. Introducing a compliant interior reported strain magnitudes more similar to the ex vivo results without notably affecting strain orientations, ratios or contour patterns, suggesting that this simple heterogeneity was the equivalent of reducing the overall stiffness of the model. Models were generally insensitive to moderate changes in loading direction or strain gauge placement, except in the squamosal portion of the zygomatic arch. The use of membrane elements made negligible differences to the reported strains. The models therefore seem most sensitive to changes in material properties, and suggest that failure to model local heterogeneity in material properties and structure of the bone may be responsible for discrepancies between the experimental and model results. This is partially attributable to a lack of resolution in the CT scans from which the model was built, and partially due to an absence of detailed material properties data

  11. Development and Validation of Statistical Models of Femur Geometry for Use with Parametric Finite Element Models.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katelyn F; Hu, Jingwen; Reed, Matthew P; Hoff, Carrie N; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2015-10-01

    Statistical models were developed that predict male and female femur geometry as functions of age, body mass index (BMI), and femur length as part of an effort to develop lower-extremity finite element models with geometries that are parametric with subject characteristics. The process for developing these models involved extracting femur geometry from clinical CT scans of 62 men and 36 women, fitting a template finite element femur mesh to the surface geometry of each patient, and then programmatically determining thickness at each nodal location. Principal component analysis was then performed on the thickness and geometry nodal coordinates, and linear regression models were developed to predict principal component scores as functions of age, BMI, and femur length. The average absolute errors in male and female external surface geometry model predictions were 4.57 and 4.23 mm, and the average absolute errors in male and female thickness model predictions were 1.67 and 1.74 mm. The average error in midshaft cortical bone areas between the predicted geometries and the patient geometries was 4.4%. The average error in cortical bone area between the predicted geometries and a validation set of cadaver femur geometries across 5 shaft locations was 2.9%.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Thermal Cycling Induced Microcracking in Carbon/Epoxy Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Morscher, Gregory; Martin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The microcrack distribution and mass change in PR520/T700s and 3502/T700s carbon/epoxy braided composites exposed to thermal cycling was evaluated experimentally. Acoustic emission was utilized to record the crack initiation and propagation under cyclic thermal loading between -55 C and 120 C. Transverse microcrack morphology was investigated using X-ray Computed Tomography. Different performance of two kinds of composites was discovered and analyzed. Based on the observations of microcrack formation, a meso-mechanical finite element model was developed to obtain the resultant mechanical properties. The simulation results exhibited a decrease in strength and stiffness with increasing crack density. Strength and stiffness reduction versus crack densities in different orientations were compared. The changes of global mechanical behavior in both axial and transverse loading conditions were studied. Keywords: Thermal cycles; Microcrack; Finite Element Model; Braided Composite

  13. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  14. A comparison of classical mechanics models and finite element simulation of elastically tailored wing boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Pickings, Richard D.; Chang, Stephen; Holl, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Structural tailoring concepts were developed to create wings with elastically produced camber for the purpose of increasing lift during takeoff conditions. Simple models based upon enhancements to the thin walled composite beam theory of Rehfield were developed to investigate prospects for elastic tailoring of the chordwise deformation of wing structures. The purpose here is to provide a comparison of the theoretical results with a finite element model for the bending method of producing camber. Finite element correlation studies were completed for two cases: a bonded unstiffened structural box, and a bolted unstiffened structural box. Results from these studies show an error of less than one percent for the bonded case and less than six percent for the bolted case in predicting camber curvature for the structural box. Examination of the results shows that the theory is very accurate for the cases studied and will provide an excellent basis for conducting further tailoring studies.

  15. Anisotropic Finite Element Modeling Based on a Harmonic Field for Patient-Specific Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wanqiu; Zou, Beiji

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. This study examined the influence of anisotropic material for human sclera. Method. First, the individual geometry of patient-specific sclera was reproduced from a laser scan. Then, high quality finite element modeling of individual sclera was performed using a convenient automatic hexahedral mesh generator based on harmonic field and integrated with anisotropic material assignment function. Finally, comparison experiments were designed to investigate the effects of anisotropy on finite element modeling of sclera biomechanics. Results. The experimental results show that the presented approach can generate high quality anisotropic hexahedral mesh for patient-specific sclera. Conclusion. The anisotropy shows significant differences for stresses and strain distribution and careful consideration should be given to its use in biomechanical FE studies. PMID:28271067

  16. User manual for ATILA, a finite-element code for modeling piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decarpigny, Jean-Noel; Debus, Jean-Claude

    1987-09-01

    This manual for the user of the finite-element code ATILA provides instruction for entering information and running the code on a VAX computer. The manual does not include the code. The finite element code ATILA has been specifically developed to aid the design of piezoelectric devices, mainly for sonar applications. Thus, it is able to perform the model analyses of both axisymmetrical and fully three-dimensional piezoelectric transducers. It can also provide their harmonic response under radiating conditions: nearfield and farfield pressure, transmitting voltage response, directivity pattern, electrical impedance, as well as displacement field, nodal plane positions, stress field and various stress criteria...Its accuracy and its ability to describe the physical behavior of various transducers (Tonpilz transducers, double headmass symmetrical length expanders, free flooded rings, flextensional transducers, bender bars, cylindrical and trilaminar hydrophones...) have been checked by modelling more than twenty different structures and comparing numerical and experimental results.

  17. Planetary gear modal vibration experiments and correlation against lumped-parameter and finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Tristan M.; Parker, Robert G.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental modal analysis techniques are applied to characterize the planar dynamic behavior of two spur planetary gears. Rotational and translational vibrations of the sun gear, carrier, and planet gears are measured. Experimentally obtained natural frequencies, mode shapes, and dynamic response are compared to the results from lumped-parameter and finite element models. Two qualitatively different classes of mode shapes in distinct frequency ranges are observed in the experiments and confirmed by the lumped-parameter model, which considers the accessory shafts and fixtures in the system to capture all of the natural frequencies and modes. The finite element model estimates the high-frequency modes that have significant tooth mesh deflection without considering the shafts and fixtures. The lumped-parameter and finite element models accurately predict the natural frequencies and modal properties established by experimentation. Rotational, translational, and planet mode types presented in published mathematical studies are confirmed experimentally. The number and types of modes in the low-frequency and high-frequency bands depend on the degrees of freedom in the central members and planet gears, respectively. The accuracy of natural frequency prediction is improved when the planet bearings have differing stiffnesses in the tangential and radial directions, consistent with the bearing load direction.

  18. A finite element formulation for modeling dynamic wetting on flexible substrates and in deformable porous media.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Cairncross, Richard A.; Madasu, S.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes research advances pursued with award funding issued by the DOE to Drexel University through the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) program. Professor Rich Cairncross was the recipient of this award in 1997. With it he pursued two related research topics under Sandia's guidance that address the outstanding issue of fluid-structural interactions of liquids with deformable solid materials, focusing mainly on the ubiquitous dynamic wetting problem. The project focus in the first four years was aimed at deriving a predictive numerical modeling approach for the motion of the dynamic contact line on a deformable substrate. A formulation of physical model equations was derived in the context of the Galerkin finite element method in an arbitrary Lagrangian/Eulerian (ALE) frame of reference. The formulation was successfully integrated in Sandia's Goma finite element code and tested on several technologically important thin-film coating problems. The model equations, the finite-element implementation, and results from several applications are given in this report. In the last year of the five-year project the same physical concepts were extended towards the problem of capillary imbibition in deformable porous media. A synopsis of this preliminary modeling and experimental effort is also discussed.