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Sample records for 3d finite-element model

  1. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  2. The Use of Direct Solver in Vector Finite Element Modeling for Calculating 3-D Magnetotelluric Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prihantoro, Rudy; Sutarno, Doddy; Nurhasan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we seek numerical solution of 3-D Magnetotelluric (MT) using edge- based finite element method. This approach is a variant of standard finite element method and commonly referred as vector finite-element (VFE) method. Nonphysical solutions usually occurred when the solution is sought using standard finite element which is a node based element. Vector finite element attempt to overcome those nonphysical solutions by using the edges of the element as vector basis. The proposed approach on solving second order Maxwell differential equation of 3-D MT is using direct solver rather than iterative method. Therefore, divergence correction to accelerate the rate of convergence for its iterative solution is no longer needed. The utilization of direct solver has been verified previously for correctness by comparing the resulting solution to those given by analytical solution, as well as the solution come from the other numerical methods, for earth layered model, 2-D models and COMMEMI 3D-2 model. In this work, further verification resulted from recent comparison model of Dublin Test Model 1 (DTM1) is presented.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Properties of 3D Four-directional Rectangular Braided Composites—Part 2: Validation of the 3D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dian-Sen; Fang, Dai-Ning; Lu, Zi-Xing; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Jiang, Nan

    2010-08-01

    In the first part of the work, we have established a new parameterized three-dimensional (3D) finite element model (FEM) which precisely simulated the spatial configuration of the braiding yarns and considered the cross-section deformation as well as the surface contact relationship between the yarns. This paper presents a prediction of the effective elastic properties and the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites to verify the validation of the FEM. The effects of the braiding parameters on the mechanical properties are investigated in detail. By analyzing the deformation and stress nephogram of the model, a reasonable overall stress field is provided and the results well support the strength prediction. The results indicate it is convenient to predict all the elastic constants of 3D braided composites with different parameters simultaneously using the FEM. Moreover, the FEM can successfully predict the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites containing periodical structures.

  4. 3D finite element model of RF heating: novel nonablative cutaneous therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Linda; Pope, Karl A.

    2003-06-01

    This study presents a finite element model of a non-ablative RF tissue heating system for dermatological applications. The Thermage ThermaCool TC System consists of a capacitively coupled treatment tip, handpiece, RF generator, and cryogen delivery system. Various electrode geometries were created to generate uniform thermal profiles at specific depths in the tissue. The optimal thermal treatment depth for a clinical indication is influenced by factors such as tissue thickness for a given anatomical location, the desired target for heating in that tissue, and anesthesia factors. Electrodes of ¼, 1, and 1½cm2 area were evaluated for depth of treatment. A 3D multi-physics finite element model was developed to simulate RF heating in tissue. The program coupled electrical and thermal models to predict the electric field produced and the consequent heating. The electrical portion of the model was verified using an electric field mapping system. The thermal section of the model was confirmed via thermocouple measurements for cooling and infrared imaging measurements for RF heating. The FEM model produced electrical and thermal predictions that were verified with experimental measurements. The finite element model shows significant potential as a predictive R&D tool to assist in RF electrode design and reduce product development time.

  5. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  6. Finite Element Analysis of 2.5D Woven Composites, Part I: Microstructure and 3D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jian; Wen, Weidong; Cui, Haitao; Zhang, Hongjian; Xu, Ying

    2016-02-01

    A new parameterized finite element model, called the Full-cell model, has been established based on the practical microstructure of 2.5D angle-interlock woven composites. This model considering the surface layer structure can predict the mechanical properties and estimate the structural performance such as the fiber volume fraction and inclination angle. According to introducing a set of periodic boundary condition, a reasonable overall stress field and periodic deformation are obtained. Furthermore, the model investigates the relationships among the woven parameters and elastic moduli, and shows the structural variation along with the corresponding woven parameters. Comparing the results calculated by FEM with the experiments, the veracity of calculation and reasonability based on the Full-cell model are confirmed. In the meantime, the predicted results based on the Full-cell model are more closed to the test results compared to those based on the Inner-cell model.

  7. Justification for a 2D versus 3D fingertip finite element model during static contact simulations.

    PubMed

    Harih, Gregor; Tada, Mitsunori; Dolšak, Bojan

    2016-10-01

    The biomechanical response of a human hand during contact with various products has not been investigated in details yet. It has been shown that excessive contact pressure on the soft tissue can result in discomfort, pain and also cumulative traumatic disorders. This manuscript explores the benefits and limitations of a simplified two-dimensional vs. an anatomically correct three-dimensional finite element model of a human fingertip. Most authors still use 2D FE fingertip models due to their simplicity and reduced computational costs. However we show that an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model can provide additional insight into the biomechanical behaviour. The use of 2D fingertip FE models is justified when observing peak contact pressure values as well as displacement during the contact for the given studied cross-section. On the other hand, an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model provides a contact pressure distribution, which reflects the fingertip's anatomy.

  8. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    This annual status report presents the results of work performed during the fourth year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes permitting more accurate and efficient 3-D analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of math models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. Volume 1 of this report discusses the special finite element models developed during the fourth year of the contract.

  9. Finite element modeling of a 3D coupled foot-boot model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, musculoskeletal models of the human body are used as powerful tools to study biological structures. The lower limb, and in particular the foot, is of interest because it is the primary physical interaction between the body and the environment during locomotion. The goal of this paper is to adopt the finite element (FE) modeling and analysis approaches to create a state-of-the-art 3D coupled foot-boot model for future studies on biomechanical investigation of stress injury mechanism, foot wear design and parachute landing fall simulation. In the modeling process, the foot-ankle model with lower leg was developed based on Computed Tomography (CT) images using ScanIP, Surfacer and ANSYS. Then, the boot was represented by assembling the FE models of upper, insole, midsole and outsole built based on the FE model of the foot-ankle, and finally the coupled foot-boot model was generated by putting together the models of the lower limb and boot. In this study, the FE model of foot and ankle was validated during balance standing. There was a good agreement in the overall patterns of predicted and measured plantar pressure distribution published in literature. The coupled foot-boot model will be fully validated in the subsequent works under both static and dynamic loading conditions for further studies on injuries investigation in military and sports, foot wear design and characteristics of parachute landing impact in military.

  10. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 describes effort performed under Task 4B, Special Finite Element Special Function Models, while Volume 2 concentrates on Task 4C, Advanced Special Functions Models.

  11. Parallel 3D Finite Element Numerical Modelling of DC Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Prudencio, E.; Candel, A.; Ge, L.; Kabel, A.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; /SLAC

    2008-02-04

    In this paper we present Gun3P, a parallel 3D finite element application that the Advanced Computations Department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is developing for the analysis of beam formation in DC guns and beam transport in klystrons. Gun3P is targeted specially to complex geometries that cannot be described by 2D models and cannot be easily handled by finite difference discretizations. Its parallel capability allows simulations with more accuracy and less processing time than packages currently available. We present simulation results for the L-band Sheet Beam Klystron DC gun, in which case Gun3P is able to reduce simulation time from days to some hours.

  12. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis.

  13. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis. PMID:26785845

  14. 3D finite element model of the diabetic neuropathic foot: a gait analysis driven approach.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-09-22

    Diabetic foot is an invalidating complication of diabetes that can lead to foot ulcers. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) allows characterizing the loads developed in the different anatomical structures of the foot in dynamic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a subject specific 3D foot FE model (FEM) of a diabetic neuropathic (DNS) and a healthy (HS) subject, whose subject specificity can be found in term of foot geometry and boundary conditions. Kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressure (PP) data were extracted from the gait analysis trials of the two subjects with this purpose. The FEM were developed segmenting bones, cartilage and skin from MRI and drawing a horizontal plate as ground support. Materials properties were adopted from previous literature. FE simulations were run with the kinematics and kinetics data of four different phases of the stance phase of gait (heel strike, loading response, midstance and push off). FEMs were then driven by group gait data of 10 neuropathic and 10 healthy subjects. Model validation focused on agreement between FEM-simulated and experimental PP. The peak values and the total distribution of the pressures were compared for this purpose. Results showed that the models were less robust when driven from group data and underestimated the PP in each foot subarea. In particular in the case of the neuropathic subject's model the mean errors between experimental and simulated data were around the 20% of the peak values. This knowledge is crucial in understanding the aetiology of diabetic foot.

  15. 3-d finite element model development for biomechanics: a software demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Ashby, E.

    1997-03-01

    Finite element analysis is becoming an increasingly important part of biomechanics and orthopedic research, as computational resources become more powerful, and data handling algorithms become more sophisticated. Until recently, tools with sufficient power did not exist or were not accessible to adequately model complicated, three-dimensional, nonlinear biomechanical systems. In the past, finite element analyses in biomechanics have often been limited to two-dimensional approaches, linear analyses, or simulations of single tissue types. Today, we have the resources to model fully three-dimensional, nonlinear, multi-tissue, and even multi-joint systems. The authors will present the process of developing these kinds of finite element models, using human hand and knee examples, and will demonstrate their software tools.

  16. A Multi-Compartment 3-D Finite Element Model of Rectocele and Its Interaction with Cystocele

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as POP-Q point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664

  17. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment.

  18. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664

  19. A 3D discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method for teleseismic modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    monteiller, vadim; Beller, Stephen; Nolet, Guust; Operto, Stephane; Virieux, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The massive development of dense seismic arrays and the rapide increase in computing capacity allow today to consider application of full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. We present an hybrid numerical method that allows for the modelling of short period telesismic waves in 3D lithospheric target with the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements method, opennig the possibility to perform waveform inversion of seismograms recorded by dense regional broadband arrays. In order to reduce the computational cost of the forward-problem, we developed a method that relies on multi-core parallel computing and computational-domain reduction. We defined two nested levels for parallelism based on MPI library, which are managed by two MPI communicators. Firstly, we use a domain partitionning strategy, assigning one subdomain to one cpu and, secondly we distribute telesismic sources on different copies of the partitioned domain. However, despite the supercomputer ability, the forward-problem remains expensive for telesismic configuration especially when 3D numerical methods are considered. In order to perform the forward problem in a reasonable amount of time, we reduce the computational domain in which full waveform modelling is performed. We defined a 3D regional domain located below the seismological network that is embeded in a background homogeneous or axisymetric model, in which the seismic wavefield can be computed efficiently. The background wavefield is used to compute the full wavefield in the 3D regional domain using the so-called total-field/scattered-field technique (Alterman & Karal (1968),Taflove & Hagness (2005)), which relies on the decomposition of the wavefield into a background and a scattered wavefields. The computational domain is subdivided intro three subdomains: an outer domain formed by the perfectly-mathed absorbing layers, an intermediate zone in which only the outgoing wavefield scattered by the

  20. A thermographic approach for surface crack depth evaluation through 3D finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basheer, Mohammed; PV, Nithin; Ravindran, Parag; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Laser Thermography has been reported earlier by several researchers as a tool for detecting surface breaking cracks in metals. A high energy laser (pulsed Nd-YAG) was used to produce a highly localized thermal spot from which heat diffuses (predominantly) in the radial direction. The crack that is perpendicular to the surface and close to this thermal spot will perturb the lateral heat flow and this disturbance can be observed by an IR camera. The laser spot is then scanned over a region to map the crack; this allows remote imaging of crack morphology even in elevated temperatures. The present study involves a 3D finite element simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics as a tool to simulate the thermal flow from a pulsed laser source in the proximity of a crack. The modeling helped to understand the various parameters affecting the thermal images of laser heated spots. The influence of depth of the crack on temperature changes across the crack and the relationship between crack depth and temperature changes due to the crack was simulated and subsequently validated experimentally.

  1. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  2. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  3. The numerical integration and 3-D finite element formulation of a viscoelastic model of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.

    1994-08-01

    The use of glasses is widespread in making hermetic, insulating seals for many electronic components. Flat panel displays and fiber optic connectors are other products utilizing glass as a structural element. When glass is cooled from sealing temperatures, residual stresses are generated due to mismatches in thermal shrinkage created by the dissimilar material properties of the adjoining materials. Because glass is such a brittle material at room temperature, tensile residual stresses must be kept small to ensure durability and avoid cracking. Although production designs and the required manufacturing process development can be deduced empirically, this is an expensive and time consuming process that does not necessarily lead to an optimal design. Agile manufacturing demands that analyses be used to reduce development costs and schedules by providing insight and guiding the design process through the development cycle. To make these gains, however, viscoelastic models of glass must be available along with the right tool to use them. A viscoelastic model of glass can be used to simulate the stress and volume relaxation that occurs at elevated temperatures as the molecular structure of the glass seeks to equilibrate to the state of the supercooled liquid. The substance of the numerical treatment needed to support the implementation of the model in a 3-D finite element program is presented herein. An accurate second-order, central difference integrator is proposed for the constitutive equations, and numerical solutions are compared to those obtained with other integrators. Inherent convergence problems are reviewed and fixes are described. The resulting algorithms are generally applicable to the broad class of viscoelastic material models. First-order error estimates are used as a basis for developing a scheme for automatic time step controls, and several demonstration problems are presented to illustrate the performance of the methodology.

  4. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased

  5. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  6. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  7. 3D controlled-source electromagnetic modeling in anisotropic medium using edge-based finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Xiong, Bin; Han, Muran; Zhdanov, Michael

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a linear edge-based finite element method for numerical modeling of 3D controlled-source electromagnetic data in an anisotropic conductive medium. We use a nonuniform rectangular mesh in order to capture the rapid change of diffusive electromagnetic field within the regions of anomalous conductivity and close to the location of the source. In order to avoid the source singularity, we solve Maxwell's equation with respect to anomalous electric field. The nonuniform rectangular mesh can be transformed to hexahedral mesh in order to simulate the bathymetry effect. The sparse system of finite element equations is solved using a quasi-minimum residual method with a Jacobian preconditioner. We have applied the developed algorithm to compute a typical MCSEM response over a 3D model of a hydrocarbon reservoir located in both isotropic and anisotropic mediums. The modeling results are in a good agreement with the solutions obtained by the integral equation method.

  8. Towards increased speed computations in 3D moving eddy current finite element modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, N.; Rodger, D.; Coles, P.C.; Street, S.; Leonard, P.J.

    1995-11-01

    Attractive and drag forces on such devices as magnetically levitated (MAGLEV) vehicles and magnetic bearings are crucially dependent on induced eddy currents. Here, a finite element scheme used to model eddy current problems with motional velocity is described here. The formulation is a variation on the A {minus} {psi} method. An additional Minkowski-transformation term is required to take into account the velocity. However, computational instability arises when the velocity increases to the point that the first order velocity terms severely dominate the second order diffusion terms. The method presented here uses upwinding to help regain stability. An additional degree of stability is inserted at higher speeds by using a lower speed result as an initial vector. This leads to a reduced permeability in saturated regions which counter-balances to some extent the increase in velocity. The method is validated by experimental measurement.

  9. Simulation of ultrasonic NCF composites testing using 3D finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Saffari, N.; Fromme, P.

    2012-04-01

    Composite materials offer many advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. Different types of composites, such as non-crimp fabrics (NCF), are currently being investigated as they offer reduced manufacturing costs and improved damage tolerance as compared to traditional pre-impregnated composite materials. NCF composites are made from stitched fiber bundles (tows), which typically have a width and thickness in the order of millimeter. This results in strongly inhomogeneous and anisotropic material properties. Different types of manufacturing imperfections, such as porosity, resin pockets, tow crimp and misalignment can lead to reduced material strength and thus to defects following excessive loads or impact, e.g. fracture and delaminations. The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of NCF composites is difficult, as the tow size is comparable to the wavelength, leading to multiple scattering in this inherently three-dimensional structure. For typical material properties and geometry of an NCF composite, a full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed in ABAQUS. The propagation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been simulated and the effect of multiple scattering at the fiber tows investigated. The effect of porosity as a typical manufacturing imperfection has been considered. The potential for the detection and quantification of such defects is discussed based on the observed influence on the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation.

  10. Development of a 3D finite element model evaluating air-coupled ultrasonic measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrig, Matthias P.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a 3D numerical finite element (FE) model which, previously developed, precisely simulates non-contact, air-coupled measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh wave propagation. The commercial FE-solver ABAQUS is used to perform the simulations. First, frequency dependent pressure wave attenuation is investigated numerically to reconstruct the sound pressure distribution along the active surface of the non-contact receiver. Second, constitutive law and excitation source properties are optimized to match nonlinear ultrasonic experimental data. Finally, the FE-model data are fit with analytical solutions showing a good agreement and thus, indicating the significance of the study performed.

  11. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  12. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  13. A two-scale model for frictional cracks in 3D fractured brittle media with the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Borja, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Stress concentration induced by the heterogeneity in brittle geomaterials is generally considered as the driving force in the evolution of the microstructure (such as the crack and pore microstructure). Specifically, modeling heterogeneity is key to properly predicting the nucleation, coalescence and propagation of micro-cracks in brittle solids. In this paper, we propose a two-scale model for frictional cracks in fractured brittle media. The major crack in the study domain is modeled at a macro level, while the micro-cracks are modeled at a finer scale. The macro-scale behavior is described by a standard boundary value problem. The finer-scale problem is modeled using the notion of representative elementary volume (REV) consisting of a solid volume with distributed micro-cracks. Periodic boundary condition and small strain formulation are assumed in the finer-scale analysis. The scale bridging mechanism is borrowed from the standard homogenization technique. The proposed model is implemented with the extended finite element method. The macro stress at each Gauss point in the finite element formulation is computed as the volume average of finer-scale stresses in each corresponding REV. The macro tangent operator is computed using a perturbation method. For 3D problems, six independent linear perturbation analyses are carried out for each numerical integration point. Our numerical examples capture the nucleation and coalescence of micro-cracks, which can be used to infer the potential propagation direction of the major crack.

  14. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  15. A new 3D finite element model of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Agustín; Barham, Richard; Ruiz, Mariano; López, Juan Manuel; DeArcas, Guillermo; Recuero, Manuel

    2008-08-01

    The artificial ear specified in IEC 60318-1 is used for the measurement of headphones and has been designed to present an acoustic load equivalent to that of normal human ears. In this respect it is specified in terms of an acoustical impedance, and modelled by a lumped parameter approach. However, this has some inherent frequency limitations and becomes less valid as the acoustic wavelength approaches the characteristic dimensions within the device. In addition, when sound propagates through structures such as narrow tubes, annular slits or over sharp corners, noticeable thermal and viscous effects take place causing further departure from the lumped parameter model. A new numerical model has therefore been developed, which gives proper consideration to the aforementioned effects. Both kinds of losses can be simulated by means of the LMS Virtual Lab acoustic software which facilitates finite and boundary element modelling of the whole artificial ear. A full 3D model of the artificial ear has therefore been developed based on key dimensional data found in IEC 60318-1. The model has been used to calculate the acoustical impedance, and the results compared with the corresponding data determined from the lumped parameter model. The numerical simulation of the artificial ear has been shown to provide realistic results, and is a powerful tool for developing a detailed understanding of the device. It is also proving valuable in the revision of IEC 60318-1 that is currently in progress.

  16. The Distributed Lambda (?) Model (DLM): A 3-D, Finite-Element Muscle Model Based on Feldman's ? Model; Assessment of Orofacial Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors aimed to design a distributed lambda model (DLM), which is well adapted to implement three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element descriptions of muscles. Method: A muscle element model was designed. Its stress-strain relationships included the active force-length characteristics of the ? model along the muscle fibers, together…

  17. 3D Finite Element Modelling of Cutting Forces in Drilling Fibre Metal Laminates and Experimental Hole Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giasin, Khaled; Ayvar-Soberanis, Sabino; French, Toby; Phadnis, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    Machining Glass fibre aluminium reinforced epoxy (GLARE) is cumbersome due to distinctively different mechanical and thermal properties of its constituents, which makes it challenging to achieve damage-free holes with the acceptable surface quality. The proposed work focuses on the study of the machinability of thin (~2.5 mm) GLARE laminate. Drilling trials were conducted to analyse the effect of feed rate and spindle speed on the cutting forces and hole quality. The resulting hole quality metrics (surface roughness, hole size, circularity error, burr formation and delamination) were assessed using surface profilometry and optical scanning techniques. A three dimensional (3D) finite-element (FE) model of drilling GLARE laminate was also developed using ABAQUS/Explicit to help understand the mechanism of drilling GLARE. The homogenised ply-level response of GLARE laminate was considered in the FE model to predict cutting forces in the drilling process.

  18. 3D Finite Element Model for Writing Long-Period Fiber Gratings by CO2 Laser Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, João M. P.; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented. PMID:23941908

  19. A new 3D finite element model of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear: II. Experimental and numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Agustín; Barham, Richard; Ruiz, Mariano; López, Juan Manuel; De Arcas, Guillermo; Alonso, Jesus

    2012-12-01

    In part I, the feasibility of using three-dimensional (3D) finite elements (FEs) to model the acoustic behaviour of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear was studied and the numerical approach compared with classical lumped elements modelling. It was shown that by using a more complex acoustic model that took account of thermo-viscous effects, geometric shapes and dimensions, it was possible to develop a realistic model. This model then had clear advantages in comparison with the models based on equivalent circuits using lumped parameters. In fact results from FE modelling produce a better understanding about the physical phenomena produced inside ear simulator couplers, facilitating spatial and temporal visualization of the sound fields produced. The objective of this study (part II) is to extend the investigation by validating the numerical calculations against measurements on an ear simulator conforming to IEC 60318-1. For this purpose, an appropriate commercially available device is taken and a complete 3D FE model developed for it. The numerical model is based on key dimensional data obtained with a non-destructive x-ray inspection technique. Measurements of the acoustic transfer impedance have been carried out on the same device at a national measurement institute using the method embodied in IEC 60318-1. Having accounted for the actual device dimensions, the thermo-viscous effects inside narrow slots and holes and environmental conditions, the results of the numerical modelling were found to be in good agreement with the measured values.

  20. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  1. Finite element simulation and analytical modeling of 3D multi scale diffusion in nanocomposites with permeable stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, A.; Maffezzoli, A.

    2016-01-01

    This work is aimed to study the mass transport in 3D nanocomposites, characterized by the presence of permeable lamellar stacks, by means of finite element (FE) analysis. To this purpose, a geometric model was developed, based on a random distribution of non-interpenetrating stacks, each one made of regularly spaced platelets, which are considered representative of an intercalated nanocomposite. The morphological features of the stacks are the number of lamellae and the thickness of lamellar galleries, which determine the thickness, and therefore the aspect ratio. FE simulation results showed the relevance of diffusion within stack, and therefore the unsuitableness of the assumption of stack impermeability. The diffusion behavior of nanocomposites made of permeable stacks was modeled by considering the probability of collision of diffusing particles on the stack surface. For a random orientation of stacks, the developed analytical model showed an excellent agreement with the FE simulation results. It was shown that other analytical models found in literature are not able to capture the dependence of diffusivity on the morphology of intercalated nanocomposites. The developed analytical model allowed estimating the error arising from the assumption of impermeable stacks in the estimation of nanofiller aspect ratio from experimental diffusivity data.

  2. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures

    PubMed Central

    Pavarino, E.; Neves, L. A.; Machado, J. M.; de Godoy, M. F.; Shiyou, Y.; Momente, J. C.; Zafalon, G. F. D.; Pinto, A. R.; Valêncio, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  3. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures.

    PubMed

    Pavarino, E; Neves, L A; Machado, J M; de Godoy, M F; Shiyou, Y; Momente, J C; Zafalon, G F D; Pinto, A R; Valêncio, C R

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  4. 3D Finite Element Modelling for the investigation of the cavity effect in extensometric rock-deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, M.; Detzky, G.; Koppán, A.

    2012-04-01

    phenomenon in general. Authors calculated the deformations of a simple-geometry 3D cavity, which is caused by variable gravity loads. Dependence of the cavity effect on changing of distinct elastic properties in categorized models has been investigated. Authors introduced qualifying parameter fields calculated using the results of the FE modelling (nodal displacements as a model answer for the gravity load), in order to characterize the effect. Modelling results can be used as an estimation not only for the absolute cavity effect rate of the intended arrangement, furthermore the sensitivity of the given system against a particular geometric property. As an application example finite element modelling were carried out in order to estimate the influence of the complicated cavity system surrounding the "Budapest-Matyashegy" Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory of the Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary.

  5. Algebraic multigrid preconditioning within parallel finite-element solvers for 3-D electromagnetic modelling problems in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldan, Jelena; Puzyrev, Vladimir; de la Puente, Josep; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Cela, José María

    2014-06-01

    We present an elaborate preconditioning scheme for Krylov subspace methods which has been developed to improve the performance and reduce the execution time of parallel node-based finite-element (FE) solvers for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) numerical modelling in exploration geophysics. This new preconditioner is based on algebraic multigrid (AMG) that uses different basic relaxation methods, such as Jacobi, symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) and Gauss-Seidel, as smoothers and the wave front algorithm to create groups, which are used for a coarse-level generation. We have implemented and tested this new preconditioner within our parallel nodal FE solver for 3-D forward problems in EM induction geophysics. We have performed series of experiments for several models with different conductivity structures and characteristics to test the performance of our AMG preconditioning technique when combined with biconjugate gradient stabilized method. The results have shown that, the more challenging the problem is in terms of conductivity contrasts, ratio between the sizes of grid elements and/or frequency, the more benefit is obtained by using this preconditioner. Compared to other preconditioning schemes, such as diagonal, SSOR and truncated approximate inverse, the AMG preconditioner greatly improves the convergence of the iterative solver for all tested models. Also, when it comes to cases in which other preconditioners succeed to converge to a desired precision, AMG is able to considerably reduce the total execution time of the forward-problem code-up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the tests have confirmed that our AMG scheme ensures grid-independent rate of convergence, as well as improvement in convergence regardless of how big local mesh refinements are. In addition, AMG is designed to be a black-box preconditioner, which makes it easy to use and combine with different iterative methods. Finally, it has proved to be very practical and efficient in the

  6. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  7. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  8. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  9. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  10. 3D Finite Element Trajectory Code with Adaptive Meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Bauer, Andy; Shephard, Mark; Beal, Mark; Tran, Hien

    2004-11-01

    Beam Optics Analysis, a new, 3D charged particle program is available and in use for the design of complex, 3D electron guns and charged particle devices. The code reads files directly from most CAD and solid modeling programs, includes an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI), and a robust mesh generator that is fully automatic. Complex problems can be set up, and analysis initiated in minutes. The program includes a user-friendly post processor for displaying field and trajectory data using 3D plots and images. The electrostatic solver is based on the standard nodal finite element method. The magnetostatic field solver is based on the vector finite element method and is also called during the trajectory simulation process to solve for self magnetic fields. The user imports the geometry from essentially any commercial CAD program and uses the GUI to assign parameters (voltages, currents, dielectric constant) and designate emitters (including work function, emitter temperature, and number of trajectories). The the mesh is generated automatically and analysis is performed, including mesh adaptation to improve accuracy and optimize computational resources. This presentation will provide information on the basic structure of the code, its operation, and it's capabilities.

  11. Stress Analysis of a Class II MO-Restored Tooth Using a 3D CT-Based Finite Element Model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yiu Pong; Tang, Chak Yin; Gao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    A computational method has been developed for stress analysis of a restored tooth so that experimental effort can be minimized. The objectives of this study include (i) developing a method to create a 3D FE assembly model for a restored tooth based on CT images and (ii) conducting stress analysis of the restored tooth using the 3D FE model established. To build up a solid computational model of a tooth, a method has been proposed to construct a 3D model from 2D CT-scanned images. Facilitated with CAD tools, the 3D tooth model has been virtually incorporated with a Class II MO restoration. The tooth model is triphasic, including the enamel, dentin, and pulp phases. To mimic the natural constraint on the movement of the tooth model, its corresponding mandible model has also been generated. The relative high maximum principal stress values were computed at the surface under loading and in the marginal region of the interface between the restoration and the tooth phases. PMID:22844287

  12. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongle; Li, Q. M.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band) of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi) may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE) simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress) and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point) are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation is found to

  13. Analysis of shear wave propagation derived from MR elastography in 3D thigh skeletal muscle using subject specific finite element model.

    PubMed

    Dao, Tien Tuan; Pouletaut, Philippe; Charleux, Fabrice; Tho, Marie-Christine Ho Ba; Bensamoun, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a subject specific finite element model derived from MRI images to numerically analyze the MRE (magnetic resonance elastography) shear wave propagation within skeletal thigh muscles. A sagittal T2 CUBE MRI sequence was performed on the 20-cm thigh segment of a healthy male subject. Skin, adipose tissue, femoral bone and 11 muscles were manually segmented in order to have 3D smoothed solid and meshed models. These tissues were modeled with different constitutive laws. A transient modal dynamics analysis was applied to simulate the shear wave propagation within the thigh tissues. The effects of MRE experimental parameters (frequency, force) and the muscle material properties (shear modulus: C10) were analyzed through the simulated shear wave displacement within the vastus medialis muscle. The results showed a plausible range of frequencies (from 90Hz to 120 Hz), which could be used for MRE muscle protocol. The wave amplitude increased with the level of the force, revealing the importance of the boundary condition. Moreover, different shear displacement patterns were obtained as a function of the muscle mechanical properties. The present study is the first to analyze the shear wave propagation in skeletal muscles using a 3D subject specific finite element model. This study could be of great value to assist the experimenters in the set-up of MRE protocols. PMID:25570875

  14. Study of the tsunamigenic rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake using a 3D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Fabrizio; Trasatti, Elisa; Lorito, Stefano; Piromallo, Claudia; Piatanesi, Alessio; Cocco, Massimo; Murphy, Shane; Tonini, Roberto; Volpe, Manuela; Brizuela, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The study of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake revealed some new aspects in the rupture process of a megathrust event. Indeed, despite its magnitude Mw 9.0, this earthquake was characterized by a spatially limited rupture area and, contrary to the common view that the shallow portion of the subduction interface mainly experiences aseismic slip, the seismic rupture propagated onto the Japan trench with very large slip (> 50 m). Starting from slip distributions obtained by joint inversion of tsunami and geodetic data, we discuss the sensitivity of the tsunami impact predictions to the complexity of the modelling strategy. We use numerical tools ranging from a homogeneous half-space dislocation model (considering only vertical sea-floor displacement and tsunami propagation in the linear shallow-water approximation) to the more complex 3D-FEM model (with heterogeneous elastic parameters derived from 3D seismic tomography), including horizontal displacement and non-hydrostatic dispersive tsunami modeling. This research is funded by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603839 (Project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe)

  15. Can the modeling for simplification of a dental implant surface affect the accuracy of 3D finite element analysis?

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido de Araújo; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess stress/strain of different implant modeling simplifications by 3D-FEA. Three variation of external hexagon implant (Ø3.75 × 10 mm) supporting one molar crown were simulated: A (no threads); B (slightly threads simplification); C (original design). 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique) were applied. Cortical bone was evaluated by maximum principal stress and microstrain qualitatively and quantitatively (ANOVA and Tukey post hoc (p < 0.05)). Higher stress levels (p < 0.05) were observed in model A. Models B and C presented similar stress transmission. It was possible to conclude that slightly simplification should be used for studies evaluating stress transferring for bone tissue.

  16. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  17. Higher Order Lagrange Finite Elements In M3D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Chen; H.R. Strauss; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; L.E. Sugiyama; G. Fu; J. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    The M3D code has been using linear finite elements to represent multilevel MHD on 2-D poloidal planes. Triangular higher order elements, up to third order, are constructed here in order to provide M3D the capability to solve highly anisotropic transport problems. It is found that higher order elements are essential to resolve the thin transition layer characteristic of the anisotropic transport equation, particularly when the strong anisotropic direction is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinates. The transition layer is measured by the profile width, which is zero for infinite anisotropy. It is shown that only higher order schemes have the ability to make this layer converge towards zero when the anisotropy gets stronger and stronger. Two cases are considered. One has the strong transport direction partially aligned with one of the element edges, the other doesn't have any alignment. Both cases have the strong transport direction misaligned with the grid line by some angles.

  18. A 3-D finite-element model for computation of temperature profiles and regions of thermal damage during focused ultrasound surgery exposures.

    PubMed

    Meaney, P M; Clarke, R L; ter Haar, G R; Rivens, I H

    1998-11-01

    Although there have been numerous models implemented for modeling thermal diffusion effects during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), most have limited themselves to representing simple situations for which analytical solutions and the use of cylindrical geometries sufficed. For modeling single lesion formation and the heating patterns from a single exposure, good results were achieved in comparison with experimental results for predicting lesion size, shape and location. However, these types of approaches are insufficient when considering the heating of multiple sites with FUS exposures when the time interval between exposures is short. In such cases, the heat dissipation patterns from initial exposures in the lesion array formation can play a significant role in the heating patterns for later exposures. Understanding the effects of adjacent lesion formation, such as this, requires a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the bioheat equation. Thus, we have developed a 3-D finite-element representation for modeling the thermal diffusion effects during FUS exposures in clinically relevant tissue volumes. The strength of this approach over past methods is its ability to represent arbitrarily shaped 3-D situations. Initial simulations have allowed calculation of the temperature distribution as a function of time for adjacent FUS exposures in excised bovine liver, with the individually computed point temperatures comparing favorably with published measurements. In addition to modeling these temperature distributions, the model was implemented in conjunction with an algorithm for calculating the thermal dose as a way of predicting lesion shape. Although used extensively in conventional hyperthermia applications, this thermal dose criterion has only been applied in a limited number of simulations in FUS for comparison with experimental measurements. In this study, simulations were run for focal depths 2 and 3 cm below the surface of pig's liver, using multiple

  19. Finite element calculations on detailed 3D models for the superferric main magnets of the FAIR SIS100 synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E.; Shcherbakov, P.; Kurnyshov, R.

    2007-11-01

    The synchrotron SIS100 is one of the two basic accelerators of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. This accelerator should provide high intensity U28+ and proton beams with a pulse repetition rate of 1 Hz (i.e. a ramp rate of 4 T/s). The magnetic system of the accelerator uses superferric 2.1 T dipoles of about 3 m length and 32 T/m quadrupoles of about 1 m length. The magnet coils are made of a hollow tube cable wrapped with Cu/NbTi composite wire cooled with two phase helium flow at 4.5 K. The bore dimensions were defined to 130 × 60 mm for the dipole and 135 × 65 mm for the quadrupole. We present the developed ANSYS models for different important aspects: AC loss, magnetic field quality and mechanical stability. Preliminary studies verified the approaches and these models were applied to calculate the effects for the coil, the yoke and the beam pipe structures. We outline further steps to fully describe the SIS100 magnets including mechanical and thermal properties.

  20. Slip Distribution of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake obtained by Geodetic and Tsunami Data and with a 3-D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F.; Trasatti, E.; Lorito, S.; Ito, Y.; Piatanesi, A.; Lanucara, P.; Hirata, K.; D'Agostino, N.; Cocco, M.

    2012-12-01

    The rupture process of the Great 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake has been particularly well studied by using an unprecedented collection of geophysical data. There is a general agreement among the different source models obtained by modeling seismological, geodetic and tsunami data. A slip patch of nearly 40÷50 meters has been imaged and located around and up-dip from the hypocenter by most of published models, while some differences exist in the slip pattern retrieved at shallow depths near the trench, likely due to the different resolving power of distinct data sets and to the adopted fault geometry. It is well known that the modeling of great subduction earthquakes requires the use of 3-D structural models in order to properly account for the effects of topography, bathymetry and the geometrical variations of the plate interface as well as for the effects of elastic contrasts between the subducting plate and the continental lithosphere. In this study we build a 3-D Finite Element (FE) model of the Tohoku-oki area in order to infer the slip distribution of the 2011 earthquake by performing a joint inversion of geodetic (GPS and seafloor observations) and tsunami (ocean bottom pressure sensors, DART and GPS buoys) data. The FE model is used to compute the geodetic and tsunami Green's functions. In order to understand how geometrical and elastic heterogeneities control the inferred slip distribution of the Tohoku-oki earthquake, we compare the slip patterns obtained using both homogeneous and heterogeneous structural models. The goal of this study is to better constrain the slip distribution and the maximum slip amplitudes. In particular, we aim to focus on the rupture process in the shallower part of the fault plane and near the trench, which is crucial to model the tsunami data and to assess the tsunamigenic potential of earthquakes in this region.

  1. An elastic/viscoelastic finite element analysis method for crustal deformation using a 3-D island-scale high-fidelity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Agata, Ryoichiro; Hori, Takane; Hirahara, Kazuro; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Hori, Muneo; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    As a result of the accumulation of high-resolution observation data, 3-D high-fidelity crustal structure data for large domains are becoming available. However, it has been difficult to use such data to perform elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analyses in large domains with quality assurance of the numerical simulation that guarantees convergence of the numerical solution with respect to the discretization size because the costs of analysis are significantly high. This paper proposes a method of constructing a high-fidelity crustal structure finite element (FE) model using high-fidelity crustal structure data and fast FE analysis to reduce the costs of analysis (based on automatic FE model generation for parallel computation, OpenMP/MPI hybrid parallel computation on distributed memory computers, a geometric multigrid, variable preconditioning and multiple precision arithmetic). Using the proposed methods, we construct 10 billion degree-of-freedom high-fidelity crustal structure FE models for the entire Japan, and conduct elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analysis using this model with enough high accuracy of the numerical simulation.

  2. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  3. Combination of finite element modeling and optimization for the study of lumbar spine biomechanics considering the 3D thorax-pelvis orientation.

    PubMed

    Ezquerro, Francisco; Simón, Antonio; Prado, María; Pérez, Ana

    2004-01-01

    A model of the lumbar spine capable of taking into account realistic loads derived from human activity would be of great benefit in studying its normal biomechanical functioning as well as its in vivo behavior in injured and surgically altered states. This paper proposes a method to analyze the mechanical response of the lumbar spine subjected to loads derived from human activity, combining a non-linear finite element model (FEM) and an optimization-based force predicting algorithm. Loads borne by the lumbar spine at the T12-L1 level (joint loads) are first predicted with the optimization algorithm and then applied to the FEM, while a boundary condition prescribing the relative L1-sacrum rotation is imposed onto the FEM to account for three-dimensional physiological thorax-pelvis orientation. The prescribed rotation is achieved through the application of moments on L1. To account for the effect of these moments on lumbar joint loads, an iteration between the optimization technique and the FEM computation has been carried out. This method provides two main benefits over previous studies: first, it allows for the application of any 3D loading condition while considering the real 3D rotation measured between the thorax and the pelvis, and second, it makes it possible to estimate the moments that must be applied on L1 in order to maintain this rotation, taking them into account when predicting joint loads. As an example application of the method, results are presented for the lumbar spine mechanical response at the time of peak T12-L1 joint force during walking.

  4. Patient-specific geometrical modeling of orthopedic structures with high efficiency and accuracy for finite element modeling and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Xiang, Chunling; Zeng, Canjun; Ouyang, Hanbin; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-12-01

    We improved the geometrical modeling procedure for fast and accurate reconstruction of orthopedic structures. This procedure consists of medical image segmentation, three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction, and assignment of material properties. The patient-specific orthopedic structures reconstructed by this improved procedure can be used in the virtual surgical planning, 3D printing of real orthopedic structures and finite element analysis. A conventional modeling consists of: image segmentation, geometrical reconstruction, mesh generation, and assignment of material properties. The present study modified the conventional method to enhance software operating procedures. Patient's CT images of different bones were acquired and subsequently reconstructed to give models. The reconstruction procedures were three-dimensional image segmentation, modification of the edge length and quantity of meshes, and the assignment of material properties according to the intensity of gravy value. We compared the performance of our procedures to the conventional procedures modeling in terms of software operating time, success rate and mesh quality. Our proposed framework has the following improvements in the geometrical modeling: (1) processing time: (femur: 87.16 ± 5.90 %; pelvis: 80.16 ± 7.67 %; thoracic vertebra: 17.81 ± 4.36 %; P < 0.05); (2) least volume reduction (femur: 0.26 ± 0.06 %; pelvis: 0.70 ± 0.47, thoracic vertebra: 3.70 ± 1.75 %; P < 0.01) and (3) mesh quality in terms of aspect ratio (femur: 8.00 ± 7.38 %; pelvis: 17.70 ± 9.82 %; thoracic vertebra: 13.93 ± 9.79 %; P < 0.05) and maximum angle (femur: 4.90 ± 5.28 %; pelvis: 17.20 ± 19.29 %; thoracic vertebra: 3.86 ± 3.82 %; P < 0.05). Our proposed patient-specific geometrical modeling requires less operating time and workload, but the orthopedic structures were generated at a higher rate of success as compared with the conventional method. It is expected to benefit the surgical planning of orthopedic

  5. Development of a 3D finite element acoustic model to predict the sound reduction index of stud based double-leaf walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, A.; Wang, C. J.; Yahiaoui, K.; Mynors, D. J.; Morgan, T.; Nguyen, V. B.; English, M.

    2014-11-01

    Building standards incorporating quantitative acoustical criteria to ensure adequate sound insulation are now being implemented. Engineers are making great efforts to design acoustically efficient double-wall structures. Accordingly, efficient simulation models to predict the acoustic insulation of double-leaf wall structures are needed. This paper presents the development of a numerical tool that can predict the frequency dependent sound reduction index R of stud based double-leaf walls at one-third-octave band frequency range. A fully vibro-acoustic 3D model consisting of two rooms partitioned using a double-leaf wall, considering the structure and acoustic fluid coupling incorporating the existing fluid and structural solvers are presented. The validity of the finite element (FE) model is assessed by comparison with experimental test results carried out in a certified laboratory. Accurate representation of the structural damping matrix to effectively predict the R values are studied. The possibilities of minimising the simulation time using a frequency dependent mesh model was also investigated. The FEA model presented in this work is capable of predicting the weighted sound reduction index Rw along with A-weighted pink noise C and A-weighted urban noise Ctr within an error of 1 dB. The model developed can also be used to analyse the acoustically induced frequency dependent geometrical behaviour of the double-leaf wall components to optimise them for best acoustic performance. The FE modelling procedure reported in this paper can be extended to other building components undergoing fluid-structure interaction (FSI) to evaluate their acoustic insulation.

  6. Finite Element Code For 3D-Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Equations (3-layer).

    1992-03-24

    HYFRACP3D is a finite element program for simulation of a pseudo three-dimensional fracture geometries with a two-dimensional planar solution. The model predicts the height, width and winglength over time for a hydraulic fracture propagating in a three-layered system of rocks with variable rock mechanics properties.

  7. A comparison of 1D analytical model and 3D finite element analysis with experiments for a rosen-type piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Boukazouha, F; Poulin-Vittrant, G; Tran-Huu-Hue, L P; Bavencoffe, M; Boubenider, F; Rguiti, M; Lethiecq, M

    2015-07-01

    This article is dedicated to the study of Piezoelectric Transformers (PTs), which offer promising solutions to the increasing need for integrated power electronics modules within autonomous systems. The advantages offered by such transformers include: immunity to electromagnetic disturbances; ease of miniaturisation for example, using conventional micro fabrication processes; and enhanced performance in terms of voltage gain and power efficiency. Central to the adequate description of such transformers is the need for complex analytical modeling tools, especially if one is attempting to include combined contributions due to (i) mechanical phenomena owing to the different propagation modes which differ at the primary and secondary sides of the PT; and (ii) electrical phenomena such as the voltage gain and power efficiency, which depend on the electrical load. The present work demonstrates an original one-dimensional (1D) analytical model, dedicated to a Rosen-type PT and simulation results are successively compared against that of a three-dimensional (3D) Finite Element Analysis (COMSOL Multiphysics software) and experimental results. The Rosen-type PT studied here is based on a single layer soft PZT (P191) with corresponding dimensions 18 mm × 3 mm × 1.5 mm, which operated at the second harmonic of 176 kHz. Detailed simulational and experimental results show that the presented 1D model predicts experimental measurements to within less than 10% error of the voltage gain at the second and third resonance frequency modes. Adjustment of the analytical model parameters is found to decrease errors relative to experimental voltage gain to within 1%, whilst a 2.5% error on the output admittance magnitude at the second resonance mode were obtained. Relying on the unique assumption of one-dimensionality, the present analytical model appears as a useful tool for Rosen-type PT design and behavior understanding.

  8. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  9. Finite element analysis of 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problem for Cosserat materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Xie, Z. Q.; Chen, B. S.; Zhang, H. W.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a finite element model for 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problem of Cosserat materials. Because 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problems belong to the unspecified boundary problems with nonlinearities in both material and geometric forms, a large number of calculations are needed to obtain numerical results with high accuracy. Based on the parametric variational principle and the corresponding quadratic programming method for numerical simulation of frictional contact problems, a finite element model is developed for 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact analysis of Cosserat materials. The problems are finally reduced to linear complementarity problems (LCP). Numerical examples show the feasibility and importance of the developed model for analyzing the contact problems of structures with materials which have micro-polar characteristics.

  10. Stabilized finite elements for 3D reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braack, M.; Richter, Th.

    2006-07-01

    Objective of this work is the numerical solution of chemically reacting flows in three dimensions described by detailed reaction mechanism. The contemplated problems include, e.g. burners with 3D geometry. Contrary to the usual operator splitting method the equations are treated fully coupled with a Newton solver. This leads to the necessity of the solution of large linear non-symmetric, indefinite systems. Due to the complexity of the regarded problems we combine a variety of numerical methods, as there are goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement, a parallel multigrid solver for the linear systems and economical stabilization techniques for the stiff problems.By blocking the solution components for every ansatz function and applying special matrix structures for each block of degrees of freedom, we can significantly reduce the required memory effort without worsening the convergence. Considering the Galerkin formulation of the regarded problems this is established by using lumping of the mass matrix and the chemical source terms. However, this technique is not longer feasible for standard stabilized finite elements as for instance Galerkin least squares techniques or streamline diffusion. Those stabilized schemes are well established for Navier-Stokes flows but for reactive flows, they introduce many further couplings into the system compared to Galerkin formulations. In this work, we discuss this issue in connection with combustion in more detail and propose the local projection stabilization technique for reactive flows. Beside the robustness of the arising linear systems we are able to maintain the problem-adapted matrix structures presented above. Finally, we will present numerical results for the proposed methods. In particular, we simulate a methane burner with a detailed reaction system involving 15 chemical species and 84 elementary reactions.

  11. Deformation of forearcs caused by subduction of aseismic ridges: The role of ridge orientation and convergence direction investigated with 3D finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges causes considerable deformation of the forearc region. To investigate the role of ridge orientation relative to the margin and convergence direction on the style of forearc deformation, we developed a series of 3D finite-elemente models, in which a rigid oceanic plate carrying the model ridge subducts beneath a deformable forearc wedge. Experiments were carried out for angles of 30°, 60° and 90° between the ridge axis and the trench and for different convergence directions. In the experiments, in which the ridge axis is parallel to the convergence direction, the ridge is stationary; in all other experiments, the ridge migrates along the margin and thus affects different regions of the forearc. Our results show that the ridge indents and uplifts the forearc in all models. For obliquely subducting ridges the displacement and strain fields become highly asymmetric regardless if the ridge is stationary or migrates along the forearc. Only if the ridge is stationary and oriented perpendicular to the margin, the deformation is symmetric relative to the ridge axis. Stationary ridges show uplift only above the ridge tip, whereas a migrating ridge causes a wave of uplift above the leading flank of the ridge followed by subsidence above the trailing flank. Horizontal strain components show domains of both extension and shortening, with extension occurring above the ridge tip and shortening above the ridge flanks. To compare our results with natural case studies, we computed additional models reflecting the setting of the stationary Cocos Ridge subducting beneath southern Costa Rica and of the Nazca Ridge, which migrates along the Peruvian margin. The results of these adjusted models are in good agreement with field observations. For the model of the Cocos Ridge the highest degree of shortening occurs normal to the margin, which coincides with the location of a thrust belt in the forearc of Costa Rica with its maximum shortening inboard

  12. Coupling of a 3D Finite Element Model of Cardiac Ventricular Mechanics to Lumped Systems Models of the Systemic and Pulmonic Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.; Neal, Maxwell L.; Gu, Quan; Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Omens, Jeff H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we present a novel, robust method to couple finite element (FE) models of cardiac mechanics to systems models of the circulation (CIRC), independent of cardiac phase. For each time step through a cardiac cycle, left and right ventricular pressures were calculated using ventricular compliances from the FE and CIRC models. These pressures served as boundary conditions in the FE and CIRC models. In succeeding steps, pressures were updated to minimize cavity volume error (FE minus CIRC volume) using Newton iterations. Coupling was achieved when a predefined criterion for the volume error was satisfied. Initial conditions for the multi-scale model were obtained by replacing the FE model with a varying elastance model, which takes into account direct ventricular interactions. Applying the coupling, a novel multi-scale model of the canine cardiovascular system was developed. Global hemodynamics and regional mechanics were calculated for multiple beats in two separate simulations with a left ventricular ischemic region and pulmonary artery constriction, respectively. After the interventions, global hemodynamics changed due to direct and indirect ventricular interactions, in agreement with previously published experimental results. The coupling method allows for simulations of multiple cardiac cycles for normal and pathophysiology, encompassing levels from cell to system. PMID:17111210

  13. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  14. 3-D thermal analysis using finite difference technique with finite element model for improved design of components of rocket engine turbomachines for Space Shuttle Main Engine SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Kiho D.; Ip, Shek-Se P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element models were generated and transferred into three-dimensional finite difference models to perform transient thermal analyses for the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump's first stage nozzles and rotor blades. STANCOOL was chosen to calculate the heat transfer characteristics (HTCs) around the airfoils, and endwall effects were included at the intersections of the airfoils and platforms for the steady-state boundary conditions. Free and forced convection due to rotation effects were also considered in hollow cores. Transient HTCs were calculated by taking ratios of the steady-state values based on the flow rates and fluid properties calculated at each time slice. Results are presented for both transient plots and three-dimensional color contour isotherm plots; they were also converted into universal files to be used for FEM stress analyses.

  15. Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model.

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A; Dechow, Paul C; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Wang, Qian; Grosse, Ian R

    2012-05-01

    We employed a probabilistic finite element analysis (FEA) method to determine how variability in material property values affects stress and strain values in a finite model of a Macaca fascicularis cranium. The material behavior of cortical bone varied in three ways: isotropic homogeneous, isotropic non-homogeneous, and orthotropic non-homogeneous. The material behavior of the trabecular bone and teeth was always treated as isotropic and homogeneous. All material property values for the cranium were randomized with a Gaussian distribution with either coefficients of variation (CVs) of 0.2 or with CVs calculated from empirical data. Latin hypercube sampling was used to determine the values of the material properties used in the finite element models. In total, four hundred and twenty six separate deterministic FE simulations were executed. We tested four hypotheses in this study: (1) uncertainty in material property values will have an insignificant effect on high stresses and a significant effect on high strains for homogeneous isotropic models; (2) the effect of variability in material property values on the stress state will increase as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increase; (3) variation in the in vivo shear strain values reported by Strait et al. (2005) and Ross et al. (2011) is not only due to variations in muscle forces and cranial morphology, but also due to variation in material property values; (4) the assumption of a uniform coefficient of variation for the material property values will result in the same trend in how moderate-to-high stresses and moderate-to-high strains vary with respect to the degree of non-homogeneity and anisotropy as the trend found when the coefficients of variation for material property values are calculated from empirical data. Our results supported the first three hypotheses and falsified the fourth. When material properties were varied with a constant CV, as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increased the level of variability in

  16. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  17. Content-Adaptive Finite Element Mesh Generation of 3-D Complex MR Volumes for Bioelectromagnetic Problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kim, T-S; Cho, M; Lee, S

    2005-01-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element method offers several advantages over other conventional methods such as boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropy. Mesh generation is the first requirement in the finite element analysis and there are many different approaches in mesh generation. However conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes, resulting in numerous elements in the smaller volume regions, thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present an improved content-adaptive mesh generation scheme that is efficient and fast along with options to change the contents of meshes. For demonstration, mesh models of the head from a volume MRI are presented in 2-D and 3-D.

  18. Implementation of Deterministically-Derived Hydrostatigraphic Units into a 3D Finite Element Model at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mansoor, K; Maley, M; Demir, Z; Hoffman, F

    2001-08-08

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large Superfund site in California that is implementing an extensive ground water remediation program. The site is underlain by a thick sequence of heterogeneous alluvial sediments. Defining ground-water flow pathways in this complex geologic setting is difficult. To better evaluate these pathways, a deterministic approach was applied to define hydrostratigraphic units (HSUS) on the basis of identifiable hydraulic behavior and contaminant migration trends. The conceptual model based on this approach indicates that groundwater flow and contaminant transport occurs within packages of sediments bounded by thin, low-permeability confining layers. To aid in the development of the remediation program, a three-dimensional finite-element model was developed for two of the HSUS at LLNL. The primary objectives of this model are to test the conceptual model with a numerical model, and provide well field management support for the large ground-water remediation system. The model was successfully calibrated to 12 years of ground water flow and contaminant transport data. These results confirm that the thin, low-permeability confining layers within the heterogeneous alluvial sediments are the dominant hydraulic control to flow and transport. This calibrated model is currently being applied to better manage the large site-wide ground water extraction system by optimizing the location of new extraction wells, managing pumping rates for extraction wells, and providing performance estimates for long-term planning and budgeting.

  19. A Novel Rat Model of Orthodontic Tooth Movement Using Temporary Skeletal Anchorage Devices: 3D Finite Element Analysis and In Vivo Validation

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Thomas; Doschak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this animal study was to develop a model of orthodontic tooth movement using a microimplant as a TSAD in rodents. A finite element model of the TSAD in alveolar bone was built using μCT images of rat maxilla to determine the von Mises stresses and displacement in the alveolar bone surrounding the TSAD. For in vivo validation of the FE model, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 25) were used and a Stryker 1.2 × 3 mm microimplant was inserted in the right maxilla and used to protract the right first permanent molar using a NiTi closed coil spring. Tooth movement measurements were taken at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. At 8 weeks, animals were euthanized and tissues were analyzed by histology and EPMA. FE modeling showed maximum von Mises stress of 45 Mpa near the apex of TSAD but the average von Mises stress was under 25 Mpa. Appreciable tooth movement of 0.62 ± 0.04 mm at 4 weeks and 1.99 ± 0.14 mm at 8 weeks was obtained. Histological and EPMA results demonstrated no active bone remodeling around the TSAD at 8 weeks depicting good secondary stability. This study provided evidence that protracted tooth movement is achieved in small animals using TSADs. PMID:25295060

  20. A detailed 3D finite element analysis of the peeling behaviour of a gecko spatula.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Roger A; Holl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed finite element analysis of the adhesion of a gecko spatula. The gecko spatulae form the tips of the gecko foot hairs that transfer the adhesional and frictional forces between substrate and foot. The analysis is based on a parameterised description of the 3D geometry of the spatula that only requires 12 parameters. The adhesion is described by a nonlinear computational contact formulation that accounts for the van der Waals interaction between spatula and substrate. The spatula adhesion model is implemented using an enriched contact finite element formulation recently developed by the first author. The finite element model is then used to simulate the peeling behaviour of the gecko spatula under applied vertical and rotational loading for various model parameters. Variations of the material stiffness, adhesional strength and range, stiction, spatula size and spatula inclination are considered to account for the natural variation of spatula properties. The study demonstrates that the spatula can function over a wide range of conditions. The computed pull-off forces are in agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The study also examines the energy required for the spatula pull-off. The proposed model is ideal to study the influence of substrate roughness on the spatula adhesion, as is finally demonstrated.

  1. Investigating the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy using finite element models derived from high-resolution 3D MRI.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M; House, M; Jambawalikar, S; Zork, N; Vink, J; Wapner, R; Myers, K

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is a strong contributor to perinatal mortality, and preterm infants that survive are at risk for long-term morbidities. During most of pregnancy, appropriate mechanical function of the cervix is required to maintain the developing fetus in utero. Premature cervical softening and subsequent cervical shortening are hypothesized to cause preterm birth. Presently, there is a lack of understanding of the structural and material factors that influence the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy. In this study we build finite element models of the pregnant uterus, cervix, and fetal membrane based on magnetic resonance imagining data in order to examine the mechanical function of the cervix under the physiologic loading conditions of pregnancy. We calculate the mechanical loading state of the cervix for two pregnant patients: 22 weeks gestational age with a normal cervical length and 28 weeks with a short cervix. We investigate the influence of (1) anatomical geometry, (2) cervical material properties, and (3) fetal membrane material properties, including its adhesion properties, on the mechanical loading state of the cervix under physiologically relevant intrauterine pressures. Our study demonstrates that membrane-uterus interaction, cervical material modeling, and membrane mechanical properties are factors that must be deliberately and carefully handled in order to construct a high quality mechanical simulation of pregnancy.

  2. Investigating the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy using finite element models derived from high-resolution 3D MRI.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M; House, M; Jambawalikar, S; Zork, N; Vink, J; Wapner, R; Myers, K

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is a strong contributor to perinatal mortality, and preterm infants that survive are at risk for long-term morbidities. During most of pregnancy, appropriate mechanical function of the cervix is required to maintain the developing fetus in utero. Premature cervical softening and subsequent cervical shortening are hypothesized to cause preterm birth. Presently, there is a lack of understanding of the structural and material factors that influence the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy. In this study we build finite element models of the pregnant uterus, cervix, and fetal membrane based on magnetic resonance imagining data in order to examine the mechanical function of the cervix under the physiologic loading conditions of pregnancy. We calculate the mechanical loading state of the cervix for two pregnant patients: 22 weeks gestational age with a normal cervical length and 28 weeks with a short cervix. We investigate the influence of (1) anatomical geometry, (2) cervical material properties, and (3) fetal membrane material properties, including its adhesion properties, on the mechanical loading state of the cervix under physiologically relevant intrauterine pressures. Our study demonstrates that membrane-uterus interaction, cervical material modeling, and membrane mechanical properties are factors that must be deliberately and carefully handled in order to construct a high quality mechanical simulation of pregnancy. PMID:25970655

  3. 3D Finite Element Study on: Bar Splinted Implants Supporting Partial Denture in the Reconstructed Mandible

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohamed; Ghali, Rami; Aboelnagga, Mona

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to estimate the stress patterns induced by the masticatory loads on a removable prosthesis supported and retained by bar splinted implants placed in the reconstructed mandible with two different clip materials and without clip, in the fibula-jaw bone and prosthesis using finite element analysis. METHODS: Two 3D finite element models were constructed, that models components were modeled on commercial CAD/CAM software then assembled into finite element package. Vertical loads were applied simulating the masticatory forces unilaterally in the resected site and bilaterally in the central fossa of the lower first molar as 100N (tension and compression). Analysis was based on the assumption full osseointegration between different types of bones, and between implants and fibula while fixing the top surface of the TMJ in place. RESULTS: The metallic bar connecting the three implants is insensitive to the clips material. Its supporting implants showed typical behavior with maximum stress values at the neck region. Fibula and jaw bone showed stresses within physiologic, while clips material effect seems to be very small due to its relatively small size. CONCLUSION: Switching loading force direction from tensile to compression did-not change the stresses and deformations distribution, but reversed their sign from positive to negative. PMID:27275353

  4. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  5. A 2D magnetic and 3D mechanical coupled finite element model for the study of the dynamic vibrations in the stator of induction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.; Belahcen, A.; Detoni, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled Finite Element Model in order to study the vibrations in induction motors under steady-state. The model utilizes a weak coupling strategy between both magnetic and elastodynamic fields on the structure. Firstly, the problem solves the magnetic vector potential in an axial cut and secondly the former solution is coupled to a three dimensional model of the stator. The coupling is performed using projection based algorithms between the computed magnetic solution and the three-dimensional mesh. The three-dimensional model of the stator includes both end-windings and end-shields in order to give a realistic picture of the motor. The present model is validated using two steps. Firstly, a modal analysis hammer test is used to validate the material characteristic of this complex structure and secondly an array of accelerometer sensors is used in order to study the rotating waves using multi-dimensional spectral techniques. The analysis of the radial vibrations presented in this paper firstly concludes that slot harmonic components are visible when the motor is loaded. Secondly, the multidimensional spectrum presents the most relevant mechanical waves on the stator such as the ones produced by the space harmonics or the saturation of the iron core. The direct retrieval of the wave-number in a multi-dimensional spectrum is able to show the internal current distribution in a non-intrusive way. Experimental results for healthy induction motors are showing mechanical imbalances in a multi-dimensional spectrum in a more straightforward form.

  6. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  7. Finite-element-based discretization and regularization strategies for 3-D inverse electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Kirby, Robert M; Johnson, Chris R

    2011-06-01

    We consider the inverse electrocardiographic problem of computing epicardial potentials from a body-surface potential map. We study how to improve numerical approximation of the inverse problem when the finite-element method is used. Being ill-posed, the inverse problem requires different discretization strategies from its corresponding forward problem. We propose refinement guidelines that specifically address the ill-posedness of the problem. The resulting guidelines necessitate the use of hybrid finite elements composed of tetrahedra and prism elements. Also, in order to maintain consistent numerical quality when the inverse problem is discretized into different scales, we propose a new family of regularizers using the variational principle underlying finite-element methods. These variational-formed regularizers serve as an alternative to the traditional Tikhonov regularizers, but preserves the L(2) norm and thereby achieves consistent regularization in multiscale simulations. The variational formulation also enables a simple construction of the discrete gradient operator over irregular meshes, which is difficult to define in traditional discretization schemes. We validated our hybrid element technique and the variational regularizers by simulations on a realistic 3-D torso/heart model with empirical heart data. Results show that discretization based on our proposed strategies mitigates the ill-conditioning and improves the inverse solution, and that the variational formulation may benefit a broader range of potential-based bioelectric problems.

  8. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  9. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  10. 3D finite element analysis of porous Ti-based alloy prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mircheski, Ile; Gradišar, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, novel designs of porous acetabular cups are created and tested with 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The aim is to develop a porous acetabular cup with low effective radial stiffness of the structure, which will be near to the architectural and mechanical behavior of the natural bone. For the realization of this research, a 3D-scanner technology was used for obtaining a 3D-CAD model of the pelvis bone, a 3D-CAD software for creating a porous acetabular cup, and a 3D-FEA software for virtual testing of a novel design of the porous acetabular cup. The results obtained from this research reveal that a porous acetabular cup from Ti-based alloys with 60 ± 5% porosity has the mechanical behavior and effective radial stiffness (Young's modulus in radial direction) that meet and exceed the required properties of the natural bone. The virtual testing with 3D-FEA of a novel design with porous structure during the very early stage of the design and the development of orthopedic implants, enables obtaining a new or improved biomedical implant for a relatively short time and reduced price.

  11. 3D mechanical analysis of aeronautical plain bearings: Validation of a finite element model from measurement of displacement fields by digital volume correlation and optical scanning tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Peyruseigt, F.; Mistou, S.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    On Airbus aircraft, spherical plain bearings are used on many components; in particular to link engine to pylon or pylon to wing. Design of bearings is based on contact pressure distribution on spherical surfaces. To determine this distribution, a 3D analysis of the mechanical behaviour of aeronautical plain bearing is presented in this paper. A numerical model has been built and validated from a comparison with 3D experimental measurements of kinematic components. For that, digital volume correlation (DVC) coupled with optical scanning tomography (OST) is employed to study the mechanical response of a plain bearing model made in epoxy resin. Experimental results have been compared with the ones obtained from the simulated model. This comparison enables us to study the influence of various boundary conditions to build the FE model. Some factors have been highlighted like the fitting behaviour which can radically change contact pressure distribution. This work shows the contribution of a representative mechanical environment to study precisely mechanical response of aeronautical plain bearings.

  12. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Thermo-Mechanical Properties of 3D Braided Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li-li; Xu, Guo-dong; Cheng, Su; Lu, Xia-mei; Zeng, Tao

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a modified finite element model (FEM) to investigate the thermo-mechanical properties of three-dimensional (3D) braided composite. The effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) and the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites are predicted. The effects of the braiding angle and fiber volume fraction on the effective CTE are evaluated. The results are compared to the experimental data available in the literature to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the present method. The tensile stress distributions of the representative volume element (RVE) are also outlined. It is found that the stress of the braiding yarn has a significant increase with temperature rise; on the other hand, the temperature change has an insignificant effect on the stress of the matrix. In addition, a rapid decrease in the tensile strength of 3D braided composites is observed with the increase in temperature. It is revealed that the thermal conditions have a significant effect on the strength of 3D braided composites. The present method provides an effective tool to predict the stresses of 3D braided composites under thermo-mechanical loading.

  14. GENSURF: A mesh generator for 3D finite element analysis of surface and corner cracks in finite thickness plates subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A computer program that generates three-dimensional (3D) finite element models for cracked 3D solids was written. This computer program, gensurf, uses minimal input data to generate 3D finite element models for isotropic solids with elliptic or part-elliptic cracks. These models can be used with a 3D finite element program called surf3d. This report documents this mesh generator. In this manual the capabilities, limitations, and organization of gensurf are described. The procedures used to develop 3D finite element models and the input for and the output of gensurf are explained. Several examples are included to illustrate the use of this program. Several input data files are included with this manual so that the users can edit these files to conform to their crack configuration and use them with gensurf.

  15. 3D finite element analysis on esthetic indirect dental restorations under thermal and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Cornacchia, Tulimar P M; Las Casas, Estevam B; Cimini, Carlos Alberto; Peixoto, Rodrigo G

    2010-11-01

    Thermo-mechanical finite element analyses in 3-D models are described for determination of the stress levels due to thermal and mechanical loads in a healthy and restored tooth. Transient thermo-mechanical analysis simulating the ingestion of cold and hot drinks was performed to determine the temperature distribution in the models of the teeth, followed by linear elastic stress analyses. The thermal loads were applied on the occlusal and lingual surfaces. Subsequently, coupled variation of the temperature and mastication loading was considered. The vertical loading was distributed at occlusal points, adding up to 180 N. Maximum stresses were verified in resin restoration under thermal loads. When studying coupled effect of mechanical loading with that arising from thermal effects, higher tensile stress values occurred in porcelain restorations, especially at the restoration-dentin interface. Regions of high tensile stress were detected and their possible clinical significance with respect to restoration damage and microleakage were discussed.

  16. ATHENA 3D: A finite element code for ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C.; Rupin, F.; Fouquet, T.; Chassignole, B.

    2014-04-01

    The understanding of wave propagation phenomena requires use of robust numerical models. 3D finite element (FE) models are generally prohibitively time consuming. However, advances in computing processor speed and memory allow them to be more and more competitive. In this context, EDF R&D developed the 3D version of the well-validated FE code ATHENA2D. The code is dedicated to the simulation of wave propagation in all kinds of elastic media and in particular, heterogeneous and anisotropic materials like welds. It is based on solving elastodynamic equations in the calculation zone expressed in terms of stress and particle velocities. The particularity of the code relies on the fact that the discretization of the calculation domain uses a Cartesian regular 3D mesh while the defect of complex geometry can be described using a separate (2D) mesh using the fictitious domains method. This allows combining the rapidity of regular meshes computation with the capability of modelling arbitrary shaped defects. Furthermore, the calculation domain is discretized with a quasi-explicit time evolution scheme. Thereby only local linear systems of small size have to be solved. The final step to reduce the computation time relies on the fact that ATHENA3D has been parallelized and adapted to the use of HPC resources. In this paper, the validation of the 3D FE model is discussed. A cross-validation of ATHENA 3D and CIVA is proposed for several inspection configurations. The performances in terms of calculation time are also presented in the cases of both local computer and computation cluster use.

  17. Finite-element simulation of flanging in the deform 3D software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrov, V. N.; Kononov, P. V.

    2016-05-01

    The results of a finite element simulation of the rolling of cylindrical workpieces using the DEFORM 3D software package are presented. The curve of the limiting plasticity of L63 brass that corresponds to various schemes of the state of stress in a workpiece is plotted. The deformation paths of the characteristic regions in a rolled part are calculated.

  18. BOPACE 3-D (the Boeing Plastic Analysis Capability for 3-dimensional Solids Using Isoparametric Finite Elements)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The BOPACE 3-D is a finite element computer program, which provides a general family of three-dimensional isoparametric solid elements, and includes a new algorithm for improving the efficiency of the elastic-plastic-creep solution procedure. Theoretical, user, and programmer oriented sections are presented to describe the program.

  19. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  20. 3D Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of the Nonuniform Residual Stress in Ultrasonic Impact Treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengsun; Guo, Chaobo; Wang, Dongpo; Wang, Zhijiang

    2016-09-01

    The nonuniform distributions of the residual stress were simulated by a 3D finite element model to analyze the elastic-plastic dynamic ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) process of multiple impacts on the 2024 aluminum alloy. The evolution of the stress during the impact process was discussed. The successive impacts during the UIT process improve the uniformity of the plastic deformation and decrease the maximum compressive residual stress beneath the former impact indentations. The influences of different controlled parameters, including the initial impact velocity, pin diameter, pin tip, device moving, and offset distances, on the residual stress distributions were analyzed. The influences of the controlled parameters on the residual stress distributions are apparent in the offset direction due to the different surface coverage in different directions. The influences can be used to understand the UIT process and to obtain the desired residual stress by optimizing the controlled parameters.

  1. Finite Element Model of Cardiac Electrical Conduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, John Zhihao

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop mathematical models to study electrical conduction of the heart. One important pattern of wave propagation of electrical excitation in the heart is reentry which is believed to be the underlying mechanism of some dangerous cardiac arhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. We present in this thesis a new ionic channel model of the ventricular cardiac cell membrane to study the microscopic electrical properties of myocardium. We base our model on recent single channel experiment data and a simple physical diffusion model of the calcium channel. Our ionic channel model of myocardium has simpler differential equations and fewer parameters than previous models. Further more, our ionic channel model achieves better results in simulating the strength-interval curve when we connect the membrane patch model to form a one dimensional cardiac muscle strand. We go on to study a finite element model which uses multiple states and non-nearest neighbor interactions to include curvature and dispersion effects. We create a generalized lattice randomization to overcome the artifacts generated by the interaction between the local dynamics and the regularities of the square lattice. We show that the homogeneous model does not display spontaneous wavefront breakup in a reentrant wave propagation once the lattice artifacts have been smoothed out by lattice randomization with a randomization scale larger than the characteristic length of the interaction. We further develop a finite 3-D 3-state heart model which employs a probability interaction rule. This model is applied to the simulation of Body Surface Laplacian Mapping (BSLM) using a cylindrical volume conductor as the torso model. We show that BSLM has a higher spatial resolution than conventional mapping methods in revealing the underlying electrical activities of the heart. The results of these studies demonstrate that mathematical modeling and computer simulation are very

  2. Holographic Interferometry based on photorefractive crystal to measure 3D thermo-elastic distortion of composite structures and comparison with finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thizy, C.; Eliot, F.; Ballhause, D.; Olympio, K. R.; Kluge, R.; Shannon, A.; Laduree, G.; Logut, D.; Georges, M. P.

    2013-04-01

    Thermo-elastic distortions of composite structures have been measured by a holographic camera using a BSO photorefractive crystal as the recording medium. The first test campaign (Phase 1) was performed on CFRP struts with titanium end-fittings glued to the tips of the strut. The samples were placed in a vacuum chamber. The holographic camera was located outside the chamber and configured with two illuminations to measure the relative out-of-plane and in-plane (in one direction) displacements. The second test campaign (Phase 2) was performed on a structure composed of a large Silicon Carbide base plate supported by 3 GFRP struts with glued Titanium end-fittings. Thermo-elastic distortions have been measured with the same holographic camera used in phase 1, but four illuminations, instead of two, have been used to provide the three components of displacement. This technique was specially developed and validated during the phase 2 in CSL laboratory. The system has been designed to measure an object size of typically 250x250 mm2; the measurement range is such that the sum of the largest relative displacements in the three measurement directions is maximum 20 μm. The validation of the four-illuminations technique led to measurement uncertainties of 120 nm for the relative in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, 230 nm for the absolute in-plane displacement and 400 nm for the absolute out-of-plane displacement. For both campaigns, the test results have been compared to the predictions obtained by finite element analyses and the correlation of these results was good.

  3. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  4. EXODUS II: A finite element data model

    SciTech Connect

    Schoof, L.A.; Yarberry, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  5. A modular numerical method for implicit 0D/3D coupling in cardiovascular finite element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Mahdi Esmaily; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Figliola, Richard; Marsden, Alison L.; Modeling Of Congenital Hearts Alliance (Mocha) Investigators

    2013-07-01

    Implementation of boundary conditions in cardiovascular simulations poses numerical challenges due to the complex dynamic behavior of the circulatory system. The use of elaborate closed-loop lumped parameter network (LPN) models of the heart and the circulatory system as boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can provide valuable global dynamic information, particularly for patient specific simulations. In this paper, the necessary formulation for coupling an arbitrary LPN to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver is presented. A circuit analogy closed-loop LPN is solved numerically, and pressure and flow information is iteratively passed between the 0D and 3D domains at interface boundaries, resulting in a time-implicit scheme. For Neumann boundaries, an implicit method, regardless of the LPN, is presented to achieve the desired stability and convergence properties. Numerical procedures for passing flow and pressure information between the 0D and 3D domains are described, and implicit, semi-implicit, and explicit quasi-Newton formulations are compared. The issue of divergence in the presence of backflow is addressed via a stabilized boundary formulation. The requirements for coupling Dirichlet boundary conditions are also discussed and this approach is compared in detail to that of the Neumann coupled boundaries. Having the option to select between Dirichlet and Neumann coupled boundary conditions increases the flexibility of current framework by allowing a wide range of components to be used at the 3D-0D interface.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Three-Dimensional Cervical Behaviors in Posterior-Oblique Car Collisions Using 3-D Human Whole Body Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yu-Bong; Jung, Duk-Young; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Nobuyuki; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Ikeuchi, Ken

    Whiplash injuries are most common disorders in rear-end car accidents, while the injury mechanism is yet unknown. Many numerical and experimental approaches have conducted to investigate the cervical behaviors with solely two-dimensional analyses in the sagittal plane. In real accidents, however, as impacts may affect several directions, the cervical behaviors should be evaluated three-dimensionally. Therefore, we evaluated the cervical behaviors under assumption of the posterior-oblique impacts depending on the impact angles with 3-D FE analysis. In addition, we analyzed the stresses occurred in the facet joints considering the relationship with a whiplash disorders. The cervical behaviors showed complex motion combined with axial torsion and lateral bending. The bending angle peaked in the impact at the angle of 15°, and the peak compressive and shear stress on the facet cartilage at C6-C7 increased by 11% and 14%. In the impact at the angle of 30°, the torsion angle peaked at C2-C3, the peak shear stress in the facet cartilage increased by 27%. It showed that the torsion and lateral bending affected the cervical behaviors, and caused the increase of peak stresses on the soft tissues. It is assumed as one of important causes of whiplash injury.

  7. Application of edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs in 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element absorbing boundary condition (FE-ABC) solution of the scattering by arbitrary 3-D structures is considered. The computational domain is discretized using edge-based tetrahedral elements. In contrast to the node-based elements, edge elements can treat geometries with sharp edges, are divergence-less, and easily satisfy the field continuity condition across dielectric interfaces. They do, however, lead to a higher unknown count but this is balanced by the greater sparsity of the resulting finite element matrix. Thus, the computation time required to solve such a system iteratively with a given degree of accuracy is less than the traditional node-based approach. The purpose is to examine the derivation and performance of the ABC's when applied to 2-D and 3-D problems and to discuss the specifics of our FE-ABC implementation.

  8. Finite element modeling of an electrically variable inductor

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Y.; Jiles, D.C.

    1999-09-01

    A new type of electrically variable inductor has been investigated. This uses an ac excitation field with an orthogonal dc bias field to control the properties of the device. Measurements showed that the effective inductance can be decreased by increasing the orthogonal dc bias field. With an appropriate current in the orthogonal bias coils, an inductance plateau can be reached in which the inductance remains stable over a range of excitation currents. The inductance value can be adjusted by controlling the orthogonal current. Based on an existing anhysteretic magnetization model, nonlinear 3D finite element modeling was successfully used to model the distribution of flux density and to identify the region of saturation which is believed to result in the decrease in effective inductance of the inductor. The effective inductance of the device was also modeled using numerical finite element calculations. The modeled inductance showed broad agreement with experimental results and predicted the observed trend in inductance.

  9. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  10. Asymmetric Outer Bow Length and Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Geramy, Allahyar; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Emadian Razavi, Elham sadat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess distal and lateral forces and moments of asymmetric headgears by variable outer bow lengths. Materials and Methods: Four 3D finite element method (FEM) models of a cervical headgear attached to the maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 software and transferred to ANSYS Workbench ver. 11 software. Models contained the first molars, their periodontal ligament (PDL), cancellous and cortical bones, a mesiodistal slice of the maxillae and the headgear. Models were the same except for the outer bow length in headgears. The headgear was symmetric in model 1. In models 2 to 4, the headgears were asymmetric in length with differences of 5mm, 10mm and 15mm, respectively. A 2.5 N force in horizontal plane was applied and the loading manner of each side of the outer bow was calculated trigonometrically using data from a volunteer. Results: The 15mm difference in outer bow length caused the greatest difference in lateral (=0.21 N) and distal (= 1.008 N) forces and also generated moments (5.044 N.mm). Conclusion: As the difference in outer bow length became greater, asymmetric effects increased. Greater distal force in the longer arm side was associated with greater lateral force towards the shorter arm side and more net yawing moment. Clinical Relevance: A difference range of 1mm to 15 mm of length in cervical headgear can be considered as a safe length of outer bow shortening in clinical use. PMID:26622275

  11. Modelling the arterial wall by finite elements.

    PubMed

    Mosora, F; Harmant, A; Bernard, C; Fossion, A; Pochet, T; Juchmes, J; Cescotto, S

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of the arterial wall was determined theoretically utilizing some parameters of blood flow measured in vivo. Continuous experimental measurements of pressure and diameter were recorded in anesthetized dogs on the thoracic ascending and midabdominal aorta. The pressure was measured by using a catheter, and the diameter firstly, at the same site, by a plethysmograph with mercury gauge and secondly, by a sonomicrometer with ferroelectric ceramic transducers. The unstressed radius and thickness were measured at the end of each experiment in situ. Considering that the viscous component is not important relatively to the nonlinear component of the elasticity and utilizing several equations for Young modulus calculation (thick and thin wall circular cylindrical tube formulas and Bergel's equation) the following values were obtained for this parameter: 0.6 MPa-2 MPa in midabdominal aorta and 2 MPa-6.5 MPa in thoracic ascending aorta. The behaviour of the aorta wall was modelled considering an elastic law and using the finite element program "Lagamine" working in large deformations. The discretized equilibrium equations are non-linear and a unique axi-symmetric, iso-parametric element of 1 cm in length with 8 knots was used for this bi-dimensional problem. The theoretical estimation of radius vessel, utilizing a constant 5 MPa Young modulus and also a variable one, are in good agreement with the experimental results, showing that this finite element model can be applied to study mechanical properties of the arteries in physiological and pathological conditions.

  12. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  13. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar–canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30–50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in

  14. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  15. A finite element model with nonviscous damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Hyer, M. W.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A constitutive law by which structural damping is modeled as a relationship between stress, strain, and strain rate in a material is used in conjunction with the finite element method to develop general integral expressions for viscous and nonviscous damping matrices. To solve the set of nonlinear equations resulting from the presence of nonviscous damping, a solution technique is developed by modifying the Newmark method to accommodate an iterative solution and treat the nonviscous damping as a pseudo-force. The technique is then checked for accuracy and convergence in single- and multi-degree-of-freedom problems, and is found to be accurate and efficient for initial-condition problems with small nonviscous damping.

  16. Finite-element modeling of nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.; Barbour, J.C.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-02-01

    Procedures have been developed based on finite-element modeling of nanoindentation data to obtain the mechanical properties of thin films and ion-beam-modified layers independently of the properties of the underlying substrates. These procedures accurately deduce the yield strength, Young{close_quote}s elastic modulus, and layer hardness from indentations as deep as 50{percent} of the layer thickness or more. We have used these procedures to evaluate materials ranging from ion implanted metals to deposited, diamond-like carbon layers. The technique increases the applicability of indentation testing to very thin layers, composite layers, and modulated compositions. This article presents an overview of the procedures involved and illustrates them with selected examples. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Least-squares finite element solution of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, Tsung-Liang; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1992-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the finite element solution of incompressible viscous flow problems. Development of more efficient methods is still needed before large-scale computation of 3D problems becomes feasible. This paper presents such a development. The most popular finite element method for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is the classic Galerkin mixed method based on the velocity-pressure formulation. The mixed method requires the use of different elements to interpolate the velocity and the pressure in order to satisfy the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition for the existence of the solution. On the other hand, due to the lack of symmetry and positive definiteness of the linear equations arising from the mixed method, iterative methods for the solution of linear systems have been hard to come by. Therefore, direct Gaussian elimination has been considered the only viable method for solving the systems. But, for three-dimensional problems, the computer resources required by a direct method become prohibitively large. In order to overcome these difficulties, a least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) has been developed. This method is based on the first-order velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. In this paper the LSFEM is extended for the solution of three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in the following first-order quasi-linear velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation.

  18. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  19. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  20. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  1. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth. PMID:26213205

  2. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  3. Experimental validation of 3D printed patient-specific implants using digital image correlation and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Miller, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    With the dawn of 3D printing technology, patient-specific implant designs are set to have a paradigm shift. A topology optimization method in designing patient-specific craniofacial implants has been developed to ensure adequate load transfer mechanism and restore the form and function of the mid-face. Patient-specific finite element models are used to design these implants and to validate whether they are viable for physiological loading such as mastication. Validation of these topology optimized finite element models using mechanical testing is a critical step. Instead of inserting the implants into a cadaver or patient, we embed the implants into the computer-aided skull model of a patient and, fuse them together to 3D print the complete skull model with the implant. Masticatory forces are applied in the molar region to simulate chewing and measure the stress-strain trajectory. Until recently, strain gages have been used to measure strains for validation. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method is a relatively new technique for full-field strain measurement which provides a continuous deformation field data. The main objective of this study is to validate the finite element model of patient-specific craniofacial implants against the strain data from the DIC obtained during the mastication simulation and show that the optimized shapes provide adequate load-transfer mechanism. Patient-specific models are obtained from CT scans. The principal maximum and minimum strains are compared. The computational and experimental approach to designing patient-specific implants proved to be a viable technique for mid-face craniofacial reconstruction. PMID:24992729

  4. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  5. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  6. Coseismic and postseismic Coulomb stress changes on intra-continental dip-slip faults and the role of viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust: insights from 3D finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge, Meike; Hampel, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Investigating the stress interaction of faults plays a crucial role for assessing seismic hazard of a region. The calculation of Coulomb stress changes allows quantifying stress changes on so-called receiver faults in the surrounding of a source fault that was ruptured during an earthquake. Positive Coulomb stress changes bring receiver faults closer to failure, while a negative value indicates a delay of the next earthquake. Besides the coseismic ('static') stress changes, postseismic ('transient') stress changes induced by postseismic viscoelastic relaxation occur. Here we use 3D finite-element models with arrays of normal or thrust faults to study the coseismic stress changes and the stress changes arising from postseismic relaxation in the lower crust. The lithosphere is divided into an elastic upper crust, a viscoelastic lower crust and a viscoelastic lithospheric mantle. Gravity is included in the models. Driven by extension or shortening of the model, slip on the fault planes develops in a self-consistent way. We modelled an earthquake on a 40-km-long source fault with a coseismic slip of 2 m and calculated the displacement fields and Coulomb stress changes during the coseismic and postseismic phases. The results for the coseismic phase (Bagge and Hampel, Tectonophysics in press) show that synthetic receiver faults in the hanging wall and footwall of the source fault exhibit a symmetric distribution of the coseismic Coulomb stress changes on each fault, with large areas of negative stress changes but also some smaller areas of positive values. In contrast, faults positioned in along-strike prolongation of the source fault and outside of its hanging wall and footwall undergo mostly positive stress changes. Postseismic stress changes caused by viscous flow modify the static stress changes in a way that the net Coulomb stress changes on the receiver faults change significantly through space and time. Our models allow deciphering the combined effect of stress

  7. Validation of a finite element model of the human metacarpal.

    PubMed

    Barker, D S; Netherway, D J; Krishnan, J; Hearn, T C

    2005-03-01

    Implant loosening and mechanical failure of components are frequently reported following metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint replacement. Studies of the mechanical environment of the MCP implant-bone construct are rare. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive ability of a finite element model of the intact second human metacarpal to provide a validated baseline for further mechanical studies. A right index human metacarpal was subjected to torsion and combined axial/bending loading using strain gauge (SG) and 3D finite element (FE) analysis. Four different representations of bone material properties were considered. Regression analyses were performed comparing maximum and minimum principal surface strains taken from the SG and FE models. Regression slopes close to unity and high correlation coefficients were found when the diaphyseal cortical shell was modelled as anisotropic and cancellous bone properties were derived from quantitative computed tomography. The inclusion of anisotropy for cortical bone was strongly influential in producing high model validity whereas variation in methods of assigning stiffness to cancellous bone had only a minor influence. The validated FE model provides a tool for future investigations of current and novel MCP joint prostheses.

  8. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  9. A finite element model of ultrasonic extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, M.; Daud, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Since the 1950's researchers have carried out investigations into the effects of applying ultrasonic excitation to metals undergoing elastic and plastic deformation. Experiments have been conducted where ultrasonic excitation is superimposed in complex metalworking operations such as wire drawing and extrusion, to identify the benefits of ultrasonic vibrations. This study presents a finite element analysis of ultrasonic excitation applied to the extrusion of a cylindrical aluminium bar. The effects of friction on the extrusion load are reported for the two excitation configurations of radially and axially applied ultrasonic vibrations and the results are compared with experimental data reported in the literature.

  10. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  11. surf3d: A 3-D finite-element program for the analysis of surface and corner cracks in solids subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program, surf3d, that uses the 3D finite-element method to calculate the stress-intensity factors for surface, corner, and embedded cracks in finite-thickness plates with and without circular holes, was developed. The cracks are assumed to be either elliptic or part eliptic in shape. The computer program uses eight-noded hexahedral elements to model the solid. The program uses a skyline storage and solver. The stress-intensity factors are evaluated using the force method, the crack-opening displacement method, and the 3-D virtual crack closure methods. In the manual the input to and the output of the surf3d program are described. This manual also demonstrates the use of the program and describes the calculation of the stress-intensity factors. Several examples with sample data files are included with the manual. To facilitate modeling of the user's crack configuration and loading, a companion program (a preprocessor program) that generates the data for the surf3d called gensurf was also developed. The gensurf program is a three dimensional mesh generator program that requires minimal input and that builds a complete data file for surf3d. The program surf3d is operational on Unix machines such as CRAY Y-MP, CRAY-2, and Convex C-220.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Meniscal Anatomical 3D Scaffolds: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, L; Lambers, F.M; Wilson, W; van Donkelaar, C.C; de Wijn, JR; Huiskesb, R; van Blitterswijk, C.A

    2007-01-01

    Solid Free-Form Fabrication (SFF) technologies allow the fabrication of anatomical 3D scaffolds from computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patients’ dataset. These structures can be designed and fabricated with a variable, interconnected and accessible porous network, resulting in modulable mechanical properties, permeability, and architecture that can be tailored to mimic a specific tissue to replace or regenerate. In this study, we evaluated whether anatomical meniscal 3D scaffolds with matching mechanical properties and architecture are beneficial for meniscus replacement as compared to meniscectomy. After acquiring CT and MRI of porcine menisci, 3D fiber-deposited (3DF) scaffolds were fabricated with different architectures by varying the deposition pattern of the fibers comprising the final structure. The mechanical behaviour of 3DF scaffolds with different architectures and of porcine menisci was measured by static and dynamic mechanical analysis and the effect of these tissue engineering templates on articular cartilage was assessed by finite element analysis (FEA) and compared to healthy conditions or to meniscectomy. Results show that 3DF anatomical menisci scaffolds can be fabricated with pore different architectures and with mechanical properties matching those of natural menisci. FEA predicted a beneficial effect of meniscus replacement with 3D scaffolds in different mechanical loading conditions as compared to meniscectomy. No influence of the internal scaffold architecture was found on articular cartilage damage. Although FEA predictions should be further confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments, this study highlights meniscus replacement by SFF anatomical scaffolds as a potential alternative to meniscectomy. PMID:19662124

  13. Nonlinear finite element modeling of THUNDER piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-06-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (Thin Layer Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  14. Non-Linear Finite Element Modeling of THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-01-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (THin Layer UNimorph Ferroelectric DrivER) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  15. Modelling the electromagnetic performance of moving rail gun launchers using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in 'smooth rotor' conductors moving at constant velocity is described. A method for joining discontinuous A fields at the interface between conductors in sliding electrical contact has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis.

  16. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shrikar R.; Karthikeyan, I.; Gaddale, Reetika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method) models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N) in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered. PMID:24554890

  17. FERM3D: A finite element R-matrix electron molecule scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    FERM3D is a three-dimensional finite element program, for the elastic scattering of a low energy electron from a general polyatomic molecule, which is converted to a potential scattering problem. The code is based on tricubic polynomials in spherical coordinates. The electron-molecule interaction is treated as a sum of three terms: electrostatic, exchange, and polarization. The electrostatic term can be extracted directly from ab initio codes ( GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here), while the exchange term is approximated using a local density functional. A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [C. Lee, W. Yang, R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. B 37 (1988) 785] describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron. Photoionization calculations are also possible and illustrated in the present work. The generality and simplicity of the approach is important in extending electron-scattering calculations to more complex targets than it is possible with other methods. Program summaryTitle of program:FERM3D Catalogue identifier:ADYL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYL_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Intel Xeon, AMD Opteron 64 bit, Compaq Alpha Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:HP Tru64 Unix v5.1, Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3 Programming language used:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:900 MB (neutral CO 2), 2.3 GB (ionic CO 2), 1.4 GB (benzene) No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:58 383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:561 653 Distribution format:tar.gzip file CPC Program library subprograms used:ADDA, ACDP Nature of physical problem:Scattering of an

  18. A 3-D finite-element computation of eddy currents and losses in laminated iron cores allowing for electric and magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, V.C.; Meunier, G.; Foggia, A.

    1995-05-01

    A 3-D scheme based on the Finite Element Method, which takes electric and magnetic anisotropy into consideration, has been developed for computing eddy-current losses caused by stray magnetic fields in laminated iron cores of large transformers and generators. The model is applied to some laminated iron-core samples and compared with equivalent solid-iron cases.

  19. Validation of high displacement piezoelectric actuator finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.

    2000-08-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness and important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN and ANSYS used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN, a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  20. Validation of High Displacement Piezoelectric Actuator Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Regitered Trademark) finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness are important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Registered Trademark) used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN(Registered Trademark), a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS(Registered Trademark) processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  1. Experimental Investigation and 3D Finite Element Prediction of Temperature Distribution during Travelling Heat Sourced from Oxyacetylene Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar Alkali, Adam; Lenggo Ginta, Turnad; Majdi Abdul-Rani, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D transient finite element modelling of the workpiece temperature field produced during the travelling heat sourced from oxyacetylene flame. The proposed model was given in terms of preheat-only test applicable during thermally enhanced machining using the oxyacetylene flame as a heat source. The FEA model as well as the experimental test investigated the surface temperature distribution on 316L stainless steel at scanning speed of 100mm/min, 125mm/min 160mm/min, 200mm/min and 250mm/min. The parametric properties of the heat source maintained constant are; lead distance Ld =10mm, focus height Fh=7.5mm, oxygen gas pressure Poxy=15psi and acetylene gas pressure Pacty=25psi. An experimental validation of the temperature field induced on type 316L stainless steel reveal that temperature distribution increases when the travelling speed decreases.

  2. A NURBS-based generalized finite element scheme for 3D simulation of heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Masoud; Najafi, Ahmad R.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Geubelle, Philippe H.

    2016-08-01

    A 3D NURBS-based interface-enriched generalized finite element method (NIGFEM) is introduced to solve problems with complex discontinuous gradient fields observed in the analysis of heterogeneous materials. The method utilizes simple structured meshes of hexahedral elements that do not necessarily conform to the material interfaces in heterogeneous materials. By avoiding the creation of conforming meshes used in conventional FEM, the NIGFEM leads to significant simplification of the mesh generation process. To achieve an accurate solution in elements that are crossed by material interfaces, the NIGFEM utilizes Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) to enrich the solution field locally. The accuracy and convergence of the NIGFEM are tested by solving a benchmark problem. We observe that the NIGFEM preserves an optimal rate of convergence, and provides additional advantages including the accurate capture of the solution fields in the vicinity of material interfaces and the built-in capability for hierarchical mesh refinement. Finally, the use of the NIGFEM in the computational analysis of heterogeneous materials is discussed.

  3. Integration of geometric modeling and advanced finite element preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.; Finnigan, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    The structure to a geometry based finite element preprocessing system is presented. The key features of the system are the use of geometric operators to support all geometric calculations required for analysis model generation, and the use of a hierarchic boundary based data structure for the major data sets within the system. The approach presented can support the finite element modeling procedures used today as well as the fully automated procedures under development.

  4. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  5. Finite Elements Modeling in Diagnostics of Small Closed Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, J; Mrzygłód, M; Grzegorowska, O

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic pneumothorax still remains to be a serious clinical problem and requires a comprehensive diagnostic and monitoring during treatment. The aim of this paper is to present a computer method of modeling of small closed pneumothorax. Radiological images of 34 patients of both sexes with small closed pneumothorax were taken into consideration. The control group consisted of X-rays of 22 patients treated because of tension pneumothorax. In every single case the model was correlated with the clinical manifestations. The procedure of computational rapid analysis (CRA) for in silico analysis of surgical intervention was introduced. It included implementation of computerize tomography images and their automatic conversion into 3D finite elements model (FEM). In order to segmentize the 3D model, an intelligent procedure of domain recognition was used. In the final step, a computer simulation project of fluid-structure interaction was built, using the ANSYS\\Workbench environment of multi-physics analysis. The FEM model and computer simulation project were employed in the analysis in order to optimize surgical intervention. The model worked out well and was compatible with the clinical manifestations of pneumothorax. We conclude that the created FEM model is a promising tool for facilitation of diagnostic procedures and prognosis of treatment in the case of small closed pneumothorax.

  6. A Simulation of crustal deformation around sourthwest Japan using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oma, T.; Ito, T.; Sasajima, R.

    2015-12-01

    In southwest Japan, the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Amurian plate at the Nankai Trough. Megathrust earthquakes have been occurred with recurrence intervals of about 100-150 years. Previous studies have estimated co-seismic slip distribution at the 1944 Tokankai and the 1946 Nankai earthquakes and interplate plate coupling along the Nankai Trough. Many of previous studies employed a homogeneous elastic half space or elastic and viscoelastic layers structure. However, these assumptions as mentioned above are inadequate, since inhomogeneous structure is exceled in the real earth result from subducting plate. Therefore, in order to estimate the effect of inhomogeneous structure on the crustal deformation, we calculate crustal deformation due to Megathrust earthquake using 3-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM). We use FEM software PyLith v2.1. In this study, we construct a finite element mesh with the region of 3000km(SW) × 2300km(NS) × 400km(depth) cover Japanese Islands, using Cubit 13.0. This mesh is considered topography, the Philippine Sea plate, the Pacific plate, Moho discontinuity, and curvature of the earth. In order to examine differences of surface displacement between inhomogeneous and homogeneous structures, we use co-seismic slip distribution of the 1944 and 1946 earthquakes estimated by Sagiya and Thatcher (1999). In result, surface elastic response under inhomogeneous structure becomes 30% larger than it's homogeneous structure at the Muroto cape. This difference indicates that co-seismic slip or plate coupling distribution estimated from Green's function under an assumption of homogeneous structure is overestimated. Then, we calculate viscoelastic response assuming Maxwell rheology model and viscosity as 1×1019. As a result, predicted horizontal velocity of viscoelastic response due to the events corresponds to 10 % of observed present deformation. It suggest that spatial pattern of plate coupling might be change when we

  7. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  8. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  9. Finite element modeling of seismic wave propagation in earthen embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadese, Binyam Darsema

    The detection of internal seepage zones in embankments (dams and levees) by geophysical seismic techniques such as seismic refraction is limited by a number of factors. Some factors are associated with inversion and smoothing problems during processing, while others are associated with the natural characteristics of embankments and seepage anomalies. In this research, changes in the seismic response associated with: embankment soil compositions and moisture, characteristics of the seepage zone, presence of water in the reservoir, and shape of embankment was studied via 2D and 3D finite element (FE) embankment models. Artificial reflections from external boundaries and numerical dispersion were first examined in the frame work of COMSOL. A combination of an absorbing layer and dashpot elements produced minimal reflections. The numerical dispersion study suggested a mesh composed of 5 quartic (4th order) elements per wavelength and a time step of 1/4 of 1/20 of the minimum period to be optimal. COMSOL models were verified by comparing to the analytic solutions for a transient point source in an unbounded media. The agreement of arrival times from a point source and a line source were also ascertained for an elastic half space model. The seismic response of dry and wet seepage zones in an embankment were evaluated for 2D longitudinal and transverse models. The zones considered in this study do not cause substantial deviations on the first arrival times but behave as scatters and their signatures were, predominantly, wavelet distortion. Wet (high impedance) zone produces a higher amplitude wavelet that is delayed in time, whereas a dry (low impedance) zone produces an earlier arriving lower amplitude, first arriving wavelet. Processing algorithms such as tomography that can incorporate such finite frequency effects may improve the detection of internal seepage in earthen embankments. The results from preliminary 3D models suggest that the water in the reservoir and the

  10. Bone stress and strain modification in diastema closure: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Bouserhal, Joseph; Martin, Domingo; Baghaeian, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the stress and strain distribution in the alveolar bone between two central incisors in the process of diastema closure with a constant force. A 3-dimensional computer modeling based on finite element techniques was used for this purpose. A model of an anterior segment of the mandible containing cortical bone, spongy bone, gingivae, PDL and two central incisors with a bracket in the labial surface of each tooth were designed. The von Mises stress and strain was evaluated in alveolar bone along a path of nodes defined in a cresto-apical direction in the midline between two teeth. It was observed that stress and strain of alveolar bone increased in midline with a constant force to close the diastema regardless of the type of movement in gradual steps of diastema closure, however the stress was higher in the tipping movement than the bodily so it can be suggested that a protocol of force system modification should be introduced to compensate for the stress and strain changes caused by the reduced distance to avoid the unwanted stress alteration during the diastema closure. PMID:26277458

  11. Finite element code development for modeling detonation of HMX composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Adam; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2015-06-01

    In this talk, we present a hydrodynamics code for modeling shock and detonation waves in HMX. A stable efficient solution strategy based on a Taylor-Galerkin finite element (FE) discretization was developed to solve the reactive Euler equations. In our code, well calibrated equations of state for the solid unreacted material and gaseous reaction products have been implemented, along with a chemical reaction scheme and a mixing rule to define the properties of partially reacted states. A linear Gruneisen equation of state was employed for the unreacted HMX calibrated from experiments. The JWL form was used to model the EOS of gaseous reaction products. It is assumed that the unreacted explosive and reaction products are in both pressure and temperature equilibrium. The overall specific volume and internal energy was computed using the rule of mixtures. Arrhenius kinetics scheme was integrated to model the chemical reactions. A locally controlled dissipation was introduced that induces a non-oscillatory stabilized scheme for the shock front. The FE model was validated using analytical solutions for sod shock and ZND strong detonation models and then used to perform 2D and 3D shock simulations. We will present benchmark problems for geometries in which a single HMX crystal is subjected to a shock condition. Our current progress towards developing microstructural models of HMX/binder composite will also be discussed.

  12. 3D finite element simulation of non-crimp fabric composites ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Saffari, N.; Fromme, P.

    2012-05-01

    Composite materials offer many advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. Different types of composites, such as non-crimp fabrics (NCF), are currently being investigated as they offer reduced manufacturing costs and improved damage tolerance as compared to traditional pre-impregnated composite materials. NCF composites are made from stitched fiber bundles (tows), which typically have a width and thickness of less than a millimeter. This results in strongly inhomogeneous and anisotropic material properties. Different types of manufacturing imperfections, such as porosity, resin pockets, tow crimp and misalignment can lead to reduced material strength and thus to defects following excessive loads or impact, e.g., fracture and delaminations. The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of NCF composites is difficult, as the tow size is comparable to the wavelength, leading to multiple scattering in this inherently three-dimensional structure. For typical material properties and geometry of an NCF composite, a full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed in ABAQUS. The propagation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been simulated and the effect of multiple scattering at the fiber tows investigated. The influence of porosity in the epoxy matrix as a typical manufacturing defect on the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation has been studied.

  13. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  14. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  15. DYNA3D Finite Element Analysis of Steam Explosion Loads on a Pedestal Wall Design

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C R

    2007-01-18

    The objective of this brief report is to document the ESBWR pedestal wall finite element analyses that were performed as a quick turnaround effort in July 2005 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and describe the assumptions and failure criteria used for these analyses [Ref 4]. The analyses described within are for the pedestal wall design that included an internal steel liner. The goal of the finite element analyses was to assist in determining the load carrying capacity of the ESBWR pedestal wall subjected to an impulsive pressure generated by a steam explosion.

  16. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  17. Finite element models of the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Finite element models were developed as input to dynamic simulations of the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP), the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP), and the space shuttle main engine (SSME). Descriptions are provided for the five basic finite element models: HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, HPOTP case, and SSME (excluding turbopumps). Modal results are presented for the HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, coupled HPFTP rotor and case, HPOTP case, coupled HPOTP rotor and case, SSME (excluding turbopumps), and SSME (including turbopumps). Results for the SSME (including turbopumps) model are compared to data from a SSME HPOTP modal survey.

  18. Finite element modeling of blast lung injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Dang, Xinglai; Adkins, Mark; Powell, Brian; Chan, Philemon

    2015-04-01

    A detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the sheep thorax was developed to predict heterogeneous and volumetric lung injury due to blast. A shared node mesh of the sheep thorax was constructed from a computed tomography (CT) scan of a sheep cadaver, and while most material properties were taken from literature, an elastic-plastic material model was used for the ribs based on three-point bending experiments performed on sheep rib specimens. Anesthetized sheep were blasted in an enclosure, and blast overpressure data were collected using the blast test device (BTD), while surface lung injury was quantified during necropsy. Matching blasts were simulated using the sheep thorax FEM. Surface lung injury in the FEM was matched to pathology reports by setting a threshold value of the scalar output termed the strain product (maximum value of the dot product of strain and strain-rate vectors over all simulation time) in the surface elements. Volumetric lung injury was quantified by applying the threshold value to all elements in the model lungs, and a correlation was found between predicted volumetric injury and measured postblast lung weights. All predictions are made for the left and right lungs separately. This work represents a significant step toward the prediction of localized and heterogeneous blast lung injury, as well as volumetric injury, which was not recorded during field testing for sheep.

  19. An analysis of the mechanical parameters used for finite element compression of a high-resolution 3D breast phantom

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Christina M. L.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Dobbins, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously introduced a methodology to generate a realistic three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, computer-simulated breast phantom based on empirical data. One of the key components of such a phantom is that it provides a means to produce a realistic simulation of clinical breast compression. In the current study, they have evaluated a finite element (FE) model of compression and have demonstrated the effect of a variety of mechanical properties on the model using a dense mesh generated from empirical breast data. While several groups have demonstrated an effective compression simulation with lower density finite element meshes, the presented study offers a mesh density that is able to model the morphology of the inner breast structures more realistically than lower density meshes. This approach may prove beneficial for multimodality breast imaging research, since it provides a high level of anatomical detail throughout the simulation study. Methods: In this paper, the authors describe methods to improve the high-resolution performance of a FE compression model. In order to create the compressible breast phantom, dedicated breast CT data was segmented and a mesh was generated with 4-noded tetrahedral elements. Using an explicit FE solver to simulate breast compression, several properties were analyzed to evaluate their effect on the compression model including: mesh density, element type, density, and stiffness of various tissue types, friction between the skin and the compression plates, and breast density. Following compression, a simulated projection was generated to demonstrate the ability of the compressible breast phantom to produce realistic simulated mammographic images. Results: Small alterations in the properties of the breast model can change the final distribution of the tissue under compression by more than 1 cm; which ultimately results in different representations of the breast model in the simulated images. The model

  20. A feasibility study of a 3-D finite element solution scheme for aeroengine duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The advantage from development of a 3-D model of aeroengine duct acoustics is the ability to analyze axial and circumferential liner segmentation simultaneously. The feasibility of a 3-D duct acoustics model was investigated using Galerkin or least squares element formulations combined with Gaussian elimination, successive over-relaxation, or conjugate gradient solution algorithms on conventional scalar computers and on a vector machine. A least squares element formulation combined with a conjugate gradient solver on a CDC Star vector computer initially appeared to have great promise, but severe difficulties were encountered with matrix ill-conditioning. These difficulties in conditioning rendered this technique impractical for realistic problems.

  1. Edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs applied to 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    An edge based finite element formulation with vector absorbing boundary conditions is presented for scattering by composite structures having boundaries satisfying impedance and/or transition conditions. Remarkably accurate results are obtained by placing the mesh a small fraction of a wavelength away from the scatterer.

  2. A shell finite element model of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    d'Aulignac, D; Martins, J A C; Pires, E B; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R M Natal

    2005-10-01

    The pelvic floor gives support to the organs in the abdominal cavity. Using the dataset made public in (Janda et al. J. Biomech. (2003) 36(6), pp. 749-757), we have reconstructed the geometry of one of the most important parts of the pelvic floor, the levator ani, using NURB surfaces. Once the surface is triangulated, the corresponding mesh is used in a finite element analysis with shell elements. Based on the 3D behavior of the muscle we have constructed a shell that takes into account the direction of the muscle fibers and the incompressibility of the tissue. The constitutive model for the isotropic strain energy and the passive strain energy stored in the fibers is adapted from Humphrey's model for cardiac muscles. To this the active behavior of the skeletal muscle is added. We present preliminary results of a simulation of the levator ani muscle under pressure and with active contraction. This research aims at helping simulate the damages to the pelvic floor that can occur after childbirth. PMID:16298856

  3. Rigorous joining of advanced reduced-dimensional beam models to three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huimin

    In the aerospace and automotive industries, many finite element analyses use lower-dimensional finite elements such as beams, plates and shells, to simplify the modeling. These simplified models can greatly reduce the computation time and cost; however, reduced-dimensional models may introduce inaccuracies, particularly near boundaries and near portions of the structure where reduced-dimensional models may not apply. Another factor in creation of such models is that beam-like structures frequently have complex geometry, boundaries and loading conditions, which may make them unsuitable for modeling with single type of element. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a method that can accurately and efficiently capture the response of a structure by rigorous combination of a reduced-dimensional beam finite element model with a model based on full two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) finite elements. The first chapter of the thesis gives the background of the present work and some related previous work. The second chapter is focused on formulating a system of equations that govern the joining of a 2D model with a beam model for planar deformation. The essential aspect of this formulation is to find the transformation matrices to achieve deflection and load continuity on the interface. Three approaches are provided to obtain the transformation matrices. An example based on joining a beam to a 2D finite element model is examined, and the accuracy of the analysis is studied by comparing joint results with the full 2D analysis. The third chapter is focused on formulating the system of equations for joining a beam to a 3D finite element model for static and free-vibration problems. The transition between the 3D elements and beam elements is achieved by use of the stress recovery technique of the variational-asymptotic method as implemented in VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis). The formulations for an interface transformation matrix and

  4. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  5. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  6. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-08-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  7. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-10-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  8. Finite element method for accurate 3D simulation of plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Sven; Zschiedrich, Lin; Pomplun, Jan; Schmidt, Frank

    2010-02-01

    Optical properties of hybrid plasmonic waveguides and of low-Q cavities, formed by waveguides of finite length are investigated numerically. These structures are of interest as building-blocks of plasmon lasers. We use a time-harmonic finite-element package including a propagation-mode solver, a resonance-mode solver and a scattering solver for studying various properties of the system. Numerical convergence of all used methods is demonstrated.

  9. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  10. Simulating hydroplaning of submarine landslides by quasi 3D depth averaged finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Blasio, Fabio; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    G.B. Crosta, H. J. Chen, and F.V. De Blasio Dept. Of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Milano, Italy Klohn Crippen Berger, Calgary, Canada Subaqueous debris flows/submarine landslides, both in the open ocean as well as in fresh waters, exhibit extremely high mobility, quantified by a ratio between vertical to horizontal displacement of the order 0.01 or even much less. It is possible to simulate subaqueous debris flows with small-scale experiments along a flume or a pool using a cohesive mixture of clay and sand. The results have shown a strong enhancement of runout and velocity compared to the case in which the same debris flow travels without water, and have indicated hydroplaning as a possible explanation (Mohrig et al. 1998). Hydroplaning is started when the snout of the debris flow travels sufficiently fast. This generates lift forces on the front of the debris flow exceeding the self-weight of the sediment, which so begins to travel detached from the bed, literally hovering instead of flowing. Clearly, the resistance to flow plummets because drag stress against water is much smaller than the shear strength of the material. The consequence is a dramatic increase of the debris flow speed and runout. Does the process occur also for subaqueous landslides and debris flows in the ocean, something twelve orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones? Obviously, no experiment will ever be capable to replicate this size, one needs to rely on numerical simulations. Results extending a depth-integrated numerical model for debris flows (Imran et al., 2001) indicate that hydroplaning is possible (De Blasio et al., 2004), but more should be done especially with alternative numerical methodologies. In this work, finite element methods are used to simulate hydroplaning using the code MADflow (Chen, 2014) adopting a depth averaged solution. We ran some simulations on the small scale of the laboratory experiments, and secondly

  11. Rn3D: A finite element code for simulating gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. User`s manual, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a user`s manual for the Rn3D finite element code. Rn3D was developed to simulate gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. The Rn3D model is applicable to a wide range of problems involving radon transport in soil because it can simulate either steady-state or transient flow and transport in one-, two- or three-dimensions (including radially symmetric two-dimensional problems). The porous materials may be heterogeneous and anisotropic. This manual describes all pertinent mathematics related to the governing, boundary, and constitutive equations of the model, as well as the development of the finite element equations used in the code. Instructions are given for constructing Rn3D input files and executing the code, as well as a description of all output files generated by the code. Five verification problems are given that test various aspects of code operation, complete with example input files, FORTRAN programs for the respective analytical solutions, and plots of model results. An example simulation is presented to illustrate the type of problem Rn3D is designed to solve. Finally, instructions are given on how to convert Rn3D to simulate systems other than radon, air, and water.

  12. 3D finite element and experimental study of the size requirements for measuring toughness on tempered martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, P.; Spätig, P.

    2009-06-01

    The fracture properties of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97, which is among the main candidates for fusion power plant structural applications, were studied with two sizes of pre-cracked compact specimens (0.35T C(T) and 0.87T C(T)). The fracture toughness behavior was characterized within the temperature range -80 to -40 °C. The ductile-to-brittle transition reference temperature, as defined in the ASTM standard E1921, was around T0 ≈ -75 °C. At -60 °C, it was found that two sets of toughness data obtained with 0.35T and 0.87T C(T) specimens are not consistent with the size adjustments recommended in the ASTM standard. It was then shown that the underlying reason of this inconsistency is an inappropriate specimen size limit of the ASTM standard for this type of steel. From published fracture toughness data on the tempered martensitic steel F82H steel, similar results were also highlighted. 3D finite elements simulations of the compact specimens were performed to compare the stresses and deformations at the onset of fracture. A local approach model based on the attainment of a critical stress and a critical volume was used to study the constraint loss phenomenon. Within the framework of this model, the strong toughness increase by reducing the specimen size could be satisfactorily explained.

  13. The effect of thread design on stress distribution in a solid screw implant: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Oğuz; Inan, Ozgür

    2010-08-01

    The biomechanical behavior of implant thread plays an important role on stresses at implant-bone interface. Information about the effect of different thread profiles upon the bone stresses is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different implant thread designs on stress distribution characteristics at supporting structures. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) stress-analysis method was used. Four types of 3D mathematical models simulating four different thread-form configurations for a solid screw implant was prepared with supporting bone structure. V-thread (1), buttress (2), reverse buttress (3), and square thread designs were simulated. A 100-N static axial occlusal load was applied to occlusal surface of abutment to calculate the stress distributions. Solidworks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FE modeling/analysis. The analysis of the von Mises stress values revealed that maximum stress concentrations were located at loading areas of implant abutments and cervical cortical bone regions for all models. Stress concentration at cortical bone (18.3 MPa) was higher than spongious bone (13.3 MPa), and concentration of first thread (18 MPa) was higher than other threads (13.3 MPa). It was seen that, while the von Mises stress distribution patterns at different implant thread models were similar, the concentration of compressive stresses were different. The present study showed that the use of different thread form designs did not affect the von Mises concentration at supporting bone structure. However, the compressive stress concentrations differ by various thread profiles.

  14. Sensitive analysis of a finite element model of orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocail, J.; Watremez, M.; Dubar, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional finite element model of orthogonal cutting. The proposed model has been developed with Abaqus/explicit software. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation is used to predict chip formation, temperature, chip-tool contact length, chip thickness, and cutting forces. This numerical model of orthogonal cutting will be validated by comparing these process variables to experimental and numerical results obtained by Filice et al. [1]. This model can be considered to be reliable enough to make qualitative analysis of entry parameters related to cutting process and frictional models. A sensitivity analysis is conducted on the main entry parameters (coefficients of the Johnson-Cook law, and contact parameters) with the finite element model. This analysis is performed with two levels for each factor. The sensitivity analysis realised with the numerical model on the entry parameters has allowed the identification of significant parameters and the margin identification of parameters.

  15. Finite Element Modelling of Fluid Coupling in the Coiled Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Saba, R.

    2011-11-01

    A finite element model is first used to calculate the modal pressure difference for a box model of the cochlea, which shows that the number of fluid elements across the width of the cochlea determines the accuracy with which the near field, or short wavenumber, component of the fluid coupling is reproduced. Then results are compared with the analytic results to validate the accuracy of the FE model. It is, however, the far field, or long wavelength, component of the fluid coupling that is most affected by the geometry. A finite element model of the coiled cochlea is then used to calculate fluid coupling in this case, which has similar characteristics to the uncoiled model.

  16. Design Optimization of Coronary Stent Based on Finite Element Models

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhu, Bao; Wu, Jinying

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an effective optimization method using the Kriging surrogate model combing with modified rectangular grid sampling to reduce the stent dogboning effect in the expansion process. An infilling sampling criterion named expected improvement (EI) is used to balance local and global searches in the optimization iteration. Four commonly used finite element models of stent dilation were used to investigate stent dogboning rate. Thrombosis models of three typical shapes are built to test the effectiveness of optimization results. Numerical results show that two finite element models dilated by pressure applied inside the balloon are available, one of which with the artery and plaque can give an optimal stent with better expansion behavior, while the artery and plaque unincluded model is more efficient and takes a smaller amount of computation. PMID:24222743

  17. Visualization methods for high-resolution, transient, 3-D, finite element situations

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-01-10

    Scientific visualization is the process whereby numerical data is transformed into a visual form to augment the process of discovery and understanding. Visualizing the data generated by large-scale, transient, three-dimensional finite element simulations poses many challenges due to geometric complexity, the presence of multiple materials and multiple element types, and the inherent unstructured nature of the meshes. In this paper, the direct use of finite element data structures, nodal assembly procedures, and element interpolants for volumetric adaptive surface extraction, surface rendering, vector grids and particle tracing is discussed. A brief description of a {open_quotes}direct-to-disk{close_quotes} animation system is presented, and case studies which demonstrate the use of isosurfaces, vector plots, cutting planes, reference surfaces and particle tracing are then discussed in the context of several case studies for transient incompressible viscous flow, and acoustic fluid-structure interaction simulations. An overview of the implications of massively parallel computers on visualization is presented to highlight the issues in parallel visualization methodology, algorithms. data locality and the ultimate requirements for temporary and archival data storage and network bandwidth.

  18. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  19. A fast hidden line algorithm for plotting finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Effective plotting of finite element models requires the use of fast hidden line plot techniques that provide interactive response. A high speed hidden line technique was developed to facilitate the plotting of NASTRAN finite element models. Based on testing using 14 different models, the new hidden line algorithm (JONES-D) appears to be very fast: its speed equals that for normal (all lines visible) plotting and when compared to other existing methods it appears to be substantially faster. It also appears to be very reliable: no plot errors were observed using the new method to plot NASTRAN models. The new algorithm was made part of the NPLOT NASTRAN plot package and was used by structural analysts for normal production tasks.

  20. Finite element modelling of the 1969 Portuguese tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesmia, M.; Heinrich, Ph.; Mariotti, C.

    1996-03-01

    On the 28 th February 1969, the coasts of Portugal, Spain and Morocco were affected by water waves generated by a submarine earthquake (Ms=7.3) with epicenter located off Portugal. The propagation of this tsunami has been simulated by a finite element numerical model solving the Boussinesq equations. These equations have been discretized using the finite element Galerkin method and a Crank-Nicholson scheme in time. The 2-D simulation of the 1969 tsunami is carried out using the hydraulic source calculated from the geophysical model of Okada and seismic parameters of Fukao. The modeled waves are compared with the recorded waves with respect to the travel times, the maximum amplitudes, the periods of the signal. Good agreement is found for most of the studied gauges. The comparison between Boussinesq and shallow-water models shows that the effects of frequency dispersion are minor using Fukao's seismic parameters.

  1. An atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 1. Formulation of the finite elements.

    PubMed

    Gleadall, Andrew; Pan, Jingzhe; Ding, Lifeng; Kruft, Marc-Anton; Curcó, David

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to analyse materials at the atomic scale. However, MD has high computational demands, which may inhibit its use for simulations of structures involving large numbers of atoms such as amorphous polymer structures. An atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) is presented in this study with significantly lower computational demands than MD. Due to the reduced computational demands, AFEM is suitable for the analysis of Young's modulus of amorphous polymer structures. This is of particular interest when studying the degradation of bioresorbable polymers, which is the topic of an accompanying paper. AFEM is derived from the inter-atomic potential energy functions of an MD force field. The nonlinear MD functions were adapted to enable static linear analysis. Finite element formulations were derived to represent interatomic potential energy functions between two, three and four atoms. Validation of the AFEM was conducted through its application to atomic structures for crystalline and amorphous poly(lactide).

  2. A verification procedure for MSC/NASTRAN Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    Finite Element Models (FEM's) are used in the design and analysis of aircraft to mathematically describe the airframe structure for such diverse tasks as flutter analysis and actively controlled landing gear design. FEM's are used to model the entire airplane as well as airframe components. The purpose of this document is to describe recommended methods for verifying the quality of the FEM's and to specify a step-by-step procedure for implementing the methods.

  3. A finite element model of ferroelectric/ferroelastic polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    HWANG,STEPHEN C.; MCMEEKING,ROBERT M.

    2000-02-17

    A finite element model of polarization switching in a polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic is developed. It is assumed that a crystallite switches if the reduction in potential energy of the polycrystal exceeds a critical energy barrier per unit volume of switching material. Each crystallite is represented by a finite element with the possible dipole directions assigned randomly subject to crystallographic constraints. The model accounts for both electric field induced (i.e. ferroelectric) switching and stress induced (i.e. ferroelastic) switching with piezoelectric interactions. Experimentally measured elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants are used consistently, but different effective critical energy barriers are selected phenomenologically. Electric displacement versus electric field, strain versus electric field, stress versus strain, and stress versus electric displacement loops of a ceramic lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) are modeled well below the Curie temperature.

  4. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  5. Finite element methods of analysis for 3D inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime

    1990-01-01

    The applicants have developed a finite element based approach for the solution of three-dimensional compressible flows. The procedure enables flow solutions to be obtained on tetrahedral discretizations of computational domains of complex form. A further development was the incorporation of a solution adaptive mesh strategy in which the adaptivity is achieved by complete remeshing of the solution domain. During the previous year, the applicants were working with the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center with an implementation of the basic meshing and solution procedure. The objective of the work to be performed over this twelve month period was the transfer of the adaptive mesh technology and also the undertaking of basic research into alternative flow algorithms for the Euler equations on unstructured meshes.

  6. Finite Element Modeling of Micromachined MEMS Photon Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Evans, B.M.; Schonberger, D.

    1999-09-20

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness.

  7. Finite Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Pritchard, Joselyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC configurations were compared with experimental modal survey data. The finite element models were updated and refined, using physical parameters, to increase correlation with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement, within an average 1.5% to 2.9%, was obtained between the predicted and measured modal frequencies of the stringer, frame and dome components. The predictions for the modal frequencies of the assembled component Configurations I through V were within an average 2.9% and 9.1%. Finite element modal analyses were performed for comparison with 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions in Configuration VI. The modal frequencies were predicted by applying differential stiffness to the elements with pressure loading and creating reduced matrices for beam elements with offsets inside external superelements. The average disagreement between the measured and predicted differences for the 0 psi and 6 psi internal pressure conditions was less than 0.5%. Comparably good agreement was obtained for the differences between the 0 psi and 3 psi measured and predicted internal pressure conditions.

  8. Tissue Modeling and Analyzing with Finite Element Method: A Review for Cranium Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xianfang; Wang, Li; Wang, Ruonan

    2013-01-01

    For the structure mechanics of human body, it is almost impossible to conduct mechanical experiments. Then the finite element model to simulate mechanical experiments has become an effective tool. By introducing several common methods for constructing a 3D model of cranial cavity, this paper carries out systematically the research on the influence law of cranial cavity deformation. By introducing the new concepts and theory to develop the 3D cranial cavity model with the finite-element method, the cranial cavity deformation process with the changing ICP can be made the proper description and reasonable explanation. It can provide reference for getting cranium biomechanical model quickly and efficiently and lay the foundation for further biomechanical experiments and clinical applications. PMID:23476630

  9. A Reduced Three Dimensional Model for SAW Sensors Using Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    El Gowini, Mohamed M.; Moussa, Walied A.

    2009-01-01

    A major problem that often arises in modeling Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) such as Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is the extensive computational capacity required. In this study a new approach is adopted to significantly reduce the computational capacity needed for analyzing the response of a SAW sensor using the finite element (FE) method. The approach is based on the plane wave solution where the properties of the wave vary in two dimensions and are uniform along the thickness of the device. The plane wave solution therefore allows the thickness of the SAW device model to be minimized; the model is referred to as a Reduced 3D Model (R3D). Various configurations of this novel R3D model are developed and compared with theoretical and experimental frequency data and the results show very good agreement. In addition, two-dimensional (2D) models with similar configurations to the R3D are developed for comparison since the 2D approach is widely adopted in the literature as a computationally inexpensive approach to model SAW sensors using the FE method. Results illustrate that the R3D model is capable of capturing the SAW response more accurately than the 2D model; this is demonstrated by comparison of centre frequency and insertion loss values. These results are very encouraging and indicate that the R3D model is capable of capturing the MEMS-based SAW sensor response without being computationally expensive. PMID:22303156

  10. A phenomenological finite element model of stereolithography processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Guess, T.R.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1996-03-01

    In the stereolithography process, three dimensional parts are built layer by layer using a laser to selectively cure slices of a photocurable resin, one on top of another. As the laser spot passes over the surface of the resin, the ensuing chemical reaction causes the resin to shrink and stiffen during solidification. When laser paths cross or when new layers are cured on top of existing layers, residual stresses are generated as the cure shrinkage of the freshly gelled resin is constrained by the adjoining previously-cured material. These internal stresses can cause curling in the compliant material. A capability for performing finite element analyses of the stereolithography process has been developed. Although no attempt has been made to incorporate all the physics of the process, a numerical platform suitable for such development has been established. A methodology and code architecture have been structured to allow finite elements to be birthed (activated) according to a prescribed order mimicking the procedure by which a laser is used to cure and build-up surface layers of resin to construct a three dimensional geometry. In its present form, the finite element code incorporates a simple phenomenological viscoelastic material model of solidification that is based on the shrinkage and relaxation observed following isolated, uncoupled laser exposures. The phenomenological material model has been used to analyze the curl in a simple cantilever beam and to make qualitative distinctions between two contrived build styles.

  11. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Armando Yukio; Maruo, Hiroshi; Argenta, Marco André; Maruo, Ivan Toshio; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1); bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2); bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3); bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4). Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution. PMID:27007765

  12. Automated Finite Element Modeling of Wing Structures for Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Michael Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The displacement formulation of the finite element method is the most general and most widely used technique for structural analysis of airplane configurations. Modem structural synthesis techniques based on the finite element method have reached a certain maturity in recent years, and large airplane structures can now be optimized with respect to sizing type design variables for many load cases subject to a rich variety of constraints including stress, buckling, frequency, stiffness and aeroelastic constraints (Refs. 1-3). These structural synthesis capabilities use gradient based nonlinear programming techniques to search for improved designs. For these techniques to be practical a major improvement was required in computational cost of finite element analyses (needed repeatedly in the optimization process). Thus, associated with the progress in structural optimization, a new perspective of structural analysis has emerged, namely, structural analysis specialized for design optimization application, or.what is known as "design oriented structural analysis" (Ref. 4). This discipline includes approximation concepts and methods for obtaining behavior sensitivity information (Ref. 1), all needed to make the optimization of large structural systems (modeled by thousands of degrees of freedom and thousands of design variables) practical and cost effective.

  13. FEMHD: An adaptive finite element method for MHD and edge modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the code FEMHD, an adaptive finite element MHD code, which is applied in a number of different manners to model MHD behavior and edge plasma phenomena on a diverted tokamak. The code uses an unstructured triangular mesh in 2D and wedge shaped mesh elements in 3D. The code has been adapted to look at neutral and charged particle dynamics in the plasma scrape off region, and into a full MHD-particle code.

  14. Finite Element Model of Training in the superconducting quadrupole magnet SQ02

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Shlomo; Ferracin, Paolo

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes the use of 3D finite element models to study training in superconducting magnets. The simulations are used to examine coil displacements when the electromagnetic forces are cycled, and compute the frictional energy released during conductor motion with the resulting temperature rise. A computed training curve is then presented and discussed. The results from the numerical computations are compared with test results of the Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet SQ02.

  15. On domain decomposition preconditioner of BPS type for finite element discretizations of 3D elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. G.

    2012-09-01

    BPS is a well known an efficient and rather general domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioner, suggested in the famous series of papers Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz (1986-1989). Since then, it has been serving as the origin for the whole family of domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioners-solvers as for h so hp discretizations of elliptic problems. For its original version, designed for h discretizations, the named authors proved the bound O(1 + log2 H/ h) for the relative condition number under some restricting conditions on the domain decomposition and finite element discretization. Here H/ h is the maximal relation of the characteristic size H of a decomposition subdomain to the mesh parameter h of its discretization. It was assumed that subdomains are images of the reference unite cube by trilinear mappings. Later similar bounds related to h discretizations were proved for more general domain decompositions, defined by means of coarse tetrahedral meshes. These results, accompanied by the development of some special tools of analysis aimed at such type of decompositions, were summarized in the book of Toselli and Widlund (2005). This paper is also confined to h discretizations. We further expand the range of admissible domain decompositions for constructing BPS preconditioners, in which decomposition subdomains can be convex polyhedrons, satisfying some conditions of shape regularity. We prove the bound for the relative condition number with the same dependence on H/ h as in the bound given above. Along the way to this result, we simplify the proof of the so called abstract bound for the relative condition number of the domain decomposition preconditioner. In the part, related to the analysis of the interface sub-problem preconditioning, our technical tools are generalization of those used by Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz.

  16. Finite element model for brittle fracture and fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wei; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Samulyak, Roman; Lu, Cao

    2016-06-01

    A new computational model for brittle fracture and fragmentation has been developed based on finite element analysis of non-linear elasticity equations. The proposed model propagates the cracks by splitting the mesh nodes alongside the most over-strained edges based on the principal direction of strain tensor. To prevent elements from overlapping and folding under large deformations, robust geometrical constraints using the method of Lagrange multipliers have been incorporated. In conclusion, the model has been applied to 2D simulations of the formation and propagation of cracks in brittle materials, and the fracture and fragmentation of stretched and compressed materials.

  17. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  18. Finite Element Model Calibration Approach for Ares I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Lazor, Daniel R.; Gaspar, James L.; Parks, Russel A.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ares I-X is a pathfinder vehicle concept under development by NASA to demonstrate a new class of launch vehicles. Although this vehicle is essentially a shell of what the Ares I vehicle will be, efforts are underway to model and calibrate the analytical models before its maiden flight. Work reported in this document will summarize the model calibration approach used including uncertainty quantification of vehicle responses and the use of nonconventional boundary conditions during component testing. Since finite element modeling is the primary modeling tool, the calibration process uses these models, often developed by different groups, to assess model deficiencies and to update parameters to reconcile test with predictions. Data for two major component tests and the flight vehicle are presented along with the calibration results. For calibration, sensitivity analysis is conducted using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). To reduce the computational burden associated with ANOVA calculations, response surface models are used in lieu of computationally intensive finite element solutions. From the sensitivity studies, parameter importance is assessed as a function of frequency. In addition, the work presents an approach to evaluate the probability that a parameter set exists to reconcile test with analysis. Comparisons of pre-test predictions of frequency response uncertainty bounds with measured data, results from the variance-based sensitivity analysis, and results from component test models with calibrated boundary stiffness models are all presented.

  19. Finite Element Model Calibration Approach for Area I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Gaspar, James L.; Lazor, Daniel R.; Parks, Russell A.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ares I-X is a pathfinder vehicle concept under development by NASA to demonstrate a new class of launch vehicles. Although this vehicle is essentially a shell of what the Ares I vehicle will be, efforts are underway to model and calibrate the analytical models before its maiden flight. Work reported in this document will summarize the model calibration approach used including uncertainty quantification of vehicle responses and the use of non-conventional boundary conditions during component testing. Since finite element modeling is the primary modeling tool, the calibration process uses these models, often developed by different groups, to assess model deficiencies and to update parameters to reconcile test with predictions. Data for two major component tests and the flight vehicle are presented along with the calibration results. For calibration, sensitivity analysis is conducted using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). To reduce the computational burden associated with ANOVA calculations, response surface models are used in lieu of computationally intensive finite element solutions. From the sensitivity studies, parameter importance is assessed as a function of frequency. In addition, the work presents an approach to evaluate the probability that a parameter set exists to reconcile test with analysis. Comparisons of pretest predictions of frequency response uncertainty bounds with measured data, results from the variance-based sensitivity analysis, and results from component test models with calibrated boundary stiffness models are all presented.

  20. Finite element model of thermal processes in retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Short duration (< 20 ms) pulses are desirable in patterned scanning laser photocoagulation to confine thermal damage to the photoreceptor layer, decrease overall treatment time and reduce pain. However, short exposures have a smaller therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation). We have constructed a finite-element computational model of retinal photocoagulation to predict spatial damage and improve the therapeutic window. Model parameters were inferred from experimentally measured absorption characteristics of ocular tissues, as well as the thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Calculated lesion diameters showed good agreement with histological measurements over a wide range of pulse durations and powers.

  1. DYNA3D: A nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics, User manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report is the User Manual for the 1993 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as a User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  3. A 3D finite-element computation of eddy currents and losses in the stator end laminations of large synchronous machines

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, V.C.; Meunier, G.; Foggia, A.

    1996-05-01

    Eddy current losses due to axial fluxes are computed in the stator end laminations of a salient-pole synchronous machine at open-circuit operating condition. The calculation is carried out with the aid of a 3D finite-element package which uses a linear T-{phi} formulation. The domain spans a full pole pitch of the machine. The flux densities computed in the end region at points outside the stator core are compared with experimental measurements. The results and the limitations of the model are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of a Kinematically-Driven Finite Element Footstrike Model.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Iain; Harland, Andy; Price, Dan; Schlarb, Heiko; Lucas, Tim

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic finite element model of a shod running footstrike was developed and driven with 6 degree of freedom foot segment kinematics determined from a motion capture running trial. Quadratic tetrahedral elements were used to mesh the footwear components with material models determined from appropriate mechanical tests. Model outputs were compared with experimental high-speed video (HSV) footage, vertical ground reaction force (GRF), and center of pressure (COP) excursion to determine whether such an approach is appropriate for the development of athletic footwear. Although unquantified, good visual agreement to the HSV footage was observed but significant discrepancies were found between the model and experimental GRF and COP readings (9% and 61% of model readings outside of the mean experimental reading ± 2 standard deviations, respectively). Model output was also found to be highly sensitive to input kinematics with a 120% increase in maximum GRF observed when translating the force platform 2 mm vertically. While representing an alternative approach to existing dynamic finite element footstrike models, loading highly representative of an experimental trial was not found to be achievable when employing exclusively kinematic boundary conditions. This significantly limits the usefulness of employing such an approach in the footwear development process.

  5. Finite Element Modeling of Transient Thermography Inspection of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1998-01-01

    Several finite element models of defects such as debond and void have been developed for composite panels subjected to transient thermography inspection. Since the exact nature of the heat generated from the flash lamps is unknown, direct comparison between FEA and experimental results is not possible. However, some similarity of the results has been observed. The shape of the time curve that simulates the heat flux from the flash lamps has minimal effect on the temperature profiles. Double the number of flash lamps could increase the contrast of thermal image and define the shape of defect better.

  6. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  7. Finite element modelling of a rotating piezoelectric ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Frangi, A; Corigliano, A; Binci, M; Faure, P

    2005-10-01

    The evaluation of the performance of ultrasonic motors as a function of input parameters such as the driving frequency, voltage input and pre-load on the rotor is of key importance to their development and is here addressed by means of a finite element three-dimensional model. First the stator is simulated as a fully deformable elastic body and the travelling wave dynamics is accurately reproduced; secondly the interaction through contact between the stator and the rotor is accounted for by assuming that the rotor behaves as a rigid surface. Numerical results for the whole motor are finally compared to available experimental data.

  8. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  9. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  10. Simplified Finite Element Modelling of Acoustically Treated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carfagni, M.; Citti, P.; Pierini, M.

    1997-07-01

    The application of non-optimized damping and phono-absorbent materials to automotive systems has not proved fully satisfactory in abating noise and vibration. The objective of this work was to develop a simple finite element modelling procedure that would allow optimizing structures such as a car body-in-white in terms of vibroacoustic behavior from the design stage. A procedure was developed to determine the modifications to be made in the mass, stiffness and damping characteristics in the finite element (FE) modelling of a metal structure meshed with shell elements so that the model would describe the behavior of the acoustically treated structure. To validate the modifications, a numerical-experimental comparison of the velocities on the vibrating surface was carried out, followed by a numerical-experimental comparison of the sound pressures generated by the vibrating plate. In the comparison a simple monopole model was used, in which each area of vibrating surface could be likened to a point source. The simulation and experimental procedures, previously validated for the metal structure, were then applied to multi-layered panels. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated velocities and sound pressures resulted for all the multi-layered panel configurations examined.

  11. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  12. Development of Femoral Head Interior Supporting Device and 3D Finite Element Analysis of its Application in the Treatment of Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongmin; Ye, Ming; Li, Xinfa; Yang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and perform the 3D finite element analysis of a femoral head interior supporting device (FHISD). Material/Methods The 3D finite element model was developed to analyze the surface load of femoral head and analyze the stress and strain of the femoral neck, using the normal femoral neck, decompressed bone graft, and FHISD-implanted bone graft models. Results The stress in the normal model concentrated around the femoral calcar, with displacement of 0.3556±0.1294 mm. In the decompressed bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the femur calcar and top and lateral sides of femoral head, with the displacement larger than the normal (0.4163±0.1310 mm). In the FHISD-implanted bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the segment below the lesser trochanter superior to the femur, with smaller displacement than the normal (0.1856±0.0118 mm). Conclusions FHISD could effectively maintain the biomechanical properties of the femoral neck. PMID:26010078

  13. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  14. A Finite Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

    2015-07-23

    We present a hydro-mechanical model, followed by stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account of the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process. Analytical solutions for pressure and deformation fields were derived for a typical geological sequestration scenario in our previous work. A finite element approach is introduced here for numerically solving the hydro-mechanical model with arbitrary boundary conditions. The numerical approach was built on an open-source finite element code Elmer, and results were compared to the analytical solutions. The shear-slip failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where the potential failure zone is identified. Information is relevant to the prediction of the maximum sustainable injection rate or pressure. The effects of caprock permeability on the fluid pressure, deformation, stress, and the shear-slip failure zone were also quantitatively studied. It was shown that a larger permeability in caprock and base rock leads to a larger uplift but a smaller shear-slip failure zone.

  15. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  16. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  17. Efficacy of adding a supporting implant in stress distribution of long-span fixed partial dentures: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Shurbaji Mozayek, Rami; Allaf, Mirza; B Abuharb, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long span is seen in many clinical situations. Treatmentplanning options of these cases are difficult and may require FPD, RPD or ISP. Each option has its own disadvantages, including mechanical problems, patient comfort and cost. This article will evaluate the stress distribution of a different treatment option, which consists of adding a single sup-porting implant to the FPD by using 3D finite element analysis. Methods. Three models, each consisting of 5 units, were created as follows: 1. Tooth Pontic Pontic Pontic Tooth; 2. Tooth Pontic Implant Pontic Tooth; 3. Tooth Pontic Pontic Implant Tooth. An axial force was applied to the prostheses by using 3D finite element method and stresses were evaluated. Results. The maximum stress was found in the prostheses in all the models; the highest stress values in all the shared components of the models were almost similar. Stress in implants was lower in the second model than the third one. Conclusion. Adding a supporting implant in long-span FPD has no advantages while it has the disadvantages of complicating treatment and the complications that may occur to the implant and surrounding bone. PMID:27429723

  18. Efficacy of adding a supporting implant in stress distribution of long-span fixed partial dentures: a 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shurbaji Mozayek, Rami; Allaf, Mirza; B. Abuharb, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long span is seen in many clinical situations. Treatmentplanning options of these cases are difficult and may require FPD, RPD or ISP. Each option has its own disadvantages, including mechanical problems, patient comfort and cost. This article will evaluate the stress distribution of a different treatment option, which consists of adding a single sup-porting implant to the FPD by using 3D finite element analysis. Methods. Three models, each consisting of 5 units, were created as follows: 1. Tooth Pontic Pontic Pontic Tooth; 2. Tooth Pontic Implant Pontic Tooth; 3. Tooth Pontic Pontic Implant Tooth. An axial force was applied to the prostheses by using 3D finite element method and stresses were evaluated. Results. The maximum stress was found in the prostheses in all the models; the highest stress values in all the shared components of the models were almost similar. Stress in implants was lower in the second model than the third one. Conclusion. Adding a supporting implant in long-span FPD has no advantages while it has the disadvantages of complicating treatment and the complications that may occur to the implant and surrounding bone. PMID:27429723

  19. Finite element modeling of electrically rectified piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, P. H.; Shu, Y. C.

    2015-09-01

    Finite element models are developed for designing electrically rectified piezoelectric energy harvesters. They account for the consideration of common interface circuits such as the standard and parallel-/series-SSHI (synchronized switch harvesting on inductor) circuits, as well as complicated structural configurations such as arrays of piezoelectric oscillators. The idea is to replace the energy harvesting circuit by the proposed equivalent load impedance together with the capacitance of negative value. As a result, the proposed framework is capable of being implemented into conventional finite element solvers for direct system-level design without resorting to circuit simulators. The validation based on COMSOL simulations carried out for various interface circuits by the comparison with the standard modal analysis model. The framework is then applied to the investigation on how harvested power is reduced due to fabrication deviations in geometric and material properties of oscillators in an array system. Remarkably, it is found that for a standard array system with strong electromechanical coupling, the drop in peak power turns out to be insignificant if the optimal load is carefully chosen. The second application is to design broadband energy harvesting by developing array systems with suitable interface circuits. The result shows that significant broadband is observed for the parallel (series) connection of oscillators endowed with the parallel-SSHI (series-SSHI) circuit technique.

  20. Finite element modeling for validation of structural damage identification experimentation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemates, D. W.; Bennett, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    The project described in this report was performed to couple experimental and analytical techniques in the field of structural health monitoring and darnage identification. To do this, a finite dement model was Constructed of a simulated three-story building used for damage identification experiments. The model was used in conjunction with data from thie physical structure to research damage identification algorithms. Of particular interest was modeling slip in joints as a function of bolt torque and predicting the smallest change of torque that could be detected experimentally. After being validated with results from the physical structure, the model was used to produce data to test the capabilities of damage identification algorithms. This report describes the finite element model constructed, the results obtained, and proposed future use of the model.

  1. Merging of intersecting triangulations for finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Cebral, J R; Löhner, R; Choyke, P L; Yim, P J

    2001-06-01

    Surface mesh generation over intersecting triangulations is a problem common to many branches of biomechanics. A new strategy for merging intersecting triangulations is described. The basis of the method is that object surfaces are represented as the zero-level iso-surface of the distance-to-surface function defined on a background grid. Thus, the triangulation of intersecting objects reduces to the extraction of an iso-surface from an unstructured grid. In a first step, a regular background mesh is constructed. For each point of the background grid, the closest distance to the surface of each object is computed. Background points are then classified as external or internal by checking the direction of the surface normal at the closest location and assigned a positive or negative distance, respectively. Finally, the zero-level iso-surface is constructed. This is the final triangulation of the intersecting objects. The overall accuracy is enhanced by adaptive refinement of the background grid elements. The resulting surface models are used as support surfaces to generate three-dimensional grids for finite element analysis. The algorithms are demonstrated by merging arterial branches independently reconstructed from contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images and by adding extra features such as vascular stents. Although the methodology is presented in the context of finite element analysis of blood flow, the algorithms are general and can be applied in other areas as well. PMID:11470121

  2. Finite Element Modeling of the Posterior Eye in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Mulugeta, Lealem; Gleason, Rudolph; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity experienced during spaceflight affects astronauts in various ways, including weakened muscles and loss of bone density. Recently, visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome has become a major concern for space missions lasting longer than 30 days. Astronauts suffering from VIIP syndrome have changes in ocular anatomical and visual impairment that persist after returning to earth. It is hypothesized that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity may increase the intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to an altered biomechanical environment of the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath (ONS).Currently, there is a lack of knowledge of how elevated ICP may lead to vision impairment and connective tissue changes in VIIP. Our goal was to develop a finite element model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. We used a finite element (FE) analysis approach to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve to the elevations in ICP thought to occur in microgravity and to identify which tissue components have the greatest impact on strain experienced by optic nerve head tissues.

  3. Application of physical parameter identification to finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronowicki, Allen J.; Lukich, Michael S.; Kuritz, Steven P.

    1986-01-01

    A time domain technique for matching response predictions of a structural dynamic model to test measurements is developed. Significance is attached to prior estimates of physical model parameters and to experimental data. The Bayesian estimation procedure allows confidence levels in predicted physical and modal parameters to be obtained. Structural optimization procedures are employed to minimize an error functional with physical model parameters describing the finite element model as design variables. The number of complete FEM analyses are reduced using approximation concepts, including the recently developed convoluted Taylor series approach. The error function is represented in closed form by converting free decay test data to a time series model using Prony' method. The technique is demonstrated on simulated response of a simple truss structure.

  4. HIFU Induced Heating Modelling by Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, R.; Vera, A.; Leija, L.

    High intensity focused ultrasound is a thermal therapy method used to treat malignant tumors and other medical conditions. Focused ultrasound concentrates acoustic energy at a focal zone. There, temperature rises rapidly over 56 °C to provoke tissue necrosis. Device performance depends on its fabrication placing computational modeling as a powerful tool to anticipate experimentation results. Finite element method allows modeling of multiphysics systems. Therefore, induced heating was modeled considering the acoustic field produced by a concave radiator excited with electric potentials from 5 V to 20 V. Nonlinear propagation was neglected and a linear response between the acoustic fields and pressure distribution was obtained. Finally, the results showed that acoustic propagation and heating models should be improved and validated with experimental measurements.

  5. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  6. Finite element implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskovitz, I.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Saleeb, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models is made in a general purpose finite element code for structural applications of metals deformed at elevated temperatures. Two constitutive models, Walker's and Robinson's models, are studied in conjunction with two implicit integration methods: the trapezoidal rule with Newton-Raphson iterations and an asymptotic integration algorithm. A comparison is made between the two integration methods, and the latter method appears to be computationally more appealing in terms of numerical accuracy and CPU time. However, in order to make the asymptotic algorithm robust, it is necessary to include a self adaptive scheme with subincremental step control and error checking of the Jacobian matrix at the integration points. Three examples are given to illustrate the numerical aspects of the integration methods tested.

  7. A Finite element model of tactile flow for softness perception.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Edoardo; Bianchi, Matteo; D'Angelo, Maria Laura; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Cannella, Ferdinando; Scilingo, Enzo P; Bicchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Touch is an extremely dynamic sense. To take into account this aspect, it has been hypothesized that there are mechanisms in the brain that specialize in processing dynamic tactile stimuli, in a way not too dissimilar from what happens for optical flow in dynamic vision. The concept of tactile flow, related to the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes in the human fingerpad, was used to explain some perceptual illusions as well as mechanisms of human softness perception. In this paper we describe a computational model of tactile flow, and apply it to a finite element model of interaction between deformable bodies. The shape and material properties of the bodies are modeled from those of a human fingertip interacting with specimens with different softness properties. Results show that the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes can be used to discriminate different materials in terms of their softness characteristics.

  8. Two-dimensional finite element model of the pultrusion process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Robert M.; Zhu, Si-Ze

    1992-01-01

    Composite materials used in the fabrication of industrial products/components are under constant development. Applications vary widely from consumer products to high-performance aerospace components. The pultrusion process is one of the important methods of production of composite materials. In order to develop a fundamental understanding of this process, a computational model employing the finite element method is developed which enables a prediction of the material temperature and degree-of-cure at any time during the process. The model is comprehensive; it can readily be employed to perform parametric studies of the process and to aid in the development of efficient design procedures for this type of material system. Comparisons are made between model predictions and experimental results and good agreement is observed.

  9. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  10. Advance finite element modeling of rotor blade aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Sangha, K. B.; Panda, B.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced beam finite element has been developed for modeling rotor blade dynamics and aeroelasticity. This element is part of the Element Library of the Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS). The element allows modeling of arbitrary rotor systems, including bearingless rotors. It accounts for moderately large elastic deflections, anisotropic properties, large frame motion for maneuver simulation, and allows for variable order shape functions. The effects of gravity, mechanically applied and aerodynamic loads are included. All kinematic quantities required to compute airloads are provided. In this paper, the fundamental assumptions and derivation of the element matrices are presented. Numerical results are shown to verify the formulation and illustrate several features of the element.

  11. Thermal buoyancy on Venus: Preliminary results of finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Enhanced surface temperatures and a thinner lithosphere on Venus relative to Earth have been cited as leading to increased lithospheric buoyancy. This would limit or prevent subduction on Venus and favor the construction of thickened crust through underthrusting. In order to evaluate the conditions distinguishing between underthrusting and subduction, we have modeled the thermal and buoyancy consequences of the subduction end member. This study considers the fate of a slab from the time it starts to subduct, but bypasses the question of subduction initiation. Thermal changes in slabs subducting into a mantle having a range of initial geotherms are used to predict density changes and thus their overall buoyancy. Finite element modeling is then applied in a first approximation of the assessment of the relative rates of subduction as compared to the buoyant rise of the slab through a viscous mantle.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Guided Wave Propagation in Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar KM, Manoj; Ramaswamy, Sivaramanivas; Kommareddy, Vamshi; Baskaran, Ganesan; Zongqi, Sun; Kirkire, Gautam

    2006-03-01

    This paper aims at developing a numerical model for guided wave propagation in plates and the interaction of modes with defects using Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Guided waves propagate as extensional, flexural and torsional waves. Theoretically, these modes are infinite in number, but only some of these propagate and the others are attenuated. The dispersion curves for a structure reveal the plausibility of these modes. In this paper, FEM is used to examine interaction of first few symmetric and anti-symmetric modes independently with the cracks of various sizes in a plate. A time-frequency representation of the acquired guided wave mode signals will be discussed to show the mode sensitivity with crack size.

  13. A three-dimensional finite element model for biomechanical analysis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Xing; Yang, Liu; Li, Kai; He, Rui; Yang, Bin; Zhan, Yan; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Yu, Bing-Nin; Jian, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the hip. The images of the hip were obtained from Chinese visible human dataset. The hip model includes acetabular bone, cartilage, labrum, and bone. The cartilage of femoral head was constructed using the AutoCAD and Solidworks software. The hip model was imported into ABAQUS analysis system. The contact surface of the hip joint was meshed. To verify the model, the single leg peak force was loaded, and contact area of the cartilage and labrum of the hip and pressure distribution in these structures were observed. The constructed 3D hip model reflected the real hip anatomy. Further, this model reflected biomechanical behavior similar to previous studies. In conclusion, this 3D finite element hip model avoids the disadvantages of other construction methods, such as imprecision of cartilage construction and the absence of labrum. Further, it provides basic data critical for accurately modeling normal and abnormal loads, and the effects of abnormal loads on the hip. PMID:23504633

  14. A three-dimensional finite element model for biomechanical analysis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Xing; Yang, Liu; Li, Kai; He, Rui; Yang, Bin; Zhan, Yan; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Yu, Bing-Nin; Jian, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the hip. The images of the hip were obtained from Chinese visible human dataset. The hip model includes acetabular bone, cartilage, labrum, and bone. The cartilage of femoral head was constructed using the AutoCAD and Solidworks software. The hip model was imported into ABAQUS analysis system. The contact surface of the hip joint was meshed. To verify the model, the single leg peak force was loaded, and contact area of the cartilage and labrum of the hip and pressure distribution in these structures were observed. The constructed 3D hip model reflected the real hip anatomy. Further, this model reflected biomechanical behavior similar to previous studies. In conclusion, this 3D finite element hip model avoids the disadvantages of other construction methods, such as imprecision of cartilage construction and the absence of labrum. Further, it provides basic data critical for accurately modeling normal and abnormal loads, and the effects of abnormal loads on the hip.

  15. Finite element modeling of 129Xe diffusive gas exchange NMR in the human alveoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Neil J.; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M.

    2016-10-01

    Existing models of 129Xe diffusive exchange for lung microstructural modeling with time-resolved MR spectroscopy data have considered analytical solutions to one-dimensional, homogeneous models of the lungs with specific assumptions about the alveolar geometry. In order to establish a model system for simulating the effects of physiologically-realistic changes in physical and microstructural parameters on 129Xe exchange NMR, we have developed a 3D alveolar capillary model for finite element analysis. To account for the heterogeneity of the alveolar geometry across the lungs, we have derived realistic geometries for finite element analysis based on 2D histological samples and 3D micro-CT image volumes obtained from ex vivo biopsies of lung tissue from normal subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. The 3D alveolar capillary model permits investigation of the impact of alveolar geometrical parameters and diffusion and perfusion coefficients on the in vivo measured 129Xe CSSR signal response. The heterogeneity of alveolar microstructure that is accounted for in image-based models resulted in considerable alterations to the shape of the 129Xe diffusive uptake curve when compared to 1D models. Our findings have important implications for the future design and optimization of 129Xe MR experiments and in the interpretation of lung microstructural changes from this data.

  16. Finite element modeling of (129)Xe diffusive gas exchange NMR in the human alveoli.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Neil J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2016-10-01

    Existing models of (129)Xe diffusive exchange for lung microstructural modeling with time-resolved MR spectroscopy data have considered analytical solutions to one-dimensional, homogeneous models of the lungs with specific assumptions about the alveolar geometry. In order to establish a model system for simulating the effects of physiologically-realistic changes in physical and microstructural parameters on (129)Xe exchange NMR, we have developed a 3D alveolar capillary model for finite element analysis. To account for the heterogeneity of the alveolar geometry across the lungs, we have derived realistic geometries for finite element analysis based on 2D histological samples and 3D micro-CT image volumes obtained from ex vivo biopsies of lung tissue from normal subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. The 3D alveolar capillary model permits investigation of the impact of alveolar geometrical parameters and diffusion and perfusion coefficients on the in vivo measured (129)Xe CSSR signal response. The heterogeneity of alveolar microstructure that is accounted for in image-based models resulted in considerable alterations to the shape of the (129)Xe diffusive uptake curve when compared to 1D models. Our findings have important implications for the future design and optimization of (129)Xe MR experiments and in the interpretation of lung microstructural changes from this data.

  17. Finite element modeling of (129)Xe diffusive gas exchange NMR in the human alveoli.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Neil J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2016-10-01

    Existing models of (129)Xe diffusive exchange for lung microstructural modeling with time-resolved MR spectroscopy data have considered analytical solutions to one-dimensional, homogeneous models of the lungs with specific assumptions about the alveolar geometry. In order to establish a model system for simulating the effects of physiologically-realistic changes in physical and microstructural parameters on (129)Xe exchange NMR, we have developed a 3D alveolar capillary model for finite element analysis. To account for the heterogeneity of the alveolar geometry across the lungs, we have derived realistic geometries for finite element analysis based on 2D histological samples and 3D micro-CT image volumes obtained from ex vivo biopsies of lung tissue from normal subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. The 3D alveolar capillary model permits investigation of the impact of alveolar geometrical parameters and diffusion and perfusion coefficients on the in vivo measured (129)Xe CSSR signal response. The heterogeneity of alveolar microstructure that is accounted for in image-based models resulted in considerable alterations to the shape of the (129)Xe diffusive uptake curve when compared to 1D models. Our findings have important implications for the future design and optimization of (129)Xe MR experiments and in the interpretation of lung microstructural changes from this data. PMID:27526397

  18. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  19. A finite element model for sound transmission through panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, J. V.; Koval, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element method (FEM) is applied to predicting coupled frequencies and pressures within an acoustic cavity in order to characterize sound transmission through a panel. Structural equations of motion are defined and the FEM model is configured with four-noded plate elements, the lateral displacement and two slopes being the unknowns at every node. Each element then has 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) and the displacement variation is expressed by a 12-term nonconforming polynomial. A consistent mass matrix is used to represent the panel mass matrix and a wave equation governs the acoustic volume. Analysis of pressure and displacement over the panel yields a square coupling matrix, and an eigenanalysis leads to a solution of the forced vibration problem.

  20. Finite element modelling of cornea mechanics: a review.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Talisa Mohammad; Foster, Craig; Gongal, Dipika

    2014-01-01

    The cornea is a transparent tissue in front of the eye that refracts light and facilitates vision. A slight change in the geometry of the cornea remarkably affects the optical power. Because of this sensitivity, biomechanical study of the cornea can reveal much about its performance and function. In vivo and in vitro studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanics of the cornea and determine its characteristics. Numerical techniques such as the finite element method (FEM) have been extensively implemented as effective and noninvasive methods for analyzing corneal mechanics and possible disorders. This article reviews the use of FEM for assessing the mechanical behavior of the cornea. Different applications of FEM in corneal disease studies, surgical predictions, impact simulations, and clinical applications have been reviewed. Some suggestions for the future of this type of modeling in the area of corneal mechanics are also discussed. PMID:25076377

  1. Two-dimensional finite element modelling of the neonatal head.

    PubMed

    Gibson, A; Bayford, R H; Holder, D S

    2000-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) could allow the early diagnosis of infant brain injury following birth asphyxia. The purpose of this work was to determine the effect of variations in skull, scalp or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistivity, as these vary in clinical conditions and could degrade image quality. These factors were investigated using finite element models of the adult and neonatal head. The results suggest that there is a wide range over which the resistivity of the neonatal skull has little effect on the sensitivity to a central impedance change. The scalp and CSF appear to shunt current away from the brain; when their resistivity was decreased from normal values, this shunting effect increased and caused a decrease in sensitivity to a central resistance change. The resistivity of neonatal skull has not, to our knowledge, been directly measured and will anyway vary within and between individuals; this work suggests that EIT will be relatively insensitive to variations in neonatal skull impedance.

  2. Nonlinear geometrically adaptive finite element model of the coilbox

    SciTech Connect

    Troyani, N.

    1996-12-01

    Hot bar heat loss in the transfer table, the rolling stage between rougher stands and finishing stands in a hot mill, is of major concern for reasons for energy consumption, metallurgical uniformity, and rollability. A mathematical model, as well as the corresponding numerical solution, is presented for the evolution of temperature in a coiling and uncoiling bar in hot mills in the form of a parabolic partial differential equation for a shape-changing domain. The space discretization is achieved via a computationally efficient geometrically adaptive finite element scheme that accommodates the change in shape of the domain, using a computationally novel treatment of the resulting thermal contact problem due to coiling. Time is discretized according to a Crank-Nicolson scheme. Finally, some numerical results are presented.

  3. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR TIDES AND CURRENTS WITH FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element model, based upon the shallow water equations, is used to calculate tidal amplitudes and currents for two field-scale test problems. Because tides are characterized by line spectra, the governing equations are subjected to harmonic decomposition. Thus the solution variables are the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude of sea level and velocity rather than a time series of these variables. The time series is recovered through synthesis. This scheme, coupled with a modified form of the governing equations, leads to high computational efficiency and freedom from excessive numerical noise. Two test-cases are presented. The first is a solution for eleven tidal constituents in the English Channel and southern North Sea, and three constituents are discussed. The second is an analysis of the frequency response and tidal harmonics for south San Francisco Bay.

  4. Workshop on the Integration of Finite Element Modeling with Geometric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozny, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The workshop on the Integration of Finite Element Modeling with Geometric Modeling was held on 12 May 1987. It was held to discuss the geometric modeling requirements of the finite element modeling process and to better understand the technical aspects of the integration of these two areas. The 11 papers are presented except for one for which only the abstract is given.

  5. New approach to mathematical and finite element modeling of delaminations in multidirectional multilayered laminated composite structures: I. Fracture criteria and finite element algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, Alexei I.; Misnik, Yuri Y.

    1999-05-01

    This paper presents new approach to the fracture analysis of laminated composite structures (laminates). The first part of the paper is devoted to the general algorithm, which allows to obtain critical stresses for any structure considering only the strip made from the same laminate. The algorithm is based on the computation of the energy release rates for all three crack modes and allows to obtain macro-failure parameters such as critical stresses through the micro-fracture characteristics. The developed algorithm is also based on the locality principle in mechanics of composite structures and sequential heterogenization method. The algorithm can be applied both for classical models of laminates with homogenous layers and new 3D finite element (FE) models of interfacial cracks in multidirectional composite structures. The results of multilevel, multimodel and multivariant analysis of 3D delamination problems with detailed microstructure in the crack tip zone are presented.

  6. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m-1 to 697.41 Fμ m-1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m-1 to 566.11 Fμ m-1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  7. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m‑1 to 697.41 Fμ m‑1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m‑1 to 566.11 Fμ m‑1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  8. Development of a Finite Element Model of Decompressive Craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Tim L.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Sutcliffe, Michael P. F.

    2014-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC), an operation whereby part of the skull is removed, is used in the management of patients with brain swelling. While the aim of DC is to reduce intracranial pressure, there is the risk that brain deformation and mechanical strain associated with the operation could damage the brain tissue. The nature and extent of the resulting strain regime is poorly understood at present. Finite element (FE) models of DC can provide insight into this applied strain and hence assist in deciding on the best surgical procedures. However there is uncertainty about how well these models match experimental data, which are difficult to obtain clinically. Hence there is a need to validate any modelling approach outside the clinical setting. This paper develops an axisymmetric FE model of an idealised DC to assess the key features of such an FE model which are needed for an accurate simulation of DC. The FE models are compared with an experimental model using gelatin hydrogel, which has similar poro-viscoelastic material property characteristics to brain tissue. Strain on a central plane of the FE model and the front face of the experimental model, deformation and load relaxation curves are compared between experiment and FE. Results show good agreement between the FE and experimental models, providing confidence in applying the proposed FE modelling approach to DC. Such a model should use material properties appropriate for brain tissue and include a more realistic whole head geometry. PMID:25025666

  9. A phenomenological finite element model of part building in the stereolithography process

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Guess, T.R.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1995-03-01

    The finite element method has been used to develop the framework for a tool that can be used to model the structural deformation arising from the stereolithography build process. Such a tool when fully developed can facilitate numerical studies aimed at evaluating build parameters and build styles. Although the current software makes no attempt to capture all the physics of the process, provisions for three important build features have been made: (1) laser path history including scanning rate and depth of cure, (2) structural linkage, and (3) time varying material behavior. For demonstration purposes, a three dimensional finite element code was modified to include a phenomenological material model of solidification. The model was based on cure shrinkage and stress relaxation data collected from in-situ tests on individual strands drawn using 3D Systems` stereolithography apparatus (SLA-250). To depict the directed path of solidification within layers, a finite element birthing scheme was conceived to activate elements along the predetermined coordinate path of the laser. Structural linkage was enforced by joining element strands of layers when laser paths connect or overlap, respectively. A limited number of analyses have been performed to contrast simple build styles.

  10. Finite element modelling of the canine and feline outer ear canal: benefits for local drug delivery?

    PubMed

    Wefstaedt, Patrick; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Nolte, Ingo; Bouguecha, Anas

    2011-01-01

    Current therapeutic regimes of outer ear infections in dogs and cats aim at the application of efficient local therapeutics after cleaning of the acoustic meatus. One so far insufficiently answered question is if the local application of these substances results in an individually suitable drug concentration in the external ear canal. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to develop a finite element model to calculate the values of the different areas of the external acoustic meatus in dogs and cats in order to provide a tool for the benefit of an appropriate local drug dosage determination. A 3D finite element model (FEM), based on computer tomographic (CT) data sets of four dogs and two cats, was generated to determine areas and volumes of the outer ear canal. Furthermore, various ear therapeutics and cleansers were tested concerning their optimal distribution on 5 cm2 dog and cat skin. The data shows major variations of the area values of the external auditory canal in case of the different dogs but not in the examined cats. These results suggest that manufacturer's recommendations of the pharmaceuticals might be insufficient in terms of achieving an optimal drug concentration in the outer ear canal especially in larger dogs. In conclusion, the developed finite element model has shown to be suitable to calculate areas of the outer ear canal in cats and dogs and could be of help in context with the definition of optimal drug concentrations for a local drug delivery.

  11. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  12. Finite Element Models for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) is a member of an emerging class of direct manufacturing processes known as solid freeform fabrication (SFF); another member of the class is the laser deposition process. Successful application of the EBF3 process requires precise control of a number of process parameters such as the EB power, speed, and metal feed rate in order to ensure thermal management; good fusion between the substrate and the first layer and between successive layers; minimize part distortion and residual stresses; and control the microstructure of the finished product. This is the only effort thus far that has addressed computer simulation of the EBF3 process. The models developed in this effort can assist in reducing the number of trials in the laboratory or on the shop floor while making high-quality parts. With some modifications, their use can be further extended to the simulation of laser, TIG (tungsten inert gas), and other deposition processes. A solid mechanics-based finite element code, ABAQUS, was chosen as the primary engine in developing these models whereas a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, Fluent, was used in a support role. Several innovative concepts were developed, some of which are highlighted below. These concepts were implemented in a number of new computer models either in the form of stand-alone programs or as user subroutines for ABAQUS and Fluent codes. A database of thermo-physical, mechanical, fluid, and metallurgical properties of stainless steel 304 was developed. Computing models for Gaussian and raster modes of the electron beam heat input were developed. Also, new schemes were devised to account for the heat sink effect during the deposition process. These innovations, and others, lead to improved models for thermal management and prediction of transient/residual stresses and distortions. Two approaches for the prediction of microstructure were pursued. The first was an empirical approach involving the

  13. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  14. Finite element modeling of occlusal variation in durophagous tooth systems.

    PubMed

    Crofts, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    In addition to breaking hard prey items, the teeth of durophagous predators must also resist failure under high loads. To understand the effects of morphology on tooth resistance to failure, finite element models were used to examine differences in total strain energy (J), first principal strain and the distribution of strains in a diversity of canonical durophagous tooth morphologies. By changing the way loads were applied to the models, I was also able to model the effects of large and small prey items. Tooth models with overall convex morphologies have higher in-model strains than those with a flat or concave occlusal surface. When a cusp is added to the tooth model, taller or thinner cusps increase in-model strain. While there is little difference in the relationships between tooth morphology and strain measurements for most models, there is a marked difference between effects of the large and small prey loads on the concave and flat tooth morphologies. Comparing these data with measurements of force required by these same morphologies to break prey items illustrates functional trade-offs between the need to prevent tooth failure under high loads by minimizing in-tooth strain versus the drive to reduce the total applied force.

  15. Bayesian sensitivity analysis of a nonlinear finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, W.; Oakley, J. E.; Surace, C.; Gili, P.; Rowson, J.; Worden, K.

    2012-10-01

    A major problem in uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is that the computational cost of propagating probabilistic uncertainty through large nonlinear models can be prohibitive when using conventional methods (such as Monte Carlo methods). A powerful solution to this problem is to use an emulator, which is a mathematical representation of the model built from a small set of model runs at specified points in input space. Such emulators are massively cheaper to run and can be used to mimic the "true" model, with the result that uncertainty analysis and sensitivity analysis can be performed for a greatly reduced computational cost. The work here investigates the use of an emulator known as a Gaussian process (GP), which is an advanced probabilistic form of regression. The GP is particularly suited to uncertainty analysis since it is able to emulate a wide class of models, and accounts for its own emulation uncertainty. Additionally, uncertainty and sensitivity measures can be estimated analytically, given certain assumptions. The GP approach is explained in detail here, and a case study of a finite element model of an airship is used to demonstrate the method. It is concluded that the GP is a very attractive way of performing uncertainty and sensitivity analysis on large models, provided that the dimensionality is not too high.

  16. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model - Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts which reflect every detail of the finished product. Ideally, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) they must provide numerical control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) they must enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in space missions. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. The research performed during the fellowship period investigated the transition process from the solid CAD model to the FEA stress analysis model with the final goal of creating an automatic interface between the two. During the period of the fellowship a detailed multi-year program for the development of such an interface was created. The ultimate goal of this program will be the development of a fully parameterized automatic ProE/FEA translator for parts and assemblies, with the incorporation of data base management into the solution, and ultimately including computational fluid dynamics and thermal modeling in the interface.

  17. Development of honeycomb sandwich finite element modeling techniques for dynamic and static analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoonire, Ross A.

    2010-07-01

    Honeycomb sandwich core is typically modeled as an equivalent continuum for both static and dynamic analysis. The orthotropic material properties for such a continuum representation are difficult to predict. The objective of this work is to examine material and geometric parameters that affect the elastic and harmonic responses of honeycomb cores. A 3D shell FEA approach is adopted to model the core geometry. The model is compared to a typical homogeneous core finite-element representation in vibratory response. It is found that adhesive filleting can play a significant role in the response of honeycomb sandwich structure. Additionally, finite-element models using homogenized core approximations are shown to yield erroneous predictions for higher modes of vibration. Only through the modeling of actual honeycomb core geometry through finiteelement methods is it possible to predict higher modes. Vibration occurring strictly in the honeycomb cells can be observed by a tight band of resonances. This band occurs at different frequency ranges depending on the modeling technique. Achieving accurate homogeneous core model dynamic response for higher modes is restricted by computational inefficiency. Steady state harmonic analysis was only possible using the 3D shell core representation. The homogeneous core models were accurate in static shear and early modal response only. When it becomes necessary to predict shorter wavelengths of vibration, the homogeneous core models are either too computationally expensive or produce incorrect responses specifically with regard to modes isolated in the core.

  18. Tensegrity finite element models of mechanical tests of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Bursa, Jiri; Lebis, Radek; Holata, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of a vascular smooth muscle cell is based on models published recently; it comprehends elements representing cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, and a complex tensegrity structure representing the cytoskeleton. In contrast to previous models of eucaryotic cells, this tensegrity structure consists of several parts. Its external and internal parts number 30 struts, 60 cables each, and their nodes are interconnected by 30 radial members; these parts represent cortical, nuclear and deep cytoskeletons, respectively. This arrangement enables us to simulate load transmission from the extracellular space to the nucleus or centrosome via membrane receptors (focal adhesions); the ability of the model was tested by simulation of some mechanical tests with isolated vascular smooth muscle cells. Although material properties of components defined on the basis of the mechanical tests are ambiguous, modelling of different types of tests has shown the ability of the model to simulate substantial global features of cell behaviour, e.g. "action at a distance effect" or the global load-deformation response of the cell under various types of loading. Based on computational simulations, the authors offer a hypothesis explaining the scatter of experimental results of indentation tests. PMID:22508025

  19. Object-oriented philosophy in designing adaptive finite-element package for 3D elliptic deferential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyong, R.; Jingtian, T.; Changsheng, L.; Xiao, X.

    2007-12-01

    Although adaptive finite-element (AFE) analysis is becoming more and more focused in scientific and engineering fields, its efficient implementations are remain to be a discussed problem as its more complex procedures. In this paper, we propose a clear C++ framework implementation to show the powerful properties of Object-oriented philosophy (OOP) in designing such complex adaptive procedure. In terms of the modal functions of OOP language, the whole adaptive system is divided into several separate parts such as the mesh generation or refinement, a-posterior error estimator, adaptive strategy and the final post processing. After proper designs are locally performed on these separate modals, a connected framework of adaptive procedure is formed finally. Based on the general elliptic deferential equation, little efforts should be added in the adaptive framework to do practical simulations. To show the preferable properties of OOP adaptive designing, two numerical examples are tested. The first one is the 3D direct current resistivity problem in which the powerful framework is efficiently shown as only little divisions are added. And then, in the second induced polarization£¨IP£©exploration case, new adaptive procedure is easily added which adequately shows the strong extendibility and re-usage of OOP language. Finally we believe based on the modal framework adaptive implementation by OOP methodology, more advanced adaptive analysis system will be available in future.

  20. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  1. Examination of Buoyancy-Reduction Effect in Induction-Heating Cookers by Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Tanaka, Kazufumi; Hara, Takehisa

    In recent years, induction-heating (IH) cookers that can be used to heat nonmagnetic metals such as aluminum have been produced. Occasionally, a light pan moves on a glass plate due to buoyancy when heated by an IH cooker. In some IH cookers, an aluminum plate is mounted between the glass plate and the coil in order to reduce the buoyancy effect. The objective of this research is to evaluate the buoyancy-reduction effect and the heating effect of buoyancy-reduction plates. Eddy current analysis is carried out by 3D finite element method, and the electromagnetic force and the heat distribution on the heating plate are calculated. After this calculation is performed, the temperature distribution of the heating plate is calculated by heat transfer analysis. It is found that the shape, area, and the position of the buoyancy reduction plate strongly affect the buoyancy and the heat distribution. The impact of the shape, area, and position of the buoyancy reduction plate was quantified. The phenomena in the heating were elucidated qualitatively.

  2. Manual for automatic generation of finite element models of spiral bevel gears in mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Reddy, S.; Kumar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop computer programs that generate finite element models suitable for doing 3D contact analysis of faced milled spiral bevel gears in mesh. A pinion tooth and a gear tooth are created and put in mesh. There are two programs: Points.f and Pat.f to perform the analysis. Points.f is based on the equation of meshing for spiral bevel gears. It uses machine tool settings to solve for an N x M mesh of points on the four surfaces, pinion concave and convex, and gear concave and convex. Points.f creates the file POINTS.OUT, an ASCI file containing N x M points for each surface. (N is the number of node points along the length of the tooth, and M is nodes along the height.) Pat.f reads POINTS.OUT and creates the file tl.out. Tl.out is a series of PATRAN input commands. In addition to the mesh density on the tooth face, additional user specified variables are the number of finite elements through the thickness, and the number of finite elements along the tooth full fillet. A full fillet is assumed to exist for both the pinion and gear.

  3. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Charles M.; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-01-01

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction–diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html. PMID:22675164

  4. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  5. Customized Finite Element Modelling of the Human Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Simonini, Irene; Pandolfi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aim To construct patient-specific solid models of human cornea from ocular topographer data, to increase the accuracy of the biomechanical and optical estimate of the changes in refractive power and stress caused by photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Method Corneal elevation maps of five human eyes were taken with a rotating Scheimpflug camera combined with a Placido disk before and after refractive surgery. Patient-specific solid models were created and discretized in finite elements to estimate the corneal strain and stress fields in preoperative and postoperative configurations and derive the refractive parameters of the cornea. Results Patient-specific geometrical models of the cornea allow for the creation of personalized refractive maps at different levels of IOP. Thinned postoperative corneas show a higher stress gradient across the thickness and higher sensitivity of all geometrical and refractive parameters to the fluctuation of the IOP. Conclusion Patient-specific numerical models of the cornea can provide accurate quantitative information on the refractive properties of the cornea under different levels of IOP and describe the change of the stress state of the cornea due to refractive surgery (PRK). Patient-specific models can be used as indicators of feasibility before performing the surgery. PMID:26098104

  6. Rock penetration : finite element sensitivity and probabilistic modeling analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Fossum, Arlo Frederick

    2004-08-01

    This report summarizes numerical analyses conducted to assess the relative importance on penetration depth calculations of rock constitutive model physics features representing the presence of microscale flaws such as porosity and networks of microcracks and rock mass structural features. Three-dimensional, nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element penetration simulations are made with a realistic geomaterial constitutive model to determine which features have the most influence on penetration depth calculations. A baseline penetration calculation is made with a representative set of material parameters evaluated from measurements made from laboratory experiments conducted on a familiar sedimentary rock. Then, a sequence of perturbations of various material parameters allows an assessment to be made of the main penetration effects. A cumulative probability distribution function is calculated with the use of an advanced reliability method that makes use of this sensitivity database, probability density functions, and coefficients of variation of the key controlling parameters for penetration depth predictions. Thus the variability of the calculated penetration depth is known as a function of the variability of the input parameters. This simulation modeling capability should impact significantly the tools that are needed to design enhanced penetrator systems, support weapons effects studies, and directly address proposed HDBT defeat scenarios.

  7. Finite element modeling of superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Naceur, Ines Ben; Charfi, Amin; Bouraoui, Tarak; Elleuch, Khaled

    2014-11-28

    Thanks to its good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, superelastic Ni–Ti wire alloys have been successfully used in orthodontic treatment. Therefore, it is important to quantify and evaluate the level of orthodontic force applied to the bracket and teeth in order to achieve tooth movement. In this study, three dimensional finite element models with a Gibbs-potential-based-formulation and thermodynamic principles were used. The aim was to evaluate the influence of possible intraoral temperature differences on the forces exerted by NiTi orthodontic arch wires with different cross sectional shapes and sizes. The prediction made by this phenomenological model, for superelastic tensile and bending tests, shows good agreement with the experimental data. A bending test is simulated to study the force variation of an orthodontic NiTi arch wire when it loaded up to the deflection of 3 mm, for this task one half of the arch wire and the 3 adjacent brackets were modeled. The results showed that the stress required for the martensite transformation increases with the increase of cross-sectional dimensions and temperature. Associated with this increase in stress, the plateau of this transformation becomes steeper. In addition, the area of the mechanical hysteresis, measured as the difference between the forces of the upper and lower plateau, increases.

  8. Lower extremity finite element model for crash simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Perfect, S.A.

    1996-03-01

    A lower extremity model has been developed to study occupant injury mechanisms of the major bones and ligamentous soft tissues resulting from vehicle collisions. The model is based on anatomically correct digitized bone surfaces of the pelvis, femur, patella and the tibia. Many muscles, tendons and ligaments were incrementally added to the basic bone model. We have simulated two types of occupant loading that occur in a crash environment using a non-linear large deformation finite element code. The modeling approach assumed that the leg was passive during its response to the excitation, that is, no active muscular contraction and therefore no active change in limb stiffness. The approach recognized that the most important contributions of the muscles to the lower extremity response are their ability to define and modify the impedance of the limb. When nonlinear material behavior in a component of the leg model was deemed important to response, a nonlinear constitutive model was incorporated. The accuracy of these assumptions can be verified only through a review of analysis results and careful comparison with test data. As currently defined, the model meets the objective for which it was created. Much work remains to be done, both from modeling and analysis perspectives, before the model can be considered complete. The model implements a modeling philosophy that can accurately capture both kinematic and kinetic response of the lower limb. We have demonstrated that the lower extremity model is a valuable tool for understanding the injury processes and mechanisms. We are now in a position to extend the computer simulation to investigate the clinical fracture patterns observed in actual crashes. Additional experience with this model will enable us to make a statement on what measures are needed to significantly reduce lower extremity injuries in vehicle crashes. 6 refs.

  9. Three-dimensional finite element model for lesion correspondence in breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yan; Li, Lihua; Goldgof, Dmitry; Sarkar, Sudeep; Anton, Sorin; Clark, Robert A.

    2004-05-01

    Predicting breast tissue deformation is of great significance in several medical applications such as biopsy, diagnosis, and surgery. In breast surgery, surgeons are often concerned with a specific portion of the breast, e.g., tumor, which must be located accurately beforehand. Also clinically it is important for combining the information provided by images from several modalities or at different times, for the detection/diagnosis, treatment planning and guidance of interventions. Multi-modality imaging of the breast obtained by X-ray mammography, MRI is thought to be best achieved through some form of data fusion technique. However, images taken by these various techniques are often obtained under entirely different tissue configurations, compression, orientation or body position. In these cases some form of spatial transformation of image data from one geometry to another is required such that the tissues are represented in an equivalent configuration. We propose to use a 3D finite element model for lesion correspondence in breast imaging. The novelty of the approach lies in the following facts: (1) Finite element is the most accurate technique for modeling deformable objects such as breast. The physical soundness and mathematical rigor of finite element method ensure the accuracy and reliability of breast modeling that is essential for lesion correspondence. (2) When both MR and mammographic images are available, a subject-specific 3D breast model will be built from MRIs. If only mammography is available, a generic breast model will be used for two-view mammography reading. (3) Incremental contact simulation of breast compression allows accurate capture of breast deformation and ensures the quality of lesion correspondence. (4) Balance between efficiency and accuracy is achieved through adaptive meshing. We have done intensive research based on phantom and patient data.

  10. Modulus reconstruction from prostate ultrasound images using finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhennan; Zhang, Shaoting; Alam, S. Kaisar; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Garra, Brian S.; Feleppa, Ernest J.

    2012-03-01

    In medical diagnosis, use of elastography is becoming increasingly more useful. However, treatments usually assume a planar compression applied to tissue surfaces and measure the deformation. The stress distribution is relatively uniform close to the surface when using a large, flat compressor but it diverges gradually along tissue depth. Generally in prostate elastography, the transrectal probes used for scanning and compression are cylindrical side-fire or rounded end-fire probes, and the force is applied through the rectal wall. These make it very difficult to detect cancer in prostate, since the rounded contact surfaces exaggerate the non-uniformity of the applied stress, especially for the distal, anterior prostate. We have developed a preliminary 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to simulate prostate deformation in elastography. The model includes a homogeneous prostate with a stiffer tumor in the proximal, posterior region of the gland. A force is applied to the rectal wall to deform the prostate, strain and stress distributions can be computed from the resultant displacements. Then, we assume the displacements as boundary condition and reconstruct the modulus distribution (inverse problem) using linear perturbation method. FEM simulation shows that strain and strain contrast (of the lesion) decrease very rapidly with increasing depth and lateral distance. Therefore, lesions would not be clearly visible if located far away from the probe. However, the reconstructed modulus image can better depict relatively stiff lesion wherever the lesion is located.

  11. Finite Element Modeling for Megagauss Magnetic Field Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, David

    2005-10-01

    Applying external magnetic fields with MegaGauss strength is needed for hot plasma confinement and stabilization. We investigate the possibility of generating ultra-high magnetic fields with the fast z-pinch generator ``Zebra'' for experiments at the NTF. Zebra can produce a load a current of 1 MA in 100 ns. To design appropriate loads we use FemlabootnotetextFemlab 3 -- multi-physics, finite-element modeling program by Comsol AB, 2004 and ScreamerootnotetextScreamer -- A Pulsed Power Design Tool developed at SNL by M. L. Kiefer, K. L. Fugelso, K. W. Struve, and M. M. Widner. to simulate the magnetic field. Screamer predicts the load current using a detailed model of Zebra and helps optimize the operation. Using the information from Screamer, Femlab is able to calculate the magnetic field, heating, and stress on the conductor. All these effects must be taken into consideration to determine the integrity of the coil until maximum field is reached. The presentation will include simulation results for single- and multi-turn coils, as well as quasi-force-free inductors.

  12. Development of a Specific Finite Element for Timber Joint Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, Thierry; Van Parys, Laurent; Datoussaïd, Sélim

    2011-01-01

    Widely used for light frame structures or for heavy laminated wood structures, dowel-type fasteners are the most commonly used kind of connectors in timber construction. The purpose of this work is to develop a tool for the semi-rigid analysis and design of such joints. Firstly, interests and approaches described in literature for the semi-rigid modeling of timber plane frames are summarized. Secondly, for a better understanding of the problem, the main characteristics of wood used as a structural material are presented. Finally, a method for an efficient study of joints built with dowel-type fasteners is proposed and developed. This method consists of the introduction of a specific finite element called "Finite Semi-Rigid Element (FSRE)" between the ends of the jointed members. This joint element consists of two nodes, each with three degrees of freedom. These nodes will be tied with common beamelements during the FE analysis. The stiffness of the FSRE is computed from the geometry of the joints and embedding stiffness of all fasteners, along and perpendicular to the grain. The embedding characteristics of fasteners are defined with help of their experimental load-slip curves (fitted with Foschi's models) leading finally to the resolution of a FE non-linear problem.

  13. FEMA: a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the construction, verification, and demonstration of a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The particular features of FEMA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Mechanisms included in FEMA are: carrier fluid advection, hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion, radioactive decay, sorption, source/sinks, and degradation due to biological, chemical as well as physical processes. Three optional sorption models are embodied in FEMA. These are linear isotherm and Freundlich and Langmuir nonlinear isotherms. Point as well as distributed source/sinks are included to represent artificial injection/withdrawals and natural infiltration of precipitation. All source/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed concentration on the Dirichlet boundary, given gradient on the Neumann boundary segment, and flux at each Cauchy boundary segment can vary independently of each other. The aquifer may consist of as many formations as desired. Either completely confined or completely unconfined or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. FEMA also includes transient leakage to or from the aquifer of interest through confining beds from or to aquifers lying below and/or above.

  14. Finite element analysis of structural engineering problems using a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses and a drag strength is investigated for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural engineering problems. To demonstrate suitability for nonlinear structural analyses, the model is implemented into a finite element program and analyses for several uniaxial and multiaxial problems are performed. Good agreement is shown between the results obtained using the finite element implementation and those obtained experimentally. The advantages of using advanced viscoplastic models for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural components are indicated.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of scattered electromagnetic waves for stroke analysis.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, N; Rajkumar, E R

    2013-01-01

    Stroke has become one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide and about 800 in every 100,000 people suffer from stroke each year. The occurrence of stroke is ranked third among the causes of acute death and first among the causes for neurological dysfunction. Currently, Neurological examinations followed by medical imaging with CT, MRI or Angiography are used to provide better identification of the location and the type of the stroke, however they are neither fast, cost-effective nor portable. Microwave technology has emerged to complement these modalities to diagnose stroke as it is sensitive to the differences between the distinct dielectric properties of the brain tissues and blood. This paper investigates the possibility of diagnosing the type of stroke using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The object of interest is a simulated head phantom with stroke, created with its specifying material characteristics like electrical conductivity and relative permittivity. The phantom is then placed in an electromagnetic field generated by a dipole antenna radiating at 1 GHz. The FEM forward model solver computes the scattered electromagnetic field by finding the solution for the Maxwell's wave equation in the head volume. Subsequently the inverse scattering problem is solved using the Contrast Source Inversion (CSI) method to reconstruct the dielectric profile of the head phantom.

  16. Finite-element model for endometrial ablation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Platt, Robert C.; Humphries, Stanley, Jr.

    1998-04-01

    Ablation of the endometrium has become a viable treatment for dysfunctional bleeding of the uterus in women. Surgical applications of thermal ablation utilized a rolling electrode to ablate the inner uterine lining, but required practiced surgical skills and made it difficult to assess subsurface damage. Recently, various energy systems have been applied to the endometrium such as lasers, microwaves, RF electrodes, hot water balloons, and cryotherapy. A finite element model is presented to compare a multi-electrode, multiplexed RF device with a balloon containing hot fluid. The temperature fields in the uterine wall are plotted over time for various blood flow values. Assumptions of constant electrical conductivity are compared to temperature- dependent electrical conductivity. Temperatures are shown to be a maximum of about 10 - 20 degree(s)C higher when varying electrical conductivity is used. Results are also shown for cases with a 2 mm blood vessel in the field and how each device adjusts its operation to compensate for this heat sink. Damage integral results will be shown according to the time and temperature of the treatments.

  17. Finite element modeling of a progressively expanding shape memory stent.

    PubMed

    Thériault, Philippe; Terriault, Patrick; Brailovski, Vladimir; Gallo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular stents are small cylindrical devices introduced in stenosed arteries to reopen the lumen and restore blood flow. However, this treatment presents complications, including restenosis, which is the reclosing of the artery's diameter after the insertion of a stent. The structure of the prosthesis penetrates into and injures the walls of the patient's artery. There then follows a proliferation of cells and the formation of scar tissue around the injury, similar to the scarring of other organic tissues. This reaction to the trauma subjects the artery to close. The proposed solution is to develop a Nitinol stent with a progressive expansion device made of polyethylene, allowing smooth and gradual contact between the stent and the artery's wall by creep effect. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technology and methodology for the numerical study of this kind of stent through the finite element method. ANSYS 8.0 software is used to perform the analysis. The Nitinol is modeled with a superelastic law and the polyethylene with a yield hardening law. A first simulation determines the final geometry of the stent laser cut from a small tube. A second simulation examines the behavior of the prosthesis during surgery and over the 4 weeks following the operation. The results demonstrate that a compromise can be reached between a limited expansion prior the inflation of the expandable balloon and a significant expansion by creep of the polymer rings.

  18. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  19. Finite element solution of 3-D turbulent Navier-Stokes equations for propeller-driven slender bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Russell Hicks

    1987-12-01

    Three-dimensional turbulent flow over the aft end of a slender propeller driven body with the wake from a slender, planar appendage was calculated for 4 configurations. The finite element method in the form of the weak Galerkin formulation with the penalty method was used to solve the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The actual code was FIDAP, modified with a propeller body force and turbulence model, used for the solution. The turbulence model included an Inner Layer Integrated TKE model, and Outer Layer mixing length model, and a Planar Wake model. No separate boundary layer method was used for the body, rather modifications to the Integrated TKE model were made to account for the primary effects of the surface boundary layer on the flow. The flow was calculated at two levels of thrust and corresponding swirl, selfpropelled and 100 percent overthrust, as well as with selfpropelled thrust but no torque simulating an ideal rotor stator combination. Also, the selfpropelled case was calculated with a simplified turbulence model using only the Inner Layer and Planar Wake model. The results compared favorably with experiments.

  20. An electromechanical finite element model for piezoelectric energy harvester plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marqui Junior, Carlos; Erturk, Alper; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-10-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesting has been investigated by several researchers over the last decade. The goal in this research field is to power small electronic components by converting the waste vibration energy available in their environment into electrical energy. Recent literature shows that piezoelectric transduction has received the most attention for vibration-to-electricity conversion. In practice, cantilevered beams and plates with piezoceramic layers are employed as piezoelectric energy harvesters. The existing piezoelectric energy harvester models are beam-type lumped parameter, approximate distributed parameter and analytical distributed parameter solutions. However, aspect ratios of piezoelectric energy harvesters in several cases are plate-like and predicting the power output to general (symmetric and asymmetric) excitations requires a plate-type formulation which has not been covered in the energy harvesting literature. In this paper, an electromechanically coupled finite element (FE) plate model is presented for predicting the electrical power output of piezoelectric energy harvester plates. Generalized Hamilton's principle for electroelastic bodies is reviewed and the FE model is derived based on the Kirchhoff plate assumptions as typical piezoelectric energy harvesters are thin structures. Presence of conductive electrodes is taken into account in the FE model. The predictions of the FE model are verified against the analytical solution for a unimorph cantilever and then against the experimental and analytical results of a bimorph cantilever with a tip mass reported in the literature. Finally, an optimization problem is solved where the aluminum wing spar of an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) is modified to obtain a generator spar by embedding piezoceramics for the maximum electrical power without exceeding a prescribed mass addition limit.

  1. On the Development of the SIMon Finite Element Head Model.

    PubMed

    Takhounts, Erik G; Eppinger, Rolf H; Campbell, J Quinn; Tannous, Rabih E; Power, Erik D; Shook, Lauren S

    2003-10-01

    The SIMon (Simulated Injury Monitor) software package is being developed to advance the interpretation of injury mechanisms based on kinematic and kinetic data measured in the advanced anthropomorphic test dummy (AATD) and applying the measured dummy response to the human mathematical models imbedded in SIMon. The human finite element head model (FEHM) within the SIMon environment is presented in this paper. Three-dimensional head kinematic data in the form of either a nine accelerometer array or three linear CG head accelerations combined with three angular velocities serves as an input to the model. Three injury metrics are calculated: Cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM) - a correlate for diffuse axonal injury (DAI); Dilatational damage measure (DDM) - to estimate the potential for contusions; and Relative motion damage measure (RMDM) - a correlate for acute subdural hematoma (ASDH). During the development, the SIMon FEHM was tuned using cadaveric neutral density targets (NDT) data and further validated against the other available cadaveric NDT data and animal brain injury experiments. The hourglass control methods, integration schemes, mesh density, and contact stiffness penalty coefficient were parametrically altered to investigate their effect on the model's response. A set of numerical and physical parameters was established that allowed a satisfactory prediction of the motion of the brain with respect to the skull, when compared with the NDT data, and a proper separation of injury/no injury cases, when compared with the brain injury data. Critical limits for each brain injury metric were also established. Finally, the SIMon FEHM performance was compared against HIC15 through the use of NHTSA frontal and side impact crash test data. It was found that the injury metrics in the current SIMon model predicted injury in all cases where HIC15 was greater than 700 and several cases from the side impact test data where HIC15 was relatively small. Side impact was

  2. 3D finite element analysis of a metallic sphere scatterer comparison of first and second order vector absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellopoulos, V. N.; Webb, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    A 3D vector analysis of plane wave scattering by a metallic sphere using finite elements and Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) is presented. The ABCs are applied on the outer surface that truncates the infinitely extending domain. Mixed order curvilinear covariantprojection elements are used to avoid spurious corruptions. The second order ABC is superior to the first at no extra computational cost. The errors due to incomplete absorption decrease as the outer surface is moved further away from the scatterer. An error of about 1% in near-field values was obtained with the second order ABC, when the outer surface was less than half a wavelength from the scatterer. Une analyse tridimensionnelle vectorielle de la diffusion d'onde plane sur une sphère métallique utilisant des éléments finis et des Conditions aux Limites Absorbantes (CLA) est présentée. Les CLA sont appliquées sur la surface exteme tronquant le domaine s'étendant à l'infini. Des éléments curvilignes mixtes utilisant des projections covariantes sont utilisés pour éviter des solutions parasites. La CLA de second ordre est supérieure à celle de premier ordre sans effort de calcul additionnel. Les erreurs dues à l'absorption incomplète décroissent à mesure que l'on déplace la surface externe à une distance croissante du diffuseur. Un taux d'erreur d'environ 1 % dans les valeurs du champ proche a été obtenu avec les CLA de second ordre lorsque la surface externe était placée à une distance inférieure à une demi-longueur de la source de diffusion.

  3. Biomechanical influence of crown-to-implant ratio on stress distribution over internal hexagon short implant: 3-D finite element analysis with statistical test.

    PubMed

    Ramos Verri, Fellippo; Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Oliveira, Guilherme Bérgamo Brandão; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Marques Honório, Heitor; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2015-01-01

    The study of short implants is relevant to the biomechanics of dental implants, and research on crown increase has implications for the daily clinic. The aim of this study was to analyze the biomechanical interactions of a singular implant-supported prosthesis of different crown heights under vertical and oblique force, using the 3-D finite element method. Six 3-D models were designed with Invesalius 3.0, Rhinoceros 3D 4.0, and Solidworks 2010 software. Each model was constructed with a mandibular segment of bone block, including an implant supporting a screwed metal-ceramic crown. The crown height was set at 10, 12.5, and 15 mm. The applied force was 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique). We performed an ANOVA statistical test and Tukey tests; p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The increase of crown height did not influence the stress distribution on screw prosthetic (p>0.05) under axial load. However, crown heights of 12.5 and 15 mm caused statistically significant damage to the stress distribution of screws and to the cortical bone (p<0.001) under oblique load. High crown to implant (C/I) ratio harmed microstrain distribution on bone tissue under axial and oblique loads (p<0.001). Crown increase was a possible deleterious factor to the screws and to the different regions of bone tissue.

  4. Finite Element Modeling of the Thermographic Inspection for Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucinell, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of composite materials is dependent on the constituent materials selected, material structural geometry, and the fabrication process. Flaws can form in composite materials as a result of the fabrication process, handling in the manufacturing environment, and exposure in the service environment to anomalous activity. Often these flaws show no indication on the surface of the material while having the potential of substantially degrading the integrity of the composite structure. For this reason it is important to have available inspection techniques that can reliably detect sub-surface defects such as inter-ply disbonds, inter-ply cracks, porosity, and density changes caused by variations in fiber volume content. Many non-destructive evaluation techniques (NDE) are capable of detecting sub-surface flaws in composite materials. These include shearography, video image correlation, ultrasonic, acoustic emissions, and X-ray. The difficulty with most of these techniques is that they are time consuming and often difficult to apply to full scale structures. An NDE technique that appears to have the capability to quickly and easily detect flaws in composite structure is thermography. This technique uses heat to detect flaws. Heat is applied to the surface of a structure with the use of a heat lamp or heat gun. A thermographic camera is then pointed at the surface and records the surface temperature as the composite structure cools. Flaws in the material will cause the thermal-mechanical material response to change. Thus, the surface over an area where a flaw is present will cool differently than regions where flaws do not exist. This paper discusses the effort made to thermo-mechanically model the thermography process. First the material properties and physical parameters used in the model will be explained. This will be followed by a detailed discussion of the finite element model used. Finally, the result of the model will be summarized along with

  5. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  6. Application of finite element models to eddy current probe design for aircraft inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sarit

    Eddy current nondestructive testing (NDT) methods are used extensively in the inspection of aircraft structures. Improvements and innovations in probe design are constantly required for detection of flaws in complex multilayer aircraft structures. This thesis investigates alternate designs of eddy current probes for addressing some of these problems. An important aspect of probe design is the capability to simulate probe performance. Numerical computation and visualization of the electromagnetic fields can provide valuable insight into the design of new probes. Finite element methods have been used in this dissertation to numerically compute the electromagnetic fields associated with the probe coils, and the eddy current probe signals. A major contribution of this thesis is development of techniques to reduce the computer resource requirement in the finite element modeling: of the eddy current phenomenon. The first flaw detection problem is addressed by focusing the flux of the probe using active compensation techniques. A novel eddy current probe using a combination of coils is proposed and studied using: the 3D model simulation. The probe consists of two current carrying concentric coils to detect flaws closer to the sample edges. Detection of defects in second and third layer of samples has been demonstrated using: the remote field eddy current (RFEC) method. In the RFEC method the pickup coils are located in the far field region which leads to a large volume to be modeled numerically with large number of elements. A method involving partitioning the volume in the 3D finite element model is demonstrated for the RFEC detection of defects. Magneto-optic/eddy current imaging (MOI) techniques have shown considerable promise in the detection of corrosion in the second layer. MOI is a nondestructive testing method currently in use in aircraft frame inspection and it involves optically sensing the magnetic field induced by the eddy currents in the test sample. A

  7. Finite element modeling of multilayered structures of fish scales.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Allison, Paul G; Rodriguez, Rogie I; Moser, Robert D; Kennedy, Alan J

    2014-12-01

    The interlinked fish scales of Atractosteus spatula (alligator gar) and Polypterus senegalus (gray and albino bichir) are effective multilayered armor systems for protecting fish from threats such as aggressive conspecific interactions or predation. Both types of fish scales have multi-layered structures with a harder and stiffer outer layer, and softer and more compliant inner layers. However, there are differences in relative layer thickness, property mismatch between layers, the property gradations and nanostructures in each layer. The fracture paths and patterns of both scales under microindentation loads were different. In this work, finite element models of fish scales of A. spatula and P. senegalus were built to investigate the mechanics of their multi-layered structures under penetration loads. The models simulate a rigid microindenter penetrating the fish scales quasi-statically to understand the observed experimental results. Study results indicate that the different fracture patterns and crack paths observed in the experiments were related to the different stress fields caused by the differences in layer thickness, and spatial distribution of the elastic and plastic properties in the layers, and the differences in interface properties. The parametric studies and experimental results suggest that smaller fish such as P. senegalus may have adopted a thinner outer layer for light-weighting and improved mobility, and meanwhile adopted higher strength and higher modulus at the outer layer, and stronger interface properties to prevent ring cracking and interface cracking, and larger fish such as A. spatula and Arapaima gigas have lower strength and lower modulus at the outer layers and weaker interface properties, but have adopted thicker outer layers to provide adequate protection against ring cracking and interface cracking, possibly because weight is less of a concern relative to the smaller fish such as P. senegalus. PMID:25300062

  8. Finite element modeling of multilayered structures of fish scales.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Allison, Paul G; Rodriguez, Rogie I; Moser, Robert D; Kennedy, Alan J

    2014-12-01

    The interlinked fish scales of Atractosteus spatula (alligator gar) and Polypterus senegalus (gray and albino bichir) are effective multilayered armor systems for protecting fish from threats such as aggressive conspecific interactions or predation. Both types of fish scales have multi-layered structures with a harder and stiffer outer layer, and softer and more compliant inner layers. However, there are differences in relative layer thickness, property mismatch between layers, the property gradations and nanostructures in each layer. The fracture paths and patterns of both scales under microindentation loads were different. In this work, finite element models of fish scales of A. spatula and P. senegalus were built to investigate the mechanics of their multi-layered structures under penetration loads. The models simulate a rigid microindenter penetrating the fish scales quasi-statically to understand the observed experimental results. Study results indicate that the different fracture patterns and crack paths observed in the experiments were related to the different stress fields caused by the differences in layer thickness, and spatial distribution of the elastic and plastic properties in the layers, and the differences in interface properties. The parametric studies and experimental results suggest that smaller fish such as P. senegalus may have adopted a thinner outer layer for light-weighting and improved mobility, and meanwhile adopted higher strength and higher modulus at the outer layer, and stronger interface properties to prevent ring cracking and interface cracking, and larger fish such as A. spatula and Arapaima gigas have lower strength and lower modulus at the outer layers and weaker interface properties, but have adopted thicker outer layers to provide adequate protection against ring cracking and interface cracking, possibly because weight is less of a concern relative to the smaller fish such as P. senegalus.

  9. Fourier finite element modeling of light emission in waveguides: 25-dimensional FEM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yangxin; Pardo, David; Chen, Yuntian

    2015-11-01

    We present a Fourier finite element modeling of light emission of dipolar emitters coupled to infinitely long waveguides. Due to the translational symmetry, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled waveguide-emitter system can be decomposed into a series of independent 2D problems (2.5D), which reduces the computational cost. Moreover, the reduced 2D problems can be extremely accurate, compared to its 3D counterpart. Our method can precisely quantify the total emission rates, as well as the fraction of emission rates into different modal channels for waveguides with arbitrary cross-sections. We compare our method with dyadic Green's function for the light emission in single mode metallic nanowire, which yields an excellent agreement. This method is applied in multi-mode waveguides, as well as multi-core waveguides. We further show that our method has the full capability of including dipole orientations, as illustrated via a rotating dipole, which leads to unidirectional excitation of guide modes. The 2.5D Finite Element Method (FEM) approach proposed here can be applied for various waveguides, thus it is useful to interface single-photon single-emitter in nano-structures, as well as for other scenarios involving coupled waveguide-emitters.

  10. Fourier finite element modeling of light emission in waveguides: 2.5-dimensional FEM approach.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yangxin; Pardo, David; Chen, Yuntian

    2015-11-16

    We present a Fourier finite element modeling of light emission of dipolar emitters coupled to infinitely long waveguides. Due to the translational symmetry, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled waveguide-emitter system can be decomposed into a series of independent 2D problems (2.5D), which reduces the computational cost. Moreover, the reduced 2D problems can be extremely accurate, compared to its 3D counterpart. Our method can precisely quantify the total emission rates, as well as the fraction of emission rates into different modal channels for waveguides with arbitrary cross-sections. We compare our method with dyadic Green's function for the light emission in single mode metallic nanowire, which yields an excellent agreement. This method is applied in multi-mode waveguides, as well as multi-core waveguides. We further show that our method has the full capability of including dipole orientations, as illustrated via a rotating dipole, which leads to unidirectional excitation of guide modes. The 2.5D Finite Element Method (FEM) approach proposed here can be applied for various waveguides, thus it is useful to interface single-photon single-emitter in nano-structures, as well as for other scenarios involving coupled waveguide-emitters.

  11. Prediction of denosumab effects on bone remodeling: A combined pharmacokinetics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Boughattas, Mohamed Hafedh; Daniel, Jean-Luc; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-07-01

    Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits receptor activator of nuclearfactor-kappa B ligand (RANKL). This key mediator of osteoclast activities has been shown to inhibit osteoclast differentiation and hence, to increase bone mineral density (BMD) in treated patients. In the current study, we develop a computer model to simulate the effects of denosumab treatments (dose and duration) on the proximal femur bone remodeling process quantified by the variation in proximal femur BMD. The simulation model is based on a coupled pharmacokinetics model of denosumab with a pharmacodynamics model consisting of a mechanobiological finite element remodeling model which describes the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed which controls the level of bone cell autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.׳s (2003) dynamic law which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cell dynamics rather than by adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed finite element model was implemented in the finite element code Abaqus (UMAT routine). In order to perform a preliminary validation, in vivo human proximal femurs were selected and scanned at two different time intervals (at baseline and at a 36-month interval). Then, a 3D FE model was generated and the denosumab-remodeling algorithm was applied to the scans at t0 simulating daily walking activities for a duration of 36 months. The predicted results (density variation) were compared to existing published ones performed on a human cohort (FREEDOM

  12. Finite Element Modelling of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J.; Siegler, M. A.; Williams, J.

    2013-12-01

    The heat flow experiments sent on Apollo missions 15 and 17 were designed to measure the temperature gradient of the lunar regolith in order to determine the heat flux of the moon. Major problems in these experiments arose from the fact that the astronauts were not able to insert the probes below the thermal skin depth. Compounding the problem, anomalies in the data have prevented scientists from conclusively determining the temperature dependent conductivity of the soil, which enters as a linear function into the heat flow calculation, thus stymieing them in their primary goal of constraining the global heat production of the Moon. Different methods of determining the thermal conductivity have yielded vastly different results resulting in downward corrections of up to 50% in some cases from the original calculations. Along with problems determining the conductivity, the data was inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the temperature variation over time, leading some to suspect that the Apollo experiment itself changed the thermal properties of the localised area surrounding the probe. The average temperature of the regolith, according to the data, increased over time, a phenomenon that makes calculating the thermal conductivity of the soil and heat flux impossible without knowing the source of error and accounting for it. The changes, possibly resulting from as varied sources as the imprint of the Astronauts boots on the lunar surface, compacted soil around the bore stem of the probe or even heat radiating down the inside of the tube, have convinced many people that the recorded data is unusable. In order to shed some light on the possible causes of this temperature rise, we implemented a finite element model of the probe using the program COMSOL Multi-physics as well as Matlab. Once the cause of the temperature rise is known then steps can be taken to account for the failings of the experiment and increase the data's utility.

  13. Nonlinear finite element modeling of dental composite polymerization behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughlin, Gayle A.

    2003-07-01

    Polymerization shrinkage has been one of the primary shortcomings preventing the use of resin composites as a universal dental restorative material. This shrinkage of the bonded restoration causes residual stresses in the composite which in turn are transferred to the adhesive interface. The deleterious effects of this stress environment include compromise of the interface itself and the decrease in the mechanical properties of the cured composite. Novel materials which claim to produce less shrinkage have been presented as a new class of restorative materials that could reduce the effects of this problem. One difficulty in assessing the actual in vivo benefits of these new materials is the fact that there is currently no direct way to measure the stress environment at the composite/tooth clinical interface. Computer modeling using finite element analysis (FEA) could provide helpful information regarding the clinical stress performance of dental composites. The purpose of this study was to develop a model that accurately simulates the nonlinear polymerization behavior of light-cured dental composites using a commercial FEA program, which could be accessible for future research. Two phases were needed to accomplish this purpose. First, a data collection phase included volumetric shrinkage, shrinkage stress, tooth analog strain, and dynamic mechanical analysis experiments. Three composites, a standard methacrylate(Z250) and two experimental low stress epoxy-based composites (oxirane and silorane), were tested. The experimental results revealed an intriguing range of polymerization behavior exhibited by the three composites, indicating that the development of a low stress composite is possible. The information gathered from this phase supplied the necessary material input for the computer modeling, and provided empirical validation data for the model solutions. In the second modeling phase, an FEA approach based on a elastic/viscoplastic material model was used to

  14. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D'Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-06-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate 'space-frame' skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics.

  15. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D’Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate ‘space-frame’ skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics. PMID:18510503

  16. Stress analysis of a complete maxillary denture under various drop impact conditions: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Complete maxillary dentures are one of the most economic and easy ways of treatment for edentulous patients and are still widely used. However, their survival rate is slightly above three years. It is presumed that the failure reasons are not only due to normal fatigue but also emerge from damage based on unavoidable improper usage. Failure types other than long-term fatigue, such as over-deforming, also influence the effective life span of dentures. A hypothesis is presumed, stating that the premature/unexpected failures may be initiated by impact on dentures, which can be related to dropping them on the ground or other effects such as biting crispy food. Thus, the behavior of a complete maxillary denture under impact loading due to drop on a rigid surface was investigated using the finite element method utilizing explicit time integration and a rate-sensitive elastoplastic material model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Local permanent deformations have been observed along with an emphasis on frenulum region of the denture, regardless of the point of impact. Contact stresses at the tooth-denture base were also investigated. The spread of energy within the structure via wave propagation is seen to play a critical role in this fact. Stress-wave propagation is also seen to be an important factor that decreases the denture's fatigue life.

  17. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D'Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-06-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate 'space-frame' skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics. PMID:18510503

  18. Finite element model of magnetoconvection of a ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Suzanne M.; Cader, Tahir; Finlayson, Bruce A.

    2003-06-01

    Combined natural and magnetic convective heat transfer through a ferrofluid in a cubic enclosure is simulated numerically. The momentum equation includes a magnetic term that arises when a magnetic fluid is in the presence of a magnetic field gradient and a temperature gradient. In order to validate the theory, the wall temperature isotherms and Nusselt numbers are compared to experimental work of Sawada et al. (Int. J. Appl. Electromagn. Mater. 4 (1994) 329). Results are obtained using standard computational fluid dynamics codes, with modifications to account for the Langevin factor when needed. The CFD code FIDAP uses the finite element method, sometimes with a user-defined subroutine. The CFD code FEMLAB uses the finite element method with a user-supplied body force.

  19. Investigation and optimization of a finite element simulation of transducer array systems for 3D ultrasound computer tomography with respect to electrical impedance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, B.; Pirinen, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2012-03-01

    The established standard screening method to detect breast cancer is X-ray mammography. However X-ray mammography often has low contrast for tumors located within glandular tissue. A new approach is 3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT), which is expected to detect small tumors at an early stage. This paper describes the development, improvement and the results of Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations of the Transducer Array System (TAS) used in our 3D USCT. The focus of this work is on researching the influence of meshing and material parameters on the electrical impedance curves. Thereafter, these findings are used to optimize the simulation model. The quality of the simulation was evaluated by comparing simulated impedance characteristics with measured data of the real TAS. The resulting FEM simulation model is a powerful tool to analyze and optimize transducer array systems applied for USCT. With this simulation model, the behavior of TAS for different geometry modifications was researched. It provides a means to understand the acoustical performances inside of any ultrasound transducer represented by its electrical impedance characteristic.

  20. Three-dimensional finite element modeling of liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbrabant, Pieter J. M.; James, Richard; Beeckman, Jeroen; Neyts, Kristiaan; Willman, Eero; Fernandez, F. Anibal

    2011-03-01

    A finite element framework is presented to combine advanced three-dimensional liquid crystal director calculations with a full-vector beam propagation analysis. This approach becomes especially valuable to analyze and design structures in which disclinations or diffraction effects play an important role. The wide applicability of the approach is illustrated in our overview from several examples including small pixel LCOS microdisplays with homeotropic alignment.

  1. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  2. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times

  3. Female patient-specific finite element modeling of pelvic organ prolapse (POP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo-Wei; Joli, Pierre; Feng, Zhi-Qiang; Rahim, Mehdi; Pirró, Nicolas; Bellemare, Marc-Emmanuel

    2015-01-21

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) occurs only in women and becomes more common as women age. However, the surgical practices remain poorly evaluated. The realization of a simulator of the dynamic behavior of the pelvic organs is then identified as a need. It allows the surgeon to estimate the functional impact of his actions before his implementation. In this work, the simulation will be based on a patient-specific approach in which each geometrical model will be carried out starting from magnetic resonance image (MRI) acquisition of pelvic organs of one patient. To determine the strain and stress in the soft biological tissues, hyperelastic constitutive laws are used in the context of finite element analysis. The Yeoh model has been implemented into an in-house finite element code FER to model these organ tissues taking into account large deformations with multiple contacts. The 2D and 3D models are considered in this preliminary study and the results show that our method can help to improve the understanding of different forms of POP. PMID:25529137

  4. Homogenized stiffness matrices for mineralized collagen fibrils and lamellar bone using unit cell finite element models.

    PubMed

    Vercher, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Tarancón, José E; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2014-04-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils have been usually analyzed like a two-phase composite material where crystals are considered as platelets that constitute the reinforcement phase. Different models have been used to describe the elastic behavior of the material. In this work, it is shown that when Halpin-Tsai equations are applied to estimate elastic constants from typical constituent properties, not all crystal dimensions yield a model that satisfy thermodynamic restrictions. We provide the ranges of platelet dimensions that lead to positive definite stiffness matrices. On the other hand, a finite element model of a mineralized collagen fibril unit cell under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed. By applying six canonical load cases, homogenized stiffness matrices are numerically calculated. Results show a monoclinic behavior of the mineralized collagen fibril. In addition, a 5-layer lamellar structure is also considered where crystals rotate in adjacent layers of a lamella. The stiffness matrix of each layer is calculated applying Lekhnitskii transformations, and a new finite element model under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed to calculate the homogenized 3D anisotropic stiffness matrix of a unit cell of lamellar bone. Results are compared with the rule-of-mixtures showing in general good agreement. PMID:23793930

  5. Homogenized stiffness matrices for mineralized collagen fibrils and lamellar bone using unit cell finite element models.

    PubMed

    Vercher, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Tarancón, José E; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2014-04-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils have been usually analyzed like a two-phase composite material where crystals are considered as platelets that constitute the reinforcement phase. Different models have been used to describe the elastic behavior of the material. In this work, it is shown that when Halpin-Tsai equations are applied to estimate elastic constants from typical constituent properties, not all crystal dimensions yield a model that satisfy thermodynamic restrictions. We provide the ranges of platelet dimensions that lead to positive definite stiffness matrices. On the other hand, a finite element model of a mineralized collagen fibril unit cell under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed. By applying six canonical load cases, homogenized stiffness matrices are numerically calculated. Results show a monoclinic behavior of the mineralized collagen fibril. In addition, a 5-layer lamellar structure is also considered where crystals rotate in adjacent layers of a lamella. The stiffness matrix of each layer is calculated applying Lekhnitskii transformations, and a new finite element model under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed to calculate the homogenized 3D anisotropic stiffness matrix of a unit cell of lamellar bone. Results are compared with the rule-of-mixtures showing in general good agreement.

  6. Finite element modeling of the left atrium to facilitate the design of an endoscopic atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, S R; Buckner, G D; Eischen, J W; Cormier, D R

    2007-12-01

    With the worldwide prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, much attention has been focused on simulating the characteristics of the human heart to better understand and treat cardiac disorders. The purpose of this study is to build a finite element model of the left atrium (LA) that incorporates detailed anatomical features and realistic material characteristics to investigate the interaction of heart tissue and surgical instruments. This model is used to facilitate the design of an endoscopically deployable atrial retractor for use in minimally invasive, robotically assisted mitral valve repair. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a pressurized explanted porcine heart were taken to provide a 3D solid model of the heart geometry, while uniaxial tensile tests of porcine left atrial tissue were conducted to obtain realistic material properties for noncontractile cardiac tissue. A finite element model of the LA was constructed using ANSYS Release 9.0 software and the MRI data. The Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model was chosen to characterize the passive left atrial tissue; material constants were derived from tensile test data. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of a CardioVations Port Access retractor and a prototype endoscopic retractor were constructed to simulate interaction between each instrument and the LA. These contact simulations were used to compare the quality of retraction between the two instruments and to optimize the design of the prototype retractor. Model accuracy was verified by comparing simulated cardiac wall deflections to those measured by MRI. FEA simulations revealed that peak forces of approximately 2.85 N and 2.46 N were required to retract the LA using the Port Access and prototype retractors, respectively. These forces varied nonlinearly with retractor blade displacement. Dilation of the atrial walls and rigid body motion of the chamber were approximately the same for both retractors. Finite element analysis is shown to be an

  7. Coupled 2D-3D finite element method for analysis of a skin panel with a discontinuous stiffener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Lotts, C. G.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient analysis method which was used to predict detailed stress states in a typical composite compression panel with a discontinuous hat stiffener. A global-local approach was used. The global model incorporated both 2D shell and 3D brick elements connected by newly developed transition elements. Most of the panel was modeled with 2D elements, while 3D elements were employed to model the stiffener flange and the adjacent skin. Both linear and geometrically nonlinear analyses were performed on the global model. The effect of geometric nonlinearity induced by the eccentric load path due to the discontinuous hat stiffener was significant. The local model used a fine mesh of 3D brick elements to model the region at the end of the stiffener. Boundary conditions of the local 3D model were obtained by spline interpolation of the nodal displacements from the global analysis. Detailed in-plane and through-the-thickness stresses were calculated in the flange-skin interface near the end of the stiffener.

  8. Finite element modeling of borehole heat exchanger systems. Part 1. Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diersch, H.-J. G.; Bauer, D.; Heidemann, W.; Rühaak, W.; Schätzl, P.

    2011-08-01

    Single borehole heat exchanger (BHE) and arrays of BHE are modeled by using the finite element method. The first part of the paper derives the fundamental equations for BHE systems and their finite element representations, where the thermal exchange between the borehole components is modeled via thermal transfer relations. For this purpose improved relationships for thermal resistances and capacities of BHE are introduced. Pipe-to-grout thermal transfer possesses multiple grout points for double U-shape and single U-shape BHE to attain a more accurate modeling. The numerical solution of the final 3D problems is performed via a widely non-sequential (essentially non-iterative) coupling strategy for the BHE and porous medium discretization. Four types of vertical BHE are supported: double U-shape (2U) pipe, single U-shape (1U) pipe, coaxial pipe with annular (CXA) and centred (CXC) inlet. Two computational strategies are used: (1) The analytical BHE method based on Eskilson and Claesson's (1988) solution, (2) numerical BHE method based on Al-Khoury et al.'s (2005) solution. The second part of the paper focusses on BHE meshing aspects, the validation of BHE solutions and practical applications for borehole thermal energy store systems.

  9. 3D-finite element analyses of cusp movements in a human upper premolar, restored with adhesive resin-based composites.

    PubMed

    Ausiello, P; Apicella, A; Davidson, C L; Rengo, S

    2001-10-01

    The combination of diverse materials and complex geometry makes stress distribution analysis in teeth very complicated. Simulation in a computerized model might enable a study of the simultaneous interaction of the many variables. A 3D solid model of a human maxillary premolar was prepared and exported into a 3D-finite element model (FEM). Additionally, a generic class II MOD cavity preparation and restoration was simulated in the FEM model by a proper choice of the mesh volumes. A validation procedure of the FEM model was executed based on a comparison of theoretical calculations and experimental data. Different rigidities were assigned to the adhesive system and restorative materials. Two different stress conditions were simulated: (a) stresses arising from the polymerization shrinkage and (b) stresses resulting from shrinkage stress in combination with vertical occlusal loading. Three different cases were analyzed: a sound tooth, a tooth with a class II MOD cavity, adhesively restored with a high (25 GPa) and one with a low (12.5GPa) elastic modulus composite. The cusp movements induced by polymerization stress and (over)-functional occlusal loading were evaluated. While cusp displacement was higher for the more rigid composites due to the pre-stressing from polymerization shrinkage, cusp movements turned out to be lower for the more flexible composites in case the restored tooth which was stressed by the occlusal loading. This preliminary study by 3D FEA on adhesively restored teeth with a class II MOD cavity indicated that Young's modulus values of the restorative materials play an essential role in the success of the restoration. Premature failure due to stresses arising from polymerization shrinkage and occlusal loading can be prevented by proper selection and combination of materials. PMID:11522306

  10. Drilling in cortical bone: a finite element model and experimental investigations.

    PubMed

    Lughmani, Waqas A; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Ashcroft, Ian

    2015-02-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill-bit breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. An experimental and computational study of drilling in cortical bone has been conducted. A 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling has been developed. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with geometrical considerations. An elastic-plastic material model is used to predict the behaviour of cortical bone during drilling. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Finite Element Models and Properties of a Stiffened Floor-Equipped Composite Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2010-01-01

    Finite element models were developed of a floor-equipped, frame and stringer stiffened composite cylinder including a coarse finite element model of the structural components, a coarse finite element model of the acoustic cavities above and below the beam-supported plywood floor, and two dense models consisting of only the structural components. The report summarizes the geometry, the element properties, the material and mechanical properties, the beam cross-section characteristics, the beam element representations and the boundary conditions of the composite cylinder models. The expressions used to calculate the group speeds for the cylinder components are presented.

  12. FEMFLOW3D; a finite-element program for the simulation of three-dimensional aquifers; version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durbin, Timothy J.; Bond, Linda D.

    1998-01-01

    This document also includes model validation, source code, and example input and output files. Model validation was performed using four test problems. For each test problem, the results of a model simulation with FEMFLOW3D were compared with either an analytic solution or the results of an independent numerical approach. The source code, written in the ANSI x3.9-1978 FORTRAN standard, and the complete input and output of an example problem are listed in the appendixes.

  13. Finite Element Modeling Techniques for Analysis of VIIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, J.; Gleason, R.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major health concern for long-duration space missions. Currently, it is thought that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity causes elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) that is transmitted along the optic nerve sheath (ONS). We hypothesize that this in turn leads to alteration and remodeling of connective tissue in the posterior eye which impacts vision. Finite element (FE) analysis is a powerful tool for examining the effects of mechanical loads in complex geometries. Our goal is to build a FE analysis framework to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve head to elevations in ICP in VIIP.

  14. Determination of mechanical properties from depth-sensing indentation data and results of finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaenkova, M. G.; Perlovich, Yu A.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Zhuk, D. I.

    2016-04-01

    3D finite element model of indentation process with Berkovich tip was created. Using this model with different type of test materials, several series of calculations were made. These calculations lead to determination of material behavior features during indentation. Relations between material properties and its behavior during instrumented indentation were used for construction of dimensionless functions required for development the calculation algorithm, suitable to determine mechanical properties of materials by results of the depth-sensing indentation. Results of mechanical properties determination using elaborated algorithm for AISI 1020 steel grade were compared to properties obtained with standard compression tests. These two results differ by less than 10% for yield stress that evidence of a good accuracy of the proposed technique.

  15. Modeling Progressive Failure of Bonded Joints Using a Single Joint Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution which can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh-independent finite element analysis. In the present study, an enhanced finite element is applied to generate a general framework capable of modeling an array of joint types. The joint field equations are derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and the resulting solutions for the displacement fields are used to generate shape functions and a stiffness matrix for a single joint finite element. This single finite element thus captures the detailed stress and strain fields within the bonded joint, but it can function within a broader structural finite element model. The costs associated with a fine mesh of the joint can thus be avoided while still obtaining a detailed solution for the joint. Additionally, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior has been included within the method, and progressive failure of the adhesive can be modeled by using a strain-based failure criteria and re-sizing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results of the model compare favorably with experimental and finite element results.

  16. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  17. Finite element model reduction application to parametric studies and optimization of rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, M.; Toossi, M.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of this work, a reduction procedure has been developed which can be applied to large finite element model of airframe type structures. This procedure, which is tailored to be used with MSC/NASTRAN finite element code, is applied to the full airframe dynamic finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The applicability of the resulting reduced model to parametric and optimization studies is examined. Through application of the design sensitivity analysis, the viability and efficiency of this reduction technique has been demonstrated in a vibration reduction study.

  18. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  19. Development and application of a technique for reducing airframe finite element models for dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, Mostafa; Toossi, Mostafa

    1990-01-01

    A computational procedure for the reduction of large finite element models was developed. This procedure is used to obtain a significantly reduced model while retaining the essential global dynamic characteristics of the full-size model. This reduction procedure is applied to the airframe finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The resulting reduced model is then validated by application to a vibration reduction study.

  20. A Finite Element Model of the THOR-K Dummy for Aerospace and Aircraft Impact Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Jacob; Untaroiu, Costin D.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Pellettiere, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    1) Update and Improve the THOR Finite Element (FE) model to specifications of the latest mod kit (THOR-K). 2) Evaluate the kinematic and kinetic response of the FE model in frontal, spinal, and lateral impact loading conditions.

  1. NIKE3D: an implicit, finite-deformation, finite element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation static and dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node constant pressure solid elements. Bandwidth minimization is optional. Post-processors for NIKE3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories.

  2. On the Finite Element Implementation of the Generalized Method of Cells Micromechanics Constitutive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), a micromechanics based constitutive model, is implemented into the finite element code MARC using the user subroutine HYPELA. Comparisons in terms of transverse deformation response, micro stress and strain distributions, and required CPU time are presented for GMC and finite element models of fiber/matrix unit cell. GMC is shown to provide comparable predictions of the composite behavior and requires significantly less CPU time as compared to a finite element analysis of the unit cell. Details as to the organization of the HYPELA code are provided with the actual HYPELA code included in the appendix.

  3. Finite element analysis and equivalent parallel-resistance model for conductive multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Yi; Juang, Jia-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The standard collinear four-point probe method is an indispensable tool and has been extensively used for characterizing conductive thin films with homogeneous and isotropic electrical properties. In this paper, we conduct three-dimensional (3D) finite element simulations on conductive multilayer films to study the relationship between the reading of the four-point probe and the conductivity of the individual layers. We find that a multilayer film may be modeled as a simple equivalent circuit with multiple resistances, connected in parallel for a wide range of resistivity and thickness ratios, as long as its total thickness is smaller than approximately half of the probe spacing. As a result, we may determine the resistivity of each layer sequentially by applying the four-point probe, with the original correction factor π/ln(2), after deposition of each layer.

  4. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  5. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  6. Finite-element modeling and analysis in nanomedicine and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andy H; Conway, Richard C; Ben-Nissan, Besim

    2014-08-01

    This article aims to provide a brief background to the current applications of finite-element analysis (FEA) in nanomedicine and dentistry. FEA was introduced in orthopedic biomechanics in the 1970s in order to assess the stresses and deformation in human bones during functional loadings and in the design and analysis of implants. Since then, it has been applied with great frequency in orthopedics and dentistry in order to analyze issues such as implant design, bone remodeling and fracture healing, the mechanical properties of biomedical coatings on implants and the interactions at the bone-implant interface. More recently, FEA has been used in nanomedicine to study the mechanics of a single cell and to gain fundamental insights into how the particulate nature of blood influences nanoparticle delivery. PMID:25321169

  7. Finite element modeling of electromagnetic fields and waves using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. Thomas, Jr.; Schroeder, Erwin

    1989-01-01

    The various formulations of Maxwell's equations are reviewed with emphasis on those formulations which most readily form analogies with Navier's equations. Analogies involving scalar and vector potentials and electric and magnetic field components are presented. Formulations allowing for media with dielectric and conducting properties are emphasized. It is demonstrated that many problems in electromagnetism can be solved using the NASTRAN finite element code. Several fundamental problems involving time harmonic solutions of Maxwell's equations with known analytic solutions are solved using NASTRAN to demonstrate convergence and mesh requirements. Mesh requirements are studied as a function of frequency, conductivity, and dielectric properties. Applications in both low frequency and high frequency are highlighted. The low frequency problems demonstrate the ability to solve problems involving media inhomogeneity and unbounded domains. The high frequency applications demonstrate the ability to handle problems with large boundary to wavelength ratios.

  8. COMGEN: A computer program for generating finite element models of composite materials at the micro level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    1990-01-01

    COMGEN (Composite Model Generator) is an interactive FORTRAN program which can be used to create a wide variety of finite element models of continuous fiber composite materials at the micro level. It quickly generates batch or session files to be submitted to the finite element pre- and postprocessor PATRAN based on a few simple user inputs such as fiber diameter and percent fiber volume fraction of the composite to be analyzed. In addition, various mesh densities, boundary conditions, and loads can be assigned easily to the models within COMGEN. PATRAN uses a session file to generate finite element models and their associated loads which can then be translated to virtually any finite element analysis code such as NASTRAN or MARC.

  9. FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR COMPUTING SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES ON DEEPLY EMBEDDED NUCLEAR POWER PLANT STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.

    2006-06-26

    PAPER DISCUSSES COMPUTATIONS OF SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES USING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED AND OR BURIED STIFF STRUCTURES SUCH AS THOSE APPEARING IN THE CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS OF STRUCTURES FOR ADVANCED REACTORS.

  10. Prediction of Residual Stress Distributions in Welded Sections of P92 Pipes with Small Diameter and Thick Wall based on 3D Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Jianming; Zhao, Yanping; Wang, Yanfei

    2015-05-01

    This study used ABAQUS finite element (FE) software to investigate the residual stress distributions of P92 welded pipes in both the as-weld and post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Sequential coupling quasi-static thermo-mechanical in conjunction with moving double ellipsoidal heat source and an element add/remove technique to simulate deposition of new weld material, are combined in the 3D FE analysis. To validate the simulation results, the residual stresses in axial direction at the surface of pipe were measured by X-ray diffraction technique and compared with the results of FE analysis. Detailed characteristic distributions of the residual stresses are discussed. Results show that the FE model can predict the residual stress distributions satisfactorily. Highest residual stresses on the outer surface are found in the last weld bead to be deposited. And the highest tensile residual stress for the full welded section take place in heat affected zone (HAZ) near the middle thickness. Larger residual sstress can be found around the welding start point along the pipe circumference. Comparison of heat treated specimen and untreated specimen illustrates that PWHT has a strong effect on the residual stress field.

  11. DynEarthSol3D: An Efficient and Flexible Unstructured Finite Element Method to Study Long-Term Tectonic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E.; Choi, E.; Lavier, L. L.; Calo, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many tectonic problems treat the lithosphere as a compressible elastic material, which can also flow viscously or break in a brittle fashion depending on the stress level applied and the temperature conditions. We present a flexible methodology to address the resulting complex material response, which imposes severe challenges on the discretization and rheological models used. This robust, adaptive, multidimensional, finite element method solves the momentum balance and the heat equation in Lagrangian form with unstructured simplicial mesh (triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D). The mesh locking problem is avoided by using averaged volumetric strain rate to update the stress. The solver uses contingent mesh adaptivity in places where shear strain is focused (localization) during remeshing. A simple scheme of mesh coarsening is employed to prevent tiny elements during remeshing. Lagrangian markers are used to track multiple compositions of rocks. The code is parallelized via OpenMP with graph coloring. We detail the solver and verify it in a number of benchmark problems against analytic and numerical solutions from the literature.

  12. Finite element implementation of Robinson's unified viscoplastic model and its application to some uniaxial and multiaxial problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.; Kaufman, A.

    1987-01-01

    A description of the finite element implementation of Robinson's unified viscoplastic model into the General Purpose Finite Element Program (MARC) is presented. To demonstrate its application, the implementation is applied to some uniaxial and multiaxial problems. A comparison of the results for the multiaxial problem of a thick internally pressurized cylinder, obtained using the finite element implementation and an analytical solution, is also presented. The excellent agreement obtained confirms the correct finite element implementation of Robinson's model.

  13. Regular algorithm for the automatic refinement of the spectral characteristics of acoustic finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. S.; Sokov, E. M.; V'yushkina, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    A new method is presented for the automatic refinement of finite element models of complex mechanical-acoustic systems using the results of experimental studies. The method is based on control of the spectral characteristics via selection of the optimal distribution of adjustments to the stiffness of a finite element mesh. The results of testing the method are given to show the possibility of its use to significantly increase the simulation accuracy of vibration characteristics of bodies with arbitrary spatial configuration.

  14. Experimental validation of finite element modelling of a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Wang, Ling; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Fisher, John

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models are becoming increasingly useful tools to conduct parametric analysis, design optimisation and pre-clinical testing for hip joint replacements. However, the verification of the finite element model is critically important. The purposes of this study were to develop a three-dimensional anatomic finite element model for a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement for predicting its contact mechanics and to conduct experimental validation for a simple finite element model which was simplified from the anatomic finite element model. An anatomic modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement model (anatomic model) was first developed and then simplified with reasonable accuracy to a simple modular total hip replacement model (simplified model) for validation. The contact areas on the articulating surface of three polyethylene liners of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement bearings with different clearances were measured experimentally in the Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator under a series of loading conditions and different cup inclination angles. The contact areas predicted from the simplified model were then compared with that measured experimentally under the same conditions. The results showed that the simplification made for the anatomic model did not change the predictions of contact mechanics of the modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement substantially (less than 12% for contact stresses and contact areas). Good agreements of contact areas between the finite element predictions from the simplified model and experimental measurements were obtained, with maximum difference of 14% across all conditions considered. This indicated that the simplification and assumptions made in the anatomic model were reasonable and the finite element predictions from the simplified model were valid.

  15. Finite Element Surface Registration Incorporating Curvature, Volume Preservation, and Statistical Model Information

    PubMed Central

    Lüthi, Marcel; Vetter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for nonrigid registration of 3D surfaces and images. The method can be used to register surfaces by means of their distance images, or to register medical images directly. It is formulated as a minimization problem of a sum of several terms representing the desired properties of a registration result: smoothness, volume preservation, matching of the surface, its curvature, and possible other feature images, as well as consistency with previous registration results of similar objects, represented by a statistical deformation model. While most of these concepts are already known, we present a coherent continuous formulation of these constraints, including the statistical deformation model. This continuous formulation renders the registration method independent of its discretization. The finite element discretization we present is, while independent of the registration functional, the second main contribution of this paper. The local discontinuous Galerkin method has not previously been used in image registration, and it provides an efficient and general framework to discretize each of the terms of our functional. Computational efficiency and modest memory consumption are achieved thanks to parallelization and locally adaptive mesh refinement. This allows for the first time the use of otherwise prohibitively large 3D statistical deformation models. PMID:24187581

  16. Finite element surface registration incorporating curvature, volume preservation, and statistical model information.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Thomas; Dedner, Andreas; Lüthi, Marcel; Vetter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for nonrigid registration of 3D surfaces and images. The method can be used to register surfaces by means of their distance images, or to register medical images directly. It is formulated as a minimization problem of a sum of several terms representing the desired properties of a registration result: smoothness, volume preservation, matching of the surface, its curvature, and possible other feature images, as well as consistency with previous registration results of similar objects, represented by a statistical deformation model. While most of these concepts are already known, we present a coherent continuous formulation of these constraints, including the statistical deformation model. This continuous formulation renders the registration method independent of its discretization. The finite element discretization we present is, while independent of the registration functional, the second main contribution of this paper. The local discontinuous Galerkin method has not previously been used in image registration, and it provides an efficient and general framework to discretize each of the terms of our functional. Computational efficiency and modest memory consumption are achieved thanks to parallelization and locally adaptive mesh refinement. This allows for the first time the use of otherwise prohibitively large 3D statistical deformation models.

  17. Finite Element Modeling of a Cylindrical Contact Using Hertzian Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The turbine blades in the high-pressure fuel turbopump/alternate turbopump (HPFTP/AT) are subjected to hot gases rapidly flowing around them. This flow excites vibrations in the blades. Naturally, one has to worry about resonance, so a damping device was added to dissipate some energy from the system. The foundation is now laid for a very complex problem. The damper is in contact with the blade, so now there are contact stresses (both normal and tangential) to contend with. Since these stresses can be very high, it is not all that difficult to yield the material. Friction is another non-linearity and the blade is made out of a Nickel-based single-crystal superalloy that is orthotropic. A few approaches exist to solve such a problem and computer models, using contact elements, have been built with friction, plasticity, etc. These models are quite cumbersome and require many hours to solve just one load case and material orientation. A simpler approach is required. Ideally, the model should be simplified so the analysis can be conducted faster. When working with contact problems determining the contact patch and the stresses in the material are the main concerns. Closed-form solutions for non-conforming bodies, developed by Hertz, made out of isotropic materials are readily available. More involved solutions for 3-D cases using different materials are also available. The question is this: can Hertzian1 solutions be applied, or superimposed, to more complicated problems-like those involving anisotropic materials? That is the point of the investigation here. If these results agree with the more complicated computer models, then the analytical solutions can be used in lieu of the numerical solutions that take a very long time to process. As time goes on, the analytical solution will eventually have to include things like friction and plasticity. The models in this report use no contact elements and are essentially an applied load problem using Hertzian assumptions to

  18. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ.

  19. Image-Based Macro-Micro Finite Element Models of a Canine Femur with Implant Design Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Krishnan, Ganapathi; Dyce, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model of a bone-cement-implant assembly is developed for a canine cemented femoral prosthesis system. Various steps in this development entail profiling the canine femur contours by computed tomography (CT) scanning, computer aided design (CAD) reconstruction of the canine femur from CT images, CAD modeling of the implant from implant blue prints and CAD modeling of the interface cement. Finite element analysis of the macroscopic assembly is conducted for stress analysis in individual components of the system, accounting for variation in density and material properties in the porous bone material. A sensitivity analysis is conducted with the macroscopic model to investigate the effect of implant design variables on the stress distribution in the assembly. Subsequently, rigorous microstructural analysis of the bone incorporating the morphological intricacies is conducted. Various steps in this development include acquisition of the bone microstructural data from histological serial sectioning, stacking of sections to obtain 3D renderings of void distributions, microstructural characterization and determination of properties and, finally, microstructural stress analysis using a 3D Voronoi cell finite element method. Generation of the simulated microstructure and analysis by the 3D Voronoi cell finite element model provides a new way of modeling complex microstructures and correlating to morphological characteristics. An inverse calculation of the material parameters of bone by combining macroscopic experiments with microstructural characterization and analysis provides a new approach to evaluating properties without having to do experiments at this scale. Finally, the microstructural stresses in the femur are computed using the 3D VCFEM to study the stress distribution at the scale of the bone porosity. Significant difference is observed between the macroscopic stresses and the peak microscopic stresses at different locations.

  20. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  1. Plan, formulate, discuss and correlate a NASTRAN finite element vibrations model of the Boeing Model 360 helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, R.; Lang, P. F.; Smith, L. A.; Reed, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing Helicopter, together with other United States helicopter manufacturers, participated in a finite element applications program to emplace in the United States a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models in support of helicopter airframe design. The activities relating to planning and creating a finite element vibrations model of the Boeing Model 36-0 composite airframe are summarized, along with the subsequent analytical correlation with ground shake test data.

  2. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  3. Comparisons between complete and slice finite element models of a multiple arch and Buttress Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, L.K.

    1995-12-31

    Multiple arch and buttress dams are very complex structures commonly requiring analysis by finite element methods for seismic structural evaluation. Complete 3-dimensional finite element models are very expensive and time consuming. Therefore, simplified finite element models, which analyze only a portion or {open_quotes}slice{close_quotes} of the dam, are considered as a possible cost- and time-saving tool. A slice model includes only a repeatable and analytical representative section of buttresses and arches. Simplifying the analyses requires assumptions concerning the restraint conditions along the finite element boundaries, the portion of the dam to model, and the expanse of the model. These assumptions are critically important for obtaining reliable results from the analyses since the critical motion during an earthquake is in the cross-canyon direction of a multiple arch and buttress dam. Incorrect modeling of the slice model could induce too much restraint and produce unreliable results. This paper will compare the dynamic frequency, displacement, and stress results obtained from complete and slice finite element models.

  4. Fault Slip Rate of the Kazerun Fault System (KFS), Iran, Investigated Using Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoorcheh, Bijan; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2015-10-01

    A 3D non-homogenous finite element model (FEM) is developed to investigate the spatial variations of interseismic deformation for the Kazerun Fault System (KFS) in the Zagros Mountains of Iran. The model includes 19 fault segments that were extracted from geological maps and previous studies, and the average slips in the dip and strike directions on these segments were computed. The contemporary surface deformation is simulated using a free horizontal detachment surface. The dip angles of the faults in the model are varied at 90°, 70°, 50° and 30° to simulate different 3D representations of the fault systems. Tectonic loading at the boundaries of the region is applied using predicted GPS velocity vectors to the north (southern part of the Central Iran Block) and south (southern region of the Zagros mountain belt), which were obtained by solving inverse and forward problems. Where possible, the fault slip rates that are obtained using our non-homogeneous finite element model are validated using the long-term geologic and instantaneous GPS slip rates. The model is then used to estimate the dip- and strike-slip rates of the fault segments of the KFS for which no a priori information was available. We derive an upper bound of 1 mm/year for the average dip-slip rate in the region, which is consistent with estimates from geomorphologic observations. The modeling results show that in addition to the 4 main faults (Dena, Kazerun, Kareh Bas and Main Recent), other faults, such as the Zagros Front, Main Front, High Zagros and Mishan faults, accommodate up to 2.5 mm/year of the differential movement between the North and Central Zagros. We also investigated the contrast in rigidity between the southern and northern areas of the Zagros mountain belt and found that a rigidity contrast of 2 best explains the GPS data of contemporary surface deformation. Neglecting to account for the rigidity contrast in the model can lead to biased estimates of the fault slip rate of up to

  5. Optimized parallel computing for cellular automaton-finite element modeling of solidification grain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carozzani, T.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Digonnet, H.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical implementation of a three-dimensional (3D) cellular automaton (CA)-finite element (FE) model has been developed for the prediction of solidification grain structures. For the first time, it relies on optimized parallel computation to solve industrial-scale problems (centimeter to meter long) while using a sufficiently small CA grid size to predict representative structures. Several algorithm modifications and strategies to maximize parallel efficiency are introduced. Improvements on a real case simulation are measured and discussed. The CA-FE implementation here is demonstrated using 32 computing units to predict grain structure in a 2.08 m × 0.382 m × 0.382 m ingot involving 4.9 billion cells and 1.6 million grains. These numerical improvements permit tracking of local changes in texture and grain size over real-cast parts while integrating interactions with macrosegregation, heat flow and fluid flow. Full 3D is essential in all these analyses, and can be dealt with successfully using the implementation presented here.

  6. Development of an Equivalent Composite Honeycomb Model: A Finite Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenackers, G.; Peeters, J.; Ribbens, B.; Vuye, C.

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analysis of complex geometries such as honeycomb composites, brings forth several difficulties. These problems are expressed primarily as high calculation times but also memory issues when solving these models. In order to bypass these issues, the main goal of this research paper is to define an appropriate equivalent model in order to minimize the complexity of the finite element model and thus minimize computation times. A finite element study is conducted on the design and analysis of equivalent layered models, substituting the honeycomb core in sandwich structures. A comparison is made between available equivalent models. An equivalent model with the right set of material property values is defined and benchmarked, consisting of one continuous layer with orthotropic elastic properties based on different available approximate formulas. This way the complex geometry does not need to be created while the model yields sufficiently accurate results.

  7. Analytical model and finite element computation of braking torque in electromagnetic retarder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lezhi; Yang, Guangzhao; Li, Desheng

    2014-12-01

    An analytical model has been developed for analyzing the braking torque in electromagnetic retarder by flux tube and armature reaction method. The magnetic field distribution in air gap, the eddy current induced in the rotor and the braking torque are calculated by the developed model. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element models for retarder have also been developed. Results from the analytical model are compared with those from finite element models. The validity of these three models is checked by the comparison of the theoretical predictions and the measurements from an experimental prototype. The influencing factors of braking torque have been studied.

  8. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  9. Integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model of human proximal femur behavior.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Lespessailles, Eric; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model allowing for the combined simulation of (i) simulation of a human proximal femur remodeling under a given boundary conditions, (ii) followed by the simulation of its fracture behavior (force-displacement curve and fracture pattern) under quasi-static load. The combination of remodeling and fracture simulation into one unified model consists in considering that the femur properties resulting from the remodeling simulation correspond to the initial state for the fracture prediction. The remodeling model is based on phenomenological one based on a coupled strain and fatigue damage stimulus. The fracture model is based on continuum damage mechanics in order to predict the progressive fracturing process which allows to predict the fracture pattern and the complete force-displacement curve under quasi-static load. To prevent mesh-dependence that generally affects the damage propagation rate, regularization technique was applied in the current work. To investigate the potential of the proposed unified remodeling-to-fracture model, we performed remodeling simulations on a 3D proximal femur model for a duration of 365 days under five different daily loading conditions followed by a side fall fracture simulation reproducing previously published experimental tests (de Bakker et al. (2009), case C, male, 72 years old). We show here that the implementation of an integrated remodeling-to-fracture model provides more realistic prediction strategy to assess the bone remodeling effects on the fracture risk of bone.

  10. Efficient combination of a 3D Quasi-Newton inversion algorithm and a vector dual-primal finite element tearing and interconnecting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznyuk, I.; Litman, A.; Tortel, H.

    2015-08-01

    A Quasi-Newton method for reconstructing the constitutive parameters of three-dimensional (3D) penetrable scatterers from scattered field measurements is presented. This method is adapted for handling large-scale electromagnetic problems while keeping the memory requirement and the time flexibility as low as possible. The forward scattering problem is solved by applying the finite-element tearing and interconnecting full-dual-primal (FETI-FDP2) method which shares the same spirit as the domain decomposition methods for finite element methods. The idea is to split the computational domain into smaller non-overlapping sub-domains in order to simultaneously solve local sub-problems. Various strategies are proposed in order to efficiently couple the inversion algorithm with the FETI-FDP2 method: a separation into permanent and non-permanent subdomains is performed, iterative solvers are favorized for resolving the interface problem and a marching-on-in-anything initial guess selection further accelerates the process. The computational burden is also reduced by applying the adjoint state vector methodology. Finally, the inversion algorithm is confronted to measurements extracted from the 3D Fresnel database.

  11. [Developing a finite element model of human head with true anatomic structure mandible].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunsheng; Zhang, Haizhong; Du, Huiliang; Huang, Shilin; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2005-02-01

    A finite element model of human mandible is developed from CT scan images by the technologies of three-dimensional reconstruction, image processing and meshing. The mandible model is connected to one modified head model of Hybrid III dummy with joint according to the anatomic structure and mechanical characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Then a finite element model of the human head with the true anatomic structure mandible is developed. This model has been validated with the cadaver test results. It can be used in researches on the mechanism of craniofacial blunt-impact injury and on the assessment of injury severity. PMID:15762115

  12. Wind Forecasting Based on the HARMONIE Model and Adaptive Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Albert; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Escobar, José María; Montero, Gustavo; Hortal, Mariano; Calvo, Javier; Cascón, José Manuel; Montenegro, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new method for wind field forecasting over complex terrain. The main idea is to use the predictions of the HARMONIE meso-scale model as the input data for an adaptive finite element mass-consistent wind model. The HARMONIE results (obtained with a maximum resolution of about 1 km) are refined in a local scale (about a few metres). An interface between both models is implemented in such a way that the initial wind field is obtained by a suitable interpolation of the HARMONIE results. Genetic algorithms are used to calibrate some parameters of the local wind field model in accordance to the HARMONIE data. In addition, measured data are considered to improve the reliability of the simulations. An automatic tetrahedral mesh generator, based on the meccano method, is applied to adapt the discretization to complex terrains. The main characteristic of the framework is a minimal user intervention. The final goal is to validate our model in several realistic applications on Gran Canaria island, Spain, with some experimental data obtained by the AEMET in their meteorological stations. The source code of the mass-consistent wind model is available online at http://www.dca.iusiani.ulpgc.es/Wind3D/.

  13. A finite element beam-model for efficient simulation of large-scale porous structures.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Martin; Huber, Martin; Van Lenthe, G Harry; Boyd, Steven K; Müller, Ralph

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents a new method for the generation of a beam finite element (FE) model from a three-dimensional (3D) data set acquired by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). This method differs from classical modeling of trabecular bone because it models a specific sample only and differs from conventional solid hexahedron element-based FE approaches in its computational efficiency. The stress-strain curve, characterizing global mechanical properties of a porous structure, could be well predicted (R(2)=0.92). Furthermore, validation of the method was achieved by comparing local displacements of element nodes with the displacements directly measured by time-lapsed imaging methods of failure, and these measures were in good agreement. The presented model is a first step in modeling specific samples for efficient strength analysis by FE modeling. We believe that with upcoming high-resolution in-vivo imaging methods, this approach could lead to a novel and accurate tool in the risk assessment for osteoporotic fractures.

  14. Preliminary 3-D finite element analyses of the triggering mechanism of an occasional reactivation of a large landslide in stiff clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Fazio, Nunzio Luciano; Vennari, Carmela; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    In December 2013 a large landslide occurred along a clay slope located at the south-western outskirts of the Montescaglioso village (Basilicata, Southern Italy) as a consequence of intense and prolonged rainfalls that presumably caused a significant increment of the pore water pressures in the slope. The slope is formed of stiff clays belonging to the formation of the Subappennine Blue Clays, which are over-consolidated and characterized by medium plasticity. According to aerial photos dating back to 1950s, the slope was already affected by previous landslide processes, so that the examined landslide process can be classified as an occasional reactivation according to the well-known classification of Cruden & Varnes (1996). Also, during the last decades several man-made actions in the area resulted in strong changes in the original water surface network that could have played some role in the slope reactivation. Based on displacement data, obtained from a monitoring system installed few days after the phenomenon, and still in function, at present the landslide does not show relevant signs of activity. Preliminary 2-D and 3-D finite element analyses have been carried out to investigate the factors that controlled the mechanism of reactivation of the landslide. The numerical model has been setup based on the available topographical, geological and geomorphological information, the geotechnical properties of the involved soils and the information concerning the piezometric regime in the slope. The results indicate that the mobilized shear strength of the clays ranges between the typical post-peak and residual values for this type of material and confirmed that the strong increment of the pore water pressures in the slope induced by the exceptional rainfalls occurred in the previous days can be identified as the main triggering factor of the reactivation.

  15. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  16. Simplified versus geometrically accurate models of forefoot anatomy to predict plantar pressures: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Scott; Erdemir, Ahmet; Woodburn, James; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2016-01-25

    Integration of patient-specific biomechanical measurements into the design of therapeutic footwear has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in patients with diabetic foot disease. The addition of numerical simulations intended to optimise intervention design may help to build on these advances, however at present the time and labour required to generate and run personalised models of foot anatomy restrict their routine clinical utility. In this study we developed second-generation personalised simple finite element (FE) models of the forefoot with varying geometric fidelities. Plantar pressure predictions from barefoot, shod, and shod with insole simulations using simplified models were compared to those obtained from CT-based FE models incorporating more detailed representations of bone and tissue geometry. A simplified model including representations of metatarsals based on simple geometric shapes, embedded within a contoured soft tissue block with outer geometry acquired from a 3D surface scan was found to provide pressure predictions closest to the more complex model, with mean differences of 13.3kPa (SD 13.4), 12.52kPa (SD 11.9) and 9.6kPa (SD 9.3) for barefoot, shod, and insole conditions respectively. The simplified model design could be produced in <1h compared to >3h in the case of the more detailed model, and solved on average 24% faster. FE models of the forefoot based on simplified geometric representations of the metatarsal bones and soft tissue surface geometry from 3D surface scans may potentially provide a simulation approach with improved clinical utility, however further validity testing around a range of therapeutic footwear types is required.

  17. Development of a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Chest Model for the 5(th) Percentile Female.

    PubMed

    Kimpara, Hideyuki; Lee, Jong B; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Iwamoto, Masami; Watanabe, Isao; Miki, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Several three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of the human body have been developed to elucidate injury mechanisms due to automotive crashes. However, these models are mainly focused on 50(th) percentile male. As a first step towards a better understanding of injury biomechanics in the small female, a 3D FE model of a 5(th) percentile female human chest (FEM-5F) has been developed and validated against experimental data obtained from two sets of frontal impact, one set of lateral impact, two sets of oblique impact and a series of ballistic impacts. Two previous FE models, a small female Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS-AF05) occupant version 1.0Beta (Kimpara et al. 2002) and the Wayne State University Human Thoracic Model (WSUHTM, Wang 1995 and Shah et al. 2001) were integrated and modified for this model development. The model incorporated not only geometrical gender differences, such as location of the internal organs and structure of the bony skeleton, but also the biomechanical differences of the ribs due to gender. It includes a detailed description of the sternum, ribs, costal cartilage, thoracic spine, skin, superficial muscles, intercostal muscles, heart, lung, diaphragm, major blood vessels and simplified abdominal internal organs and has been validated against a series of six cadaveric experiments on the small female reported by Nahum et al. (1970), Kroell et al. (1974), Viano (1989), Talantikite et al. (1998) and Wilhelm (2003). Results predicted by the model were well-matched to these experimental data for a range of impact speeds and impactor masses. More research is needed in order to increase the accuracy of predicting rib fractures so that the mechanisms responsible for small female injury can be more clearly defined. PMID:17096277

  18. Finite element modelling of the cervical spinal cord injury -- clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Czyż, Marcin; Ścigała, Krzysztof; Będziński, Romuald; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of Finite Element Method (FEM) modelling of the clinical cases of traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The study population consisted of 28 patients suffering from traumatic cervical spine injury with (study group) and without (control) neurological deficits. A numerical simulation of the trauma event was performed, based on validated 3D FEM model. All the results obtained underwent statistical analysis. Statistically significant differences between both groups were found in severity of bony and neural structure damage as well as in stress and strain ratios. The highest values of tensile stress and deformation were noted in the sagittal (Y) axis. The maximum stress and strain were found in anterior spinothalamic, lateral spinothalamic and dorsal columns. It was also found that stress and strain in each segment and axis of the spinal cord model were positively correlated with the severity of the cervical spine injury (R-Spearman 0.39 to 0.64) and neurological symptoms of SCI (R-Spearman: 0.43 to 0.82). It is possible to create a clinical numerical model of the SCI with the use of FEM. The correlations between the mechanical force and neurological deficits show tendencies which require further studies based on an improved model and a greater number of patients.

  19. Ultrasonically assisted drilling: A finite-element model incorporating acoustic softening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonically assisted drilling (UAD) is a novel machining technique suitable for drilling in hard-to-machine quasi-brittle materials such as carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites (CFRP). UAD has been shown to possess several advantages compared to conventional drilling (CD), including reduced thrust forces, diminished burr formation at drill exit and an overall improvement in roundness and surface finish of the drilled hole. Recently, our in-house experiments of UAD in CFRP composites demonstrated remarkable reductions in thrust-force and torque measurements (average force reductions in excess of 80%) when compared to CD with the same machining parameters. In this study, a 3D finite-element model of drilling in CFRP is developed. In order to model acoustic (ultrasonic) softening effects, a phenomenological model, which accounts for ultrasonically induced plastic strain, was implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit. The model also accounts for dynamic frictional effects, which also contribute to the overall improved machining characteristics in UAD. The model is validated with experimental findings, where an excellent correlation between the reduced thrust force and torque magnitude was achieved.

  20. [Study of mechanical effects of the EVA glove on finger base with finite element modeling].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyou; Ding, Li; Yue, Guodong

    2013-08-01

    The hand strength of astronauts, when they are outside the space capsule, is highly influenced by the residual pressure (the pressure difference between inside pressure and outside one of the suit) of extravehicular activity spacesuit glove and the pressure exerted by braided fabric. The hand strength decreases significantly on extravehicular activity, severely reducing the operation efficiency. To measure mechanical influence caused by spacesuit glove on muscle-tendon and joints, the present paper analyzes the movement anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of gripping, and then proposes a grip model. With phalangeal joint simplified as hinges, seven muscles as a finger grip energy unit, the Hill muscle model was used to compute the effects. We also used ANSYS in this study to establish a 3-D finite element model of an index finger which included both bones and muscles with glove, and then we verified the model. This model was applied to calculate the muscle stress in various situations of bare hands or hands wearing gloves in three different sizes. The results showed that in order to achieve normal grip strength with the influence caused by superfluous press, the finger's muscle stress should be increased to 5.4 times of that in normal situation, with most of the finger grip strength used to overcome the influence of superfluous pressure. When the gap between the finger surface and the glove is smaller, the mechanical influence which superfluous press made will decrease. The results would provide a theoretical basis for the design of the EVA Glove.

  1. Numerical solution of an elastic and viscoelastic gravitational models by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjona Almodóvar, A.; Chacón Rebollo, T.; Gómez Marmol, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic areas present a lower effective viscosity than usually in the Earth's crust. Both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models allow the computation of gravity, deformation, and gravitational potential changes in order to investigate crustal deformations of Earth (see for instance Battaglia & Segall, 2004; Fernández et al. 1999, 2001; Rundle 1980 and 1983). These models can be represented by a coupled system of linear parabolic (for the elastic deformations), hyperbolic (for the viscoelastic deformations) and elliptic partial differential equations (for gravitational potential changes) (see for instance Arjona et al. 2008 and 2010). The existence and uniqueness of weak solutions for both the elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational problem was demonstrated in Arjona et al. (2008 and 2014). The stabilization to solutions of the associated stationary system was proved in Arjona and Díaz (2007). Here we consider the internal source as response to the effect of a pressurized magma reservoir into a multilayered, elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational earth model. We introduce the numerical analysis of a simplified steady elastic-gravitational model, solved by means of the finite element method. We also present some numerical tests in realistic situations that confirm the predictions of theoretical order of convergence. Finally, we describe the methodology for both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models using 2D and 3D test examples performed with FreeFEM++.

  2. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  3. Finite Element Modeling to Simulate the Elasto-Plastic Behavior of Polycrystalline in 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifaz, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D strain gradient plasticity finite element model was developed to simulate the elasto-plastic behavior of polycrystalline IN 718 alloys. The proposed model constructed in the basis of the so-called Kocks-Mecking model is used to determine the influence of microstructure attributes on the inelastic stress-strain distribution. Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) of different edge size but similar grain morphology and affordable computational meshes were tested to investigate the link between micro and macro variables of deformation and stress. The virtual specimens subjected to continuous monotonic straining loading conditions were constrained with random periodic boundary conditions. The difference in crystallographic orientation (which evolves in the process of straining) and the incompatibility of deformation between neighboring grains were accounted by the introduction of averaged Taylor factors and the evolution of geometrically necessary dislocation density. The effect of plastic deformation gradients imposed by the microstructure is clearly observed. Results demonstrate a strong dependence of flow stress and plastic strain on phase type and grain size. A main strategy for constitutive modeling of individual bulk grains is presented. The influence of the grain size on the aggregate response, in terms of local stress variations and aggregate elastic moduli was analyzed. It was observed that the elastic modulus in the bulk material is not dependent on grain size.

  4. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Model of the Radiocarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald D; Deshpande, Balachandra R; Daniel, Thomas E; Baratz, Mark E

    2005-01-01

    Displaced intra-articular distal radius fractures are difficult to treat, with numerous associated complications. The potential onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA) is a major concern. The relationship between malreduced intra-articular fracture of the distal radius and subsequent early onset of radiocarpal OA is clinically important, yet poorly understood. To better understand this presumed mechanical relationship, detailed information regarding joint loading, kinematics and associated stress distributions must be obtained. Toward this end, a three-dimensional finite element (3D FE) contact model of the radiocarpal joint has been developed, including the radius, lunate, scaphoid, articulations between these bones and selected soft tissues near the joint. FE model geometry was derived from cryomicrotome sections of a cadaver wrist. Radiocarpal contact stress distributions in the intact and simulated malreduced fracture conditions, previously collected using a cadaveric intra-articular fracture model, are used to establish validity of the computational model. Finally, a section of the distal radius constituting the entire lunate fossa was displaced 1, 2 and 3 mm to represent a depressed lunate die-punch fracture. PMID:16089082

  5. Application of a data base management system to a finite element model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In today's software market, much effort is being expended on the development of data base management systems (DBMS). Most commercially available DBMS were designed for business use. However, the need for such systems within the engineering and scientific communities is becoming apparent. A potential DBMS application that appears attractive is the handling of data for finite element engineering models. The applications of a commercially available, business-oriented DBMS to a structural engineering, finite element model is explored. The model, DBMS, an approach to using the DBMS, advantages and disadvantages are described. Plans for research on a scientific and engineering DBMS are discussed.

  6. Experimental measurement of tympanic membrane response for finite element model validation of a human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Soo; Baek, Moo-Jin; Lee, Dooho

    2013-01-01

    The middle ear consists of a tympanic membrane, ligaments, tendons, and three ossicles. An important function of the tympanic membrane is to deliver exterior sound stimulus to the ossicles and inner ear. In this study, the responses of the tympanic membrane in a human ear were measured and compared with those of a finite element model of the middle ear. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of the tympanic membrane, which had the measurement point on the cone of light of the tympanic membrane. The measured subjects were five Korean male adults and a cadaver. The tympanic membranes were stimulated using pure-tone sine waves at 18 center frequencies of one-third octave band over a frequency range of 200 Hz ~10 kHz with 60 and 80 dB sound pressure levels. The measured responses were converted into the umbo displacement transfer function (UDTF) with a linearity assumption. The measured UDTFs were compared with the calculated UDTFs using a finite element model for the Korean human middle ear. The finite element model of the middle ear consists of three ossicles, a tympanic membrane, ligaments, and tendons. In the finite element model, the umbo displacements were calculated under a unit sound pressure on the tympanic membrane. The UDTF of the finite element model exhibited good agreement with that of the experimental one in low frequency range, whereas in higher frequency band, the two response functions deviated from each other, which demonstrates that the finite element model should be updated with more accurate material properties and/or a frequency dependent material model.

  7. Influence of Material Models Used in Finite Element Modeling on Cutting Forces in Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivishov, Vusal; Rzayev, Elchin

    2016-08-01

    Finite element modeling of machining is significantly influenced by various modeling input parameters such as boundary conditions, mesh size and distribution, as well as properties of workpiece and tool materials. The flow stress model of the workpiece material is the most critical input parameter. However, it is very difficult to obtain experimental values under the same conditions as in machining operations.. This paper analyses the influence of different material models for two steels (AISI 1045 and hardened AISI 52100) in finite element modelling of cutting forces. In this study, the machining process is scaled by a constant ratio of the variable depth of cut h and cutting edge radius rβ. The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. This comparison illustrates some of the capabilities and limitations of FEM modelling.

  8. Measuring morphological parameters of the pelvic floor for finite element modelling purposes.

    PubMed

    Janda, Stepán; van der Helm, Frans C T; de Blok, Sjoerd B

    2003-06-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain a complete data set needed for studying the complex biomechanical behaviour of the pelvic floor muscles using a computer model based on the finite element (FE) theory. The model should be able to predict the effect of surgical interventions and give insight into the function of pelvic floor muscles. Because there was a lack of any information concerning morphological parameters of the pelvic floor muscle structures, we performed an experimental measurement to uncover those morphological parameters. Geometric parameters as well as muscle parameters of the pelvic floor muscles were measured on an embalmed female cadaver. A three-dimensional (3D) geometric data set of the pelvic floor including muscle fibre directions was obtained using a palpator device. A 3D surface model based on the experimental data, needed for mathematical modelling of the pelvic floor, was created. For all parts of the diaphragma pelvis, the optimal muscle fibre length was determined by laser diffraction measurements of the sarcomere length. In addition, other muscle parameters such as physiological cross-sectional area and total muscle fibre length were determined. Apart from these measurements we obtained a data set of the pelvic floor structures based on nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the same cadaver specimen. The purpose of this experiment was to discover the relationship between the MRI morphology and geometrical parameters obtained from the previous measurements. The produced data set is not only important for biomechanical modelling of the pelvic floor muscles, but it also describes the geometry of muscle fibres and is useful for functional analysis of the pelvic floor in general. By the use of many reference landmarks all these morphologic data concerning fibre directions and optimal fibre length can be morphed to the geometrical data based on segmentation from MRI scans. These data can be directly used as an input for building a

  9. On finite element implementation and computational techniques for constitutive modeling of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Wilt, T.; Iskovitz, I.

    1989-01-01

    The research work performed during the past year on finite element implementation and computational techniques pertaining to high temperature composites is outlined. In the present research, two main issues are addressed: efficient geometric modeling of composite structures and expedient numerical integration techniques dealing with constitutive rate equations. In the first issue, mixed finite elements for modeling laminated plates and shells were examined in terms of numerical accuracy, locking property and computational efficiency. Element applications include (currently available) linearly elastic analysis and future extension to material nonlinearity for damage predictions and large deformations. On the material level, various integration methods to integrate nonlinear constitutive rate equations for finite element implementation were studied. These include explicit, implicit and automatic subincrementing schemes. In all cases, examples are included to illustrate the numerical characteristics of various methods that were considered.

  10. Three-dimensional DC anisotropic resistivity modelling using finite elements on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wu, Xiaoping; Spitzer, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    We present a newly developed finite element program for direct current resistivity modelling, which can handle arbitrary 3-D electric anisotropy. For this purpose, it is of particular importance to construct appropriate grids because artificial anisotropy can be introduced through preferential directions associated with regular grid structures. Therefore, results from different kinds of grids (structured hexahedral, structured tetrahedral and unstructured tetrahedral) are checked for symmetry. After a series of comparisons, we conclude that unstructured tetrahedral grids generally perform best. In addition, this grid type allows for local refinement, which greatly reduces the number of nodes and, consequently, lowers the computational costs significantly. A singularity removal technique is applied, which improves the accuracy considerably. The resulting system of linear equations is solved by a conjugate gradient method with a symmetric successive overrelaxation pre-conditioner. Comparisons with analytical solutions prove the code to be highly accurate for both isotropic and anisotropic models. More complex models are investigated to analyse the response of anisotropic structures, for example, in form of the P2 tensor invariant. Finally, we apply the code to a hot dry rock scenario and show that anisotropy reveals significant information on the hydraulically induced fracture system.

  11. Thermo-mechanical finite element modeling of shape memory materials’ microindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovich, Yu A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Zhuk, D. I.

    2016-04-01

    Indentation of shape memory materials and later heating with recovery of indent is studied in this work using finite element modelling. Results of simulations of two types of shape memory materials, with one-way shape memory effect and with superelastic properties compared to experimental indentation with 200μm spherical indenter. Based on results of finite element modeling, several useful quantities plotted for loading, unloading and thermal recovery for various materials with shape memory effect. Recovery of imprint made with Berkovich (three-sided pyramid) compared to recovery of imprint made with spherical indenter.

  12. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    1993-04-28

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneousmore » systems by identifying the type of material in each element.« less

  13. GRIDMAKER. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, T.K.; Yeh, G.T.; Wilson, G.V.; Toran, L.E.

    1990-06-01

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneous systems by identifying the type of material in each element.

  14. The validation and application of a finite element human head model for frontal skull fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Z; Baumgartner, D; Willinger, R; Graw, M; Peldschus, S

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic head injuries can result from vehicular accidents, sports, falls or assaults. The current advances in computational methods and the detailed finite element models of the human head provide a significant opportunity for biomechanical study of human head injuries. The biomechanical characteristics of the human head through head impact scenarios can be studied in detail by using the finite element models. Skull fracture is one of the most frequent occurring types of head injuries. The purpose of this study is to analyse the experimental head impacts on cadavers by means of the Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model (SUFEHM). The results of the numerical model and experimental data are compared for validation purpose. The finite element model has also been applied to predict the skull bone fracture in frontal impacts. The head model includes the scalp, the facial bone, the skull, the cerebral spinal fluid, the meninges, the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The model is used to simulate the experimental frontal head impact tests using a cylindrical padded impactor. Results of the computational simulation shows that the model correlated well with a number of experimental data and a global fracture pattern has been predicted well by the model. Therefore the presented numerical model could be used for reconstruction of head impacts in different impact conditions also the forensic application of the head model would provide a tool for investigation of the causes and mechanism of head injuries.

  15. Stress Distribution Changes after Root Canal Therapy in Canine Model: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Geramy, Allahyar; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Ehsani, Sara

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The fracture strength of endodontically treated teeth compared to vital ones has long been a source of controversy. It is not clear how root canal therapy affects the stress distribution in teeth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in stress distribution after root canal therapy in a human maxillary canine by finite element analysis (FEM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two 3D FEM models of a maxillary canine were created; one represented a virgin tooth and the other represented the same tooth after root canal therapy. A single force of 14.1 N was applied 45 degrees to horizontal plane to the center of the palatal surface; stress distribution was then analyzed in both models. RESULTS: SEQV (VonMises stress) analysis demonstrated an obvious decrease after root canal therapy and the regions near cementoenamel junction (CEJ) showed the highest displacement. The endodontically treated tooth demonstrated higher deflection than the vital one. CONCLUSION: Maximum stress and displacement was repeatedly found in the cervical area, hence more emphasis should be placed on the reinforcement of this region. PMID:24082903

  16. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  17. An Integrated Magnetic Circuit Model and Finite Element Model Approach to Magnetic Bearing Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenza, Andrew J.; Kenny, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan B.

    2003-01-01

    A code for designing magnetic bearings is described. The code generates curves from magnetic circuit equations relating important bearing performance parameters. Bearing parameters selected from the curves by a designer to meet the requirements of a particular application are input directly by the code into a three-dimensional finite element analysis preprocessor. This means that a three-dimensional computer model of the bearing being developed is immediately available for viewing. The finite element model solution can be used to show areas of magnetic saturation and make more accurate predictions of the bearing load capacity, current stiffness, position stiffness, and inductance than the magnetic circuit equations did at the start of the design process. In summary, the code combines one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling methods for designing magnetic bearings.

  18. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    PubMed

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials. PMID:21428686

  19. Creating a Test-Validated Finite-Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in a finite-element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression and, therefore, in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground-vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model-tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, whereas other properties such as c.g. location, total weight, and off-diagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was an improved structural dynamic finite-element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  20. Creating a Test Validated Structural Dynamic Finite Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the Multi Utility Technology Test-bed, X-56A aircraft, is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, while other properties such as center of gravity location, total weight, and offdiagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was a more improved and desirable structural dynamic finite element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  1. A Finite-Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

    2014-09-01

    Herein, we present a coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide followed by the stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis. This fully coupled model considers the geomechanical response, fluid flow, and thermal transport relevant to geological sequestration. Both analytical solutions and numerical approach via finite element model are introduced for solving the thermal-hydro-mechanical model. Analytical solutions for pressure, temperature, deformation, and stress field were obtained for a simplified typical geological sequestration scenario. The finite element model is more general and can be used for arbitrary geometry. It was built on an open-source finite element code, Elmer, and was designed to simulate the entire period of CO2 injection (up to decades) both stably and accurately—even for large time steps. The shear-slip failure analysis was implemented based on the numerical results from the finite element model. The analysis reveals the potential failure zone caused by the fluid injection and thermal effect. From the simulation results, the thermal effect is shown to enhance well injectivity, especially at the early time of the injection. However, it also causes some side effects, such as the appearance of a small failure zone in the caprock. The coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model improves prediction of displacement, stress distribution, and potential failure zone compared to the model that neglects non-isothermal effects, especially in an area with high geothermal gradient.

  2. Dynamic and thermal response finite element models of multi-body space structural configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edighoffer, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is structural dynamics modeling of two multibody space structural configurations. The first configuration is a generic space station model of a cylindrical habitation module, two solar array panels, radiator panel, and central connecting tube. The second is a 15-m hoop-column antenna. Discussed is the special joint elimination sequence used for these large finite element models, so that eigenvalues could be extracted. The generic space station model aided test configuration design and analysis/test data correlation. The model consisted of six finite element models, one of each substructure and one of all substructures as a system. Static analysis and tests at the substructure level fine-tuned the finite element models. The 15-m hoop-column antenna is a truss column and structural ring interconnected with tension stabilizing cables. To the cables, pretensioned mesh membrane elements were attached to form four parabolic shaped antennae, one per quadrant. Imposing thermal preloads in the cables and mesh elements produced pretension in the finite element model. Thermal preload variation in the 96 control cables was adjusted to maintain antenna shape within the required tolerance and to give pointing accuracy.

  3. Finite element modelling and experimental study of oblique soccer ball bounce.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Ali; Verhelst, Rudy; Van Paepegem, Wim; Degrieck, Joris

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we develop a finite element model to examine the oblique soccer ball bounce. A careful simulation of the interaction between the ball membrane and air pressure in the ball makes the model more realistic than analytical models, and helps us to conduct an accurate study on the effect of different parameters on a bouncing ball. This finite element model includes a surface-based fluid cavity to model the mechanical response between the ball carcass and the internal air of the ball. An experimental set-up was devised to study the bounce of the ball in game-relevant impact conditions. Ball speed, angle, and spin were measured before and after the bounce, as well as ball deformation and the forces during the impact. The finite element model has been validated with three different sets of data, and the results demonstrate that the finite element model reported here is a valuable tool for the study of ball bounce. After validation of the model, the effect of the friction coefficient on soccer ball bounce was studied numerically. Simulation results show that increasing the friction coefficient may result in reversal of the horizontal impact force.

  4. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  5. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B; Cook, Mark J; Wolters, Carsten H; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  6. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B.; Cook, Mark J.; Wolters, Carsten H.; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  7. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite element model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model in finite element (SIMFE) is presented to enable the simulation of flow circulations and pollutant transport and dispersion in natural or artificial lakes, reservoirs or ponds with any number of islands. This surface impoundment model consists of two sub-models: hydrodynamic and pollutant transport models. Both submodels are simulated by the finite element method. While the hydrodynamic model is solved by the standard Galerkin finite element scheme, the pollutant transport model can be solved by any of the twelve optional finite element schemes built in the program. Theoretical approximations and the numerical algorithm of SIMFE are described. Detail instruction of the application are given and listing of FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given. One is for an idealized system with a known solution to show the accuracy and partial validation of the models. The other is applied to Prairie Island for a set of hypothetical input data, typifying a class of problems to which SIMFE may be applied.

  8. Finite element simulation of an artificial intervertebral disk using fiber reinforced laminated composite model.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi, Mehrdad; Asgharzadeh Shirazi, Hadi; Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-10-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral disk (IVD) has been increased in recent years. The lumbar herniation can be cured using conservative and surgical procedures. Surgery is considered after failure of conservative treatment. Partial discectomy, fusion, and total disk replacement (TDR) are also common surgical treatments for degenerative disk disease. However, due to limitations and disadvantages of the current treatments, many studies have been carried out to approach the best design of mimicking natural disk. Recently, a new method of TDRs has been introduced using nature deformation of IVD by reinforced fibers of annulus fibrosis. Nonetheless, owing to limitations of experimental works on the human body, numerical studies of IVD may help to understand load transfer and biomechanical properties within the disks with reinforced fibers. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the L2-L3 disk vertebrae unit with 12 vertical fibers embedded into annulus fibrosis was constructed. The IVD was subjected to compressive force, bending moment, and axial torsion. The most important parameters of disk failures were compared to that of experimental data. The results showed that the addition of reinforced fibers into the disk invokes a significant decrease of stress in the nucleus and annulus. The findings of this study may have implications not only for developing IVDs with reinforced fibers but also for the application of fiber reinforced IVD in orthopedics surgeries as a suitable implant. PMID:24981720

  9. Tooth fracture risk analysis based on a new finite element dental structure models using micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Fan, W; Mishra, S; El-Atem, A; Schuetz, M A; Xiao, Y

    2012-10-01

    The finite element (FE) analysis is an effective method to study the strength and predict the fracture risk of endodontically-treated teeth. This paper presents a rapid method developed to generate a comprehensive tooth FE model using data retrieved from micro-computed tomography (μCT). With this method, the inhomogeneity of material properties of teeth was included into the model without dividing the tooth model into different regions. The material properties of the tooth were assumed to be related to the mineral density. The fracture risk at different tooth portions was assessed for root canal treatments. The micro-CT images of a tooth were processed by a Matlab software programme and the CT numbers were retrieved. The tooth contours were obtained with thresholding segmentation using Amira. The inner and outer surfaces of the tooth were imported into Solidworks and a three-dimensional (3D) tooth model was constructed. An assembly of the tooth model with the periodontal ligament (PDL) layer and surrounding bone was imported into ABAQUS. The material properties of the tooth were calculated from the retrieved CT numbers via ABAQUS user's subroutines. Three root canal geometries (original and two enlargements) were investigated. The proposed method in this study can generate detailed 3D finite element models of a tooth with different root canal enlargements and filling materials, and would be very useful for the assessment of the fracture risk at different tooth portions after root canal treatments.

  10. Anisotropic constitutive model for nickel base single crystal alloys: Development and finite element implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    A tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel base single crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components is developed. This is achieved by a rate dependent anisotropic constitutive model implemented in a nonlinear three dimensional finite element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurigical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. A non Schmid's law formulation is used to model the tension/compression asymmetry and orientation dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is a good approximation to the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response, and strain rate sensitivity of these alloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are presented. The finite element implementation utilizes an initial strain method and twenty noded isoparametric solid elements. The ability to model piecewise linear load histories is included in the finite element code. The constitutive equations are accurately and economically integrated using a second order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method with a dynamic time incrementing procedure. Computed results from the finite element code are compared with experimental data for tensile, creep and cyclic tests at 760 deg C. The strain rate sensitivity and stress relaxation capabilities of the model are evaluated.

  11. p-version finite element modeling for NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Camille A.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    The formulation for the quadrilateral element of a p-version FEM for NDE is presented. Nodal shape, side shape, and internal shape functions are derived. The problem of wave propagation in solids is investigated using a Newmark direct integration scheme applied to p-version FEM meshes. It is found that numerical noise prevails for all the time steps and along the whole structure, and that there is no apparent wave propagation phenomenon in the displacement time-history. The numerical noise suggests that the abrupt change in the element material properties between the different layers of composite material and glue resin is a fatal modeling defect. The negative effect of using higher order p-version elements and the abrupt change of the element material properties should be countered by using a greater number of elements to model each layer and higher order mapping functions in the mapping process.

  12. An extended finite element formulation for modeling the response of polycrystalline materials to shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    The eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) is a finite element based discretization technique developed originally to model dynamic crack propagation [1]. Since that time the method has been used for modeling physics ranging from static mesoscale material failure to dendrite growth. Here we adapt the recent advances of Benson et al. [2] and Belytchko et al. [3] to model shock loading of polycrystalline material. Through several demonstration problems we evaluate the method for modeling the shock response of polycrystalline materials at the mesoscale. Specifically, we use the X-FEM to model grain boundaries. This approach allows us to i) eliminate ad-hoc mixture rules for multi-material elements and ii) avoid explicitly meshing grain boundaries. ([1] N. Moes, J. Dolbow, J and T. Belytschko, 1999,``A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 46, 131-150. [2] E. Vitali, and D. J. Benson, 2006, ``An extended finite element formulation for contact in multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian calculations,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 67, 1420-1444. [3] J-H Song, P. M. A. Areias and T. Belytschko, 2006, ``A method for dynamic crack and shear band propagation with phantom nodes,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 67, 868-893.)

  13. Application of physical parameter identification to finite-element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronowicki, Allen J.; Lukich, Michael S.; Kuritz, Steven P.

    1987-01-01

    The time domain parameter identification method described previously is applied to TRW's Large Space Structure Truss Experiment. Only control sensors and actuators are employed in the test procedure. The fit of the linear structural model to the test data is improved by more than an order of magnitude using a physically reasonable parameter set. The electro-magnetic control actuators are found to contribute significant damping due to a combination of eddy current and back electro-motive force (EMF) effects. Uncertainties in both estimated physical parameters and modal behavior variables are given.

  14. Advanced Finite Element Modeling of Low Cycle Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne; McGill, Preston; Swanson, Greg; Wells, Doug; Throckmorton, D. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document (a viewgraph presentation) assumes a crack-like defect of a size which may be missed in inspection will exist in most critical location of any critical structure or component. Flaw existence assumption is usually, but not always, conservative based on past experiences in NASA and knowledge of manufacturing processes. Cyclic, environmental, and sustained loads used to generate stresses on models. Fracture Mechanics analysis used to predict crack growth and residual strength. Must show that defective structure will still provide four times required mission lifetime. Special exemptions cover redundant structures, low risk parts, etc. Assessments require specialized software tools, experienced analysts, and reliable material crack growth rate test database.

  15. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C. A.; Knepley, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.6) can be used for quasi-static viscoelastic modeling, dynamic spontaneous rupture and/or ground-motion modeling. Unstructured and structured finite-element discretizations allow for spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales in dynamic problems ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales in quasi-static problems ranging from minutes to thousands of years. PyLith development is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and the software runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). Binaries (Linux, Darwin, and Windows systems) and source code are available from geodynamics.org. PyLith uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current PyLith features include prescribed fault ruptures with multiple earthquakes and aseismic creep, spontaneous fault ruptures with a variety of fault constitutive models, time-dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, absorbing boundary conditions, time-dependent point forces, and gravitational body forces. PyLith supports infinitesimal and small strain formulations for linear elastic rheologies, linear and generalized Maxwell viscoelastic rheologies, power-law viscoelastic rheologies, and Drucker-Prager elastoplastic rheologies. Current software development focuses on coupling quasi-static and dynamic simulations to resolve multi-scale deformation across the entire seismic cycle and the coupling of elasticity to heat and/or fluid flow.

  16. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K.; Rainsberger, R.

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  17. An Efficient Finite Element Approach for Modeling Fibrotic Clefts in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Caroline Mendonca; Campos, Fernando O.; Prassl, Anton J.; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Ahammer, Helmut; Hofer, Ernst; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging technologies provide a wealth of information on cardiac anatomy and structure at a paracellular resolution, allowing to identify micro-structural discontinuities which disrupt the intracellular matrix. Current state-of-the-art computer models built upon such datasets account for increasingly finer anatomical details, however, structural discontinuities at the paracellular level are typically discarded in the model generation process, owing to the significant costs which incur when using high resolutions for explicit representation. In this study, a novel discontinuous finite element (dFE) approach for discretizing the bidomain equations is presented, which accounts for fine-scale structures in a computer model without the need to increase spatial resolution. In the dFE method this is achieved by imposing infinitely thin lines of electrical insulation along edges of finite elements which approximate the geometry of discontinuities in the intracellular matrix. Simulation results demonstrate that the dFE approach accounts for effects induced by microscopic size scale discontinuities, such as the formation of microscopic virtual electrodes, with vast computational savings as compared to high resolution continuous finite element models. Moreover, the method can be implemented in any standard continuous finite element code with minor effort. PMID:24557691

  18. Finite Element Modeling of a Microhotplate for Microfluidic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Manginell, R.P.; Rosato, D.A.

    1999-03-09

    A hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab) is being developed that utilizes a silicon- nitride-supported microhotplate in the front-end, gas sampling and preconcentration stage. Device constraints include low-power (<200mW at 5V), rapid heating (<20msec), and a relatively uniform temperature distribution throughout the heated area ({approximately}3mm{sup 2}). To optimize for these criteria, the electro-thermal behavior of the microhotplate was modeled using Thermal Analysis System (TAS). Predicted steady-state and transient behavior agree well with infrared (IR) microscope data and measured transient response for a low-stress silicon nitride thermal conductivity of k{sub n} = 6.4 x 10{sup {minus}2} W x (cm x {degree}C){sup {minus}1} and a convection coefficient of h{sub cv} = 3.5 x 10{sup {minus}3} W x (cm{sup 2} x {degree}C){sup {minus}1}. The magnitude of h{sub cv} is framed in the context of vacuum measurements and empirical data. Details and limitations of the IR measurement are discussed. Finally, the efficacy of methods for reducing thermal gradients in the microhotplate's active area is presented.

  19. 3D finite element analysis of electrostatic deflection of commercial and FIB-modified cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy: I. Triangular shaped cantilevers with symmetric pyramidal tips.

    PubMed

    Valdrè, Giovanni; Moro, Daniele

    2008-10-01

    The investigation of the nanoscale distribution of electrostatic forces on material surfaces is of paramount importance for the development of nanotechnology, since these confined forces govern many physical processes on which a large number of technological applications are based. For instance, electric force microscopy (EFM) and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) are technologies based on an electrostatic interaction between a cantilever and a specimen. In the present work we report on a 3D finite element analysis of the electrostatic deflection of cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy. A commercial triangular shaped cantilever with a symmetric pyramidal tip was modelled. In addition, the cantilever was modified by a focused ion beam (FIB) in order to reduce its parasitic electrostatic force, and its behaviour was studied by computation analysis. 3D modelling of the electrostatic deflection was realized by using a multiphysics finite element analysis software and it was applied to the real geometry of the cantilevers and probes obtained by using basic CAD tools. The results of the modelling are in good agreement with experimental data.

  20. A progress report on estuary modeling by the finite-element method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, William G.

    1978-01-01

    Various schemes are investigated for finite-element modeling of two-dimensional surface-water flows. The first schemes investigated combine finite-element spatial discretization with split-step time stepping schemes that have been found useful in finite-difference computations. Because of the large number of numerical integrations performed in space and the large sparse matrices solved, these finite-element schemes were found to be economically uncompetitive with finite-difference schemes. A very promising leapfrog scheme is proposed which, when combined with a novel very fast spatial integration procedure, eliminates the need to solve any matrices at all. Additional problems attacked included proper propagation of waves and proper specification of the normal flow-boundary condition. This report indicates work in progress and does not come to a definitive conclusion as to the best approach for finite-element modeling of surface-water problems. The results presented represent findings obtained between September 1973 and July 1976. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Improved Finite Element Modeling of the Turbofan Engine Inlet Radiation Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Indranil Danda; Eversman, Walter; Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    Improvements have been made in the finite element model of the acoustic radiated field from a turbofan engine inlet in the presence of a mean flow. The problem of acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet is difficult to model numerically because of the large domain and high frequencies involved. A numerical model with conventional finite elements in the near field and wave envelope elements in the far field has been constructed. By employing an irrotational mean flow assumption, both the mean flow and the acoustic perturbation problem have been posed in an axisymmetric formulation in terms of the velocity potential; thereby minimizing computer storage and time requirements. The finite element mesh has been altered in search of an improved solution. The mean flow problem has been reformulated with new boundary conditions to make it theoretically rigorous. The sound source at the fan face has been modeled as a combination of positive and negative propagating duct eigenfunctions. Therefore, a finite element duct eigenvalue problem has been solved on the fan face and the resulting modal matrix has been used to implement a source boundary condition on the fan face in the acoustic radiation problem. In the post processing of the solution, the acoustic pressure has been evaluated at Gauss points inside the elements and the nodal pressure values have been interpolated from them. This has significantly improved the results. The effect of the geometric position of the transition circle between conventional finite elements and wave envelope elements has been studied and it has been found that the transition can be made nearer to the inlet than previously assumed.

  2. Finite Element Stress Model of a Strike-Slip Duplex: A Case Study from Southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrieta, P. C.; Hurtado, D.; Cembrano, J. M.; Valderrama, C.; Stanton-Yonge, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) is spatially and genetically related to seismic activity, volcanic hazard and hydrothermal resources in southern Chile. The LOFS is a regional-scale shear zone, which accommodates part of the oblique component of the convergence vector. In the LOFS southern end, an extensional strike-slip duplex arises from the connection between two NNE-striking master faults, where two damaging earthquakes (6.1-6.2 Mw) occurred in 2007. In order to understand the nature and origin of the stress field within the duplex area, we calculate the ellipticity of the stress tensor field by means of a 3D finite element model. The model represents the brittle-plastic transition in the mid crust, within which the fault zone is mechanically distinguished from the host rock in a continuum fashion. The fault zone is modeled by using an elastic-plastic constitutive relation, which is built on the basis of a range of width and orientation of mylonitic bands, representing the fault zone as seen in the field. Boundary conditions reproduce the convergence velocity between Nazca and South-America plates. Results are broadly consistent with structural data and seismicity recorded in the region. Extensional-to-transtensional stress regimes match spatially with a seismic swarm recorded in the region in 2007, and with the spatial distribution of quaternary volcanic centers. The model also shows a transpressive state of stress in the western branch of the LOFS, whereas in the eastern branch, pure strike-slip is obtained. We propose that the current duplex kinematics can be explained by convergence obliquity, duplex geometry and the occurrence of plastic deformation, which are sufficient enough to deliver the current stress configuration. Sources of discrepancy between structural data and model results might be explained by other factors not considered by the model, such as the timing of deformation or the current activity of blind faults.

  3. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system.

  4. A comparison between block and smooth modeling in finite element simulations of tDCS.

    PubMed

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Current density distributions in five selected structures, namely, anterior superior temporal gyrus (ASTG), hippocampus (HIP), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), occipital lobe (OCC) and pre-central gyrus (PRC) were investigated as part of a comparison between electrostatic finite element models constructed directly from MRI-resolution data (block models), and smoothed tetrahedral finite element models (smooth models). Three electrode configurations were applied, mimicking different tDCS therapies. Smooth model simulations were found to require three times longer to complete. The percentage differences between mean and median current densities of each model type in arbitrarily chosen brain structures ranged from -33.33-48.08%. No clear relationship was found between structure volumes and current density differences between the two model types. Tissue regions nearby the electrodes demonstrated the least percentage differences between block and smooth models. Therefore, block models may be adequate to predict current density values in cortical regions presumed targeted by tDCS.

  5. Dynamic Modelling of Tooth Deformation Using Occlusal Kinematics and Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh Nhu; Kullmer, Ottmar; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2016-01-01

    Background Dental biomechanics based on finite element (FE) analysis is attracting enormous interest in dentistry, biology, anthropology and palaeontology. Nonetheless, several shortcomings in FE modeling exist, mainly due to unrealistic loading conditions. In this contribution we used kinematics information recorded in a virtual environment derived from occlusal contact detection between high resolution models of an upper and lower human first molar pair (M1 and M1, respectively) to run a non-linear dynamic FE crash colliding test. Methodology MicroCT image data of a modern human skull were segmented to reconstruct digital models of the antagonistic right M1 and M1 and the dental supporting structures. We used the Occlusal Fingerprint Analyser software to reconstruct the individual occlusal pathway trajectory during the power stroke of the chewing cycle, which was applied in a FE simulation to guide the M1 3D-path for the crash colliding test. Results FE analysis results showed that the stress pattern changes considerably during the power stroke, demonstrating that knowledge about chewing kinematics in conjunction with a morphologically detailed FE model is crucial for understanding tooth form and function under physiological conditions. Conclusions/Significance Results from such advanced dynamic approaches will be applicable to evaluate and avoid mechanical failure in prosthodontics/endodontic treatments, and to test material behavior for modern tooth restoration in dentistry. This approach will also allow us to improve our knowledge in chewing-related biomechanics for functional diagnosis and therapy, and it will help paleoanthropologists to illuminate dental adaptive processes and morphological modifications in human evolution. PMID:27031836

  6. Simulation of surface mine hydrology with the finite element storm hydrograph model

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, M.D.; Younos, T.M.

    1980-12-01

    Use of a spatially responsive finite element model is demonstrated for simulating the hydrologic response of a reclaimed mountaintop removal operation near Beckley, West Virginia. The use of the Finite Element Storm Hydrograph Model (FESHM), developed at Virginia Tech, provides a means of incorporating spatially distributed characteristics of the watershed, thus preserving the natural configuration of overland and channel flow. The research consisted of a series of calibration studies using runoff plot data to estimate values for model parameters and reclaimed mine surface. The model verification consisted of a comparison of simulated and observed runoff characteristics using an ungaged concept. The model was found to predict runoff volume with acceptable accuracy. Peak runoff rate was generally under predicted. Poor performance of the model was noted for long duration, low intensity storm events. Use of the model to evaluate the effect of cover management for modification of hydrologic response was demonstrated.

  7. Bayesian model selection for a finite element model of a large civil aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, F. M.; Rutherford, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Nine aircraft stiffness parameters have been varied and used as inputs to a finite element model of an aircraft to generate natural frequency and deflection features (Goge, 2003). This data set (147 input parameter configurations and associated outputs) is now used to generate a metamodel, or a fast running surrogate model, using Bayesian model selection methods. Once a forward relationship is defined, the metamodel may be used in an inverse sense. That is, knowing the measured output frequencies and deflections, what were the input stiffness parameters that caused them?

  8. A Strategy for Integrating a Large Finite Element Model: X-33 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGhee, David S.

    2000-01-01

    The X-33 vehicle is an advanced technology demonstrator sponsored by NASA. For the past three years the Structural Dynamics & Loads Group of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has had the task of integrating the X-33 vehicle structural finite element model. In that time, five versions of the integrated vehicle model have been produced and a strategy has evolved that would benefit anyone given the task of integrating structural finite element models that have been generated by various modelers and companies. The strategy that has been presented here consists of six decisions that need to be made. These six decisions are: purpose of model, units, common material list, model numbering, interface control, and archive format. This strategy has been proved and expanded from experience on the X-33 vehicle.

  9. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  10. Finite element modelling of non-linear magnetic circuits using Cosmic NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    The general purpose Finite Element Program COSMIC NASTRAN currently has the ability to model magnetic circuits with constant permeablilities. An approach was developed which, through small modifications to the program, allows modelling of non-linear magnetic devices including soft magnetic materials, permanent magnets and coils. Use of the NASTRAN code resulted in output which can be used for subsequent mechanical analysis using a variation of the same computer model. Test problems were found to produce theoretically verifiable results.

  11. A comparison of two finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics using a North Sea data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Werner, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    Using the region of the English Channel and the southern bight of the North Sea, we systematically compare the results of two independent finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics. The model intercomparison provides a means for increasing our understanding of the relevant physical processes in the region in question as well as a means for the evaluation of certain algorithmic procedures of the two models. ?? 1989.

  12. AQUIFEM-SALT; a finite-element model for aquifers containing a seawater interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, C.I.

    1984-01-01

    Described are modifications to AQUIFEM, a finite element areal ground-water flow model for aquifer evaluation. The modified model, AQUIFEM-SALT, simulates an aquifer containing a freshwater body that freely floats on seawater. Parts of the freshwater lens may be confined above and below by less permeable units. Theory, code modifications, and model verification are discussed. A modified input data list is included. This report is intended as a companion to the original AQUIFEM documentation. (USGS)

  13. An Extended Finite Element Method Formulation for Modeling the Response of Polycrystalline Materials to Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas E.

    2007-12-01

    The eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) is a finite-element based discretization technique developed originally to model dynamic crack propagation [1]. Since that time the method has been used for modeling physics ranging from static meso-scale material failure to dendrite growth. Here we adapt the recent advances of Vitali and Benson [2] and Song et al. [3] to model dynamic loading of a polycrystalline material. We use demonstration problems to examine the method's efficacy for modeling the dynamic response of polycrystalline materials at the meso-scale. Specifically, we use the X-FEM to model grain boundaries. This approach allows us to i) eliminate ad-hoc mixture rules for multi-material elements and ii) avoid explicitly meshing grain boundaries.

  14. Finite element model update via Bayesian estimation and minimization of dynamic residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, K.F.

    1996-12-31

    An algorithm is presented for updating finite element models based upon a minimization of dynamic residuals. The dynamic residual of interest is the force unbalance in the homogeneous form of the equations of motion arising from errors in the model`s mass and stiffness when evaluated with the identified modal parameters. The present algorithm is a modification and extension of a previously-developed Sensitivity-Based Element-By-Element (SB-EBE) method for damage detection and finite element model up- dating. In the present algorithm, SB-EBE has been generalized to minimize a dynamic displacement residual quantity, which is shown to improve test- analysis mode correspondence. Furthermore, the algorithm has been modified to include Bayesian estimation concepts, and the underlying nonlinear optimization problem has been consistently linearized to improve the convergence properties. The resulting algorithm is demonstrated via numerical and experimental examples to be an efficient and robust method for both localizing model errors and estimating physical parameters.

  15. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  16. Elastic-Plastic J-Integral Solutions or Surface Cracks in Tension Using an Interpolation Methodology. Appendix C -- Finite Element Models Solution Database File, Appendix D -- Benchmark Finite Element Models Solution Database File

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wells, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    No closed form solutions exist for the elastic-plastic J-integral for surface cracks due to the nonlinear, three-dimensional nature of the problem. Traditionally, each surface crack must be analyzed with a unique and time-consuming nonlinear finite element analysis. To overcome this shortcoming, the authors have developed and analyzed an array of 600 3D nonlinear finite element models for surface cracks in flat plates under tension loading. The solution space covers a wide range of crack shapes and depths (shape: 0.2 less than or equal to a/c less than or equal to 1, depth: 0.2 less than or equal to a/B less than or equal to 0.8) and material flow properties (elastic modulus-to-yield ratio: 100 less than or equal to E/ys less than or equal to 1,000, and hardening: 3 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 20). The authors have developed a methodology for interpolating between the goemetric and material property variables that allows the user to reliably evaluate the full elastic-plastic J-integral and force versus crack mouth opening displacement solution; thus, a solution can be obtained very rapidly by users without elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modeling experience. Complete solutions for the 600 models and 25 additional benchmark models are provided in tabular format.

  17. Finite Element Modeling of Ground Deformation and Gravity Data Observed at Mt Etna During the 1993-1997 Inflation Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, G.; Currenti, G.; Del Negro, C.

    2006-12-01

    Elastic finite element models are applied to investigate the effects of topography and medium heterogeneities on the surface deformation and the gravity field produced by volcanic pressure sources. Changes in the gravity field cannot be interpreted only in terms of gain of mass disregarding the deformations of the rocks surrounding the source. Contributions to gravity variations depend also on surface and subsurface mass redistribution driven by dilation of the volcanic source. Both ground deformation and gravity changes were firstly evaluated by solving a coupled axial symmetric problem to estimate the effects of topography and medium heterogeneities. Numerical results show significant discrepancies in the ground deformation and gravity field compared to those predicted by analytical solutions, which disregard topography, elastic heterogeneities and density subsurface structures. With this in mind, we reviewed the expected gravity changes accompanying the 1993- 1997 inflation phase on Mt Etna by setting up a fully 3D finite element model in which we used the real topography of Etna volcano to include the geometry and seismic tomography data to infer crustal heterogeneities. The inflation phase was clearly detected by different geodetic techniques (EDM, GPS, SAR and leveling data) that showed a uniform expansion of the overall volcano edifice. When the gravity data are integrated with ground deformation data and a coupled modeling is solved, a mass intrusion is expected at depth to justify both ground deformation and gravity observation. Our findings highlighted two main points. Firstly, geodetic and gravity data, which independently reflect the state of volcano, need to be jointly modeled in order to obtain a reliable estimate of the depth and density of the intrusion. Secondly, the application of finite element methods allows for a more accurate modeling procedure, which might provide sensible insight into volcanic source definition.

  18. Finite Element Model for Failure Study of Two-Dimensional Triaxially Braided Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuetao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    A new three-dimensional finite element model of two-dimensional triaxially braided composites is presented in this paper. This meso-scale modeling technique is used to examine and predict the deformation and damage observed in tests of straight sided specimens. A unit cell based approach is used to take into account the braiding architecture as well as the mechanical properties of the fiber tows, the matrix and the fiber tow-matrix interface. A 0 deg / plus or minus 60 deg. braiding configuration has been investigated by conducting static finite element analyses. Failure initiation and progressive degradation has been simulated in the fiber tows by use of the Hashin failure criteria and a damage evolution law. The fiber tow-matrix interface was modeled by using a cohesive zone approach to capture any fiber-matrix debonding. By comparing the analytical results to those obtained experimentally, the applicability of the developed model was assessed and the failure process was investigated.

  19. Use of geostatistical modeling to capture complex geology in finite-element analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, C.A.; Longenbaugh, R.S.; Ryder, E.E.

    1995-12-01

    This paper summarizes a number of transient thermal analyses performed for a representative two-dimensional cross section of volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain using the finite element, nonlinear heat-conduction code COYOTE-II. In addition to conventional design analyses, in which material properties are formulated as a uniform single material and as horizontally layered, internally uniform matters, an attempt was made to increase the resemblance of the thermal property field to the actual geology by creating two fairly complex, geologically realistic models. The first model was created by digitizing an existing two-dimensional geologic cross section of Yucca Mountain. The second model was created using conditional geostatistical simulation. Direct mapping of geostatistically generated material property fields onto finite element computational meshes was demonstrated to yield temperature fields approximately equivalent to those generated through more conventional procedures. However, the ability to use the geostatistical models offers a means of simplifying the physical-process analyses.

  20. Planning, creating and documenting a NASTRAN finite element model of a modern helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabal, R.; Reed, D.; Ricks, R.; Kesack, W.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical models based on the finite element method of structural analysis as embodied in the NASTRAN computer code are widely used by the helicopter industry to calculate static internal loads and vibration of airframe structure. The internal loads are routinely used for sizing structural members. The vibration predictions are not yet relied on during design. NASA's Langley Research Center sponsored a program to conduct an application of the finite element method with emphasis on predicting structural vibration. The Army/Boeing CH-47D helicopter was used as the modeling subject. The objective was to engender the needed trust in vibration predictions using these models and establish a body of modeling guides which would enable confident future prediction of airframe vibration as part of the regular design process.

  1. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the aerostructures test wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  2. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  3. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  4. A Monte Carlo-finite element model for strain energy controlled microstructural evolution - 'Rafting' in superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a specialized microstructural lattice model, MCFET (Monte Carlo finite element technique), which simulates microstructural evolution in materials in which strain energy has an important role in determining morphology. The model is capable of accounting for externally applied stress, surface tension, misfit, elastic inhomogeneity, elastic anisotropy, and arbitrary temperatures. The MCFET analysis was found to compare well with the results of analytical calculations of the equilibrium morphologies of isolated particles in an infinite matrix.

  5. An assessment of finite-element modeling techniques for thick-solid/thin-shell joints analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    The subject of finite-element modeling has long been of critical importance to the practicing designer/analyst who is often faced with obtaining an accurate and cost-effective structural analysis of a particular design. Typically, these two goals are in conflict. The purpose is to discuss the topic of finite-element modeling for solid/shell connections (joints) which are significant for the practicing modeler. Several approaches are currently in use, but frequently various assumptions restrict their use. Such techniques currently used in practical applications were tested, especially to see which technique is the most ideally suited for the computer aided design (CAD) environment. Some basic thoughts regarding each technique are also discussed. As a consequence, some suggestions based on the results are given to lead reliable results in geometrically complex joints where the deformation and stress behavior are complicated.

  6. Numerical implementation of energy-based models in finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattonjai, Piyachat

    2016-06-01

    Soil is one of the most complex materials including several characteristics which are not only effect on stress-strain relationship but also volume changed such as contraction and dilation. Those characteristics depend on so many factors such as stress history, drained condition, current effective stress state, stress paths as well as void ratio, etc. In finite element analysis, the relevant constitutive model which includes relevant factors as mentioned above is one of the main key that will provide the accurate predicting of strength and deformation characteristic of geotechnical structure. For modern finite element program, the user-defined material subroutines have been provided when the material models included in the material library could not accurately predict the rather complex behavior of material. The objective of this study is to implement the elasto-plastic work-hardening-softening constitutive model into ABAQUS via VUMAT subroutine. The simulated results were verified by the experimental results of Toyoura sand under plane strain condition.

  7. Subject specific finite element modeling of periprosthetic femoral fracture using element deactivation to simulate bone failure.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Shi, Angela; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology could predict peri-prosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) for cementless hip arthoplasty in the early postoperative period. This study develops methodology for subject-specific finite element modeling by using the element deactivation technique to simulate bone failure and validate with experimental testing, thereby predicting peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in the early postoperative period. Material assignments for biphasic and triphasic models were undertaken. Failure modeling with the element deactivation feature available in ABAQUS 6.9 was used to simulate a crack initiation and propagation in the bony tissue based upon a threshold of fracture strain. The crack mode for the biphasic models was very similar to the experimental testing crack mode, with a similar shape and path of the crack. The fracture load is sensitive to the friction coefficient at the implant-bony interface. The development of a novel technique to simulate bone failure by element deactivation of subject-specific finite element models could aid prediction of fracture load in addition to fracture risk characterization for PFF. PMID:25937546

  8. Sensitivity and ex vivo validation of finite element models of the domestic pig cranium

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2011-01-01

    A finite element (FE) validation and sensitivity study was undertaken on a modern domestic pig cranium. Bone strain data were collected ex vivo from strain gauges, and compared with results from specimen-specific FE models. An isotropic, homogeneous model was created, then input parameters were altered to investigate model sensitivity. Heterogeneous, isotropic models investigated the effects of a constant-thickness, stiffer outer layer (representing cortical bone) atop a more compliant interior (representing cancellous bone). Loading direction and placement of strain gauges were also varied, and the use of 2D membrane elements at strain gauge locations as a method of projecting 3D model strains into the plane of the gauge was investigated. The models correctly estimate the loading conditions of the experiment, yet at some locations fail to reproduce correct principal strain magnitudes, and hence strain ratios. Principal strain orientations are predicted well. The initial model was too stiff by approximately an order of magnitude. Introducing a compliant interior reported strain magnitudes more similar to the ex vivo results without notably affecting strain orientations, ratios or contour patterns, suggesting that this simple heterogeneity was the equivalent of reducing the overall stiffness of the model. Models were generally insensitive to moderate changes in loading direction or strain gauge placement, except in the squamosal portion of the zygomatic arch. The use of membrane elements made negligible differences to the reported strains. The models therefore seem most sensitive to changes in material properties, and suggest that failure to model local heterogeneity in material properties and structure of the bone may be responsible for discrepancies between the experimental and model results. This is partially attributable to a lack of resolution in the CT scans from which the model was built, and partially due to an absence of detailed material properties data

  9. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  10. Development and validation of a three-dimensional finite element model of the face.

    PubMed

    Barbarino, G G; Jabareen, M; Trzewik, J; Nkengne, A; Stamatas, G; Mazza, E

    2009-04-01

    A detailed three-dimensional finite element model of the face is presented in this paper. Bones, muscles, skin, fat, and superficial muscoloaponeurotic system were reconstructed from magnetic resonance images and modeled according to anatomical, plastic, and reconstructive surgery literature. The finite element mesh, composed of hexahedron elements, was generated through a semi-automatic procedure with an effective compromise between the detailed representation of anatomical parts and the limitation of the computational time. Nonlinear constitutive equations are implemented in the finite element model. The corresponding model parameters were selected according to previous work with mechanical measurements on soft facial tissue, or based on reasonable assumptions. Model assumptions concerning tissue geometry, interactions, mechanical properties, and the boundary conditions were validated through comparison with experiments. The calculated response of facial tissues to gravity loads, to the application of a pressure inside the oral cavity and to the application of an imposed displacement was shown to be in good agreement with the data from corresponding magnetic resonance images and holographic measurements. As a first application, gravimetric soft tissue descent was calculated from the long time action of gravity on the face in the erect position, with tissue aging leading to a loss of stiffness. Aging predictions are compared with the observations from an "aging database" with frontal photos of volunteers at different age ranges (i.e., 20-40 years and 50-70 years). PMID:19275435

  11. Finite element modeling of cracked bodies using the Bodner-Partom flow law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, T.; Bohun, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Bodner-Partom flow law which models viscoplastic material behavior has been used to represent two nickel-base superalloys, Gatorized IN100 and Inconel 718 at elevated temperature. Procedures for the determination of the material parameters are presented along with a discussion of the physical significance of each parameter. The material model is then used in finite element computations to evaluate the response of cracked bodies to monotonic, sustained, or cyclic loading. Geometries investigated include the center cracked panel, the compact tension specimen, and the single cracked ring under tension. A Hybrid Experimental Numerical (HEN) procedure has been used to deduce crack growth rates from experimental displacement measurements which are input into finite element computations. The results of several studies conducted over the last several years are summarized.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Thermal Cycling Induced Microcracking in Carbon/Epoxy Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Morscher, Gregory; Martin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The microcrack distribution and mass change in PR520/T700s and 3502/T700s carbon/epoxy braided composites exposed to thermal cycling was evaluated experimentally. Acoustic emission was utilized to record the crack initiation and propagation under cyclic thermal loading between -55 C and 120 C. Transverse microcrack morphology was investigated using X-ray Computed Tomography. Different performance of two kinds of composites was discovered and analyzed. Based on the observations of microcrack formation, a meso-mechanical finite element model was developed to obtain the resultant mechanical properties. The simulation results exhibited a decrease in strength and stiffness with increasing crack density. Strength and stiffness reduction versus crack densities in different orientations were compared. The changes of global mechanical behavior in both axial and transverse loading conditions were studied. Keywords: Thermal cycles; Microcrack; Finite Element Model; Braided Composite

  13. A comparison of classical mechanics models and finite element simulation of elastically tailored wing boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Pickings, Richard D.; Chang, Stephen; Holl, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Structural tailoring concepts were developed to create wings with elastically produced camber for the purpose of increasing lift during takeoff conditions. Simple models based upon enhancements to the thin walled composite beam theory of Rehfield were developed to investigate prospects for elastic tailoring of the chordwise deformation of wing structures. The purpose here is to provide a comparison of the theoretical results with a finite element model for the bending method of producing camber. Finite element correlation studies were completed for two cases: a bonded unstiffened structural box, and a bolted unstiffened structural box. Results from these studies show an error of less than one percent for the bonded case and less than six percent for the bolted case in predicting camber curvature for the structural box. Examination of the results shows that the theory is very accurate for the cases studied and will provide an excellent basis for conducting further tailoring studies.

  14. Finite Element Modeling of the Different Failure Mechanisms of a Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar-Far, M.; Absi, J.; Mariaux, G.

    2012-12-01

    A new finite element model is used to investigate catastrophic failures of a thermal barrier coatings system due to crack propagation along the interfaces between the ceramic top-coat, thermally grown oxide, and bond-coat layers, as well as between the lamellas structure of the ceramic layer. The thermo-mechanical model is designed to take into account a non-homogenous temperature distribution and the effects of the residual stresses generated during the coating process. Crack propagation is simulated using the contact tool "Debond" present in the ABAQUS finite element code. Simulations are performed with a geometry corresponding to similar or dissimilar amplitudes of asperity, and for different thicknesses of the oxide layer. The numerical results have shown that crack evolution depends crucially on the ratio of the loading rate caused by growth and swelling of the oxide layer and also on the interface roughness obtained during the spraying of coatings.

  15. Development and initial evaluation of a finite element model of the pediatric craniocervical junction.

    PubMed

    Phuntsok, Rinchen; Mazur, Marcus D; Ellis, Benjamin J; Ravindra, Vijay M; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is a significant deficiency in understanding the biomechanics of the pediatric craniocervical junction (CCJ) (occiput-C2), primarily because of a lack of human pediatric cadaveric tissue and the relatively small number of treated patients. To overcome this deficiency, a finite element model (FEM) of the pediatric CCJ was created using pediatric geometry and parameterized adult material properties. The model was evaluated under the physiological range of motion (ROM) for flexion-extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending and under tensile loading. METHODS This research utilizes the FEM method, which is a numerical solution technique for discretizing and analyzing systems. The FEM method has been widely used in the field of biomechanics. A CT scan of a 13-month-old female patient was used to create the 3D geometry and surfaces of the FEM model, and an open-source FEM software suite was used to apply the material properties and boundary and loading conditions and analyze the model. The published adult ligament properties were reduced to 50%, 25%, and 10% of the original stiffness in various iterations of the model, and the resulting ROMs for flexion-extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending were compared. The flexion-extension ROMs and tensile stiffness that were predicted by the model were evaluated using previously published experimental measurements from pediatric cadaveric tissues. RESULTS The model predicted a ROM within 1 standard deviation of the published pediatric ROM data for flexion-extension at 10% of adult ligament stiffness. The model's response in terms of axial tension also coincided well with published experimental tension characterization data. The model behaved relatively stiffer in extension than in flexion. The axial rotation and lateral bending results showed symmetric ROM, but there are currently no published pediatric experimental data available for comparison. The model predicts a relatively stiffer ROM in both axial

  16. A finite element formulation for modeling dynamic wetting on flexible substrates and in deformable porous media.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Cairncross, Richard A.; Madasu, S.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes research advances pursued with award funding issued by the DOE to Drexel University through the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) program. Professor Rich Cairncross was the recipient of this award in 1997. With it he pursued two related research topics under Sandia's guidance that address the outstanding issue of fluid-structural interactions of liquids with deformable solid materials, focusing mainly on the ubiquitous dynamic wetting problem. The project focus in the first four years was aimed at deriving a predictive numerical modeling approach for the motion of the dynamic contact line on a deformable substrate. A formulation of physical model equations was derived in the context of the Galerkin finite element method in an arbitrary Lagrangian/Eulerian (ALE) frame of reference. The formulation was successfully integrated in Sandia's Goma finite element code and tested on several technologically important thin-film coating problems. The model equations, the finite-element implementation, and results from several applications are given in this report. In the last year of the five-year project the same physical concepts were extended towards the problem of capillary imbibition in deformable porous media. A synopsis of this preliminary modeling and experimental effort is also discussed.

  17. Finite element model-simulation-based characterization of a magnetostrictive gyrosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Marschner, U.; Graham, F.; Yoo, J.-H.; Flatau, A. B.; Mudivarthi, C.; Neubert, H.

    2010-05-15

    This paper analyzes a prototype microgyrosensor that employs the magnetostrictive alloy Galfenol for transduction of Coriolis-induced forces into an electrical output for quantifying a given angular velocity. The magnetic induction distribution in the Galfenol sensor patch depends on its bending shape and magnetoelastic properties and is investigated using a finite element model. Fluctuations in magnetic induction caused by a sinusoidal rotation of the sensor produce an amplitude modulated voltage in a surrounding coil which is simulated and measured.

  18. Pericellular Matrix Mechanics in the Anulus Fibrosus Predicted by a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Model and In Situ Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li; Guilak, Farshid; Setton, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Anulus fibrosus (AF) cells have been demonstrated to exhibit dramatic differences in morphology and biologic responses to different types of mechanical stimuli. AF cells may reside as single cell, paired or multiple cells in a contiguous pericellular matrix (PCM), whose structure and properties are expected to have a significant influence on the mechanical stimuli that these cells may experience during physiologic loading of the spine, as well as in tissue degeneration and regeneration. In this study, a computational model was developed to predict the micromechanical stimuli, such as stress and strain, fluid pressure and flow, of cells and their surrounding PCM in the AF tissue using three-dimensional (3D) finite element models based on in situ morphology. 3D solid geometries of cell-PCM regions were registered from serial confocal images obtained from mature rat AF tissues by custom codes. Distinct cell-matrix units were modeled with a custom 3D biphasic finite element code (COMSOL Multiphysics), and simulated to experience uni-axial tensile strain along the local collagen fiber direction. AF cells were predicted to experience higher volumetric strain with a strain amplification ratio (relative to that in the extracellular matrix) of ~ 3.1 – 3.8 at equilibrium, as compared to the PCM domains (1.3 – 1.9). The strain concentrations were generally found at the cell/PCM interface and stress concentration at the PCM/ECM interface. Increased numbers of cells within a contiguous PCM was associated with an apparent increase of strain levels and decreased rate of fluid pressurization in the cell, with magnitudes dependent on the cell size, shape and relative position inside the PCM. These studies provide spatio-temporal information on micromechanics of AF cells in understanding the mechanotransduction in the intervertebral disc. PMID:19946619

  19. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  20. FEMWATER: a finite-element model of water flow through saturated-unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Ward, D.S.

    1980-10-01

    Upon examining the Water Movement Through Saturated-Unsaturated Porous Media: A Finite-Element Galerkin Model, it was felt that the model should be modified and expanded. The modification is made in calculating the flow field in a manner consistent with the finite element approach, in evaluating the moisture-content increasing rate within the region of interest, and in numerically computing the nonlinear terms. With these modifications, the flow field is continuous everywhere in the flow regime, including element boundaries and nodal points, and the mass loss through boundaries is much reduced. Expansion is made to include four additional numerical schemes which would be more appropriate for many situations. Also, to save computer storage, all arrays pertaining to the boundary condition information are compressed to smaller dimension, and to ease the treatment of different problems, all arrays are variably dimensioned in all subroutines. This report is intended to document these efforts. In addition, in the derivation of finite-element equations, matrix component representation is used, which is believed more readable than the matrix representation in its entirety. Two identical sample problems are simulated to show the difference between the original and revised models.

  1. Experimental validation of finite element model analysis of a steel frame in simulated post-earthquake fire environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Bevans, W. J.; Xiao, Hai; Zhou, Zhi; Chen, Genda

    2012-04-01

    During or after an earthquake event, building system often experiences large strains due to shaking effects as observed during recent earthquakes, causing permanent inelastic deformation. In addition to the inelastic deformation induced by the earthquake effect, the post-earthquake fires associated with short fuse of electrical systems and leakage of gas devices can further strain the already damaged structures during the earthquakes, potentially leading to a progressive collapse of buildings. Under these harsh environments, measurements on the involved building by various sensors could only provide limited structural health information. Finite element model analysis, on the other hand, if validated by predesigned experiments, can provide detail structural behavior information of the entire structures. In this paper, a temperature dependent nonlinear 3-D finite element model (FEM) of a one-story steel frame is set up by ABAQUS based on the cited material property of steel from EN 1993-1.2 and AISC manuals. The FEM is validated by testing the modeled steel frame in simulated post-earthquake environments. Comparisons between the FEM analysis and the experimental results show that the FEM predicts the structural behavior of the steel frame in post-earthquake fire conditions reasonably. With experimental validations, the FEM analysis of critical structures could be continuously predicted for structures in these harsh environments for a better assistant to fire fighters in their rescue efforts and save fire victims.

  2. Thermoviscoelastic finite element modeling of laser-generated ultrasound in viscoelastic plates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi

    2010-12-15

    Laser-generated ultrasound in a thin composite plate with thermoviscoelastic property has been studied quantitatively. According to thermoviscoelastic theory, considering the viscoelastic and thermophysical properties of materials, a numerical model for the laser-generated Lamb waves is established in the frequency domain by using a finite element method. It is confirmed that the temperature and displacement fields calculated in the frequency domain coincide well with those obtained in the time domain. In the numerical simulations of thermoviscoelastically generated Lamb waves, the effects of viscoelastic and elastic stiffness moduli, and the thickness of the materials have been taken into account in details. The characteristics of the Lamb waves in the numerical results agree well with the features of the disperse curves. The results show that the finite element method in this paper provides a useful technique to characterize mechanical properties of composite materials.

  3. GPU-Accelerated Finite Element Method for Modelling Light Transport in Diffuse Optical Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a GPU-accelerated finite element forward solver for the computation of light transport in scattering media. The forward model is the computationally most expensive component of iterative methods for image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography, and performance optimisation of the forward solver is therefore crucial for improving the efficiency of the solution of the inverse problem. The GPU forward solver uses a CUDA implementation that evaluates on the graphics hardware the sparse linear system arising in the finite element formulation of the diffusion equation. We present solutions for both time-domain and frequency-domain problems. A comparison with a CPU-based implementation shows significant performance gains of the graphics accelerated solution, with improvements of approximately a factor of 10 for double-precision computations, and factors beyond 20 for single-precision computations. The gains are also shown to be dependent on the mesh complexity, where the largest gains are achieved for high mesh resolutions. PMID:22013431

  4. GPU-Accelerated Finite Element Method for Modelling Light Transport in Diffuse Optical Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a GPU-accelerated finite element forward solver for the computation of light transport in scattering media. The forward model is the computationally most expensive component of iterative methods for image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography, and performance optimisation of the forward solver is therefore crucial for improving the efficiency of the solution of the inverse problem. The GPU forward solver uses a CUDA implementation that evaluates on the graphics hardware the sparse linear system arising in the finite element formulation of the diffusion equation. We present solutions for both time-domain and frequency-domain problems. A comparison with a CPU-based implementation shows significant performance gains of the graphics accelerated solution, with improvements of approximately a factor of 10 for double-precision computations, and factors beyond 20 for single-precision computations. The gains are also shown to be dependent on the mesh complexity, where the largest gains are achieved for high mesh resolutions.

  5. Determination of Nonlinear Stiffness Coefficients for Finite Element Models with Application to the Random Vibration Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muravyov, Alexander A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a method for obtaining nonlinear stiffness coefficients in modal coordinates for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models is developed. The method requires application of a finite-element program with a geometrically non- linear static capability. The MSC/NASTRAN code is employed for this purpose. The equations of motion of a MDOF system are formulated in modal coordinates. A set of linear eigenvectors is used to approximate the solution of the nonlinear problem. The random vibration problem of the MDOF nonlinear system is then considered. The solutions obtained by application of two different versions of a stochastic linearization technique are compared with linear and exact (analytical) solutions in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) displacements and strains for a beam structure.

  6. Three-dimensional finite element models from magnetic resonance images as a structural framework for continuum analysis of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Andrew D.; Costa, Kevin D.

    1995-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an extremely versatile technique for noninvasive imaging of the anatomy, structure, and physiological function of the heart and other soft tissues and organs. Although mathematical models have often been used to enhance the information content of medical images, these models are most often based on the physics of the imaging system rather that the properties of the target organ or tissue. We use finite element (FE) models of regional mechanical and electrical function in the intact heart to compute 3D distributions of important physiological field variables, such as myocardial stress, that cannot be imaged directly. A parametric model of the heart based on the physical properties of the organ as a material continuum provides a general and convenient way to synthesize clinical data, such as multidimensional images, with experimental tests, such as biomechanical and histological studies.

  7. Effect of attachment types and number of implants supporting mandibular overdentures on stress distribution: a computed tomography-based 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Arat Bilhan, Selda; Baykasoglu, Cengiz; Bilhan, Hakan; Kutay, Omer; Mugan, Ata

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate stresses in bone tissue surrounding uncoupled and splinted implants that are induced by a bite force applied to the mandible and to determine whether the number of mandibular overdenture supporting implants in mandibular bone influence the stress distribution. A human adult edentulous mandible retrieved from a formalin fixed cadaver was used to define the geometry of finite element (FE) model and the FE model was verified with experimental measurements. Following the FE model validation, three different biting situations were simulated for the 2-, 3- and 4-implant retentive anchor as well as bar attachment overdentures under vertical loading of 100 N. As a result of the analyses, it was concluded that an increment in implant number and the splinted attachment type tended to cause lower stresses and the use of two single attachments seems to be a safe and sufficient solution for the treatment of mandibular edentulism with overdentures.

  8. Experimental validation of DXA-based finite element models for prediction of femoral strength.

    PubMed

    Dall'Ara, E; Eastell, R; Viceconti, M; Pahr, D; Yang, L

    2016-10-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are a major clinical problem and current diagnostic tools have an accuracy of only 50%. The aim of this study was to validate dual energy X-rays absorptiometry (DXA)-based finite element (FE) models to predict femoral strength in two loading configurations. Thirty-six pairs of fresh frozen human proximal femora were scanned with DXA and quantitative computed tomography (QCT). For each pair one femur was tested until failure in a one-legged standing configuration (STANCE) and one by replicating the position of the femur in a fall onto the greater trochanter (SIDE). Subject-specific 2D DXA-based linear FE models and 3D QCT-based nonlinear FE models were generated for each specimen and used to predict the measured femoral strength. The outcomes of the models were compared to standard DXA-based areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurements. For the STANCE configuration the DXA-based FE models (R(2)=0.74, SEE=1473N) outperformed the best densitometric predictor (Neck_aBMD, R(2)=0.66, SEE=1687N) but not the QCT-based FE models (R(2)=0.80, SEE=1314N). For the SIDE configuration both QCT-based FE models (R(2)=0.85, SEE=455N) and DXA neck aBMD (R(2)=0.80, SEE=502N) outperformed DXA-based FE models (R(2)=0.77, SEE=529N). In both configurations the DXA-based FE model provided a good 1:1 agreement with the experimental data (CC=0.87 for SIDE and CC=0.86 for STANCE), with proper optimization of the failure criteria. In conclusion we found that the DXA-based FE models are a good predictor of femoral strength as compared with experimental data ex vivo. However, it remains to be investigated whether this novel approach can provide good predictions of the risk of fracture in vivo. PMID:27341287

  9. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  10. Mechanical performance of physical-contact, multi-fiber optical connectors: Finite element analysis and semi-analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Esteban B.; Tran, Hieu V.; Kobyakov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analysis of physical-contact, multi-fiber optical connector was used to characterize fiber-to-fiber contact and support the development and validation of a semi-analytical model (SAM) for the contact force. This contact behavior is determined by the elastic deformation of the system components (ferrule, fibers, and bonding adhesive) and the classical Hertzian contact at the fiber tips - effects that ultimately define the axial compliance of the system. Two 3-D finite element models for a 12-fiber connector are constructed to study the contact of two connectors, and the specific numerical simulations are carried out to generate input data to SAM, confirm the main assumptions made in its development, and numerically validate the predictions for the contact force. These simulations mainly consider non-uniform fiber height profiles and different end-face fiber tip geometries characterized by their radius of curvature. The numerically validated SAM is then used to study some performance aspects of multi-fiber connectors as related to the required contact force, namely, finding fiber height profiles that require minimum contact force and evaluating the throughput of polishing processes assuming a target contact force. Predictions are supported by Monte Carlo simulations and associated with current profile geometry metrics.

  11. Potential and limitations of finite element modelling in assessing structural integrity of coralline algae under future global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbourne, L. A.; Griffin, J.; Schmidt, D. N.; Rayfield, E. J.

    2015-02-01

    Coralline algae are important habitat formers found on all rocky shores. While the impact of future ocean acidification on the physiological performance of the species has been well studied, little research has focussed on potential changes in structural integrity in response to climate change. A previous study using 2-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA), suggested increased vulnerability to fracture (by wave action or boring) in algae grown under high CO2 conditions. To assess how realistically 2-D simplified models represent structural performance, a series of increasingly biologically accurate 3-D FE-models that represent coralline algal growth were developed. Simplified geometric 3-D models of the genus Lithothamnion were compared to models created from computed tomography (CT) scan data of the same genus. The biologically accurate model and the simplified geometric model representing individual cells had similar average stresses and stress distributions, emphasizing the importance of the cell walls in dissipating the stress throughout the structure. In contrast models without the accurate representation of the cell geometry resulted in larger stress and strain results. Our more complex 3-D model reiterated the potential of climate change to diminish the structural integrity of the organism. This suggests that under future environmental conditions the weakening of the coralline algal skeleton along with increased external pressures (wave and bioerosion) may negatively influence the ability for coralline algae to maintain a habitat able to sustain high levels of biodiversity.

  12. Potential and limitations of finite element modelling in assessing structural integrity of coralline algae under future global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbourne, L. A.; Griffin, J.; Schmidt, D. N.; Rayfield, E. J.

    2015-10-01

    Coralline algae are important habitat formers found on all rocky shores. While the impact of future ocean acidification on the physiological performance of the species has been well studied, little research has focused on potential changes in structural integrity in response to climate change. A previous study using 2-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA) suggested increased vulnerability to fracture (by wave action or boring) in algae grown under high CO2 conditions. To assess how realistically 2-D simplified models represent structural performance, a series of increasingly biologically accurate 3-D FE models that represent different aspects of coralline algal growth were developed. Simplified geometric 3-D models of the genus Lithothamnion were compared to models created from computed tomography (CT) scan data of the same genus. The biologically accurate model and the simplified geometric model representing individual cells had similar average stresses and stress distributions, emphasising the importance of the cell walls in dissipating the stress throughout the structure. In contrast models without the accurate representation of the cell geometry resulted in larger stress and strain results. Our more complex 3-D model reiterated the potential of climate change to diminish the structural integrity of the organism. This suggests that under future environmental conditions the weakening of the coralline algal skeleton along with increased external pressures (wave and bioerosion) may negatively influence the ability for coralline algae to maintain a habitat able to sustain high levels of biodiversity.

  13. An enriched finite element model with q-refinement for radiative boundary layers in glass cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M. Shadi; Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon; Laghrouche, Omar

    2014-02-01

    Radiative cooling in glass manufacturing is simulated using the partition of unity finite element method. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary simplified P{sub 1} approximation for the radiation in non-grey semitransparent media. To integrate the coupled equations in time we consider a linearly implicit scheme in the finite element framework. A class of hyperbolic enrichment functions is proposed to resolve boundary layers near the enclosure walls. Using an industrial electromagnetic spectrum, the proposed method shows an immense reduction in the number of degrees of freedom required to achieve a certain accuracy compared to the conventional h-version finite element method. Furthermore the method shows a stable behaviour in treating the boundary layers which is shown by studying the solution close to the domain boundaries. The time integration choice is essential to implement a q-refinement procedure introduced in the current study. The enrichment is refined with respect to the steepness of the solution gradient near the domain boundary in the first few time steps and is shown to lead to a further significant reduction on top of what is already achieved with the enrichment. The performance of the proposed method is analysed for glass annealing in two enclosures where the simplified P{sub 1} approximation solution with the partition of unity method, the conventional finite element method and the finite difference method are compared to each other and to the full radiative heat transfer as well as the canonical Rosseland model.

  14. 3D Quantification of Wall Shear Stress and Oscillatory Shear Index Using a Finite-Element Method in 3D CINE PC-MRI Data of the Thoracic Aorta.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio; Urbina, Jesus; Valverde, Israel; Tejos, Cristian; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Hurtado, Daniel E

    2016-06-01

    Several 2D methods have been proposed to estimate WSS and OSI from PC-MRI, neglecting the longitudinal velocity gradients that typically arise in cardiovascular flow, particularly on vessel geometries whose cross section and centerline orientation strongly vary in the axial direction. Thus, the contribution of longitudinal velocity gradients remains understudied. In this work, we propose a 3D finite-element method for the quantification of WSS and OSI from 3D-CINE PC-MRI that accounts for both in-plane and longitudinal velocity gradients. We demonstrate the convergence and robustness of the method on cylindrical geometries using a synthetic phantom based on the Poiseuille flow equation. We also show that, in the presence of noise, the method is both stable and accurate. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that the proposed 3D method results in more accurate WSS estimates than those obtained from a 2D analysis not considering out-of-plane velocity gradients. Further, we conclude that for irregular geometries the accurate prediction of WSS requires the consideration of longitudinal gradients in the velocity field. Additionally, we compute 3D maps of WSS and OSI for 3D-CINE PC-MRI data sets from an aortic phantom and sixteen healthy volunteers and two patients. The OSI values show a greater dispersion than WSS, which is strongly dependent on the PC-MRI resolution. We envision that the proposed 3D method will improve the estimation of WSS and OSI from 3D-CINE PC-MRI images, allowing for more accurate estimates in vessels with pathologies that induce high longitudinal velocity gradients, such as coarctations and aneurisms.

  15. Finite element model of spinal hemiepiphysiodesis: effect of contact conditions, initial conditions, and growth.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B; Bylski-Austrow, D I; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    Growth modification is under investigation to treat pediatric spine deformities. A hemiepiphyseal staple construct has been shown to alter growth and create physeal structural gradients in an in vivo porcine model. A finite element model (FEM) of a motion segment with and without implant was developed based on preliminary experimental results of initial post-operative motion segment compressive properties. The nonlinear tangent stiffness determined from the model correlated well with the experiments for the native segment, whereas after addition of the implant, the model overestimated the stiffness. The current purpose was to determine the effect of implant-bone contact conditions and initial disc displacement conditions, include growth effects, and compare FEM and experimental results at each stage. A 3D FEM was developed from a CT scan of a porcine T7-T8 segment. The annulus was modeled as an incompressible anisotropic hyperelastic material, and the nucleus as an incompressible fluid. A CAD model of the implant was constructed. Load-displacement curves in compression were determined from a nonlinear analysis performed under different initial and bone-implant interface conditions. Contact conditions were a) perfect, b) friction of 0.1-0.3, or c) soft contact. Initial conditions were that implant insertion induced a) no change in stress or strain in the disc, b) a 2˚ angulation with a centrally located neutral axis and no residual stresses, and c) both stress and coronal plane displacement gradients. Growth modulation effects were added using a published linear relationship between compressive stress and growth rate. A 2 month PO time was simulated. Altering bone - implant surface contact conditions from perfect to either friction or soft contact decreased the stiffness, but all models remained stiffer than experimental results. An initial disc angulation without residual stress did not affect stiffness, whereas stiffness increased with an initial angle and

  16. A preliminary investigation of finite-element modeling for composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Nixon, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    The results from an initial phase of an in-house study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of elastic couplings are presented. Large degree of freedom shell finite element models of an extension twist coupled composite tube were developed and analyzed using MSC/NASTRAN. An analysis employing a simplified beam finite element representation of the specimen with the equivalent engineering stiffness was additionally performed. Results from the shell finite element normal modes and frequency analysis were compared to those obtained experimentally, showing an agreement within 13 percent. There was appreciable degradation in the frequency prediction for the torsional mode, which is elastically coupled. This was due to the absence of off-diagonal coupling terms in the formulation of the equivalent engineering stiffness. Parametric studies of frequency variation due to small changes in ply orientation angle and ply thickness were also performed. Results showed linear frequency variations less than 2 percent per 1 degree variation in the ply orientation angle, and 1 percent per 0.0001 inch variation in the ply thickness.

  17. Parallel eigenanalysis of finite element models in a completely connected architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, F. A.; Morel, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    A parallel algorithm is presented for the solution of the generalized eigenproblem in linear elastic finite element analysis, (K)(phi) = (M)(phi)(omega), where (K) and (M) are of order N, and (omega) is order of q. The concurrent solution of the eigenproblem is based on the multifrontal/modified subspace method and is achieved in a completely connected parallel architecture in which each processor is allowed to communicate with all other processors. The algorithm was successfully implemented on a tightly coupled multiple-instruction multiple-data parallel processing machine, Cray X-MP. A finite element model is divided into m domains each of which is assumed to process n elements. Each domain is then assigned to a processor or to a logical processor (task) if the number of domains exceeds the number of physical processors. The macrotasking library routines are used in mapping each domain to a user task. Computational speed-up and efficiency are used to determine the effectiveness of the algorithm. The effect of the number of domains, the number of degrees-of-freedom located along the global fronts and the dimension of the subspace on the performance of the algorithm are investigated. A parallel finite element dynamic analysis program, p-feda, is documented and the performance of its subroutines in parallel environment is analyzed.

  18. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C.; Knepley, M.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.3), combines the quasi-static viscoelastic modeling functionality of PyLith 0.8 and its predecessors (LithoMop and Tecton) and the wave propagation modeling functionality of EqSim. The target applications contain spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales for dynamic modeling ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales for quasi-static modeling ranging from minutes to hundreds of years. PyLith is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). It uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current features include kinematic fault ruptures, Dirichlet (displacement or velocity), Neumann (traction), and absorbing boundary conditions, linear elastic, generalized Maxwell, and Maxwell linear viscoelastic materials, gravitational body forces, and automatic time step selection for quasi-static problems. Future releases will add dynamic fault interface conditions (employing fault constitutive models), additional viscoelastic and viscoplastic materials, and automated calculation of suites of Green's functions. We also plan to extend PyLith to allow coupling multiple simultaneous simulations. For example, this could include (1) coupling an interseismic deformation simulation to a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation (each using subsets of the software), (2) coupling a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation to a global wave propagation simulation, or (3) coupling a short-term crustal deformation simulation to a mantle convection

  19. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C.; Knepley, M.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith version 1.1, combines the quasi-static viscoelastic modeling functionality of PyLith 0.8 and its predecessors (LithoMop and Tecton) and the wave propagation and spontaneous rupture modeling functionality of EqSim. The target applications contain spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales for dynamic modeling ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales for quasi-static modeling ranging from minutes to hundreds of years. PyLith is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and runs on a wide variety of platforms, from laptops to Beowulf clusters. It uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current features include kinematic fault interface conditions, Dirichlet (displacement or velocity), Neumann (traction), and absorbing boundary conditions, linear elastic, generalized Maxwell, and Maxwell linear viscoelastic materials, and quasi-static and dynamic time-stepping. Future releases will add dynamic fault interface conditions (employing fault constitutive models), additional viscoelastic and viscoplastic materials, and automated calculation of suites of Green's functions. We also plan to extend PyLith to allow coupling multiple simultaneous simulations. For example, this could include (1) coupling an interseismic deformation simulation to a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation (each using subsets of the software), (2) coupling a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation to a global wave propagation simulation, or (3) coupling a short-term crustal deformation simulation to a mantle convection simulation and an orogenesis and basin

  20. A stabilized mixed finite element method for shear-rate dependent non-Newtonian fluids: 3D benchmark problems and application to blood flow in bifurcating arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwack, JaeHyuk; Masud, Arif

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a stabilized mixed finite element method for shear-rate dependent fluids. The nonlinear viscosity field is a function of the shear-rate and varies uniformly in space and in time. The stabilized form is developed via application of Variational Multiscale (VMS) framework to the underlying generalized Navier-Stokes equation. Linear and quadratic tetrahedral and hexahedral elements are employed with equal-order interpolations for the velocity and pressure fields. A variety of benchmark problems are solved to assess the stability and accuracy properties of the resulting method. The method is then applied to non-Newtonian shear-rate dependent flows in bifurcating artery geometry, and significant non-Newtonian fluid effects are observed. A comparative study of the proposed method shows that the additional computational costs due to the nonlinear shear-rate dependent viscosity are only ten percent more than the computational cost for a Newtonian model.

  1. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  2. A Clinically Oriented Introduction and Review on Finite Element Models of the Human Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Kikidis, Dimitrios; Bibas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of the inner ear, direct in vivo information on cochlear mechanics is difficult to obtain. Mathematical modelling is a promising way to provide insight into the physiology and pathology of the cochlea. Finite element method (FEM) is one of the most popular discrete mathematical modelling techniques, mainly used in engineering that has been increasingly used to model the cochlea and its elements. The aim of this overview is to provide a brief introduction to the use of FEM in modelling and predicting the behavior of the cochlea in normal and pathological conditions. It will focus on methodological issues, modelling assumptions, simulation of clinical scenarios, and pathologies. PMID:25530973

  3. Implementation of two geologic constitutive models in the HONDO finite-element code

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, D.V.

    1983-05-01

    Two constitutive models for use with geologic materials have been incorporated into the HONDO finite-element program. Both models have the same behavior in tension, using a stress criterion to form cracks normal to the maximum principal stress. In compression, the two models give upper and lower bound solutions to the unconfined postfailure strength. The first model uses a Coulomb criterion to form explicit shear cracks, while the second model uses an elastic-plastic formulation developed by Krieg. Two sample applications, an indentor test and fracture of a borehole, are presented.

  4. Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element model of the cervical spine to geometry.

    PubMed

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Numerous finite element models of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with symmetric approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of symmetric assumption on the predicted motion by finite element model of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element models of the cervical spine C2-C7. One model was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric model), whereas the other was symmetric (symmetric model) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both models-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric model and symmetric model predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left axial rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for axial rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the symmetric model were 1.5° axial rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric model were 1.6° axial rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the symmetric model was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted.

  5. IFEMS, an Interactive Finite Element Modeling System Using a CAD/CAM System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckellip, S.; Schuman, T.; Lauer, S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of coupling a CAD/CAM system with a general purpose finite element mesh generator is described. The three computer programs which make up the interactive finite element graphics system are discussed.

  6. Development and Calibration of a System-Integrated Rotorcraft Finite Element Model for Impact Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta, Lucas G.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.

    2012-01-01

    Two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility in support of NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Project. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of an externally mounted composite deployable energy absorber (DEA) under combined impact conditions. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish baseline loads that are regarded as severe but survivable. The presence of this energy absorbing device reduced the peak impact acceleration levels by a factor of three. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to a system-integrated finite element model of the test article developed in parallel with the test program. In preparation for the full-scale crash test, a series of sub-scale and MD-500 mass simulator tests were conducted to evaluate the impact performances of various components and subsystems, including new crush tubes and the DEA blocks. Parameters defined for the system-integrated finite element model were determined from these tests. Results from 19 accelerometers placed throughout the airframe were compared to finite element model responses. The model developed for the purposes of predicting acceleration responses from the first crash test was inadequate when evaluating more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used to calibrate model results for the full-scale crash test without the DEA. This combination of heuristic and quantitative methods identified modeling deficiencies, evaluated parameter importance, and proposed required model changes. The multidimensional calibration techniques presented here are particularly effective in identifying model adequacy. Acceleration results for the calibrated model were

  7. A Finite Element Model for Mixed Porohyperelasticity with Transport, Swelling, and Growth.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle Hine; Buganza Tepole, Adrián; Kuhl, Ellen; Simon, Bruce R; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to establish a unified theory of porohyperelasticity with transport and growth and to demonstrate the capability of this theory using a finite element model developed in MATLAB. We combine the theories of volumetric growth and mixed porohyperelasticity with transport and swelling (MPHETS) to derive a new method that models growth of biological soft tissues. The conservation equations and constitutive equations are developed for both solid-only growth and solid/fluid growth. An axisymmetric finite element framework is introduced for the new theory of growing MPHETS (GMPHETS). To illustrate the capabilities of this model, several example finite element test problems are considered using model geometry and material parameters based on experimental data from a porcine coronary artery. Multiple growth laws are considered, including time-driven, concentration-driven, and stress-driven growth. Time-driven growth is compared against an exact analytical solution to validate the model. For concentration-dependent growth, changing the diffusivity (representing a change in drug) fundamentally changes growth behavior. We further demonstrate that for stress-dependent, solid-only growth of an artery, growth of an MPHETS model results in a more uniform hoop stress than growth in a hyperelastic model for the same amount of growth time using the same growth law. This may have implications in the context of developing residual stresses in soft tissues under intraluminal pressure. To our knowledge, this manuscript provides the first full description of an MPHETS model with growth. The developed computational framework can be used in concert with novel in-vitro and in-vivo experimental approaches to identify the governing growth laws for various soft tissues.

  8. A Finite Element Model for Mixed Porohyperelasticity with Transport, Swelling, and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Michelle Hine; Buganza Tepole, Adrián; Kuhl, Ellen; Simon, Bruce R.; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to establish a unified theory of porohyperelasticity with transport and growth and to demonstrate the capability of this theory using a finite element model developed in MATLAB. We combine the theories of volumetric growth and mixed porohyperelasticity with transport and swelling (MPHETS) to derive a new method that models growth of biological soft tissues. The conservation equations and constitutive equations are developed for both solid-only growth and solid/fluid growth. An axisymmetric finite element framework is introduced for the new theory of growing MPHETS (GMPHETS). To illustrate the capabilities of this model, several example finite element test problems are considered using model geometry and material parameters based on experimental data from a porcine coronary artery. Multiple growth laws are considered, including time-driven, concentration-driven, and stress-driven growth. Time-driven growth is compared against an exact analytical solution to validate the model. For concentration-dependent growth, changing the diffusivity (representing a change in drug) fundamentally changes growth behavior. We further demonstrate that for stress-dependent, solid-only growth of an artery, growth of an MPHETS model results in a more uniform hoop stress than growth in a hyperelastic model for the same amount of growth time using the same growth law. This may have implications in the context of developing residual stresses in soft tissues under intraluminal pressure. To our knowledge, this manuscript provides the first full description of an MPHETS model with growth. The developed computational framework can be used in concert with novel in-vitro and in-vivo experimental approaches to identify the governing growth laws for various soft tissues. PMID:27078495

  9. A Finite Element Model for Mixed Porohyperelasticity with Transport, Swelling, and Growth.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle Hine; Buganza Tepole, Adrián; Kuhl, Ellen; Simon, Bruce R; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to establish a unified theory of porohyperelasticity with transport and growth and to demonstrate the capability of this theory using a finite element model developed in MATLAB. We combine the theories of volumetric growth and mixed porohyperelasticity with transport and swelling (MPHETS) to derive a new method that models growth of biological soft tissues. The conservation equations and constitutive equations are developed for both solid-only growth and solid/fluid growth. An axisymmetric finite element framework is introduced for the new theory of growing MPHETS (GMPHETS). To illustrate the capabilities of this model, several example finite element test problems are considered using model geometry and material parameters based on experimental data from a porcine coronary artery. Multiple growth laws are considered, including time-driven, concentration-driven, and stress-driven growth. Time-driven growth is compared against an exact analytical solution to validate the model. For concentration-dependent growth, changing the diffusivity (representing a change in drug) fundamentally changes growth behavior. We further demonstrate that for stress-dependent, solid-only growth of an artery, growth of an MPHETS model results in a more uniform hoop stress than growth in a hyperelastic model for the same amount of growth time using the same growth law. This may have implications in the context of developing residual stresses in soft tissues under intraluminal pressure. To our knowledge, this manuscript provides the first full description of an MPHETS model with growth. The developed computational framework can be used in concert with novel in-vitro and in-vivo experimental approaches to identify the governing growth laws for various soft tissues. PMID:27078495

  10. Finite element modeling of cooled-tip probe radiofrequency ablation processes in liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Barauskas, Rimantas; Gulbinas, Antanas; Vanagas, Tomas; Barauskas, Giedrius

    2008-06-01

    Finite element model of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with cooled-tip probe in liver has been developed by employing COMSOL Multiphysics software. It describes coupled electric, thermal and sodium chloride solution infiltration flow phenomena taking place during ablation processes. Features of hydraulic capacity, saturation of the tissue by infiltration, and dependency of electrical conductivity on the damage integral of the tissue have been supplied to the model. RFA experiments have validated the model. Physical parameters describing hydraulic capacity and hydraulic conductivity in the tissue, as well as, the relation of electrical conductivity against the value of damage integral have been determined.

  11. Optical laboratory solution and error model simulation of a linear time-varying finite element equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B. K.; Casasent, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of simplified error models to accurately simulate and evaluate the performance of an optical linear-algebra processor is described. The optical architecture used to perform banded matrix-vector products is reviewed, along with a linear dynamic finite-element case study. The laboratory hardware and ac-modulation technique used are presented. The individual processor error-source models and their simulator implementation are detailed. Several significant simplifications are introduced to ease the computational requirements and complexity of the simulations. The error models are verified with a laboratory implementation of the processor, and are used to evaluate its potential performance.

  12. Boundary effects on backscattering by a solid aluminum cylinder: experiment and finite element model comparisons (L).

    PubMed

    La Follett, Jon R; Williams, Kevin L; Marston, Philip L

    2011-08-01

    Backscattering of sound by a solid aluminum cylinder was measured in the free field and with the cylinder near a flat surface. The target was suspended just below the surface of a water tank to simulate some aspects of backscattering when resting on the seabed. Measurements were compared with predictions made by an approximate hybrid approach based on multiple two-dimensional finite element calculations and the use of images. Many of the spectral features present in the tank data were present in the model. Comparing numerical model predictions with experimental data serves to build credibility for the modeling approach and can assist in developing insight into the underlying physical processes. PMID:21877778

  13. Finite element simulation of turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flows using a low Reynolds number k- model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh Hannani, Siamak; Stanislas, Michel

    1999-05-01

    Developing Couette-Poiseuille flows at Re=5000 are studied using a low Reynolds number k- two-equation model and a finite element formulation. Mesh-independent solutions are obtained using a standard Galerkin formulation and a Galerkin/least-squares stabilized method. The predictions for the velocity and turbulent kinetic energy are compared with available experimental results and to the DNS data. Second moment closure's solutions are also compared with those of the k- model. The deficiency of eddy viscosity models to predict dissymmetric low Reynolds number channel flows has been demonstrated. Copyright

  14. Modal testing and finite element model updating of laser spot welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Husain, N.; Haddad Khodaparast, H.; Snaylam, A.; James, S.; Sharp, M.; Dearden, G.; Ouyang, H.

    2009-08-01

    Spot welds are used extensively in automotive engineering. One of the latest manufacturing techniques for producing spot welds is Laser Welding. Finite element (FE) modelling of laser welds for dynamic analysis is a research issue because of the complexity and uncertainty of the welds and thus formed structures. In this work, FE model of the welds is developed by employing CWELD element in NASTRAN and its feasibility for representing laser spot welds is investigated. The FE model is updated based on the measured modal data of hat-plate structures and cast as a structural minimisation problem by the application of NASTRAN codes.

  15. A Coupled Ice--Ocean Finite--Element Model of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, N.

    2002-05-01

    A coupled ice-ocean finite-element model of the Arctic Ocean is proposed for the Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (AOMIP) studies. The model is based on the system of primitive equations for ocean. Sea ice dynamics are based upon the cavitating fluid solution described by Flato and Hibler (1990, 1992). The sea ice component of the model is driven by the heat, momentum, and freshwater fluxes provided at the upper and lower ice boundaries. Vertical water turbulence is parameterized by the generalized Prandtl theory for the vertical turbulent diffusion/momentum exchange coefficient. Model domain covers area north of 65o N. Equations are solved on a rotated coordinate system with the North Pole located at 0o N and 180o W. Horizontal model resolution is 1o and the model has 16 vertical levels. The model numerics is based on the finite-element (FE) spatial approximations. Time approximation is made by the time-splitting scheme with a special treatment for nonlinear sea ice rheology. Temperature, salinity and momentum advection is approximated by the FE upwind scheme with no crosswind diffusion created by Hughes and Brooks, 1979. For the sea ice mass and concentration transports the FE analog of the first order directed differences scheme was developed. The integral function of the model is the sea level elevation, which is determined by an implicit time scheme using Generalized Minimal Residual Method (Saad and Schultz, 1986). Major model results and some considerations for the model intercomparison methodology will be discussed.

  16. The Importance of Craniofacial Sutures in Biomechanical Finite Element Models of the Domestic Pig

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Jen A.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial sutures are a ubiquitous feature of the vertebrate skull. Previous experimental work has shown that bone strain magnitudes and orientations often vary when moving from one bone to another, across a craniofacial suture. This has led to the hypothesis that craniofacial sutures act to modify the strain environment of the skull, possibly as a mode of dissipating high stresses generated during feeding or impact. This study tests the hypothesis that the introduction of craniofacial sutures into finite element (FE) models of a modern domestic pig skull would improve model accuracy compared to a model without sutures. This allowed the mechanical effects of sutures to be assessed in isolation from other confounding variables. These models were also validated against strain gauge data collected from the same specimen ex vivo. The experimental strain data showed notable strain differences between adjacent bones, but this effect was generally not observed in either model. It was found that the inclusion of sutures in finite element models affected strain magnitudes, ratios, orientations and contour patterns, yet contrary to expectations, this did not improve the fit of the model to the experimental data, but resulted in a model that was less accurate. It is demonstrated that the presence or absence of sutures alone is not responsible for the inaccuracies in model strain, and is suggested that variations in local bone material properties, which were not accounted for by the FE models, could instead be responsible for the pattern of results. PMID:22363727

  17. Geological applications of automatic grid generation tools for finite elements applied to porous flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, C.W.; Trease, H.E.; Cherry, T.A.

    1996-04-01

    The construction of grids that accurately reflect geologic structure and stratigraphy for computational flow and transport models poses a formidable task. Even with a complete understanding of stratigraphy, material properties, boundary and initial conditions, the task of incorporating data into a numerical model can be difficult and time consuming. Furthermore, most tools available for representing complex geologic surfaces and volumes are not designed for producing optimal grids for flow and transport computation. We have developed a modeling tool, GEOMESH, for automating finite element grid generation that maintains the geometric integrity of geologic structure and stratigraphy. The method produces an optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grid that can be used for flow and transport computations. The process of developing a flow and transport model can be divided into three parts: (1) Developing accurate conceptual models inclusive of geologic interpretation, material characterization and construction of a stratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic framework model, (2) Building and initializing computational frameworks; grid generation, boundary and initial conditions, (3) Computational physics models of flow and transport. Process (1) and (3) have received considerable attention whereas (2) has not. This work concentrates on grid generation and its connections to geologic characterization and process modeling. Applications of GEOMESH illustrate grid generation for two dimensional cross sections, three dimensional regional models, and adaptive grid refinement in three dimensions. Examples of grid representation of wells and tunnels with GEOMESH can be found in Cherry et al. The resulting grid can be utilized by unstructured finite element or integrated finite difference models.

  18. Application of a finite element model in the diagnosis process of middle ear pathologies.

    PubMed

    Marin, Karina Cristina; Berdich-Kun, Karla Noemy; Gentil, Fernanda; Parente, Marco; Natal, Renato Jorge; Marin, Horia Alin; Poenaru, Marioara; Popa, Daniela Roxana

    2014-01-01

    The ear is a complex organ that can be affected by various pathologies that are still fairly misunderstood. This work tests the possibilities of studying the ear and its pathologies using a virtual environment and thus bypassing expensive and time-consuming clinical trial. A previous validated finite element model of the middle ear was employed to study two pathological states of the middle ear. It was shown that the model obtained results very close to the clinical evaluation thus proving of being a proper tool for further investigations of middle ear pathologies.

  19. Adhesive behaviour of gecko-inspired nanofibrillar arrays: combination of experiments and finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng-zhi; Xu, Yun; Gu, Ping

    2012-04-01

    A polypropylene nanofibrillar array was successfully fabricated by template-assisted nanofabrication strategy. Adhesion properties of this gecko-inspired structure were studied through two parallel and independent approaches: experiments and finite element simulations. Experimental results show relatively good normal adhesion, but accompanied by high preloads. The interfacial adhesion was modelled by effective spring elements with piecewise-linear constitution. The effective elasticity of the fibre-array system was originally calculated from our measured elasticity of single nanowire. Comparisons of the experimental and simulative results reveal quantitative agreement except for some explainable deviations, which suggests the potential applicability of the present models and applied theories.

  20. Mesoscopic strain fields in woven composites: Experiments vs. finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoletto, Gianni; Anzelotti, Giancarlo; Riva, Enrica

    2009-03-01

    Detailed determination of strain in woven composite materials is fundamental for understanding their mechanics and for validating sophisticated computational models. The digital image correlation technique is briefly presented and applied to the full-field strain determination in a twill-weave carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic (CFRP) composite under in-plane loading. The experimental results are used to assess companion results obtained with an ad hoc finite element-based model. The DIC vs. FEM comparison is carried out at the mesoscopic scale.

  1. Detailed finite element modelling of deep needle insertions into a soft tissue phantom using a cohesive approach.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Matthew; Dini, Daniele; Giordano, Gianpaolo; Rodriguez Y Baena, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Detailed finite element modelling of needle insertions into soft tissue phantoms encounters difficulties of large deformations, high friction, contact loading and material failure. This paper demonstrates the use of cohesive elements in high-resolution finite element models to overcome some of the issues associated with these factors. Experiments are presented enabling extraction of the strain energy release rate during crack formation. Using data from these experiments, cohesive elements are calibrated and then implemented in models for validation of the needle insertion process. Successful modelling enables direct comparison of finite element and experimental force-displacement plots and energy distributions. Regions of crack creation, relaxation, cutting and full penetration are identified. By closing the loop between experiments and detailed finite element modelling, a methodology is established which will enable design modifications of a soft tissue probe that steers through complex mechanical interactions with the surrounding material. PMID:22229447

  2. Predicting electromyographic signals under realistic conditions using a multiscale chemo–electro–mechanical finite element model

    PubMed Central

    Mordhorst, Mylena; Heidlauf, Thomas; Röhrle, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel multiscale finite element-based framework for modelling electromyographic (EMG) signals. The framework combines (i) a biophysical description of the excitation–contraction coupling at the half-sarcomere level, (ii) a model of the action potential (AP) propagation along muscle fibres, (iii) a continuum-mechanical formulation of force generation and deformation of the muscle, and (iv) a model for predicting the intramuscular and surface EMG. Owing to the biophysical description of the half-sarcomere, the model inherently accounts for physiological properties of skeletal muscle. To demonstrate this, the influence of membrane fatigue on the EMG signal during sustained contractions is investigated. During a stimulation period of 500 ms at 100 Hz, the predicted EMG amplitude decreases by 40% and the AP propagation velocity decreases by 15%. Further, the