Science.gov

Sample records for 3d flair mri

  1. Reduced Scan Time 3D FLAIR using Modulated Inversion and Repetition Time

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Neville D.; Butman, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To design and evaluate a new reduced scan time 3D FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Materials and Methods The 3D FLAIR sequence was modified so that the repetition time was modulated in a predetermined smooth fashion (3D mFLAIR). Inversion times were adjusted accordingly to maintain CSF suppression. Simulations were performed to determine SNR for gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and CSF. Fourteen volunteers were imaged using the modified and product sequence. SNR measurements were performed in GM, WM and CSF. Mean value and the 95% confidence interval ([CI]) were assessed. Scan time for the 3D FLAIR and 3D mFLAIR sequences was measured. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the SNR measured in GM (P value = 0.5; mean SNR = 42.8 [CI]: 38.2-45.5 vs 42.2 [CI]: 38.3-46.1 for 3D FLAIR and 3D mFLAIR, respectively) and WM (P value = 0.25; mean SNR = 32.1 [CI]: 30.3-33.8 vs 32.9 [CI]: 31.1-34.7). Scan time reduction greater than 30% was achieved for the given parameter set with the 3D mFLAIR sequence. Conclusion Scan time for 3D FLAIR can be effectively reduced by modulating repetition and inversion time in a predetermined fashion while maintaining the SNR and CNR of a constant TR sequence. PMID:24979311

  2. Automatic histogram-based segmentation of white matter hyperintensities using 3D FLAIR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Rita; Slump, Cornelis; Moenninghoff, Christoph; Wanke, Isabel; Dlugaj, Martha; Weimar, Christian

    2012-03-01

    White matter hyperintensities are known to play a role in the cognitive decline experienced by patients suffering from neurological diseases. Therefore, accurately detecting and monitoring these lesions is of importance. Automatic methods for segmenting white matter lesions typically use multimodal MRI data. Furthermore, many methods use a training set to perform a classification task or to determine necessary parameters. In this work, we describe and evaluate an unsupervised segmentation method that is based solely on the histogram of FLAIR images. It approximates the histogram by a mixture of three Gaussians in order to find an appropriate threshold for white matter hyperintensities. We use a context-sensitive Expectation-Maximization method to determine the Gaussian mixture parameters. The segmentation is subsequently corrected for false positives using the knowledge of the location of typical FLAIR artifacts. A preliminary validation with the ground truth on 6 patients revealed a Similarity Index of 0.73 +/- 0.10, indicating that the method is comparable to others in the literature which require multimodal MRI and/or a preliminary training step.

  3. Unsupervised Pathological Area Extraction using 3D T2 and FLAIR MR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Pavel; Bartušek, Karel; Smékal, Zdeněk

    2014-12-01

    This work discusses fully automated extraction of brain tumor and edema in 3D MR volumes. The goal of this work is the extraction of the whole pathological area using such an algorithm that does not require a human intervention. For the good visibility of these kinds of tissues both T2-weighted and FLAIR images were used. The proposed method was tested on 80 MR volumes of publicly available BRATS database, which contains high and low grade gliomas, both real and simulated. The performance was evaluated by the Dice coefficient, where the results were differentiated between high and low grade and real and simulated gliomas. The method reached promising results for all of the combinations of images: real high grade (0.73 ± 0.20), real low grade (0.81 ± 0.06), simulated high grade (0.81 ± 0.14), and simulated low grade (0.81 ± 0.04).

  4. Normal findings on brain FLAIR MRI scans at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Neema, Mohit; Guss, Zachary D.; Stankiewicz, James M.; Arora, Ashish; Healy, Brian C.; Bakshi, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging of the brain has become a routine tool for assessing lesions in patients with suspected neurologic disorders. There is growing interest in 3T brain FLAIR MR imaging but little normative data are available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency and topography of cerebral hyperintensities seen with FLAIR MR imaging of the brain at 3T in a normal population and compare those findings to 1.5T. MATERIALS AND METHODS Whole-brain 2D FLAIR MR imaging was performed in 22 healthy controls (mean age, 44 ± 8 years; range, 30–53 years) at 3T. Fifteen of these subjects also underwent 2D FLAIR at 1.5T, with similar optimized parameters and voxel size. Cerebral hyperintense areas, including discrete foci, anterior and posterior periventricular capping, diffuse parenchymal hyperintensity, septal hyperintensity, corticospinal tract hyperintensity, and CSF flow artifacts were assessed. The Spearman rank test assessed the correlation between discrete hyperintense foci and age. The Wilcoxon signed rank test compared foci detectability at 3T versus 1.5T. RESULTS FLAIR at 3T commonly showed hyperintensities such as discrete foci (mean, 10.68 per subject; at least 1 present in 68% of subjects), anterior and posterior periventricular capping, diffuse posterior white matter hyperintensity, septal hyperintensity, corticospinal tract hyperintensity, and ventricular CSF flow artifacts. FLAIR at 3T showed a higher hyperintense foci volume (170 ± 243 versus 93 ± 152 mm3, P < .01) and number (9.4 ± 13 versus 5.5 ± 9.2, P < .01) than at 1.5T. No significant differences (P = .68) in the length/diameter of individual discrete hyperintense foci were seen between 3T and 1.5T. Discrete foci volume (r = 0.72 at 3T, r = 0.70 at 1.5T) and number (r = 0.74 at 3T; r = 0.69 at 1.5T) correlated with age to a similar degree on both platforms. All discrete foci were confined to the noncallosal supratentorial

  5. [Aspects of FLAIR sequences, 3D-CISS and diffusion-weight MR imaging of intracranial epidermoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Doll, A; Abu Eid, M; Kehrli, P; Esposito, P; Gillis, C; Bogorin, A; Jacques, C; Dietemann, J L

    2000-06-01

    We propose to assess the usefulness of diffusion-weighted MR Imaging (DWI), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequences in depicting epidermoid cysts (EC). FLAIR, CISS and DWI were obtained in 7 patients among 22. All patients were studied with T1 and T2 sequences. On Spin Echo images, EC demonstrate signal similar to LCS, which may lead to difficult differentiation between EC and arachnoid cyst (AC), specially for inexperienced radiologists. EC appear with a heterogeneous signal on T1 images (32%), irregular limits (91%) and with extension through foramen of Pacchioni in 18% of cases. On FLAIR sequence, the tumors were heterogeneous, different from void signal of CSF in 86% of cases. On CISS sequence, the tumors appear heterogeneous, hyperintense but less than LCS and with irregular limits in all cases. Some more, CISS images allowed to appreciate exact tumor extension and their relations with nerves and vessels. On DWI images, signal is hyperintense in all cases. Our study exhibited the great usefulness of DWI, CISS and FLAIR sequences in diagnosis of EC and in differentiating EC from AC. PMID:10970961

  6. MRI Volume Fusion Based on 3D Shearlet Decompositions.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chang; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Xue Gang; Huang, Qi Hong

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays many MRI scans can give 3D volume data with different contrasts, but the observers may want to view various contrasts in the same 3D volume. The conventional 2D medical fusion methods can only fuse the 3D volume data layer by layer, which may lead to the loss of interframe correlative information. In this paper, a novel 3D medical volume fusion method based on 3D band limited shearlet transform (3D BLST) is proposed. And this method is evaluated upon MRI T2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping data of 4 human brains. Both the perspective impression and the quality indices indicate that the proposed method has a better performance than conventional 2D wavelet, DT CWT, and 3D wavelet, DT CWT based fusion methods. PMID:24817880

  7. MRI Volume Fusion Based on 3D Shearlet Decompositions

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chang; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Xue Gang; Huang, Qi Hong

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays many MRI scans can give 3D volume data with different contrasts, but the observers may want to view various contrasts in the same 3D volume. The conventional 2D medical fusion methods can only fuse the 3D volume data layer by layer, which may lead to the loss of interframe correlative information. In this paper, a novel 3D medical volume fusion method based on 3D band limited shearlet transform (3D BLST) is proposed. And this method is evaluated upon MRI T2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping data of 4 human brains. Both the perspective impression and the quality indices indicate that the proposed method has a better performance than conventional 2D wavelet, DT CWT, and 3D wavelet, DT CWT based fusion methods. PMID:24817880

  8. Creating 3D visualizations of MRI data: A brief guide

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is itself 3D, it is often difficult to adequately present the results papers and slides in 3D. As a result, findings of MRI studies are often presented in 2D instead. A solution is to create figures that include perspective and can convey 3D information; such figures can sometimes be produced by standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis packages and related specialty programs. However, many options cannot provide functionality such as visualizing activation clusters that are both cortical and subcortical (i.e., a 3D glass brain), the production of several statistical maps with an identical perspective in the 3D rendering, or animated renderings. Here I detail an approach for creating 3D visualizations of MRI data that satisfies all of these criteria. Though a 3D ‘glass brain’ rendering can sometimes be difficult to interpret, they are useful in showing a more overall representation of the results, whereas the traditional slices show a more local view. Combined, presenting both 2D and 3D representations of MR images can provide a more comprehensive view of the study’s findings. PMID:26594340

  9. MRI in neuro-Behçet's syndrome: comparison of conventional spin-echo and FLAIR pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Jäger, H R; Albrecht, T; Curati-Alasonatti, W L; Williams, E J; Haskard, D O

    1999-10-01

    We compared the sensitivity of a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequence with that of a conventional dual-echo spin-echo (SE) sequence) to brain lesions in 20 patients with Behçet's syndrome. They underwent 25 MRI examinations. The images were independently analysed for the number, type and anatomical location of lesions shown. There were 18 abnormal studies (13 initial and 5 follow-up). The FLAIR sequence detected significantly more lesions than the SE TE 80 (P < 0.05) and SE TE 20 (P < 0.01) sequences. It was particularly useful for demonstrating lesions in the juxtacortical white matter, which accounted for over half the lesions detected on the FLAIR images. Of patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms such as headache, seven had normal and five had abnormal studies. All patients presenting with focal neurological signs had abnormal imaging. We found supratentorial and, in particular, juxtacortical lesions to be more frequent than previously described. PMID:10552026

  10. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using 23Na and proton MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 × 0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60 × 60 × 60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/.

  11. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using (23)Na and proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Truong, Milton L; Harrington, Michael G; Schepkin, Victor D; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm(3) and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/. PMID:25261742

  12. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) Using 23Na and Proton MRI

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-01-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/hour concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/ PMID:25261742

  13. Optimized 3D Ultrashort Echo Time Pulmonary MRI

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Fain, Sean B.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Nagle, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To optimize 3D radial ultrashort echo time MRI for high resolution whole-lung imaging. Methods 3D radial ultrashort echo time was implemented on a 3T scanner to investigate the effects of: (1) limited field-of-view excitation, (2) variable density readouts, and (3) radial oversampling. Improvements in noise performance and spatial resolution were assessed through simulation and phantom studies. Their effects on lung and airway visualization in five healthy male human subjects (mean age 32 years) were compared qualitatively through blinded ordinal scoring by two cardiothoracic radiologists using a nonparametric Friedman test (P < 0.05). Relative signal difference between endobronchial air and adjacent lung tissue, normalized to nearby vessel, was used as a surrogate for lung tissue signal. Quantitative measures were compared using the paired Student's t-test (P < 0.05). Finally, clinical feasibility was investigated in a patient with interstitial fibrosis. Results Simulation and phantom studies showed up to 67% improvement in SNR and reduced blurring for short T2* species using all three optimizations. In vivo images showed decreased artifacts and improved lung tissue and airway visualization both qualitatively and quantitatively. Conclusion The use of limited field-of-view excitation, variable readout gradients, and radial oversampling significantly improve the technical quality of 3D radial ultrashort echo time lung images. PMID:23213020

  14. Deep MRI brain extraction: A 3D convolutional neural network for skull stripping.

    PubMed

    Kleesiek, Jens; Urban, Gregor; Hubert, Alexander; Schwarz, Daniel; Maier-Hein, Klaus; Bendszus, Martin; Biller, Armin

    2016-04-01

    Brain extraction from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for many neuroimaging workflows. Current methods demonstrate good results on non-enhanced T1-weighted images, but struggle when confronted with other modalities and pathologically altered tissue. In this paper we present a 3D convolutional deep learning architecture to address these shortcomings. In contrast to existing methods, we are not limited to non-enhanced T1w images. When trained appropriately, our approach handles an arbitrary number of modalities including contrast-enhanced scans. Its applicability to MRI data, comprising four channels: non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1w, T2w and FLAIR contrasts, is demonstrated on a challenging clinical data set containing brain tumors (N=53), where our approach significantly outperforms six commonly used tools with a mean Dice score of 95.19. Further, the proposed method at least matches state-of-the-art performance as demonstrated on three publicly available data sets: IBSR, LPBA40 and OASIS, totaling N=135 volumes. For the IBSR (96.32) and LPBA40 (96.96) data set the convolutional neuronal network (CNN) obtains the highest average Dice scores, albeit not being significantly different from the second best performing method. For the OASIS data the second best Dice (95.02) results are achieved, with no statistical difference in comparison to the best performing tool. For all data sets the highest average specificity measures are evaluated, whereas the sensitivity displays about average results. Adjusting the cut-off threshold for generating the binary masks from the CNN's probability output can be used to increase the sensitivity of the method. Of course, this comes at the cost of a decreased specificity and has to be decided application specific. Using an optimized GPU implementation predictions can be achieved in less than one minute. The proposed method may prove useful for large-scale studies and clinical trials. PMID:26808333

  15. Dynamic deformable models for 3D MRI heart segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Leonid; Bao, Zhaosheng; Gusikov, Igor; Wood, John; Breen, David E.

    2002-05-01

    Automated or semiautomated segmentation of medical images decreases interstudy variation, observer bias, and postprocessing time as well as providing clincally-relevant quantitative data. In this paper we present a new dynamic deformable modeling approach to 3D segmentation. It utilizes recently developed dynamic remeshing techniques and curvature estimation methods to produce high-quality meshes. The approach has been implemented in an interactive environment that allows a user to specify an initial model and identify key features in the data. These features act as hard constraints that the model must not pass through as it deforms. We have employed the method to perform semi-automatic segmentation of heart structures from cine MRI data.

  16. Resolution of early diffusion-weighted and FLAIR MRI abnormalities in a patient with TIA.

    PubMed

    Lecouvet, F E; Duprez, T P; Raymackers, J M; Peeters, A; Cosnard, G

    1999-03-23

    We report a patient with a clinical history and neurologic examination consistent with acute stroke. Diffusion-weighted and fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI obtained 4 hours after stroke onset detected focal abnormalities suggestive of acute ischemic brain damage. The neurologic deficit and the imaging abnormalities both resolved completely at follow-up. This patient illustrates complete resolution of early changes observed with diffusion-weighted MRI at the hyperacute phase in a TIA. PMID:10102438

  17. Development and Assessment of a New 3D Neuroanatomy Teaching Tool for MRI Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapkin, Zachary A.; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Lopez, Michael J.; Stabio, Maureen E.

    2015-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional (3D) neuroanatomy teaching tool was developed for training medical students to identify subcortical structures on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series of the human brain. This program allows the user to transition rapidly between two-dimensional (2D) MRI slices, 3D object composites, and a combined model in…

  18. Breast Tissue 3D Segmentation and Visualization on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiangfei; Sun, Feifei

    2013-01-01

    Tissue segmentation and visualization are useful for breast lesion detection and quantitative analysis. In this paper, a 3D segmentation algorithm based on Kernel-based Fuzzy C-Means (KFCM) is proposed to separate the breast MR images into different tissues. Then, an improved volume rendering algorithm based on a new transfer function model is applied to implement 3D breast visualization. Experimental results have been shown visually and have achieved reasonable consistency. PMID:23983676

  19. Comparison of 3D orientation distribution functions measured with confocal microscopy and diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Kurt; Janve, Vaibhav; Gao, Yurui; Stepniewska, Iwona; Landman, Bennett A; Anderson, Adam W

    2016-04-01

    The ability of diffusion MRI (dMRI) fiber tractography to non-invasively map three-dimensional (3D) anatomical networks in the human brain has made it a valuable tool in both clinical and research settings. However, there are many assumptions inherent to any tractography algorithm that can limit the accuracy of the reconstructed fiber tracts. Among them is the assumption that the diffusion-weighted images accurately reflect the underlying fiber orientation distribution (FOD) in the MRI voxel. Consequently, validating dMRI's ability to assess the underlying fiber orientation in each voxel is critical for its use as a biomedical tool. Here, using post-mortem histology and confocal microscopy, we present a method to perform histological validation of orientation functions in 3D, which has previously been limited to two-dimensional analysis of tissue sections. We demonstrate the ability to extract the 3D FOD from confocal z-stacks, and quantify the agreement between the MRI estimates of orientation information obtained using constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) and the true geometry of the fibers. We find an orientation error of approximately 6° in voxels containing nearly parallel fibers, and 10-11° in crossing fiber regions, and note that CSD was unable to resolve fibers crossing at angles below 60° in our dataset. This is the first time that the 3D white matter orientation distribution is calculated from histology and compared to dMRI. Thus, this technique serves as a gold standard for dMRI validation studies - providing the ability to determine the extent to which the dMRI signal is consistent with the histological FOD, and to establish how well different dMRI models can predict the ground truth FOD. PMID:26804781

  20. Development and assessment of a new 3D neuroanatomy teaching tool for MRI training.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, Zachary A; Lindgren, Kristen A; Lopez, Michael J; Stabio, Maureen E

    2015-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional (3D) neuroanatomy teaching tool was developed for training medical students to identify subcortical structures on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series of the human brain. This program allows the user to transition rapidly between two-dimensional (2D) MRI slices, 3D object composites, and a combined model in which 3D objects are overlaid onto the 2D MRI slices, all while rotating the brain in any direction and advancing through coronal, sagittal, or axial planes. The efficacy of this tool was assessed by comparing scores from an MRI identification quiz and survey in two groups of first-year medical students. The first group was taught using this new 3D teaching tool, and the second group was taught the same content for the same amount of time but with traditional methods, including 2D images of brain MRI slices and 3D models from widely used textbooks and online sources. Students from the experimental group performed marginally better than the control group on overall test score (P = 0.07) and significantly better on test scores extracted from questions involving C-shaped internal brain structures (P < 0.01). Experimental participants also expressed higher confidence in their abilities to visualize the 3D structure of the brain (P = 0.02) after using this tool. Furthermore, when surveyed, 100% of the students in the experimental group recommended this tool for future students. These results suggest that this neuroanatomy teaching tool is an effective way to train medical students to read an MRI of the brain and is particularly effective for teaching C-shaped internal brain structures. PMID:25573020

  1. Spatio-temporal registration in multiplane MRI acquisitions for 3D colon motiliy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Oliver; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Berkovich, Marina; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for analyzing and visualizing dynamic peristaltic motion of the colon in 3D from two series of differently oriented 2D MRI images. To this end, we have defined an MRI examination protocol, and introduced methods for spatio-temporal alignment of the two MRI image series into a common reference. This represents the main contribution of this paper, which enables the 3D analysis of peristaltic motion. The objective is to provide a detailed insight into this complex motion, aiding in the diagnosis and characterization of colon motion disorders. We have applied the proposed spatio-temporal method on Cine MRI data sets of healthy volunteers. The results have been inspected and validated by an expert radiologist. Segmentation and cylindrical approximation of the colon results in a 4D visualization of the peristaltic motion.

  2. 3D MRI-based tumor delineation of ocular melanoma and its comparison with conventional techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Daftari, Inder k; Aghaian, Elsa; O'Brien, Joan M.; Dillon, William; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2005-11-15

    The aim of this study is to (1) compare the delineation of the tumor volume for ocular melanoma on high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images with conventional techniques of A- and B-scan ultrasound, transcleral illumination, and placement of tantalum markers around tumor base and (2) to evaluate whether the surgically placed marker ring tumor delineation can be replaced by 3D MRI based tumor delineation. High-resolution 3D T2-weighted fast spin echo (3D FSE) MRI scans were obtained for 60 consecutive ocular melanoma patients using a 1.5 T MRI (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI), in a standard head coil. These patients were subsequently treated with proton beam therapy at the UC Davis Cyclotron, Davis, CA. The tumor was delineated by placement of tantalum rings (radio-opaque markers) around the tumor periphery as defined by pupillary transillumination during surgery. A point light source, placed against the sclera, was also used to confirm ring agreement with indirect ophthalmoscopy. When necessary, intraoperative ultrasound was also performed. The patients were planned using EYEPLAN software and the tumor volumes were obtained. For analysis, the tumors were divided into four categories based on tumor height and basal diameter. In order to assess the impact of high-resolution 3D T2 FSE MRI, the tumor volumes were outlined on the MRI scans by two independent observers and the tumor volumes calculated for each patient. Six (10%) of 60 patients had tumors, which were not visible on 3D MRI images. These six patients had tumors with tumor heights {<=}3 mm. A small intraobserver variation with a mean of (-0.22{+-}4)% was seen in tumor volumes delineated by 3D T2 FSE MR images. The ratio of tumor volumes measured on MRI to EYEPLAN for the largest to the smallest tumor volumes varied between 0.993 and 1.02 for 54 patients. The tumor volumes measured directly on 3D T2 FSE MRI ranged from 4.03 to 0.075 cm{sup 3

  3. Registration of 3D ultrasound computer tomography and MRI for evaluation of tissue correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. In the current state of development it is essential to correlate USCT with a known imaging modality like MRI to evaluate how different tissue types are depicted. Due to different imaging conditions, e.g. with the breast subject to buoyancy in USCT, a direct correlation is demanding. We present a 3D image registration method to reduce positioning differences and allow direct side-by-side comparison of USCT and MRI volumes. It is based on a two-step approach including a buoyancy simulation with a biomechanical model and free form deformations using cubic B-Splines for a surface refinement. Simulation parameters are optimized patient-specifically in a simulated annealing scheme. The method was evaluated with in-vivo datasets resulting in an average registration error below 5mm. Correlating tissue structures can thereby be located in the same or nearby slices in both modalities and three-dimensional non-linear deformations due to the buoyancy are reduced. Image fusion of MRI volumes and USCT sound speed volumes was performed for intuitive display. By applying the registration to data of our first in-vivo study with the KIT 3D USCT, we could correlate several tissue structures in MRI and USCT images and learn how connective tissue, carcinomas and breast implants observed in the MRI are depicted in the USCT imaging modes.

  4. MRI Slice Segmentation and 3D Modelling of Temporomandibular Joint Measured by Microscopic Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirg, O.; Liberda, O.; Smekal, Z.; Sprlakova-Pukova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices and 3D modelling of the temporomandibular joint disc in order to help physicians diagnose patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The most common joint dysfunction is due to the disc. The disc is a soft tissue, which in principle cannot be diagnosed by the CT method. Therefore, a 3D model is made from the MRI slices, which can image soft tissues. For the segmentation of the disc in individual slices a new method is developed based on spatial distribution and anatomical TMJ structure with automatic thresholding. The thresholding is controlled by a genetic algorithm. The 3D model is realized using the marching cube method.

  5. Comparison of Parallel MRI Reconstruction Methods for Accelerated 3D Fast Spin-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhikui; Hoge, W. Scott; Mulkern, R.V.; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Guangshu; Kyriakos, Walid E.

    2014-01-01

    Parallel MRI (pMRI) achieves imaging acceleration by partially substituting gradient-encoding steps with spatial information contained in the component coils of the acquisition array. Variable-density subsampling in pMRI was previously shown to yield improved two-dimensional (2D) imaging in comparison to uniform subsampling, but has yet to be used routinely in clinical practice. In an effort to reduce acquisition time for 3D fast spin-echo (3D-FSE) sequences, this work explores a specific nonuniform sampling scheme for 3D imaging, subsampling along two phase-encoding (PE) directions on a rectilinear grid. We use two reconstruction methods—2D-GRAPPA-Operator and 2D-SPACE RIP—and present a comparison between them. We show that high-quality images can be reconstructed using both techniques. To evaluate the proposed sampling method and reconstruction schemes, results via simulation, phantom study, and in vivo 3D human data are shown. We find that fewer artifacts can be seen in the 2D-SPACE RIP reconstructions than in 2D-GRAPPA-Operator reconstructions, with comparable reconstruction times. PMID:18727083

  6. 3D active surfaces for liver segmentation in multisequence MRI images.

    PubMed

    Bereciartua, Arantza; Picon, Artzai; Galdran, Adrian; Iriondo, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Biopsies for diagnosis can sometimes be replaced by non-invasive techniques such as CT and MRI. Surgeons require accurate and efficient methods that allow proper segmentation of the organs in order to ensure the most reliable intervention planning. Automated liver segmentation is a difficult and open problem where CT has been more widely explored than MRI. MRI liver segmentation represents a challenge due to the presence of characteristic artifacts, such as partial volumes, noise and low contrast. In this paper, we present a novel method for multichannel MRI automatic liver segmentation. The proposed method consists of the minimization of a 3D active surface by means of the dual approach to the variational formulation of the underlying problem. This active surface evolves over a probability map that is based on a new compact descriptor comprising spatial and multisequence information which is further modeled by means of a liver statistical model. This proposed 3D active surface approach naturally integrates volumetric regularization in the statistical model. The advantages of the compact visual descriptor together with the proposed approach result in a fast and accurate 3D segmentation method. The method was tested on 18 healthy liver studies and results were compared to a gold standard made by expert radiologists. Comparisons with other state-of-the-art approaches are provided by means of nine well established quality metrics. The obtained results improve these methodologies, achieving a Dice Similarity Coefficient of 98.59. PMID:27282235

  7. 3D MRI Analysis of the Lower Legs of Treated Idiopathic Congenital Talipes Equinovarus (Clubfoot)

    PubMed Central

    Duce, Suzanne L.; D’Alessandro, Mariella; Du, Yimeng; Jagpal, Baljit; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Crichton, Lena; Barker, Simon; Collinson, J. Martin; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is the commonest form of clubfoot. Its exact cause is unknown, although it is related to limb development. The aim of this study was to quantify the anatomy of the muscle, subcutaneous fat, tibia, fibula and arteries in the lower legs of teenagers and young adults with CTEV using 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus to investigate the anatomical differences between CTEV participants and controls. Methodology/Principal Findings The lower legs of six CTEV (2 bilateral, 4 unilateral) and five control young adults (age 12–28) were imaged using a 3T MRI Philips scanner. 5 of the CTEV participants had undergone soft-tissue and capsular release surgery. 3D T1-weighted and 3D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images were acquired. Segmentation software was used for volumetric, anatomical and image analysis. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were performed. The volumes of the lower affected leg, muscle, tibia and fibula in unilateral CTEV participants were consistently smaller compared to their contralateral unaffected leg, this was most pronounced in muscle. The proportion of muscle in affected CTEV legs was significantly reduced compared with control and unaffected CTEV legs, whilst proportion of muscular fat increased. No spatial abnormalities in the location or branching of arteries were detected, but hypoplastic anomalies were observed. Conclusions/Significance Combining 3D MRI and MRA is effective for quantitatively characterizing CTEV anatomy. Reduction in leg muscle volume appears to be a sensitive marker. Since 5/6 CTEV cases had soft-tissue surgery, further work is required to confirm that the treatment did not affect the MRI features observed. We propose that the proportion of muscle and intra-muscular fat within the lower leg could provide a valuable addition to current clinical CTEV classification. These measures could be useful for clinical care and guiding treatment pathways, as well as

  8. Fractality in the neuron axonal topography of the human brain based on 3-D diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaloulis, P.; Ghosh, A.; Philippe, A. C.; Provata, A.; Deriche, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this work the fractal architecture of the neuron axonal topography of the human brain is evaluated, as derived from 3-D diffusion MRI (dMRI) acquisitions. This is a 3D extension of work performed previously in 2D regions of interest (ROIs), where the fractal dimension of the neuron axonal topography was computed from dMRI data. A group study with 18 subjects is here conducted and the fractal dimensions D f of the entire 3-D volume of the brains is estimated via the box counting, the correlation dimension and the fractal mass dimension methods. The neuron axon data is obtained using tractography algorithms on diffusion tensor imaging of the brain. We find that all three calculations of D f give consistent results across subjects, namely, they demonstrate fractal characteristics in the short and medium length scales: different fractal exponents prevail at different length scales, an indication of multifractality. We surmise that this complexity stems as a collective property emerging when many local brain units, performing different functional tasks and having different local topologies, are recorded together.

  9. Visualization of 3D geometric models of the breast created from contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken, III; Wang, Xiao Hui; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Chapman, Brian E.

    2002-05-01

    Contrast enhanced breast MRI is currently used as an adjuvant modality to x-ray mammography because of its ability to resolve ambiguities and determine the extent of malignancy. This study described techniques to create and visualize 3D geometric models of abnormal breast tissue. MRIs were performed on a General Electric 1.5 Tesla scanner using dual phased array breast coils. Image processing tasks included: 1) correction of image inhomogeneity caused by the coils, 2) segmentation of normal and abnormal tissue, and 3) modeling and visualization of the segmented tissue. The models were visualized using object-based surface rendering which revealed characteristics critical to differentiating benign from malignant tissue. Surface rendering illustrated the enhancement distribution and enhancement patterns. The modeling process condensed the multi-slice MRI data information and standardized its interpretation. Visualizing the 3D models should improve the radiologist's and/or surgeon's impression of the 3D shape, extent, and accessibility of the malignancy compared to viewing breast MRI data slice by slice.

  10. 3D mapping of somatotopic reorganization with small animal functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Wang, Shumin; Chen, Der-Yow; Dodd, Stephen; Goloshevsky, Artem; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2009-01-01

    There are few in vivo noninvasive methods to study neuroplasticity in animal brains. Functional MRI (fMRI) has been developed for animal brain mapping, but few fMRI studies have analyzed functional alteration due to plasticity in animal models. One major limitation is that fMRI maps are characterized by statistical parametric mapping making the apparent boundary dependent on the statistical threshold used. Here, we developed a method to characterize the location of center-of-mass in fMRI maps that is shown not to be sensitive to statistical threshold. Utilizing centers-of-mass as anchor points to fit the spatial distribution of the BOLD response enabled quantitative group analysis of altered boundaries of functional somatosensory maps. This approach was used to study cortical reorganization in the rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) after sensory deprivation to the barrel cortex by follicle ablation (F.A.). FMRI demonstrated an enlarged nose S1 representation in the 3D somatotopic functional maps. This result clearly demonstrates that fMRI enables the spatial mapping of functional changes that can characterize multiple regions of S1 cortex and still be sensitive to changes due to plasticity. PMID:19770051

  11. Assessing tumor response after loco-regional liver cancer therapies: the role of 3D MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chapiro, Julius; Lin, MingDe; Duran, Rafael; Schernthaner, Rüdiger E; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the tumor response of liver cancer lesions after intraarterial therapies is of major clinical interest. Over the last two decades, tumor response criteria have come a long way from purely size-based, anatomic methods such as the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors towards more functional, enhancement- and diffusion-based parameters with a strong emphasis on MRI as the ultimate imaging modality. However, the relatively low reproducibility of those one- and 2D techniques (modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and the European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria) provided the rationale for the development of new, 3D quantitative assessment techniques. This review will summarize and compare the existing methodologies used for 3D quantitative tumor analysis and provide an overview of the published clinical evidence for the benefits of 3D quantitative tumor response assessment techniques. PMID:25371052

  12. Multimodal visualization of 3D enhanced MRI and CT of acoustic schwannoma and related structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2005-09-01

    According to the necessity of supporting vestibular schwannoma surgery, there is a demand to develop a convenient method of medical data visualization. The process of making choice of optimal operating access way has been uncomfortable for a surgeon so far, because there has been a necessity of analyzing two independent 3D images series (CT -bone tissues visible, MRI - soft tissues visible) in the region of ponto-cerebellar angle tumors. The authors propose a solution that will improve this process. The system used is equipped with stereoscopic helmet mounted display. It allows merged CT and MRI data representing tissues in the region of of ponto-cerebellar angle to be visualized in stereoscopic way. The process of data preparation for visualization includes: -automated segmentation algorithms, -different types of 3D images (CT, MRI) fusion. The authors focused on the development of novel algorithms for segmentation of vestibular schwannoma. It is important and difficult task due to different types of tumors and their inhomogeneous character dependent on growth models. The authors propose algorithms based on histogram spectrum and multimodal character of MRI imaging (T1 and T2 modes). However due to a variety of objects the library of algorithms with specific modifications matching to selected types of images is proposed. The applicability and functionality of the algorithms and library was proved on the series of data delivered by Warsaw Central Medical University Hospital.

  13. Reduction of Breast Density Following Tamoxifen Treatment Evaluated by 3-D MRI: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Chang, Daniel; Wang, Yi-Ting; Nie, Ke; Chang, Ruey-Feng; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Su, Min-Ying

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the change of breast density in women receiving tamoxifen treatment using 3-D MRI. Sixteen women were studied. Each woman received breast MRI before and after tamoxifen. The breast and the fibroglandular tissue were segmented using a computer-assisted algorithm, based on T1-weighted images. The fibroglandular tissue volume (FV) and breast volume (BV) were measured and the ratio was calculated as the percent breast density (%BD). The changes in breast volume (ΔBV), fibroglandular tissue volume (ΔFV), and percent density (Δ%BD) between two MRI studies were analyzed and correlated with treatment duration and baseline breast density. The ΔFV showed a reduction in all 16 women. The Δ%BD showed a mean reduction of 5.8%. The reduction of FV was significantly correlated with baseline FV (P<0.001) and treatment duration (P=0.03). The percentage change in FV was correlated with duration (P=0.049). The reduction in %BD was positively correlated with baseline %BD (p=0.02). Women with higher baseline %BD showed more reduction of %BD. 3D MRI may be useful for the measurement of the small changes of ΔFV and Δ%BD after tamoxifen. These changes can potentially be used to correlate with the future reduction of cancer risk. PMID:20832226

  14. High-Performance 3D Compressive Sensing MRI Reconstruction Using Many-Core Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daehyun; Trzasko, Joshua; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; Haider, Clifton; Dubey, Pradeep; Manduca, Armando

    2011-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) describes how sparse signals can be accurately reconstructed from many fewer samples than required by the Nyquist criterion. Since MRI scan duration is proportional to the number of acquired samples, CS has been gaining significant attention in MRI. However, the computationally intensive nature of CS reconstructions has precluded their use in routine clinical practice. In this work, we investigate how different throughput-oriented architectures can benefit one CS algorithm and what levels of acceleration are feasible on different modern platforms. We demonstrate that a CUDA-based code running on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU can reconstruct a 256 × 160 × 80 volume from an 8-channel acquisition in 19 seconds, which is in itself a significant improvement over the state of the art. We then show that Intel's Knights Ferry can perform the same 3D MRI reconstruction in only 12 seconds, bringing CS methods even closer to clinical viability. PMID:21922017

  15. Role of 3D MRI with proset technique in the evaluation of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grasso, D; Borreggine, C; Melchionda, D; Bristogiannis, C; Stoppino, L P; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3D MRI) using the ProSet technique in the diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy and to compare morphological findings with clinical and neurophysiological data. 40 patients suffering from L5 or S1 mono-radiculopathy caused by a disc herniation were evaluated through preliminary clinical assessment and electromyography (EMG) technique. Both conventional spin-echo sequences and 3D coronal FFE with selective water excitation (ProSet imaging) were acquired. Indentation, swelling and tilt angle of the nerve root were assessed by means of a 3D MR radiculography. 3D ProSet multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) were used for quantitative measurements of L5 and S1 nerve root widths. Widths of the symptomatic nerve root were compared with those of the contralateral nerve. Data were processed using Epi Info 3.3 software (CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA) and were compared through a paired t-Student test. We observed an abnormal tilt angle in 22 patients (57,2 percent, P less than 0.05). Morphologic alterations such as monolateral swelling or indentation of the involved roots were found in 36 patients (90 percent, P less than0.01) using 3D MR radiculography. In 10 patients, EMG revealed more nerve roots involved, while 3D FFE with ProSet technique shows a single root involved. In 2 patients, alterations were demonstrated only through EMG technique. We suggest that 3D MR radiculography can provide more information than other techniques about symptomatic disc herniation, supporting the detection of morphological changes of all nerve segments. 3D FFE with ProSet technique demonstrates high sensibility to exactly identify the level of the root involved and can provide an extremely useful tool to lead a surgical planning. PMID:24152846

  16. Meshless deformable models for 3D cardiac motion and strain analysis from tagged MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Shaoting; Schaerer, Joël; Qian, Zhen; Huh, Suejung; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) provides a direct and noninvasive way to visualize the in-wall deformation of the myocardium. Due to the through-plane motion, the tracking of 3D trajectories of the material points and the computation of 3D strain field call for the necessity of building 3D cardiac deformable models. The intersections of three stacks of orthogonal tagging planes are material points in the myocardium. With these intersections as control points, 3D motion can be reconstructed with a novel meshless deformable model (MDM). Volumetric MDMs describe an object as point cloud inside the object boundary and the coordinate of each point can be written in parametric functions. A generic heart mesh is registered on the TMRI with polar decomposition. A 3D MDM is generated and deformed with MR image tagging lines. Volumetric MDMs are deformed by calculating the dynamics function and minimizing the local Laplacian coordinates. The similarity transformation of each point is computed by assuming its neighboring points are making the same transformation. The deformation is computed iteratively until the control points match the target positions in the consecutive image frame. The 3D strain field is computed from the 3D displacement field with moving least squares. We demonstrate that MDMs outperformed the finite element method and the spline method with a numerical phantom. Meshless deformable models can track the trajectory of any material point in the myocardium and compute the 3D strain field of any particular area. The experimental results on in vivo healthy and patient heart MRI show that the MDM can fully recover the myocardium motion in three dimensions. PMID:25157446

  17. Meshless deformable models for 3D cardiac motion and strain analysis from tagged MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Shaoting; Schaerer, Joël; Qian, Zhen; Huh, Suejung; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) provides a direct and noninvasive way to visualize the in-wall deformation of the myocardium. Due to the through-plane motion, the tracking of 3D trajectories of the material points and the computation of 3D strain field call for the necessity of building 3D cardiac deformable models. The intersections of three stacks of orthogonal tagging planes are material points in the myocardium. With these intersections as control points, 3D motion can be reconstructed with a novel meshless deformable model (MDM). Volumetric MDMs describe an object as point cloud inside the object boundary and the coordinate of each point can be written in parametric functions. A generic heart mesh is registered on the TMRI with polar decomposition. A 3D MDM is generated and deformed with MR image tagging lines. Volumetric MDMs are deformed by calculating the dynamics function and minimizing the local Laplacian coordinates. The similarity transformation of each point is computed by assuming its neighboring points are making the same transformation. The deformation is computed iteratively until the control points match the target positions in the consecutive image frame. The 3D strain field is computed from the 3D displacement field with moving least squares. We demonstrate that MDMs outperformed the finite element method and the spline method with a numerical phantom. Meshless deformable models can track the trajectory of any material point in the myocardium and compute the 3D strain field of any particular area. The experimental results on in vivo healthy and patient heart MRI show that the MDM can fully recover the myocardium motion in three dimensions. PMID:25157446

  18. Whole brain 3D T2-weighted BOLD fMRI at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Pekar, James J.; Jones, Craig K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. Methods It employs a T2-preparation module to induce BOLD contrast, followed by a single-shot 3D fast gradient-echo readout with short TE. It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the “dead time” due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed “3D T2prep-GRE”, was implemented at 7T with a typical spatial (2.5×2.5×2.5mm3) and temporal (TR=2.3s) resolution for fMRI and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. Results In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. Conclusion This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. PMID:24338901

  19. 3D MRI-based multicomponent FSI models for atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K; Sicard, Gregorio A; Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Yuan, Chun

    2004-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) MRI-based computational model with multicomponent plaque structure and fluid-structure interactions (FSI) is introduced to perform mechanical analysis for human atherosclerotic plaques and identify critical flow and stress/strain conditions which may be related to plaque rupture. Three-dimensional geometry of a human carotid plaque was reconstructed from 3D MR images and computational mesh was generated using Visualization Toolkit. Both the artery wall and the plaque components were assumed to be hyperelastic, isotropic, incompressible, and homogeneous. The flow was assumed to be laminar, Newtonian, viscous, and incompressible. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved by ADINA, a well-tested finite element package. Results from two-dimensional (2D) and 3D models, based on ex vivo MRI and histological images (HI), with different component sizes and plaque cap thickness, under different pressure and axial stretch conditions, were obtained and compared. Our results indicate that large lipid pools and thin plaque caps are associated with both extreme maximum (stretch) and minimum (compression when negative) stress/strain levels. Large cyclic stress/strain variations in the plaque under pulsating pressure were observed which may lead to artery fatigue and possible plaque rupture. Large-scale patient studies are needed to validate the computational findings for possible plaque vulnerability assessment and rupture predictions. PMID:15298432

  20. Imaging knee position using MRI, RSA/CT and 3D digitisation.

    PubMed

    McPherson, A; Kärrholm, J; Pinskerova, V; Sosna, A; Martelli, S

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 3 methods of imaging knee position. Three fresh cadaver knees were imaged at 6 flexion angles between 0 degrees and 120 degrees by MRI, a combination of RSA and CT and 3D digitisation (in two knees). Virtual models of all 42 positions were created using suitable computer software. Each virtual model was aligned to a newly defined anatomically based Cartesian coordinate system. The angular rotations around the 3 coordinate system axes were calculated directly from the aligned virtual models using rigid body kinematics and found to be equally accurate for the 3 methods. The 3 rotations in each knee could be depicted using anatomy-based diagrams for all 3 methods. We conclude that the 3 methods of data acquisition are equally and adequately accurate in vitro. MRI may be the most useful in vivo. PMID:15598452

  1. MRI 3D CISS– A Novel Imaging Modality in Diagnosing Trigeminal Neuralgia – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Besta, Radhika; Shankar, Y. Uday; Kumar, Ashwini; Prakash, S. Bhanu

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN) is considered as one of the most painful neurologic disorders affecting oro-facial region. TN is often diagnosed clinically based on the patients complete history of pain (severity, duration, episodes etc), relief of pain on test dose of Carbamazepine, regional block of long acting anaesthetic. However, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) plays an important and confirmatory role in showing Neuro Vascular Conflict (NVC) which is the commonest causative factor for TN. This article reviews the effectiveness of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady-state (3D-CISS) MRI in diagnosing the exact location, degree of neurovascular conflict responsible for classical as well as atypical TN and possible pre-treatment evaluation and treatment outcome. PMID:27135019

  2. MRI 3D CISS- A Novel Imaging Modality in Diagnosing Trigeminal Neuralgia - A Review.

    PubMed

    Besta, Radhika; Shankar, Y Uday; Kumar, Ashwini; Rajasekhar, E; Prakash, S Bhanu

    2016-03-01

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN) is considered as one of the most painful neurologic disorders affecting oro-facial region. TN is often diagnosed clinically based on the patients complete history of pain (severity, duration, episodes etc), relief of pain on test dose of Carbamazepine, regional block of long acting anaesthetic. However, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) plays an important and confirmatory role in showing Neuro Vascular Conflict (NVC) which is the commonest causative factor for TN. This article reviews the effectiveness of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady-state (3D-CISS) MRI in diagnosing the exact location, degree of neurovascular conflict responsible for classical as well as atypical TN and possible pre-treatment evaluation and treatment outcome. PMID:27135019

  3. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21 mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  4. 3D hyperpolarized He-3 MRI of ventilation using a multi-echo projection acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, James H.; O’Halloran, Rafael L.; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Jung, Youngkyoo; Block, Walter F.; Fain, Sean B.

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented for high resolution 3D imaging of the whole lung using inhaled hyperpolarized (HP) He-3 MR with multiple half-echo radial trajectories that can accelerate imaging through undersampling. A multiple half-echo radial trajectory can be used to reduce the level of artifact for undersampled 3D projection reconstruction (PR) imaging by increasing the amount of data acquired per unit time for HP He-3 lung imaging. The point spread functions (PSFs) for breath-held He-3 MRI using multiple half-echo trajectories were evaluated using simulations to predict the effects of T2* and gas diffusion on image quality. Results from PSF simulations were consistent with imaging results in volunteer studies showing improved image quality with increasing number of echoes using up to 8 half-echoes. The 8 half-echo acquisition is shown to accommodate lost breath-holds as short as 6 s using a retrospective reconstruction at reduced resolution as well as to allow reduced breath-hold time compared to an equivalent Cartesian trajectory. Furthermore, preliminary results from a 3D dynamic inhalation-exhalation maneuver are demonstrated using the 8 half-echo trajectory. Results demonstrate the first high resolution 3D PR imaging of ventilation and respiratory dynamics in humans using HP He-3 MR. PMID:18429034

  5. Deformable templates guided discriminative models for robust 3D brain MRI segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Yi; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Tu, Zhuowen

    2013-10-01

    Automatically segmenting anatomical structures from 3D brain MRI images is an important task in neuroimaging. One major challenge is to design and learn effective image models accounting for the large variability in anatomy and data acquisition protocols. A deformable template is a type of generative model that attempts to explicitly match an input image with a template (atlas), and thus, they are robust against global intensity changes. On the other hand, discriminative models combine local image features to capture complex image patterns. In this paper, we propose a robust brain image segmentation algorithm that fuses together deformable templates and informative features. It takes advantage of the adaptation capability of the generative model and the classification power of the discriminative models. The proposed algorithm achieves both robustness and efficiency, and can be used to segment brain MRI images with large anatomical variations. We perform an extensive experimental study on four datasets of T1-weighted brain MRI data from different sources (1,082 MRI scans in total) and observe consistent improvement over the state-of-the-art systems. PMID:23836390

  6. On-line 3D motion estimation using low resolution MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2015-08-01

    Image processing such as deformable image registration finds its way into radiotherapy as a means to track non-rigid anatomy. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy, intrafraction anatomy snapshots become technically feasible. MRI provides the needed tissue signal for high-fidelity image registration. However, acquisitions, especially in 3D, take a considerable amount of time. Pushing towards real-time adaptive radiotherapy, MRI needs to be accelerated without degrading the quality of information. In this paper, we investigate the impact of image resolution on the quality of motion estimations. Potentially, spatially undersampled images yield comparable motion estimations. At the same time, their acquisition times would reduce greatly due to the sparser sampling. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, exemplary 4D datasets of the abdomen were downsampled gradually. Subsequently, spatiotemporal deformations are extracted consistently using the same motion estimation for each downsampled dataset. Errors between the original and the respectively downsampled version of the dataset are then evaluated. Compared to ground-truth, results show high similarity of deformations estimated from downsampled image data. Using a dataset with {{≤ft(2.5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} voxel size, deformation fields could be recovered well up to a downsampling factor of 2, i.e. {{≤ft(5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} . In a therapy guidance scenario MRI, imaging speed could accordingly increase approximately fourfold, with acceptable loss of estimated motion quality.

  7. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  8. 3D segmentation of masses in DCE-MRI images using FCM and adaptive MRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengjie; Li, Lihua

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a sensitive imaging modality for the detection of breast cancer. Automated segmentation of breast lesions in DCE-MRI images is challenging due to inherent signal-to-noise ratios and high inter-patient variability. A novel 3D segmentation method based on FCM and MRF is proposed in this study. In this method, a MRI image is segmented by spatial FCM, firstly. And then MRF segmentation is conducted to refine the result. We combined with the 3D information of lesion in the MRF segmentation process by using segmentation result of contiguous slices to constraint the slice segmentation. At the same time, a membership matrix of FCM segmentation result is used for adaptive adjustment of Markov parameters in MRF segmentation process. The proposed method was applied for lesion segmentation on 145 breast DCE-MRI examinations (86 malignant and 59 benign cases). An evaluation of segmentation was taken using the traditional overlap rate method between the segmented region and hand-drawing ground truth. The average overlap rates for benign and malignant lesions are 0.764 and 0.755 respectively. Then we extracted five features based on the segmentation region, and used an artificial neural network (ANN) to classify between malignant and benign cases. The ANN had a classification performance measured by the area under the ROC curve of AUC=0.73. The positive and negative predictive values were 0.86 and 0.58, respectively. The results demonstrate the proposed method not only achieves a better segmentation performance in accuracy also has a reasonable classification performance.

  9. A novel Hessian based algorithm for rat kidney glomerulus detection in 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Wu, Teresa; Bennett, Kevin M.

    2015-03-01

    The glomeruli of the kidney perform the key role of blood filtration and the number of glomeruli in a kidney is correlated with susceptibility to chronic kidney disease and chronic cardiovascular disease. This motivates the development of new technology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the number of glomeruli and nephrons in vivo. However, there is currently a lack of computationally efficient techniques to perform fast, reliable and accurate counts of glomeruli in MR images due to the issues inherent in MRI, such as acquisition noise, partial volume effects (the mixture of several tissue signals in a voxel) and bias field (spatial intensity inhomogeneity). Such challenges are particularly severe because the glomeruli are very small, (in our case, a MRI image is ~16 million voxels, each glomerulus is in the size of 8~20 voxels), and the number of glomeruli is very large. To address this, we have developed an efficient Hessian based Difference of Gaussians (HDoG) detector to identify the glomeruli on 3D rat MR images. The image is first smoothed via DoG followed by the Hessian process to pre-segment and delineate the boundary of the glomerulus candidates. This then provides a basis to extract regional features used in an unsupervised clustering algorithm, completing segmentation by removing the false identifications occurred in the pre-segmentation. The experimental results show that Hessian based DoG has the potential to automatically detect glomeruli,from MRI in 3D, enabling new measurements of renal microstructure and pathology in preclinical and clinical studies.

  10. Semi-automatic segmentation for 3D motion analysis of the tongue with dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghoon; Woo, Jonghye; Xing, Fangxu; Murano, Emi Z; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic MRI has been widely used to track the motion of the tongue and measure its internal deformation during speech and swallowing. Accurate segmentation of the tongue is a prerequisite step to define the target boundary and constrain the tracking to tissue points within the tongue. Segmentation of 2D slices or 3D volumes is challenging because of the large number of slices and time frames involved in the segmentation, as well as the incorporation of numerous local deformations that occur throughout the tongue during motion. In this paper, we propose a semi-automatic approach to segment 3D dynamic MRI of the tongue. The algorithm steps include seeding a few slices at one time frame, propagating seeds to the same slices at different time frames using deformable registration, and random walker segmentation based on these seed positions. This method was validated on the tongue of five normal subjects carrying out the same speech task with multi-slice 2D dynamic cine-MR images obtained at three orthogonal orientations and 26 time frames. The resulting semi-automatic segmentations of a total of 130 volumes showed an average dice similarity coefficient (DSC) score of 0.92 with less segmented volume variability between time frames than in manual segmentations. PMID:25155697

  11. SPASM: a 3D-ASM for segmentation of sparse and arbitrarily oriented cardiac MRI data.

    PubMed

    van Assen, Hans C; Danilouchkine, Mikhail G; Frangi, Alejandro F; Ordás, Sebastián; Westenberg, Jos J M; Reiber, Johan H C; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F

    2006-04-01

    A new technique (SPASM) based on a 3D-ASM is presented for automatic segmentation of cardiac MRI image data sets consisting of multiple planes with arbitrary orientations, and with large undersampled regions. Model landmark positions are updated in a two-stage iterative process. First, landmark positions close to intersections with images are updated. Second, the update information is propagated to the regions without image information, such that new locations for the whole set of the model landmarks are obtained. Feature point detection is performed by a fuzzy inference system, based on fuzzy C-means clustering. Model parameters were optimized on a computer cluster and the computational load distributed by grid computing. SPASM was applied to image data sets with an increasing sparsity (from 2 to 11 slices) comprising images with different orientations and stemming from different MRI acquisition protocols. Segmentation outcomes and calculated volumes were compared to manual segmentation on a dense short-axis data configuration in a 3D manner. For all data configurations, (sub-)pixel accuracy was achieved. Performance differences between data configurations were significantly different (p<0.05) for SA data sets with less than 6 slices, but not clinically relevant (volume differences<4 ml). Comparison to results from other 3D model-based methods showed that SPASM performs comparable to or better than these other methods, but SPASM uses considerably less image data. Sensitivity to initial model placement proved to be limited within a range of position perturbations of approximately 20 mm in all directions. PMID:16439182

  12. Quantification of Diaphragm Mechanics in Pompe Disease Using Dynamic 3D MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mogalle, Katja; Perez-Rovira, Adria; Ciet, Pierluigi; Wens, Stephan C. A.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Tiddens, Harm A. W. M.; van der Ploeg, Ans T.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Diaphragm weakness is the main reason for respiratory dysfunction in patients with Pompe disease, a progressive metabolic myopathy affecting respiratory and limb-girdle muscles. Since respiratory failure is the major cause of death among adult patients, early identification of respiratory muscle involvement is necessary to initiate treatment in time and possibly prevent irreversible damage. In this paper we investigate the suitability of dynamic MR imaging in combination with state-of-the-art image analysis methods to assess respiratory muscle weakness. Methods The proposed methodology relies on image registration and lung surface extraction to quantify lung kinematics during breathing. This allows for the extraction of geometry and motion features of the lung that characterize the independent contribution of the diaphragm and the thoracic muscles to the respiratory cycle. Results Results in 16 3D+t MRI scans (10 Pompe patients and 6 controls) of a slow expiratory maneuver show that kinematic analysis from dynamic 3D images reveals important additional information about diaphragm mechanics and respiratory muscle involvement when compared to conventional pulmonary function tests. Pompe patients with severely reduced pulmonary function showed severe diaphragm weakness presented by minimal motion of the diaphragm. In patients with moderately reduced pulmonary function, cranial displacement of posterior diaphragm parts was reduced and the diaphragm dome was oriented more horizontally at full inspiration compared to healthy controls. Conclusion Dynamic 3D MRI provides data for analyzing the contribution of both diaphragm and thoracic muscles independently. The proposed image analysis method has the potential to detect less severe diaphragm weakness and could thus be used to determine the optimal start of treatment in adult patients with Pompe disease in prospect of increased treatment response. PMID:27391236

  13. Combining supine MRI and 3D optical scanning for improved surgical planning of breast conserving surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Poplack, Steven P.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided wire localization is the current standard of care for the excision of non-palpable carcinomas during breast conserving surgeries (BCS). The efficacy of this technique depends upon the accuracy of wire placement, maintenance of the fixed wire position (despite patient movement), and the surgeon's understanding of the spatial relationship between the wire and tumor. Notably, breast shape can vary significantly between the imaging and surgical positions. Despite this method of localization, re-excision is needed in approximately 30% of patients due to the proximity of cancer to the specimen margins. These limitations make wire localization an inefficient and imprecise procedure. Alternatively, we investigate a method of image registration and finite element (FE) deformation which correlates preoperative supine MRIs with 3D optical scans of the breast surface. MRI of the breast can accurately define the extents of very small cancers. Furthermore, supine breast MR reduces the amount of tissue deformation between the imaging and surgical positions. At the time of surgery, the surface contour of the breast may be imaged using a handheld 3D laser scanner. With the MR images segmented by tissue type, the two scans are approximately registered using fiducial markers present in both acquisitions. The segmented MRI breast volume is then deformed to match the optical surface using a FE mechanical model of breast tissue. The resulting images provide the surgeon with 3D views and measurements of the tumor shape, volume, and position within the breast as it appears during surgery which may improve surgical guidance and obviate the need for wire localization.

  14. Simulation of 3D MRI brain images for quantitative evaluation of image segmentation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Obladen, Thorsten; Sabri, Osama; Buell, Udalrich

    2000-06-01

    To model the true shape of MRI brain images, automatically classified T1-weighted 3D MRI images (gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, scalp/bone and background) are utilized for simulation of grayscale data and imaging artifacts. For each class, Gaussian distribution of grayscale values is assumed, and mean and variance are computed from grayscale images. A random generator fills up the class images with Gauss-distributed grayscale values. Since grayscale values of neighboring voxels are not correlated, a Gaussian low-pass filtering is done, preserving class region borders. To simulate anatomical variability, a Gaussian distribution in space with user-defined mean and variance can be added at any user-defined position. Several imaging artifacts can be added: (1) to simulate partial volume effects, every voxel is averaged with neighboring voxels if they have a different class label; (2) a linear or quadratic bias field can be added with user-defined strength and orientation; (3) additional background noise can be added; and (4) artifacts left over after spoiling can be simulated by adding a band with increasing/decreasing grayscale values. With this method, realistic-looking simulated MRI images can be produced to test classification and segmentation algorithms regarding accuracy and robustness even in the presence of artifacts.

  15. 3D cardiac motion reconstruction from CT data and tagged MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Mihalef, Viorel; Qian, Zhen; Voros, Szilard; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for left ventricle (LV) endocardium motion reconstruction using high resolution CT data and tagged MRI. High resolution CT data provide anatomic details on the LV endocardial surface, such as the papillary muscle and trabeculae carneae. Tagged MRI provides better time resolution. The combination of these two imaging techniques can give us better understanding on left ventricle motion. The high resolution CT images are segmented with mean shift method and generate the LV endocardium mesh. The meshless deformable model built with high resolution endocardium surface from CT data fit to the tagged MRI of the same phase. 3D deformation of the myocardium is computed with the Lagrangian dynamics and local Laplacian deformation. The segmented inner surface of left ventricle is compared with the heart inner surface picture and show high agreement. The papillary muscles are attached to the inner surface with roots. The free wall of the left ventricle inner surface is covered with trabeculae carneae. The deformation of the heart wall and the papillary muscle in the first half of the cardiac cycle is presented. The motion reconstruction results are very close to the live heart video. PMID:23366825

  16. 3D Cardiac Motion Reconstruction from CT Data and Tagged MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Mihalef, Viorel; Qian, Zhen; Voros, Szilard; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for left ventricle (LV) endocardium motion reconstruction using high resolution CT data and tagged MRI. High resolution CT data provide anatomic details on the LV endocardial surface, such as the papillary muscle and trabeculae carneae. Tagged MRI provides better time resolution. The combination of these two imaging techniques can give us better understanding on left ventricle motion. The high resolution CT images are segmented with mean shift method and generate the LV endocardium mesh. The meshless deformable model built with high resolution endocardium surface from CT data fit to the tagged MRI of the same phase. 3D deformation of the myocardium is computed with the Lagrangian dynamics and local Laplacian deformation. The segmented inner surface of left ventricle is compared with the heart inner surface picture and show high agreement. The papillary muscles are attached to the inner surface with roots. The free wall of the left ventricle inner surface is covered with trabeculae carneae. The deformation of the heart wall and the papillary muscle in the first half of the cardiac cycle is presented. The motion reconstruction results are very close to the live heart video. PMID:23366825

  17. TU-F-BRF-06: 3D Pancreas MRI Segmentation Using Dictionary Learning and Manifold Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, S; Rapacchi, S; Hu, P; Sheng, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recent advent of MRI guided radiotherapy machines has lent an exciting platform for soft tissue target localization during treatment. However, tools to efficiently utilize MRI images for such purpose have not been developed. Specifically, to efficiently quantify the organ motion, we develop an automated segmentation method using dictionary learning and manifold clustering (DLMC). Methods: Fast 3D HASTE and VIBE MR images of 2 healthy volunteers and 3 patients were acquired. A bounding box was defined to include pancreas and surrounding normal organs including the liver, duodenum and stomach. The first slice of the MRI was used for dictionary learning based on mean-shift clustering and K-SVD sparse representation. Subsequent images were iteratively reconstructed until the error is less than a preset threshold. The preliminarily segmentation was subject to the constraints of manifold clustering. The segmentation results were compared with the mean shift merging (MSM), level set (LS) and manual segmentation methods. Results: DLMC resulted in consistently higher accuracy and robustness than comparing methods. Using manual contours as the ground truth, the mean Dices indices for all subjects are 0.54, 0.56 and 0.67 for MSM, LS and DLMC, respectively based on the HASTE image. The mean Dices indices are 0.70, 0.77 and 0.79 for the three methods based on VIBE images. DLMC is clearly more robust on the patients with the diseased pancreas while LS and MSM tend to over-segment the pancreas. DLMC also achieved higher sensitivity (0.80) and specificity (0.99) combining both imaging techniques. LS achieved equivalent sensitivity on VIBE images but was more computationally inefficient. Conclusion: We showed that pancreas and surrounding normal organs can be reliably segmented based on fast MRI using DLMC. This method will facilitate both planning volume definition and imaging guidance during treatment.

  18. Histological Evaluation of 3D MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Therapy in the Prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Siddharth; Boyes, Aaron; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Previous work from our group has shown that transurethral ultrasound therapy, with a single ultrasound transducer guided by temperature feedback from a single MRI plane (slice), can be used to treat a targeted region accurately in the prostate gland. We have extended this approach to a larger, 3D, targeted volume within the prostate, using a multi-element transducer controlled concurrently by temperature feedback from multiple imaging planes. Animals were placed supine in a 1.5 T clinical MRI, and the transurethral heating device was positioned with image guidance. A four-element transducer (each element was 5 mm long, operating at ˜8 MHz) was rotated to treat a targeted volume around the device. Temperature maps transverse to each element were acquired during heating and used to control the acoustic power of each element and the rate of rotation of the device. T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced (CE) MR images were obtained pre- and post-heating. Following the treatment, prostates were removed and fixed, axially sliced, stained with H&E, and digitally imaged at high-resolution to outline boundaries of cell death. Slice alignment and image registration techniques were developed to enable quantitative comparison of the axial MRI images and matching histological sections. Prostate sections showed clear regions of coagulative necrosis, extending ˜20 mm along the urethra, which correlated well with CE MRI data and transducer length. After registration, the outer border of coagulative necrosis on H&E conformed well to the target isotherm, similar to results from our previous (single element) acute studies. These results confirm that our previous analysis techniques for a single transducer can be extended to multiple elements, and that a large volumetric ablation of the prostate gland is feasible with a high degree of accuracy.

  19. Thermal analysis of the surrounding anatomy during 3-D MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Previous numerical simulations have shown that MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy can generate highly accurate volumes of thermal coagulation conforming to 3-D human prostate geometries. The goal of this work is to simulate, quantify and evaluate the thermal impact of these treatments on the rectum, pelvic bone, neurovascular bundles (NVB) and urinary sphincters. This study used twenty 3-D anatomical models of prostate cancer patients and detailed bio-acoustic simulations incorporating an active feedback algorithm which controlled a rotating, planar ultrasound transducer (17-4×3 mm elements, 4.7/9.7 MHz, 10 Wac/cm2). Heating of the adjacent surrounding anatomy was evaluated using thermal tolerances reported in the literature. Heating of the rectum poses the most important safety concern and is influenced largely by the water temperature flowing through an endorectal cooling device; temperatures of 7-37° C are required to limit potential damage to less than 10 mm3 on the outer 1 mm layer of rectum. Significant heating of the pelvic bone was predicted in 30% of the patient models with an ultrasound frequency of 4.7 MHz; setting the frequency to 9.7 MHz when the bone is less than 10 mm away from the prostate reduced heating in all cases below the threshold for irreversible damage. Heating of the NVB was significant in 75% of the patient models in the absence of treatment planning; this proportion was reduced to 5% by using treatment margins of up to 4 mm. To avoid damaging the urinary sphincters, margins from the transducer of 2-4 mm should be used, depending on the transurethral cooling temperature. Simulations show that MRI-guided transurethral therapy can treat the entire prostate accurately. Strategies have been developed which, along with careful treatment planning, can be used to avoid causing thermal injury to the rectum, pelvic bone, NVB and urinary sphincters.

  20. Fast imaging of laboratory core floods using 3D compressed sensing RARE MRI.

    PubMed

    Ramskill, N P; Bush, I; Sederman, A J; Mantle, M D; Benning, M; Anger, B C; Appel, M; Gladden, L F

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the fluid distributions within the rock is essential to enable the unambiguous interpretation of core flooding data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to image fluid saturation in rock cores; however, conventional acquisition strategies are typically too slow to capture the dynamic nature of the displacement processes that are of interest. Using Compressed Sensing (CS), it is possible to reconstruct a near-perfect image from significantly fewer measurements than was previously thought necessary, and this can result in a significant reduction in the image acquisition times. In the present study, a method using the Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence with CS to provide 3D images of the fluid saturation in rock core samples during laboratory core floods is demonstrated. An objective method using image quality metrics for the determination of the most suitable regularisation functional to be used in the CS reconstructions is reported. It is shown that for the present application, Total Variation outperforms the Haar and Daubechies3 wavelet families in terms of the agreement of their respective CS reconstructions with a fully-sampled reference image. Using the CS-RARE approach, 3D images of the fluid saturation in the rock core have been acquired in 16min. The CS-RARE technique has been applied to image the residual water saturation in the rock during a water-water displacement core flood. With a flow rate corresponding to an interstitial velocity of vi=1.89±0.03ftday(-1), 0.1 pore volumes were injected over the course of each image acquisition, a four-fold reduction when compared to a fully-sampled RARE acquisition. Finally, the 3D CS-RARE technique has been used to image the drainage of dodecane into the water-saturated rock in which the dynamics of the coalescence of discrete clusters of the non-wetting phase are clearly observed. The enhancement in the temporal resolution that has

  1. Fast imaging of laboratory core floods using 3D compressed sensing RARE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramskill, N. P.; Bush, I.; Sederman, A. J.; Mantle, M. D.; Benning, M.; Anger, B. C.; Appel, M.; Gladden, L. F.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the fluid distributions within the rock is essential to enable the unambiguous interpretation of core flooding data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to image fluid saturation in rock cores; however, conventional acquisition strategies are typically too slow to capture the dynamic nature of the displacement processes that are of interest. Using Compressed Sensing (CS), it is possible to reconstruct a near-perfect image from significantly fewer measurements than was previously thought necessary, and this can result in a significant reduction in the image acquisition times. In the present study, a method using the Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence with CS to provide 3D images of the fluid saturation in rock core samples during laboratory core floods is demonstrated. An objective method using image quality metrics for the determination of the most suitable regularisation functional to be used in the CS reconstructions is reported. It is shown that for the present application, Total Variation outperforms the Haar and Daubechies3 wavelet families in terms of the agreement of their respective CS reconstructions with a fully-sampled reference image. Using the CS-RARE approach, 3D images of the fluid saturation in the rock core have been acquired in 16 min. The CS-RARE technique has been applied to image the residual water saturation in the rock during a water-water displacement core flood. With a flow rate corresponding to an interstitial velocity of vi = 1.89 ± 0.03 ft day-1, 0.1 pore volumes were injected over the course of each image acquisition, a four-fold reduction when compared to a fully-sampled RARE acquisition. Finally, the 3D CS-RARE technique has been used to image the drainage of dodecane into the water-saturated rock in which the dynamics of the coalescence of discrete clusters of the non-wetting phase are clearly observed. The enhancement in the temporal resolution

  2. 3D MRI brain image segmentation based on region restricted EM algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Fan, Jianping

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm of 3D human brain tissue segmentation and classification in magnetic resonance image (MRI) based on region restricted EM algorithm (RREM). The RREM is a level set segmentation method while the evolution of the contours was driven by the force field composed by the probability density functions of the Gaussian models. Each tissue is modeled by one or more Gaussian models restricted by free shaped contour so that the Gaussian models are adaptive to the local intensities. The RREM is guaranteed to be convergency and achieving the local minimum. The segmentation avoids to be trapped in the local minimum by the split and merge operation. A fuzzy rule based classifier finally groups the regions belonging to the same tissue and forms the segmented 3D image of white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) which are of major interest in numerous applications. The presented method can be extended to segment brain images with tumor or the images having part of the brain removed with the adjusted classifier.

  3. Atlas-registration based image segmentation of MRI human thigh muscles in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ezak; Yap, Moi Hoon; Degens, Hans; McPhee, Jamie S.

    2014-03-01

    Automatic segmentation of anatomic structures of magnetic resonance thigh scans can be a challenging task due to the potential lack of precisely defined muscle boundaries and issues related to intensity inhomogeneity or bias field across an image. In this paper, we demonstrate a combination framework of atlas construction and image registration methods to propagate the desired region of interest (ROI) between atlas image and the targeted MRI thigh scans for quadriceps muscles, femur cortical layer and bone marrow segmentations. The proposed system employs a semi-automatic segmentation method on an initial image in one dataset (from a series of images). The segmented initial image is then used as an atlas image to automate the segmentation of other images in the MRI scans (3-D space). The processes include: ROI labeling, atlas construction and registration, and morphological transform correspondence pixels (in terms of feature and intensity value) between the atlas (template) image and the targeted image based on the prior atlas information and non-rigid image registration methods.

  4. On the validity of 3D polymer gel dosimetry: III. MRI-related error sources.

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (PAGAT) polymer gel dosimetry, there exists some controversy on the validity of 3D dose verifications of clinical treatments. The relative contribution of important sources of uncertainty in MR scanning to the overall accuracy and precision of 3D MRI polymer gel dosimetry is quantified in this study. The performance in terms of signal-to-noise and imaging artefacts was evaluated on three different MR scanners (two 1.5 T and a 3 T scanner). These include: (1) B₀-field inhomogeneity, (2) B₁-field inhomogeneity, (3) dielectric effects (losses and standing waves) and (4) temperature inhomogeneity during scanning. B₀-field inhomogeneities that amount to maximum 5 ppm result in dose deviations of up to 4.3% and deformations of up to 5 pixels. Compensation methods are proposed. B₁-field inhomogeneities were found to induce R₂ variations in large anthropomorphic phantoms both at 1.5 and 3 T. At 1.5 T these effects are mainly caused by the coil geometry resulting in dose deviations of up to 25%. After the correction of the R₂ maps using a heuristic flip angle-R₂ relation, these dose deviations are reduced to 2.4%. At 3 T, the dielectric properties of the gel phantoms are shown to strongly influence B₁-field homogeneity, hence R₂ homogeneity, especially of large anthropomorphic phantoms. The low electrical conductivity of polymer gel dosimeters induces standing wave patterns resulting in dose deviations up to 50%. Increasing the conductivity of the gel by adding NaCl reduces the dose deviation to 25% after which the post-processing is successful in reducing the remaining inhomogeneities caused by the coil geometry to within 2.4%. The measurements are supported by computational modelling of the B₁-field. Finally, temperature fluctuations of 1 °C frequently encountered in clinical MRI scanners result in dose deviations up to 15%. It is illustrated that with adequate temperature stabilization, the dose uncertainty is reduced to within 2.58%. PMID

  5. On the validity of 3D polymer gel dosimetry: III. MRI-related error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (PAGAT) polymer gel dosimetry, there exists some controversy on the validity of 3D dose verifications of clinical treatments. The relative contribution of important sources of uncertainty in MR scanning to the overall accuracy and precision of 3D MRI polymer gel dosimetry is quantified in this study. The performance in terms of signal-to-noise and imaging artefacts was evaluated on three different MR scanners (two 1.5 T and a 3 T scanner). These include: (1) B0-field inhomogeneity, (2) B1-field inhomogeneity, (3) dielectric effects (losses and standing waves) and (4) temperature inhomogeneity during scanning. B0-field inhomogeneities that amount to maximum 5 ppm result in dose deviations of up to 4.3% and deformations of up to 5 pixels. Compensation methods are proposed. B1-field inhomogeneities were found to induce R2 variations in large anthropomorphic phantoms both at 1.5 and 3 T. At 1.5 T these effects are mainly caused by the coil geometry resulting in dose deviations of up to 25%. After the correction of the R2 maps using a heuristic flip angle-R2 relation, these dose deviations are reduced to 2.4%. At 3 T, the dielectric properties of the gel phantoms are shown to strongly influence B1-field homogeneity, hence R2 homogeneity, especially of large anthropomorphic phantoms. The low electrical conductivity of polymer gel dosimeters induces standing wave patterns resulting in dose deviations up to 50%. Increasing the conductivity of the gel by adding NaCl reduces the dose deviation to 25% after which the post-processing is successful in reducing the remaining inhomogeneities caused by the coil geometry to within 2.4%. The measurements are supported by computational modelling of the B1-field. Finally, temperature fluctuations of 1 °C frequently encountered in clinical MRI scanners result in dose deviations up to 15%. It is illustrated that with adequate temperature stabilization, the dose uncertainty is reduced to within 2.58%. Both authors contributed

  6. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  7. 3D conformal MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy: results of gel phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Djin, W. A.; Burtnyk, M.; McCormick, S.; Bronskill, M.; Chopra, R.

    2011-09-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy shows promise for minimally invasive treatment of localized prostate cancer. Previous in-vivo studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing conservative treatments using real-time temperature feedback to control accurately the establishment of coagulative lesions within circumscribed prostate regions. This in-vitro study tested device configuration and control options for achieving full prostate treatments. A multi-channel MRI compatible ultrasound therapy system was evaluated in gel phantoms using 3 canine prostate models. Prostate profiles were 5 mm-step-segmented from T2-weighted MR images performed during previous in-vivo experiments. During ultrasound exposures, each ultrasound element was controlled independently by the 3D controller. Decisions on acoustic power, frequency, and device rotation rate were made in real time based on MR thermometry feedback and prostate radii. Low and high power treatment approaches using maximum acoustic powers of 10 or 20 W.cm-2 were tested as well as single and dual-frequency strategies (4.05/13.10 MHz). The dual-frequency strategy used either the fundamental frequency or the 3rd harmonic component, depending on the prostate radius. The 20 W.cm-2 dual frequency approach was the most efficient configuration in achieving full prostate treatments. Treatment times were about half the duration of those performed with 10 W.cm-2 configurations. Full prostate coagulations were performed in 16.3±6.1 min at a rate of 1.8±0.2 cm3.min-1, and resulted in very little undertreated tissue (<3%). Surrounding organs positioned beyond a safety distance of 1.4±1.0 mm from prostate boundaries were not damaged, particularly rectal wall tissues. In this study, a 3D, MR-thermometry-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy was validated in vitro in a tissue-mimicking phantom for performing full prostate treatment. A dual-frequency configuration with 20 W.cm-2 ultrasound intensity exposure showed good

  8. 3D MRI of impaired hyperpolarized 129Xe uptake in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Zackary I; Virgincar, Rohan S; Qi, Yi; Robertson, Scott H; Degan, Simone; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2014-12-01

    A variety of pulmonary pathologies, in particular interstitial lung diseases, are characterized by thickening of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier, and this thickening results in reduced gas exchange. Such diffusive impairment is challenging to quantify spatially, because the distributions of the metabolically relevant gases (CO2 and O2) cannot be detected directly within the lungs. Hyperpolarized (HP) (129)Xe is a promising surrogate for these metabolic gases, because MR spectroscopy and imaging allow gaseous alveolar (129)Xe to be detected separately from (129)Xe dissolved in the red blood cells (RBCs) and the adjacent tissues, which comprise blood plasma and lung interstitium. Because (129)Xe reaches the RBCs by diffusing across the same barrier tissues (blood plasma and interstitium) as O2, barrier thickening will delay (129)Xe transit and, thus, reduce RBC-specific (129)Xe MR signal. Here we have exploited these properties to generate 3D, MR images of (129)Xe uptake by the RBCs in two groups of rats. In the experimental group, unilateral fibrotic injury was generated prior to imaging by instilling bleomycin into one lung. In the control group, a unilateral sham instillation of saline was performed. Uptake of (129)Xe by the RBCs, quantified as the fraction of RBC signal relative to total dissolved (129)Xe signal, was significantly reduced (P = 0.03) in the injured lungs of bleomycin-treated animals. In contrast, no significant difference (P = 0.56) was observed between the saline-treated and untreated lungs of control animals. Together, these results indicate that 3D MRI of HP (129)Xe dissolved in the pulmonary tissues can provide useful biomarkers of impaired diffusive gas exchange resulting from fibrotic thickening. PMID:24816478

  9. Automatic 3D segmentation of spinal cord MRI using propagated deformable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leener, B.; Cohen-Adad, J.; Kadoury, S.

    2014-03-01

    Spinal cord diseases or injuries can cause dysfunction of the sensory and locomotor systems. Segmentation of the spinal cord provides measures of atrophy and allows group analysis of multi-parametric MRI via inter-subject registration to a template. All these measures were shown to improve diagnostic and surgical intervention. We developed a framework to automatically segment the spinal cord on T2-weighted MR images, based on the propagation of a deformable model. The algorithm is divided into three parts: first, an initialization step detects the spinal cord position and orientation by using the elliptical Hough transform on multiple adjacent axial slices to produce an initial tubular mesh. Second, a low-resolution deformable model is iteratively propagated along the spinal cord. To deal with highly variable contrast levels between the spinal cord and the cerebrospinal fluid, the deformation is coupled with a contrast adaptation at each iteration. Third, a refinement process and a global deformation are applied on the low-resolution mesh to provide an accurate segmentation of the spinal cord. Our method was evaluated against a semi-automatic edge-based snake method implemented in ITK-SNAP (with heavy manual adjustment) by computing the 3D Dice coefficient, mean and maximum distance errors. Accuracy and robustness were assessed from 8 healthy subjects. Each subject had two volumes: one at the cervical and one at the thoracolumbar region. Results show a precision of 0.30 +/- 0.05 mm (mean absolute distance error) in the cervical region and 0.27 +/- 0.06 mm in the thoracolumbar region. The 3D Dice coefficient was of 0.93 for both regions.

  10. Construction of an MRI 3D high resolution sheep brain template.

    PubMed

    Ella, Arsène; Keller, Matthieu

    2015-12-01

    Sheep is a developing animal model used in the field of neurosciences for the study of many behavioral, physiological or pathophysiological mechanisms, including for example, the central control of social behavior, brain injury or neurodegenerative diseases. However, sheep remains an orphan species in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, a mean image (template), resulting of registrations of multiple subject images is needed and currently does not exist. In this study, we: i) computed multimodal high resolution 3D in-vivo sheep brain templates of T1 weighted (T1W) and T2W images, ii) computed gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior probability maps using linear and optimized non-linear registrations iii) used prior probability maps to perform the segmentation of a single brain tissues. Computed multimodal sheep brain templates showed to preserve and underline all brain patterns of a single T1W or T2W image, and prior probability maps allowed to improve the segmentation of brain tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that these templates and prior probability maps were able to be portable in other publicly available imaging software and could be used as standardized spaces for multi-institution neuroimaging studies or other neuroscience methods. PMID:26363468

  11. 3-D sonography for diagnosis of osteoarthrosis and disk degeneration of the temporomandibular joint, compared with MRI.

    PubMed

    Landes, Constantin A; Goral, Wojciech; Mack, Martin G; Sader, Robert

    2006-05-01

    This study determined the value of three-dimensional (3-D) sonography for the assessment of osteoarthrosis and disk degeneration of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Sixty-eight patients (136 TMJ) with clinical dysfunction were examined by 272 sonographic 3-D scans. An 8- to 12.5-MHz motor-angulated transducer positioned inferior-parallel to the zygomatic arch scanned the region-of-interest. 3-D condylar morphology was compared with subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifty-three datasets were complete, i.e., 106 TMJ, 212 examinations. 3-D sonographic examination took 5 min and attained 70% sensitivity/76% specificity/75% accuracy; positive predictive value was 44%%; negative predictive value was 90%. Disk degeneration was diagnosed synonymously with 64%/73%/71%/42%/ 87%. 3-D sonography proved to be reliable for exclusion of osteoarthrosis as disk degeneration compared with MRI, whereas the presence of osteoarthrosis and disk dislocation cannot be reliably diagnosed. Prospective use will include routine screening, using more sophisticated equipment with higher frequency in real-time 3-D viewing. PMID:16677921

  12. Computer-aided segmentation and 3D analysis of in vivo MRI examinations of the human vocal tract during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; Behrends, Johannes; Hoole, Phil; Leinsinger, Gerda L.; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2008-03-01

    We developed, tested, and evaluated a 3D segmentation and analysis system for in vivo MRI examinations of the human vocal tract during phonation. For this purpose, six professionally trained speakers, age 22-34y, were examined using a standardized MRI protocol (1.5 T, T1w FLASH, ST 4mm, 23 slices, acq. time 21s). The volunteers performed a prolonged (>=21s) emission of sounds of the German phonemic inventory. Simultaneous audio tape recording was obtained to control correct utterance. Scans were made in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes each. Computer-aided quantitative 3D evaluation included (i) automated registration of the phoneme-specific data acquired in different slice orientations, (ii) semi-automated segmentation of oropharyngeal structures, (iii) computation of a curvilinear vocal tract midline in 3D by nonlinear PCA, (iv) computation of cross-sectional areas of the vocal tract perpendicular to this midline. For the vowels /a/,/e/,/i/,/o/,/ø/,/u/,/y/, the extracted area functions were used to synthesize phoneme sounds based on an articulatory-acoustic model. For quantitative analysis, recorded and synthesized phonemes were compared, where area functions extracted from 2D midsagittal slices were used as a reference. All vowels could be identified correctly based on the synthesized phoneme sounds. The comparison between synthesized and recorded vowel phonemes revealed that the quality of phoneme sound synthesis was improved for phonemes /a/ and /y/, if 3D instead of 2D data were used, as measured by the average relative frequency shift between recorded and synthesized vowel formants (p<0.05, one-sided Wilcoxon rank sum test). In summary, the combination of fast MRI followed by subsequent 3D segmentation and analysis is a novel approach to examine human phonation in vivo. It unveils functional anatomical findings that may be essential for realistic modelling of the human vocal tract during speech production.

  13. MRI data driven partial volume effects correction in PET imaging using 3D local multi-resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pogam, Adrien; Lamare, Frederic; Hatt, Mathieu; Fernandez, Philippe; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2013-02-01

    PET partial volume effects (PVE) resulting from the limited resolution of PET scanners is still a quantitative issue that PET/MRI scanners do not solve by themselves. A recently proposed voxel-based locally adaptive 3D multi-resolution PVE correction based on the mutual analysis of wavelet decompositions was applied on 12 clinical 18F-FLT PET/T1 MRI images of glial tumors, and compared to a PET only voxel-wise iterative deconvolution approach. Quantitative and qualitative results demonstrated the interest of exploiting PET/MRI information with higher uptake increases (19±8% vs. 11±7%, p=0.02), as well as more convincing visual restoration of details within tumors with respect to deconvolution of the PET uptake only. Further studies are now required to demonstrate the accuracy of this restoration with histopathological validation of the uptake in tumors.

  14. SU-E-J-231: Comparison of 3D Angiogram and MRI in Delineating the AVM Target for Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Avkshtol, V; Tanny, S; Reddy, K; Chen, C; Parsai, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) provides an excellent alternative to embolization and surgical excision for the management of appropriately selected cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The currently accepted standard for delineating AVMs is planar digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DSA can be used to acquire a 3D data set that preserves osseous structures (3D-DA) at the time of the angiography for SRT planning. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative noninvasive method of visualizing the AVM nidus with comparable spatial resolution. We utilized 3D-DA and T1 post-contrast MRI data to evaluate the differences in SRT target volumes. Methods: Four patients underwent 3D-DA and high-resolution MRI. 3D T1 post-contrast images were obtained in all three reconstruction planes. A planning CT was fused with MRI and 3D-DA data sets. The AVMs were contoured utilizing one of the image sets at a time. Target volume, centroid, and maximum and minimum dimensions were analyzed for each patient. Results: Targets delineated using post-contrast MRI demonstrated a larger mean volume. AVMs >2 cc were found to have a larger difference between MRI and 3D-DA volumes. Larger AVMs also demonstrated a smaller relative uncertainty in contour centroid position (1 mm). AVM targets <2 cc had smaller absolute differences in volume, but larger differences in contour centroid position (2.5 mm). MRI targets demonstrated a more irregular shape compared to 3D-DA targets. Conclusions: Our preliminary data supports the use of MRI alone to delineate AVM targets >2 cc. The greater centroid stability for AVMs >2 cc ensures accurate target localization during image fusion. The larger MRI target volumes did not result in prohibitively greater volumes of normal brain tissue receiving the prescription dose. The larger centroid instability for AVMs <2 cc precludes the use of MRI alone for target delineation. We recommend incorporating a 3D-DA for these patients.

  15. 3D interactive tractography-informed resting-state fMRI connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chamberland, Maxime; Bernier, Michaël; Fortin, David; Whittingstall, Kevin; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the fusion between diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has opened the way for exploring structure-function relationships in vivo. As it stands, the common approach usually consists of analysing fMRI and dMRI datasets separately or using one to inform the other, such as using fMRI activation sites to reconstruct dMRI streamlines that interconnect them. Moreover, given the large inter-individual variability of the healthy human brain, it is possible that valuable information is lost when a fixed set of dMRI/fMRI analysis parameters such as threshold values are assumed constant across subjects. By allowing one to modify such parameters while viewing the results in real-time, one can begin to fully explore the sensitivity of structure-function relations and how they differ across brain areas and individuals. This is especially important when interpreting how structure-function relationships are altered in patients with neurological disorders, such as the presence of a tumor. In this study, we present and validate a novel approach to achieve this: First, we present an interactive method to generate and visualize tractography-driven resting-state functional connectivity, which reduces the bias introduced by seed size, shape and position. Next, we demonstrate that structural and functional reconstruction parameters explain a significant portion of intra- and inter-subject variability. Finally, we demonstrate how our proposed approach can be used in a neurosurgical planning context. We believe this approach will promote the exploration of structure-function relationships in a subject-specific aspect and will open new opportunities for connectomics. PMID:26321901

  16. Imaging of prostate cancer: a platform for 3D co-registration of in-vivo MRI ex-vivo MRI and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orczyk, Clément; Mikheev, Artem; Rosenkrantz, Andrew; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Rusinek, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: Multi-parametric MRI is emerging as a promising method for prostate cancer diagnosis. prognosis and treatment planning. However, the localization of in-vivo detected lesions and pathologic sites of cancer remains a significant challenge. To overcome this limitation we have developed and tested a system for co-registration of in-vivo MRI, ex-vivo MRI and histology. Materials and Methods: Three men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (ages 54-72, PSA levels 5.1-7.7 ng/ml) were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent 3T multi-parametric MRI that included T2W, DCEMRI, and DWI prior to robotic-assisted prostatectomy. Ex-vivo multi-parametric MRI was performed on fresh prostate specimen. Excised prostates were then sliced at regular intervals and photographed both before and after fixation. Slices were perpendicular to the main axis of the posterior capsule, i.e., along the direction of the rectal wall. Guided by the location of the urethra, 2D digital images were assembled into 3D models. Cancer foci, extra-capsular extensions and zonal margins were delineated by the pathologist and included in 3D histology data. A locally-developed software was applied to register in-vivo, ex-vivo and histology using an over-determined set of anatomical landmarks placed in anterior fibro-muscular stroma, central. transition and peripheral zones. The mean root square distance across corresponding control points was used to assess co-registration error. Results: Two specimens were pT3a and one pT2b (negative margin) at pathology. The software successfully fused invivo MRI. ex-vivo MRI fresh specimen and histology using appropriate (rigid and affine) transformation models with mean square error of 1.59 mm. Coregistration accuracy was confirmed by multi-modality viewing using operator-guided variable transparency. Conclusion: The method enables successful co-registration of pre-operative MRI, ex-vivo MRI and pathology and it provides initial evidence

  17. Automatic "pipeline" analysis of 3-D MRI data for clinical trials: application to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zijdenbos, Alex P; Forghani, Reza; Evans, Alan C

    2002-10-01

    The quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has become increasingly important in both research and clinical studies aiming at human brain development, function, and pathology. Inevitably, the role of quantitative image analysis in the evaluation of drug therapy will increase, driven in part by requirements imposed by regulatory agencies. However, the prohibitive length of time involved and the significant intraand inter-rater variability of the measurements obtained from manual analysis of large MRI databases represent major obstacles to the wider application of quantitative MRI analysis. We have developed a fully automatic "pipeline" image analysis framework and have successfully applied it to a number of large-scale, multicenter studies (more than 1,000 MRI scans). This pipeline system is based on robust image processing algorithms, executed in a parallel, distributed fashion. This paper describes the application of this system to the automatic quantification of multiple sclerosis lesion load in MRI, in the context of a phase III clinical trial. The pipeline results were evaluated through an extensive validation study, revealing that the obtained lesion measurements are statistically indistinguishable from those obtained by trained human observers. Given that intra- and inter-rater measurement variability is eliminated by automatic analysis, this system enhances the ability to detect small treatment effects not readily detectable through conventional analysis techniques. While useful for clinical trial analysis in multiple sclerosis, this system holds widespread potential for applications in other neurological disorders, as well as for the study of neurobiology in general. PMID:12585710

  18. FLAIR Project at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, C. P.; Grieser, M.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.

    2006-03-20

    The future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt will produce the highest flux of antiprotons in the world. Within the planned complex of storage rings, it will also be feasible to decelerate the antiprotons to about 30 MeV kinetic energy, opening up the unique possibility to create low energy antiprotons and thus, establish low-energy antiproton physics at GSI. In the Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) the antiprotons shall be slowed down by means of two cooler storage rings. In the second one, the Ultra-low energy electrostatic Storage Ring (USR), energies ranging from 300 keV to 20 keV will be available for various in-ring experiments as well as for efficient injection of antiprotons into traps. In the limit of such small beam energies, the realization of efficient electron cooling, employing electron energies of only a few eV is one of the new challenges. In this contribution, a review of the FLAIR facility is given and its deceleration and cooling scheme is elucidated in comparison to the present AD operation scheme. Special emphasis is placed on the problems related to electron cooling at ultra-low energies.

  19. 3D Quantification of Wall Shear Stress and Oscillatory Shear Index Using a Finite-Element Method in 3D CINE PC-MRI Data of the Thoracic Aorta.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio; Urbina, Jesus; Valverde, Israel; Tejos, Cristian; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Hurtado, Daniel E

    2016-06-01

    Several 2D methods have been proposed to estimate WSS and OSI from PC-MRI, neglecting the longitudinal velocity gradients that typically arise in cardiovascular flow, particularly on vessel geometries whose cross section and centerline orientation strongly vary in the axial direction. Thus, the contribution of longitudinal velocity gradients remains understudied. In this work, we propose a 3D finite-element method for the quantification of WSS and OSI from 3D-CINE PC-MRI that accounts for both in-plane and longitudinal velocity gradients. We demonstrate the convergence and robustness of the method on cylindrical geometries using a synthetic phantom based on the Poiseuille flow equation. We also show that, in the presence of noise, the method is both stable and accurate. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that the proposed 3D method results in more accurate WSS estimates than those obtained from a 2D analysis not considering out-of-plane velocity gradients. Further, we conclude that for irregular geometries the accurate prediction of WSS requires the consideration of longitudinal gradients in the velocity field. Additionally, we compute 3D maps of WSS and OSI for 3D-CINE PC-MRI data sets from an aortic phantom and sixteen healthy volunteers and two patients. The OSI values show a greater dispersion than WSS, which is strongly dependent on the PC-MRI resolution. We envision that the proposed 3D method will improve the estimation of WSS and OSI from 3D-CINE PC-MRI images, allowing for more accurate estimates in vessels with pathologies that induce high longitudinal velocity gradients, such as coarctations and aneurisms. PMID:26780787

  20. 3D+t brain MRI segmentation using robust 4D Hidden Markov Chain.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, François; Collet, Christophe; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    In recent years many automatic methods have been developed to help physicians diagnose brain disorders, but the problem remains complex. In this paper we propose a method to segment brain structures on two 3D multi-modal MR images taken at different times (longitudinal acquisition). A bias field correction is performed with an adaptation of the Hidden Markov Chain (HMC) allowing us to take into account the temporal correlation in addition to spatial neighbourhood information. To improve the robustness of the segmentation of the principal brain structures and to detect Multiple Sclerosis Lesions as outliers the Trimmed Likelihood Estimator (TLE) is used during the process. The method is validated on 3D+t brain MR images. PMID:25571045

  1. Rule-based fuzzy vector median filters for 3D phase contrast MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareswaran, Kartik S.; Frakes, David H.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2008-02-01

    Recent technological advances have contributed to the advent of phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) as standard practice in clinical environments. In particular, decreased scan times have made using the modality more feasible. PCMRI is now a common tool for flow quantification, and for more complex vector field analyses that target the early detection of problematic flow conditions. Segmentation is one component of this type of application that can impact the accuracy of the final product dramatically. Vascular segmentation, in general, is a long-standing problem that has received significant attention. Segmentation in the context of PCMRI data, however, has been explored less and can benefit from object-based image processing techniques that incorporate fluids specific information. Here we present a fuzzy rule-based adaptive vector median filtering (FAVMF) algorithm that in combination with active contour modeling facilitates high-quality PCMRI segmentation while mitigating the effects of noise. The FAVMF technique was tested on 111 synthetically generated PC MRI slices and on 15 patients with congenital heart disease. The results were compared to other multi-dimensional filters namely the adaptive vector median filter, the adaptive vector directional filter, and the scalar low pass filter commonly used in PC MRI applications. FAVMF significantly outperformed the standard filtering methods (p < 0.0001). Two conclusions can be drawn from these results: a) Filtering should be performed after vessel segmentation of PC MRI; b) Vector based filtering methods should be used instead of scalar techniques.

  2. Relevance of 3D magnetic resonance imaging sequences in diagnosing basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo Mezo, Roger; Lara García, Javier; Arroyo, Mariana; Fleury, Agnès

    2015-12-01

    Imagenological diagnosis of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis is usually difficult when classical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of 3D MRI sequences (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition (FIESTA) and Spoiled Gradient Recalled Echo (SPGR)) with respect to classical sequences (Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and T1) in visualizing Taenia solium cyst in these locations. Forty-seven T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space were diagnosed in eighteen Mexican patients. A pre-treatment MRI was performed on all patients, and all four sequences (FIESTA, FLAIR, T1 SPGR, and T2) were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists. The sensitivity of each sequence to detect the parasite membrane and scolex was evaluated, along with its capacity to detect differences in signal intensity between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cysts. FIESTA sequences allowed the visualization of cyst membrane in 87.2% of the parasites evaluated, FLAIR in 38.3%, SPGR in 23.4%, and T2 in 17.0%. The superiority of FIESTA sequences over the other three imaging methods was statistically significant (P<0.001). Scolices were detected by FIESTA twice as much as the other sequences did, although this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Differences in signal intensity between CSF and parasite cysts were significant in FIESTA (P<0.0001), SPGR (P<0.0001), and FLAIR (P=0.005) sequences. For the first time, the usefulness of 3D MRI sequences to diagnose T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space was demonstrated. The routine use of these sequences could favor an earlier diagnosis and greatly improve the prognosis of patients affected by this severe form of the disease. PMID:26327445

  3. 3D-Dixon MRI based volumetry of peri- and epicardial fat.

    PubMed

    Homsi, Rami; Meier-Schroers, Michael; Gieseke, Jürgen; Dabir, Darius; Luetkens, Julian A; Kuetting, Daniel L; Naehle, Claas P; Marx, Christian; Schild, Hans H; Thomas, Daniel K; Sprinkart, Alois M

    2016-02-01

    There is growing evidence that pericardial and epicardial fat volume (PFV, EFV) are associated with cardiovascular risk. We evaluated a novel method for accurate measurement of PFV and EFV using a 3D-Dixon based cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) approach. An electrocardiography triggered and respiratory navigator gated 3D-gradient echo pulse sequence was used for cardiac Dixon imaging. Based on this sequence, voxels predominantly containing fat were identified and added up for volumetry. After accuracy assessment in phantoms, consisting of muscle tissue and seven different fat samples (50-200 ml), the sequence was acquired in 34 healthy volunteers (22 male, BMI range 14-42 kg/m(2), age range 21-79 years) at 1.5 T. Analysis was performed independently by two readers who draw two 3D-regions of interest, one for EFV and one for PFV. Additionally, EFV and PFV were compared between overweighted and non-overweighted subjects. The phantom study showed an excellent agreement of measured and true fat volumes (maximum difference = 6 %, linear correlation coefficient R = 1.00). PFV over all volunteers was 158.0 ± 126.4 ml and EFV was 77.0 ± 55.3 ml. PFV and EFV were highly correlated (R = 0.96). Inter-reader agreement was good with a mean difference of 0.2 ± 5.6 and 4.5 ± 4.2 ml for PFV/EFV, (R > 0.99, each). EFV and PFV differed significantly between subjects with BMI > 25 kg/m(2) and BMI < 25 kg/m(2), n = 17 each (PFV 219.0 ± 151.8 vs. 96.9 ± 44.7 ml and EFV 102.3 ± 66.3 vs. 51.7 ± 23.6 ml, p < 0.001, each). The proposed 3D-Dixon based method allows accurate measurement of cardiac fat volumes. It provides a valuable tool for cardiovascular risk stratification by CMR. PMID:26424492

  4. 3D source localization of interictal spikes in epilepsy patients with MRI lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Worrell, Gregory A.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; He, Bin

    2006-08-01

    The present study aims to accurately localize epileptogenic regions which are responsible for epileptic activities in epilepsy patients by means of a new subspace source localization approach, i.e. first principle vectors (FINE), using scalp EEG recordings. Computer simulations were first performed to assess source localization accuracy of FINE in the clinical electrode set-up. The source localization results from FINE were compared with the results from a classic subspace source localization approach, i.e. MUSIC, and their differences were tested statistically using the paired t-test. Other factors influencing the source localization accuracy were assessed statistically by ANOVA. The interictal epileptiform spike data from three adult epilepsy patients with medically intractable partial epilepsy and well-defined symptomatic MRI lesions were then studied using both FINE and MUSIC. The comparison between the electrical sources estimated by the subspace source localization approaches and MRI lesions was made through the coregistration between the EEG recordings and MRI scans. The accuracy of estimations made by FINE and MUSIC was also evaluated and compared by R2 statistic, which was used to indicate the goodness-of-fit of the estimated sources to the scalp EEG recordings. The three-concentric-spheres head volume conductor model was built for each patient with three spheres of different radii which takes the individual head size and skull thickness into consideration. The results from computer simulations indicate that the improvement of source spatial resolvability and localization accuracy of FINE as compared with MUSIC is significant when simulated sources are closely spaced, deep, or signal-to-noise ratio is low in a clinical electrode set-up. The interictal electrical generators estimated by FINE and MUSIC are in concordance with the patients' structural abnormality, i.e. MRI lesions, in all three patients. The higher R2 values achieved by FINE than MUSIC

  5. Prospective motion correction of 3D echo-planar imaging data for functional MRI using optical tracking

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Nick; Josephs, Oliver; Callaghan, Martina F.; Lutti, Antoine; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of an optical camera based prospective motion correction (PMC) system in improving the quality of 3D echo-planar imaging functional MRI data. An optical camera and external marker were used to dynamically track the head movement of subjects during fMRI scanning. PMC was performed by using the motion information to dynamically update the sequence's RF excitation and gradient waveforms such that the field-of-view was realigned to match the subject's head movement. Task-free fMRI experiments on five healthy volunteers followed a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial design with the following factors: PMC on or off; 3.0 mm or 1.5 mm isotropic resolution; and no, slow, or fast head movements. Visual and motor fMRI experiments were additionally performed on one of the volunteers at 1.5 mm resolution comparing PMC on vs PMC off for no and slow head movements. Metrics were developed to quantify the amount of motion as it occurred relative to k-space data acquisition. The motion quantification metric collapsed the very rich camera tracking data into one scalar value for each image volume that was strongly predictive of motion-induced artifacts. The PMC system did not introduce extraneous artifacts for the no motion conditions and improved the time series temporal signal-to-noise by 30% to 40% for all combinations of low/high resolution and slow/fast head movement relative to the standard acquisition with no prospective correction. The numbers of activated voxels (p < 0.001, uncorrected) in both task-based experiments were comparable for the no motion cases and increased by 78% and 330%, respectively, for PMC on versus PMC off in the slow motion cases. The PMC system is a robust solution to decrease the motion sensitivity of multi-shot 3D EPI sequences and thereby overcome one of the main roadblocks to their widespread use in fMRI studies. PMID:25783205

  6. 3D MRI of non-Gaussian 3He gas diffusion in the rat lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Richard E.; Laicher, Gernot; Minard, Kevin R.

    2007-10-01

    In 3He magnetic resonance images of pulmonary air spaces, the confining architecture of the parenchymal tissue results in a non-Gaussian distribution of signal phase that non-exponentially attenuates image intensity as diffusion weighting is increased. Here, two approaches previously used for the analysis of non-Gaussian effects in the lung are compared and related using diffusion-weighted 3He MR images of mechanically ventilated rats. One approach is model-based and was presented by Yablonskiy et al., while the other approach utilizes the second order decay contribution that is predicted from the cumulant expansion theorem. Total lung coverage is achieved using a hybrid 3D pulse sequence that combines conventional phase encoding with sparse radial sampling for efficient gas usage. This enables the acquisition of nine 3D images using a total of only ˜1 L of hyperpolarized 3He gas. Diffusion weighting ranges from 0 s/cm 2 to 40 s/cm 2. Results show that the non-Gaussian effects of 3He gas diffusion in healthy rat lungs are directly attributed to the anisotropic geometry of lung microstructure as predicted by the Yablonskiy model, and that quantitative analysis over the entire lung can be reliably repeated in time-course studies of the same animal.

  7. Age- and race-dependence of the fibroglandular breast density analyzed on 3D MRI

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Ke; Su, Min-Ying; Chau, Man-Kwun; Chan, Siwa; Nguyen, Hoanglong; Tseng, Tiffany; Huang, Yuhong; McLaren, Christine E.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the age- and race-dependence of the breast fibroglandular tissue density based on three-dimensional breast MRI. Methods: The normal breasts of 321 consecutive patients including Caucasians, Asians, and Hispanics were studied. The subjects were separated into three age groups: Younger than 45, between 45 and 55, and older than 55. Computer algorithms based on body landmarks were used to segment the breast, and fuzzy c-means algorithm was used to segment the fibroglandular tissue. Linear regression analysis was applied to compare mean differences among different age groups and race∕ethnicity groups. The obtained parameters were not normally distributed, and the transformed data, natural log (ln) for the fibroglandular tissue volume, and the square root for the percent density were used for statistical analysis. Results: On the average, the transformed fibroglandular tissue volume and percent density decreased significantly with age. Racial differences in mean transformed percent density were found among women older than 45, but not among women younger than 45. Mean percent density was higher in Asians compared to Caucasians and Hispanics; the difference remained significant after adjustment for age, but not significant after adjusted for both age and breast volume. There was no significant difference in the density between the Caucasians and the Hispanics. Conclusions: The results analyzed using the MRI-based method show age- and race-dependence, which is consistent with literature using mammography-based methods. PMID:20632587

  8. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  9. Segmentation of Brain MRI Using SOM-FCM-Based Method and 3D Statistical Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Andrés; Palacio, Antonio A.; Górriz, Juan M.; Ramírez, Javier; Salas-González, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Current medical imaging systems provide excellent spatial resolution, high tissue contrast, and up to 65535 intensity levels. Thus, image processing techniques which aim to exploit the information contained in the images are necessary for using these images in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Image segmentation may be defined as the process of parcelling the image to delimit different neuroanatomical tissues present on the brain. In this paper we propose a segmentation technique using 3D statistical features extracted from the volume image. In addition, the presented method is based on unsupervised vector quantization and fuzzy clustering techniques and does not use any a priori information. The resulting fuzzy segmentation method addresses the problem of partial volume effect (PVE) and has been assessed using real brain images from the Internet Brain Image Repository (IBSR). PMID:23762192

  10. Sparse Bayesian framework applied to 3D super-resolution reconstruction in fetal brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Laura C.; Velasco Toledo, Nelson; Romero Castro, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Magnetic Resonance (FMR) is an imaging technique that is becoming increasingly important as allows assessing brain development and thus make an early diagnostic of congenital abnormalities, spatial resolution is limited by the short acquisition time and the unpredictable fetus movements, in consequence the resulting images are characterized by non-parallel projection planes composed by anisotropic voxels. The sparse Bayesian representation is a flexible strategy which is able to model complex relationships. The Super-resolution is approached as a regression problem, the main advantage is the capability to learn data relations from observations. Quantitative performance evaluation was carried out using synthetic images, the proposed method demonstrates a better reconstruction quality compared with standard interpolation approach. The presented method is a promising approach to improve the information quality related with the 3-D fetal brain structure. It is important because allows assessing brain development and thus make an early diagnostic of congenital abnormalities.

  11. Real-Time Estimation of 3-D Needle Shape and Deflection for MRI-Guided Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Lae; Elayaperumal, Santhi; Daniel, Bruce; Ryu, Seok Chang; Shin, Mihye; Savall, Joan; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a MRI-compatible biopsy needle instrumented with optical fiber Bragg gratings for measuring bending deflections of the needle as it is inserted into tissues. During procedures, such as diagnostic biopsies and localized treatments, it is useful to track any tool deviation from the planned trajectory to minimize positioning errors and procedural complications. The goal is to display tool deflections in real time, with greater bandwidth and accuracy than when viewing the tool in MR images. A standard 18 ga × 15 cm inner needle is prepared using a fixture, and 350-μm-deep grooves are created along its length. Optical fibers are embedded in the grooves. Two sets of sensors, located at different points along the needle, provide an estimate of the bent profile, as well as temperature compensation. Tests of the needle in a water bath showed that it produced no adverse imaging artifacts when used with the MR scanner. PMID:26405428

  12. A Novel Multiparametric Approach to 3D Quantitative MRI of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giuseppe; Tedeschi, Enrico; Borrelli, Pasquale; Cocozza, Sirio; Russo, Carmela; Liu, Saifeng; Ye, Yongquan; Comerci, Marco; Alfano, Bruno; Salvatore, Marco; Haacke, E. Mark; Mancini, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance properties of tissues can be quantified in several respects: relaxation processes, density of imaged nuclei, magnetism of environmental molecules, etc. In this paper, we propose a new comprehensive approach to obtain 3D high resolution quantitative maps of arbitrary body districts, mainly focusing on the brain. The theory presented makes it possible to map longitudinal (R1), pure transverse (R2) and free induction decay (R2*) rates, along with proton density (PD) and magnetic susceptibility (χ), from a set of fast acquisition sequences in steady-state that are highly insensitive to flow phenomena. A novel denoising scheme is described and applied to the acquired datasets to enhance the signal to noise ratio of the derived maps and an information theory approach compensates for biases from radio frequency (RF) inhomogeneities, if no direct measure of the RF field is available. Finally, the results obtained on sample brain scans of healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients are presented and discussed. PMID:26284778

  13. 3D morphology of the rear foot from MRI data: technical validation and clinical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stindel, Eric; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hirsch, Bruce E.; Odhner, Dewey; Couture, Christine

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the 3D morphology of the bones of the rear foot using MR data. This work has two subaims: (1) to study the variability of the various computed architectural measures as a result of the subjectivity and variations in the various processing operations; (2) to study the morphology of the bones included in the peritalar complex. Each image data set utilized in this study consists of 60 longitudinal slices of the foot acquired on a 1.5 T commercial GE MR system. Our description of the rear foot morphology is based mainly on the principal axes, which represent the inertia axes of the bones, as well as on the bone surfaces. We use the live-wire method for segmenting and forming the surfaces of the bones. In the first part of this work, we focus on the dependence of the principal axes system on segmentation and on scan orientation. In the second part, we describe the normal morphology of the rear foot considering the four bones (calcaneus, cuboid, navicular, talus) and compare them to a population from the Upper Pleistocene. We conclude that this non-invasive method can be used in live patients to characterize the bone morphology or as a comparative method to classify population of bones. in spite of the variations involved in the various processing operations.

  14. Multidimensional morphometric 3D MRI analyses for detecting brain abnormalities in children: impact of control population.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Marko; Rose, Douglas F; Holland, Scott K; Leach, James L

    2014-07-01

    Automated morphometric approaches are used to detect epileptogenic structural abnormalities in 3D MR images in adults, using the variance of a control population to obtain z-score maps in an individual patient. Due to the substantial changes the developing human brain undergoes, performing such analyses in children is challenging. This study investigated six features derived from high-resolution T1 datasets in four groups: normal children (1.5T or 3T data), normal clinical scans (3T data), and patients with structural brain lesions (3T data), with each n = 10. Normative control data were obtained from the NIH study on normal brain development (n = 401). We show that control group size substantially influences the captured variance, directly impacting the patient's z-scores. Interestingly, matching on gender does not seem to be beneficial, which was unexpected. Using data obtained at higher field scanners produces slightly different base rates of suprathreshold voxels, as does using clinically derived normal studies, suggesting a subtle but systematic effect of both factors. Two approaches for controlling suprathreshold voxels in a multidimensional approach (combining features and requiring a minimum cluster size) were shown to be substantial and effective in reducing this number. Finally, specific strengths and limitations of such an approach could be demonstrated in individual cases. PMID:25050423

  15. Automatic ROI selection in structural brain MRI using SOM 3D projection.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Andrés; Górriz, Juan M; Ramírez, Javier; Martinez-Murcia, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method for selecting Regions of Interest (ROI) in brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for diagnostic purposes, using statistical learning and vector quantization techniques. The proposed method models the distribution of GM and WM tissues grouping the voxels belonging to each tissue in ROIs associated to a specific neurological disorder. Tissue distribution of normal and abnormal images is modelled by a Self-Organizing map (SOM), generating a set of representative prototypes, and the receptive field (RF) of each SOM prototype defines a ROI. Moreover, the proposed method computes the relative importance of each ROI by means of its discriminative power. The devised method has been assessed using 818 images from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) which were previously segmented through Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). The proposed algorithm was used over these images to parcel ROIs associated to the Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Additionally, this method can be used to extract a reduced set of discriminative features for classification, since it compresses discriminative information contained in the brain. Voxels marked by ROIs which were computed using the proposed method, yield classification results up to 90% of accuracy for controls (CN) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and 84% of accuracy for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and AD patients. PMID:24728041

  16. Segmentation and quantitative evaluation of brain MRI data with a multiphase 3D implicit deformable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Elsa D.; Song, Ting; Mensh, Brett D.; Laine, Andrew

    2004-05-01

    Segmentation of three-dimensional anatomical brain images into tissue classes has applications in both clinical and research settings. This paper presents the implementation and quantitative evaluation of a four-phase three-dimensional active contour implemented with a level set framework for automated segmentation of brain MRIs. The segmentation algorithm performs an optimal partitioning of three-dimensional data based on homogeneity measures that naturally evolves to the extraction of different tissue types in the brain. Random seed initialization was used to speed up numerical computation and avoid the need for a priori information. This random initialization ensures robustness of the method to variation of user expertise, biased a priori information and errors in input information that could be influenced by variations in image quality. Experimentation on three MRI brain data sets showed that an optimal partitioning successfully labeled regions that accurately identified white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles. Quantitative evaluation of the segmentation was performed with comparison to manually labeled data and computed false positive and false negative assignments of voxels for the three organs. We report high accuracy for the two comparison cases. These results demonstrate the efficiency and flexibility of this segmentation framework to perform the challenging task of automatically extracting brain tissue volume contours.

  17. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in Posterior Circulation Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Holger; Böhme, Johannes; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Groden, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of blood brain barrier injury in posterior circulation infarction as demonstrated by the hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR). Methods From a MRI report database we identified patients with posterior circulation infarction who underwent MRI, including perfusion-weighted images (PWI), within 12 hours after onset and follow-up MRI within 24 hours and analyzed diffusion-weighted images (DWI), PWI, FLAIR, and MR angiography (MRA). On FLAIR images, the presence of HARM was noted by using pre-specified criteria (focal enhancement in the subarachnoid space and/or the ventricles). Results Overall 16 patients (median age of patients 68.5 (IQR 55.5–82.75) years) with posterior circulation infarction were included. Of these, 13 (81.3%) demonstrated PCA occlusion, and 3 (18.7%) patients BA occlusion on MRA. Initial DWI demonstrated ischemic lesions in the thalamus (68.8%), splenium (18.8%), hippocampus (75%), occipital lobe (81.3%), mesencephalon (18.8%), pons (18.8%), and cerebellum (50%). On follow-up MRA recanalization was noted in 10 (62.5%) patients. On follow-up FLAIR images, HARM was observed in 8 (50%) patients. In all of these, HARM was detected remote from the acute ischemic lesion. HARM was more frequently observed in patients with vessel recanalization (p = 0.04), minor infarction growth (p = 0.01), and smaller ischemic lesions on follow-up DWI (p = 0.05). Conclusions HARM is a frequent finding in posterior circulation infarction and associated with vessel recanalization, minor infarction growth as well as smaller infarction volumes in the course. Neuroradiologists should be cognizant of the fact that HARM may be present on short interval follow-up FLAIR images in patients with acute ischemic infarction who initially underwent MRI and received intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents. PMID:27326459

  18. Qualitative Evaluation of a High-Resolution 3D Multi-Sequence Intracranial Vessel Wall Protocol at 3 Tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjie; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Abrigo, Jill; Lee, Ka Lok; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Siero, Jeroen C. W.; Wong, Ka Sing; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Chen, Fiona Xiang Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracranial vessel wall imaging using MRI has great potential as a clinical method for assessing intracranial atherosclerosis. The purpose of the current study was to compare three 3T MRI vessel wall sequences with different contrast weightings (T1w, PD, T2w) and dedicated sagittal orientation perpendicular to the middle cerebral artery, to the reconstructed sagittal image from a transverse 3D T1w volumetric isotropically reconstructed turbo spin-echo acquisition (VIRTA), and provide a clinical recommendation. Materials and Methods The above-mentioned sequences were acquired in 10 consecutive Chinese ischemic stroke or TIA patients (age: 68 years, sex: 4 females) with angiographic-confirmed MCA stenosis at 3T. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Two raters qualitatively scored all images on overall image quality, presence of artifacts, and visibility of plaques. Data were compared using Repeated measures ANOVA and Sidak’s adjusted post hoc tests. Results All sequences except the T2w sequence were able to depict the walls of the large vessels of the Circle of Willis (p<0.05). T1w sagittal oblique VIRTA showed significantly more artifacts (p<0.01). Peripherally located plaques were sometimes missed on the sagittal sequences, but could be appreciated on the transverse T1w VIRTA. Conclusion With the 3T multi-sequence vessel wall protocol we were able to assess the intracranial plaque with two different image contrast weightings. The sequence of preference to include in a clinical protocol would be the transverse 3D T1w VIRTA based on absence of artifacts, larger coverage including the whole Circle of Willis, and excellent lesion depiction. PMID:27532106

  19. Automatic training and reliability estimation for 3D ASM applied to cardiac MRI segmentation.

    PubMed

    Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Sukno, Federico M; Butakoff, Constantine; Huguet, Marina; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2012-07-01

    Training active shape models requires collecting manual ground-truth meshes in a large image database. While shape information can be reused across multiple imaging modalities, intensity information needs to be imaging modality and protocol specific. In this context, this study has two main purposes: (1) to test the potential of using intensity models learned from MRI simulated datasets and (2) to test the potential of including a measure of reliability during the matching process to increase robustness. We used a population of 400 virtual subjects (XCAT phantom), and two clinical populations of 40 and 45 subjects. Virtual subjects were used to generate simulated datasets (MRISIM simulator). Intensity models were trained both on simulated and real datasets. The trained models were used to segment the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) from real datasets. Segmentations were also obtained with and without reliability information. Performance was evaluated with point-to-surface and volume errors. Simulated intensity models obtained average accuracy comparable to inter-observer variability for LV segmentation. The inclusion of reliability information reduced volume errors in hypertrophic patients (EF errors from 17 ± 57% to 10 ± 18%; LV MASS errors from -27 ± 22 g to -14 ± 25 g), and in heart failure patients (EF errors from -8 ± 42% to -5 ± 14%). The RV model of the simulated images needs further improvement to better resemble image intensities around the myocardial edges. Both for real and simulated models, reliability information increased segmentation robustness without penalizing accuracy. PMID:22683992

  20. Automatic training and reliability estimation for 3D ASM applied to cardiac MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Sukno, Federico M.; Butakoff, Constantine; Huguet, Marina; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2012-07-01

    Training active shape models requires collecting manual ground-truth meshes in a large image database. While shape information can be reused across multiple imaging modalities, intensity information needs to be imaging modality and protocol specific. In this context, this study has two main purposes: (1) to test the potential of using intensity models learned from MRI simulated datasets and (2) to test the potential of including a measure of reliability during the matching process to increase robustness. We used a population of 400 virtual subjects (XCAT phantom), and two clinical populations of 40 and 45 subjects. Virtual subjects were used to generate simulated datasets (MRISIM simulator). Intensity models were trained both on simulated and real datasets. The trained models were used to segment the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) from real datasets. Segmentations were also obtained with and without reliability information. Performance was evaluated with point-to-surface and volume errors. Simulated intensity models obtained average accuracy comparable to inter-observer variability for LV segmentation. The inclusion of reliability information reduced volume errors in hypertrophic patients (EF errors from 17 ± 57% to 10 ± 18% LV MASS errors from -27 ± 22 g to -14 ± 25 g), and in heart failure patients (EF errors from -8 ± 42% to -5 ± 14%). The RV model of the simulated images needs further improvement to better resemble image intensities around the myocardial edges. Both for real and simulated models, reliability information increased segmentation robustness without penalizing accuracy.

  1. Construction of Neuroanatomical Shape Complex Atlas from 3D Brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Rangarajan, Anand; Eisenschenk, Stephan J.; Vemuri, Baba C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique for constructing a neuroanatomical shape complex atlas using an information geometry framework. A shape complex is a collection of shapes in a local neighborhood. We represent the boundary of the entire shape complex using the zero level set of a distance function S(x). The spatial relations between the different anatomical structures constituting the shape complex are captured via the distance transform. We then leverage the well known relationship between the stationary state wave function ψ(x) of the Schrödinger equation −ħ2∇2ψ + ψ = 0 and the eikonal equation ‖∇S‖ = 1 satisfied by any distance function S(x). This leads to a one-to-one map between ψ(x) and S(x) and allows for recovery of S(x) from ψ(x) through an explicit mathematical relationship. Since the wave function can be regarded as a square-root density function, we are able to exploit this connection and convert shape complex distance transforms into probability density functions. Furthermore, square-root density functions can be seen as points on a unit hypersphere whose Riemannian structure is fully known. A shape complex atlas is constructed by first computing the Karcher mean ψ̄(x) of the wave functions, followed by an inverse mapping of the estimated mean back to the space of distance transforms in order to realize the atlas. We demonstrate the shape complex atlas computation via a set of experiments on a population of brain MRI scans. We also present modes of variation from the computed atlas for the control population to demonstrate the shape complex variability. PMID:20879384

  2. Construction of a neuroanatomical shape complex atlas from 3D MRI brain structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Rangarajan, Anand; Eisenschenk, Stephan J; Vemuri, Baba C

    2012-04-15

    Brain atlas construction has attracted significant attention lately in the neuroimaging community due to its application to the characterization of neuroanatomical shape abnormalities associated with various neurodegenerative diseases or neuropsychiatric disorders. Existing shape atlas construction techniques usually focus on the analysis of a single anatomical structure in which the important inter-structural information is lost. This paper proposes a novel technique for constructing a neuroanatomical shape complex atlas based on an information geometry framework. A shape complex is a collection of neighboring shapes - for example, the thalamus, amygdala and the hippocampus circuit - which may exhibit changes in shape across multiple structures during the progression of a disease. In this paper, we represent the boundaries of the entire shape complex using the zero level set of a distance transform function S(x). We then re-derive the relationship between the stationary state wave function ψ(x) of the Schrödinger equation [formula in text] and the eikonal equation [formula in text] satisfied by any distance function. This leads to a one-to-one map (up to scale) between ψ(x) and S(x) via an explicit relationship. We further exploit this relationship by mapping ψ(x) to a unit hypersphere whose Riemannian structure is fully known, thus effectively turn ψ(x) into the square-root of a probability density function. This allows us to make comparisons - using elegant, closed-form analytic expressions - between shape complexes represented as square-root densities. A shape complex atlas is constructed by computing the Karcher mean ψ¯(x) in the space of square-root densities and then inversely mapping it back to the space of distance transforms in order to realize the atlas shape. We demonstrate the shape complex atlas computation technique via a set of experiments on a population of brain MRI scans including controls and epilepsy patients with either right anterior

  3. Construction of neuroanatomical shape complex atlas from 3D brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Rangarajan, Anand; Eisenschenk, Stephan J; Vemuri, Baba C

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique for constructing a neuroanatomical shape complex atlas using an information geometry framework. A shape complex is a collection of shapes in a local neighborhood. We represent the boundary of the entire shape complex using the zero level set of a distance function S(x). The spatial relations between the different anatomical structures constituting the shape complex are captured via the distance transform. We then leverage the well known relationship between the stationary state wave function psi(x) of the Schrödinger equation -h2nabla2 psi + psi = 0 and the eikonal equation //nablaS// = 1 satisfied by any distance function S(x). This leads to a one-to-one map between psi(x) and S(x) and allows for recovery of S(x) from psi(x) through an explicit mathematical relationship. Since the wave function can be regarded as a square-root density function, we are able to exploit this connection and convert shape complex distance transforms into probability density functions. Furthermore, square-root density functions can be seen as points on a unit hypersphere whose Riemannian structure is fully known. A shape complex atlas is constructed by first computing the Karcher mean psi(x) of the wave functions, followed by an inverse mapping of the estimated mean back to the space of distance transforms in order to realize the atlas. We demonstrate the shape complex atlas computation via a set of experiments on a population of brain MRI scans. We also present modes of variation from the computed atlas for the control population to demonstrate the shape complex variability. PMID:20879384

  4. A discriminative model-constrained EM approach to 3D MRI brain tissue classification and intensity non-uniformity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wels, Michael; Zheng, Yefeng; Huber, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-06-01

    We describe a fully automated method for tissue classification, which is the segmentation into cerebral gray matter (GM), cerebral white matter (WM), and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and intensity non-uniformity (INU) correction in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes. It combines supervised MRI modality-specific discriminative modeling and unsupervised statistical expectation maximization (EM) segmentation into an integrated Bayesian framework. While both the parametric observation models and the non-parametrically modeled INUs are estimated via EM during segmentation itself, a Markov random field (MRF) prior model regularizes segmentation and parameter estimation. Firstly, the regularization takes into account knowledge about spatial and appearance-related homogeneity of segments in terms of pairwise clique potentials of adjacent voxels. Secondly and more importantly, patient-specific knowledge about the global spatial distribution of brain tissue is incorporated into the segmentation process via unary clique potentials. They are based on a strong discriminative model provided by a probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) for classifying image voxels. It relies on the surrounding context and alignment-based features derived from a probabilistic anatomical atlas. The context considered is encoded by 3D Haar-like features of reduced INU sensitivity. Alignment is carried out fully automatically by means of an affine registration algorithm minimizing cross-correlation. Both types of features do not immediately use the observed intensities provided by the MRI modality but instead rely on specifically transformed features, which are less sensitive to MRI artifacts. Detailed quantitative evaluations on standard phantom scans and standard real-world data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. They also demonstrate relative superiority in comparison to other state-of-the-art approaches to this kind of computational task: our method achieves average

  5. 3D documentation and visualization of external injury findings by integration of simple photography in CT/MRI data sets (IprojeCT).

    PubMed

    Campana, Lorenzo; Breitbeck, Robert; Bauer-Kreuz, Regula; Buck, Ursula

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of documenting patterned injury using three dimensions and true colour photography without complex 3D surface documentation methods. This method is based on a generated 3D surface model using radiologic slice images (CT) while the colour information is derived from photographs taken with commercially available cameras. The external patterned injuries were documented in 16 cases using digital photography as well as highly precise photogrammetry-supported 3D structured light scanning. The internal findings of these deceased were recorded using CT and MRI. For registration of the internal with the external data, two different types of radiographic markers were used and compared. The 3D surface model generated from CT slice images was linked with the photographs, and thereby digital true-colour 3D models of the patterned injuries could be created (Image projection onto CT/IprojeCT). In addition, these external models were merged with the models of the somatic interior. We demonstrated that 3D documentation and visualization of external injury findings by integration of digital photography in CT/MRI data sets is suitable for the 3D documentation of individual patterned injuries to a body. Nevertheless, this documentation method is not a substitution for photogrammetry and surface scanning, especially when the entire bodily surface is to be recorded in three dimensions including all external findings, and when precise data is required for comparing highly detailed injury features with the injury-inflicting tool. PMID:26496803

  6. Continuous table acquisition MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning: Distortion assessment with a new extended 3D volumetric phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Amy Metcalfe, Peter; Liney, Gary; Holloway, Lois; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Accurate geometry is required for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). When considering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RTP, geometric distortions observed in the acquired images should be considered. While scanner technology and vendor supplied correction algorithms provide some correction, large distortions are still present in images, even when considering considerably smaller scan lengths than those typically acquired with CT in conventional RTP. This study investigates MRI acquisition with a moving table compared with static scans for potential geometric benefits for RTP. Methods: A full field of view (FOV) phantom (diameter 500 mm; length 513 mm) was developed for measuring geometric distortions in MR images over volumes pertinent to RTP. The phantom consisted of layers of refined plastic within which vitamin E capsules were inserted. The phantom was scanned on CT to provide the geometric gold standard and on MRI, with differences in capsule location determining the distortion. MRI images were acquired with two techniques. For the first method, standard static table acquisitions were considered. Both 2D and 3D acquisition techniques were investigated. With the second technique, images were acquired with a moving table. The same sequence was acquired with a static table and then with table speeds of 1.1 mm/s and 2 mm/s. All of the MR images acquired were registered to the CT dataset using a deformable B-spline registration with the resulting deformation fields providing the distortion information for each acquisition. Results: MR images acquired with the moving table enabled imaging of the whole phantom length while images acquired with a static table were only able to image 50%–70% of the phantom length of 513 mm. Maximum distortion values were reduced across a larger volume when imaging with a moving table. Increased table speed resulted in a larger contribution of distortion from gradient nonlinearities in the through

  7. Geometrically undistorted MRI in the presence of field inhomogeneities using compressed sensing accelerated broadband 3D phase encoded turbo spin-echo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gorp, Jetse S.; Bakker, Chris J. G.; Bouwman, Job G.; Smink, Jouke; Zijlstra, Frank; Seevinck, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential of compressed sensing (CS) accelerated broadband 3D phase-encoded turbo spin-echo (3D-PE-TSE) for the purpose of geometrically undistorted imaging in the presence of field inhomogeneities. To achieve this goal 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE sequences with broadband rf pulses and dedicated undersampling patterns were implemented on a clinical scanner. Additionally, a 3D multi-spectral spin-echo (ms3D-SE) sequence was implemented for reference purposes. First, we demonstrated the influence of susceptibility induced off-resonance effects on the spatial encoding of broadband 3D-SE, ms3D-SE, 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE using a grid phantom containing a titanium implant (Δχ = 182 ppm) with x-ray CT as a gold standard. These experiments showed that the spatial encoding of 3D-PE-(T)SE was unaffected by susceptibility induced off-resonance effects, which caused geometrical distortions and/or signal hyper-intensities in broadband 3D-SE and, to a lesser extent, in ms3D-SE frequency encoded methods. Additionally, an SNR analysis was performed and the temporally resolved signal of 3D-PE-(T)SE sequences was exploited to retrospectively decrease the acquisition bandwidth and obtain field offset maps. The feasibility of CS acceleration was studied retrospectively and prospectively for the 3D-PE-SE sequence using an existing CS algorithm adapted for the reconstruction of 3D data with undersampling in all three phase encoded dimensions. CS was combined with turbo-acceleration by variable density undersampling and spherical stepwise T2 weighting by randomly sorting consecutive echoes in predefined spherical k-space layers. The CS-TSE combination resulted in an overall acceleration factor of 60, decreasing the original 3D-PE-SE scan time from 7 h to 7 min. Finally, CS accelerated 3D-PE-TSE in vivo images of a titanium screw were obtained within 10 min using a micro-coil demonstrating the feasibility of geometrically undistorted MRI near severe

  8. Geometrically undistorted MRI in the presence of field inhomogeneities using compressed sensing accelerated broadband 3D phase encoded turbo spin-echo imaging.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Bakker, Chris J G; Bouwman, Job G; Smink, Jouke; Zijlstra, Frank; Seevinck, Peter R

    2015-01-21

    In this study, we explore the potential of compressed sensing (CS) accelerated broadband 3D phase-encoded turbo spin-echo (3D-PE-TSE) for the purpose of geometrically undistorted imaging in the presence of field inhomogeneities. To achieve this goal 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE sequences with broadband rf pulses and dedicated undersampling patterns were implemented on a clinical scanner. Additionally, a 3D multi-spectral spin-echo (ms3D-SE) sequence was implemented for reference purposes. First, we demonstrated the influence of susceptibility induced off-resonance effects on the spatial encoding of broadband 3D-SE, ms3D-SE, 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE using a grid phantom containing a titanium implant (Δχ = 182 ppm) with x-ray CT as a gold standard. These experiments showed that the spatial encoding of 3D-PE-(T)SE was unaffected by susceptibility induced off-resonance effects, which caused geometrical distortions and/or signal hyper-intensities in broadband 3D-SE and, to a lesser extent, in ms3D-SE frequency encoded methods. Additionally, an SNR analysis was performed and the temporally resolved signal of 3D-PE-(T)SE sequences was exploited to retrospectively decrease the acquisition bandwidth and obtain field offset maps. The feasibility of CS acceleration was studied retrospectively and prospectively for the 3D-PE-SE sequence using an existing CS algorithm adapted for the reconstruction of 3D data with undersampling in all three phase encoded dimensions. CS was combined with turbo-acceleration by variable density undersampling and spherical stepwise T2 weighting by randomly sorting consecutive echoes in predefined spherical k-space layers. The CS-TSE combination resulted in an overall acceleration factor of 60, decreasing the original 3D-PE-SE scan time from 7 h to 7 min. Finally, CS accelerated 3D-PE-TSE in vivo images of a titanium screw were obtained within 10 min using a micro-coil demonstrating the feasibility of geometrically undistorted MRI near severe

  9. Velocity Measurement in Carotid Artery: Quantitative Comparison of Time-Resolved 3D Phase-Contrast MRI and Image-based Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Nasiraei Moghaddam, Abbas; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza; Firouznia, Kavous; Shakiba, Madjid; Ghanaati, Hossein; Wilkinson, Iain David; Frangi, Alejandro Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background: Understanding hemodynamic environment in vessels is important for realizing the mechanisms leading to vascular pathologies. Objectives: Three-dimensional velocity vector field in carotid bifurcation is visualized using TR 3D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (TR 3D PC MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This study aimed to present a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the velocity vector field obtained by each technique. Subjects and Methods: MR imaging was performed on a 30-year old male normal subject. TR 3D PC MRI was performed on a 3 T scanner to measure velocity in carotid bifurcation. 3D anatomical model for CFD was created using images obtained from time-of-flight MR angiography. Velocity vector field in carotid bifurcation was predicted using CFD and PC MRI techniques. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the agreement between the two methods. Results: Although the main flow patterns were the same for the both techniques, CFD showed a greater resolution in mapping the secondary and circulating flows. Overall root mean square (RMS) errors for all the corresponding data points in PC MRI and CFD were 14.27% in peak systole and 12.91% in end diastole relative to maximum velocity measured at each cardiac phase. Bland-Altman plots showed a very good agreement between the two techniques. However, this study was not aimed to validate any of methods, instead, the consistency was assessed to accentuate the similarities and differences between Time-resolved PC MRI and CFD. Conclusion: Both techniques provided quantitatively consistent results of in vivo velocity vector fields in right internal carotid artery (RCA). PC MRI represented a good estimation of main flow patterns inside the vasculature, which seems to be acceptable for clinical use. However, limitations of each technique should be considered while interpreting results. PMID:26793288

  10. CT and MRI Assessment and Characterization Using Segmentation and 3D Modeling Techniques: Applications to Muscle, Bone and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Helgason, Thordur; Ramon, Ceon; jr, Halldór Jónsson; Carraro, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the novel use of CT and MRI data and image processing tools to segment and reconstruct tissue images in 3D to determine characteristics of muscle, bone and brain. This to study and simulate the structural changes occurring in healthy and pathological conditions as well as in response to clinical treatments. Here we report the application of this methodology to evaluate and quantify: 1. progression of atrophy in human muscle subsequent to permanent lower motor neuron (LMN) denervation, 2. muscle recovery as induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES), 3. bone quality in patients undergoing total hip replacement and 4. to model the electrical activity of the brain. Study 1: CT data and segmentation techniques were used to quantify changes in muscle density and composition by associating the Hounsfield unit values of muscle, adipose and fibrous connective tissue with different colors. This method was employed to monitor patients who have permanent muscle LMN denervation in the lower extremities under two different conditions: permanent LMN denervated not electrically stimulated and stimulated. Study 2: CT data and segmentation techniques were employed, however, in this work we assessed bone and muscle conditions in the pre-operative CT scans of patients scheduled to undergo total hip replacement. In this work, the overall anatomical structure, the bone mineral density (BMD) and compactness of quadriceps muscles and proximal femoral was computed to provide a more complete view for surgeons when deciding which implant technology to use. Further, a Finite element analysis provided a map of the strains around the proximal femur socket when solicited by typical stresses caused by an implant press fitting. Study 3 describes a method to model the electrical behavior of human brain using segmented MR images. The aim of the work is to use these models to predict the electrical activity of the human brain under normal and pathological conditions by

  11. A non-invasive, 3D, dynamic MRI method for measuring muscle moment arms in vivo: demonstration in the human ankle joint and Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Clarke, E C; Martin, J H; d'Entremont, A G; Pandy, M G; Wilson, D R; Herbert, R D

    2015-01-01

    Muscle moment arms are used widely in biomechanical analyses. Often they are measured in 2D or at a series of static joint positions. In the present study we demonstrate a simple MRI method for measuring muscle moment arms dynamically in 3D from a single range-of-motion cycle. We demonstrate this method in the Achilles tendon for comparison with other methods, and validate the method using a custom apparatus. The method involves registration of high-resolution joint geometry from MRI scans of the stationary joint with low-resolution geometries from ultrafast MRI scans of the slowly moving joint. Tibio-talar helical axes and 3D Achilles tendon moment arms were calculated throughout passive rotation for 10 adult subjects, and compared with recently published data. A simple validation was conducted by comparing MRI measurements with direct physical measurements made on a phantom. The moment arms measured using our method and those of others were similar and there was good agreement between physical measurements (mean 41.0mm) and MRI measurements (mean 39.5mm) made on the phantom. This new method can accurately measure muscle moment arms from a single range-of-motion cycle without the need to control rotation rate or gate the scanning. Supplementary data includes custom software to assist implementation. PMID:25466777

  12. Application of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI-based 3D reconstruction of the dural tail sign in meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    You, Binsheng; Cheng, Yanhao; Zhang, Jian; Song, Qimin; Dai, Chao; Heng, Xueyuan; Fei, Chang

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT The goal of this study was to investigate the significance of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) MRI-based 3D reconstruction of dural tail sign (DTS) in meningioma resection. METHODS Between May 2013 and August 2014, 18 cases of convexity and parasagittal meningiomas showing DTS on contrast-enhanced T1W MRI were selected. Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction of DTS was conducted before surgical treatment. The vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR images and 3D reconstruction images were measured and compared. Surgical incisions were designed by referring to the 3D reconstruction and MR images, and then the efficiency of the 2 methods was evaluated with assistance of neuronavigation. RESULTS Three-dimensional reconstruction of DTS can reveal its overall picture. In most cases, the DTS around the tumor is uneven, whereas the DTS around the dural vessels presents longer extensions. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS measured on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR and 3D reconstruction images. The 3D images of DTS were more intuitive, and the overall picture of DTS could be revealed in 1 image, which made it easier to design the incision than by using the MR images. Meanwhile, assessment showed that the incisions designed using 3D images were more accurate than those designed using MR images (ridit analysis by SAS, F = 7.95; p = 0.008). Pathological examination showed that 34 dural specimens (except 2 specimens from 1 tumor) displayed tumor invasion. The distance of tumor cell invasion was 1.0-21.6 mm (5.4 ± 4.41 mm [mean ± SD]). Tumor cell invasion was not observed at the dural resection margin in all 36 specimens. CONCLUSIONS Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction can intuitively and accurately reveal the size and shape of DTS, and thus provides guidance for designing meningioma incisions. PMID:26654184

  13. The Holy Grail in diagnostic neuroradiology: 3T or 3D?

    PubMed Central

    Pouwels, Petra J. W.; Wattjes, Mike P.

    2010-01-01

    Many technical developments keep occurring in the field of MRI that could benefit image acquisition in the field of diagnostic neuroradiology. While there is much focus on the potential advantages of 3T and higher field strengths, it is often unclear whether these are cosmetic only, or convey clinically relevant diagnostic value. The increased signal-to-noise at 3T is certainly beneficial in different ways particularly for the acquisition of isotropic 3D sequences like FLAIR. Single-slab 3D sequences can now be obtained with multiple contrasts in clinically attainable data acquisition times and could revolutionize MRI to evolve into a fundamentally multi-planar technique, rather similar to what has happened with the introduction of multi-detector row CT. PMID:21181406

  14. Use of the functional imaging modalities, f MRI r CBV and PET FDG, alters radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning in patients with malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzek, M.; Pardo, F.S.; Busierre, M.

    1995-12-31

    Malignant gliomas present one of the most difficult challenges to definitive radiation therapy, not only with respect to local control, but also with respect to clinical functional status. While tumor target volume definitions for malignant gliomas are often based on CT and conventional MRI, the functional imaging modalities, echo planar rCBV (regional cerebral blood volume mapping) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, are more sensitive modalities for the detection of neovascularization, perhaps one of the earliest signs of glial tumor initiation and progression. In order to address the clinical utility of functional imaging in radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning, we compared tumor target volume definitions and overall dosimetry in patients either undergoing co-registration of conventional Gadolinium-enhanced MRI, or co-registration of functional imaging modalities, prior to radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning.

  15. Early survival prediction after intra-arterial therapies: a 3D quantitative MRI assessment of tumour response after TACE or radioembolization of colorectal cancer metastases to the liver

    PubMed Central

    Chapiro, Julius; Duran, Rafael; Lin, MingDe; Schernthaner, Rüdiger; Lesage, David; Wang, Zhijun; Savic, Lynn Jeanette; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the predictive role of 1D, 2D and 3D quantitative, enhancement-based MRI regarding overall survival (OS) in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM) following intra-arterial therapies (IAT). Methods This retrospective analysis included 29 patients who underwent transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or radioembolization and received MRI within 6 weeks after therapy. Tumour response was assessed using 1D and 2D criteria (such as European Association for the Study of the Liver guidelines [EASL] and modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [mRECIST]). In addition, a segmentation-based 3D quantification of overall (volumetric [v] RECIST) and enhancing lesion volume (quantitative [q] EASL) was performed on portal venous phase MRI. Accordingly, patients were classified as responders (R) and non-responders (NR). Survival was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier analysis and compared using Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR). Results Only enhancement-based criteria identified patients as responders. EASL and mRECIST did not predict patient survival (P = 0.27 and P = 0.44, respectively). Using uni- and multivariate analysis, qEASL was identified as the sole predictor of patient survival (9.9 months for R, 6.9 months for NR; P = 0.038; HR 0.4). Conclusion The ability of qEASL to predict survival early after IAT provides evidence for potential advantages of 3D quantitative tumour analysis. PMID:25636420

  16. Effects of incremental beta-blocker dosing on myocardial mechanics of the human left ventricle: MRI 3D-tagging insight into pharmacodynamics supports theory of inner antagonism.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Boris; Li, Tieyan; Kutty, Shelby; Khasheei, Alireza; Schmitt, Katharina R L; Anderson, Robert H; Lunkenheimer, Paul P; Berger, Felix; Kühne, Titus; Peters, Björn

    2015-07-01

    Beta-blockers contribute to treatment of heart failure. Their mechanism of action, however, is incompletely understood. Gradients in beta-blocker sensitivity of helically aligned cardiomyocytes compared with counteracting transversely intruding cardiomyocytes seem crucial. We hypothesize that selective blockade of transversely intruding cardiomyocytes by low-dose beta-blockade unloads ventricular performance. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3D tagging delivers parameters of myocardial performance. We studied 13 healthy volunteers by MRI 3D tagging during escalated intravenous administration of esmolol. The circumferential, longitudinal, and radial myocardial shortening was determined for each dose. The curves were analyzed for peak value, time-to-peak, upslope, and area-under-the-curve. At low doses, from 5 to 25 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1), peak contraction increased while time-to-peak decreased yielding a steeper upslope. Combining the values revealed a left shift of the curves at low doses compared with baseline without esmolol. At doses of 50 to 150 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1), a right shift with flattening occurred. In healthy volunteers we found more pronounced myocardial shortening at low compared with clinical dosage of beta-blockers. In patients with ventricular hypertrophy and higher prevalence of transversely intruding cardiomyocytes selective low-dose beta-blockade could be even more effective. MRI 3D tagging could help to determine optimal individual beta-blocker dosing avoiding undesirable side effects. PMID:25888512

  17. Compatibility of glass-guided recording microelectrodes in the brain stem of squirrel monkeys with high-resolution 3D MRI.

    PubMed

    Tammer, R; Ehrenreich, L; Boretius, S; Watanabe, T; Frahm, J; Michaelis, T

    2006-06-15

    Knowledge of the precise position of recording microelectrodes within the brain of a non-human primate is essential for a reliable exploration of very small anatomic structures. This work demonstrates the compatibility of a newly developed glass-guided microelectrode design and microfeed equipment with high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). T1- and T2-weighted images allow for the non-invasive visualization of chronically implanted microelectrodes within the brain stem of squirrel monkeys in vivo. Neural extracellular multi-unit recordings proved the functionality of the microelectrode before and after the use of 3D MRI suggesting the preservation of normal brain tissue at the tip of the electrode. Because histology confirmed the absence of lesions attributable to MRI, the approach offers an interactive monitoring during the course of neuroethological experiments. Consequently, MRI may become an in vivo alternative to common histological post mortem verifications of electrode tracks and hence may avoid the early sacrificing of primates after only a small number of experiments. PMID:16343640

  18. More IMPATIENT: A Gridding-Accelerated Toeplitz-based Strategy for Non-Cartesian High-Resolution 3D MRI on GPUs

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Jiading; Obeid, Nady; Holtrop, Joseph L.; Wu, Xiao-Long; Lam, Fan; Fu, Maojing; Haldar, Justin P.; Hwu, Wen-mei W.; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2013-01-01

    Several recent methods have been proposed to obtain significant speed-ups in MRI image reconstruction by leveraging the computational power of GPUs. Previously, we implemented a GPU-based image reconstruction technique called the Illinois Massively Parallel Acquisition Toolkit for Image reconstruction with ENhanced Throughput in MRI (IMPATIENT MRI) for reconstructing data collected along arbitrary 3D trajectories. In this paper, we improve IMPATIENT by removing computational bottlenecks by using a gridding approach to accelerate the computation of various data structures needed by the previous routine. Further, we enhance the routine with capabilities for off-resonance correction and multi-sensor parallel imaging reconstruction. Through implementation of optimized gridding into our iterative reconstruction scheme, speed-ups of more than a factor of 200 are provided in the improved GPU implementation compared to the previous accelerated GPU code. PMID:23682203

  19. Effect of Task-Correlated Physiological Fluctuations and Motion in 2D and 3D Echo-Planar Imaging in a Higher Cognitive Level fMRI Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Ladstein, Jarle; Evensmoen, Hallvard R.; Håberg, Asta K.; Kristoffersen, Anders; Goa, Pål E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare 2D and 3D echo-planar imaging (EPI) in a higher cognitive level fMRI paradigm. In particular, to study the link between the presence of task-correlated physiological fluctuations and motion and the fMRI contrast estimates from either 2D EPI or 3D EPI datasets, with and without adding nuisance regressors to the model. A signal model in the presence of partly task-correlated fluctuations is derived, and predictions for contrast estimates with and without nuisance regressors are made. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one healthy volunteers were scanned using 2D EPI and 3D EPI during a virtual environmental learning paradigm. In a subgroup of 7 subjects, heart rate and respiration were logged, and the correlation with the paradigm was evaluated. FMRI analysis was performed using models with and without nuisance regressors. Differences in the mean contrast estimates were investigated by analysis-of-variance using Subject, Sequence, Day, and Run as factors. The distributions of group level contrast estimates were compared. Results: Partially task-correlated fluctuations in respiration, heart rate and motion were observed. Statistically significant differences were found in the mean contrast estimates between the 2D EPI and 3D EPI when using a model without nuisance regressors. The inclusion of nuisance regressors for cardiorespiratory effects and motion reduced the difference to a statistically non-significant level. Furthermore, the contrast estimate values shifted more when including nuisance regressors for 3D EPI compared to 2D EPI. Conclusion: The results are consistent with 3D EPI having a higher sensitivity to fluctuations compared to 2D EPI. In the presence partially task-correlated physiological fluctuations or motion, proper correction is necessary to get expectation correct contrast estimates when using 3D EPI. As such task-correlated physiological fluctuations or motion is difficult to avoid in paradigms exploring higher cognitive functions, 2

  20. Diagnostic performance of 3D TSE MRI versus 2D TSE MRI of the knee at 1.5 T, with prompt arthroscopic correlation, in the detection of meniscal and cruciate ligament tears*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lorenzato, Mário Müller; Salim, Rodrigo; Kfuri-Junior, Maurício; Crema, Michel Daoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo (3D TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the performance of the standard two-dimensional turbo spin-echo (2D TSE) protocol at 1.5 T, in the detection of meniscal and ligament tears. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients were imaged twice, first with a standard multiplanar 2D TSE MR technique, and then with a 3D TSE technique, both in the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. The patients underwent knee arthroscopy within the first three days after the MRI. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, we determined the diagnostic performance and agreement. Results For detecting anterior cruciate ligament tears, the 3D TSE and routine 2D TSE techniques showed similar values for sensitivity (93% and 93%, respectively) and specificity (80% and 85%, respectively). For detecting medial meniscal tears, the two techniques also had similar sensitivity (85% and 83%, respectively) and specificity (68% and 71%, respectively). In addition, for detecting lateral meniscal tears, the two techniques had similar sensitivity (58% and 54%, respectively) and specificity (82% and 92%, respectively). There was a substantial to almost perfect intraobserver and interobserver agreement when comparing the readings for both techniques. Conclusion The 3D TSE technique has a diagnostic performance similar to that of the routine 2D TSE protocol for detecting meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament tears at 1.5 T, with the advantage of faster acquisition. PMID:27141127

  1. Automating measurement of subtle changes in articular cartilage from MRI of the knee by combining 3D image registration and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, John A.; Zaim, Souhil; Zhao, Jenny; Peterfy, Charles G.; Genant, Harry K.

    2001-07-01

    In osteoarthritis, articular cartilage loses integrity and becomes thinned. This usually occurs at sites which bear weight during normal use. Measurement of such loss from MRI scans, requires precise and reproducible techniques, which can overcome the difficulties of patient repositioning within the scanner. In this study, we combine a previously described technique for segmentation of cartilage from MRI of the knee, with a technique for 3D image registration that matches localized regions of interest at followup and baseline. Two patients, who had recently undergone meniscal surgery, and developed lesions during the 12 month followup period were examined. Image registration matched regions of interest (ROI) between baseline and followup, and changes within the cartilage lesions were estimate to be about a 16% reduction in cartilage volume within each ROI. This was more than 5 times the reproducibility of the measurement, but only represented a change of between 1 and 2% in total femoral cartilage volume. Changes in total cartilage volume may be insensitive for quantifying changes in cartilage morphology. A combined used of automated image segmentation, with 3D image registration could be a useful tool for the precise and sensitive measurement of localized changes in cartilage from MRI of the knee.

  2. Systolic and diastolic assessment by 3D-ASM segmentation of gated-SPECT Studies: a comparison with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobon-Gomez, C.; Bijnens, B. H.; Huguet, M.; Sukno, F.; Moragas, G.; Frangi, A. F.

    2009-02-01

    Gated single photon emission tomography (gSPECT) is a well-established technique used routinely in clinical practice. It can be employed to evaluate global left ventricular (LV) function of a patient. The purpose of this study is to assess LV systolic and diastolic function from gSPECT datasets in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) measurements. This is achieved by applying our recently implemented 3D active shape model (3D-ASM) segmentation approach for gSPECT studies. This methodology allows for generation of 3D LV meshes for all cardiac phases, providing volume time curves and filling rate curves. Both systolic and diastolic functional parameters can be derived from these curves for an assessment of patient condition even at early stages of LV dysfunction. Agreement of functional parameters, with respect to CMR measurements, were analyzed by means of Bland-Altman plots. The analysis included subjects presenting either LV hypertrophy, dilation or myocardial infarction.

  3. MRI-based Preplanning Using CT and MRI Data Fusion in Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With 3D-based Brachytherapy: Feasibility and Accuracy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dolezel, Martin; Odrazka, Karel; Zizka, Jan; Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kohlova, Tereza; Kroulik, Tomas; Spitzer, Dusan; Ryska, Pavel; Tichy, Michal; Kostal, Milan; Jalcova, Lubica

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assisted radiation treatment planning enables enhanced target contouring. The purpose of this study is to analyze the feasibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and MRI data fusion for MRI-based treatment planning in an institution where an MRI scanner is not available in the radiotherapy department. Methods and Materials: The registration inaccuracy of applicators and soft tissue was assessed in 42 applications with CT/MRI data fusion. The absolute positional difference of the center of the applicators was measured in four different planes from the top of the tandem to the cervix. Any inaccuracy of registration of soft tissue in relation to the position of applicators was determined and dose-volume parameters for MRI preplans and for CT/MRI fusion plans with or without target and organs at risk (OAR) adaptation were evaluated. Results: We performed 6,132 measurements in 42 CT/MRI image fusions. Median absolute difference of the center of tandem on CT and MRI was 1.1 mm. Median distance between the center of the right ovoid on CT and MRI was 1.7 and 1.9 mm in the laterolateral and anteroposterior direction, respectively. Corresponding values for the left ovoid were 1.6 and 1.8 mm. Rotation of applicators was 3.1 Degree-Sign . Median absolute difference in position of applicators in relation to soft tissue was 1.93, 1.50, 1.05, and 0.84 mm in the respective transverse planes, and 1.17, 1.28, 1.27, and 1.17 mm in selected angular directions. The dosimetric parameters for organs at risk on CT/MRI fusion plans without OAR adaptation were significantly impaired whereas the target coverage was not influenced. Planning without target adaptation led to overdosing of the target volume, especially high-risk clinical target volume - D{sub 90} 88.2 vs. 83.1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI-based preplanning with consecutive CT/MRI data fusion can be safe and feasible, with an acceptable inaccuracy of soft tissue registration.

  4. Data-driven optimization and evaluation of 2D EPI and 3D PRESTO for BOLD fMRI at 7 Tesla: I. Focal coverage.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert L; Strother, Stephen C; Gatenby, J Christopher; Gore, John C

    2011-04-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is commonly performed using 2D single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI). However, single-shot EPI at 7 Tesla (T) often suffers from significant geometric distortions (due to low bandwidth (BW) in the phase-encode (PE) direction) and amplified physiological noise. Recent studies have suggested that 3D multi-shot sequences such as PRESTO may offer comparable BOLD contrast-to-noise ratio with increased volume coverage and decreased geometric distortions. Thus, a four-way group-level comparison was performed between 2D and 3D acquisition sequences at two in-plane resolutions. The quality of fMRI data was evaluated via metrics of prediction and reproducibility using NPAIRS (Non-parametric Prediction, Activation, Influence and Reproducibility re-Sampling). Group activation maps were optimized for each acquisition strategy by selecting the number of principal components that jointly maximized prediction and reproducibility, and showed good agreement in sensitivity and specificity for positive BOLD changes. High-resolution EPI exhibited the highest z-scores of the four acquisition sequences; however, it suffered from the lowest BW in the PE direction (resulting in the worst geometric distortions) and limited spatial coverage, and also caused some subject discomfort through peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS). In comparison, PRESTO also had high z-scores (higher than EPI for a matched in-plane resolution), the highest BW in the PE direction (producing images with superior geometric fidelity), the potential for whole-brain coverage, and no reported PNS. This study provides evidence to support the use of 3D multi-shot acquisition sequences in lieu of single-shot EPI for ultra high field BOLD fMRI at 7T. PMID:21232613

  5. Creation of 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model actual patient non-rigid body motion as determined from MRI and position tracking studies of volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, C. M.; Konik, A.; Dasari, P. K. R.; Segars, P.; Zheng, S.; Johnson, K. L.; Dey, J.; King, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Patient motion can cause artifacts, which can lead to difficulty in interpretation. The purpose of this study is to create 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model the location of the structures of the chest and upper abdomen of human volunteers undergoing a series of clinically relevant motions. The 3D anatomy is modeled using the XCAT phantom and based on MRI studies. The NURBS surfaces of the XCAT are interactively adapted to fit the MRI studies. A detailed XCAT phantom is first developed from an EKG triggered Navigator acquisition composed of sagittal slices with a 3 x 3 x 3 mm voxel dimension. Rigid body motion states are then acquired at breath-hold as sagittal slices partially covering the thorax, centered on the heart, with 9 mm gaps between them. For non-rigid body motion requiring greater sampling, modified Navigator sequences covering the entire thorax with 3 mm gaps between slices are obtained. The structures of the initial XCAT are then adapted to fit these different motion states. Simultaneous to MRI imaging the positions of multiple reflective markers on stretchy bands about the volunteer's chest and abdomen are optically tracked in 3D via stereo imaging. These phantoms with combined position tracking will be used to investigate both imaging-data-driven and motion-tracking strategies to estimate and correct for patient motion. Our initial application will be to cardiacperfusion SPECT imaging where the XCAT phantoms will be used to create patient activity and attenuation distributions for each volunteer with corresponding motion tracking data from the markers on the body-surface. Monte Carlo methods will then be used to simulate SPECT acquisitions, which will be used to evaluate various motion estimation and correction strategies.

  6. Shape analysis of hypertrophic and hypertensive heart disease using MRI-based 3D surface models of left ventricular geometry.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Siamak; Jain, Saurabh; Sanzi, Alianna; Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Abraham, Theodore P; Abraham, M Roselle; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Wu, Katherine C; Winslow, Raimond L; Miller, Michael I; Younes, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this study was to develop advanced mathematical tools to construct high-resolution 3D models of left-ventricular (LV) geometry to evaluate focal geometric differences between patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and hypertensive heart disease (HHD) using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) cross-sectional images. A limiting factor in 3D analysis of cardiac MR cross-sections is the low out-of-plane resolution of the acquired images. To overcome this problem, we have developed a mathematical framework to construct a population-based high-resolution 3D LV triangulated surface (template) in which an iterative matching algorithm maps a surface mesh of a normal heart to a set of cross-sectional contours that were extracted from short-axis cine cardiac MR images of patients who were diagnosed with either HCM or HHD. A statistical analysis was conducted on deformations that were estimated at each surface node to identify shape differences at end-diastole (ED), end-systole (ES), and motion-related shape variation from ED to ES. Some significant shape difference in radial thickness was detected at ES. Differences of LV 3D surface geometry were identified focally on the basal anterior septum wall. Further research is needed to relate these findings to the HCM morphological substrate and to design a classifier to discriminate among different etiologies of LV hypertrophy. PMID:26766206

  7. A super-resolution framework for 3-D high-resolution and high-contrast imaging using 2-D multislice MRI.

    PubMed

    Shilling, Richard Z; Robbie, Trevor Q; Bailloeul, Timothée; Mewes, Klaus; Mersereau, Russell M; Brummer, Marijn E

    2009-05-01

    A novel super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) framework in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is proposed. Its purpose is to produce images of both high resolution and high contrast desirable for image-guided minimally invasive brain surgery. The input data are multiple 2-D multislice inversion recovery MRI scans acquired at orientations with regular angular spacing rotated around a common frequency encoding axis. The output is a 3-D volume of isotropic high resolution. The inversion process resembles a localized projection reconstruction problem. Iterative algorithms for reconstruction are based on the projection onto convex sets (POCS) formalism. Results demonstrate resolution enhancement in simulated phantom studies, and ex vivo and in vivo human brain scans, carried out on clinical scanners. A comparison with previously published SRR methods shows favorable characteristics in the proposed approach. PMID:19272995

  8. Noninvasive 3D pressure calculation from PC-MRI via non-iterative harmonics-based orthogonal projection: constant flow experiment.

    PubMed

    Negahdar, M J; Kadbi, Mo; Cha, J; Cebral, J; Amini, A

    2013-01-01

    Use of phase-contrast (PC) MRI in assessment of hemodynamics has significant clinical importance. In this paper we develop a novel approach to determination of hemodynamic pressures. 3D gradients of pressure obtained from Navier-Stokes equation are expanded into a series of orthogonal basis functions, and are subsequently projected onto an integrable subspace. Before the projection step however, a scheme is devised to eliminate the discontinuity at the vessel and image boundaries. In terms of the computation time, the proposed approach significantly improves on previous iterative methods for pressure calculations. The method has been validated using computational fluid dynamic simulations and in-vitro MRI studies of stenotic flows. PMID:24110706

  9. Using stress MRI to analyze the 3D changes in apical ligament geometry from rest to maximal Valsalva: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiajia; Betschart, Cornelia; Chen, Luyun; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis A method was developed using 3D stress magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was piloted to test hypotheses concerning changes in apical ligament lengths and lines of action from rest to maximal Valsalva. Methods Ten women with (cases) and ten without (controls) pelvic organ prolapse (POP) were selected from an ongoing case-control study. Supine, multiplanar stress MRI was performed at rest and at maximal Valsalva and was imported into 3D Slicer v. 3.4.1 and aligned. The 3D reconstructions of the uterus and vagina, cardinal ligament (CL), deep uterosacral ligament (USLd), and pelvic bones were created. Ligament length and orientation were then measured. Results Adequate ligament representations were possible in all 20 study participants. When cases were compared with controls, the curve length of the CL at rest was 71 ±16 mm vs. 59±9 mm (p =0.051), and the USLd was 38±16 mm vs. 36±11 mm (p =0.797). Similarly, the increase in CL length from rest to strain was 30±16 mm vs. 15±9 mm (p =0.033), and USLd was 15±12 mm vs. 7±4 mm (p =0.094). Likewise, the change in USLd angle was significantly different from CL (p <0.001). Conclusions This technique allows quantification of 3D geometry at rest and at strain. In our pilot sample, at maximal Valsalva, CL elongation was greater in cases than controls, whereas USLd was not; CL also exhibited greater changes in ligament length, and USLd exhibited greater changes in ligament inclination angle. PMID:24008367

  10. A hybrid framework of multiple active appearance models and global registration for 3D prostate segmentation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Lladó, Xavier; Freixenet, Jordi; Mitra, Jhimli; Vilanova, Joan C.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2012-02-01

    Real-time fusion of Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Trans Rectal Ultra Sound (TRUS) images aid in the localization of malignant tissues in TRUS guided prostate biopsy. Registration performed on segmented contours of the prostate reduces computational complexity and improves the multimodal registration accuracy. However, accurate and computationally efficient 3D segmentation of the prostate in MR images could be a challenging task due to inter-patient shape and intensity variability of the prostate gland. In this work, we propose to use multiple statistical shape and appearance models to segment the prostate in 2D and a global registration framework to impose shape restriction in 3D. Multiple mean parametric models of the shape and appearance corresponding to the apex, central and base regions of the prostate gland are derived from principal component analysis (PCA) of prior shape and intensity information of the prostate from the training data. The estimated parameters are then modified with the prior knowledge of the optimization space to achieve segmentation in 2D. The 2D segmented slices are then rigidly registered with the average 3D model produced by affine registration of the ground truth of the training datasets to minimize pose variations and impose 3D shape restriction. The proposed method achieves a mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) value of 0.88+/-0.11, and mean Hausdorff distance (HD) of 3.38+/-2.81 mm when validated with 15 prostate volumes of a public dataset in leave-one-out validation framework. The results achieved are better compared to some of the works in the literature.

  11. Accurate high-resolution measurements of 3-D tissue dynamics with registration-enhanced displacement encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Arnold D; Merchant, Samer S; Hsu, Edward W

    2014-06-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  12. Automatic ultrasound-MRI registration for neurosurgery using the 2D and 3D LC(2) Metric.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Bernhard; Wein, Wolfgang; Müller, Markus; Navab, Nassir

    2014-12-01

    To enable image guided neurosurgery, the alignment of pre-interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intra-operative ultrasound (US) is commonly required. We present two automatic image registration algorithms using the similarity measure Linear Correlation of Linear Combination (LC(2)) to align either freehand US slices or US volumes with MRI images. Both approaches allow an automatic and robust registration, while the three dimensional method yields a significantly improved percentage of optimally aligned registrations for randomly chosen clinically relevant initializations. This study presents a detailed description of the methodology and an extensive evaluation showing an accuracy of 2.51mm, precision of 0.85mm and capture range of 15mm (>95% convergence) using 14 clinical neurosurgical cases. PMID:24842859

  13. Accurate High-Resolution Measurements of 3-D Tissue Dynamics With Registration-Enhanced Displacement Encoded MRI

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Samer S.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  14. Predicting Alzheimer's disease by classifying 3D-Brain MRI images using SVM and other well-defined classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoug, S.; Abdel-Dayem, A.; Passi, K.; Gross, W.; Alqarni, M.

    2012-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting seniors age 65 and over. When AD is suspected, the diagnosis is usually confirmed with behavioural assessments and cognitive tests, often followed by a brain scan. Advanced medical imaging and pattern recognition techniques are good tools to create a learning database in the first step and to predict the class label of incoming data in order to assess the development of the disease, i.e., the conversion from prodromal stages (mild cognitive impairment) to Alzheimer's disease, which is the most critical brain disease for the senior population. Advanced medical imaging such as the volumetric MRI can detect changes in the size of brain regions due to the loss of the brain tissues. Measuring regions that atrophy during the progress of Alzheimer's disease can help neurologists in detecting and staging the disease. In the present investigation, we present a pseudo-automatic scheme that reads volumetric MRI, extracts the middle slices of the brain region, performs segmentation in order to detect the region of brain's ventricle, generates a feature vector that characterizes this region, creates an SQL database that contains the generated data, and finally classifies the images based on the extracted features. For our results, we have used the MRI data sets from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database.

  15. A comparison study of atlas-based 3D cardiac MRI segmentation: global versus global and local transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daryanani, Aditya; Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a standard-of-care imaging modality for cardiac function assessment and guidance of cardiac interventions thanks to its high image quality and lack of exposure to ionizing radiation. Cardiac health parameters such as left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass, thickness, and strain can be assessed by segmenting the heart from cardiac MRI images. Furthermore, the segmented pre-operative anatomical heart models can be used to precisely identify regions of interest to be treated during minimally invasive therapy. Hence, the use of accurate and computationally efficient segmentation techniques is critical, especially for intra-procedural guidance applications that rely on the peri-operative segmentation of subject-specific datasets without delaying the procedure workflow. Atlas-based segmentation incorporates prior knowledge of the anatomy of interest from expertly annotated image datasets. Typically, the ground truth atlas label is propagated to a test image using a combination of global and local registration. The high computational cost of non-rigid registration motivated us to obtain an initial segmentation using global transformations based on an atlas of the left ventricle from a population of patient MRI images and refine it using well developed technique based on graph cuts. Here we quantitatively compare the segmentations obtained from the global and global plus local atlases and refined using graph cut-based techniques with the expert segmentations according to several similarity metrics, including Dice correlation coefficient, Jaccard coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and Mean absolute distance error.

  16. Mapping motion from 4D-MRI to 3D-CT for use in 4D dose calculations: A technical feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Tony; Knopf, Antje

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Target sites affected by organ motion require a time resolved (4D) dose calculation. Typical 4D dose calculations use 4D-CT as a basis. Unfortunately, 4D-CT images have the disadvantage of being a 'snap-shot' of the motion during acquisition and of assuming regularity of breathing. In addition, 4D-CT acquisitions involve a substantial additional dose burden to the patient making many, repeated 4D-CT acquisitions undesirable. Here the authors test the feasibility of an alternative approach to generate patient specific 4D-CT data sets. Methods: In this approach motion information is extracted from 4D-MRI. Simulated 4D-CT data sets [which the authors call 4D-CT(MRI)] are created by warping extracted deformation fields to a static 3D-CT data set. The employment of 4D-MRI sequences for this has the advantage that no assumptions on breathing regularity are made, irregularities in breathing can be studied and, if necessary, many repeat imaging studies (and consequently simulated 4D-CT data sets) can be performed on patients and/or volunteers. The accuracy of 4D-CT(MRI)s has been validated by 4D proton dose calculations. Our 4D dose algorithm takes into account displacements as well as deformations on the originating 4D-CT/4D-CT(MRI) by calculating the dose of each pencil beam based on an individual time stamp of when that pencil beam is applied. According to corresponding displacement and density-variation-maps the position and the water equivalent range of the dose grid points is adjusted at each time instance. Results: 4D dose distributions, using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets as input were compared to results based on a reference conventional 4D-CT data set capturing similar motion characteristics. Almost identical 4D dose distributions could be achieved, even though scanned proton beams are very sensitive to small differences in the patient geometry. In addition, 4D dose calculations have been performed on the same patient, but using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets based on

  17. A Pilot Study of Improved Lesion Characterization in Breast MRI Using a 3D Radial Balanced SSFP Technique With Isotropic Resolution and Efficient Fat-Water Separation

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Catherine J.; Kelcz, Frederick; Jung, Youngkyoo; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Fain, Sean B.; Block, Walter F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess a 3D radial balanced steady state free precession technique that provides sub-millimeter isotropic resolution and inherently registered fat and water image volumes in comparison to conventional T2-weighted RARE imaging for lesion characterization in breast MRI. Materials and Methods 3D PRojection SSFP (3DPR-SSFP) combines a dual half-echo radial k-space trajectory with a linear combination fat/water separation technique (Linear Combination SSFP). A pilot study was performed in 20 patients to assess fat suppression and depiction of lesion morphology using 3DPR-SSFP. For all patients fat suppression was measured for the 3DPR-SSFP image volumes and depiction of lesion morphology was compared against corresponding T2-weighted Fast Spin Echo (FSE) datasets for 15 lesions in 11 patients. Results The isotropic 0.63 mm resolution of the 3DPR-SSFP sequence demonstrated improved depiction of lesion morphology in comparison to FSE. The 3DPR-SSFP fat and water datasets were available in a 5 minute scan time while average fat suppression with 3DPR-SSFP was 71% across all twenty patients. Conclusion 3DPR-SSFP has the potential to improve the lesion characterization information available in breast MRI, particularly in comparison to conventional FSE. A larger study is warranted to quantify the effect of 3DPR-SSFP on specificity. PMID:19557728

  18. Patient-Specific Artery Shrinkage and 3D Zero-Stress State in Multi-Component 3D FSI Models for Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques Based on In Vivo MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xueying; Yang, Chun; Yuan, Chun; Liu, Fei; Canton, Gador; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K.; Sicard, Gregorio A.; Tang, Dalin

    2009-01-01

    Image-based computational models for atherosclerotic plaques have been developed to perform mechanical analysis to quantify critical flow and stress/strain conditions related to plaque rupture which often leads directly to heart attack or stroke. An important modeling issue is how to determine zero stress state from in vivo plaque geometries. This paper presents a method to quantify human carotid artery axial and inner circumferential shrinkages by using patient-specific ex vivo and in vivo MRI images. A shrink-stretch process based on patient-specific in vivo plaque morphology and shrinkage data was introduced to shrink the in vivo geometry first to find the zero-stress state (opening angle was ignored to reduce the complexity), and then stretch and pressurize to recover the in vivo plaque geometry with computed initial stress, strain, flow pressure and velocity conditions. Effects of the shrink-stretch process on plaque stress/strain distributions were demonstrated based on patient-specific data using 3D models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI). The average artery axial and inner circumferential shrinkages were 25% and 7.9%, respectively, based on a data set obtained from 10 patients. Maximum values of maximum principal stress and strain increased 349.8% and 249% respectively with 33% axial stretch. Influence of inner circumferential shrinkage (7.9%) was not very noticeable under 33% axial stretch, but became more noticeable under smaller axial stretch. Our results indicated that accurate knowledge of artery shrinkages and the shrink-stretch process will considerably improve the accuracy of computational predictions made based on results from those in vivo MRI-based FSI models. PMID:19444328

  19. Patient-specific artery shrinkage and 3D zero-stress state in multi-component 3D FSI models for carotid atherosclerotic plaques based on in vivo MRI data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xueying; Yang, Chun; Yuan, Chun; Liu, Fei; Canton, Gador; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K; Sicard, Gregorio A; Tang, Dalin

    2009-06-01

    Image-based computational models for atherosclerotic plaques have been developed to perform mechanical analysis to quantify critical flow and stress/strain conditions related to plaque rupture which often leads directly to heart attack or stroke. An important modeling issue is how to determine zero stress state from in vivo plaque geometries. This paper presents a method to quantify human carotid artery axial and inner circumferential shrinkages by using patient-specific ex vivo and in vivo MRI images. A shrink-stretch process based on patient-specific in vivo plaque morphology and shrinkage data was introduced to shrink the in vivo geometry first to find the zero-stress state (opening angle was ignored to reduce the complexity), and then stretch and pressurize to recover the in vivo plaque geometry with computed initial stress, strain, flow pressure and velocity conditions. Effects of the shrink-stretch process on plaque stress/strain distributions were demonstrated based on patient-specific data using 3D models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI). The average artery axial and inner circumferential shrinkages were 25% and 7.9%, respectively, based on a data set obtained from 10 patients. Maximum values of maximum principal stress and strain increased 349.8% and 249% respectively with 33% axial stretch. Influence of inner circumferential shrinkage (7.9%) was not very noticeable under 33% axial stretch, but became more noticeable under smaller axial stretch. Our results indicated that accurate knowledge of artery shrinkages and the shrink-stretch process will considerably improve the accuracy of computational predictions made based on results from those in vivo MRI-based FSI models. PMID:19444328

  20. Quantification of regional fractional ventilation in human subjects by measurement of hyperpolarized 3He washout with 2D and 3D MRI.

    PubMed

    Horn, Felix C; Deppe, Martin H; Marshall, Helen; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2014-01-15

    Multiple-breath washout hyperpolarized (3)He MRI was used to calculate regional parametric images of fractional ventilation (r) as the ratio of fresh gas entering a volume unit to the total end inspiratory volume of the unit. Using a single dose of inhaled hyperpolarized gas and a total acquisition time of under 1 min, gas washout was measured by dynamic acquisitions during successive breaths with a fixed delay. A two-dimensional (2D) imaging protocol was investigated in four healthy subjects in the supine position, and in a second protocol the capability of extending the washout imaging to a three-dimensional (3D) acquisition covering the whole lungs was tested. During both protocols, subjects were breathing comfortably, only restricted by synchronization of breathing to the sequence timings. The 3D protocol was also successfully tested on one patient with cystic fibrosis. Mean r values from each volunteer were compared with global gas volume turnover, as calculated from flow measurement at the mouth divided by total lung volume (from MRI images), and a significant correlation (r = 0.74, P < 0.05) was found. The effects of gravity on R were investigated, and an average decrease in r of 5.5%/cm (Δr = 0.016 ± 0.006 cm(-1)) from posterior to anterior was found in the right lung. Intersubject reproducibility of r imaging with the 2D and 3D protocol was tested, and a significant correlation between repeated experiments was found in a pixel-by-pixel comparison. The proposed methods can be used to measure r on a regional basis. PMID:24311749

  1. Depiction of Achilles Tendon Microstructure In-Vivo Using High-Resolution 3D Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Liu, Jing; Krug, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of depicting the internal structure of the Achilles tendon in vivo using high-resolution 3D ultrashort echo-time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7T. Materials and Methods For our UTE imaging, a minimum-phase radiofrequency pulse and an anisotropic field-of-view 3D radial acquisition were used to minimize the echo time and scan time. A fat saturation pulse was applied every eight spoke acquisitions to reduce blurring and chemical shift artifacts from fat and to improve dynamic range of the tendon signal. Five healthy volunteers and one patient were scanned with an isotropic spatial resolution of up to 0.6 mm. Fat-suppressed UTE images were qualitatively evaluated and compared to non-fat-suppressed UTE images and longer echo-time images. Results High-resolution UTE imaging was able to visualize the microstructure of the Achilles tendon. Fat suppression substantially improved the depiction of the internal structure. The UTE images revealed a fascicular pattern in the Achilles tendon and fibrocartilage at the tendon insertion. In a patient who had tendon elongation surgery after birth there was clear depiction of disrupted tendon structure. Conclusions High-resolution fat-suppressed 3D UTE imaging at 7T allows for evaluation of the Achilles tendon microstructure in vivo. PMID:24500089

  2. An open-source, automated platform for visualizing subdural electrodes using 3D CT-MRI coregistration

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Allison; Krish, Veena T.; Wagenaar, Joost; Chen, Weixuan; Zheng, Yuanjie; Wang, Hongzhi; Lucas, Timothy H.; Gee, James C.; Litt, Brian; Davis, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Visualizing implanted subdural electrodes in 3D space can greatly aid planning, executing, and validating resection in epilepsy surgery. Coregistration software is available, but cost, complexity, insufficient accuracy or validation limit adoption. We present a fully automated open-source application, based upon a novel method using post-implant CT and post-implant MR images, for accurately visualizing intracranial electrodes in 3D space. Methods CT-MR rigid brain coregistration, MR non-rigid registration, and prior-based segmentation were carried out on 7 subjects. Post-implant CT, post-implant MR, and an external labeled atlas were then aligned in the same space. The coregistration algorithm was validated by manually marking identical anatomical landmarks on the post-implant CT and post-implant MR images. Following coregistration, distances between the center of the landmark masks on the post-implant MR and the coregistered CT images were calculated for all subjects. Algorithms were implemented in open-source software and translated into a “drag and drop” desktop application for Apple Mac OS X. Results Despite post-operative brain deformation, the method was able to automatically align intra-subject multi-modal images and segment cortical subregions so that all electrodes could be visualized on the parcellated brain. Manual marking of anatomical landmarks validated the coregistration algorithm with a mean misalignment distance of 2.87 ± 0.58 mm between the landmarks. Software was easily used by operators without prior image processing experience. Significance We demonstrate an easy to use, novel platform for accurately visualizing subdural electrodes in 3D space on a parcellated brain. We rigorously validated this method using quantitative measures. The method is unique because it involves no pre-processing, is fully automated, and freely available worldwide. A desktop application, as well as the source code, are both available for download on the

  3. MRI-driven accretion on to magnetized stars: global 3D MHD simulations of magnetospheric and boundary layer regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, M. M.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2012-03-01

    We discuss results of global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of accretion on to a rotating magnetized star with a tilted dipole magnetic field, where the accretion is driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). The simulations show that MRI-driven turbulence develops in the disc, and angular momentum is transported outwards primarily due to the magnetic stress. The turbulent flow is strongly inhomogeneous and the densest matter is in azimuthally stretched turbulent cells. We investigate two regimes of accretion: a magnetospheric regime and a boundary layer (BL) regime. In the magnetospheric regime, the magnetic field of the star is dynamically important: the accretion disc is truncated by the star's magnetic field within a few stellar radii from the star's surface, and matter flows to the star in funnel streams. The funnel streams flow towards the south and north magnetic poles but are not equal due to the inhomogeneity of the flow. The hotspots on the stellar surface are not symmetric as well. In the BL regime, the magnetic field of the star is dynamically unimportant, and matter accretes on to the surface of the star through the BL. The magnetic field in the inner disc is strongly amplified by the shear of the accretion flow, and the matter and magnetic stresses become comparable. Accreting matter forms a belt-shaped hot region on the surface of the star. The belt has inhomogeneous density distribution which varies in time due to variable accretion rate. The peaks in the variability curve are associated with accretion of individual turbulent cells. They show 20-50 per cent density amplifications at periods of ˜5-10 dynamical time-scales at the surface of the star. Spiral waves in the disc are excited in both magnetospheric and BL regimes of accretion. Results of simulations can be applied to classical T Tauri stars, accreting brown dwarfs, millisecond pulsars, dwarf novae cataclysmic variables and other stars with magnetospheres smaller

  4. Jet fuel toxicity: skin damage measured by 900-MHz MRI skin microscopy and visualization by 3D MR image processing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh; Locke, Bruce R

    2010-09-01

    The toxicity of jet fuels was measured using noninvasive magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) at 900-MHz magnetic field. The hypothesis was that MRM can visualize and measure the epidermis exfoliation and hair follicle size of rat skin tissue due to toxic skin irritation after skin exposure to jet fuels. High-resolution 900-MHz MRM was used to measure the change in size of hair follicle, epidermis thickening and dermis in the skin after jet fuel exposure. A number of imaging techniques utilized included magnetization transfer contrast (MTC), spin-lattice relaxation constant (T1-weighting), combination of T2-weighting with magnetic field inhomogeneity (T2*-weighting), magnetization transfer weighting, diffusion tensor weighting and chemical shift weighting. These techniques were used to obtain 2D slices and 3D multislice-multiecho images with high-contrast resolution and high magnetic resonance signal with better skin details. The segmented color-coded feature spaces after image processing of the epidermis and hair follicle structures were used to compare the toxic exposure to tetradecane, dodecane, hexadecane and JP-8 jet fuels. Jet fuel exposure caused skin damage (erythema) at high temperature in addition to chemical intoxication. Erythema scores of the skin were distinct for jet fuels. The multicontrast enhancement at optimized TE and TR parameters generated high MRM signal of different skin structures. The multiple contrast approach made visible details of skin structures by combining specific information achieved from each of the microimaging techniques. At short echo time, MRM images and digitized histological sections confirmed exfoliated epidermis, dermis thickening and hair follicle atrophy after exposure to jet fuels. MRM data showed correlation with the histopathology data for epidermis thickness (R(2)=0.9052, P<.0002) and hair root area (R(2)=0.88, P<.0002). The toxicity of jet fuels on skin structures was in the order of tetradecane

  5. 3D He-3 diffusion MRI as a local in vivo morphometric tool to evaluate emphysematous rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Minard, Kevin R.; Laicher, Gernot J.; Timchalk, Charles

    2008-08-21

    In this work, we validate 3He magnetic resonance imaging as a non-invasive morphometric tool to assess emphysematous disease state on a local level. Emphysema was induced intratracheally in rats with 25U/100g body weight of porcine pancreatic elastase dissolved in 200 μL saline. Rats were then paired with saline-dosed controls. Nine three-dimensional 3He diffusion-weighted images were acquired at one-, two-, or three-weeks post-dose, after which the lungs were harvested and prepared for histological analysis. Recently introduced indices sensitive to the heterogeneity of the airspace size distribution were calculated. These indices, D1 and D2, were derived from the moments of the mean equivalent airway diameters. Averaged over the entire lung, it is shown that the 3He diffusivity (Dave) and anisotropy (Dan) both correlate with histology (R = 0.85, p < 0.0001 and R = 0.88, p < 0.0001, respectively). By matching small (0.046 cm2) regions in 3He images with corresponding regions in histological slices, Dave and Dan each correlate significantly with both D1 and D2 (R = 0.93, p < 0.0001). It is concluded that 3He MRI is a viable non-invasive morphometric tool for localized in vivo emphysema assessment.

  6. A New Method to Explore the Spectral Impact of the Piriform Fossae on the Singing Voice: Benchmarking Using MRI-Based 3D-Printed Vocal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Delvaux, Bertrand; Howard, David

    2014-01-01

    The piriform fossae are the 2 pear-shaped cavities lateral to the laryngeal vestibule at the lower end of the vocal tract. They act acoustically as side-branches to the main tract, resulting in a spectral zero in the output of the human voice. This study investigates their spectral role by comparing numerical and experimental results of MRI-based 3D printed Vocal Tracts, for which a new experimental method (based on room acoustics) is introduced. The findings support results in the literature: the piriform fossae create a spectral trough in the region 4–5 kHz and act as formants repellents. Moreover, this study extends those results by demonstrating numerically and perceptually the impact of having large piriform fossae on the sung output. PMID:25048199

  7. A new method to explore the spectral impact of the piriform fossae on the singing voice: benchmarking using MRI-based 3D-printed vocal tracts.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, Bertrand; Howard, David

    2014-01-01

    The piriform fossae are the 2 pear-shaped cavities lateral to the laryngeal vestibule at the lower end of the vocal tract. They act acoustically as side-branches to the main tract, resulting in a spectral zero in the output of the human voice. This study investigates their spectral role by comparing numerical and experimental results of MRI-based 3D printed Vocal Tracts, for which a new experimental method (based on room acoustics) is introduced. The findings support results in the literature: the piriform fossae create a spectral trough in the region 4-5 kHz and act as formants repellents. Moreover, this study extends those results by demonstrating numerically and perceptually the impact of having large piriform fossae on the sung output. PMID:25048199

  8. Inverse Planning Approach for 3-D MRI-Based Pulse-Dose Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chajon, Enrique; Dumas, Isabelle; Touleimat, Mahmoud B.Sc.; Magne, Nicolas; Coulot, Jeremy; Verstraet, Rodolfe; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) software for the optimization of dose distribution in patients with cervix carcinoma treated with MRI-based pulsed-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients treated with a technique using a customized vaginal mold were selected. Dose-volume parameters obtained using the IPSA method were compared with the classic manual optimization method (MOM). Target volumes and organs at risk were delineated according to the Gynecological Brachytherapy Group/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology recommendations. Because the pulsed dose rate program was based on clinical experience with low dose rate, dwell time values were required to be as homogeneous as possible. To achieve this goal, different modifications of the IPSA program were applied. Results: The first dose distribution calculated by the IPSA algorithm proposed a heterogeneous distribution of dwell time positions. The mean D90, D100, and V100 calculated with both methods did not differ significantly when the constraints were applied. For the bladder, doses calculated at the ICRU reference point derived from the MOM differed significantly from the doses calculated by the IPSA method (mean, 58.4 vs. 55 Gy respectively; p = 0.0001). For the rectum, the doses calculated at the ICRU reference point were also significantly lower with the IPSA method. Conclusions: The inverse planning method provided fast and automatic solutions for the optimization of dose distribution. However, the straightforward use of IPSA generated significant heterogeneity in dwell time values. Caution is therefore recommended in the use of inverse optimization tools with clinical relevance study of new dosimetric rules.

  9. Multi-material 3-D viscoelastic model of a transtibial residuum from in-vivo indentation and MRI data.

    PubMed

    Sengeh, David M; Moerman, Kevin M; Petron, Arthur; Herr, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    Although the socket is critical in a prosthetic system for a person with limb amputation, the methods of its design are largely artisanal. A roadblock for a repeatable and quantitative socket design process is the lack of predictive and patient specific biomechanical models of the residuum. This study presents the evaluation of such a model using a combined experimental-numerical approach. The model geometry and tissue boundaries are derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The soft tissue non-linear elastic and viscoelastic mechanical behavior was evaluated using inverse finite element analysis (FEA) of in-vivo indentation experiments. A custom designed robotic in-vivo indentation system was used to provide a rich experimental data set of force versus time at 18 sites across a limb. During FEA, the tissues were represented by two layers, namely the skin-adipose layer and an underlying muscle-soft tissue complex. The non-linear elastic behavior was modeled using 2nd order Ogden hyperelastic formulations, and viscoelasticity was modeled using the quasi-linear theory of viscoelasticity. To determine the material parameters for each tissue, an inverse FEA based optimization routine was used that minimizes the combined mean of the squared force differences between the numerical and experimental force-time curves for indentations at 4 distinct anatomical regions on the residuum. The optimization provided the following material parameters for the skin-adipose layer: [c=5.22kPam=4.79γ=3.57MPaτ=0.32s] and for the muscle-soft tissue complex [c=5.20kPam=4.78γ=3.47MPaτ=0.34s]. These parameters were evaluated to predict the force-time curves for the remaining 14 anatomical locations. The mean percentage error (mean absolute error/ maximum experimental force) for these predictions was 7±3%. The mean percentage error at the 4 sites used for the optimization was 4%. PMID:26946095

  10. Impossible expectations: fMRI adaptation in the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is modulated by the statistical regularities of 3D structural information.

    PubMed

    Freud, Erez; Ganel, Tzvi; Avidan, Galia

    2015-11-15

    fMRI adaptation (fMRIa), the attenuation of fMRI signal which follows repeated presentation of a stimulus, is a well-documented phenomenon. Yet, the underlying neural mechanisms supporting this effect are not fully understood. Recently, short-term perceptual expectations, induced by specific experimental settings, were shown to play an important modulating role in fMRIa. Here we examined the role of long-term expectations, based on 3D structural statistical regularities, in the modulation of fMRIa. To this end, human participants underwent fMRI scanning while performing a same-different task on pairs of possible (regular, expected) objects and spatially impossible (irregular, unexpected) objects. We hypothesized that given the spatial irregularity of impossible objects in relation to real-world visual experience, the visual system would always generate a prediction which is biased to the possible version of the objects. Consistently, fMRIa effects in the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) were found for possible, but not for impossible objects. Additionally, in alternating trials the order of stimulus presentation modulated LOC activity. That is, reduced activation was observed in trials in which the impossible version of the object served as the prime object (i.e. first object) and was followed by the possible version compared to the reverse order. These results were also supported by the behavioral advantage observed for trials that were primed by possible objects. Together, these findings strongly emphasize the importance of perceptual expectations in object representation and provide novel evidence for the role of real-world statistical regularities in eliciting fMRIa. PMID:26254586

  11. Feasibility of 3-D MRI of Proximal Femur Microarchitecture at 3 T using 26 Receive Elements without and with Parallel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Gregory; Deniz, Cem; Honig, Stephen; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Egol, Kenneth; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Brown, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High-resolution imaging of deeper anatomy such as the hip is challenging due to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), necessitating long scan times. Multi-element coils can increase SNR and reduce scan time through parallel imaging (PI). We assessed the feasibility of using a 26-element receive coil setup to perform 3 T MRI of proximal femur microarchitecture without and with PI. Materials and Methods This study had institutional review board approval. We scanned thirteen subjects on a 3 T scanner using 26 receive-elements and a 3-D FLASH sequence without and with PI (acceleration factors (AF) 2, 3, 4). We assessed SNR, depiction of individual trabeculae, PI performance (1/g-factor), and image quality with PI (1=non-visualization to 5=excellent). Results SNR maps demonstrate higher SNR for the 26-element setup compared to a 12-element setup for hip MRI. Without PI, individual proximal femur trabeculae were well-depicted, including microarchitectural deterioration in osteoporotic subjects. With PI, 1/g values for the 26-element/12-element receive-setup were 0.71/0.45, 0.56/0.25, and 0.44/0.08 at AF2, AF3, and AF4, respectively. Image quality was: AF1, excellent (4.8±0.4); AF2, good (4.2±1.0); AF3, average (3.3±1.0); AF4, non-visualization (1.4±0.9). Conclusion A 26-element receive-setup permits 3 T MRI of proximal femur microarchitecture with good image quality up to PI AF2. PMID:24711013

  12. Patient-Specific Carotid Plaque Progression Simulation Using 3D Meshless Generalized Finite Difference Models with Fluid-Structure Interactions Based on Serial In Vivo MRI Data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Atluri, Satya

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we introduced a computational procedure based on three-dimensional meshless generalized finite difference (MGFD) method and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to quantify patient-specific carotid atherosclerotic plaque growth functions and simulate plaque progression. Structure-only models were used in our previous report. In this paper, fluid-stricture interaction (FSI) was added to improve on prediction accuracy. One participating patient was scanned three times (T1, T2, and T3, at intervals of about 18 months) to obtain plaque progression data. Blood flow was assumed to laminar, Newtonian, viscous and incompressible. The Navier-Stokes equations with arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation were used as the governing equations. Plaque material was assumed to be uniform, homogeneous, isotropic, linear, and nearly incompressible. The linear elastic model was used. The 3D FSI plaque model was discretized and solved using a meshless generalized finite difference (GFD) method. Growth functions with a) morphology alone; b) morphology and plaque wall stress (PWS); morphology and flow shear stress (FSS), and d) morphology, PWS and FSS were introduced to predict future plaque growth based on previous time point data. Starting from the T2 plaque geometry, plaque progression was simulated by solving the FSI model and adjusting plaque geometry using plaque growth functions iteratively until T3 is reached. Numerically simulated plaque progression agreed very well with the target T3 plaque geometry with errors ranging from 8.62%, 7.22%, 5.77% and 4.39%, with the growth function including morphology, plaque wall stress and flow shear stress terms giving the best predictions. Adding flow shear stress term to the growth function improved the prediction error from 7.22% to 4.39%, a 40% improvement. We believe this is the first time 3D plaque progression FSI simulation based on multi-year patient-tracking data was reported. Serial MRI-based progression

  13. MRI-guided 3D conformal arc micro-irradiation of a F98 glioblastoma rat model using the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP).

    PubMed

    Bolcaen, Julie; Descamps, Benedicte; Deblaere, Karel; Boterberg, Tom; Hallaert, Giorgio; Van den Broecke, Caroline; Decrock, Elke; Vral, Anne; Leybaert, Luc; Vanhove, Christian; Goethals, Ingeborg

    2014-11-01

    Current glioblastoma (GB) small animal models for cranial radiation therapy (RT) use simple single beam technologies, which differ from the advanced conformal image-guided radiation techniques used in clinical practice. This technological disparity presents a major disadvantage for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Hence, we established a F98 GB rat model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided three-dimensional (3D)-conformal arc RT with the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP). Ten Fischer rats were inoculated with F98 tumor cells. When the tumor reached a volume of approximately 27 mm(3) on T2-weighted MR images, the animals were randomized into a treatment group (n = 5) receiving RT and concomitant temozolomide, and a sham group (n = 5) receiving control injections. For the treated animals, contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images were acquired followed by a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on the SARRP system. Both scans were co-registered; MRI was used to define the target whereas CBCT was used for calculating a dose plan (20 Gy, three non-coplanar arc beams, 3 × 3 mm collimator). Tumor volumes were evaluated on follow-up contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images. Verification of treatment accuracy with γH2AX immunohistochemical staining was performed. Tumors in the control animals showed rapid proliferation during follow-up, encompassing almost the entire right cerebral hemisphere at day 12-15. Treated animals showed no significant tumor growth from 2 to 9 days post RT. γH2AX results confirmed the accuracy of dose delivery. This model, which is quite similar to the approach in the clinic, is valid for combined RT and chemotherapy of GB in rats. PMID:25069566

  14. Estimating subthreshold tumor on MRI using a 3D-DTI growth model for GBM: An adjunct to radiation therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Leith; Patel, Vishal

    2016-08-01

    Mathematical modeling and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used to calculate patient-specific rates of tumor diffusion, D, and proliferation, ρ, can be combined to simulate glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) growth. We showed that the proportion and distribution of tumor cells below the MRI threshold are determined by the D/ρ ratio of the tumor. As most radiation fields incorporate a 1‑3 cm margin to account for subthreshold tumor, accurate characterization of subthreshold tumor aids the design of optimal radiation fields. This study compared two models: a standard one‑dimensional (1D) isotropic model and a three‑dimensional (3D) anisotropic model using the advanced imaging method of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) ‑ with regards to the D/ρ ratio's effect on the proportion and spatial extent of the subthreshold tumor. A validated reaction‑diffusion equation accounting for tumor diffusion and proliferation modeled tumor concentration in time and space. For the isotropic and anisotropic models, nine tumors with different D/ρ ratios were grown to a T1 radius of 1.5 cm. For each tumor, the percent and extent of tumor cells beyond the T2 radius were calculated. For both models, higher D/ρ ratios were correlated with a greater proportion and extent of subthreshold tumor. Anisotropic modeling demonstrated a higher proportion and extent of subthreshold tumor than predicted by the isotropic modeling. Because the quantity and distribution of subthreshold tumor depended on the D/ρ ratio, this ratio should influence radiation field demarcation. Furthermore, the use of DTI data to account for anisotropic tumor growth allows for more refined characterization of the subthreshold tumor based on the patient-specific D/ρ ratio. PMID:27374420

  15. TU-F-17A-04: Respiratory Phase-Resolved 3D MRI with Isotropic High Spatial Resolution: Determination of the Average Breathing Motion Pattern for Abdominal Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Yang, W; Yue, Y; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Li, D; Fan, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a retrospective 4D-MRI technique (respiratory phase-resolved 3D-MRI) for providing an accurate assessment of tumor motion secondary to respiration. Methods: A 3D projection reconstruction (PR) sequence with self-gating (SG) was developed for 4D-MRI on a 3.0T MRI scanner. The respiration-induced shift of the imaging target was recorded by SG signals acquired in the superior-inferior direction every 15 radial projections (i.e. temporal resolution 98 ms). A total of 73000 radial projections obtained in 8-min were retrospectively sorted into 10 time-domain evenly distributed respiratory phases based on the SG information. Ten 3D image sets were then reconstructed offline. The technique was validated on a motion phantom (gadolinium-doped water-filled box, frequency of 10 and 18 cycles/min) and humans (4 healthy and 2 patients with liver tumors). Imaging protocol included 8-min 4D-MRI followed by 1-min 2D-realtime (498 ms/frame) MRI as a reference. Results: The multiphase 3D image sets with isotropic high spatial resolution (1.56 mm) permits flexible image reformatting and visualization. No intra-phase motion-induced blurring was observed. Comparing to 2D-realtime, 4D-MRI yielded similar motion range (phantom: 10.46 vs. 11.27 mm; healthy subject: 25.20 vs. 17.9 mm; patient: 11.38 vs. 9.30 mm), reasonable displacement difference averaged over the 10 phases (0.74mm; 3.63mm; 1.65mm), and excellent cross-correlation (0.98; 0.96; 0.94) between the two displacement series. Conclusion: Our preliminary study has demonstrated that the 4D-MRI technique can provide high-quality respiratory phase-resolved 3D images that feature: a) isotropic high spatial resolution, b) a fixed scan time of 8 minutes, c) an accurate estimate of average motion pattern, and d) minimal intra-phase motion artifact. This approach has the potential to become a viable alternative solution to assess the impact of breathing on tumor motion and determine appropriate treatment margins

  16. Detection of subjects and brain regions related to Alzheimer's disease using 3D MRI scans based on eigenbrain and machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Dong, Zhengchao; Phillips, Preetha; Wang, Shuihua; Ji, Genlin; Yang, Jiquan; Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Early diagnosis or detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from the normal elder control (NC) is very important. However, the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) was not widely used, and the classification performance did not reach the standard of practical use. We proposed a novel CAD system for MR brain images based on eigenbrains and machine learning with two goals: accurate detection of both AD subjects and AD-related brain regions. Method: First, we used maximum inter-class variance (ICV) to select key slices from 3D volumetric data. Second, we generated an eigenbrain set for each subject. Third, the most important eigenbrain (MIE) was obtained by Welch's t-test (WTT). Finally, kernel support-vector-machines with different kernels that were trained by particle swarm optimization, were used to make an accurate prediction of AD subjects. Coefficients of MIE with values higher than 0.98 quantile were highlighted to obtain the discriminant regions that distinguish AD from NC. Results: The experiments showed that the proposed method can predict AD subjects with a competitive performance with existing methods, especially the accuracy of the polynomial kernel (92.36 ± 0.94) was better than the linear kernel of 91.47 ± 1.02 and the radial basis function (RBF) kernel of 86.71 ± 1.93. The proposed eigenbrain-based CAD system detected 30 AD-related brain regions (Anterior Cingulate, Caudate Nucleus, Cerebellum, Cingulate Gyrus, Claustrum, Inferior Frontal Gyrus, Inferior Parietal Lobule, Insula, Lateral Ventricle, Lentiform Nucleus, Lingual Gyrus, Medial Frontal Gyrus, Middle Frontal Gyrus, Middle Occipital Gyrus, Middle Temporal Gyrus, Paracentral Lobule, Parahippocampal Gyrus, Postcentral Gyrus, Posterial Cingulate, Precentral Gyrus, Precuneus, Subcallosal Gyrus, Sub-Gyral, Superior Frontal Gyrus, Superior Parietal Lobule, Superior Temporal Gyrus, Supramarginal Gyrus, Thalamus, Transverse Temporal Gyrus, and Uncus). The results were coherent with existing

  17. Optimization of Free-Breathing Whole-Heart 3D Cardiac MRI at 3Tesla to Identify Coronary Vein Anatomy and to Compare with Multi-Detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Wael G.; El Khouli, Riham H.; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.; Matta, Jatin Raj; McAreavey, Dorothea; Gharib, Ahmed M

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study optimizes use of 3T MRI to delineate coronary venous anatomy, and compares 3T MRI with MDCT measurements. Methods The study population included 37 consecutive subjects (22 men, 19-71 years). Whole-heart contrast-enhanced MRI images at 3T were acquired using segmented k-space gradient echo with inversion recovery prepared technique. MDCT images were obtained using nonionic iodinated contrast. Results The coronary sinus, and great cardiac, posterior interventricular, and anterior interventricular veins were visualized in 100% of cases by both MRI and MDCT. Detection of the posterior vein of left ventricle and left marginal vein by MRI was 97% and 81% respectively. Bland Altman plots showed agreement in ostial diameter measured by both modalities with correlation coefficients ranging 0.5-0.76. Vein length and distances also agreed closely. Conclusion Free-breathing whole-heart 3D MRI at 3T provides high spatial resolution images and could offer an alternative imaging technique instead of MDCT scans. PMID:24983436

  18. Flair-fleet location and information reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, E. R.; Dunlap, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    The FLAIR system, as now produced, automatically updates each vehicle's location and corresponding officer's status once each two seconds and presents this information to police dispatchers in the command and control center. The position of all vehicles available for assignment is displayed on a color video map at each dispatcher's console to an accuracy of 50 feet. This gives the dispatcher a continuous picture of the deployment of the total available force and thus complete command and control of all police under his responsibility.

  19. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in a Patient with Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Alex; Wenz, Holger; Groden, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) has initially been described in acute ischemic stroke. The phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium enhancement in the subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Here we report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with transient paresis and sensory loss in the right arm. Initial routine stroke MRI including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging demonstrated no acute pathology. Follow-up MRI after three hours demonstrated subarachnoid gadolinium enhancement in the left middle cerebral artery territory consistent with HARM that completely resolved on follow-up MRI three days later. This case illustrates that even in transient ischemic attack patients disturbances of the blood-brain barrier may be present which significantly exceed the extent of acute ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging. Inclusion of FLAIR images with delayed acquisition after intravenous contrast agent application in MRI stroke protocols might facilitate the diagnosis of a recent acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27127673

  20. Low-energy antiprotons physics and the FLAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, E.

    2015-11-01

    FLAIR, the Facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research has been proposed in 2004 as an extension of the planned FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. FLAIR was not included into the modularized start version of FAIR, but the recent installation of the CRYRING storage ring at GSI Darmstadt has opened new perspectives for physics with low-energy antiprotons at FAIR.

  1. Computer aided detection of tumor and edema in brain FLAIR magnetic resonance image using ANN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nandita; Sinha, A. K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an efficient region based segmentation technique for detecting pathological tissues (Tumor & Edema) of brain using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This work segments FLAIR brain images for normal and pathological tissues based on statistical features and wavelet transform coefficients using k-means algorithm. The image is divided into small blocks of 4×4 pixels. The k-means algorithm is used to cluster the image based on the feature vectors of blocks forming different classes representing different regions in the whole image. With the knowledge of the feature vectors of different segmented regions, supervised technique is used to train Artificial Neural Network using fuzzy back propagation algorithm (FBPA). Segmentation for detecting healthy tissues and tumors has been reported by several researchers by using conventional MRI sequences like T1, T2 and PD weighted sequences. This work successfully presents segmentation of healthy and pathological tissues (both Tumors and Edema) using FLAIR images. At the end pseudo coloring of segmented and classified regions are done for better human visualization.

  2. Regional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) at 7 Tesla correlates with amyloid beta in hippocampus and brainstem of cognitively normal elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Simon J.; Liu, Xinyang; Gietl, Anton F.; Wyss, Michael; Steininger, Stefanie C.; Gruber, Esmeralda; Treyer, Valerie; Meier, Irene B.; Kälin, Andrea M.; Leh, Sandra E.; Buck, Alfred; Nitsch, Roger M.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Hock, Christoph; Unschuld, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) may occur during healthy aging and is a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD). While individual Aβ-accumulation can be measured non-invasively using Pittsburgh Compund-B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET), Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequence, capable of indicating heterogeneous age-related brain pathologies associated with tissue-edema. In the current study cognitively normal elderly subjects were investigated for regional correlation of PiB- and FLAIR intensity. Methods: Fourteen healthy elderly subjects without known history of cognitive impairment received 11C-PiB-PET for estimation of regional Aβ-load. In addition, whole brain T1-MPRAGE and FLAIR-MRI sequences were acquired at high field strength of 7 Tesla (7T). Volume-normalized intensities of brain regions were assessed by applying an automated subcortical segmentation algorithm for spatial definition of brain structures. Statistical dependence between FLAIR- and PiB-PET intensities was tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho), followed by Holm–Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Results: Neuropsychological testing revealed normal cognitive performance levels in all participants. Mean regional PiB-PET and FLAIR intensities were normally distributed and independent. Significant correlation between volume-normalized PiB-PET signals and FLAIR intensities resulted for Hippocampus (right: rho = 0.86; left: rho = 0.84), Brainstem (rho = 0.85) and left Basal Ganglia vessel region (rho = 0.82). Conclusions: Our finding of a significant relationship between PiB- and FLAIR intensity mainly observable in the Hippocampus and Brainstem, indicates regional Aβ associated tissue-edema in cognitively normal elderly subjects. Further studies including clinical populations are necessary to clarify the relevance of our findings for estimating individual risk for age-related neurodegenerative

  3. Audio-Visual Perception of 3D Cinematography: An fMRI Study Using Condition-Based and Computation-Based Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Akitoshi; Bordier, Cecile; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    The use of naturalistic stimuli to probe sensory functions in the human brain is gaining increasing interest. Previous imaging studies examined brain activity associated with the processing of cinematographic material using both standard “condition-based” designs, as well as “computational” methods based on the extraction of time-varying features of the stimuli (e.g. motion). Here, we exploited both approaches to investigate the neural correlates of complex visual and auditory spatial signals in cinematography. In the first experiment, the participants watched a piece of a commercial movie presented in four blocked conditions: 3D vision with surround sounds (3D-Surround), 3D with monaural sound (3D-Mono), 2D-Surround, and 2D-Mono. In the second experiment, they watched two different segments of the movie both presented continuously in 3D-Surround. The blocked presentation served for standard condition-based analyses, while all datasets were submitted to computation-based analyses. The latter assessed where activity co-varied with visual disparity signals and the complexity of auditory multi-sources signals. The blocked analyses associated 3D viewing with the activation of the dorsal and lateral occipital cortex and superior parietal lobule, while the surround sounds activated the superior and middle temporal gyri (S/MTG). The computation-based analyses revealed the effects of absolute disparity in dorsal occipital and posterior parietal cortices and of disparity gradients in the posterior middle temporal gyrus plus the inferior frontal gyrus. The complexity of the surround sounds was associated with activity in specific sub-regions of S/MTG, even after accounting for changes of sound intensity. These results demonstrate that the processing of naturalistic audio-visual signals entails an extensive set of visual and auditory areas, and that computation-based analyses can track the contribution of complex spatial aspects characterizing such life-like stimuli

  4. 3D Breath-Held Cardiac Function With Projection Reconstruction in Steady State Free Precession Validated Using 2D Cine MRI

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Dana C.; Ennis, Daniel B.; Rohatgi, Pratik; Syed, Mushabbar A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Arai, Andrew E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a three-dimensional (3D) single breath-hold, projection reconstruction (PR), balanced steady state free precession (SSFP) method for cardiac function evaluation against a two-dimensional (2D) multislice Fourier (Cartesian) transform (FT) SSFP method. Materials and Methods: The 3D PR SSFP sequence used projections in the x-y plane and partitions in z, providing 70–80 msec temporal resolution and 1.7 × 1.7 × 8–10 mm in a 24-heartbeat breath hold. A total of 10 volunteers were imaged with both methods, and the measurements of global cardiac function were compared. Results: Mean signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for the blood and myocardium were 114 and 42 (2D) and 59 and 21 (3D). Bland-Altman analysis comparing the 2D and 3D ejection fraction (EF), left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV) and end systolic volume (LVESV), and end diastolic myocardial mass (LVEDM) provided values of bias ±2 SD of 0.6% ± 7.7 % for LVEF, 5.9 mL ± 20 mL for LVEDV, −2.8 mL ± 12 mL for LVESV, and −0.61 g ± 13 g for LVEDM. 3D interobserver variability was greater than 2D for LVEDM and LVESV. Conclusion: In a single breath hold, the 3D PR method provides comparable information to the standard 2D FT method, which employs 10–12 breath holds. PMID:15332248

  5. Audio-visual perception of 3D cinematography: an fMRI study using condition-based and computation-based analyses.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akitoshi; Bordier, Cecile; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    The use of naturalistic stimuli to probe sensory functions in the human brain is gaining increasing interest. Previous imaging studies examined brain activity associated with the processing of cinematographic material using both standard "condition-based" designs, as well as "computational" methods based on the extraction of time-varying features of the stimuli (e.g. motion). Here, we exploited both approaches to investigate the neural correlates of complex visual and auditory spatial signals in cinematography. In the first experiment, the participants watched a piece of a commercial movie presented in four blocked conditions: 3D vision with surround sounds (3D-Surround), 3D with monaural sound (3D-Mono), 2D-Surround, and 2D-Mono. In the second experiment, they watched two different segments of the movie both presented continuously in 3D-Surround. The blocked presentation served for standard condition-based analyses, while all datasets were submitted to computation-based analyses. The latter assessed where activity co-varied with visual disparity signals and the complexity of auditory multi-sources signals. The blocked analyses associated 3D viewing with the activation of the dorsal and lateral occipital cortex and superior parietal lobule, while the surround sounds activated the superior and middle temporal gyri (S/MTG). The computation-based analyses revealed the effects of absolute disparity in dorsal occipital and posterior parietal cortices and of disparity gradients in the posterior middle temporal gyrus plus the inferior frontal gyrus. The complexity of the surround sounds was associated with activity in specific sub-regions of S/MTG, even after accounting for changes of sound intensity. These results demonstrate that the processing of naturalistic audio-visual signals entails an extensive set of visual and auditory areas, and that computation-based analyses can track the contribution of complex spatial aspects characterizing such life-like stimuli. PMID

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy with a fast FLAIR sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Wieshmann, U C; Free, S L; Everitt, A D; Bartlett, P A; Barker, G J; Tofts, P S; Duncan, J S; Shorvon, S D; Stevens, J M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic value of the fast FLAIR sequence in patients with epilepsy. METHODS: One hundred and twenty eight patients with epilepsy and 10 control subjects were scanned with the fast FLAIR sequence with 5 mm slices, a coronal gradient echo (GRE) T1 weighted sequence with 1.5 mm slices and spin echo (SE) or fast spin echo (FSE) proton density and T2 weighted sequences with 5 mm slices. All images were compared by an unblinded neuroradiologist and neurologist. Fast FLAIR images of patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and normal control subjects were also evaluated by two blinded independent raters. RESULTS: Fast FLAIR provided a high conspicuity of neocortical damage, hamartomas, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumours, and clear cut hippocampal sclerosis. However, the same information could be obtained from the coronal T1 and T2 weighted images. In three patients fast FLAIR showed a clearly abnormal signal when SE T2 weighted images had not been definitely abnormal. Heterotopia was less conspicuous on fast FLAIR than GRE T1 weighted images. The two blinded raters detected all but one of the patients with clear cut hippocampal sclerosis on fast FLAIR images but missed all borderline cases of hippocampal atrophy and there were two false positives. Clear cut hippocampal sclerosis was more conspicuous on fast FLAIR images than on SE T2 weighted images in most patients, but additional patients were not identified. CONCLUSION: Fast FLAIR has the advantage of identifying neocortical lesions and definite hippocampal sclerosis with a short scanning time and may also demonstrate lesions when other sequences are normal in a limited number of cases. The technique was not useful, however, for identifying mild hippocampal sclerosis or heterotopia. Images PMID:8890773

  7. Ultrahigh-Field MRI in Human Ischemic Stroke – a 7 Tesla Study

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Miriam; Stengl, Katharina L.; Mutke, Matthias A.; Tovar-Martinez, Elena; Wuerfel, Jens; Endres, Matthias; Niendorf, Thoralf; Sobesky, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using field strengths up to 3 Tesla (T) has proven to be a powerful tool for stroke diagnosis. Recently, ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI at 7 T has shown relevant diagnostic benefits in imaging of neurological diseases, but its value for stroke imaging has not been investigated yet. We present the first evaluation of a clinically feasible stroke imaging protocol at 7 T. For comparison an established stroke imaging protocol was applied at 3 T. Methods In a prospective imaging study seven patients with subacute and chronic stroke were included. Imaging at 3 T was immediately followed by 7 T imaging. Both protocols included T1-weighted 3D Magnetization-Prepared Rapid-Acquired Gradient-Echo (3D-MPRAGE), T2-weighted 2D Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (2D-FLAIR), T2-weighted 2D Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (2D-T2-TSE), T2* weighted 2D Fast Low Angle Shot Gradient Echo (2D-HemoFLASH) and 3D Time-of-Flight angiography (3D-TOF). Results The diagnostic information relevant for clinical stroke imaging obtained at 3 T was equally available at 7 T. Higher spatial resolution at 7 T revealed more anatomical details precisely depicting ischemic lesions and periinfarct alterations. A clear benefit in anatomical resolution was also demonstrated for vessel imaging at 7 T. RF power deposition constraints induced scan time prolongation and reduced brain coverage for 2D-FLAIR, 2D-T2-TSE and 3D-TOF at 7 T versus 3 T. Conclusions The potential of 7 T MRI for human stroke imaging is shown. Our pilot study encourages a further evaluation of the diagnostic benefit of stroke imaging at 7 T in a larger study. PMID:22701525

  8. FLAIR imaging for multiple sclerosis: a comparative MR study at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Rainald; Reilmann, Ralf; Schwindt, Wolfram; Kugel, Harald; Heindel, Walter; Krämer, Stefan

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to identify the optimal TE for FLAIR-imaging at 3.0 T assessing three different echo times qualitatively and quantitatively and (2) to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of high-field 3.0-T FLAIR imaging in comparison to conventional 1.5-T MRI in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Twenty-two patients with clinically definite MS underwent axial FLAIR imaging at 1.5 and 3.0 T. In 15 of these patients further FLAIR images with a TE of 100, 120 and 140 ms were acquired at 3.0 T. Imaging protocols were modified for 3.0 T using the increased SNR to acquire more and thinner slices while maintaining a comparable scan time. FLAIR images of either different TEs or different field strengths were ranked for each patient qualitatively by two observers. Signal intensity measurements were obtained in the gray and white matter, CSF and representative white matter lesions (WML). At 3.0 T, a TE of 100 and 120 ms proved superior in all qualitative categories when compared to 140 ms. In the quantitative assessment CNR of WML was highest for 120 ms (CNR: 19.8), intermediate for 100 ms (17.2) and lowest for 140 ms (15.3) (P<0.003). For lesion conspicuity and overall image quality, 3.0 T was judged superior to 1.5 T, whereas no difference was found for gray-white differentiation and image noise. With regard to artifacts, 3.0 T was inferior to 1.5 T. The CNR for WML was slightly lower at 3.0 T, but the difference was not significant (22.6 vs. 28.0, P=ns). However, significantly more WML were detected at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T (483 vs. 341, P<0.0001). The optimal echo time for FLAIR imaging at 3.0 T is 120 ms due to the significantly higher CNR of WML. By trading the higher SNR at 3.0 T for better spatial resolution, nearly the same CNR level could be maintained, increasing lesion detectability at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T. Thus, high-field MRI may further strengthen the role of MRI as the most sensitive paraclinical test for the early diagnosis of MS. PMID

  9. Construction and investigation of 3D vessels net of the brain according to MRI data using the method of variation of scanning plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevko, A. A.; Yankova, G. S.; Maltseva, S. V.; Parshin, D. V.; Akulov, A. E.; Khe, A. K.; Chupakhin, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The blood realizes the transport of substances, which are necessary for livelihoods, throughout the body. The assumption about the relationship genotype and structure of vasculature (in particular of brain) is natural. In the paper we consider models of vessel net for two genetic lines of laboratory mice. Vascular net obtained as a result of preprocessing MRI data. MRI scanning is realized using the method of variation of slope of scanning plane, i.e. by several sets of parallel planes specified by different normal vectors. The following special processing allowed to construct models of vessel nets without fragmentation. The purpose of the work is to compare the vascular network models of two different genetic lines of laboratory mice.

  10. A study on the flip angle for an optimal T1-weighted image based on the 3D-THRIVE MRI technique: Focusing on the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the optimal flip angle (FA) for a T1-weighted image in the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 3D-T1-weighted high-resolution isotropic volume examination (THRIVE) technique was used to determine the dependence of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on the change in FA. This study targeted 40 liver cancer patients (25 men and 15 women aged 50 to 70 years with a mean age of 60.32 ± 6.2 years) who visited this hospital to undergo an abdominal MRI examination from January to June 2013. A 3.0 Tesla MRI machine (Philips, Medical System, Achieva) and a MRI receiver coil for data reception with a 16-channel multicoil were used in this study. The THRIVE (repetition time (TR): 8.1 ms, echo time (TE): 3.7 ms, matrix: 172 × 172, slice thickness: 4 mm, gap: 2 mm, field of view (FOV): 350 mm, and band width (BW): 380.1 Hz) technique was applied as a pulse sequence. The time required for the examination was 19 seconds, and the breath-hold technique was used. Axial images were obtained at five FAs: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25°. The signal intensities of the liver, the lesion and the background noise were measured based on the acquired images before the SNR and the CNR were calculated. To evaluate the image at the FA, we used SPSS for Windows ver. 17.0 to conduct a one-way ANOVA test. A Bonferroni test was conducted as a post-hoc test. The SNRs of the hemorrhagic HCC in the 3D-THRIVE technique were 35.50 ± 4.12, 97.00 ± 10.24, 66.09 ± 7.29, 53.84 ± 5.43, and 42.92 ± 5.11 for FAs of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°, respectively (p = 0.0430), whereas the corresponding CNRs were 30.50 ± 3.84, 43.00 ± 5.42, 36.54 ± 4.09, 32.30 ± 2.79, and 31.69 ± 3.21 (p = 0.0003). At a small FA of 10, the SNR and the CNR showed the highest values. As the FA was increased, the SNR and the CNR values showed a decreasing tendency. In conclusion, the optimal T1-weighted image FA should be set to 10° to detect a HCC by using the 3D

  11. Investigation of cyano-bridged coordination nanoparticles Gd(3+)/[Fe(CN)6](3-)/D-mannitol as T1-weighted MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Perrier, M; Gallud, A; Ayadi, A; Kennouche, S; Porredon, C; Gary-Bobo, M; Larionova, J; Goze-Bac, Ch; Zanca, M; Garcia, M; Basile, I; Long, J; de Lapuente, J; Borras, M; Guari, Y

    2015-07-28

    Cyano-bridged Gd(3+)/[Fe(CN)6](3-) coordination polymer nanoparticles of 3-4 nm stabilized with D-mannitol presenting a high r1 relaxivity value of 11.4 mM(-1) s(-1) were investigated in vivo as contrast agents (CA) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They allow an increase of the MR image contrast and can act as an efficient intravascular T1 CA with a relatively long blood-circulation lifetime (60 min) without specific toxicity. PMID:25967733

  12. Investigation of cyano-bridged coordination nanoparticles Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3-/d-mannitol as T1-weighted MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, M.; Gallud, A.; Ayadi, A.; Kennouche, S.; Porredon, C.; Gary-Bobo, M.; Larionova, J.; Goze-Bac, Ch.; Zanca, M.; Garcia, M.; Basile, I.; Long, J.; de Lapuente, J.; Borras, M.; Guari, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Cyano-bridged Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3- coordination polymer nanoparticles of 3-4 nm stabilized with d-mannitol presenting a high r1 relaxivity value of 11.4 mM-1 s-1 were investigated in vivo as contrast agents (CA) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They allow an increase of the MR image contrast and can act as an efficient intravascular T1 CA with a relatively long blood-circulation lifetime (60 min) without specific toxicity.Cyano-bridged Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3- coordination polymer nanoparticles of 3-4 nm stabilized with d-mannitol presenting a high r1 relaxivity value of 11.4 mM-1 s-1 were investigated in vivo as contrast agents (CA) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They allow an increase of the MR image contrast and can act as an efficient intravascular T1 CA with a relatively long blood-circulation lifetime (60 min) without specific toxicity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and procedures, toxicological data, physical characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01557j

  13. Aliskiren Effect on Plaque Progression in Established Atherosclerosis Using High Resolution 3D MRI (ALPINE): A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Georgeta; Varghese, Juliet; Kampfrath, Thomas; Gushchina, Liubov; Hafer, Lisa; Deiuliis, Jeffrey; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Lu, Bo; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Background The renin–angiotensin system is well recognized as a mediator of pathophysiological events in atherosclerosis. The benefits of renin inhibition in atherosclerosis, especially when used in combination with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEIs/ARBs) are currently not known. We hypothesized that treatment with the renin inhibitor aliskiren in patients with established cardiovascular disease will prevent the progression of atherosclerosis as determined by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of arterial wall volume in the thoracic and abdominal aortas of high-risk patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results This was a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with established cardiovascular disease. After a 2-week single-blind placebo phase, patients were randomized to receive either placebo (n=37, mean±SD age 64.5±8.9 years, 3 women) or 150 mg of aliskiren (n=34, mean±SD age 63.9±11.5 years, 9 women). Treatment dose was escalated to 300 mg at 2 weeks and maintained during the remainder of the study. Patients underwent dark-blood, 3-dimensional MRI assessment of atherosclerotic plaque in the thoracic and abdominal segments at baseline and on study completion or termination (up to 36 weeks of drug or matching placebo). Aliskiren use resulted in significant progression of aortic wall volume (normalized total wall volume 5.31±6.57 vs 0.15±4.39 mm3, P=0.03, and percentage wall volume 3.37±2.96% vs 0.97±2.02%, P=0.04) compared with placebo. In a subgroup analysis of subjects receiving ACEI/ARB therapy, atherosclerosis progression was observed only in the aliskiren group, not in the placebo group. Conclusions MRI quantification of atheroma plaque burden demonstrated that aliskiren use in patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease resulted in an unexpected increase in aortic atherosclerosis compared with placebo. Although

  14. MRI - 3D Ultrasound - X-ray Image Fusion with Electromagnetic Tracking for Transendocardial Therapeutic Injections: In-vitro Validation and In-vivo Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Hatt, Charles R.; Jain, Ameet K.; Parthasarathy, Vijay; Lang, Andrew; Raval, Amish N.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Small animal studies have shown that stem-cell therapy offers dramatic functional improvement post-MI. An endomyocardial catheter injection approach to therapeutic agent delivery has been proposed to improve efficacy through increased cell retention. Accurate targeting is critical for reaching areas of greatest therapeutic potential while avoiding a life-threatening myocardial perforation. Multimodal image fusion has been proposed as a way to improve these procedures by augmenting traditional intra-operative imaging modalities with high resolution pre-procedural images. Previous approaches have suffered from a lack of real-time tissue imaging and dependence on X-ray imaging to track devices, leading to increased ionizing radiation dose. In this paper, we present a new image fusion system for catheter-based targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. The system registers real-time 3D echocardiography, magnetic resonance, X-ray, and electromagnetic sensor tracking within a single flexible framework. All system calibrations and registrations were validated and found to have target registration errors less than 5 mm in the worst case. Injection accuracy was validated in a motion enabled cardiac injection phantom, where targeting accuracy ranged from 0.57 to 3.81 mm. Clinical feasibility was demonstrated with in-vivo swine experiments, where injections were successfully made into targeted regions of the heart. PMID:23561056

  15. Non-contrast 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography for visualization of intracranial aneurysms in patients with absolute contraindications to CT or MRI contrast

    PubMed Central

    Yanamadala, Vijay; Sheth, Sameer A.; Walcott, Brian P.; Buchbinder, Bradley R.; Buckley, Deidre; Ogilvy, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    The preoperative evaluation in patients with intracranial aneurysms typically includes a contrast-enhanced vascular study, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), or digital subtraction angiography. However, there are numerous absolute and relative contraindications to the administration of imaging contrast agents, including pregnancy, severe contrast allergy, and renal insufficiency. Evaluation of patients with contrast contraindications thus presents a unique challenge. We identified three patients with absolute contrast contraindications who presented with intracranial aneurysms. One patient was pregnant, while the other two had previous severe anaphylactic reactions to iodinated contrast. Because of these contraindications to intravenous contrast, we performed non-contrast time-of-flight MRA with 3D reconstruction (TOF MRA with 3DR) with maximum intensity projections and volume renderings as part of the preoperative evaluation prior to successful open surgical clipping of the aneurysms. In the case of one paraclinoid aneurysm, a high-resolution non-contrast CT scan was also performed to assess the relationship of the aneurysm to the anterior clinoid process. TOF MRA with 3DR successfully identified the intracranial aneurysms and adequately depicted the surrounding microanatomy. Intraoperative findings were as predicted by the preoperative imaging studies. The aneurysms were successfully clip-obliterated, and the patients had uneventful post-operative courses. These cases demonstrate that non-contrast imaging is a viable modality to assess intracranial aneurysms as part of the surgical planning process in patients with contrast contraindications. TOF MRA with 3DR, in conjunction with high-resolution non-contrast CT when indicated, provides adequate visualization of the microanatomy of the aneurysm and surrounding structures. PMID:23685107

  16. Cetacean brain evolution: Dwarf sperm whale (Kogia sima) and common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) - An investigation with high-resolution 3D MRI.

    PubMed

    Oelschläger, H H A; Ridgway, S H; Knauth, M

    2010-01-01

    This study compares a whole brain of the dwarf sperm whale (Kogia sima) with that of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Kogia brain was scanned with a Siemens Trio Magnetic Resonance scanner in the three main planes. As in the common dolphin and other marine odontocetes, the brain of the dwarf sperm whale is large, with the telencephalic hemispheres remarkably dominating the brain stem. The neocortex is voluminous and the cortical grey matter thin but expansive and densely convoluted. The corpus callosum is thin and the anterior commissure hard to detect whereas the posterior commissure is well-developed. There is consistency as to the lack of telencephalic structures (olfactory bulb and peduncle, olfactory ventricular recess) and neither an occipital lobe of the telencephalic hemisphere nor the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle are present. A pineal organ could not be detected in Kogia. Both species show a tiny hippocampus and thin fornix and the mammillary body is very small whereas other structures of the limbic system are well-developed. The brain stem is thick and underlies a large cerebellum, both of which, however, are smaller in Kogia. The vestibular system is markedly reduced with the exception of the lateral (Deiters') nucleus. The visual system, although well-developed in both species, is exceeded by the impressive absolute and relative size of the auditory system. The brainstem and cerebellum comprise a series of structures (elliptic nucleus, medial accessory inferior olive, paraflocculus and posterior interpositus nucleus) showing characteristic odontocete dimensions and size correlations. All these structures seem to serve the auditory system with respect to echolocation, communication, and navigation. PMID:20203478

  17. Time-Resolved 3D Quantitative Flow MRI of the Major Intracranial Vessels: Initial Experience and Comparative Evaluation at 1.5T and 3.0T in Combination With Parallel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Hope, Thomas A.; Aksoy, Murat; Alley, Marcus T.

    2012-01-01

    Exact knowledge of blood flow characteristics in the major cerebral vessels is of great relevance for diagnosing cerebrovascular abnormalities. This involves the assessment of hemodynamically critical areas as well as the derivation of biomechanical parameters such as wall shear stress and pressure gradients. A time-resolved, 3D phase-contrast (PC) MRI method using parallel imaging was implemented to measure blood flow in three dimensions at multiple instances over the cardiac cycle. The 4D velocity data obtained from 14 healthy volunteers were used to investigate dynamic blood flow with the use of multiplanar reformatting, 3D streamlines, and 4D particle tracing. In addition, the effects of magnetic field strength, parallel imaging, and temporal resolution on the data were investigated in a comparative evaluation at 1.5T and 3T using three different parallel imaging reduction factors and three different temporal resolutions in eight of the 14 subjects. Studies were consistently performed faster at 3T than at 1.5T because of better parallel imaging performance. A high temporal resolution (65 ms) was required to follow dynamic processes in the intracranial vessels. The 4D flow measurements provided a high degree of vascular conspicuity. Time-resolved streamline analysis provided features that have not been reported previously for the intracranial vasculature. PMID:17195166

  18. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  19. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  20. Multifocal and multicentric glioblastoma: Improved characterisation with FLAIR imaging and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Lasocki, Arian; Gaillard, Frank; Tacey, Mark; Drummond, Katharine; Stuckey, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma usually presents on imaging as a single peripherally enhancing lesion, but multiple enhancing lesions can occur, termed multifocal if there is a connection between enhancing lesions, or multicentric when no communication is demonstrated. We aim to determine the incidence and prognostic implications of multifocal and multicentric glioblastoma in the era of modern MRI, focusing on the added benefit of T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging. Patients with a new diagnosis of glioblastoma were identified. Preoperative MRI were reviewed to determine whether more than one distinct enhancing lesion was present, and whether there was communication between lesions. The findings were compared against survival data. More than one discrete contrast-enhancing lesion was present in 51 of the 151 patients (34%). Communication between lesions was identified in 47 of these, most commonly direct parenchymal spread (41 patients). The patients with multiple lesions had worse survival (median 176days, compared to 346days), but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.253). These tumours more frequently involved deep structures (p<0.001) and the posterior fossa (p=0.045), both of which were associated with worse survival. The presence of multiple enhancing foci in glioblastoma is common, occurring in about one-third of patients, and the majority have multifocal disease. The FLAIR sequence is the crucial sequence for demonstrating a communication between lesions. The worse survival of these patients is, at least in large part related to more extensive tumour dissemination and more frequent involvement of key structures, rather than multiplicity per se. PMID:27343042

  1. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  2. 3D-MRI rendering of the anatomical structures related to acupuncture points of the Dai mai, Yin qiao mai and Yang qiao mai meridians within the context of the WOMED concept of lateral tension: implications for musculoskeletal disease

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, Roy; Rudisch, Ansgar; Kremser, Christian; Moncayo, Helga

    2007-01-01

    Background A conceptual model of lateral muscular tension in patients presenting thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) has been recently described. Clinical improvement has been achieved by using acupuncture on points belonging to the so-called extraordinary meridians. The aim of this study was to characterize the anatomical structures related to these acupuncture points by means of 3D MRI image rendering relying on external markers. Methods The investigation was carried out the index case patient of the lateral tension model. A licensed medical acupuncture practitioner located the following acupuncture points: 1) Yin qiao mai meridian (medial ankle): Kidney 3, Kidney 6, the plantar Kidney 6 (Nan jing description); 2) Yang qiao mai meridian (lateral ankle): Bladder 62, Bladder 59, Bladder 61, and the plantar Bladder 62 (Nan jing description); 3) Dai mai meridian (wait): Liver 13, Gall bladder 26, Gall bladder 27, Gall bladder 28, and Gall bladder 29. The points were marked by taping a nitro-glycerin capsule on the skin. Imaging was done on a Siemens Magnetom Avanto MR scanner using an array head and body coil. Mainly T1-weighted imaging sequences, as routinely used for patient exams, were used to obtain multi-slice images. The image data were rendered in 3D modus using dedicated software (Leonardo, Siemens). Results Points of the Dai mai meridian – at the level of the waist – corresponded to the obliquus externus abdominis and the obliquus internus abdominis. Points of the Yin qiao mai meridian – at the medial side of the ankle – corresponded to tendinous structures of the flexor digitorum longus as well as to muscular structures of the abductor hallucis on the foot sole. Points of the Yang qiao mai meridian – at the lateral side of the ankle – corresponded to tendinous structures of the peroneus brevis, the peroneous longus, and the lateral surface of the calcaneus and close to the foot sole to the abductor digiti minimi. Conclusion This non

  3. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  4. Clinical applications of 3-D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    Both 3-D gels and radiochromic plastic dosimeters, in conjunction with dose image readout systems (MRI or optical-CT), have been employed to measure 3-D dose distributions in many clinical applications. The 3-D dose maps obtained from these systems can provide a useful tool for clinical dose verification for complex treatment techniques such as IMRT, SRS/SBRT, brachytherapy, and proton beam therapy. These complex treatments present high dose gradient regions in the boundaries between the target and surrounding critical organs. Dose accuracy in these areas can be critical, and may affect treatment outcome. In this review, applications of 3-D gels and PRESAGE dosimeter are reviewed and evaluated in terms of their performance in providing information on clinical dose verification as well as commissioning of various treatment modalities. Future interests and clinical needs on studies of 3-D dosimetry are also discussed.

  5. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  6. The Generalized FLaIR Model (GFM) for landslide forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Davide Luciano; Versace, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    A new version of the hydrological model named FLaIR (Forecasting of Landslides Induced by Rainfall, Capparelli and Versace 2011) is proposed, named as GFM (Generalized FLaIR Model). Non stationary rainfall thresholds, depending on antecedent precipitation, are introduced in this new release, which allow for a better prediction of landslide occurrences. It is possible to demonstrate that GFM reproduces all the Antecedent Precipitation models (AP) proposed in technical literature as particular cases, besides Intensity-Duration schemes (ID) and more conceptual approaches, whose reconstruction with the first release of FlaIR model, which adopts only stationary thresholds, was already discussed in Capparelli and Versace (2011). GFM is extremely flexible, and the main advantage of the model is represented by the possibility of using well-established procedures for the choice of the most appropriate configuration for the selected case study, and of facilitating the comparison between several options, through the use of a mobility function. Gimigliano municipality, located in Calabria region (southern Italy) was chosen as case study, where a consistent number of landslides occurred in the past years; in particular, during the period 2008-2010 this area (like the whole Calabria region) was affected by persistent rainfall events, which induced several damages related to infrastructures and buildings. For the selected case study GFM allows to obtain significant improvements in landslide prediction; in details a substantial reduction of False Alarms is obtained with respect to application of classical ID and AP schemes. REFERENCES Capparelli G, Versace P (2011). FLaIR and SUSHI: Two mathematical models for Early Warning Systems for rainfall induced landslides. Landslides 8:67-79. doi: 10.1007/s10346-010-0228-6

  7. Non-Invasive Targeted Peripheral Nerve Ablation Using 3D MR Neurography and MRI-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU): Pilot Study in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Merel; Staruch, Robert M.; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; van den Bosch, Maurice A.; Burns, Dennis K.; Chhabra, Avneesh; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultrasound (US)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been proposed for noninvasive treatment of neuropathic pain and has been investigated in in-vivo studies. However, ultrasound has important limitations regarding treatment guidance and temperature monitoring. Magnetic resonance (MR)-imaging guidance may overcome these limitations and MR-guided HIFU (MR-HIFU) has been used successfully for other clinical indications. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing 3D MR neurography to identify and guide ablation of peripheral nerves using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Methods Volumetric MR-HIFU was used to induce lesions in the peripheral nerves of the lower limbs in three pigs. Diffusion-prep MR neurography and T1-weighted images were utilized to identify the target, plan treatment and immediate post-treatment evaluation. For each treatment, one 8 or 12 mm diameter treatment cell was used (sonication duration 20 s and 36 s, power 160–300 W). Peripheral nerves were extracted < 3 hours after treatment. Ablation dimensions were calculated from thermal maps, post-contrast MRI and macroscopy. Histological analysis included standard H&E staining, Masson’s trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Results All targeted peripheral nerves were identifiable on MR neurography and T1-weighted images and could be accurately ablated with a single exposure of focused ultrasound, with peak temperatures of 60.3 to 85.7°C. The lesion dimensions as measured on MR neurography were similar to the lesion dimensions as measured on CE-T1, thermal dose maps, and macroscopy. Histology indicated major hyperacute peripheral nerve damage, mostly confined to the location targeted for ablation. Conclusion Our preliminary results indicate that targeted peripheral nerve ablation is feasible with MR-HIFU. Diffusion-prep 3D MR neurography has potential for guiding therapy procedures where either nerve targeting or avoidance is desired, and may

  8. Use of 3D DCE-MRI for the estimation of renal perfusion and glomerular filtration rate: an intrasubject comparison of FLASH and KWIC with a comprehensive framework for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Eikefjord, Eli; Andersen, Erling; Hodneland, Erlend; Zöllner, Frank; Lundervold, Arvid; Svarstad, Einar; Rørvik, Jarle

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to compare two 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI measurement techniques for MR renography, a radial k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) sequence and a cartesian FLASH sequence, in terms of intrasubject differences in estimates of renal functional parameters and image quality characteristics. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Ten healthy volunteers underwent repeated breath-hold KWIC and FLASH sequence examinations with temporal resolutions of 2.5 and 2.8 seconds, respectively. A two-compartment model was used to estimate MRI-derived perfusion parameters and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The latter was compared with the iohexol GFR and the estimated GFR. Image quality was assessed using a visual grading characteristic analysis of relevant image quality criteria and signal-to-noise ratio calculations. RESULTS. Perfusion estimates from FLASH were closer to literature reference values than were the KWIC sequences. In relation to the iohexol GFR (mean [± SD], 103 ± 11 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), KWIC produced significant underestimations and larger bias in GFR values (mean, 70 ± 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2); bias = -33.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) compared with the FLASH GFR (110 ± 29 mL/min/1.73 m(2); bias = 6.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). KWIC was statistically significantly (p < 0.005) more impaired by artifacts than was FLASH (AUC = 0.18). The average signal-enhancement ratio (delta ratio) in the cortex was significantly lower for KWIC (delta ratio = 0.99) than for FLASH (delta ratio = 1.40). Other visually graded image quality characteristics and signal-to-noise ratio measurements were not statistically significantly different. CONCLUSION. Using the same postprocessing scheme and pharmacokinetic model, FLASH produced more accurate perfusion and filtration parameters than did KWIC compared with clinical reference methods. Our data suggest an apparent relationship between image quality characteristics and the degree of stability in the numeric model

  9. The power of hybrid / fusion imaging metrics in future PACS systems: a case study into the white matter hyperintensity prenumbra using FLAIR and diffusion MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Ma, Samantha J.; Michels, Peter A.; Gajawelli, Niharika; Law, Meng; Chui, Helena; Lepore, Natasha

    2014-04-01

    Most white matter related neurological disease exhibit a large number of White Matter Hyperintensities (WMHs) on FLAIR MRI images. However, these lesions are not well understood. At the same time, Diffusion MRI has been gaining popularity as a powerful method of characterizing White Matter (WM) integrity. This work aims to study the behavior of the diffusion signal within the WMH voxels. The goal is to develop hybrid MR metrics that leverage information from multiple MR acquisitions to solve clinical problems. In our case, we are trying to address the WMH penumbra (as defined by Maillard et al 20112) where WMH delineates a foci that is more widespread than the actual damage area presumably due to acute inflammation. Our results show that diffusion MR metrics may be able to better delineate tissue that is inflamed versus scar tissue but may be less specific to lesions than FLAIR. Therefore, a hybrid metric that encodes information from both FLAIR and Diffusion MR may yield new and novel imaging information about the progression of white matter disease progression. We hope that this work also demonstrates how future PACS systems could have image fusion capabilities that would be able to leverage information from multiple imaging series to yield new and novel imaging contrast.

  10. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  11. MRI localization of the subthalamic nucleus in normal adults and its relation with age.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huandi; Geng, Zuojun; Zhu, Qingfeng; Wang, Lixin; Song, Zhenhu; Chang, Ruiting; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-11

    The subthalamic nucleus regulates motor and neurocognitive functions. Because of its small size and close proximity to other small subcortical structures, it has been a challenge to localize and visualize it using MRI. Here, we sought to define the optimal MRI scan method and visualization plane for locating the subthalamic nucleus on MRI images and to further delineate the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus and their correlation with age, laterality, and sex. Healthy volunteers received axial, sagittal, and coronal T2_3D_DRIVE CLEAR, coronal T1-WI, coronal T2FLAIR, coronal T2, and coronal SWI sequence. The coronal T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR images were compared with the Schaltenbrand-Wahren Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain for localizing the subthalamic nucleus. The best visualization plane with the largest sectional area and the most distinct outline was obtained and region of interest was delineated manually on the basis of the contours of the bilateral subthalamic nuclei in T2-WI images. T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view showed optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus and indicated that the subthalamic nucleus showed three morphological types: the double convex lens type (172, 64%), the ram's horn type (62, 23%), and the willow leaf type (34, 13%). There were no statistically significant differences because of laterality, sex, and age in the sectional area, and maximal long and short diameter of the subthalamic nucleus. On the basis of our results, the current study has shown that T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view provides optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus, which shows three distinct morphological types on MRI images, and there is no statistically significant difference in the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus because of laterality, sex, and age in normal individuals. PMID:26379058

  12. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  13. The FlaIR regional model in landslide early warning.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capparelli, G.; De Luca, D. L.; Versace, P.

    2012-04-01

    Over recent years, the link between rainfall and landslides has been the focus of many studies. The analytical approaches which can be found in the specific technical literature differ greatly in terms of methodology and formulation. The methodology here proposed concerns the hydrological FLAIR model (Forecasting of Landslides Induced by Rainfall - Sirangelo & Versace 1992) that was applied following a regional approach. Regional models are, often, the only alternative when it is necessary to predict the triggering of landslide movements in vast areas where there is concern not only about the reactivation of pre-existing movements, but also activation of new movements whose exact location is unforeseeable. The regional FLaIR model was used for studying the hydrogeological events which have occurred in the Region of Calabria (South Italy) over the winters from 2008 to 2010, during which heavy, persistent rainfalls have placed the security of tens of thousands of people in great trouble, involving nearly the entire region as more than 1,600 events, from landslides and flood rivers. The University of Calabria, through CAMILab, Centre of Competence of the National Department of Civil Protection, has developed a systematic study of the events recorded over this period, carrying out on-the-spot investigations, analysing photographic documentation, images and news provided by local television, the press and governmental organisations (Versace et al. 2011). Following the procedures proposed by FLaIR model, a comparison was made of the events foreseen by the model and those which actually occurred, estimating the number of Correct Alarms (CA), Missed Alarms (MA) and False Alarms (FA), which are the principal indicators for evaluating how efficacious and efficient the various models are. The results presented in this work show that the model is highly capable of predicting the different events, with a limited number of MA. Even by comparison with the results obtained by

  14. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  15. Automated segmentation of MS lesions in FLAIR, DIR and T2-w MR images via an information theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Jason E.; Matlock, Kevin; Pal, Ranadip; Nutter, Brian; Mitra, Sunanda

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a vital tool in the diagnosis and characterization of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS lesions can be imaged with relatively high contrast using either Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) or Double Inversion Recovery (DIR). Automated segmentation and accurate tracking of MS lesions from MRI remains a challenging problem. Here, an information theoretic approach to cluster the voxels in pseudo-colorized multispectral MR data (FLAIR, DIR, T2-weighted) is utilized to automatically segment MS lesions of various sizes and noise levels. The Improved Jump Method (IJM) clustering, assisted by edge suppression, is applied to the segmentation of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and MS lesions, if present, into a subset of slices determined to be the best MS lesion candidates via Otsu's method. From this preliminary clustering, the modal data values for the tissues can be determined. A Euclidean distance is then used to estimate the fuzzy memberships of each brain voxel for all tissue types and their 50/50 partial volumes. From these estimates, binary discrete and fuzzy MS lesion masks are constructed. Validation is provided by using three synthetic MS lesions brains (mild, moderate and severe) with labeled ground truths. The MS lesions of mild, moderate and severe designations were detected with a sensitivity of 83.2%, and 88.5%, and 94.5%, and with the corresponding Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.7098, 0.8739, and 0.8266, respectively. The effect of MRI noise is also examined by simulated noise and the application of a bilateral filter in preprocessing.

  16. 3D-DIR for early differential diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of NMO

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanbing; Yan, Hong; Ding, Qixing; Mao, Cunhua; Shen, Yelong; Wang, Guangbin

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acute or subacute lesion of demyelinating disease involving the optic nerve and spinal cord, and imaging techniques and their effects have been the focus of investigations. The aim of the present study was to examine the value of three-dimensional double inversion recovery (3D-DIR) in the early differential diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of NMO. Forty-eight patients with suspicious NMO were included into the study and underwent a combination of serum NMO-IgG quantitative detection and 3D-DIR examination. Forty cases (83.3%) of the suspicious cases were confirmed with NMO. The average time from onset to definite diagnosis was 3.5±0.6 days. The brain showed high T2W and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signals, involving 5.8±1.2 sites on average, distributed in the peripheral lateral ventricle, medulla, cerebral white matter, the third ventricle, peripheral aqueduct of sylvius, pons and diencephalon. The average T2W signal strength was 2.73±0.12. The signal intensity of DIR was significantly higher than that of T2W and FLAIR, and the difference was statistically significant. The optic nerve and chiasma showed a high FLAIR signal, with an average signal intensity of 2.13±0.14. The spinal cord showed swelling, necrosis and cavity lesion, involving the gray and white matter of the central site, transversely, with an average lesion length of 4.7±0.6 centrum. The relative signal intensity of DIR was significantly higher than that of T2W and FLAIR. Following treatment, the signal intensity of the brain, optic nerve, optic chiasma and spinal cord decreased significantly (P<0.05). In conclusion, 3D-DIR has great application value in the early differential diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of NMO.

  17. 3D reconstruction of tensors and vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Defrise, Michel; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2005-02-17

    Here we have developed formulations for the reconstruction of 3D tensor fields from planar (Radon) and line-integral (X-ray) projections of 3D vector and tensor fields. Much of the motivation for this work is the potential application of MRI to perform diffusion tensor tomography. The goal is to develop a theory for the reconstruction of both Radon planar and X-ray or line-integral projections because of the flexibility of MRI to obtain both of these type of projections in 3D. The development presented here for the linear tensor tomography problem provides insight into the structure of the nonlinear MRI diffusion tensor inverse problem. A particular application of tensor imaging in MRI is the potential application of cardiac diffusion tensor tomography for determining in vivo cardiac fiber structure. One difficulty in the cardiac application is the motion of the heart. This presents a need for developing future theory for tensor tomography in a motion field. This means developing a better understanding of the MRI signal for diffusion processes in a deforming media. The techniques developed may allow the application of MRI tensor tomography for the study of structure of fiber tracts in the brain, atherosclerotic plaque, and spine in addition to fiber structure in the heart. However, the relations presented are also applicable to other fields in medical imaging such as diffraction tomography using ultrasound. The mathematics presented can also be extended to exponential Radon transform of tensor fields and to other geometric acquisitions such as cone beam tomography of tensor fields.

  18. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  19. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  20. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  1. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  2. Fast and robust 3D T1 mapping using spiral encoding and steady RF excitation at 7 T: application to cardiac manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in mice.

    PubMed

    Castets, Charles R; Ribot, Emeline J; Lefrançois, William; Trotier, Aurélien J; Thiaudière, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Miraux, Sylvain

    2015-07-01

    Mapping longitudinal relaxation times in 3D is a promising quantitative and non-invasive imaging tool to assess cardiac remodeling. Few methods are proposed in the literature allowing us to perform 3D T1 mapping. These methods often require long scan times and use a low number of 3D images to calculate T1 . In this project, a fast 3D T1 mapping method using a stack-of-spirals sampling scheme and regular RF pulse excitation at 7 T is presented. This sequence, combined with a newly developed fitting procedure, allowed us to quantify T1 of the whole mouse heart with a high spatial resolution of 208 × 208 × 315 µm(3) in 10-12 min acquisition time. The sensitivity of this method for measuring T1 variations was demonstrated on mouse hearts after several injections of manganese chloride (doses from 25 to 150 µmol kg(-1) ). T1 values were measured in vivo in both pre- and post-contrast experiments. This protocol was also validated on ischemic mice to demonstrate its efficiency to visualize tissue damage induced by a myocardial infarction. This study showed that combining spiral gradient shape and steady RF excitation enabled fast and robust 3D T1 mapping of the entire heart with a high spatial resolution. PMID:25989986

  3. MR imaging of intracranial epidermoid tumors: specific diagnosis with Turbo-FLAIR pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Karantanas, A H

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the imaging findings with particular reference to the FLAIR magnetic resonance (MR) pulse sequence, of four patients with epidermoid cysts. In all cases CT showed hypodense lesions with stippled peripheral calcifications and no enhancement. The MR showed low signal intensity lesions in T1-weighted images, high signal intensity in T2-weighted lesions, no or minor enhancement after gadolinium administration and characteristic heterogeneous appearance in FLAIR images. Including the FLAIR sequence in MR imaging, a specific diagnosis can be suggested. PMID:11179701

  4. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  5. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  6. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  7. High-Resolution 3-T Endorectal Prostate MRI: A Multireader Study of Radiologist Preference and Perceived Interpretive Quality of 2D and 3D T2-Weighted Fast Spin-Echo MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Noworolski, Susan M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Jhaveri, Kartik S.; Raman, Steve S.; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Zagoria, Ronald J.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to compare the perceived quality of 3-T axial T2-weighted high-resolution 2D and high-resolution 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) endorectal MR images of the prostate. MATERIALS AND METHODS Six radiologists independently reviewed paired 3-T axial T2-weighted high-resolution 2D and 3D FSE endorectal MR images of the prostates of 85 men in two sessions. In the first session (n = 85), each reader selected his or her preferred images; in the second session (n = 28), they determined their confidence in tumor identification and compared the depiction of the prostatic anatomy, tumor conspicuity, and subjective intrinsic image quality of images. A meta-analysis using a random-effects model, logistic regression, and the paired Wilcoxon rank-sum test were used for statistical analyses. RESULTS Three readers preferred the 2D acquisition (67–89%), and the other three preferred the 3D images (70–80%). The option for one of the techniques was not associated with any of the predictor variables. The 2D FSE images were significantly sharper than 3D FSE (p < 0.001) and significantly more likely to exhibit other (nonmotion) artifacts (p = 0.002). No other statistically significant differences were found. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that there are strong individual preferences for the 2D or 3D FSE MR images, but there was a wide variability among radiologists. There were differences in image quality (image sharpness and presence of artifacts not related to motion) but not in the sequences’ ability to delineate the glandular anatomy and depict a cancerous tumor. PMID:26491891

  8. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  9. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  10. Volumetric MRI data correlate to disease severity in metachromatic leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Derks, Marloes GM; Pouwels, Petra J W; de Graaf, Pim; van Rappard, Diane F; Barkhof, Frederik; Steenweg, Marjan E; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited lysosomal disorder due to a deficiency in arylsulfatase A with progressive demyelination and neurological decline. This retrospective MRI study investigated the extent of cortical involvement at time of diagnosis, and clinical correlates to both conventional and regional volumetric measures of brain involvement. Methods 3D-T1-weighted MRI scans were used to determine cortical thickness and surface-based cerebral cortical gray matter (GM) and cerebral white matter (WM) volume (GMV and WMV), WM lesions, thalamus, and cerebellum. MRI-MLD severity scores were obtained from FLAIR images. Associations between clinical and imaging data were examined using correlation coefficients. Results Twenty patients with MLD (mean age 13.7 years, range 2–35) and 20 controls (mean age 13.9 years, range 2–40) were included. Compared with control subjects, late-infantile, and juvenile patients (n = 14) had significantly diminished cerebral cortical GMV and thalamus volume (P < 0.05), but did not differ in WMV and cortical thickness. Adult patients (n = 6) showed significantly reduced GMV, WMV and cortical thickness (all P < 0.05). Regional analysis showed statistically significant cortical thinning in the cingulate gyrus and most pronounced thinning with age in the frontal lobe of MLD patients. Intelligence quotient (IQ) correlated with MRI-MLD scores (r = −0.87, P < 0.001). Interpretation Significant cerebral cortical GMV loss is already present in early stages of MLD. IQ correlates with WM severity scores and lesion volume, but not with volumetric measures. In adult presentations, there is more pronounced global atrophy with GMV and WMV loss and accelerated cortical thinning, most prominently in the cingulate gyrus and frontal lobes. PMID:26401514

  11. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka; Casillas, Christen; Dutt, Shubir; Schuff, Norbert; Truran-Sacrey, Diana; Boxer, Adam; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present a method to segment four brainstem structures (midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and superior cerebellar peduncle) from 3D brain MRI scans. The segmentation method relies on a probabilistic atlas of the brainstem and its neighboring brain structures. To build the atlas, we combined a dataset of 39 scans with already existing manual delineations of the whole brainstem and a dataset of 10 scans in which the brainstem structures were manually labeled with a protocol that was specifically designed for this study. The resulting atlas can be used in a Bayesian framework to segment the brainstem structures in novel scans. Thanks to the generative nature of the scheme, the segmentation method is robust to changes in MRI contrast or acquisition hardware. Using cross validation, we show that the algorithm can segment the structures in previously unseen T1 and FLAIR scans with great accuracy (mean error under 1mm) and robustness (no failures in 383 scans including 168 AD cases). We also indirectly evaluate the algorithm with a experiment in which we study the atrophy of the brainstem in aging. The results show that, when used simultaneously, the volumes of the midbrain, pons and medulla are significantly more predictive of age than the volume of the entire brainstem, estimated as their sum. The results also demonstrate that the method can detect atrophy patterns in the brainstem structures that have been previously described in the literature. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is able to detect differential effects of AD on the brainstem structures. The method will be implemented as part of the popular neuroimaging package FreeSurfer. PMID:25776214

  12. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  13. Automatic iterative segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions using Student's t mixture models and probabilistic anatomical atlases in FLAIR images.

    PubMed

    Freire, Paulo G L; Ferrari, Ricardo J

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease that attacks the central nervous system (CNS) and affects more than 2 million people worldwide. The segmentation of MS lesions in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very important task to assess how a patient is responding to treatment and how the disease is progressing. Computational approaches have been proposed over the years to segment MS lesions and reduce the amount of time spent on manual delineation and inter- and intra-rater variability and bias. However, fully-automatic segmentation of MS lesions still remains an open problem. In this work, we propose an iterative approach using Student's t mixture models and probabilistic anatomical atlases to automatically segment MS lesions in Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) images. Our technique resembles a refinement approach by iteratively segmenting brain tissues into smaller classes until MS lesions are grouped as the most hyperintense one. To validate our technique we used 21 clinical images from the 2015 Longitudinal Multiple Sclerosis Lesion Segmentation Challenge dataset. Evaluation using Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), True Positive Ratio (TPR), False Positive Ratio (FPR), Volume Difference (VD) and Pearson's r coefficient shows that our technique has a good spatial and volumetric agreement with raters' manual delineations. Also, a comparison between our proposal and the state-of-the-art shows that our technique is comparable and, in some cases, better than some approaches, thus being a viable alternative for automatic MS lesion segmentation in MRI. PMID:27058437

  14. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  15. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  16. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  17. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  18. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  19. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  20. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  1. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  2. High definition 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, A K; Krumm, J C; Kozlowski, D M; Kuhlmann, J L; Wilson, C; Little, C; Dickey, F M; Kwok, K S; Rogers, B; Walsh, N

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated high definition and improved resolution using a novel scanning system integrated with a commercial ultrasound machine. The result is a volumetric 3D ultrasound data set that can be visualized using standard techniques. Unlike other 3D ultrasound images, image quality is improved from standard 2D data. Image definition and bandwidth is improved using patent pending techniques. The system can be used to image patients or wounded soldiers for general imaging of anatomy such as abdominal organs, extremities, and the neck. Although the risks associated with x-ray carcinogenesis are relatively low at diagnostic dose levels, concerns remain for individuals in high risk categories. In addition, cost and portability of CT and MRI machines can be prohibitive. In comparison, ultrasound can provide portable, low-cost, non-ionizing imaging. Previous clinical trials comparing ultrasound to CT were used to demonstrate qualitative and quantitative improvements of ultrasound using the Sandia technologies. Transverse leg images demonstrated much higher clarity and lower noise than is seen in traditional ultrasound images. An x-ray CT scan was provided of the same cross-section for comparison. The results of our most recent trials demonstrate the advantages of 3D ultrasound and motion compensation compared with 2D ultrasound. Metal objects can also be observed within the anatomy. PMID:10168958

  3. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  4. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  5. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  8. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  9. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  10. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  11. Endolymphatic Hydrops Detected by 3-Dimensional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery MRI following Intratympanic Injection of Gadolinium in the Asymptomatic Contralateral Ears of Patients with Unilateral Ménière’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yupeng; Jia, Huan; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hui; Li, Yuhua; Yang, Jun; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of endolymphatic hydrops using 3-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the contralateral ear in patients with unilateral Ménière’s disease (MD). Material/Methods This was a prospective study. 3D-FLAIR MRI was performed with a 3 Tesla (3 T) unit 24 h after the intratympanic administration of gadolinium (Gd) in 30 unilateral MD patients with an asymptomatic contralateral ear. The incidence of contralateral involvement in unilateral MD patients and the potential correlations between the affected and contralateral ears were analyzed. Results Endolymphatic hydrops was observed in 7 of the 30 (23.3%) asymptomatic ears. The mean PTA of the asymptomatic ears in the contralateral hydrops patients (33.0±6.1 dB) was significantly higher compared with the non-hydrops patients (17.8±5.7 dB). The patients with observed contralateral hydrops exhibited a significantly longer duration of the disease compared with the non-hydrops patients (6.7±6.3 vs. 2.9±3.1 years, respectively). Furthermore, the patients with contralateral hydrops had a worse hearing level in the affected ears compared with the non-hydrops patients (70.3±7.4 vs. 52.5±3.8 dB, respectively). Conclusions Endolymphatic hydrops is closely related to hearing loss but does not necessarily result in Ménière’s symptoms. Patients with a long history of MD and severe hearing loss in the affected ear are more likely to exhibit endolymphatic hydrops in the asymptomatic contralateral ear. Adequate attention should focus on unilateral MD patients with contralateral ear hydrops because of the potential to develop bilateral MD. PMID:25742875

  12. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  13. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    PubMed

    Naftulin, Jason S; Kimchi, Eyal Y; Cash, Sydney S

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = <30 min). Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes. PMID:26295459

  14. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Sydney S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3–4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14–17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4–6 hr; printing = 9–11 hr, post-processing = <30 min). Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1–5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes. PMID:26295459

  15. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  16. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  17. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  18. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marc E.; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G.; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  19. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  20. Personalized development of human organs using 3D printing technology.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of organ transplantation created by the lack of organ donors and life-long immunosuppression. We hypothesized a precision medicine approach to human organ fabrication using 3D printed technology, in which the digital volumetric data would be collected by imaging of a patient, i.e. CT or MRI images followed by mathematical modeling to create a digital 3D image. Then a suitable biocompatible material, with an optimal resolution for cells seeding and maintenance of cell viability during the printing process, would be printed with a compatible printer type and finally implanted into the patient. Life-saving operations with 3D printed implants were already performed in patients. However, several issues need to be addressed before translational application of 3D printing into clinical medicine. These are vascularization, innervation, and financial cost of 3D printing and safety of biomaterials used for the construct. PMID:26826637

  1. Quantification of traumatic meningeal injury using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Williford, Joshua P.; Cota, Martin R.; MacLaren, Judy M.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Latour, Lawrence L.; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic meningeal injury is a novel imaging marker of traumatic brain injury, which appears as enhancement of the dura on post-contrast T2-weighted FLAIR images, and is likely associated with inflammation of the meninges. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI provides a better discrimination of abnormally perfused regions. A method to properly identify those regions is presented. Images of seventeen patients scanned within 96 hours of head injury with positive traumatic meningeal injury were normalized and aligned. The difference between the pre- and last post-contrast acquisitions was segmented and voxels in the higher class were spatially clustered. Spatial and morphological descriptors were used to identify the regions of enhancement: a) centroid; b) distance to the brain mask from external voxels; c) distance from internal voxels; d) size; e) shape. The method properly identified thirteen regions among all patients. The method failed in one case due to the presence of a large brain lesion that altered the mask boundaries. Most false detections were correctly rejected resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 92.9% and 93.6%, respectively.

  2. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  3. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  4. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  5. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  6. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  7. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  8. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2003-05-12

    This project is in its first full year after the combining of two previously funded projects: ''3D Code Development'' and ''Dynamic Material Properties''. The motivation behind this move was to emphasize and strengthen the ties between the experimental work and the computational model development in the materials area. The next year's activities will indicate the merging of the two efforts. The current activity is structured in two tasks. Task A, ''Simulations and Measurements'', combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. Task B, ''ALE3D Development'', is a continuation of the non-materials related activities from the previous project.

  9. How 3D immersive visualization is changing medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koning, Anton H. J.

    2011-03-01

    Originally the only way to look inside the human body without opening it up was by means of two dimensional (2D) images obtained using X-ray equipment. The fact that human anatomy is inherently three dimensional leads to ambiguities in interpretation and problems of occlusion. Three dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as CT, MRI and 3D ultrasound remove these drawbacks and are now part of routine medical care. While most hospitals 'have gone digital', meaning that the images are no longer printed on film, they are still being viewed on 2D screens. However, this way valuable depth information is lost, and some interactions become unnecessarily complex or even unfeasible. Using a virtual reality (VR) system to present volumetric data means that depth information is presented to the viewer and 3D interaction is made possible. At the Erasmus MC we have developed V-Scope, an immersive volume visualization system for visualizing a variety of (bio-)medical volumetric datasets, ranging from 3D ultrasound, via CT and MRI, to confocal microscopy, OPT and 3D electron-microscopy data. In this talk we will address the advantages of such a system for both medical diagnostics as well as for (bio)medical research.

  10. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  11. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  12. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  13. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  14. Cortical Mapping of 3D Optical Topography in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Papademetriou, Maria D; Richards, John; Correia, Teresa; Blasi, Anna; Murphy, D. G.; Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Johnson, Mark; Elwell, Clare E

    2014-01-01

    Precise localization of cortical activation in the early development of the infant brain remains unclear. It is challenging to co-register haemodynamic responses during functional activation in infants with the underlying anatomy of the brain. We used a multispectral imaging algorithm to reconstruct 3D optical topographic images of haemodynamic responses in an infant during voice processing. In this paper we present a method for co-registering 3D optical topography images reconstructed from functional activation data in infants onto anatomical brain images obtained from MRI structurals of the individual infants. PMID:23852529

  15. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  16. Optoplasmonics: hybridization in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, L.; Gervinskas, G.; Žukauskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.; Brasselet, E.; Juodkazis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Femtosecond laser fabrication has been used to make hybrid refractive and di ractive micro-optical elements in photo-polymer SZ2080. For applications in micro- uidics, axicon lenses were fabricated (both single and arrays), for generation of light intensity patterns extending through the entire depth of a typically tens-of-micrometers deep channel. Further hybridisation of an axicon with a plasmonic slot is fabricated and demonstrated nu- merically. Spiralling chiral grooves were inscribed into a 100-nm-thick gold coating sputtered over polymerized micro-axicon lenses, using a focused ion beam. This demonstrates possibility of hybridisation between optical and plasmonic 3D micro-optical elements. Numerical modelling of optical performance by 3D-FDTD method is presented.

  17. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  18. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  19. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  20. 360-degree 3D profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanhe; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wenyi; Tan, Yushan

    1997-12-01

    A new method of 360 degree turning 3D shape measurement in which light sectioning and phase shifting techniques are both used is presented in this paper. A sine light field is applied in the projected light stripe, meanwhile phase shifting technique is used to calculate phases of the light slit. Thereafter wrapped phase distribution of the slit is formed and the unwrapping process is made by means of the height information based on the light sectioning method. Therefore phase measuring results with better precision can be obtained. At last the target 3D shape data can be produced according to geometric relationships between phases and the object heights. The principles of this method are discussed in detail and experimental results are shown in this paper.

  1. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  2. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  3. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  4. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  5. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  6. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  7. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  8. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  9. Correlations between DTI and FLAIR images reveal the relationships of microscopic and macroscopic white matter degeneration in elderly subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, W.; Zhang, Y.; Lorenzen, P.; Mueller, S. G.; Schuff, N.; Weiner, M. W.

    2008-03-01

    Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) detects the T2 prolongation in whiter matter lesions (WML) measured on a macroscopic scale, whereas diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) more specifically detects the white matter (WM) integrity alterations as measured by water diffusion on a microscopic scale. Both techniques have been widely used to evaluate WM changes associated with aging, dementia and cerebral vascular disease, however, the relationship between white matter lesions (FLAIR) and changes of DTI remains largely unknown. We addressed this issue using a voxel based correlation analysis between DTI and FLAIR images acquired from 33 elderly subjects at 4T. The WML volume and intensity were correlated the fraction anisotropy (FA) or mean diffusivity (MD) across all the subjects on a voxelwise basis. Our results revealed that significant DTI-WML correlations occur at regions overlapping the major WML distributions with moderate intensity, and that no significant correlations were detected in periventricular regions where the FLAIR intensities are particularly high. We investigated WM degeneration as a continuum from normal WM to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using a two-compartment WM model. The simulation results indicated that the FLAIR intensity of WML reaches a maximum when the lesion severity is around 0.7, which is the same point where correlations between DTI and WML disappear. Based on these findings, WM degeneration in elderly subjects may be better characterized by using regional DTI-WML correlations in different stages of WM degeneration. DTI and FLAIR, taken together improve specificity for characterization of WM degeneration than each measure alone.

  10. 3-D Display Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Of The Spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Alan C.; Kim, Yongmin; Haralick, Robert M.; Anderson, Paul A.; Johnson, Roger H.; DeSoto, Larry A.

    1988-06-01

    The original data is produced through standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures with a surface coil applied to the lower back of a normal human subject. The 3-D spine image data consists of twenty-six contiguous slices with 256 x 256 pixels per slice. Two methods for visualization of the 3-D spine are explored. One method utilizes a verifocal mirror system which creates a true 3-D virtual picture of the object. Another method uses a standard high resolution monitor to simultaneously show the three orthogonal sections which intersect at any user-selected point within the object volume. We discuss the application of these systems in assessment of low back pain.

  11. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  12. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  13. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  14. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  15. Vacant Lander in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rear hazard-identification camera shows the now-empty lander that carried the rover 283 million miles to Meridiani Planum, Mars. Engineers received confirmation that Opportunity's six wheels successfully rolled off the lander and onto martian soil at 3:01 a.m. PST, January 31, 2004, on the seventh martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the lander, facing north.

  16. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  17. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  18. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  19. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  20. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  1. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  2. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  3. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  4. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  5. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  6. Pituitary Adenoma Volumetry with 3D Slicer

    PubMed Central

    Nimsky, Christopher; Kikinis, Ron

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we present pituitary adenoma volumetry using the free and open source medical image computing platform for biomedical research: (3D) Slicer. Volumetric changes in cerebral pathologies like pituitary adenomas are a critical factor in treatment decisions by physicians and in general the volume is acquired manually. Therefore, manual slice-by-slice segmentations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, which have been obtained at regular intervals, are performed. In contrast to this manual time consuming slice-by-slice segmentation process Slicer is an alternative which can be significantly faster and less user intensive. In this contribution, we compare pure manual segmentations of ten pituitary adenomas with semi-automatic segmentations under Slicer. Thus, physicians drew the boundaries completely manually on a slice-by-slice basis and performed a Slicer-enhanced segmentation using the competitive region-growing based module of Slicer named GrowCut. Results showed that the time and user effort required for GrowCut-based segmentations were on average about thirty percent less than the pure manual segmentations. Furthermore, we calculated the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) between the manual and the Slicer-based segmentations to proof that the two are comparable yielding an average DSC of 81.97±3.39%. PMID:23240062

  7. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  8. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  9. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  10. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  11. Fast algorithm of 3D median filter for medical image despeckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chengyi; Hou, Jianhua; Gao, Zhirong; He, Xiang; Chen, Shaoping

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) median filtering is very useful to eliminate speckle noise from a medical imaging source, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and ultrasonic imaging. 3-D median filtering is characterized by its higher computation complexity. N 3(N 3-1)/2 comparison operations would be required for 3-D median filtering with N×N×N window if the conventional bubble-sorting algorithm is adopted. In this paper, an efficient fast algorithm for 3-D median filtering was presented, which considerably reduced the computation complexity for extracting the median of a 3-D data array. Compared to the state-of-the-art, the proposed method could reduce the computation complexity of 3-D median filtering by 33%. It results in efficiently reducing the system delay of the 3-D median filter by software implementation, and the system cost and power consumption by hardware implementation.

  12. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  13. Dynamic 3D Visualization of Vocal Tract Shaping During Speech

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yinghua; Kim, Yoon-Chul; Proctor, Michael I.; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is widely used in speech research as a means to investigate the shaping and dynamics of the vocal tract during speech production. 3D dynamic MRI would be a major advance, as it would provide 3D dynamic visualization of the entire vocal tract. We present a novel method for the creation of 3D dynamic movies of vocal tract shaping based on the acquisition of 2D dynamic data from parallel slices and temporal alignment of the image sequences using audio information. Multiple sagittal 2D real-time movies with synchronized audio recordings are acquired for English vowel-consonant-vowel stimuli /ala/, /aɹa/, /asa/ and /aʃa/. Audio data are aligned using mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) extracted from windowed intervals of the speech signal. Sagittal image sequences acquired from all slices are then aligned using dynamic time warping (DTW). The aligned image sequences enable dynamic 3D visualization by creating synthesized movies of the moving airway in the coronal planes, visualizing desired tissue surfaces and tube-shaped vocal tract airway after manual segmentation of targeted articulators and smoothing. The resulting volumes allow for dynamic 3D visualization of salient aspects of lingual articulation, including the formation of tongue grooves and sublingual cavities, with a temporal resolution of 78 ms. PMID:23204279

  14. Faster, higher quality volume visualization for 3D medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvin, Alan D.; Laine, Andrew F.; Song, Ting

    2008-03-01

    The two major volume visualization methods used in biomedical applications are Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and Volume Rendering (VR), both of which involve the process of creating sets of 2D projections from 3D images. We have developed a new method for very fast, high-quality volume visualization of 3D biomedical images, based on the fact that the inverse of this process (transforming 2D projections into a 3D image) is essentially equivalent to tomographic image reconstruction. This new method uses the 2D projections acquired by the scanner, thereby obviating the need for the two computationally expensive steps currently required in the complete process of biomedical visualization, that is, (i) reconstructing the 3D image from 2D projection data, and (ii) computing the set of 2D projections from the reconstructed 3D image As well as improvements in computation speed, this method also results in improvements in visualization quality, and in the case of x-ray CT we can exploit this quality improvement to reduce radiation dosage. In this paper, demonstrate the benefits of developing biomedical visualization techniques by directly processing the sensor data acquired by body scanners, rather than by processing the image data reconstructed from the sensor data. We show results of using this approach for volume visualization for tomographic modalities, like x-ray CT, and as well as for MRI.

  15. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  16. A new multiple scattering scheme for the FLAIR forest radiative transfer model: Application to biochemical and biophysical parameter retrieval using hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omari, Khalid

    This thesis investigated the development and assessment of a simple parameterization of the multiple scattering within canopies assuming the single scattering field is known and the background beneath the canopy is completely absorbing. The parameterization is based on the concept of spectral invariants related to recollision and escape probabilities from vegetation canopies. The simplified approach is evaluated against detailed 3-D ray tracing model, PARCINOPY, as well as reference datasets from the Radiation Modelling Intercomparison Experiment On-Line Checker. Comparison with homogenous canopies simulated with PARCINOPY showed that the model's performance is best in both the solar principal and perpendicular planes at low and mid LAI levels for all solar zenith angles. The comparison to the On-line Checker datasets shows also that the model is a suitable approach to describe the multiple scattering components of physically based models. This simple parameterization is then incorporated into the Four Scale Linear Model for Anisotropie Reflectance (FLAIR) canopy radiative transfer model to enhance the description of the spectrally dependant multiple scattered radiation field of a forest canopy. The contribution of the multiply scattered radiation between the canopy and the background is also added to the parameterization of the multiple scattering component. The validation of the new version of the FLAIR model was performed using the multi-angular data sets obtained by the airborne sensor POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) during the BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) campaign of 1994. The results indicate that this approach is well suited to the FLAIR model. It is also demonstrated that the multiple scattering problem can be parameterized by a limited number of architectural parameters and the leaf scattering coefficient. Finally, the combined canopy-leaf PROFLAIR (PROSPECT + FLAIR) model is used to investigate the

  17. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  18. High-quality breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  19. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  20. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  2. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  3. Yogi the rock - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Yogi, a rock taller than rover Sojourner, is the subject of this image, taken in stereo by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The soil in the foreground has been the location of multiple soil mechanics experiments performed by Sojourner's cleated wheels. Pathfinder scientists were able to control the force inflicted on the soil beneath the rover's wheels, giving them insight into the soil's mechanical properties. The soil mechanics experiments were conducted after this image was taken.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  4. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  5. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  6. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  7. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  8. Antemortem MRI findings associated with microinfarcts at autopsy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Mekala R.; Preboske, Gregory M.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Murphy, Matthew C.; Murray, Melissa E.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine antemortem MRI findings associated with microinfarcts at autopsy. Methods: Patients with microinfarcts (n = 22) and patients without microinfarcts (n = 44) who underwent antemortem MRI were identified from a dementia clinic–based, population–based, and community clinic–based autopsy cohort. The microinfarct and no-microinfarct groups were matched on age at MRI, age at death, sex, APOE status, Mini-Mental State Examination score, and pathologic diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. Brain infarcts were assessed on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI. White matter hyperintensities on FLAIR MRI and hippocampal volumes on T1-weighted MRI were quantified using automated methods. A subset of subjects with microinfarcts (n = 15) and a matched group of subjects without microinfarcts (n = 15) had serial T1-weighted MRIs and were included in an analysis of global and regional brain atrophy rates using automated methods. Results: The presence of cortical (p = 0.03) and subcortical (p = 0.02) infarcts on antemortem MRI was associated with presence of microinfarcts at autopsy. Higher numbers of cortical (p = 0.05) and subcortical (p = 0.03) infarcts on antemortem MRI were also associated with presence of microinfarcts. Presence of microinfarcts was not associated with white matter hyperintensities and cross-sectional hippocampal volume on antemortem MRI. Whole-brain and regional precuneus, motor, and somatosensory atrophy rates were higher in subjects with microinfarcts compared to subjects without microinfarcts. Conclusions: Microinfarcts increase brain atrophy rates independent of Alzheimer disease pathology. Association between microinfarct pathology and macroinfarcts on MRI suggests either common risk factors or a shared pathophysiology and potentially common preventive targets. PMID:24793188

  9. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  10. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  11. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  12. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  13. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  14. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  15. 3-D Reconstruction From 2-D Radiographic Images and Its Application to Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Motoyoshi

    3D imaging technique is very important and indispensable in diagnosis. The main stream of the technique is one in which 3D image is reconstructed from a set of slice images, such as X-ray CT and MRI. However, these systems require large space and high costs. On the other hand, a low cost and small size 3D imaging system is needed in clinical veterinary medicine, for example, in the case of diagnosis in X-ray car or pasture area. We propose a novel 3D imaging technique using 2-D X-ray radiographic images. This system can be realized by cheaper system than X-ray CT and enables to get 3D image in X-ray car or portable X-ray equipment. In this paper, a 3D visualization technique from 2-D radiographic images is proposed and several reconstructions are shown. These reconstructions are evaluated by veterinarians.

  16. Hybrid segmentation framework for 3D medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Metaxas, Dimitri N.

    2003-05-01

    Medical image segmentation is the process that defines the region of interest in the image volume. Classical segmentation methods such as region-based methods and boundary-based methods cannot make full use of the information provided by the image. In this paper we proposed a general hybrid framework for 3D medical image segmentation purposes. In our approach we combine the Gibbs Prior model, and the deformable model. First, Gibbs Prior models are applied onto each slice in a 3D medical image volume and the segmentation results are combined to a 3D binary masks of the object. Then we create a deformable mesh based on this 3D binary mask. The deformable model will be lead to the edge features in the volume with the help of image derived external forces. The deformable model segmentation result can be used to update the parameters for Gibbs Prior models. These methods will then work recursively to reach a global segmentation solution. The hybrid segmentation framework has been applied to images with the objective of lung, heart, colon, jaw, tumor, and brain. The experimental data includes MRI (T1, T2, PD), CT, X-ray, Ultra-Sound images. High quality results are achieved with relatively efficient time cost. We also did validation work using expert manual segmentation as the ground truth. The result shows that the hybrid segmentation may have further clinical use.

  17. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  18. The Esri 3D city information model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, T.; Schubiger-Banz, S.

    2014-02-01

    With residential and commercial space becoming increasingly scarce, cities are going vertical. Managing the urban environments in 3D is an increasingly important and complex undertaking. To help solving this problem, Esri has released the ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution. The ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution provides the information model, tools and apps for creating, analyzing and maintaining a 3D city using the ArcGIS platform. This paper presents an overview of the 3D City Information Model and some sample use cases.

  19. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  20. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  1. Solar flair.

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, John S

    2003-01-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  2. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  3. Application of 3-D printing (rapid prototyping) for creating physical models of pediatric orthopedic disorders.

    PubMed

    Starosolski, Zbigniew A; Kan, J Herman; Rosenfeld, Scott D; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Annapragada, Ananth

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional printing called rapid prototyping, a technology that is used to create physical models based on a 3-D computer representation, is now commercially available and can be created from CT or MRI datasets. This technical innovation paper reviews the specific requirements and steps necessary to apply biomedical 3-D printing of pediatric musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss its role for the radiologist, orthopedist and patient. PMID:24202430

  4. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  5. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  6. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, Matthew F.; Lee, Brian J.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial “Micro Deluxe” phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. Methods: CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results: Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. Conclusions: This work shows that 3D printed

  7. 3D Dynamic Echocardiography with a Digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Matani, Ayumu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    1998-05-01

    In this paper,a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging system,where a US brightness-mode (B-mode) imagetriggered with an R-wave of electrocardiogram (ECG)was obtained with an ultrasound diagnostic deviceand the location and orientation of the US probewere simultaneously measured with a 3D digitizer, is described.The obtained B-mode imagewas then projected onto a virtual 3D spacewith the proposed interpolation algorithm using a Gaussian operator.Furthermore, a 3D image was presented on a cathode ray tube (CRT)and stored in virtual reality modeling language (VRML).We performed an experimentto reconstruct a 3D heart image in systole using this system.The experimental results indicatethat the system enables the visualization ofthe 3D and internal structure of a heart viewed from any angleand has potential for use in dynamic imaging,intraoperative ultrasonography and tele-medicine.

  8. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    This is the first book written on using Blender for scientific visualization. It is a practical and interesting introduction to Blender for understanding key parts of 3D rendering and animation that pertain to the sciences via step-by-step guided tutorials. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender takes you through an understanding of 3D graphics and modelling for different visualization scenarios in the physical sciences.

  9. Software for 3D radiotherapy dosimetry. Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this work is polyGeVero® software (GeVero Co., Poland), which has been developed to fill the requirements of fast calculations of 3D dosimetry data with the emphasis on polymer gel dosimetry for radiotherapy. This software comprises four workspaces that have been prepared for: (i) calculating calibration curves and calibration equations, (ii) storing the calibration characteristics of the 3D dosimeters, (iii) calculating 3D dose distributions in irradiated 3D dosimeters, and (iv) comparing 3D dose distributions obtained from measurements with the aid of 3D dosimeters and calculated with the aid of treatment planning systems (TPSs). The main features and functions of the software are described in this work. Moreover, the core algorithms were validated and the results are presented. The validation was performed using the data of the new PABIGnx polymer gel dosimeter. The polyGeVero® software simplifies and greatly accelerates the calculations of raw 3D dosimetry data. It is an effective tool for fast verification of TPS-generated plans for tumor irradiation when combined with a 3D dosimeter. Consequently, the software may facilitate calculations by the 3D dosimetry community. In this work, the calibration characteristics of the PABIGnx obtained through four calibration methods: multi vial, cross beam, depth dose, and brachytherapy, are discussed as well.

  10. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  11. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-03-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The current paper describes the modern stereo 3-D technologies that are applicable to various tasks in teaching physics in schools, colleges, and universities. Examples of stereo 3-D simulations developed by the author can be observed on online.

  12. Accuracy in Quantitative 3D Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative 3D imaging is becoming an increasingly popular and powerful approach to investigate plant growth and development. With the increased use of 3D image analysis, standards to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of these data are required. This commentary highlights how image acquisition and postprocessing can introduce artifacts into 3D image data and proposes steps to increase both the accuracy and reproducibility of these analyses. It is intended to aid researchers entering the field of 3D image processing of plant cells and tissues and to help general readers in understanding and evaluating such data. PMID:25804539

  13. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  14. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  15. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  16. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  17. Objective and reproducible segmentation and quantification of tuberous sclerosis lesions in FLAIR brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Niessen, Wiro J.; Vincken, Koen L.; Maintz, J. B. Antoine; Jansen, Floor; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Viergever, Max A.

    2001-07-01

    A semi-automatic segmentation method for Tuberous Sclerosis (TS) lesions in the brain has been developed. Both T1 images and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) images are integrated in the segmentation procedure. The segmentation procedure is mainly based on the notion of fuzzy connectedness. This approach uses the two basic concepts of adjacency and affinity to form a fuzzy relation between voxels in the image. The affinity is defined using two quantities that are both based on characteristics of the intensities in the lesion and surrounding brain tissue (grey and white matter). The semi-automatic method has been compared to results of manual segmentation. Manual segmentation is prone to interobserver and intraobserver variability. This was especially true for this particular study, where large variations were observed, which implies that a golden standard for comparison was not available. The method did perform within the variability of the observers and therefore has the potential to improve reproducibility of quantitative measurements.

  18. An experimental test of the weak equivalence principle for antihydrogen at the future FLAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaum, Klaus; Raizen, Mark G.; Quint, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    We present new experimental ideas to investigate the gravitational interaction of antihydrogen. The experiment can first be performed in an off-line mirror measurement on hydrogen atoms, as a testing ground for our methods, before the implementation with antihydrogen atoms. A beam of hydrogen atoms is formed by launching a cold beam of protons through a cloud of trapped electrons in a nested Penning trap arrangement. In the next step, the atoms are stopped in a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils — so-called atomic coilgun. The stopped atoms are confined in a magnetic quadrupole trap and cooled by single-photon laser cooling. We intend to employ the method of Raman interferometry to study the gravitational interaction of atomic hydrogen — and later on antihydrogen at the FLAIR facility — with high sensitivity.

  19. 3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-11-11

    Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

  20. Topology dictionary for 3D video understanding.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tony; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that achieves 3D video understanding. 3D video consists of a stream of 3D models of subjects in motion. The acquisition of long sequences requires large storage space (2 GB for 1 min). Moreover, it is tedious to browse data sets and extract meaningful information. We propose the topology dictionary to encode and describe 3D video content. The model consists of a topology-based shape descriptor dictionary which can be generated from either extracted patterns or training sequences. The model relies on 1) topology description and classification using Reeb graphs, and 2) a Markov motion graph to represent topology change states. We show that the use of Reeb graphs as the high-level topology descriptor is relevant. It allows the dictionary to automatically model complex sequences, whereas other strategies would require prior knowledge on the shape and topology of the captured subjects. Our approach serves to encode 3D video sequences, and can be applied for content-based description and summarization of 3D video sequences. Furthermore, topology class labeling during a learning process enables the system to perform content-based event recognition. Experiments were carried out on various 3D videos. We showcase an application for 3D video progressive summarization using the topology dictionary. PMID:22745004

  1. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Husseini, M.; Chimblo, R.

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  2. A 3D Geostatistical Mapping Tool

    1999-02-09

    This software provides accurate 3D reservoir modeling tools and high quality 3D graphics for PC platforms enabling engineers and geologists to better comprehend reservoirs and consequently improve their decisions. The mapping algorithms are fractals, kriging, sequential guassian simulation, and three nearest neighbor methods.

  3. 3D, or Not to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Keith

    2012-01-01

    It may be too soon for students to be showing up for class with popcorn and gummy bears, but technology similar to that behind the 3D blockbuster movie "Avatar" is slowly finding its way into college classrooms. 3D classroom projectors are taking students on fantastic voyages inside the human body, to the ruins of ancient Greece--even to faraway…

  4. Stereoscopic Investigations of 3D Coulomb Balls

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeding, Sebastian; Melzer, Andre; Arp, Oliver; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander

    2005-10-31

    In dusty plasmas particles are arranged due to the influence of external forces and the Coulomb interaction. Recently Arp et al. were able to generate 3D spherical dust clouds, so-called Coulomb balls. Here, we present measurements that reveal the full 3D particle trajectories from stereoscopic imaging.

  5. 3-D structures of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, W.

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in the 3-D reconstruction of planetary nebulae are reviewed. We include not only results for 3-D reconstructions, but also the current techniques in terms of general methods and software. In order to obtain more accurate reconstructions, we suggest to extend the widely used assumption of homologous nebula expansion to map spectroscopically measured velocity to position along the line of sight.

  6. Wow! 3D Content Awakens the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2010-01-01

    From her first encounter with stereoscopic 3D technology designed for classroom instruction, Megan Timme, principal at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet School in Dallas, sensed it could be transformative. Last spring, when she began pilot-testing 3D content in her third-, fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, Timme wasn't disappointed. Students…

  7. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  8. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  9. Immersive 3D Geovisualization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how immersive 3D geovisualization can be used in higher education. Based on MacEachren and Kraak's geovisualization cube, we examine the usage of immersive 3D geovisualization and its usefulness in a research-based learning module on flood risk, called GEOSimulator. Results of a survey among participating students…

  10. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  11. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D…

  12. A 3-D measurement of biomagnetic field and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, Yoshinori; Kim, Bong-Soo; Kobayashi, Koichiro

    2006-09-01

    This review paper focuses in the usefulness of three-dimensional (3-D) biomagnetic field measurement for discriminating multiple sources closely located and overlapped in time. We have developed a 3-D second-order gradiometer connected to 39-channel SQUIDs for vector measurement of magnetoencephalogram (MEG), which can simultaneously detect magnetic field components perpendicular and tangential to the scalp. To assess discrimination and separation of multiple sources overlapping in time, we showed both simulation study and 3-D vector measurement of MEG as following; (a) mixed auditory evoked field (AEF) and somatosensory evoked field (SEF), (b) separating second somatosensory (SII) activity from primary somatosensory (SI) activity in SEF. The magnetic field distribution perpendicular to the scalp was not helpful for estimating the location and number of sources, owing to the lack of a dipole pattern, but the magnetic field distribution tangential to the scalp can provide information about new constraint conditions by visual inspection and singular value decomposition (SVD) method. We estimated multiple sources of mixed AEF and SEF from the MEG data of the magnetic field tangential to the scalp, and also estimated multiple sources of SI and SII activity. These results were confirmed by comparison with superimposed source locations in MRI of subject's head.

  13. Undersampling k-space using fast progressive 3D trajectories.

    PubMed

    Spiniak, Juan; Guesalaga, Andres; Mir, Roberto; Guarini, Marcelo; Irarrazaval, Pablo

    2005-10-01

    In 3D MRI, sampling k-space with traditional trajectories can be excessively time-consuming. Fast imaging trajectories are used in an attempt to efficiently cover the k-space and reduce the scan time without significantly affecting the image quality. In many applications, further reductions in scan time can be achieved via undersampling of the k-space; however, no clearly optimal method exists. In most 3D trajectories the k-space is divided into regions that are sampled with shots that share a common geometry (e.g., spirals). A different approach is to design trajectories that gradually but uniformly cover the k-space. In the current work, successive shots progressively add sampled regions to the 3D frequency space. By cutting the sequence short, a natural undersampled method is obtained. This can be particularly efficient because in these types of trajectories the contribution of new information by later shots is less significant. In this work the performance of progressive trajectories for different degrees of undersampling is assessed with trajectories based on missile guidance (MG) ideas. The results show that the approach can be efficient in terms of reducing the scan time, and performs better than the stack of spirals (SOS) technique, particularly under nonideal conditions. PMID:16142719

  14. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26805790

  15. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  16. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  17. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  18. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  19. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.

  20. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging. PMID:24464989

  1. Some Methods of Applied Numerical Analysis to 3d Facial Reconstruction Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Şerban; Ianeş, Emilia; Roşu, Doina

    2010-09-01

    This paper deals with the collective work performed by medical doctors from the University Of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara and engineers from the Politechnical Institute Timisoara in the effort to create the first Romanian 3d reconstruction software based on CT or MRI scans and to test the created software in clinical practice.

  2. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes. PMID:27067418

  3. Comparing GPU Implementations of Bilateral and Anisotropic Diffusion Filters for 3D Biomedical Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark

    2010-05-06

    We compare the performance of hand-tuned CUDA implementations of bilateral and anisotropic diffusion filters for denoising 3D MRI datasets. Our tests sweep comparable parameters for the two filters and measure total runtime, memory bandwidth, computational throughput, and mean squared errors relative to a noiseless reference dataset.

  4. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26562233

  5. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:25093879

  6. Optically rewritable 3D liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Srivastava, A K; Zhang, W; Wang, L; Chigrinov, V G; Kwok, H S

    2014-11-01

    Optically rewritable liquid crystal display (ORWLCD) is a concept based on the optically addressed bi-stable display that does not need any power to hold the image after being uploaded. Recently, the demand for the 3D image display has increased enormously. Several attempts have been made to achieve 3D image on the ORWLCD, but all of them involve high complexity for image processing on both hardware and software levels. In this Letter, we disclose a concept for the 3D-ORWLCD by dividing the given image in three parts with different optic axis. A quarter-wave plate is placed on the top of the ORWLCD to modify the emerging light from different domains of the image in different manner. Thereafter, Polaroid glasses can be used to visualize the 3D image. The 3D image can be refreshed, on the 3D-ORWLCD, in one-step with proper ORWLCD printer and image processing, and therefore, with easy image refreshing and good image quality, such displays can be applied for many applications viz. 3D bi-stable display, security elements, etc. PMID:25361316

  7. Extra Dimensions: 3D in PDF Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) and the ISO PRC file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. Until recently, Adobe's Acrobat software was also capable of incorporating 3D content into PDF files from a variety of 3D file formats, including proprietary CAD formats. However, this functionality is no longer available in Acrobat X, having been spun off to a separate company. Incorporating 3D content now requires the additional purchase of a separate plug-in. In this talk we present alternatives based on open source libraries which allow the programmatic creation of 3D content in PDF format. While not providing the same level of access to CAD files as the commercial software, it does provide physicists with an alternative path to incorporate 3D content into PDF files from such disparate applications as detector geometries from Geant4, 3D data sets, mathematical surfaces or tesselated volumes.

  8. Semi-Quantitative vs. Volumetric Determination of Endolymphatic Space in Menière’s Disease Using Endolymphatic Hydrops 3T-HR-MRI after Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Georg; Vieth, Volker; Weiss, Daniel; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Heindel, Walter; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Böckenfeld, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging enhances the clinical diagnosis of Menière's disease. This is accomplished by in vivo detection of endolymphatic hydrops, which are graded using different semi-quantitative grading systems. We evaluated an established, semi-quantitative endolymphatic hydrops score and with a quantitative method for volumetric assessment of the endolymphatic size. 11 patients with Menière's disease and 2 healthy subjects underwent high resolution endolymphatic hydrops 3 Tesla MRI with highly T2 weighted FLAIR and T2DRIVE sequences. The degree of endolymphatic hydrops was rated semi-quantitatively and compared to the results of 3D-volumetry. Moreover, the grade of endolymphatic hydrops was correlated with pure tone audiometry. Semi-quantitative grading and volumetric evaluation of the endolymphatic hydrops are in accordance (r = 0.92) and the grade of endolymphatic hydrops correlates with pure tone audiometry. Patients with a sickness duration of ≥ 30 months showed a significant higher total labyrinth fluid volume (p = 0.03). Fast, semi-quantitative evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops is highly reliable compared to quantitative/volumetric assessment. Endolymphatic space is significantly higher in patients with longer sickness duration. PMID:25768940

  9. FUN3D Manual: 12.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.7, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  10. FUN3D Manual: 12.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.9, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  11. FUN3D Manual: 13.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bill; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.0, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  12. FUN3D Manual: 12.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.8, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  13. 3D packaging for integrated circuit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Palmer, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    A goal was set for high density, high performance microelectronics pursued through a dense 3D packing of integrated circuits. A {open_quotes}tool set{close_quotes} of assembly processes have been developed that enable 3D system designs: 3D thermal analysis, silicon electrical through vias, IC thinning, mounting wells in silicon, adhesives for silicon stacking, pretesting of IC chips before commitment to stacks, and bond pad bumping. Validation of these process developments occurred through both Sandia prototypes and subsequent commercial examples.

  14. A high capacity 3D steganography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-hung; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a very high-capacity and low-distortion 3D steganography scheme. Our steganography approach is based on a novel multilayered embedding scheme to hide secret messages in the vertices of 3D polygon models. Experimental results show that the cover model distortion is very small as the number of hiding layers ranges from 7 to 13 layers. To the best of our knowledge, this novel approach can provide much higher hiding capacity than other state-of-the-art approaches, while obeying the low distortion and security basic requirements for steganography on 3D models. PMID:19147891

  15. New method of 3-D object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, An-Zhi; Li, Qun Z.; Miao, Peng C.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper, a new method of 3-D object recognition using optical techniques and a computer is presented. We perform 3-D object recognition using moire contour to obtain the object's 3- D coordinates, projecting drawings of the object in three coordinate planes to describe it and using a method of inquiring library of judgement to match objects. The recognition of a simple geometrical entity is simulated by computer and studied experimentally. The recognition of an object which is composed of a few simple geometrical entities is discussed.

  16. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, includingmore » frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.« less

  17. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  18. An Improved Version of TOPAZ 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    An improved version of the TOPAZ 3D gun code is presented as a powerful tool for beam optics simulation. In contrast to the previous version of TOPAZ 3D, the geometry of the device under test is introduced into TOPAZ 3D directly from a CAD program, such as Solid Edge or AutoCAD. In order to have this new feature, an interface was developed, using the GiD software package as a meshing code. The article describes this method with two models to illustrate the results.

  19. FUN3D Manual: 12.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.4, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixedelement unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  20. FUN3D Manual: 12.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.5, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational uid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables ecient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  1. FUN3D Manual: 12.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.6, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  2. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.

  3. XML3D and Xflow: combining declarative 3D for the Web with generic data flows.

    PubMed

    Klein, Felix; Sons, Kristian; Rubinstein, Dmitri; Slusallek, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have combined XML3D, which provides declarative, interactive 3D scene descriptions based on HTML5, with Xflow, a language for declarative, high-performance data processing. The result lets Web developers combine a 3D scene graph with data flows for dynamic meshes, animations, image processing, and postprocessing. PMID:24808080

  4. JAR3D Webserver: Scoring and aligning RNA loop sequences to known 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Roll, James; Zirbel, Craig L; Sweeney, Blake; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles

    2016-07-01

    Many non-coding RNAs have been identified and may function by forming 2D and 3D structures. RNA hairpin and internal loops are often represented as unstructured on secondary structure diagrams, but RNA 3D structures show that most such loops are structured by non-Watson-Crick basepairs and base stacking. Moreover, different RNA sequences can form the same RNA 3D motif. JAR3D finds possible 3D geometries for hairpin and internal loops by matching loop sequences to motif groups from the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, by exact sequence match when possible, and by probabilistic scoring and edit distance for novel sequences. The scoring gauges the ability of the sequences to form the same pattern of interactions observed in 3D structures of the motif. The JAR3D webserver at http://rna.bgsu.edu/jar3d/ takes one or many sequences of a single loop as input, or else one or many sequences of longer RNAs with multiple loops. Each sequence is scored against all current motif groups. The output shows the ten best-matching motif groups. Users can align input sequences to each of the motif groups found by JAR3D. JAR3D will be updated with every release of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, and so its performance is expected to improve over time. PMID:27235417

  5. 3D-printed bioanalytical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Gregory W.; Satterwhite-Warden, Jennifer E.; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Rusling, James F.

    2016-07-01

    While 3D printing technologies first appeared in the 1980s, prohibitive costs, limited materials, and the relatively small number of commercially available printers confined applications mainly to prototyping for manufacturing purposes. As technologies, printer cost, materials, and accessibility continue to improve, 3D printing has found widespread implementation in research and development in many disciplines due to ease-of-use and relatively fast design-to-object workflow. Several 3D printing techniques have been used to prepare devices such as milli- and microfluidic flow cells for analyses of cells and biomolecules as well as interfaces that enable bioanalytical measurements using cellphones. This review focuses on preparation and applications of 3D-printed bioanalytical devices.

  6. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  7. Tropical Cyclone Jack in Satellite 3-D

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D flyby from NASA's TRMM satellite of Tropical Cyclone Jack on April 21 shows that some of the thunderstorms were shown by TRMM PR were still reaching height of at least 17 km (10.5 miles). ...

  8. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host tissue integration (e.g., cellular infiltration, vascularization, and active remodeling). This review will cover several approaches that have advanced the field of 3D printing through novel fabrication methods of tissue engineering constructs. It will also discuss the applications of synthetic and natural materials for 3D printing facilitated tissue fabrication. PMID:26869728

  9. 3D Visualization of Recent Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Atul; Kilb, Debi

    2005-04-01

    Scientists and visualization experts at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have created an interactive three-dimensional visualization of the 28 March 2005 magnitude 8.7 earthquake in Sumatra. The visualization shows the earthquake's hypocenter and aftershocks recorded until 29 March 2005, and compares it with the location of the 26 December 2004 magnitude 9 event and the consequent seismicity in that region. The 3D visualization was created using the Fledermaus software developed by Interactive Visualization Systems (http://www.ivs.unb.ca/) and stored as a ``scene'' file. To view this visualization, viewers need to download and install the free viewer program iView3D (http://www.ivs3d.com/products/iview3d).

  10. Future Engineers 3-D Print Timelapse

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Challenges K-12 students to create a model of a container for space using 3-D modeling software. Astronauts need containers of all kinds - from advanced containers that can study fruit flies t...

  11. 3-D Flyover Visualization of Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D visualization flies across a small portion of the Veil Nebula as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. This region is a small part of a huge expanding remnant from a star that explod...

  12. Quantifying Modes of 3D Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Meghan K; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-12-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates. PMID:26603943

  13. 3D-patterned polymer brush surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuechang; Liu, Xuqing; Xie, Zhuang; Zheng, Zijian

    2011-12-01

    Polymer brush-based three-dimensional (3D) structures are emerging as a powerful platform to engineer a surface by providing abundant spatially distributed chemical and physical properties. In this feature article, we aim to give a summary of the recent progress on the fabrication of 3D structures with polymer brushes, with a particular focus on the micro- and nanoscale. We start with a brief introduction on polymer brushes and the challenges to prepare their 3D structures. Then, we highlight the recent advances of the fabrication approaches on the basis of traditional polymerization time and grafting density strategies, and a recently developed feature density strategy. Finally, we provide some perspective outlooks on the future directions of engineering the 3D structures with polymer brushes.

  14. Modeling Cellular Processes in 3-D

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Odde, David

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in photonic imaging and fluorescent protein technology offer unprecedented views of molecular space-time dynamics in living cells. At the same time, advances in computing hardware and software enable modeling of ever more complex systems, from global climate to cell division. As modeling and experiment become more closely integrated, we must address the issue of modeling cellular processes in 3-D. Here, we highlight recent advances related to 3-D modeling in cell biology. While some processes require full 3-D analysis, we suggest that others are more naturally described in 2-D or 1-D. Keeping the dimensionality as low as possible reduces computational time and makes models more intuitively comprehensible; however, the ability to test full 3-D models will build greater confidence in models generally and remains an important emerging area of cell biological modeling. PMID:22036197

  15. Eyes on the Earth 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, anton I.; Doronila, Paul R.; Nguyen, Viet T.; Jackson, Randal K.; Greene, William M.; Hussey, Kevin J.; Garcia, Christopher M.; Lopez, Christian A.

    2013-01-01

    Eyes on the Earth 3D software gives scientists, and the general public, a realtime, 3D interactive means of accurately viewing the real-time locations, speed, and values of recently collected data from several of NASA's Earth Observing Satellites using a standard Web browser (climate.nasa.gov/eyes). Anyone with Web access can use this software to see where the NASA fleet of these satellites is now, or where they will be up to a year in the future. The software also displays several Earth Science Data sets that have been collected on a daily basis. This application uses a third-party, 3D, realtime, interactive game engine called Unity 3D to visualize the satellites and is accessible from a Web browser.

  16. 3-D Animation of Typhoon Bopha

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D animation of NASA's TRMM satellite data showed Typhoon Bopha tracking over the Philippines on Dec. 3 and moving into the Sulu Sea on Dec. 4, 2012. TRMM saw heavy rain (red) was falling at ...

  17. 3-D TRMM Flyby of Hurricane Amanda

    NASA Video Gallery

    The TRMM satellite flew over Hurricane Amanda on Tuesday, May 27 at 1049 UTC (6:49 a.m. EDT) and captured rainfall rates and cloud height data that was used to create this 3-D simulated flyby. Cred...

  18. Cyclone Rusty's Landfall in 3-D

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D image derived from NASA's TRMM satellite Precipitation Radar data on February 26, 2013 at 0654 UTC showed that the tops of some towering thunderstorms in Rusty's eye wall were reaching hei...

  19. TRMM 3-D Flyby of Ingrid

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ingrid's rainfall was created from TRMM satellite data for Sept. 16. Heaviest rainfall appears in red towers over the Gulf of Mexico, while moderate rainfall stretc...

  20. 3D-printed bioanalytical devices.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Gregory W; Satterwhite-Warden, Jennifer E; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Rusling, James F

    2016-07-15

    While 3D printing technologies first appeared in the 1980s, prohibitive costs, limited materials, and the relatively small number of commercially available printers confined applications mainly to prototyping for manufacturing purposes. As technologies, printer cost, materials, and accessibility continue to improve, 3D printing has found widespread implementation in research and development in many disciplines due to ease-of-use and relatively fast design-to-object workflow. Several 3D printing techniques have been used to prepare devices such as milli- and microfluidic flow cells for analyses of cells and biomolecules as well as interfaces that enable bioanalytical measurements using cellphones. This review focuses on preparation and applications of 3D-printed bioanalytical devices. PMID:27250897

  1. Palacios field: A 3-D case history

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, R.; Torguson, B.

    1994-12-31

    In late 1992, Mitchell Energy Corporation acquired a 7.75 sq mi (20.0 km{sup 2}) 3-D seismic survey over Palacios field. Matagorda County, Texas. The company shot the survey to help evaluate the field for further development by delineating the fault pattern of the producing Middle Oligocene Frio interval. They compare the mapping of the field before and after the 3-D survey. This comparison shows that the 3-D volume yields superior fault imaging and interpretability compared to the dense 2-D data set. The problems with the 2-D data set are improper imaging of small and oblique faults and insufficient coverage over a complex fault pattern. Whereas the 2-D data set validated a simple fault model, the 3-D volume revealed a more complex history of faulting that includes three different fault systems. This discovery enabled them to reconstruct the depositional and structural history of Palacios field.

  2. Radiosity diffusion model in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jason D.; Arridge, Simon R.; Chrysanthou, Yiorgos; Dehghani, Hamid; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Schweiger, Martin

    2001-11-01

    We present the Radiosity-Diffusion model in three dimensions(3D), as an extension to previous work in 2D. It is a method for handling non-scattering spaces in optically participating media. We present the extension of the model to 3D including an extension to the model to cope with increased complexity of the 3D domain. We show that in 3D more careful consideration must be given to the issues of meshing and visibility to model the transport of light within reasonable computational bounds. We demonstrate the model to be comparable to Monte-Carlo simulations for selected geometries, and show preliminary results of comparisons to measured time-resolved data acquired on resin phantoms.

  3. 2D and 3D MALDI-imaging: conceptual strategies for visualization and data mining.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Herbert; Heldmann, Stefan; Trede, Dennis; Strehlow, Jan; Wirtz, Stefan; Dreher, Wolfgang; Berger, Judith; Oetjen, Janina; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Fischer, Bernd; Maass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    3D imaging has a significant impact on many challenges in life sciences, because biology is a 3-dimensional phenomenon. Current 3D imaging-technologies (various types MRI, PET, SPECT) are labeled, i.e. they trace the localization of a specific compound in the body. In contrast, 3D MALDI mass spectrometry-imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a label-free method imaging the spatial distribution of molecular compounds. It complements 3D imaging labeled methods, immunohistochemistry, and genetics-based methods. However, 3D MALDI-MSI cannot tap its full potential due to the lack of statistical methods for analysis and interpretation of large and complex 3D datasets. To overcome this, we established a complete and robust 3D MALDI-MSI pipeline combined with efficient computational data analysis methods for 3D edge preserving image denoising, 3D spatial segmentation as well as finding colocalized m/z values, which will be reviewed here in detail. Furthermore, we explain, why the integration and correlation of the MALDI imaging data with other imaging modalities allows to enhance the interpretation of the molecular data and provides visualization of molecular patterns that may otherwise not be apparent. Therefore, a 3D data acquisition workflow is described generating a set of 3 different dimensional images representing the same anatomies. First, an in-vitro MRI measurement is performed which results in a three-dimensional image modality representing the 3D structure of the measured object. After sectioning the 3D object into N consecutive slices, all N slices are scanned using an optical digital scanner, enabling for performing the MS measurements. Scanning the individual sections results into low-resolution images, which define the base coordinate system for the whole pipeline. The scanned images conclude the information from the spatial (MRI) and the mass spectrometric (MALDI-MSI) dimension and are used for the spatial three-dimensional reconstruction of the object performed by image

  4. 3D-HST results and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2015-01-01

    The 3D-HST survey is providing a comprehensive census of the distant Universe, combining HST WFC3 imaging and grism spectroscopy with a myriad of other ground- and space-based datasets. This talk constitutes an overview of science results from the survey, with a focus on ongoing work and ways to exploit the rich public release of the 3D-HST data.

  5. Assessing 3d Photogrammetry Techniques in Craniometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshobane, M. C.; de Bruyn, P. J. N.; Bester, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features) has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc®) three-dimensional (3D) modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model's accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  6. 3D model reconstruction of underground goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuanmin; Zuo, Xiaoqing; Jin, Baoxuan

    2005-10-01

    Constructing 3D model of underground goaf, we can control the process of mining better and arrange mining work reasonably. However, the shape of goaf and the laneway among goafs are very irregular, which produce great difficulties in data-acquiring and 3D model reconstruction. In this paper, we research on the method of data-acquiring and 3D model construction of underground goaf, building topological relation among goafs. The main contents are as follows: a) The paper proposed an efficient encoding rule employed to structure the field measurement data. b) A 3D model construction method of goaf is put forward, which by means of combining several TIN (triangulated irregular network) pieces, and an efficient automatic processing algorithm of boundary of TIN is proposed. c) Topological relation of goaf models is established. TIN object is the basic modeling element of goaf 3D model, and the topological relation among goaf is created and maintained by building the topological relation among TIN objects. Based on this, various 3D spatial analysis functions can be performed including transect and volume calculation of goaf. A prototype is developed, which can realized the model and algorithm proposed in this paper.

  7. 3D steerable wavelets in practice.

    PubMed

    Chenouard, Nicolas; Unser, Michael

    2012-11-01

    We introduce a systematic and practical design for steerable wavelet frames in 3D. Our steerable wavelets are obtained by applying a 3D version of the generalized Riesz transform to a primary isotropic wavelet frame. The novel transform is self-reversible (tight frame) and its elementary constituents (Riesz wavelets) can be efficiently rotated in any 3D direction by forming appropriate linear combinations. Moreover, the basis functions at a given location can be linearly combined to design custom (and adaptive) steerable wavelets. The features of the proposed method are illustrated with the processing and analysis of 3D biomedical data. In particular, we show how those wavelets can be used to characterize directional patterns and to detect edges by means of a 3D monogenic analysis. We also propose a new inverse-problem formalism along with an optimization algorithm for reconstructing 3D images from a sparse set of wavelet-domain edges. The scheme results in high-quality image reconstructions which demonstrate the feature-reduction ability of the steerable wavelets as well as their potential for solving inverse problems. PMID:22752138

  8. DYNA3D example problem manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, S.C.; Whirley, R.G.

    1990-10-10

    This manual describes in detail the solution of ten example problems using the explicit nonlinear finite element code DYNA3D. The sample problems include solid, shell, and beam element types, and a variety of linear and nonlinear material models. For each example, there is first an engineering description of the physical problem to be studied. Next, the analytical techniques incorporated in the model are discussed and key features of DYNA3D are highlighted. INGRID commands used to generate the mesh are listed, and sample plots from the DYNA3D analysis are given. Finally, there is a description of the TAURUS post-processing commands used to generate the plots of the solution. This set of example problems is useful in verifying the installation of DYNA3D on a new computer system. In addition, these documented analyses illustrate the application of DYNA3D to a variety of engineering problems, and thus this manual should be helpful to new analysts getting started with DYNA3D. 7 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care. PMID:25620087

  10. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-10-30

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D-a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool-designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  11. 3-D SAR image formation from sparse aperture data using 3-D target grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Li, Junfei; Ling, Hao

    2005-05-01

    The performance of ATR systems can potentially be improved by using three-dimensional (3-D) SAR images instead of the traditional two-dimensional SAR images or one-dimensional range profiles. 3-D SAR image formation of targets from radar backscattered data collected on wide angle, sparse apertures has been identified by AFRL as fundamental to building an object detection and recognition capability. A set of data has been released as a challenge problem. This paper describes a technique based on the concept of 3-D target grids aimed at the formation of 3-D SAR images of targets from sparse aperture data. The 3-D target grids capture the 3-D spatial and angular scattering properties of the target and serve as matched filters for SAR formation. The results of 3-D SAR formation using the backhoe public release data are presented.

  12. Rapid 360 degree imaging and stitching of 3D objects using multiple precision 3D cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Thomas; Yin, Stuart; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Jiangan; Wu, Frank

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we present the system architecture of a 360 degree view 3D imaging system. The system consists of multiple 3D sensors synchronized to take 3D images around the object. Each 3D camera employs a single high-resolution digital camera and a color-coded light projector. The cameras are synchronized to rapidly capture the 3D and color information of a static object or a live person. The color encoded structure lighting ensures the precise reconstruction of the depth of the object. A 3D imaging system architecture is presented. The architecture employs the displacement of the camera and the projector to triangulate the depth information. The 3D camera system has achieved high depth resolution down to 0.1mm on a human head sized object and 360 degree imaging capability.

  13. 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Markstedt, Kajsa; Mantas, Athanasios; Tournier, Ivan; Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-05-11

    The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs. PMID:25806996

  14. CFL3D, FUN3d, and NSU3D Contributions to the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Laflin, Kelly R.; Chaffin, Mark S.; Powell, Nicholas; Levy, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Results presented at the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop using CFL3D, FUN3D, and NSU3D are described. These are calculations on the workshop provided grids and drag adapted grids. The NSU3D results have been updated to reflect an improvement to skin friction calculation on skewed grids. FUN3D results generated after the workshop are included for custom participant generated grids and a grid from a previous workshop. Uniform grid refinement at the design condition shows a tight grouping in calculated drag, where the variation in the pressure component of drag is larger than the skin friction component. At this design condition, A fine-grid drag value was predicted with a smaller drag adjoint adapted grid via tetrahedral adaption to a metric and mixed-element subdivision. The buffet study produced larger variation than the design case, which is attributed to large differences in the predicted side-of-body separation extent. Various modeling and discretization approaches had a strong impact on predicted side-of-body separation. This large wing root separation bubble was not observed in wind tunnel tests indicating that more work is necessary in modeling wing root juncture flows to predict experiments.

  15. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  16. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  17. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mahmoud A; Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-12-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country. PMID:26807414

  18. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  19. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country. PMID:26807414

  20. Quantitative measurements of relative fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensities in acute stroke for the prediction of time from symptom onset

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bastian; Brinkmann, Mathias; Forkert, Nils D; Treszl, Andras; Ebinger, Martin; Köhrmann, Martin; Wu, Ona; Kang, Dong-Wha; Liebeskind, David S; Tourdias, Thomas; Singer, Oliver C; Christensen, Soren; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Fiehler, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2013-01-01

    In acute stroke magnetic resonance imaging, a ‘mismatch' between visibility of an ischemic lesion on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and missing corresponding parenchymal hyperintensities on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) data sets was shown to identify patients with time from symptom onset ≤4.5 hours with high specificity. However, moderate sensitivity and suboptimal interpreter agreement are limitations of a visual rating of FLAIR lesion visibility. We tested refined image analysis methods in patients included in the previously published PREFLAIR study using refined visual analysis and quantitative measurements of relative FLAIR signal intensity (rSI) from a three-dimensional, segmented stroke lesion volume. A total of 399 patients were included. The rSI of FLAIR lesions showed a moderate correlation with time from symptom onset (r=0.382, P<0.001). A FLAIR rSI threshold of <1.0721 predicted symptom onset ≤4.5 hours with slightly increased specificity (0.85 versus 0.78) but also slightly decreased sensitivity (0.47 versus 0.58) as compared with visual analysis. Refined visual analysis differentiating between ‘subtle' and ‘obvious' FLAIR hyperintensities and classification and regression tree algorithms combining information from visual and quantitative analysis also did not improve diagnostic accuracy. Our results raise doubts whether the prediction of stroke onset time by visual image judgment can be improved by quantitative rSI measurements. PMID:23047272

  1. Multiresolution texture models for brain tumor segmentation in MRI.

    PubMed

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Ahmed, Shaheen; Hossen, Jakir

    2011-01-01

    In this study we discuss different types of texture features such as Fractal Dimension (FD) and Multifractional Brownian Motion (mBm) for estimating random structures and varying appearance of brain tissues and tumors in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We use different selection techniques including KullBack - Leibler Divergence (KLD) for ranking different texture and intensity features. We then exploit graph cut, self organizing maps (SOM) and expectation maximization (EM) techniques to fuse selected features for brain tumors segmentation in multimodality T1, T2, and FLAIR MRI. We use different similarity metrics to evaluate quality and robustness of these selected features for tumor segmentation in MRI for real pediatric patients. We also demonstrate a non-patient-specific automated tumor prediction scheme by using improved AdaBoost classification based on these image features. PMID:22255946

  2. PLOT3D Export Tool for Tecplot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The PLOT3D export tool for Tecplot solves the problem of modified data being impossible to output for use by another computational science solver. The PLOT3D Exporter add-on enables the use of the most commonly available visualization tools to engineers for output of a standard format. The exportation of PLOT3D data from Tecplot has far reaching effects because it allows for grid and solution manipulation within a graphical user interface (GUI) that is easily customized with macro language-based and user-developed GUIs. The add-on also enables the use of Tecplot as an interpolation tool for solution conversion between different grids of different types. This one add-on enhances the functionality of Tecplot so significantly, it offers the ability to incorporate Tecplot into a general suite of tools for computational science applications as a 3D graphics engine for visualization of all data. Within the PLOT3D Export Add-on are several functions that enhance the operations and effectiveness of the add-on. Unlike Tecplot output functions, the PLOT3D Export Add-on enables the use of the zone selection dialog in Tecplot to choose which zones are to be written by offering three distinct options - output of active, inactive, or all zones (grid blocks). As the user modifies the zones to output with the zone selection dialog, the zones to be written are similarly updated. This enables the use of Tecplot to create multiple configurations of a geometry being analyzed. For example, if an aircraft is loaded with multiple deflections of flaps, by activating and deactivating different zones for a specific flap setting, new specific configurations of that aircraft can be easily generated by only writing out specific zones. Thus, if ten flap settings are loaded into Tecplot, the PLOT3D Export software can output ten different configurations, one for each flap setting.

  3. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  4. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally describedmore » in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.« less

  5. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.

  6. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  7. Automatic needle segmentation in 3D ultrasound images using 3D Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Qiu, Wu; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Songgeng

    2007-12-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is a new technology that can be used for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as obstetrical, vascular, and urological imaging, and has been explored greatly potential in the applications of image-guided surgery and therapy. Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese woman, and a minimally invasive ablation system using an RF button electrode which is needle-like is being used to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding currently. Now a 3D US guidance system has been developed to avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localizations of the electrode and the tumor position during treatment. In this paper, we described two automated techniques, the 3D Hough Transform (3DHT) and the 3D Randomized Hough Transform (3DRHT), which is potentially fast, accurate, and robust to provide needle segmentation in 3D US image for use of 3D US imaging guidance. Based on the representation (Φ , θ , ρ , α ) of straight lines in 3D space, we used the 3DHT algorithm to segment needles successfully assumed that the approximate needle position and orientation are known in priori. The 3DRHT algorithm was developed to detect needles quickly without any information of the 3D US images. The needle segmentation techniques were evaluated using the 3D US images acquired by scanning water phantoms. The experiments demonstrated the feasibility of two 3D needle segmentation algorithms described in this paper.

  8. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  9. Shim3d Helmholtz Solution Package

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes solves the Helmholtz Equation for the steady-state propagation of single-frequency electromagnetic radiation in an arbitrary 2D or 3D dielectric medium. Materials can be either transparent or absorptive (including metals) and are described entirely by their shape and complex dielectric constant. Dielectric boundaries are assumed to always fall on grid boundaries and the material within a single grid cell is considered to be uniform. Input to the problem is in the formmore » of a Dirichlet boundary condition on a single boundary, and may be either analytic (Gaussian) in shape, or a mode shape computed using a separate code (such as the included eigenmode solver vwave20), and written to a file. Solution is via the finite difference method using Jacobi iteration for 3D problems or direct matrix inversion for 2D problems. Note that 3D problems that include metals will require different iteration parameters than described in the above reference. For structures with curved boundaries not easily modeled on a rectangular grid, the auxillary codes helmholtz11(2D), helm3d (semivectoral), and helmv3d (full vectoral) are provided. For these codes the finite difference equations are specified on a topological regular triangular grid and solved using Jacobi iteration or direct matrix inversion as before. An automatic grid generator is supplied.« less

  10. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  11. T-HEMP3D user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.

    1983-08-01

    The T-HEMP3D (Transportable HEMP3D) computer program is a derivative of the STEALTH three-dimensional thermodynamics code developed by Science Applications, Inc., under the direction of Ron Hofmann. STEALTH, in turn, is based entirely on the original HEMP3D code written at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary advantage STEALTH has over its predecessors is that it was designed using modern structured design techniques, with rigorous programming standards enforced. This yields two benefits. First, the code is easily changeable; this is a necessity for a physics code used for research. The second benefit is that the code is easily transportable between different types of computers. The STEALTH program was transferred to LLNL under a cooperative development agreement. Changes were made primarily in three areas: material specification, coordinate generation, and the addition of sliding surface boundary conditions. The code was renamed T-HEMP3D to avoid confusion with other versions of STEALTH. This document summarizes the input to T-HEMP3D, as used at LLNL. It does not describe the physics simulated by the program, nor the numerical techniques employed. Furthermore, it does not describe the separate job steps of coordinate generation and post-processing, including graphical display of results. (WHK)

  12. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  13. 3D dynamic roadmapping for abdominal catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Frederik; Groher, Martin; Khamene, Ali; Wein, Wolfgang; Heibel, Tim Hauke; Navab, Nassir

    2008-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in interventional imaging, the navigation of a guide wire through abdominal vasculature remains, not only for novice radiologists, a difficult task. Since this navigation is mostly based on 2D fluoroscopic image sequences from one view, the process is slowed down significantly due to missing depth information and patient motion. We propose a novel approach for 3D dynamic roadmapping in deformable regions by predicting the location of the guide wire tip in a 3D vessel model from the tip's 2D location, respiratory motion analysis, and view geometry. In a first step, the method compensates for the apparent respiratory motion in 2D space before backprojecting the 2D guide wire tip into three dimensional space, using a given projection matrix. To countervail the error connected to the projection parameters and the motion compensation, as well as the ambiguity caused by vessel deformation, we establish a statistical framework, which computes a reliable estimate of the guide wire tip location within the 3D vessel model. With this 2D-to-3D transfer, the navigation can be performed from arbitrary viewing angles, disconnected from the static perspective view of the fluoroscopic sequence. Tests on a realistic breathing phantom and on synthetic data with a known ground truth clearly reveal the superiority of our approach compared to naive methods for 3D roadmapping. The concepts and information presented in this paper are based on research and are not commercially available. PMID:18982662

  14. Lifting Object Detection Datasets into 3D.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Joao; Vicente, Sara; Agapito, Lourdes; Batista, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    While data has certainly taken the center stage in computer vision in recent years, it can still be difficult to obtain in certain scenarios. In particular, acquiring ground truth 3D shapes of objects pictured in 2D images remains a challenging feat and this has hampered progress in recognition-based object reconstruction from a single image. Here we propose to bypass previous solutions such as 3D scanning or manual design, that scale poorly, and instead populate object category detection datasets semi-automatically with dense, per-object 3D reconstructions, bootstrapped from:(i) class labels, (ii) ground truth figure-ground segmentations and (iii) a small set of keypoint annotations. Our proposed algorithm first estimates camera viewpoint using rigid structure-from-motion and then reconstructs object shapes by optimizing over visual hull proposals guided by loose within-class shape similarity assumptions. The visual hull sampling process attempts to intersect an object's projection cone with the cones of minimal subsets of other similar objects among those pictured from certain vantage points. We show that our method is able to produce convincing per-object 3D reconstructions and to accurately estimate cameras viewpoints on one of the most challenging existing object-category detection datasets, PASCAL VOC. We hope that our results will re-stimulate interest on joint object recognition and 3D reconstruction from a single image. PMID:27295458

  15. 3D camera tracking from disparity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Woo, Woontack

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust camera tracking method that uses disparity images computed from known parameters of 3D camera and multiple epipolar constraints. We assume that baselines between lenses in 3D camera and intrinsic parameters are known. The proposed method reduces camera motion uncertainty encountered during camera tracking. Specifically, we first obtain corresponding feature points between initial lenses using normalized correlation method. In conjunction with matching features, we get disparity images. When the camera moves, the corresponding feature points, obtained from each lens of 3D camera, are robustly tracked via Kanade-Lukas-Tomasi (KLT) tracking algorithm. Secondly, relative pose parameters of each lens are calculated via Essential matrices. Essential matrices are computed from Fundamental matrix calculated using normalized 8-point algorithm with RANSAC scheme. Then, we determine scale factor of translation matrix by d-motion. This is required because the camera motion obtained from Essential matrix is up to scale. Finally, we optimize camera motion using multiple epipolar constraints between lenses and d-motion constraints computed from disparity images. The proposed method can be widely adopted in Augmented Reality (AR) applications, 3D reconstruction using 3D camera, and fine surveillance systems which not only need depth information, but also camera motion parameters in real-time.

  16. Full-color holographic 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masami; Shigeta, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Susumu; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Iwata, Fujio

    2003-05-01

    A holographic 3D printer is a system that produces a direct hologram with full-parallax information using the 3-dimensional data of a subject from a computer. In this paper, we present a proposal for the reproduction of full-color images with the holographic 3D printer. In order to realize the 3-dimensional color image, we selected the 3 laser wavelength colors of red (λ=633nm), green (λ=533nm), and blue (λ=442nm), and we built a one-step optical system using a projection system and a liquid crystal display. The 3-dimensional color image is obtained by synthesizing in a 2D array the multiple exposure with these 3 wavelengths made on each 250mm elementary hologram, and moving recording medium on a x-y stage. For the natural color reproduction in the holographic 3D printer, we take the approach of the digital processing technique based on the color management technology. The matching between the input and output colors is performed by investigating first, the relation between the gray level transmittance of the LCD and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram and second, by measuring the color displayed by the hologram to establish a correlation. In our first experimental results a non-linear functional relation for single and multiple exposure of the three components were found. These results are the first step in the realization of a natural color 3D image produced by the holographic color 3D printer.

  17. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  18. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universalmore » 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.« less

  19. The importance of 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been getting progressively more complex for the past 20 years. Early radiation therapy techniques needed only basic dosimetry equipment; motorized water phantoms, ionization chambers, and basic radiographic film techniques. As intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided therapy came into widespread practice, medical physicists were challenged with developing effective and efficient dose measurement techniques. The complex 3-dimensional (3D) nature of the dose distributions that were being delivered demanded the development of more quantitative and more thorough methods for dose measurement. The quality assurance vendors developed a wide array of multidetector arrays that have been enormously useful for measuring and characterizing dose distributions, and these have been made especially useful with the advent of 3D dose calculation systems based on the array measurements, as well as measurements made using film and portal imagers. Other vendors have been providing 3D calculations based on data from the linear accelerator or the record and verify system, providing thorough evaluation of the dose but lacking quality assurance (QA) of the dose delivery process, including machine calibration. The current state of 3D dosimetry is one of a state of flux. The vendors and professional associations are trying to determine the optimal balance between thorough QA, labor efficiency, and quantitation. This balance will take some time to reach, but a necessary component will be the 3D measurement and independent calculation of delivered radiation therapy dose distributions.

  20. Visual inertia of rotating 3-D objects.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Pantle, A J; Mark, L S

    1998-02-01

    Five experiments were designed to determine whether a rotating, transparent 3-D cloud of dots (simulated sphere) could influence the perceived direction of rotation of a subsequent sphere. Experiment 1 established conditions under which the direction of rotation of a virtual sphere was perceived unambiguously. When a near-far luminance difference and perspective depth cues were present, observers consistently saw the sphere rotate in the intended direction. In Experiment 2, a near-far luminance difference was used to create an unambiguous rotation sequence that was followed by a directionally ambiguous rotation sequence that lacked both the near-far luminance cue and the perspective cue. Observers consistently saw the second sequence as rotating in the same direction as the first, indicating the presence of 3-D visual inertia. Experiment 3 showed that 3-D visual inertia was sufficiently powerful to bias the perceived direction of a rotation sequence made unambiguous by a near-far luminance cue. Experiment 5 showed that 3-D visual inertia could be obtained using an occlusion depth cue to create an unambiguous inertia-inducing sequence. Finally, Experiments 2, 4, and 5 all revealed a fast-decay phase of inertia that lasted for approximately 800 msec, followed by an asymptotic phase that lasted for periods as long as 1,600 msec. The implications of these findings are examined with respect to motion mechanisms of 3-D visual inertia. PMID:9529911

  1. Integral 3D display using multiple LCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaichi, Naoto; Miura, Masato; Arai, Jun; Mishina, Tomoyuki

    2015-03-01

    The quality of the integral 3D images created by a 3D imaging system was improved by combining multiple LCDs to utilize a greater number of pixels than that possible with one LCD. A prototype of the display device was constructed by using four HD LCDs. An integral photography (IP) image displayed by the prototype is four times larger than that reconstructed by a single display. The pixel pitch of the HD display used is 55.5 μm, and the number of elemental lenses is 212 horizontally and 119 vertically. The 3D image pixel count is 25,228, and the viewing angle is 28°. Since this method is extensible, it is possible to display an integral 3D image of higher quality by increasing the number of LCDs. Using this integral 3D display structure makes it possible to make the whole device thinner than a projector-based display system. It is therefore expected to be applied to the home television in the future.

  2. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. PMID:26724184

  3. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  4. 3D optical measuring technologies and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.

    2005-02-01

    The results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the 3D optical measuring technologies and systems for noncontact 3D optical dimensional inspection applied to atomic and railway industry safety problems are presented. This activity includes investigations of diffraction phenomena on some 3D objects, using the original constructive calculation method. The efficient algorithms for precise determining the transverse and longitudinal sizes of 3D objects of constant thickness by diffraction method, peculiarities on formation of the shadow and images of the typical elements of the extended objects were suggested. Ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors and running trains as well as their high exploitation reliability requires a 100% noncontact precise inspection of geometrical parameters of their components. To solve this problem we have developed methods and produced the technical vision measuring systems LMM, CONTROL, PROFIL, and technologies for noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of grid spacers and fuel elements for the nuclear reactor VVER-1000 and VVER-440, as well as automatic laser diagnostic COMPLEX for noncontact inspection of geometric parameters of running freight car wheel pairs. The performances of these systems and the results of industrial testing are presented and discussed. The created devices are in pilot operation at Atomic and Railway Companies.

  5. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  6. Acute verbal dyspraxia, a rare presentation in multiple sclerosis: a case report with MRI localization.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Stephen L; Glabus, Michael F; Kelley, Roger E; Minagar, Alireza

    2003-12-01

    Cortical speech disorders rarely occur in multiple sclerosis (MS). We report a patient with relapsing-remitting MS, who presented with acute verbal dyspraxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated an acute T2/Flair hyperintense, primarily white matter lesion underlying the middle third of the inferior frontal gyrus. The verbal dyspraxia cleared beginning 48 hours after the initiation of iv dexamethasone. Follow-up MRI demonstrated qualitative and quantitative diminution of the hyperintensity. This is the first report of a clinically definite MS patient with acute verbal dyspraxia. Moreover, there was a suggestive localization of verbal praxis to Brodmann areas 44/45. PMID:14664479

  7. Toward 3D-guided prostate biopsy target optimization: an estimation of tumor sampling probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy aims to reduce the ~23% false negative rate of clinical 2D TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsy still yields false negatives. Therefore, we propose optimization of biopsy targeting to meet the clinician's desired tumor sampling probability, optimizing needle targets within each tumor and accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system errors, image registration errors, and irregular tumor shapes. We obtained multiparametric MRI and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. We estimated the probability, P, of obtaining a tumor sample with a single biopsy. Given an RMS needle delivery error of 3.5 mm for a contemporary fusion biopsy system, P >= 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors when the point of optimal sampling probability was targeted. Therefore, more than one biopsy core must be taken from 74% of the tumors to achieve P >= 95% for a biopsy system with an error of 3.5 mm. Our experiments indicated that the effect of error along the needle axis on the percentage of core involvement (and thus the measured tumor burden) was mitigated by the 18 mm core length.

  8. Weakly supervised automatic segmentation and 3D modeling of the knee joint from MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Amal; Ben Azouz, Zouhour

    2013-12-01

    Automatic segmentation and 3D modeling of the knee joint from MR images, is a challenging task. Most of the existing techniques require the tedious manual segmentation of a training set of MRIs. We present an approach that necessitates the manual segmentation of one MR image. It is based on a volumetric active appearance model. First, a dense tetrahedral mesh is automatically created on a reference MR image that is arbitrary selected. Second, a pairwise non-rigid registration between each MRI from a training set and the reference MRI is computed. The non-rigid registration is based on a piece-wise affine deformation using the created tetrahedral mesh. The minimum description length is then used to bring all the MR images into a correspondence. An average image and tetrahedral mesh, as well as a set of main modes of variations, are generated using the established correspondence. Any manual segmentation of the average MRI can be mapped to other MR images using the AAM. The proposed approach has the advantage of simultaneously generating 3D reconstructions of the surface as well as a 3D solid model of the knee joint. The generated surfaces and tetrahedral meshes present the interesting property of fulfilling a correspondence between different MR images. This paper shows preliminary results of the proposed approach. It demonstrates the automatic segmentation and 3D reconstruction of a knee joint obtained by mapping a manual segmentation of a reference image.

  9. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: update from a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Henrich, J.; Tukalo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Kaiser, C.; Knaudt, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. We developed a 3D USCT system and tested it in a pilot study with encouraging results: 3D USCT was able to depict two carcinomas, which were present in contrast enhanced MRI volumes serving as ground truth. To overcome severe differences in the breast shape, an image registration was applied. We analyzed the correlation between average sound speed in the breast and the breast density estimated from segmented MRIs and found a positive correlation with R=0.70. Based on the results of the pilot study we now carry out a successive clinical study with 200 patients. For this we integrated our reconstruction methods and image post-processing into a comprehensive workflow. It includes a dedicated DICOM viewer for interactive assessment of fused USCT images. A new preview mode now allows intuitive and faster patient positioning. We updated the USCT system to decrease the data acquisition time by approximately factor two and to increase the penetration depth of the breast into the USCT aperture by 1 cm. Furthermore the compute-intensive reflectivity reconstruction was considerably accelerated, now allowing a sub-millimeter volume reconstruction in approximately 16 minutes. The updates made it possible to successfully image first patients in our ongoing clinical study.

  10. Perceptual integration for qualitatively different 3-D cues in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Dövencioğlu, Dicle; Ban, Hiroshi; Schofield, Andrew J; Welchman, Andrew E

    2013-09-01

    The visual system's flexibility in estimating depth is remarkable: We readily perceive 3-D structure under diverse conditions from the seemingly random dots of a "magic eye" stereogram to the aesthetically beautiful, but obviously flat, canvasses of the Old Masters. Yet, 3-D perception is often enhanced when different cues specify the same depth. This perceptual process is understood as Bayesian inference that improves sensory estimates. Despite considerable behavioral support for this theory, insights into the cortical circuits involved are limited. Moreover, extant work tested quantitatively similar cues, reducing some of the challenges associated with integrating computationally and qualitatively different signals. Here we address this challenge by measuring fMRI responses to depth structures defined by shading, binocular disparity, and their combination. We quantified information about depth configurations (convex "bumps" vs. concave "dimples") in different visual cortical areas using pattern classification analysis. We found that fMRI responses in dorsal visual area V3B/KO were more discriminable when disparity and shading concurrently signaled depth, in line with the predictions of cue integration. Importantly, by relating fMRI and psychophysical tests of integration, we observed a close association between depth judgments and activity in this area. Finally, using a cross-cue transfer test, we found that fMRI responses evoked by one cue afford classification of responses evoked by the other. This reveals a generalized depth representation in dorsal visual cortex that combines qualitatively different information in line with 3-D perception. PMID:23647559

  11. Real-time monitoring of 3D cell culture using a 3D capacitance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Han, Nalae; Lee, Rimi; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Yong-Beom; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently received attention because they represent a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. However, 2D-based imaging techniques or cell sensors are insufficient for real-time monitoring of cellular behavior in 3D cell culture. Here, we report investigations conducted with a 3D capacitance cell sensor consisting of vertically aligned pairs of electrodes. When GFP-expressing human breast cancer cells (GFP-MCF-7) encapsulated in alginate hydrogel were cultured in a 3D cell culture system, cellular activities, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis at different heights, could be monitored non-invasively and in real-time by measuring the change in capacitance with the 3D capacitance sensor. Moreover, we were able to monitor cell migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with our 3D capacitance sensor. PMID:26386332

  12. 3D scene reconstruction based on 3D laser point cloud combining UAV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiyun; Yan, Yangyang; Zhang, Xitong; Wu, Zhenzhen

    2016-03-01

    It is a big challenge capturing and modeling 3D information of the built environment. A number of techniques and technologies are now in use. These include GPS, and photogrammetric application and also remote sensing applications. The experiment uses multi-source data fusion technology for 3D scene reconstruction based on the principle of 3D laser scanning technology, which uses the laser point cloud data as the basis and Digital Ortho-photo Map as an auxiliary, uses 3DsMAX software as a basic tool for building three-dimensional scene reconstruction. The article includes data acquisition, data preprocessing, 3D scene construction. The results show that the 3D scene has better truthfulness, and the accuracy of the scene meet the need of 3D scene construction.

  13. 3D whiteboard: collaborative sketching with 3D-tracked smart phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, James; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the feasibility of a new approach for collaborative drawing in 3D, based on Android smart phones. Our approach utilizes a number of fiduciary markers, placed in the working area where they can be seen by the smart phones' cameras, in order to estimate the pose of each phone in the room. Our prototype allows two users to draw 3D objects with their smart phones by moving their phones around in 3D space. For example, 3D lines are drawn by recording the path of the phone as it is moved around in 3D space, drawing line segments on the screen along the way. Each user can see the virtual drawing space on their smart phones' displays, as if the display was a window into this space. Besides lines, our prototype application also supports 3D geometry creation, geometry transformation operations, and it shows the location of the other user's phone.

  14. 3D face analysis for demographic biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tokola, Ryan A; Mikkilineni, Aravind K; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2015-01-01

    Despite being increasingly easy to acquire, 3D data is rarely used for face-based biometrics applications beyond identification. Recent work in image-based demographic biometrics has enjoyed much success, but these approaches suffer from the well-known limitations of 2D representations, particularly variations in illumination, texture, and pose, as well as a fundamental inability to describe 3D shape. This paper shows that simple 3D shape features in a face-based coordinate system are capable of representing many biometric attributes without problem-specific models or specialized domain knowledge. The same feature vector achieves impressive results for problems as diverse as age estimation, gender classification, and race classification.

  15. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    PubMed

    Keating, Steven J; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  16. Angular description for 3D scattering centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Raynal, Ann Marie; Ling, Hao; Moore, John; Velten, Vincent J.

    2006-05-01

    The electromagnetic scattered field from an electrically large target can often be well modeled as if it is emanating from a discrete set of scattering centers (see Fig. 1). In the scattering center extraction tool we developed previously based on the shooting and bouncing ray technique, no correspondence is maintained amongst the 3D scattering center extracted at adjacent angles. In this paper we present a multi-dimensional clustering algorithm to track the angular and spatial behaviors of 3D scattering centers and group them into features. The extracted features for the Slicy and backhoe targets are presented. We also describe two metrics for measuring the angular persistence and spatial mobility of the 3D scattering centers that make up these features in order to gather insights into target physics and feature stability. We find that features that are most persistent are also the most mobile and discuss implications for optimal SAR imaging.

  17. Ames Lab 101: 3D Metals Printer

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Ryan

    2014-02-13

    To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century - finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials - scientists will need new and advanced tools. The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research. 3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food. But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery.

  18. 3D Simulation: Microgravity Environments and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Estes, Samantha; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most, if not all, 3-D and Virtual Reality (VR) software programs are designed for one-G gravity applications. Space environments simulations require gravity effects of one one-thousandth to one one-million of that of the Earth's surface (10(exp -3) - 10(exp -6) G), thus one must be able to generate simulations that replicate those microgravity effects upon simulated astronauts. Unfortunately, the software programs utilized by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration does not have the ability to readily neutralize the one-G gravity effect. This pre-programmed situation causes the engineer or analysis difficulty during micro-gravity simulations. Therefore, microgravity simulations require special techniques or additional code in order to apply the power of 3D graphic simulation to space related applications. This paper discusses the problem and possible solutions to allow microgravity 3-D/VR simulations to be completed successfully without program code modifications.

  19. Structured light field 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zewei; Liu, Xiaoli; Peng, Xiang; Yin, Yongkai; Li, Ameng; Wu, Jiachen; Gao, Bruce Z

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a method by means of light field imaging under structured illumination to deal with high dynamic range 3D imaging. Fringe patterns are projected onto a scene and modulated by the scene depth then a structured light field is detected using light field recording devices. The structured light field contains information about ray direction and phase-encoded depth, via which the scene depth can be estimated from different directions. The multidirectional depth estimation can achieve high dynamic 3D imaging effectively. We analyzed and derived the phase-depth mapping in the structured light field and then proposed a flexible ray-based calibration approach to determine the independent mapping coefficients for each ray. Experimental results demonstrated the validity of the proposed method to perform high-quality 3D imaging for highly and lowly reflective surfaces. PMID:27607639

  20. 3D holoscopic video imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steurer, Johannes H.; Pesch, Matthias; Hahne, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    Since many years, integral imaging has been discussed as a technique to overcome the limitations of standard still photography imaging systems where a three-dimensional scene is irrevocably projected onto two dimensions. With the success of 3D stereoscopic movies, a huge interest in capturing three-dimensional motion picture scenes has been generated. In this paper, we present a test bench integral imaging camera system aiming to tailor the methods of light field imaging towards capturing integral 3D motion picture content. We estimate the hardware requirements needed to generate high quality 3D holoscopic images and show a prototype camera setup that allows us to study these requirements using existing technology. The necessary steps that are involved in the calibration of the system as well as the technique of generating human readable holoscopic images from the recorded data are discussed.

  1. Spectroradiometric characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    Spectroradiometric measurements have been made for the experimental characterization of the RGB channels of autostereoscopic 3D displays, giving results for different measurement angles with respect to the normal direction of the plane of the display. In the study, 2 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and resolutions were used, making measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). From the measurements made, goniometric results were recorded for luminance contrast, and the fundamental hypotheses have been evaluated for the characterization of the displays: independence of the RGB channels and their constancy. The results show that the display with the lower angle variability in the contrast-ratio value and constancy of the chromaticity coordinates nevertheless presented the greatest additivity deviations with the measurement angle. For both displays, when the parameters evaluated were taken into account, lower angle variability consistently resulted in the 2D mode than in the 3D mode.

  2. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  3. Decoder for 3-D color codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Kung-Chuan; Brun, Todd

    Transversal circuits are important components of fault-tolerant quantum computation. Several classes of quantum error-correcting codes are known to have transversal implementations of any logical Clifford operation. However, to achieve universal quantum computation, it would be helpful to have high-performance error-correcting codes that have a transversal implementation of some logical non-Clifford operation. The 3-D color codes are a class of topological codes that permit transversal implementation of the logical π / 8 -gate. The decoding problem of a 3-D color code can be understood as a graph-matching problem on a three-dimensional lattice. Whether this class of codes will be useful in terms of performance is still an open question. We investigate the decoding problem of 3-D color codes and analyze the performance of some possible decoders.

  4. Particle Acceleration in 3D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, J.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important driver of energetic particles in phenomena such as magnetospheric storms and solar flares. Using kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we show that the stochastic magnetic field structure which develops during 3D reconnection plays a vital role in particle acceleration and transport. In a 2D system, electrons are trapped in magnetic islands which limits their energy gain. In a 3D system, however, the stochastic magnetic field enables the energetic electrons to access volume-filling acceleration regions and therefore gain energy much more efficiently than in the 2D system. We also examine the relative roles of two important acceleration drivers: parallel electric fields and a Fermi mechanism associated with reflection of charged particles from contracting field lines. We find that parallel electric fields are most important for accelerating low energy particles, whereas Fermi reflection dominates energetic particle production. We also find that proton energization is reduced in the 3D system.

  5. Ames Lab 101: 3D Metals Printer

    ScienceCinema

    Ott, Ryan

    2014-06-04

    To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century - finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials - scientists will need new and advanced tools. The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research. 3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food. But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery.

  6. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  7. Impedance mammograph 3D phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Wtorek, J; Stelter, J; Nowakowski, A

    1999-04-20

    The results obtained using the Technical University of Gdansk Electroimpedance Mammograph (TUGEM) of a 3D phantom study are presented. The TUGEM system is briefly described. The hardware contains the measurement head and DSP-based identification modules controlled by a PC computer. A specially developed reconstruction algorithm, Regulated Correction Frequency Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (RCFART), is used to obtain 3D images. To visualize results, the Advance Visualization System (AVS) is used. It allows a powerful image processing on a fast workstation or on a high-performance computer. Results of three types of 3D conductivity perturbations used in the study (aluminum, Plexiglas, and cucumber) are shown. The relative volumes of perturbations less than 2% of the measurement chamber are easily evidenced. PMID:10372188

  8. 3D EIT image reconstruction with GREIT.

    PubMed

    Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Müller, Beat; Adler, Andy

    2016-06-01

    Most applications of thoracic EIT use a single plane of electrodes on the chest from which a transverse image 'slice' is calculated. However, interpretation of EIT images is made difficult by the large region above and below the electrode plane to which EIT is sensitive. Volumetric EIT images using two (or more) electrode planes should help compensate, but are little used currently. The Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT (GREIT) has become popular in lung EIT. One shortcoming of the original formulation of GREIT is its restriction to reconstruction onto a 2D planar image. We present an extension of the GREIT algorithm to 3D and develop open-source tools to evaluate its performance as a function of the choice of stimulation and measurement pattern. Results show 3D GREIT using two electrode layers has significantly more uniform sensitivity profiles through the chest region. Overall, the advantages of 3D EIT are compelling. PMID:27203184

  9. Methods for comparing 3D surface attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Alex; Freeman, Adam

    1996-03-01

    A common task in data analysis is to compare two or more sets of data, statistics, presentations, etc. A predominant method in use is side-by-side visual comparison of images. While straightforward, it burdens the user with the task of discerning the differences between the two images. The user if further taxed when the images are of 3D scenes. This paper presents several methods for analyzing the extent, magnitude, and manner in which surfaces in 3D differ in their attributes. The surface geometry are assumed to be identical and only the surface attributes (color, texture, etc.) are variable. As a case in point, we examine the differences obtained when a 3D scene is rendered progressively using radiosity with different form factor calculation methods. The comparison methods include extensions of simple methods such as mapping difference information to color or transparency, and more recent methods including the use of surface texture, perturbation, and adaptive placements of error glyphs.

  10. Automated curved planar reformation of 3D spine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2005-10-01

    Traditional techniques for visualizing anatomical structures are based on planar cross-sections from volume images, such as images obtained by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, planar cross-sections taken in the coordinate system of the 3D image often do not provide sufficient or qualitative enough diagnostic information, because planar cross-sections cannot follow curved anatomical structures (e.g. arteries, colon, spine, etc). Therefore, not all of the important details can be shown simultaneously in any planar cross-section. To overcome this problem, reformatted images in the coordinate system of the inspected structure must be created. This operation is usually referred to as curved planar reformation (CPR). In this paper we propose an automated method for CPR of 3D spine images, which is based on the image transformation from the standard image-based to a novel spine-based coordinate system. The axes of the proposed spine-based coordinate system are determined on the curve that represents the vertebral column, and the rotation of the vertebrae around the spine curve, both of which are described by polynomial models. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained in an image analysis based optimization framework. The proposed method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on five CT spine images. The method performed well on both normal and pathological cases and was consistent with manually obtained ground truth data. The proposed spine-based CPR benefits from reduced structural complexity in favour of improved feature perception of the spine. The reformatted images are diagnostically valuable and enable easier navigation, manipulation and orientation in 3D space. Moreover, reformatted images may prove useful for segmentation and other image analysis tasks.

  11. Local Diagnosis of Reconnection in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate (I,II) an approach to find reconnection sites in 3D where there is no flux function for guidance, and where local observational signatures for the ``violation of frozen flux'' are under developed, if not non-existent. We use 2D and 3D PIC simulations of asymmetric guide field reconnection to test our observational hierarchy of single spacecraft kinetic diagnostics - all possible with present state of the art instrumentation. The proliferation of turbulent, electron inertial scale layers in the realistic 3D case demonstrates that electron demagnetization, while necessary, is not sufficient to identify reconnection sites. An excellent local, observable, single spacecraft proxy is demonstrated for the size of the theoretical frozen flux violation. Since even frozen flux violations need not imply reconnection is at hand, a new calibrated dimensionless method is used to determine the importance of such violations. This measure is available in 2D and 3D to help differentiate reconnection layers from weaker frozen flux violating layers. We discuss the possibility that this technique can be implemented on MMS. A technique to highlight flow geometries conducive to reconnection in 3D simulations is also suggested, that may also be implementable with the MMS flotilla. We use local analysis with multiple necessary, but theoretically independent electron kinetic conditions to help reduce the probability of misidentification of any given layer as a reconnection site. Since these local conditions are all necessary for the site, but none is known to be sufficient, the multiple tests help to greatly reduce false positive identifications. The selectivity of the results of this approach using PIC simulations of 3D asymmetric guide field reconnection will be shown using varying numbers of simultaneous conditions. Scudder, J.D., H. Karimabadi, W. Daughton and V. Roytershteyn I, II, submitted Phys. Plasma., 2014

  12. Characteristics and clinical value of 3D MR imaging in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiashou; Li, Zhongwei; Qu, Yanyan; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhang, Guowei; Zhang, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics and value of 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography (3D-DCE-MRPA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). Among patients suspected with PE, 30 cases were scheduled for 3D-DCE-MRPA [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) group], and 30 cases were examined using multislice computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (msCTPA) [computed tomography (CT) group]. Direct signs including location, number, morphology of emboli, and indirect signs such as pulmonary infarction, pneumonia and pleural effusion, were analyzed. Pulmonary artery enhancement was observed. Image quality was contrasted, branches of the pulmonary artery revealed, and differences in sensitivity, specificity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared. The number and morphology of emboli in the two groups were compared, and there were no significant differences (P>0.05). In the MRI group, significantly more emboli were located in segmental and subsegmental bronchi (P<0.05). The indirect signs in the two groups were compared and the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in image quality between the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Levels 5 and 6 of the pulmonary artery branch were more evident in the MRI group compared to the CT group. The SNR and carrier-to-noise ratio in the MRI group were significantly higher than those in the CT group (P<0.05). Twenty-six cases of PE were diagnosed in the CT group, with a sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 86.7%. Twenty-five cases were diagnosed in the MRI group, with a sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 84.2%. In conclusion, 3D-DCE-MRPA surpassed msCTPA in revealing segmental and subsegmental pulmonary artery PE. PMID:27588094

  13. 3D printed diffractive terahertz lenses.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Walter D; Ferrando, Vicente; Monsoriu, Juan A; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Czerwińska, Elżbieta; Szustakowski, Mieczysław

    2016-04-15

    A 3D printer was used to realize custom-made diffractive THz lenses. After testing several materials, phase binary lenses with periodic and aperiodic radial profiles were designed and constructed in polyamide material to work at 0.625 THz. The nonconventional focusing properties of such lenses were assessed by computing and measuring their axial point spread function (PSF). Our results demonstrate that inexpensive 3D printed THz diffractive lenses can be reliably used in focusing and imaging THz systems. Diffractive THz lenses with unprecedented features, such as extended depth of focus or bifocalization, have been demonstrated. PMID:27082335

  14. The Galicia 3D experiment: an Introduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Martinez Loriente, Sara; Holroyd, Luke; Merry, Tobias; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Shillington, Donna; Gibson, James; Minshull, Tim; Karplus, Marianne; Bayracki, Gaye; Davy, Richard; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Ranero, Cesar; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Martinez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    In June and July 2013, scientists from 8 institutions took part in the Galicia 3D seismic experiment, the first ever crustal -scale academic 3D MCS survey over a rifted margin. The aim was to determine the 3D structure of a critical portion of the west Galicia rifted margin. At this margin, well-defined tilted fault blocks, bound by west-dipping faults and capped by synrift sediments are underlain by a bright reflection, undulating on time sections, termed the S reflector and thought to represent a major detachment fault of some kind. Moving west, the crust thins to zero thickness and mantle is unroofed, as evidence by the "Peridotite Ridge" first reported at this margin, but since observed at many other magma-poor margins. By imaging such a margin in detail, the experiment aimed to resolve the processes controlling crustal thinning and mantle unroofing at a type example magma poor margin. The experiment set out to collect several key datasets: a 3D seismic reflection volume measuring ~20x64km and extending down to ~14s TWT, a 3D ocean bottom seismometer dataset suitable for full wavefield inversion (the recording of the complete 3D seismic shots by 70 ocean bottom instruments), the "mirror imaging" of the crust using the same grid of OBS, a single 2D combined reflection/refraction profile extending to the west to determine the transition from unroofed mantle to true oceanic crust, and the seismic imaging of the water column, calibrated by regular deployment of XBTs to measure the temperature structure of the water column. We collected 1280 km2 of seismic reflection data, consisting of 136533 shots recorded on 1920 channels, producing 260 million seismic traces, each ~ 14s long. This adds up to ~ 8 terabytes of data, representing, we believe, the largest ever academic 3D MCS survey in terms of both the area covered and the volume of data. The OBS deployment was the largest ever within an academic 3D survey.

  15. Vector quantization of 3-D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jae-Young; Kim, Chang-Su; Lee, Sang-Uk

    2005-10-01

    A geometry compression algorithm for 3-D QSplat data using vector quantization (VQ) is proposed in this work. The positions of child spheres are transformed to the local coordinate system, which is determined by the parent children relationship. The coordinate transform makes child positions more compactly distributed in 3-D space, facilitating effective quantization. Moreover, we develop a constrained encoding method for sphere radii, which guarantees hole-free surface rendering at the decoder side. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm provides a faithful rendering quality even at low bitrates.

  16. Solar abundances and 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Freytag, Bernd; Cayrel, Roger

    2010-03-01

    We present solar photospheric abundances for 12 elements from optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The abundance analysis was conducted employing 3D hydrodynamical (CO5BOLD) as well as standard 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres. We compare our results to others with emphasis on discrepancies and still lingering problems, in particular exemplified by the pivotal abundance of oxygen. We argue that the thermal structure of the lower solar photosphere is very well represented by our 3D model. We obtain an excellent match of the observed center-to-limb variation of the line-blanketed continuum intensity, also at wavelengths shortward of the Balmer jump.

  17. Visualization of liver in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Tu; Chou, Jin-Shin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Kahn, Charles E., Jr.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Lin, Wei-Chung

    1991-05-01

    Visualization of the liver in three dimensions (3-D) can improve the accuracy of volumetric estimation and also aid in surgical planning. We have developed a method for 3-D visualization of the liver using x-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) images. This method includes four major components: (1) segmentation algorithms for extracting liver data from tomographic images; (2) interpolation techniques for both shape and intensity; (3) schemes for volume rendering and display, and (4) routines for electronic surgery and image analysis. This method has been applied to cases from a living-donor liver transplant project and appears to be useful for surgical planning.

  18. Acquisition and applications of 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterian, Paul; Mocanu, Elena

    2007-08-01

    The moiré fringes method and their analysis up to medical and entertainment applications are discussed in this paper. We describe the procedure of capturing 3D images with an Inspeck Camera that is a real-time 3D shape acquisition system based on structured light techniques. The method is a high-resolution one. After processing the images, using computer, we can use the data for creating laser fashionable objects by engraving them with a Q-switched Nd:YAG. In medical field we mention the plastic surgery and the replacement of X-Ray especially in pediatric use.

  19. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the recent years 3D waveform inversion has become achievable procedure for seismic data processing. A number of datasets has been inverted and presented (Warner el al 2008, Ben Hadj at all, Sirgue et all 2010) using isotropic 3D waveform inversion. However the question arises will the results be affected by isotropic assumption. Full-wavefield inversion techniques seek to match field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, to synthetic data generated by a high-resolution model of the sub-surface. In this endeavour, correctly matching the travel times of the principal arrivals is a necessary minimal requirement. In many, perhaps most, long-offset and wide-azimuth datasets, it is necessary to introduce some form of p-wave velocity anisotropy to match the travel times successfully. If this anisotropy is not also incorporated into the wavefield inversion, then results from the inversion will necessarily be compromised. We have incorporated anisotropy into our 3D wavefield tomography codes, characterised as spatially varying transverse isotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry - TTI anisotropy. This enhancement approximately doubles both the run time and the memory requirements of the code. We show that neglect of anisotropy can lead to significant artefacts in the recovered velocity models. We will present inversion results of inverting anisotropic 3D dataset by assuming isotropic earth and compare them with anisotropic inversion result. As a test case Marmousi model extended to 3D with no velocity variation in third direction and with added spatially varying anisotropy is used. Acquisition geometry is assumed as OBC with sources and receivers everywhere at the surface. We attempted inversion using both 2D and full 3D acquisition for this dataset. Results show that if no anisotropy is taken into account although image looks plausible most features are miss positioned in depth and space, even for relatively low anisotropy, which leads to incorrect result. This may lead to

  20. FARGO3D: Hydrodynamics/magnetohydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez Llambay, Pablo; Masset, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    A successor of FARGO (ascl:1102.017), FARGO3D is a versatile HD/MHD code that runs on clusters of CPUs or GPUs, with special emphasis on protoplanetary disks. FARGO3D offers Cartesian, cylindrical or spherical geometry; 1-, 2- or 3-dimensional calculations; and orbital advection (aka FARGO) for HD and MHD calculations. As in FARGO, a simple Runge-Kutta N-body solver may be used to describe the orbital evolution of embedded point-like objects. There is no need to know CUDA; users can develop new functions in C and have them translated to CUDA automatically to run on GPUs.

  1. 3D Modeling Engine Representation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Timothy Yang

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This summary report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a 3D modeling engine to represent risk analysis simulation for advanced small modular reactor structures and components. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  2. Immersive 3D geovisualisation in higher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2014-05-01

    Through geovisualisation we explore spatial data, we analyse it towards a specific questions, we synthesise results, and we present and communicate them to a specific audience (MacEachren & Kraak 1997). After centuries of paper maps, the means to represent and visualise our physical environment and its abstract qualities have changed dramatically since the 1990s - and accordingly the methods how to use geovisualisation in teaching. Whereas some people might still consider the traditional classroom as ideal setting for teaching and learning geographic relationships and its mapping, we used a 3D CAVE (computer-animated virtual environment) as environment for a problem-oriented learning project called "GEOSimulator". Focussing on this project, we empirically investigated, if such a technological advance like the CAVE make 3D visualisation, including 3D geovisualisation, not only an important tool for businesses (Abulrub et al. 2012) and for the public (Wissen et al. 2008), but also for educational purposes, for which it had hardly been used yet. The 3D CAVE is a three-sided visualisation platform, that allows for immersive and stereoscopic visualisation of observed and simulated spatial data. We examined the benefits of immersive 3D visualisation for geographic research and education and synthesized three fundamental technology-based visual aspects: First, the conception and comprehension of space and location does not need to be generated, but is instantaneously and intuitively present through stereoscopy. Second, optical immersion into virtual reality strengthens this spatial perception which is in particular important for complex 3D geometries. And third, a significant benefit is interactivity, which is enhanced through immersion and allows for multi-discursive and dynamic data exploration and knowledge transfer. Based on our problem-oriented learning project, which concentrates on a case study on flood risk management at the Wilde Weisseritz in Germany, a river

  3. Cryogenic 3D printing for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, Michal; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new cryogenic 3D printing technology for freezing hydrogels, with a potential impact to tissue engineering. We show that complex frozen hydrogel structures can be generated when the 3D object is printed immersed in a liquid coolant (liquid nitrogen), whose upper surface is maintained at the same level as the highest deposited layer of the object. This novel approach ensures that the process of freezing is controlled precisely, and that already printed frozen layers remain at a constant temperature. We describe the device and present results which illustrate the potential of the new technology. PMID:26548335

  4. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints. PMID:24288392

  5. Recent developments in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    We will report our recent developments in DFD (Depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display, both of which have smooth movement parallax. Firstly, fatigueless DFD display, composed of only two layered displays with a gap, has continuous perceived depth by changing luminance ratio between two images. Two new methods, called "Edge-based DFD display" and "Deep DFD display", have been proposed in order to solve two severe problems of viewing angle and perceived depth limitations. Edge-based DFD display, layered by original 2D image and its edge part with a gap, can expand the DFD viewing angle limitation both in 2D and 3D perception. Deep DFD display can enlarge the DFD image depth by modulating spatial frequencies of front and rear images. Secondly, Arc 3D display can provide floating 3D images behind or in front of the display by illuminating many arc-shaped directional scattering sources, for example, arcshaped scratches on a flat board. Curved Arc 3D display, composed of many directional scattering sources on a curved surface, can provide a peculiar 3D image, for example, a floating image in the cylindrical bottle. The new active device has been proposed for switching arc 3D images by using the tips of dual-frequency liquid-crystal prisms as directional scattering sources. Directional scattering can be switched on/off by changing liquid-crystal refractive index, resulting in switching of arc 3D image.

  6. The EISCAT_3D Science Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Mann, I.; McCrea, I.; Aikio, A. T.

    2013-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be a world-leading international research infrastructure using the incoherent scatter technique to study the atmosphere in the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic and to investigate how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space. The EISCAT_3D phased-array multistatic radar system will be operated by EISCAT Scientific Association and thus be an integral part of an organisation that has successfully been running incoherent scatter radars for more than thirty years. The baseline design of the radar system contains a core site with transmitting and receiving capabilities located close to the intersection of the Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish borders and five receiving sites located within 50 to 250 km from the core. The EISCAT_3D project is currently in its Preparatory Phase and can smoothly transit into implementation in 2014, provided sufficient funding. Construction can start 2016 and first operations in 2018. The EISCAT_3D Science Case is prepared as part of the Preparatory Phase. It is regularly updated with annual new releases, and it aims at being a common document for the whole future EISCAT_3D user community. The areas covered by the Science Case are atmospheric physics and global change; space and plasma physics; solar system research; space weather and service applications; and radar techniques, new methods for coding and analysis. Two of the aims for EISCAT_3D are to understand the ways natural variability in the upper atmosphere, imposed by the Sun-Earth system, can influence the middle and lower atmosphere, and to improve the predictivity of atmospheric models by providing higher resolution observations to replace the current parametrised input. Observations by EISCAT_3D will also be used to monitor the direct effects from the Sun on the ionosphere-atmosphere system and those caused by solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. In addition, EISCAT_3D will be used for remote sensing the large-scale behaviour of the magnetosphere from its

  7. Recent improvements in SPE3D: a VR-based surgery planning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Verdonschot, Nico

    2014-02-01

    SPE3D is a surgery planning environment developed within TLEMsafe project [1] (funded by the European Commission FP7). It enables the operator to plan a surgical procedure on the customized musculoskeletal (MS) model of the patient's lower limbs, send the modified model to the biomechanical analysis module, and export the scenario's parameters to the surgical navigation system. The personalized patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) MS model is registered with 3-D MRI dataset of lower limbs and the two modalities may be visualized simultaneously. Apart from main planes, any arbitrary MRI cross-section can be rendered on the 3-D MS model in real time. The interface provides tools for: bone cutting, manipulating and removal, repositioning muscle insertion points, modifying muscle force, removing muscles and placing implants stored in the implant library. SPE3D supports stereoscopic viewing as well as natural inspection/manipulation with use of haptic devices. Alternatively, it may be controlled with use of a standard computer keyboard, mouse and 2D display or a touch screen (e.g. in an operating room). The interface may be utilized in two main fields. Experienced surgeons may use it to simulate their operative plans and prepare input data for a surgical navigation system while student or novice surgeons can use it for training.

  8. Fast Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging (SWI) with 3D Short-Axis Propeller (SAP)-EPI

    PubMed Central

    Holdsworth, Samantha J.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Moseley, Michael E.; Skare, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging (SWI) in neuroimaging can be challenging due to long scan times of 3D Gradient Recalled Echo (GRE), while faster techniques such as 3D interleaved EPI (iEPI) are prone to motion artifacts. Here we outline and implement a 3D Short-Axis Propeller Echo-Planar Imaging (SAP-EPI) trajectory as a faster, motion-correctable approach for SWI. Methods Experiments were conducted on a 3T MRI system. 3D SAP-EPI, 3D iEPI, and 3D GRE SWI scans were acquired on two volunteers. Controlled motion experiments were conducted to test the motion-correction capability of 3D SAP-EPI. 3D SAP-EPI SWI data were acquired on two pediatric patients as a potential alternative to 2D GRE used clinically. Results 3D GRE images had a better target resolution (0.47 × 0.94 × 2mm, scan time = 5min), iEPI and SAP-EPI images (resolution = 0.94 × 0.94 × 2mm) were acquired in a faster scan time (1:52min) with twice the brain coverage. SAP-EPI showed motion-correction capability and some immunity to undersampling from rejected data. Conclusion While 3D SAP-EPI suffers from some geometric distortion, its short scan time and motion-correction capability suggest that SAP-EPI may be a useful alternative to GRE and iEPI for use in SWI, particularly in uncooperative patients. PMID:24956237

  9. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D<