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Sample records for 3d fluid-structure interaction

  1. Curvilinear Immersed Boundary Method for Simulating Fluid Structure Interaction with Complex 3D Rigid Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    The sharp-interface CURVIB approach of Ge and Sotiropoulos [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries, Journal of Computational Physics 225 (2007) 1782–1809] is extended to simulate fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems involving complex 3D rigid bodies undergoing large structural displacements. The FSI solver adopts the partitioned FSI solution approach and both loose and strong coupling strategies are implemented. The interfaces between immersed bodies and the fluid are discretized with a Lagrangian grid and tracked with an explicit front-tracking approach. An efficient ray-tracing algorithm is developed to quickly identify the relationship between the background grid and the moving bodies. Numerical experiments are carried out for two FSI problems: vortex induced vibration of elastically mounted cylinders and flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve at physiologic conditions. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with benchmark simulations and experimental measurements. The numerical experiments suggest that both the properties of the structure (mass, geometry) and the local flow conditions can play an important role in determining the stability of the FSI algorithm. Under certain conditions unconditionally unstable iteration schemes result even when strong coupling FSI is employed. For such cases, however, combining the strong-coupling iteration with under-relaxation in conjunction with the Aitken’s acceleration technique is shown to effectively resolve the stability problems. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the findings of the numerical experiments. It is shown that the ratio of the added mass to the mass of the structure as well as the sign of the local time rate of change of the force or moment imparted on the structure by the fluid determine the stability and convergence of the

  2. Fluid-structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration.

  3. Validation of a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction model simulating flow through an elastic aperture

    PubMed Central

    Quaini, A.; Canic, S.; Glowinski, R.; Igo, S.; Hartley, C.J.; Zoghbi, W.; Little, S.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a validation of a fluid-structure interaction computational model simulating the flow conditions in an in vitro mock heart chamber modeling mitral valve regurgitation during the ejection phase during which the trans-valvular pressure drop and valve displacement are not as large. The mock heart chamber was developed to study the use of 2D and 3D color Doppler techniques in imaging the clinically relevant complex intra-cardiac flow events associated with mitral regurgitation. Computational models are expected to play an important role in supporting, refining, and reinforcing the emerging 3D echocardiographic applications. We have developed a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction algorithm based on a semi-implicit, monolithic method, combined with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach to capture the fluid domain motion. The mock regurgitant mitral valve corresponding to an elastic plate with a geometric orifice, was modeled using 3D elasticity, while the blood flow was modeled using the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible, viscous fluid. The two are coupled via the kinematic and dynamic conditions describing the two-way coupling. The pressure, the flow rate, and orifice plate displacement were measured and compared with numerical simulation results. In-line flow meter was used to measure the flow, pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure, and a Doppler method developed by one of the authors was used to measure the axial displacement of the orifice plate. The maximum recorded difference between experiment and numerical simulation for the flow rate was 4%, the pressure 3.6%, and for the orifice displacement 15%, showing excellent agreement between the two. PMID:22138194

  4. Validation of a numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction model for a prosthetic valve based on experimental PIV measurements.

    PubMed

    Guivier-Curien, Carine; Deplano, Valérie; Bertrand, Eric

    2009-10-01

    A numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of a prosthetic aortic valve was developed, based on a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program using an Arbitrary Eulerian Lagrangian (ALE) formulation. To make sure of the validity of this numerical model, an equivalent experimental model accounting for both the geometrical features and the hydrodynamic conditions was also developed. The leaflet and the flow behaviours around the bileaflet valve were investigated numerically and experimentally by performing particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Through quantitative and qualitative comparisons, it was shown that the leaflet behaviour and the velocity fields were similar in both models. The present study allows the validation of a fully coupled 3-D FSI numerical model. The promising numerical tool could be therefore used to investigate clinical issues involving the aortic valve.

  5. Fluid-structure interaction and structural analyses using a comprehensive mitral valve model with 3D chordal structure.

    PubMed

    Toma, Milan; Einstein, Daniel R; Bloodworth, Charles H; Cochran, Richard P; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2016-06-25

    Over the years, three-dimensional models of the mitral valve have generally been organized around a simplified anatomy. Leaflets have been typically modeled as membranes, tethered to discrete chordae typically modeled as one-dimensional, non-linear cables. Yet, recent, high-resolution medical images have revealed that there is no clear boundary between the chordae and the leaflets. In fact, the mitral valve has been revealed to be more of a webbed structure whose architecture is continuous with the chordae and their extensions into the leaflets. Such detailed images can serve as the basis of anatomically accurate, subject-specific models, wherein the entire valve is modeled with solid elements that more faithfully represent the chordae, the leaflets, and the transition between the two. These models have the potential to enhance our understanding of mitral valve mechanics and to re-examine the role of the mitral valve chordae, which heretofore have been considered to be 'invisible' to the fluid and to be of secondary importance to the leaflets. However, these new models also require a rethinking of modeling assumptions. In this study, we examine the conventional practice of loading the leaflets only and not the chordae in order to study the structural response of the mitral valve apparatus. Specifically, we demonstrate that fully resolved 3D models of the mitral valve require a fluid-structure interaction analysis to correctly load the valve even in the case of quasi-static mechanics. While a fluid-structure interaction mode is still more computationally expensive than a structural-only model, we also show that advances in GPU computing have made such models tractable. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Identification of artery wall stiffness: in vitro validation and in vivo results of a data assimilation procedure applied to a 3D fluid-structure interaction model.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, Cristóbal; Barber, David; Gaddum, Nicholas; Valverde, Israel; Rutten, Marcel; Beerbaum, Philipp; Moireau, Philippe; Hose, Rodney; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2014-03-21

    We consider the problem of estimating the stiffness of an artery wall using a data assimilation method applied to a 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Recalling previous works, we briefly present the FSI model, the data assimilation procedure and the segmentation algorithm. We present then two examples of the procedure using real data. First, we estimate the stiffness distribution of a silicon rubber tube from image data. Second, we present the estimation of aortic wall stiffness from real clinical data.

  7. Passive movement of human soft palate during respiration: A simulation of 3D fluid/structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian Hua; Lee, Heow Pueh; Lim, Kian Meng; Lee, Shu Jin; Teo, Li San Lynette; Wang, De Yun

    2012-07-26

    This study reconstructed a three dimensional fluid/structure interaction (FSI) model to investigate the compliance of human soft palate during calm respiration. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy male subject were obtained for model reconstruction of the upper airway and the soft palate. The fluid domain consists of nasal cavity, nasopharynx and oropharynx. The airflow in upper airway was assumed as laminar and incompressible. The soft palate was assumed as linear elastic. The interface between airway and soft palate was the FSI interface. Sinusoidal variation of velocity magnitude was applied at the oropharynx corresponding to ventilation rate of 7.5L/min. Simulations of fluid model in upper airway, FSI models with palatal Young's modulus of 7539Pa and 3000Pa were carried out for two cycles of respiration. The results showed that the integrated shear forces over the FSI interface were much smaller than integrated pressure forces in all the three directions (axial, coronal and sagittal). The total integrated force in sagittal direction was much smaller than that of coronal and axial directions. The soft palate was almost static during inspiration but moved towards the posterior pharyngeal wall during expiration. In conclusion, the displacement of human soft palate during respiration was mainly driven by air pressure around the surface of the soft palate with minimal contribution of shear stress of the upper airway flow. Despite inspirational negative pressure, expiratory posterior movement of soft palate could be another factor for the induction of airway collapse.

  8. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Papillary Muscle Forces Using a Comprehensive Mitral Valve Model with 3D Chordal Structure.

    PubMed

    Toma, Milan; Jensen, Morten Ø; Einstein, Daniel R; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Cochran, Richard P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models of native heart valves are being used to study valve biomechanics to aid design and development of repair procedures and replacement devices. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems. Such simulations are useful for predicting the mechanical and hemodynamic loading on implanted valve devices. A current challenge for improving the accuracy of these predictions is choosing and implementing modeling boundary conditions. In order to address this challenge, we are utilizing an advanced in vitro system to validate FSI conditions for the mitral valve system. Explanted ovine mitral valves were mounted in an in vitro setup, and structural data for the mitral valve was acquired with [Formula: see text]CT. Experimental data from the in vitro ovine mitral valve system were used to validate the computational model. As the valve closes, the hemodynamic data, high speed leaflet dynamics, and force vectors from the in vitro system were compared to the results of the FSI simulation computational model. The total force of 2.6 N per papillary muscle is matched by the computational model. In vitro and in vivo force measurements enable validating and adjusting material parameters to improve the accuracy of computational models. The simulations can then be used to answer questions that are otherwise not possible to investigate experimentally. This work is important to maximize the validity of computational models of not just the mitral valve, but any biomechanical aspect using computational simulation in designing medical devices.

  9. Influence of material property variability on the mechanical behaviour of carotid atherosclerotic plaques: A 3D fluid-structure interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianmin; Teng, Zhongzhao; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J; Gillard, Jonathan H; Jing, Zaiping; Lu, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical analysis has been shown to be complementary to luminal stenosis in assessing atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. However, patient-specific material properties are not available and the effect of material properties variability has not been fully quantified. Media and fibrous cap (FC) strips from carotid endarterectomy samples were classified into hard, intermediate and soft according to their incremental Young's modulus. Lipid and intraplaque haemorrhage/thrombus strips were classified as hard and soft. Idealised geometry-based 3D fluid-structure interaction analyses were performed to assess the impact of material property variability in predicting maximum principal stress (Stress-P1) and stretch (Stretch-P1). When FC was thick (1000 or 600 µm), Stress-P1 at the shoulder was insensitive to changes in material stiffness, whereas Stress-P1 at mid FC changed significantly. When FC was thin (200 or 65 µm), high stress concentrations shifted from the shoulder region to mid FC, and Stress-P1 became increasingly sensitive to changes in material properties, in particular at mid FC. Regardless of FC thickness, Stretch-P1 at these locations was sensitive to changes in material properties. Variability in tissue material properties influences both the location and overall stress/stretch value. This variability needs to be accounted for when interpreting the results of mechanical modelling. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25940741

  10. Influence of material property variability on the mechanical behaviour of carotid atherosclerotic plaques: a 3D fluid-structure interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianmin; Teng, Zhongzhao; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J; Gillard, Jonathan H; Jing, Zaiping; Lu, Qingsheng

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical analysis has been shown to be complementary to luminal stenosis in assessing atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. However, patient-specific material properties are not available and the effect of material properties variability has not been fully quantified. Media and fibrous cap (FC) strips from carotid endarterectomy samples were classified into hard, intermediate and soft according to their incremental Young's modulus. Lipid and intraplaque haemorrhage/thrombus strips were classified as hard and soft. Idealised geometry-based 3D fluid-structure interaction analyses were performed to assess the impact of material property variability in predicting maximum principal stress (Stress-P1 ) and stretch (Stretch-P1 ). When FC was thick (1000 or 600 µm), Stress-P1 at the shoulder was insensitive to changes in material stiffness, whereas Stress-P1 at mid FC changed significantly. When FC was thin (200 or 65 µm), high stress concentrations shifted from the shoulder region to mid FC, and Stress-P1 became increasingly sensitive to changes in material properties, in particular at mid FC. Regardless of FC thickness, Stretch-P1 at these locations was sensitive to changes in material properties. Variability in tissue material properties influences both the location and overall stress/stretch value. This variability needs to be accounted for when interpreting the results of mechanical modelling.

  11. Fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, K.

    A few nonflow field problems are considered, taking into account mainly fluid-shell dynamic interaction and fluid-solid impact. Fluid-shell systems are used as models for sloshing and POGO (structure-propulsion coupling oscillation) in liquid rockets, floating lids of oil tanks, large tanks containing fluid, nuclear containment vessels, and head injury studies in biomechanics. The study of structure-water impact finds applications in the problems associated with water landings of reentry vehicles, water entry of torpedoes, and slamming of ships in heavy seas. At least three different methods can be used in handling wet structures. Attention is given to the method which treats fluid by boundary elements and structure by finite elements.

  12. Application of computational fluid dynamics and fluid structure interaction techniques for calculating the 3D transient flow of journal bearings coupled with rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Guichang; Liu, Shulian; Zheng, Shuiying

    2012-09-01

    Journal bearings are important parts to keep the high dynamic performance of rotor machinery. Some methods have already been proposed to analysis the flow field of journal bearings, and in most of these methods simplified physical model and classic Reynolds equation are always applied. While the application of the general computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-fluid structure interaction (FSI) techniques is more beneficial for analysis of the fluid field in a journal bearing when more detailed solutions are needed. This paper deals with the quasi-coupling calculation of transient fluid dynamics of oil film in journal bearings and rotor dynamics with CFD-FSI techniques. The fluid dynamics of oil film is calculated by applying the so-called "dynamic mesh" technique. A new mesh movement approach is presented while the dynamic mesh models provided by FLUENT are not suitable for the transient oil flow in journal bearings. The proposed mesh movement approach is based on the structured mesh. When the journal moves, the movement distance of every grid in the flow field of bearing can be calculated, and then the update of the volume mesh can be handled automatically by user defined function (UDF). The journal displacement at each time step is obtained by solving the moving equations of the rotor-bearing system under the known oil film force condition. A case study is carried out to calculate the locus of the journal center and pressure distribution of the journal in order to prove the feasibility of this method. The calculating results indicate that the proposed method can predict the transient flow field of a journal bearing in a rotor-bearing system where more realistic models are involved. The presented calculation method provides a basis for studying the nonlinear dynamic behavior of a general rotor-bearing system.

  13. Patient-Specific Simulations of Reactivity in Models of the Pulmonary Vasculature: A 3-D Numerical Study with Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Kendall; Zhang, Yanhang; Lanning, Craig

    2005-11-01

    Insight into the progression of pulmonary hypertension may be obtained from thorough study of vascular flow during reactivity testing, an invasive diagnostic procedure which can dramatically alter vascular hemodynamics. Diagnostic imaging methods, however, are limited in their ability to provide extensive data. Here we present detailed flow and wall deformation results from simulations of pulmonary arteries undergoing this procedure. Patient-specific 3-D geometric reconstructions of the first four branches of the pulmonary vasculature were obtained clinically and meshed for use with computational software. Transient simulations in normal and reactive states were obtained from four such models were completed with patient-specific velocity inlet conditions and flow impedance exit conditions. A microstructurally based orthotropic hyperelastic model that simulates pulmonary artery mechanics under normotensive and hypoxic hypertensive conditions treated wall constitutive changes due to pressure reactivity and arterial remodeling. Pressure gradients, velocity fields, arterial deformation, and complete topography of shear stress were obtained. These models provide richer detail of hemodynamics than can be obtained from current imaging techniques, and should allow maximum characterization of vascular function in the clinical situation.

  14. Transient cavitation in fluid-structure interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Youngdahl, C.K.; Valentin, R.A.

    1981-11-01

    A generalized column separation model is extended to predict transient cavitation associated with fluid-structure interactions. The essential feature of the combined fluid-structure interaction calculations is the coupling between the fluid transient, which is computed one dimensionally, and the structural response which can be multidimensional. Proper coupling is achieved by defining an average, one-dimensional, structural velocity and by assuming a spatially uniform pressure loading of the structure. This procedure is found to be effective even for complex finite element structural models for which the required computational time step is orders of magnitude smaller than that for the fluid transient. Computational examples and comparison with experimental data show that neglecting cavitation and setting the fluid velocity at all times equal to that of the structural boundary leads to unreal negative pressure predictions. A properly coupled column separation model reproduces the important features of fluid-structure interactions, converges rapidly, and gives reasonable fluid and structural response predictions. 9 refs.

  15. Shock-driven fluid-structure interaction for civil design

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Stephen L; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-11-01

    The multiphysics fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded structures requires the dynamic coupling of a shock-capturing flow solver to a solid mechanics solver for large deformations. The Virtual Test Facility combines a Cartesian embedded boundary approach with dynamic mesh adaptation in a generic software framework of flow solvers using hydrodynamic finite volume upwind schemes that are coupled to various explicit finite element solid dynamics solvers (Deiterding et al., 2006). This paper gives a brief overview of the computational approach and presents first simulations that utilize the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D for complex 3D structures of interest in civil engineering. Results from simulations of a reinforced column, highway bridge, multistory building, and nuclear reactor building are presented.

  16. Fluid-Structure Interactions with Flexible and Rigid Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David Jesse

    Fluid structure interactions occur to some extent in nearly every type of fluid flow. Understanding how structures interact with fluids and visa-versa is of vital importance in many engineering applications. The purpose of this research is to explore how fluids interact with flexible and rigid structures. A computational model was used to model the fluid structure interactions of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. The model simulated the coupling of the fluid and solid domains using a fluid-structure interface boundary condition. The fluid domain used a slightly compressible flow solver to allow for the possibility of acoustic coupling with the subglottal geometry and vibration of the vocal fold model. As the subglottis lengthened, the frequency of vibration decreased until a new acoustic mode could form in the subglottis. Synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV) is a three-dimensional particle tracking technique. SAPIV was used to image the jet of air that emerges from vibrating human vocal folds (glottal jet) during phonation. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the glottal jet found faint evidence of flow characteristics seen in previous research, such as axis-switching, but did not have sufficient resolution to detect small features. SAPIV was further applied to reconstruct the smaller flow characteristics of the glottal jet of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. Two- and four-layer synthetic vocal fold models were used to determine how the glottal jet from the synthetic models compared to the glottal jet from excised human vocal folds. The two- and four-layer models clearly exhibited axis-switching which has been seen in other 3D analyses of the glottal jet. Cavitation in a quiescent fluid can break a rigid structure such as a glass bottle. A new cavitation number was derived to include acceleration and pressure head at cavitation onset. A cavitation stick was used to validate the cavitation number by filling it with different depths and hitting

  17. Solving Fluid Structure Interaction Problems with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barad, Michael F.; Brehm, Christoph; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations can be used for moving boundary problems as well as fully coupled fluid-structure interaction is presented. The underlying Cartesian immersed boundary method of the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) framework, based on the locally stabilized immersed boundary method previously presented by the authors, is extended to account for unsteady boundary motion and coupled to linear and geometrically nonlinear structural finite element solvers. The approach is validated for moving boundary problems with prescribed body motion and fully coupled fluid structure interaction problems. Keywords: Immersed Boundary Method, Higher-Order Finite Difference Method, Fluid Structure Interaction.

  18. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  19. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  20. Mitral valve dynamics in structural and fluid-structure interaction models.

    PubMed

    Lau, K D; Diaz, V; Scambler, P; Burriesci, G

    2010-11-01

    Modelling and simulation of heart valves is a challenging biomechanical problem due to anatomical variability, pulsatile physiological pressure loads and 3D anisotropic material behaviour. Current valvular models based on the finite element method can be divided into: those that do model the interaction between the blood and the valve (fluid-structure interaction or 'wet' models) and those that do not (structural models or 'dry' models). Here an anatomically sized model of the mitral valve has been used to compare the difference between structural and fluid-structure interaction techniques in two separately simulated scenarios: valve closure and a cardiac cycle. Using fluid-structure interaction, the valve has been modelled separately in a straight tubular volume and in a U-shaped ventricular volume, in order to analyse the difference in the coupled fluid and structural dynamics between the two geometries. The results of the structural and fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the stress distribution in the closure simulation is similar in all the models, but the magnitude and closed configuration differ. In the cardiac cycle simulation significant differences in the valvular dynamics were found between the structural and fluid-structure interaction models due to difference in applied pressure loads. Comparison of the fluid domains of the fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the ventricular geometry generates slower fluid velocity with increased vorticity compared to the tubular geometry. In conclusion, structural heart valve models are suitable for simulation of static configurations (opened or closed valves), but in order to simulate full dynamic behaviour fluid-structure interaction models are required.

  1. A Method of Simulating Fluid Structure Interactions for Deformable Decelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidzak, Vladimyr Mykhalo

    A method is developed for performing simulations that contain fluid-structure interactions between deployable decelerators and a high speed compressible flow. The problem of coupling together multiple physical systems is examined with discussion of the strength of coupling for various methods. A non-monolithic strongly coupled option is presented for fluid-structure systems based on grid deformation. A class of algebraic grid deformation methods is then presented with examples of increasing complexity. The strength of the fluid-structure coupling is validated against two analytic problems, chosen to test the time dependent behavior of structure on fluid interactions, and of fluid on structure interruptions. A one-dimentional material heating model is also validated against experimental data. Results are provided for simulations of a wind tunnel scale disk-gap-band parachute with comparison to experimental data. Finally, a simulation is performed on a flight scale tension cone decelerator, with examination of time-dependent material stress, and heating.

  2. Fluid Structure Interaction Effect on Sandwich Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI, composite, balsa, low velocity impact, sandwich composites, VARTM , Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer...11 1. Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) ...................11 2. Procedure...required equipment for VARTM composite production. ..............10 Figure 4. VARTM Lay-up (From [8

  3. Fluid-structure Interaction Simulations of Deformable Soft Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman

    2011-11-01

    Soft tissue interacts with the surrounding fluid environment in many biological and biomedical applications. Simulating such an interaction is quite challenging due to the large non-linear deformations of tissue, flow pulsatility, transition to turbulence, and non-linear fluid-structure interaction. We have extended our previous three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) framework for rigid bodies (Borazjani, Ge, and Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational Physics, 2008) to deformable soft tissue by coupling our incompressible Navier-Stokes solver for fluids with a non-linear large deformation finite element method for soft tissue. We use Fung-type constitutive law for the soft tissue that can capture the stress-strain behavior of the tissue. The FSI solver adopts a strongly-coupled partitioned approach that is stabilized with under-relaxation and Aitken acceleration technique. We validate our solvers against the experimental data for tissue valves and elastic tubes. We show the capabilities of our solver by simulating the fluid-structure interaction of tissue valves implanted in the aortic positions and elastic collapsible tubes. This work was partly supported by the Center for Computational Research at the University at Buffalo.

  4. Adaptivity and smart algorithms for fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews new approaches in CFD which have the potential for significantly increasing current capabilities of modeling complex flow phenomena and of treating difficult problems in fluid-structure interaction. These approaches are based on the notions of adaptive methods and smart algorithms, which use instantaneous measures of the quality and other features of the numerical flowfields as a basis for making changes in the structure of the computational grid and of algorithms designed to function on the grid. The application of these new techniques to several problem classes are addressed, including problems with moving boundaries, fluid-structure interaction in high-speed turbine flows, flow in domains with receding boundaries, and related problems.

  5. Coupling fluid-structure interaction with phase-field fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a concept for coupling fluid-structure interaction with brittle fracture in elasticity is proposed. The fluid-structure interaction problem is modeled in terms of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian technique and couples the isothermal, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with nonlinear elastodynamics using the Saint-Venant Kirchhoff solid model. The brittle fracture model is based on a phase-field approach for cracks in elasticity and pressurized elastic solids. In order to derive a common framework, the phase-field approach is re-formulated in Lagrangian coordinates to combine it with fluid-structure interaction. A crack irreversibility condition, that is mathematically characterized as an inequality constraint in time, is enforced with the help of an augmented Lagrangian iteration. The resulting problem is highly nonlinear and solved with a modified Newton method (e.g., error-oriented) that specifically allows for a temporary increase of the residuals. The proposed framework is substantiated with several numerical tests. In these examples, computational stability in space and time is shown for several goal functionals, which demonstrates reliability of numerical modeling and algorithmic techniques. But also current limitations such as the necessity of using solid damping are addressed.

  6. An Immersed Boundary Method for Solving the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations with Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Christoph; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equation and the additional infrastructure that is needed to solve moving boundary problems and fully coupled fluid-structure interaction is described. All the methods described in this paper were implemented in NASA's LAVA solver framework. The underlying immersed boundary method is based on the locally stabilized immersed boundary method that was previously introduced by the authors. In the present paper this method is extended to account for all aspects that are involved for fluid structure interaction simulations, such as fast geometry queries and stencil computations, the treatment of freshly cleared cells, and the coupling of the computational fluid dynamics solver with a linear structural finite element method. The current approach is validated for moving boundary problems with prescribed body motion and fully coupled fluid structure interaction problems in 2D and 3D. As part of the validation procedure, results from the second AIAA aeroelastic prediction workshop are also presented. The current paper is regarded as a proof of concept study, while more advanced methods for fluid structure interaction are currently being investigated, such as geometric and material nonlinearities, and advanced coupling approaches.

  7. Influence of Young's moduli in 3D fluid-structure coupled models of the human cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnke, Frank; Semmelbauer, Sebastian; Marquardt, Torsten

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in the human cochlea was studied using a tapered box-model with linear assumptions respective to all mechanical parameters. The discretisation and evaluation is conducted by a commercial finite element package (ANSYS). The main difference to former models of the cochlea was the representation of the basilar membrane by a 3D elastic solid. The Young's moduli of this solid were modified to study their influence on the travelling wave. The lymph in the scala vestibuli and scala tympani was represented by a viscous and nearly incompressible fluid finite element approach. Our results show the maximum displacement for f = 2kHz at half of the length of the cochlea in accordance with former experiments. For low frequencies f <200 Hz nearly zero phase shifts were found, whereas for f =1 kHz it reaches values up to -12 cycles depending on the degree of orthotropy.

  8. An interactive multiview 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Zhang, Mei; Dong, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The progresses in 3D display systems and user interaction technologies will help more effective 3D visualization of 3D information. They yield a realistic representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them. In this paper, we describe an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system with capability of real-time user interaction. Design principle of this autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system is presented, together with the details of its hardware/software architecture. A prototype is built and tested based upon multi-projectors and horizontal optical anisotropic display structure. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of this novel 3D display and user interaction system.

  9. FE Modelling of the Fluid-Structure-Acoustic Interaction for the Vocal Folds Self-Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švancara, Pavel; Horáček, J.; Hrůza, V.

    The flow induced self-oscillation of the human vocal folds in interaction with acoustic processes in the simplified vocal tract model was explored by three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model. Developed FE model includes vocal folds pretension before phonation, large deformations of the vocal fold tissue, vocal folds contact, fluid-structure interaction, morphing the fluid mesh according the vocal folds motion (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach), unsteady viscous compressible airflow described by the Navier-Stokes equations and airflow separation during the glottis closure. Iterative partitioned approach is used for modelling the fluid-structure interaction. Computed results prove that the developed model can be used for simulation of the vocal folds self-oscillation and resulting acoustic waves. The developed model enables to numerically simulate an influence of some pathological changes in the vocal fold tissue on the voice production.

  10. Simulating Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device Operation Using Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris; Bazilevs, Yuri; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to patients in heart failure. They are primarily used to extend life until cardiac transplant, but also show promise as a ``bridge-to-recovery'' device in pediatric patients. Commercially available pediatric pumps are pulsatile displacement pumps, with two distinct chambers for air and blood separated by a thin, flexible membrane. The air chamber pneumatically drives the membrane, which drives blood through the other chamber via displacement. The primary risk factor associated with these devices is stroke or embolism due to thrombogenesis in the blood chamber, occurring in as many as 40% of patients. Our goal is to perform simulations that accurately model the hemodynamics of the device, as well as the non-linear membrane buckling. We apply a finite-element based fluid solver, with an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework to account for mesh motion. Isogeometric Analysis with a Kirchhoff-Love shell formulation is used on the membrane, and two distinct fluid subdomains are used for the air and blood chambers. The Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) problem is solved simultaneously, using a Matrix Free method to model the interactions at the fluid-structure boundary. Methods and results are presented.

  11. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis on Sidewall Aneurysm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qing

    2016-11-01

    Wall shear stress is considered as an important factor for cerebral aneurysm growth and rupture. The objective of present study is to evaluate wall shear stress in aneurysm sac and neck by a fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) model, which was developed and validated against the particle image velocimetry (PIV) data. In this FSI model, the flow characteristics in a straight tube with different asymmetric aneurysm sizes over a range of Reynolds numbers from 200 to 1600 were investigated. The FSI results agreed well with PIV data. It was found that at steady flow conditions, when Reynolds number above 700, one large recirculating vortex would be formed, occupying the entire aneurysm sac. The center of the vortex is located at region near to the distal neck. A pair of counter rotating vortices would however be formed at Reynolds number below 700. Wall shear stresses reached highest level at the distal neck of the aneurysmal sac. The vortex strength, in general, is stronger at higher Reynolds number. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis on Sidewall Aneurysm Models.

  12. A self-excited flapper from fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curet, Oscar M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    The flexible nature of lifting and propulsive surfaces is a common characteristic of aquatic and aerial locomotion in animals. These surfaces may not only move actively, but also passively or with a combination of both. What is the nature of this passive movement? What is the role of this passive motion on force generation, efficiency and muscle control? Here, we present results using a simple wing model with two degrees of freedom designed to study passive flapping, and fluid-structure interaction. The wing is composed of a flat plate with a hinged trailing flap. The wing is cantilevered to the main body to enable a flapping motion with a well-defined natural frequency. We test the wing model in a wind tunnel. At low speed the wing is stationary. Above a critical velocity the trailing wing section starts to oscillate, generating an oscillating lift force on the wing. This oscillating lift force results on a self-excited flapping motion of the wing. We measure the kinematics and the forces generated by the wing as a function of flow velocity and stiffness of the cantilever. Comparisons with aeroelasticity theory will be presented as well as details of the fluid-structure interactions.

  13. Modeling fluid-structure interactions in shallow microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidhore, Tanmay C.; Christov, Ivan C.

    2016-11-01

    Rectangular microfluidic conduits with deformable walls are some of the simplest and most extensively studied microfluidic devices, primarily due to their practical design applications in a variety of fields like biology, medical diagnostics (e.g., lab-on-a-chip), nanotechnology, etc. Experimentally, these devices are found to deform into a non-rectangular cross-section due to fluid-structure interactions occurring at the channel walls. These deformations significantly affect the flow profile, which results in a non-linear relationship between the flow rate and the pressure drop, which cannot be explained by a 'generalised Poiseuille flow solution'. To this end, we perform a numerical study of these fluid-structure interactions and their effect on the flow rate and the pressure drop occurring in microfluidic conduits with a single deformable wall. The behavior of several shallow conduit systems (l >> w >> h) with rigid base and side walls and a soft top wall (e.g., PDMS) is simulated under laminar flow conditions using the commercial software suite ANSYS. Simulation results are compared against experimental pressure drop-flow rate data from the literature and also newly developed analytical expressions for the wall deformation, the pressure and the normalized flow rate.

  14. Fluid Structure Interaction Simulations of Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri

    2011-11-01

    Pediatric ventricular assist devices (PVADs) are used for mechanical circulatory support in children with failing hearts. They can be used to allow the heart to heal naturally or to extend the life of the patient until transplant. A PVAD has two chambers, blood and air, separated by a flexible membrane. The air chamber is pressurized, which drives the membrane and pumps the blood. The primary risk associated with these devices is stroke or embolism from thrombogenesis. Simulation of these devices is difficult due to a complex coupling of two fluid domains and a thin membrane, requiring fluid-structure interaction modeling. The goal of this work is to accurately simulate the hemodynamics of a PVAD. We perform FSI simulations using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element framework to account for large motions of the membrane and the fluid domains. The air, blood, and membrane are meshed as distinct subdomains, and a method for non-matched discretizations at the fluid-structure interface is presented. The use of isogeometric analysis to model the membrane mechanics is also discussed, and the results of simulations are presented.

  15. Fluid-structure interaction of reticulated porous wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Elizabeth; Jawed, Mohammad; Reis, Pedro

    Insects of the orders Neuroptera and Hymenoptera locomote via flapping flight with reticulated wings that have porous structures that confers them with remarkable lightweight characteristics. Yet these porous wings still perform as contiguous plates to provide the necessary aerodynamic lift and drag required for flight. Even though the fluid flow past the bulk of these insects may be in high Reynolds conditions, viscosity can dominate over inertia in the flow through the porous sub-features. Further considering the flexibility of these reticulated wings yields a highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction problem. We perform a series of dynamically-scaled precision model experiments to gain physical insight into this system. Our experiments are complemented with computer simulations that combine the Discrete Elastic Rods method and a model for the fluid loading that takes into account the `leakiness' through the porous structure. Our results are anticipated to find applications in micro-air vehicle aerodynamics.

  16. Discrete Data Transfer Technique for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a general three-dimensional algorithm for data transfer between dissimilar meshes. The algorithm is suitable for applications of fluid-structure interaction and other high-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. Because the algorithm is independent of the mesh topology, we can treat structured and unstructured meshes in the same manner. The algorithm is fast and accurate for transfer of scalar or vector fields between dissimilar surface meshes. The algorithm is also applicable for the integration of a scalar field (e.g., coefficients of pressure) on one mesh and injection of the resulting vectors (e.g., force vectors) onto another mesh. The author has implemented the algorithm in a C++ computer code. This paper contains a complete formulation of the algorithm with a few selected results.

  17. Development of a Fluid Structures Interaction Test Technique for Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.; Heineck, James T.; Schairer, Edward T.; Mosher, Robert N.; Garbeff, Theodore Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Application of fluid structures interaction (FSI) computational techniques to configurations of interest to the entry, descent and landing (EDL) community is limited by two factors - limited characterization of the material properties for fabrics of interest and insufficient experimental data to validate the FSI codes. Recently ILC Dover Inc. performed standard tests to characterize the static stress-strain response of four candidate fabrics for use in EDL applications. The objective of the tests described here is to address the need for a FSI dataset for CFD validation purposes. To reach this objective, the structural response of fabrics was measured in a very simple aerodynamic environment with well controlled boundary conditions. Two test series were undertaken. The first series covered a range of tunnel conditions and the second focused on conditions that resulted in fabric panel buckling.

  18. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  19. Optimal Force Generation with Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Diing-wen

    Typical computational and experimental methods are unsuitable for studying large scale optimization problems involving complex fluid structure interactions, primarily due to their time-consuming nature. A novel experimental approach is proposed here that provides a high-fidelity and efficient alternative to discover optimal parameters arising from the passive interaction between structural elasticity and fluid dynamic forces. This approach utilizes motors, force transducers, and active controllers to emulate the effects of elasticity, eliminating the physical need to replace structural components in the experiment. A clustering genetic algorithm is then used to tune the structural parameters to achieve desired optimality conditions, resulting in approximated global optimal regions within the search bound. A prototype fluid-structure interaction experiment inspired by the lift generation of flapping wing insects is presented to highlight the capabilities of this approach. The experiment aims to maximize the average lift on a sinusoidally translating plate, by optimizing the damping ratio and natural frequency of the plate's elastic pitching dynamics. Reynolds number, chord length, and stroke length are varied between optimizations to explore their relationships to the optimal structural parameters. The results reveal that only limited ranges of stroke lengths are conducive to lift generation; there also exists consistent trends between optimal stroke length, natural frequency, and damping ratio. The measured lift, pitching angle, and torque on the plate for optimal scenarios exhibit the same frequency as the translation frequency, and the phase angles of the optimal structural parameters at this frequency are found to be independent of the stroke length. This critical phase can be then characterized by a linear function of the chord length and Reynolds number. Particle image velocimetry measurements are acquired for the kinematics generated with optimal and

  20. Fluid-structure interaction in compliant insect wings.

    PubMed

    Eberle, A L; Reinhall, P G; Daniel, T L

    2014-06-01

    Insect wings deform significantly during flight. As a result, wings act as aeroelastic structures wherein both the driving motion of the structure and the aerodynamic loading of the surrounding fluid potentially interact to modify wing shape. We explore two key issues associated with the design of compliant wings: over a range of driving frequencies and phases of pitch-heave actuation, how does wing stiffness influence (1) the lift and thrust generated and (2) the relative importance of fluid loading on the shape of the wing? In order to examine a wide range of parameters relevant to insect flight, we develop a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model that couples point vortex methods for fluid force computations with structural finite element methods to model the fluid-structure interaction of a wing in air. We vary the actuation frequency, phase of actuation, and flexural stiffness over a range that encompasses values measured for a number of insect taxa (10-90 Hz; 0-π rad; 10(-7)-10(-5) N m(2)). We show that the coefficients of lift and thrust are maximized at the first and second structural resonant frequencies of the system. We also show that even in regions of structural resonance, fluid loading never contributes more than 20% to the development of flight forces.

  1. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  2. Computational modeling of fluid structural interaction in arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Leila; Boukedjane, Mouloud; Bahi, Lakhdar

    2013-12-01

    Atherosclerosis affects the arterial blood vessels causing stenosis because of which the artery hardens resulting in loss of elasticity in the affected region. In this paper, we present: an approach to model the fluid-structure interaction through such an atherosclerosis affected region of the artery, The blood is assumed as an incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid, and the vessel wall was treated as a thick-walled, incompressible and isotropic material with uniform mechanical properties. The numerical simulation has been studied in the context of The Navier-Stokes equations for an interaction with an elastic solid. The study of fluid flow and wall motion was initially carried out separately, Discretized forms of the transformed wall and flow equations, which are coupled through the boundary conditions at their interface, are obtained by control volume method and simultaneously to study the effects of wall deformability, solutions are obtained for both rigid and elastic walls. The results indicate that deformability of the wall causes an increase in the time average of pressure drop, but a decrease in the maximum wall shear stress. Displacement and stress distributions in the wall are presented.

  3. Effects of Fluid-Structure Interaction on Dynamic Response of Composite Structures: Experimental and Numerical Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    composite structures in water and air to enhance the understanding of the effects of fluid-structure interaction on marine composite structural...naval structures are in continuous contact with a water medium. As a result, proper understanding of fluid-structure interaction is important for a...Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) is more critical for the former structures. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of water on

  4. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; ...

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionallymore » dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.« less

  5. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.

  6. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  7. A mixed time integration method for large scale acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.; Wineman, S.J.; Goudreau, G.L.; Foch, J.D.

    1994-07-18

    The transient, coupled, interaction of sound with structures is a process in which an acoustic fluid surrounding an elastic body contributes to the effective inertia and elasticity of the body. Conversely, the presence of an elastic body in an acoustic medium influences the behavior of propagating disturbances. This paper details the application of a mixed explicit-implicit time integration algorithm to the fully coupled acoustic fluidstructure interaction problem. Based upon a dispersion analysis of the semi-discrete wave equation a second-order, explicit scheme for solving the wave equation is developed. The combination of a highly vectorized, explicit, acoustic fluid solver with an implicit structural code for linear elastodynamics has resulted in a simulation tool, PING, for acoustic fluid-structure interaction. PING`s execution rates range from 1{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for rigid scattering to 10{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for fully coupled problems. Several examples of PING`s application to 3-D problems serve in part to validate the code, and also to demonstrate the capability to treat complex geometry, acoustic fluid-structure problems which require high resolution meshes.

  8. Fluid-structure interaction simulation of an avian flight model.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Sebastian; Oertel, Herbert

    2010-12-15

    A three-dimensional numerical avian model was developed to investigate the unsteady and turbulent aerodynamic performance of flapping wings for varying wingbeat frequencies and flow velocities (up to 12 Hz and 9 m s(-1)), corresponding to a reduced frequency range of k=0.22 to k=1.0 and a Reynolds number range of Re=16,000 to Re=50,000. The wings of the bird-inspired model consist of an elastic membrane. Simplifying the complicated locomotion kinematics to a sinusoidal wing rotation about two axes, the main features of dynamic avian flight were approximated. Numerical simulation techniques of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) providing a fully resolved flow field were applied to calculate the aerodynamic performance of the flapping elastic wings with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. The results were used to characterize and describe the macroscopic flow configurations in terms of starting, stopping, trailing and bound vortices. For high reduced frequencies up to k=0.67 it was shown that the wake does not consist of individual vortex rings known as the discrete vortex ring gait. Rather, the wake is dominated by a chain of elliptical vortex rings on each wing. The structures are interlocked at the starting and stopping vortices, which are shed in pairs at the reversal points of the wingbeat cycle. For decreasing reduced frequency, the results indicate a transition to a continuous vortex gait. The upstroke becomes more aerodynamically active, leading to a consistent circulation of the bound vortex on the wing and a continuous spanwise shedding of small scale vortices. The formation of the vortices shed spanwise in pairs at the reversal points is reduced and the wake is dominated by the tip and root vortices, which form long drawn-out vortex structures.

  9. Techniques for interactive 3-D scientific visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Glinert, E.P. . Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics California Univ., Davis, CA . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Becker, B.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National La

    1990-09-24

    Interest in interactive 3-D graphics has exploded of late, fueled by (a) the allure of using scientific visualization to go where no-one has gone before'' and (b) by the development of new input devices which overcome some of the limitations imposed in the past by technology, yet which may be ill-suited to the kinds of interaction required by researchers active in scientific visualization. To resolve this tension, we propose a flat 5-D'' environment in which 2-D graphics are augmented by exploiting multiple human sensory modalities using cheap, conventional hardware readily available with personal computers and workstations. We discuss how interactions basic to 3-D scientific visualization, like searching a solution space and comparing two such spaces, are effectively carried out in our environment. Finally, we describe 3DMOVE, an experimental microworld we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Reference Map Technique for Incompressible Fluid-Structure Interaction Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rycroft, Chris; Wu, Chen-Hung; Yu, Yue; Kamrin, Ken

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully Eulerian approach to simulate soft structures immersed in an incompressible fluid. The flow is simulated on a fixed grid using a second order projection method to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and the fluid-structure interfaces are modeled using the level set method. By introducing a reference map variable to model finite-deformation constitutive relations in the structure on the same grid as the fluid, the interfacial coupling is highly simplified. This fully Eulerian approach provides a computationally efficient alternative to moving mesh approaches. Example simulations featuring many-body contacts and flexible swimmers will be presented.

  11. Computer Simulation of Blood Flow, Left Ventricular Wall Motion and Their Interrelationship by Fluid-Structure Interaction Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Fukunari, Hiroshi

    To simulate fluid-structure interaction involved in the contraction of a human left ventricle, a 3D finite element based simulation program incorporating the propagation of excitation and excitation-contraction coupling mechanisms was developed. An ALE finite element method with automatic mesh updating was formulated for large domain changes, and a strong coupling strategy was taken. Under the assumption that the inertias of both fluid and structure are negligible and fluid-structure interaction is restricted to the pressure on the interface, the fluid dynamics part was eliminated from the FSI program, and a static structural FEM code corresponding to the cardiac muscles was also developed. The simulations of the contraction of the left ventricle in normal excitation and arrhythmia demonstrated the capability of the proposed method. Also, the results obtained by the two methods are compared. These simulators can be powerful tools in the clinical practice of heart disease.

  12. Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface. Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

  13. Fluid-structure interaction of complex bodies in two-phase flows on locally refined grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    Many real-life flow problems in engineering applications involve fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of arbitrarily complex geometries interacting with free surface flows. Despite the recent significant computational advances, conventional numerical methods are inefficient to resolve the prevailing complex dynamics due to the inherent large disparity of spatial and temporal scales that emerge in the air/water phases of the flow and around rigid bodies. To this end, the new generation 3D, unsteady, unstructured Cartesian incompressible flow solver, developed at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL), is integrated with a FSI immersed boundary method and is coupled with the level-set formulation. The predictive capabilities of our method to simulate non-linear free surface phenomena, with low computational cost, are significantly improved by locally refining the computational grid in the vicinity of solid boundaries and around the free surface interface. We simulate three-dimensional complex flows involving complex rigid bodies interacting with a free surface both with prescribed body motion and coupled FSI and we investigate breaking wave events. In all the cases, very good agreement with benchmark data is found. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (CBET-1509071).

  14. Three Dimensional Viscous Finite Element Formulation For Acoustic Fluid Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; White, Robert D.; Grosh, Karl

    2010-01-01

    A three dimensional viscous finite element model is presented in this paper for the analysis of the acoustic fluid structure interaction systems including, but not limited to, the cochlear-based transducers. The model consists of a three dimensional viscous acoustic fluid medium interacting with a two dimensional flat structure domain. The fluid field is governed by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with the fluid displacements and the pressure chosen as independent variables. The mixed displacement/pressure based formulation is used in the fluid field in order to alleviate the locking in the nearly incompressible fluid. The structure is modeled as a Mindlin plate with or without residual stress. The Hinton-Huang’s 9-noded Lagrangian plate element is chosen in order to be compatible with 27/4 u/p fluid elements. The results from the full 3d FEM model are in good agreement with experimental results and other FEM results including Beltman’s thin film viscoacoustic element [2] and two and half dimensional inviscid elements [21]. Although it is computationally expensive, it provides a benchmark solution for other numerical models or approximations to compare to besides experiments and it is capable of modeling any irregular geometries and material properties while other numerical models may not be applicable. PMID:20174602

  15. Simplified Aeroelastic Model for Fluid Structure Interaction between Microcantilever Sensors and Fluid Surroundings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Yanling; Qiao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Fluid-structural coupling occurs when microcantilever sensors vibrate in a fluid. Due to the complexity of the mechanical characteristics of microcantilevers and lack of high-precision microscopic mechanical testing instruments, effective methods for studying the fluid-structural coupling of microcantilevers are lacking, especially for non-rectangular microcantilevers. Here, we report fluid-structure interactions (FSI) of the cable-membrane structure via a macroscopic study. The simplified aeroelastic model was introduced into the microscopic field to establish a fluid-structure coupling vibration model for microcantilever sensors. We used the finite element method to solve the coupled FSI system. Based on the simplified aeroelastic model, simulation analysis of the effects of the air environment on the vibration of the commonly used rectangular microcantilever was also performed. The obtained results are consistent with the literature. The proposed model can also be applied to the auxiliary design of rectangular and non-rectangular sensors used in fluid environments.

  16. 3D shock-bubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2013-09-01

    We present a simulation for the interactions of shockwaves with light spherical density inhomogeneities. Euler equations for two-phase compressible flows are solved in a 3D uniform resolution finite volume based solver using 5th order WENO reconstructions of the primitive quantities, HLL-type numerical fluxes and 3rd order TVD time stepping scheme. In this study, a normal Mach 3 shockwave in air is directed at a helium bubble with an interface Atwood number of -0.76. We employ 4 billion cells on a supercomputing cluster and demonstrate the development of this flow until relatively late times. Shock passage compresses the bubble and deposits baroclinic vorticity on the interface. Initial distribution of the vorticity and compressions lead to the formation of an air jet, interface roll-ups and the formation of a long lasting vortical core, the white core. Compressed upstream of the bubble turns into a mixing zone and as the vortex ring distances from this mixing zone, a plume-shaped region is formed and sustained. Close observations have been reported in previous experimental works. The visualization is presented in a fluid dynamics video.

  17. Modelling of a Francis Turbine Runner Fatigue Failure Process Caused by Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutov, A.; Kryukov, A.; Cherny, S.; Chirkov, D.; Salienko, A.; Skorospelov, V.; Turuk, P.

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper considered is the problem of the numerical simulation of Francis turbine runner fatigue failure caused by fluid-structure interaction. The unsteady 3D flow is modeled simultaneously in the spiral chamber, each wicket gate and runner channels and in the draft tube using the Euler equations. Based on the unsteady runner loadings at each time step stresses in the whole runner are calculated using the elastic equilibrium equations solved with boundary element method. Set of static stress-strain states provides quasi-dynamics of runner cyclic loading. It is assumed that equivalent stresses in the runner are below the critical value after which irreversible plastic processes happen in the runner material. Therefore runner is subjected to the fatigue damage caused by high-cycle fatigue, in which the loads are generally low compared with the limit stress of the material. As a consequence, the stress state around the crack front can be fully characterized by linear elastic fracture mechanics. The place of runner cracking is determined as a point with maximal amplitude of stress oscillations. Stress pulsations amplitude is used to estimate the number of cycles until the moment of fatigue failure, number of loading cycles and oscillation frequency are used to calculate runner service time. Example of the real Francis runner which has encountered premature fatigue failure as a result of incorrect durability estimation is used to verify the developed numerical model.

  18. Towards numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; White, Susan M.; Huang, Shao-Ching; Mallya, Sanjay; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2014-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea(OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low pressure loads incurred during breathing. The numerical simulation with patient-specific upper airway model can provide assistance for diagnosis and treatment assessment. The eventual goal of this research is the development of numerical tool for air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with OSA. This tool is expected to capture collapse of the airway in respiratory flow conditions, as well as the effects of various treatment protocols. Here, we present our ongoing progress toward this goal. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the air-tissue interface in the complex patient-specific airway geometries. For the structure simulation, a cut-cell FEM is used. Non-linear Green strains are used for properly resolving the large tissue displacements in the soft palate structures. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled. Preliminary results will be shown, including flow simulation inside the 3D rigid upper airway of patients with OSA, and several validation problem for the fluid-structure coupling.

  19. GPU-accelerated model for fast, three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computations.

    PubMed

    Nita, Cosmin; Itu, Lucian; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Rapaka, Saikiran

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a methodology for performing one-way Fluid-Structure interaction (FSI), i.e. where the motion of the wall boundaries is imposed. We use a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) implementation and present an efficient workflow for embedding the moving geometry, given as a set of polygonal meshes, in the LBM computation. The proposed method is first validated in a synthetic experiment: a vessel which is periodically expanding and contracting. Next, the evaluation focuses on the 3D Peristaltic flow problem: a fluid flows inside a flexible tube, where a periodic wave-like deformation produces a fluid motion along the centerline of the tube. Different geometry configurations are used and results are compared against previously published solutions. The efficient approach leads to an average execution time of approx. one hour per computation, whereas 50% of it is required for the geometry update operations. Finally, we also analyse the effect of changing the Reynolds number on the flow streamlines: the flow regime is significantly affected by the Reynolds number.

  20. Generalized fictitious methods for fluid-structure interactions: Analysis and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Baek, Hyoungsu; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    We present a new fictitious pressure method for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems in incompressible flow by generalizing the fictitious mass and damping methods we published previously in [1]. The fictitious pressure method involves modification of the fluid solver whereas the fictitious mass and damping methods modify the structure solver. We analyze all fictitious methods for simplified problems and obtain explicit expressions for the optimal reduction factor (convergence rate index) at the FSI interface [2]. This analysis also demonstrates an apparent similarity of fictitious methods to the FSI approach based on Robin boundary conditions, which have been found to be very effective in FSI problems. We implement all methods, including the semi-implicit Robin based coupling method, in the context of spectral element discretization, which is more sensitive to temporal instabilities than low-order methods. However, the methods we present here are simple and general, and hence applicable to FSI based on any other spatial discretization. In numerical tests, we verify the selection of optimal values for the fictitious parameters for simplified problems and for vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) even at zero mass ratio ("for-ever-resonance"). We also develop an empirical a posteriori analysis for complex geometries and apply it to 3D patient-specific flexible brain arteries with aneurysms for very large deformations. We demonstrate that the fictitious pressure method enhances stability and convergence, and is comparable or better in most cases to the Robin approach or the other fictitious methods.

  1. A Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    A capability to couple NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the installed coupling software to demonstrate/investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between pressure wave and flexible inhibitor inside reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM). First a unified governing equation for both fluid and structure is presented, then an Eulerian-Lagrangian framework is described to satisfy the interfacial continuity requirements. The features of fluid solver, Loci/CHEM and structural solver, CoBi, are discussed before the coupling methodology of the solvers is described. The simulation uses production level CFD LES turbulence model with a grid resolution of 80 million cells. The flexible inhibitor is modeled with full 3D shell elements. Verifications against analytical solutions of structural model under steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic condition of modal analysis show excellent agreements in terms of displacement distribution and eigen modal frequencies. The preliminary coupled result shows that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor.

  2. Fluid Structure Interaction Effects on Composites Under Low Velocity Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Interaction, FSI, low velocity impact, carbon fiber reinforced polymers, CFRP, carbon nanotubes, CNT, vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, VARTM . 16...Ethyl Ketone Peroxide MWCNT Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube VARTM Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...samples used in this research is known as vacuum assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ). VARTM is a very common method used in low pressure composite

  3. Numerical simulation of the fluid-structure interaction between air blast waves and soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, S.; Risby, M. S.; Albert, A. Luthfi; Norazman, M.; Ariffin, I.; Alias, Y. Muhamad

    2014-03-01

    Normally, an explosion threat on free field especially from high explosives is very dangerous due to the ground shocks generated that have high impulsive load. Nowadays, explosion threats do not only occur in the battlefield, but also in industries and urban areas. In industries such as oil and gas, explosion threats may occur on logistic transportation, maintenance, production, and distribution pipeline that are located underground to supply crude oil. Therefore, the appropriate blast resistances are a priority requirement that can be obtained through an assessment on the structural response, material strength and impact pattern of material due to ground shock. A highly impulsive load from ground shocks is a dynamic load due to its loading time which is faster than ground response time. Of late, almost all blast studies consider and analyze the ground shock in the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) because of its influence on the propagation and interaction of ground shock. Furthermore, analysis in the FSI integrates action of ground shock and reaction of ground on calculations of velocity, pressure and force. Therefore, this integration of the FSI has the capability to deliver the ground shock analysis on simulation to be closer to experimental investigation results. In this study, the FSI was implemented on AUTODYN computer code by using Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE). Euler-Godunov has the capability to deliver a structural computation on a 3D analysis, while ALE delivers an arbitrary calculation that is appropriate for a FSI analysis. In addition, ALE scheme delivers fine approach on little deformation analysis with an arbitrary motion, while the Euler-Godunov scheme delivers fine approach on a large deformation analysis. An integrated scheme based on Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian allows us to analyze the blast propagation waves and structural interaction simultaneously.

  4. Fluid-Structure interaction modeling in deformable porous arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework is developed to study the coupling of blood flow in arteries interacting with a poroelastic arterial wall featuring possibly large deformations. Blood is modeled as an incompressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid using the Navier-Stokes equations and the arterial wall consists of a thick material which is modeled as a Biot system that describes the mechanical behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic skeleton, and connecting pores filled with fluid. Discretization via finite element method leads to the system of nonlinear equations and a Newton-Raphson scheme is adopted to solve the resulting nonlinear system through consistent linearization. Moreover, interface conditions are imposed on the discrete level via mortar finite elements or Nitsche's coupling. The discrete linearized coupled FSI system is solved by means of a splitting strategy, which allows solving the Navier-Stokes and Biot equations separately. The numerical results investigate the effects of proroelastic parameters on the pressure wave propagation in arteries, filtration of incompressible fluids through the porous media, and the structure displacement. The fellowship support from the Computational Modeling & Simulation PhD program at University of Pittsburgh for Rana Zakerzadeh is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Parallel adaptive fluid-structure interaction simulation of explosions impacting on building structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Wood, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    We pursue a level set approach to couple an Eulerian shock-capturing fluid solver with space-time refinement to an explicit solid dynamics solver for large deformations and fracture. The coupling algorithms considering recursively finer fluid time steps as well as overlapping solver updates are discussed in detail. Our ideas are implemented in the AMROC adaptive fluid solver framework and are used for effective fluid-structure coupling to the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D. Beside simulations verifying the coupled fluid-structure solver and assessing its parallel scalability, the detailed structural analysis of a reinforced concrete column under blast loading and the simulation of a prototypical blast explosion in a realistic multistory building are presented.

  6. Interactive 3d Landscapes on Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanini, B.; Calori, L.; Ferdani, D.; Pescarin, S.

    2011-09-01

    The paper describes challenges identified while developing browser embedded 3D landscape rendering applications, our current approach and work-flow and how recent development in browser technologies could affect. All the data, even if processed by optimization and decimation tools, result in very huge databases that require paging, streaming and Level-of-Detail techniques to be implemented to allow remote web based real time fruition. Our approach has been to select an open source scene-graph based visual simulation library with sufficient performance and flexibility and adapt it to the web by providing a browser plug-in. Within the current Montegrotto VR Project, content produced with new pipelines has been integrated. The whole Montegrotto Town has been generated procedurally by CityEngine. We used this procedural approach, based on algorithms and procedures because it is particularly functional to create extensive and credible urban reconstructions. To create the archaeological sites we used optimized mesh acquired with laser scanning and photogrammetry techniques whereas to realize the 3D reconstructions of the main historical buildings we adopted computer-graphic software like blender and 3ds Max. At the final stage, semi-automatic tools have been developed and used up to prepare and clusterise 3D models and scene graph routes for web publishing. Vegetation generators have also been used with the goal of populating the virtual scene to enhance the user perceived realism during the navigation experience. After the description of 3D modelling and optimization techniques, the paper will focus and discuss its results and expectations.

  7. A computational fluid-structure interaction model for plaque vulnerability assessment in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza; Haghpanahi, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    Coronary artery disease is responsible for a third of global deaths worldwide. Computational simulations of blood flow can be used to understand the interactions of artery/plaque and blood in coronary artery disease and to better predict the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. So far, the mechanical properties of animals' coronary artery have been mostly used for hemodynamic simulation of atherosclerotic arteries. The mechanical properties of animals' coronary arteries are often not accurate enough and can be only used for an approximate estimation and comparative assessment of the cognate parameters in human. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid-structure interactions model with three different plaque types is presented to perform a more accurate plaque vulnerability assessment for human atherosclerotic plaques. The coronary arteries of twenty-two male individuals were removed during autopsy and subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. The hyperelastic material coefficients of coronary arteries were calculated and implemented to the computational model. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved using the explicit dynamics finite element code LS-DYNA. The normal and shear stresses induced within the plaques were significantly affected by different plaque types. The highest von Mises (153 KPa) and shear (57 KPa) stresses were observed for hypocellular plaques, while the lowest von Mises (70 KPa) and shear (39 KPa) stresses were observed on the stiffer calcified plaques. The results suggest that the risk of plaque rupture due to blood flow is lower for cellular and hypocellular plaques, while higher for calcified plaques with low fracture stresses.

  8. FaCSI: A block parallel preconditioner for fluid-structure interaction in hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Simone; Forti, Davide; Grandperrin, Gwenol; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-12-01

    Modeling Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) in the vascular system is mandatory to reliably compute mechanical indicators in vessels undergoing large deformations. In order to cope with the computational complexity of the coupled 3D FSI problem after discretizations in space and time, a parallel solution is often mandatory. In this paper we propose a new block parallel preconditioner for the coupled linearized FSI system obtained after space and time discretization. We name it FaCSI to indicate that it exploits the Factorized form of the linearized FSI matrix, the use of static Condensation to formally eliminate the interface degrees of freedom of the fluid equations, and the use of a SIMPLE preconditioner for saddle-point problems. FaCSI is built upon a block Gauss-Seidel factorization of the FSI Jacobian matrix and it uses ad-hoc preconditioners for each physical component of the coupled problem, namely the fluid, the structure and the geometry. In the fluid subproblem, after operating static condensation of the interface fluid variables, we use a SIMPLE preconditioner on the reduced fluid matrix. Moreover, to efficiently deal with a large number of processes, FaCSI exploits efficient single field preconditioners, e.g., based on domain decomposition or the multigrid method. We measure the parallel performances of FaCSI on a benchmark cylindrical geometry and on a problem of physiological interest, namely the blood flow through a patient-specific femoropopliteal bypass. We analyze the dependence of the number of linear solver iterations on the cores count (scalability of the preconditioner) and on the mesh size (optimality).

  9. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  10. Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff; Harris, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible inhibitors are generally used in solid rocket motors (SRMs) as a means to control the burning of propellant. Vortices generated by the flow of propellant around the flexible inhibitors have been identified as a driving source of instabilities that can lead to thrust oscillations in launch vehicles. Potential coupling between the SRM thrust oscillations and structural vibration modes is an important risk factor in launch vehicle design. As a means to predict and better understand these phenomena, a multidisciplinary simulation capability that couples the NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This capability is crucial to the development of NASA's new space launch system (SLS). This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the coupled software to demonstrate and investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena between pressure waves and flexible inhibitors inside reusable solid rocket motors (RSRMs). The features of the fluid and structural solvers are described in detail, and the coupling methodology and interfacial continuity requirements are then presented in a general Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. The simulations presented herein utilize production level CFD with hybrid RANS/LES turbulence modeling and grid resolution in excess of 80 million cells. The fluid domain in the SRM is discretized using a general mixed polyhedral unstructured mesh, while full 3D shell elements are utilized in the structural domain for the flexible inhibitors. Verifications against analytical solutions for a structural model under a steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic modal analysis show excellent agreement in terms of displacement distribution and eigenmode frequencies. The preliminary coupled results indicate that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor

  11. Development of an integrated BEM approach for hot fluid structure interaction: BEST-FSI: Boundary Element Solution Technique for Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.; Shi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the continuing effort at NASA LeRC to improve both the durability and reliability of hot section Earth-to-orbit engine components, significant enhancements must be made in existing finite element and finite difference methods, and advanced techniques, such as the boundary element method (BEM), must be explored. The BEM was chosen as the basic analysis tool because the critical variables (temperature, flux, displacement, and traction) can be very precisely determined with a boundary-based discretization scheme. Additionally, model preparation is considerably simplified compared to the more familiar domain-based methods. Furthermore, the hyperbolic character of high speed flow is captured through the use of an analytical fundamental solution, eliminating the dependence of the solution on the discretization pattern. The price that must be paid in order to realize these advantages is that any BEM formulation requires a considerable amount of analytical work, which is typically absent in the other numerical methods. All of the research accomplishments of a multi-year program aimed toward the development of a boundary element formulation for the study of hot fluid-structure interaction in Earth-to-orbit engine hot section components are detailed. Most of the effort was directed toward the examination of fluid flow, since BEM's for fluids are at a much less developed state. However, significant strides were made, not only in the analysis of thermoviscous fluids, but also in the solution of the fluid-structure interaction problem.

  12. Fluid-Structure Interaction Modeling of High-Aspect Ratio Nuclear Fuel Plates Using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Franklin G; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D

    2013-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Lab is in the research stage of converting its fuel from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium. Due to different physical properties of the new fuel and changes to the internal fuel plate design, the current safety basis must be re-evaluated through rigorous computational analyses. One of the areas being explored is the fluid-structure interaction phenomenon due to the interaction of thin fuel plates (50 mils thickness) and the cooling fluid (water). Detailed computational fluid dynamics and fluid-structure interaction simulations have only recently become feasible due to improved numerical algorithms and advancements in computing technology. For many reasons including the already built-in fluid-structure interaction module, COMSOL has been chosen for this complex problem. COMSOL's ability to solve multiphysics problems using a fully-coupled and implicit solution algorithm is crucial in obtaining a stable and accurate solution. Our initial findings show that COMSOL can accurately model such problems due to its ability to closely couple the fluid dynamics and the structural dynamics problems.

  13. Large-Scale Numerical Simulation of Fluid Structure Interactions in Low Reynolds Number Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eken, Ali; Sahin, Mehmet

    2011-11-01

    A fully coupled numerical algorithm has been developed for the numerical simulation of large-scale fluid structure interaction problems. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation based on the side-centered unstructured finite volume method. A special attention is given to satisfy the discrete continuity equation within each element at discrete level as well as the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL). The linear elasticity equations are discretized within the structure domain using the Galerkin finite element method. The resulting algebraic linear equations are solved in a fully coupled form using a monolitic multigrid method. The implementation of the fully coupled iterative solvers is based on the PETSc library for improving the efficiency of the parallel code. The present numerical algorithm is initially validated for a beam in cross flow and then it is used to simulate the fluid structure interaction of a membrane-wing micro aerial vehicle (MAV).

  14. Interactive 3D display simulator for autostereoscopic smart pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Yeong-Seon; Lee, Ho-Dong; Park, Min-Chul; Son, Jung-Young; Park, Gwi-Tae

    2012-06-01

    There is growing interest of displaying 3D images on a smart pad for entertainments and information services. Designing and realizing various types of 3D displays on the smart pad is not easy for costs and given time. Software simulation can be an alternative method to save and shorten the development. In this paper, we propose a 3D display simulator for autostereoscopic smart pad. It simulates light intensity of each view and crosstalk for smart pad display panels. Designers of 3D display for smart pad can interactively simulate many kinds of autostereoscopic displays interactively by changing parameters required for panel design. Crosstalk to reduce leakage of one eye's image into the image of the other eye, and light intensity for computing visual comfort zone are important factors in designing autostereoscopic display for smart pad. Interaction enables intuitive designs. This paper describes an interactive 3D display simulator for autostereoscopic smart pad.

  15. Interactive mapping on 3-D terrain models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardin, T.; Cowgill, E.; Gold, R.; Hamann, B.; Kreylos, O.; Schmitt, A.

    2006-10-01

    We present an interactive, real-time mapping system for use with digital elevation models and remotely sensed multispectral imagery that aids geoscientists in the creation and interpretation of geologic/neotectonic maps at length scales of 10 m to 1000 km. Our system provides a terrain visualization of the surface of the Earth or other terrestrial planets by displaying a virtual terrain model generated from a digital elevation model overlain by a color texture generated from orthophotos or satellite imagery. We use a quadtree-based, multiresolution display method to render in real time high-resolution virtual terrain models that span large spatial regions. The system allows users to measure the orientations of geologic surfaces and record their observations by drawing lines directly on the virtual terrain model. In addition, interpretive surfaces can be generated from these drawings and displayed to facilitate understanding of the three-dimensional geometry of geologic surfaces. The main strength of our system is the combination of real-time rendering and interactive mapping performed directly on the virtual terrain model with the ability to navigate the scene while changing viewpoints arbitrarily during mapping. User studies and comparisons with commercially available mapping software show that our system improves mapping accuracy and efficiency and also yields observations that cannot be made with existing systems.

  16. A fictitious domain/mortar element method for fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaijens, Frank P. T.

    2001-04-01

    A new method for the computational analysis of fluid-structure interaction of a Newtonian fluid with slender bodies is developed. It combines ideas of the fictitious domain and the mortar element method by imposing continuity of the velocity field along an interface by means of Lagrange multipliers. The key advantage of the method is that it circumvents the need for complicated mesh movement strategies common in arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods, usually used for this purpose. Copyright

  17. Active noise control - Piezoceramic actuators in fluid/structure interaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Fang, W.; Smith, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    A model for a 2-D acoustic cavity with a flexible boundary (a beam) controlled via piezoceramic patches producing bending moments in the beam is considered. The associated control problem for this fluid/structure interaction system to reduce the acoustic pressure in the cavity involves unbounded control inputs. Approximation methods in the context of an LQR state space formulation are discussed, and numerical results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach in computing feedback controls for noise reduction.

  18. Parallel Three-Dimensional Computation of Fluid Dynamics and Fluid-Structure Interactions of Ram-Air Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    1998-01-01

    This is a final report as far as our work at University of Minnesota is concerned. The report describes our research progress and accomplishments in development of high performance computing methods and tools for 3D finite element computation of aerodynamic characteristics and fluid-structure interactions (FSI) arising in airdrop systems, namely ram-air parachutes and round parachutes. This class of simulations involves complex geometries, flexible structural components, deforming fluid domains, and unsteady flow patterns. The key components of our simulation toolkit are a stabilized finite element flow solver, a nonlinear structural dynamics solver, an automatic mesh moving scheme, and an interface between the fluid and structural solvers; all of these have been developed within a parallel message-passing paradigm.

  19. A fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Hsu, M.-C.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, W.; Liang, X.; Kvamsdal, T.; Brekken, R.; Isaksen, J. G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a computational vascular fluid-structure interaction (FSI) methodology and its application to patient-specific aneurysm models of the middle cerebral artery bifurcation. A fully coupled fluid-structural simulation approach is reviewed, and main aspects of mesh generation in support of patient-specific vascular FSI analyses are presented. Quantities of hemodynamic interest such as wall shear stress and wall tension are studied to examine the relevance of FSI modeling as compared to the rigid arterial wall assumption. We demonstrate the importance of including the flexible wall modeling in vascular blood flow simulations by performing a comparison study that involves four patient-specific models of cerebral aneurysms varying in shape and size.

  20. A Parallel Monolithic Approach for Fluid-Structure Interaction in a Cerebral Aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Eken, Ali

    2014-11-01

    A parallel fully-coupled approach has been developed for the fluid-structure interaction problem in a cerebral artery with aneurysm. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation based on the side-centered unstructured finite volume method is employed for the governing incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the classical Galerkin finite element formulation is used to discretize the constitutive law for the Saint Venant-Kirchhoff material in a Lagrangian frame for the solid domain. The time integration method for the structure domain is based on the energy conserving mid-point method while the second-order backward difference is used within the fluid domain. The resulting large-scale algebraic linear equations are solved using a one-level restricted additive Schwarz preconditioner with a block-incomplete factorization within each partitioned sub-domains. The parallel implementation of the present fully coupled unstructured fluid-structure solver is based on the PETSc library. The proposed numerical algorithm is initially validated for several classical benchmark problems and then applied to a more complicated problem involving unsteady pulsatile blood flow in a cerebral artery with aneurysm as a realistic fluid-structure interaction problem encountered in biomechanics. The authors acknowledge financial support from Turkish National Scientific and Technical Research Council through Project Number 112M107.

  1. A Finite Element Procedure for Calculating Fluid-Structure Interaction Using MSC/NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen; Gartmeier, Otto

    1990-01-01

    This report is intended to serve two purposes. The first is to present a survey of the theoretical background of the dynamic interaction between a non-viscid, compressible fluid and an elastic structure is presented. Section one presents a short survey of the application of the finite element method (FEM) to the area of fluid-structure-interaction (FSI). Section two describes the mathematical foundation of the structure and fluid with special emphasis on the fluid. The main steps in establishing the finite element (FE) equations for the fluid structure coupling are discussed in section three. The second purpose is to demonstrate the application of MSC/NASTRAN to the solution of FSI problems. Some specific topics, such as fluid structure analogy, acoustic absorption, and acoustic contribution analysis are described in section four. Section five deals with the organization of the acoustic procedure flowchart. Section six includes the most important information that a user needs for applying the acoustic procedure to practical FSI problems. Beginning with some rules concerning the FE modeling of the coupled system, the NASTRAN USER DECKs for the different steps are described. The goal of section seven is to demonstrate the use of the acoustic procedure with some examples. This demonstration includes an analytic verification of selected FE results. The analytical description considers only some aspects of FSI and is not intended to be mathematically complete. Finally, section 8 presents an application of the acoustic procedure to vehicle interior acoustic analysis with selected results.

  2. Development of an integrated BEM approach for hot fluid structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    The progress made toward the development of a boundary element formulation for the study of hot fluid-structure interaction in Earth-to-Orbit engine hot section components is reported. The convective viscous integral formulation was derived and implemented in the general purpose computer program GP-BEST. The new convective kernel functions, in turn, necessitated the development of refined integration techniques. As a result, however, since the physics of the problem is embedded in these kernels, boundary element solutions can now be obtained at very high Reynolds number. Flow around obstacles can be solved approximately with an efficient linearized boundary-only analysis or, more exactly, by including all of the nonlinearities present in the neighborhood of the obstacle. The other major accomplishment was the development of a comprehensive fluid-structure interaction capability within GP-BEST. This new facility is implemented in a completely general manner, so that quite arbitrary geometry, material properties and boundary conditions may be specified. Thus, a single analysis code (GP-BEST) can be used to run structures-only problems, fluids-only problems, or the combined fluid-structure problem. In all three cases, steady or transient conditions can be selected, with or without thermal effects. Nonlinear analyses can be solved via direct iteration or by employing a modified Newton-Raphson approach.

  3. Development of an integrated BEM approach for hot fluid structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.; Shi, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive fluid-structure interaction capability within a boundary element computer code is described. This new capability is implemented in a completely general manner, so that quite arbitrary geometry, material properties and boundary conditions may be specified. Thus, a single analysis code can be used to run structures-only problems, fluids-only problems, or the combined fluid-structure problem. In all three cases, steady or transient conditions can be selected, with or without thermal effects. Nonlinear analyses can be solved via direct iteration or by employing a modified Newton-Raphson approach. A number of detailed numerical examples are included at the end of these two sections to validate the formulations and to emphasize both the accuracy and generality of the computer code. A brief review of the recent applicable boundary element literature is included for completeness. The fluid-structure interaction facility is discussed. Once again, several examples are provided to highlight this unique capability. A collection of potential boundary element applications that have been uncovered as a result of work related to the present grant is given. For most of those problems, satisfactory analysis techniques do not currently exist.

  4. Computational modeling of RNA 3D structures and interactions.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Wayne K; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    RNA molecules have key functions in cellular processes beyond being carriers of protein-coding information. These functions are often dependent on the ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is difficult, which has prompted the development of computational methods for structure prediction from sequence. Recent progress in 3D structure modeling of RNA and emerging approaches for predicting RNA interactions with ions, ligands and proteins have been stimulated by successes in protein 3D structure modeling.

  5. Fluid-Structure Interaction Effects on Mass Flow Rates in Solid Rocket Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-02

    Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 12 August 2015 – 02 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Fluid- Structure Interaction Effects on Mass Flow Rates... structure interaction (FSI) effects between the combusting gases and propellant alter the motor chamber pressure and mass flow rate. To account for the...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. PA#    FLUID‐ STRUCTURE  INTERACTION EFFECTS ON

  6. Fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical perception model for tactile sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The reproduced tactile sensation of haptic interfaces usually selectively reproduces a certain object attribute, such as the object's material reflected by vibration and its surface shape by a pneumatic nozzle array. Tactile biomechanics investigates the relation between responses to an external load stimulus and tactile perception and guides the design of haptic interface devices via a tactile mechanism. Focusing on the pneumatic haptic interface, we established a fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical model of responses to static and dynamic loads and conducted numerical simulation and experiments. This model provides a theoretical basis for designing haptic interfaces and reproducing tactile textures.

  7. Vortex methods for fluid-structure interaction problems with deforming geometries and their application to swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We present a vortex particle-mesh method for fluid-structure interaction problems. The proposed methodology combines implicit interface capturing, Brinkmann penalization techniques, and the self-consistent computation of momentum transfer between the fluid and the structure. In addition, our scheme is able to handle immersed bodies characterized by non-solenoidal deformations, allowing the study of arbitrary deforming geometries. This attractively simple algorithm is shown to accurately reproduce reference simulations for rigid and deforming structures. Its suitability for biological locomotion problems is then demonstrated with the simulation of self-propelled anguilliform swimmers.

  8. Fluid structure interaction and transient cavitation tests in a T-piece pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijsseling, A. S.; Vardy, A. E.

    2005-08-01

    A physical model featuring the combined phenomena of fluid structure interaction (FSI) and vaporous cavitation is presented. The model is a closed, water-filled, T-shaped, laboratory pipe system, where the T-junction and the three closed ends are potential locations for strong FSI coupling and/or column separation. The system is suspended horizontally on long steel wires and is excited through external impact. The impact force and the static pressure of the liquid control the severity of the cavitation phenomenon.

  9. Isogeometric Fluid structure Interaction Analysis with Applications to Arterial Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Calo, V. M.; Zhang, Y.; Hughes, T. J. R.

    2006-09-01

    A NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines)-based isogeometric fluid structure interaction formulation, coupling incompressible fluids with non-linear elastic solids, and allowing for large structural displacements, is developed. This methodology, encompassing a very general class of applications, is applied to problems of arterial blood flow modeling and simulation. In addition, a set of procedures enabling the construction of analysis-suitable NURBS geometries directly from patient-specific imaging data is outlined. The approach is compared with representative benchmark problems, yielding very good results. Computation of a patient-specific abdominal aorta is also performed, giving qualitative agreement with computations by other researchers using similar models.

  10. [3D visualization and information interaction in biomedical applications].

    PubMed

    Pu, F; Fan, Y; Jiang, W; Zhang, M; Mak, A F; Chen, J

    2001-06-01

    3D visualization and virtual reality are important trend in the development of modern science and technology, and as well in the studies on biomedical engineering. This paper presents a computer procedure developed for 3D visualization in biomedical applications. The biomedical models are constructed in slice sequences based on polygon cells and information interaction is realized on the basis of OpenGL selection mode in particular consideration of the specialties in this field such as irregularity in geometry and complexity in material etc. The software developed has functions of 3D model construction and visualization, real-time modeling transformation, information interaction and so on. It could serve as useful platform for 3D visualization in biomedical engineering research.

  11. Combining subject-specific and low-order modeling techniques to study fluid-structure interaction of rabbit phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Siyuan; Luo, Haoxiang; Novaleski, Carolyn; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    A subject-specific computational model has been developed to simulate flow-induced vocal fold vibration for evoked rabbit phonation. A freshly excised larynx was scanned using micro magnetic resonance imaging. Images were segmented to identify the vocal fold tissue and lumen surface. The 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model was then constructed with experimentally measured flow parameters as input. The tissue deformation is assumed to be finite, and a previously developed FSI solver is used to simulate the coupled flow and nonlinear tissue mechanics. In addition, a one-dimensional flow model based on heuristic estimate of the flow separation point is used as an efficient tool to guide the full 3D simulation. This low-order model is motivated by presence of uncertainties in the tissue properties and boundary conditions, and it has proven to be very useful in our study. Similarities and differences in the vibration characteristics of the vocal fold predicted by these two models will be discussed.

  12. Reliability-based aeroelastic optimization of a composite aircraft wing via fluid-structure interaction of high fidelity solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikbay, M.; Fakkusoglu, N.; Kuru, M. N.

    2010-06-01

    We consider reliability based aeroelastic optimization of a AGARD 445.6 composite aircraft wing with stochastic parameters. Both commercial engineering software and an in-house reliability analysis code are employed in this high-fidelity computational framework. Finite volume based flow solver Fluent is used to solve 3D Euler equations, while Gambit is the fluid domain mesh generator and Catia-V5-R16 is used as a parametric 3D solid modeler. Abaqus, a structural finite element solver, is used to compute the structural response of the aeroelastic system. Mesh based parallel code coupling interface MPCCI-3.0.6 is used to exchange the pressure and displacement information between Fluent and Abaqus to perform a loosely coupled fluid-structure interaction by employing a staggered algorithm. To compute the probability of failure for the probabilistic constraints, one of the well known MPP (Most Probable Point) based reliability analysis methods, FORM (First Order Reliability Method) is implemented in Matlab. This in-house developed Matlab code is embedded in the multidisciplinary optimization workflow which is driven by Modefrontier. Modefrontier 4.1, is used for its gradient based optimization algorithm called NBI-NLPQLP which is based on sequential quadratic programming method. A pareto optimal solution for the stochastic aeroelastic optimization is obtained for a specified reliability index and results are compared with the results of deterministic aeroelastic optimization.

  13. NASA VERVE: Interactive 3D Visualization Within Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Tamar; Allan, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    At NASA, we develop myriad Eclipse RCP applications to provide situational awareness for remote systems. The Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center has developed VERVE - a high-performance, robot user interface that provides scientists, robot operators, and mission planners with powerful, interactive 3D displays of remote environments.VERVE includes a 3D Eclipse view with an embedded Java Ardor3D scenario, including SWT and mouse controls which interact with the Ardor3D camera and objects in the scene. VERVE also includes Eclipse views for exploring and editing objects in the Ardor3D scene graph, and a HUD (Heads Up Display) framework allows Growl-style notifications and other textual information to be overlayed onto the 3D scene. We use VERVE to listen to telemetry from robots and display the robots and associated scientific data along the terrain they are exploring; VERVE can be used for any interactive 3D display of data.VERVE is now open source. VERVE derives from the prior Viz system, which was developed for Mars Polar Lander (2001) and used for the Mars Exploration Rover (2003) and the Phoenix Lander (2008). It has been used for ongoing research with IRG's K10 and KRex rovers in various locations. VERVE was used on the International Space Station during two experiments in 2013 - Surface Telerobotics, in which astronauts controlled robots on Earth from the ISS, and SPHERES, where astronauts control a free flying robot on board the ISS.We will show in detail how to code with VERVE, how to interact between SWT controls to the Ardor3D scenario, and share example code.

  14. Backward uniqueness of the s.c. semigroup arising in parabolic-hyperbolic fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avalos, George; Triggiani, Roberto

    A 2-d or 3-d fluid-structure interaction model in its linear form is considered, for which semigroup well-posedness (with explicit generator) was recently established in [G. Avalos, R. Triggiani, The coupled PDE-system arising in fluid-structure interaction. Part I: Explicit semigroup generator and its spectral properties, in: Fluids and Waves, in: Contemp. Math., vol. 440, Amer. Math. Soc., 2007, pp. 15-55; G. Avalos, R. Triggiani, The coupled PDE-system arising in fluid-structure interaction. Part II: Uniform stabilization with boundary dissipation at the interface, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst., in press]. This is a system which couples at the interface the linear version of the Navier-Stokes equations with the equations of linear elasticity (wave-like). In this paper, we establish a backward uniqueness theorem for such a parabolic-hyperbolic coupled PDE system. If { is the (contraction) s.c. semigroup describing its evolution on the finite energy space H, then ey=0 for some T>0 and y∈H, implies y=0. This property has implications in establishing unique continuation and controllability properties, as in the case of thermoelastic equations [M. Eller, I. Lasiecka, R. Triggiani, Simultaneous exact/approximate boundary controllability of thermoelastic plates with variable coefficient, in: Marcel Dekker Lect. Notes Pure Appl. Math., vol. 216, February 2001, pp. 109-230, invited paper for the special volume entitled Shape Optimization and Optimal Designs, J. Cagnol, J.P. Zolesio (Eds). (Preliminary version is in invited paper in: A.V. Balakrishnan (Ed.), Semigroup of Operators and Applications, Birkhäuser, 2000, pp. 335-351.); M. Eller, I. Lasiecka, R. Triggiani, Simultaneous exact/approximate boundary controllability of thermoelastic plates with variable thermal coefficient and moment control, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 251 (2000) 452-478; M. Eller, I. Lasiecka, R. Triggiani, Simultaneous exact/approximate boundary controllability of thermoelastic plates with variable

  15. Coupling analysis of fluid-structure interaction in fluid-filled elbow pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. W.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    Fluid in the ship pipeline, due to power equipment components (such as impellers, plungers, etc.) and valves, will induce turbulence, cavitations, which generate high-frequency vibration excitation lines. The measurements results show that fluid-induced vibration of the pipeline is not only confined to the pipeline, but also have an impact on the hull structure. Pipe vibration due to transient flow is very common in marine pipe system Thus fluid-structure interaction problems in shipping lines is being paid more and more attention. In this paper, the fluid-filled elbow pipe is simulated considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI) by the software ADINA. And the simulation results are validated through comparison with results obtained by other numerical solution. The results show that FSI affects the pipe-filled-water modal frequencies seriously, but have little effects on pipe vibration shapes, and the free vibration frequency of the fluid-filled pipe is lower than that of empty pipe. The pipe vibration amplitude and effective stress caused by fluid increase as the fluid velocity increase. Pipe continues vibrating after fluid velocity is steady, and the vibration is dispersing as time increase. The protection against vibration near the elbow is important because the maximum pipe deformation caused by fluid near the elbow. The maximum effective stress increases from 0 to 1.4MPa due to the fluid velocity increases from 0 to 20m/s in 5 seconds. So it is necessary to consider the FSI for fluid-filled pipe.

  16. Fluid-structure interaction including volumetric coupling with homogenised subdomains for modeling respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Lena; Roth, Christian J; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-04-01

    In this article, a novel approach is presented for combining standard fluid-structure interaction with additional volumetric constraints to model fluid flow into and from homogenised solid domains. The proposed algorithm is particularly interesting for investigations in the field of respiratory mechanics as it enables the mutual coupling of airflow in the conducting part and local tissue deformation in the respiratory part of the lung by means of a volume constraint. In combination with a classical monolithic fluid-structure interaction approach, a comprehensive model of the human lung can be established that will be useful to gain new insights into respiratory mechanics in health and disease. To illustrate the validity and versatility of the novel approach, three numerical examples including a patient-specific lung model are presented. The proposed algorithm proves its capability of computing clinically relevant airflow distribution and tissue strain data at a level of detail that is not yet achievable, neither with current imaging techniques nor with existing computational models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Numerical simulations of the discontinuous progression of cerebral aneurysms based on fluid-structure interactions study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoqi; Wang, Yueshe; Yu, Fangjun; Wang, Guoxiang

    2010-05-01

    Investigations into the characteristics of hemodynamics will provide a better understanding of the pathology of cerebral aneurysms for clinicians. In this work, a steady state discontinuous-growth model of the cerebral aneurysms was proposed. With the assumption of the fluid-structure interaction between the wall of blood vessel and blood, a fluid-structure coupling numerical simulation for this model was built using software ANSYS and CFX. The simulation results showed that as the aneurysm volume increased, a blood flow vortex came forth, the vortex region became asymptotically larger, and eddy density became gradually stronger in it. After the emergence of the vortex region, the blood flow in the vicinity of the downstream in the aneurysms volume turned into bifurcated flow, and the location of the flow bifurcated point was shifted with the aneurysm volume growing while directions of the shear stress applied to two sides of the bifurcated point were opposite. The Von Mises stress distribution along the wall of aneurysm volume decreased in the prior period and increased gradually in the later period. The maximum stress was in the neck of the volume and the minimum was on the distal end in the whole process of growth. It was shown that as the aneurysm increased the maximum deformation location of the aneurysm, vertical to the streamline, was transferred from the distal end of the aneurysm to its neck, then back to its distal end of the aneurysm again.

  18. Development of an integrated BEM approach for hot fluid structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, Gary F.; Banerjee, Prasanta K.; Honkala, Keith A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a boundary element formulation for the study of hot fluid-structure interaction in earth-to-orbit engine hot section components is described. The initial primary thrust of the program to date was directed quite naturally toward the examination of fluid flow, since boundary element methods for fluids are at a much less developed state. This required the development of integral formulations for both the solid and fluid, and some preliminary infrastructural enhancements to a boundary element code to permit coupling of the fluid-structure problem. Boundary element formulations are implemented in two dimensions for both the solid and the fluid. The solid is modeled as an uncoupled thermoelastic medium under plane strain conditions, while several formulations are investigated for the fluid. For example, both vorticity and primitive variable approaches are implemented for viscous, incompressible flow, and a compressible version is developed. All of the above boundary element implementations are incorporated in a general purpose two-dimensional code. Thus, problems involving intricate geometry, multiple generic modeling regions, and arbitrary boundary conditions are all supported.

  19. CFD Fuel Slosh Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction in Spacecraft Propellant Tanks with Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sances, Dillon J.; Gangadharan, Sathya N.; Sudermann, James E.; Marsell, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Liquid sloshing within spacecraft propellant tanks causes rapid energy dissipation at resonant modes, which can result in attitude destabilization of the vehicle. Identifying resonant slosh modes currently requires experimental testing and mechanical pendulum analogs to characterize the slosh dynamics. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques have recently been validated as an effective tool for simulating fuel slosh within free-surface propellant tanks. Propellant tanks often incorporate an internal flexible diaphragm to separate ullage and propellant which increases modeling complexity. A coupled fluid-structure CFD model is required to capture the damping effects of a flexible diaphragm on the propellant. ANSYS multidisciplinary engineering software employs a coupled solver for analyzing two-way Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) cases such as the diaphragm propellant tank system. Slosh models generated by ANSYS software are validated by experimental lateral slosh test results. Accurate data correlation would produce an innovative technique for modeling fuel slosh within diaphragm tanks and provide an accurate and efficient tool for identifying resonant modes and the slosh dynamic response.

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction Study on a Pre-Buckled Deformable Flat Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovargue, Lauren; Shams, Ehsan; Watterson, Amy; Corson, Dave; Filardo, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Daniel; Shan, Bob; Oberai, Assad

    2015-11-01

    A Fluid-Structure Interaction study is conducted for the flow over a deformable flat ribbon. This mechanism, which is called ribbon frond, maybe used as a device for pumping water and/or harvesting energy in rivers. We use a lower dimensional mathematical model, which represents the ribbon as a pre-buckled structure. The surface forces from the fluid flow, dictate the deformation of the ribbon, and the ribbon in turn imposes boundary conditions for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The mesh motion is handled using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) scheme and the fluid-structure coupling is handled by iterating over the staggered governing equations for the structure, the fluid and the mesh. Simulations are conducted at three different free stream velocities. The results, including the frequency of oscillations, show agreement with experimental data. The vortical structures near the surface of the ribbon and its deformation are highly correlated. It is observed that the ribbon motion exhibits deviation from a harmonic motion, especially at lower free stream velocities. The behavior of the ribbon is compared to swimming animals, such as eels, in order to better understand its performance. The authors acknowledge support from ONR SBIR Phase II, contract No. N0001412C0604 and USDA, NIFA SBIR Phase I, contract No. 2013-33610-20836 and NYSERDA PON 2569, contract No. 30364.

  1. The role of fluid-structure interaction for safety and life time prediction in hydraulic machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, B.; Weber, W.; Seidel, U.

    2016-11-01

    Reliable assessments of dynamic phenomena in hydraulic machinery require the consideration of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) if natural frequencies or damping properties of submerged structural parts clearly change due to the surrounding water or if the interaction may cause instabilities. Exemplarily, three different applications of strongly coupled FSI are presented which all have a high impact on operational safety or dynamic stresses and fatigue life. At first, flow induced damping effects at a Francis runner exhibit a strong dependency on operating condition and mode shape. Secondly, if a rotating disc is submerged, a splitting of natural frequencies is observed for mode shapes with different spinning direction. Finally, a hydroelastic instabilitiy is identified in a bypass valve at small opening.

  2. Multi-dimensional arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method for dynamic fluid-structure interaction. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method for analyzing fluid-structure interactions in fast-reactor containment with complex internal structures. The fluid transient can be calculated either implicitly or explicitly, using a finite-difference mesh with vertices that may be moved with the fluid (Lagrangian), held fixed (Eulerian), or moved in any other prescribed manner (hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian). The structural response is computed explicitly by two nonlinear, elastic-plastic finite-element modules formulated in corotational coordinates. Interaction between fluid and structure is accounted for by enforcing the interface boundary conditions. The method has convincing advantages in treating complicated phenomena such as flow through perforated structures, large material distortions, flow around corners and irregularities, and highly contorted fluid boundaries. Several sample problems are given to illustrate the effectiveness of this arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method.

  3. Experiment for validation of fluid-structure interaction models and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Hessenthaler, A; Gaddum, N R; Holub, O; Sinkus, R; Röhrle, O; Nordsletten, D

    2016-11-04

    In this paper a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) experiment is presented. The aim of this experiment is to provide a challenging yet easy-to-setup FSI test case that addresses the need for rigorous testing of FSI algorithms and modeling frameworks. Steady-state and periodic steady-state test cases with constant and periodic inflow were established. Focus of the experiment is on biomedical engineering applications with flow being in the laminar regime with Reynolds numbers 1283 and 651. Flow and solid domains were defined using computer-aided design (CAD) tools. The experimental design aimed at providing a straightforward boundary condition definition. Material parameters and mechanical response of a moderately viscous Newtonian fluid and a nonlinear incompressible solid were experimentally determined. A comprehensive data set was acquired by using magnetic resonance imaging to record the interaction between the fluid and the solid, quantifying flow and solid motion.

  4. Fluid-structure interaction in straight pipelines with different anchoring conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferras, David; Manso, Pedro A.; Schleiss, Anton J.; Covas, Dídia I. C.

    2017-04-01

    This investigation aims at assessing the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) occurring during hydraulic transients in straight pipeline systems fixed to anchor blocks. A two mode 4-equation model is implemented incorporating the main interacting mechanisms: Poisson, friction and junction coupling. The resistance to movement due to inertia and dry friction of the anchor blocks is treated as junction coupling. Unsteady skin friction is taken into account in friction coupling. Experimental waterhammer tests collected from a straight copper pipe-rig are used for model validation in terms of wave shape, timing and damping. Numerical results successfully reproduce laboratory measurements for realistic values of calibration parameters. The novelty of this paper is the presentation of a 1D FSI solver capable of describing the resistance to movement of anchor blocks and its effect on the transient pressure wave propagation in straight pipelines.

  5. Interactive 3D visualisation of ECMWF ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Grams, Christian M.; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the feasibility of interactive 3D visualisation of ensemble weather predictions in a way suited for weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns. The study builds upon our previous work on web-based, 2D visualisation of numerical weather prediction data for the purpose of research flight planning (Rautenhaus et al., Geosci. Model Dev., 5, 55-71, 2012). Now we explore how interactive 3D visualisation of ensemble forecasts can be used to quickly identify atmospheric features relevant to a flight and to assess their uncertainty. We use data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) and present techniques to interactively visualise the forecasts on a commodity desktop PC with a state-of-the-art graphics card. Major objectives of this study are: (1) help the user transition from the ``familiar'' 2D views (horizontal maps and vertical cross-sections) to 3D visualisation by putting interactive 2D views into a 3D context and enriching them with 3D elements, at the same time (2) maintain a high degree of quantitativeness in the visualisation to facilitate easy interpretation; (3) exploitation of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for maximum interactivity; (4) investigation of how visualisation can be performed directly from datasets on ECMWF hybrid model levels; (5) development of a basic forecasting tool that provides synchronized navigation through forecast base and lead times, as well as through the ensemble dimension and (6) interactive computation and visualisation of ensemble-based quantities. A prototype of our tool was used for weather forecasting during the aircraft-based T-NAWDEX-Falcon field campaign, which took place in October 2012 at the German Aerospace Centre's (DLR) Oberpfaffenhofen base. We reconstruct the forecast of a warm conveyor belt situation that occurred during the campaign and discuss challenges and opportunities posed by employing three

  6. Fluid-structure interaction analysis applied to thermal barrier coated cooled rocket thrust chambers with subsequent local investigation of delamination phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowollik, D. S. C.; Horst, P.; Haupt, M. C.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate numerically thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems applied to realistic rocket thrust chamber conditions. A global full parametric three-dimensional (3D) modeling approach for cooled rocket thrust chambers is presented to be able to simulate the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena involved. In a subsequent analysis step, realistic mechanical and thermal boundary conditions are extracted from critical design regions of the global model and applied to a local finite element model (FEM) to analyze possible TBC delaminations by means of a Fracture Mechanics (FM) approach.

  7. Expanding the Interaction Lexicon for 3D Graphics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    Graphics We shape out tools, and thereafter our tools shape us. Marshall McLuhan It is not reason that is the guide of life, but custom. David...Interaction Lexicon for 3D Graphics We don’t know who discovered water, but we are pretty sure it wasn’t a fish. Marshall McLuhan Successful innovation in a

  8. Harnessing fluid-structure interactions to design self-regulating acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Filippo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-01-01

    The design of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials with tunable and adaptive wave properties remains one of the outstanding challenges for the development of next generation acoustic devices. We report on the numerical and experimental demonstration of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial with dispersion characteristics, which autonomously adapt in response to changes of an incident aerodynamic flow. The metamaterial consists of a slender beam featuring a periodic array or airfoil-shaped masses supported by a linear and torsional springs. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils lead to strong attenuation at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed on the incident fluid. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic bandgap materials to autonomously adapt their dispersion properties through fluid-structure interactions, and has the potential to dramatically impact a variety of applications, such as robotics, civil infrastructures, and defense systems.

  9. Harnessing fluid-structure interactions to design self-regulating acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Casadei, Filippo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-01-21

    The design of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials with tunable and adaptive wave properties remains one of the outstanding challenges for the development of next generation acoustic devices. We report on the numerical and experimental demonstration of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial with dispersion characteristics, which autonomously adapt in response to changes of an incident aerodynamic flow. The metamaterial consists of a slender beam featuring a periodic array or airfoil-shaped masses supported by a linear and torsional springs. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils lead to strong attenuation at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed on the incident fluid. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic bandgap materials to autonomously adapt their dispersion properties through fluid-structure interactions, and has the potential to dramatically impact a variety of applications, such as robotics, civil infrastructures, and defense systems.

  10. Development of an integrated BEM approach for hot fluid structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, Gary F.; Banerjee, Prasanta K.; Dunn, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    Significant progress was made toward the goal of developing a general purpose boundary element method for hot fluid-structure interaction. For the solid phase, a boundary-only formulation was developed and implemented for uncoupled transient thermoelasticity in two dimensions. The elimination of volume discretization not only drastically reduces required modeling effort, but also permits unconstrained variation of the through-the-thickness temperature distribution. Meanwhile, for the fluids, fundamental solutions were derived for transient incompressible and compressible flow in the absence of the convective terms. Boundary element formulations were developed and described. For the incompressible case, the necessary kernal functions, under transient and steady-state conditions, were derived and fully implemented into a general purpose, multi-region boundary element code. Several examples were examined to study the suitability and convergence characteristics of the various algorithms.

  11. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  12. Optimization and analysis of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Sanbao; Zhang, Yunqing; Chen, Liping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of vibrations of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). A set of centrifugal pumps with various blade shapes were studied using FSI method, in order to investigate the transient vibration performance. The Kriging model, based on the results of the FSI simulations, was established to approximate the relationship between the geometrical parameters of pump impeller and the root mean square (RMS) values of the displacement response at the pump bearing block. Hence, multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) has been implemented to minimize the RMS value of the impeller displacement. A prototype of centrifugal pump has been manufactured and an experimental validation of the optimization results has been carried out. The comparison among results of Kriging surrogate model, FSI simulation, and experimental test showed a good consistency of the three approaches. Finally, the transient mechanical behavior of pump impeller has been investigated using FSI method based on the optimized geometry parameters of pump impeller.

  13. Optimization and Analysis of Centrifugal Pump considering Fluid-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sanbao

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of vibrations of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). A set of centrifugal pumps with various blade shapes were studied using FSI method, in order to investigate the transient vibration performance. The Kriging model, based on the results of the FSI simulations, was established to approximate the relationship between the geometrical parameters of pump impeller and the root mean square (RMS) values of the displacement response at the pump bearing block. Hence, multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) has been implemented to minimize the RMS value of the impeller displacement. A prototype of centrifugal pump has been manufactured and an experimental validation of the optimization results has been carried out. The comparison among results of Kriging surrogate model, FSI simulation, and experimental test showed a good consistency of the three approaches. Finally, the transient mechanical behavior of pump impeller has been investigated using FSI method based on the optimized geometry parameters of pump impeller. PMID:25197690

  14. Advanced Fluid--Structure Interaction Techniques in Application to Horizontal and Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Artem

    During the last several decades engineers and scientists put significant effort into developing reliable and efficient wind turbines. As a wind power production demands grow, the wind energy research and development need to be enhanced with high-precision methods and tools. These include time-dependent, full-scale, complex-geometry advanced computational simulations at large-scale. Those, computational analysis of wind turbines, including fluid-structure interaction simulations (FSI) at full scale is important for accurate and reliable modeling, as well as blade failure prediction and design optimization. In current dissertation the FSI framework is applied to most challenging class of problems, such as large scale horizontal axis wind turbines and vertical axis wind turbines. The governing equations for aerodynamics and structural mechanics together with coupled formulation are explained in details. The simulations are performed for different wind turbine designs, operational conditions and validated against field-test and wind tunnel experimental data.

  15. Methods for simulation-based analysis of fluid-structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Methods for analysis of fluid-structure interaction using high fidelity simulations are critically reviewed. First, a literature review of modern numerical techniques for simulation of aeroelastic phenomena is presented. The review focuses on methods contained within the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework for coupling computational fluid dynamics codes to computational structural mechanics codes. The review treats mesh movement algorithms, the role of the geometric conservation law, time advancement schemes, wetted surface interface strategies, and some representative applications. The complexity and computational expense of coupled Navier-Stokes/structural dynamics simulations points to the need for reduced order modeling to facilitate parametric analysis. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection approach for building a reduced order model (ROM) is presented, along with ideas for extension of the methodology to allow construction of ROMs based on data generated from ALE simulations.

  16. Partitioned semi-implicit methods for simulation of biomechanical fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, A.; Lehmkuhl, O.; Gonzalez, I.; Oliva, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper represents numerical simulation of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) system involving an incompressible viscous fluid and a lightweight elastic structure. We follow a semi-implicit approach in which we implicitly couple the added-mass term (pressure stress) of the fluid to the structure, while other terms are coupled explicitly. This significantly reduces the computational cost of the simulations while showing adequate stability. Several coupling schemes are tested including fixed-point method with different static and dynamic relaxation, as well as Newton-Krylov method with approximated Jacobian. Numerical tests are conducted in the context of a biomechanical problem. Results indicate that the Newton-Krylov solver outperforms fixed point ones while introducing more complexity to the problem due to the evaluation of the Jacobian. Fixed-point solver with Aitken's relaxation method also proved to be a simple, yet efficient method for FSI simulations.

  17. Computational fluid-structure interaction: methods and application to a total cavopulmonary connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Yuri; Hsu, M.-C.; Benson, D. J.; Sankaran, S.; Marsden, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Fontan procedure is a surgery that is performed on single-ventricle heart patients, and, due to the wide range of anatomies and variations among patients, lends itself nicely to study by advanced numerical methods. We focus on a patient-specific Fontan configuration, and perform a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis of hemodynamics and vessel wall motion. To enable physiologically realistic simulations, a simple approach to constructing a variable-thickness blood vessel wall description is proposed. Rest and exercise conditions are simulated and rigid versus flexible vessel wall simulation results are compared. We conclude that flexible wall modeling plays an important role in predicting quantities of hemodynamic interest in the Fontan connection. To the best of our knowledge, this paper presents the first three-dimensional patient-specific fully coupled FSI analysis of a total cavopulmonary connection that also includes large portions of the pulmonary circulation.

  18. Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Franklin G; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

  19. Global Model Reduction for Fluid-Structure Interaction in Flapping Flexible Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingjun; Yang, Tao

    2009-11-01

    Reduced-order models (ROMs) for fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction problems are desired in many applications (e.g. design of flapping-wing Micro Air Vehicles). Traditional approach is to build ROMs individually for fluid and solid and couple them through the interface. In this work, we suggest an approach to apply model reduction globally on a uniform description of fluid and solid in Eulerian framework. The idea has been made possible by a set of combined fluid-structue equations, where solid properties are presented as extra terms to Navier-Stokes equations. Then, typical Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection can be used for model reduction as in most fluid-only problems, with special care of the extra ``solid'' terms. In the example, we show that one can capture most energy by only a few POD modes. More importantly, the leading POD modes show the signatures of both fluid flow and solid structure.

  20. Static characteristics design of hydrostatic guide-ways based on fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shuo; Yin, YueHong

    2016-10-01

    With the raising requirements in micro optical systems, the available machines become hard to achieve the process dynamic and accuracy in all aspects. This makes compact design based on fluid/structure interactions (FSI) important. However, there is a difficulty in studying FSI with oil film as fluid domain. This paper aims at static characteristic design of a hydrostatic guide-way with capillary restrictors based on FSI. The pressure distribution of the oil film land is calculated by solving the Reynolds-equation with Galerkin technique. The deformation of structure is calculated by commercial FEM software, MSC. Nastran. A matlab program is designed to realize the coupling progress by modifying the load boundary in the submitting file and reading the deformation result. It's obvious that the stiffness of the hydrostatic bearing decreases with the weakening of the bearing structure. This program is proposed to make more precise prediction of bearing stiffness.

  1. Unsteady fluid-structure interactions with a heaving compliant membrane wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon Tzezana, Gali; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings have been shown to provide some benefits over rigid wings at the low Reynolds number regime (Re 103 to 105), specifically improved thrust in flapping flight. Here we present results from a theoretical framework used to characterize the unsteady aeroelastic behavior of compliant membrane wings executing a heaving motion. An analytical model is developed using 2D unsteady thin airfoil theory, coupled with an unsteady membrane equation. Chebyshev collocation methods are used to solve the coupled system efficiently. The model is used to explore the effects of wing compliance, inertia (including added mass effect) and flapping kinematics on the aerodynamic performance, identifying optimal conditions for maximum thrust and propulsive efficiency. A resonant frequency of the coupled system is identified and characterized for different fluid-structure interaction regimes. Extensions to pitching kinematics are also discussed.

  2. Peptide Directed 3D Assembly of Nanoparticles through Biomolecular Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prerna

    The current challenge of the 'bottom up' process is the programmed self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks into complex and larger-scale superstructures with unique properties that can be integrated as components in solar cells, microelectronics, meta materials, catalysis, and sensors. Recent trends in the complexity of device design demand the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) superstructures from multi-nanomaterial components in precise configurations. Bio mimetic assembly is an emerging technique for building hybrid materials because living organisms are efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally benign material generators, allowing low temperature fabrication. Using this approach, a novel peptide-directed nanomaterial assembly technology based on bio molecular interaction of streptavidin and biotin is presented for assembling nanomaterials with peptides for the construction of 3D peptide-inorganic superlattices with defined 3D shape. We took advantage of robust natural collagen triple-helix peptides and used them as nanowire building blocks for 3D peptide-gold nanoparticles superlattice generation. The type of 3D peptide superlattice assembly with hybrid NP building blocks described herein shows potential for the fabrication of complex functional device which demands precise long-range arrangement and periodicity of NPs.

  3. Convergence acceleration for partitioned simulations of the fluid-structure interaction in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Lars; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Düster, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    We present a partitioned approach to fluid-structure interaction problems arising in analyses of blood flow in arteries. Several strategies to accelerate the convergence of the fixed-point iteration resulting from the coupling of the fluid and the structural sub-problem are investigated. The Aitken relaxation and variants of the interface quasi-Newton -least-squares method are applied to different test cases. A hybrid variant of two well-known variants of the interface quasi-Newton-least-squares method is found to perform best. The test cases cover the typical boundary value problem faced when simulating the fluid-structure interaction in arteries, including a strong added mass effect and a wet surface which accounts for a large part of the overall surface of each sub-problem. A rubber-like Neo Hookean material model and a soft-tissue-like Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden material model are used to describe the artery wall and are compared in terms of stability and computational expenses. To avoid any kind of locking, high-order finite elements are used to discretize the structural sub-problem. The finite volume method is employed to discretize the fluid sub-problem. We investigate the influence of mass-proportional damping and the material model chosen for the artery on the performance and stability of the acceleration strategies as well as on the simulation results. To show the applicability of the partitioned approach to clinical relevant studies, the hemodynamics in a pathologically deformed artery are investigated, taking the findings of the test case simulations into account.

  4. Fluid-structure Interaction Modeling of Aneurysmal Conditions with High and Normal Blood Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Ryo; Oshima, Marie; Kobayashi, Toshio; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2006-09-01

    Hemodynamic factors like the wall shear stress play an important role in cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the influence of hemodynamic factors in blood vessels, the authors have developed a numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis technique. The objective is to use numerical simulation as an effective tool to predict phenomena in a living human body. We applied the technique to a patient-specific arterial model, and with that we showed the effect of wall deformation on the WSS distribution. In this paper, we compute the interaction between the blood flow and the arterial wall for a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm with various hemodynamic conditions, such as hypertension. We particularly focus on the effects of hypertensive blood pressure on the interaction and the WSS, because hypertension is reported to be a risk factor in rupture of aneurysms. We also aim to show the possibility of FSI computations with hemodynamic conditions representing those risk factors in cardiovascular disease. The simulations show that the transient behavior of the interaction under hypertensive blood pressure is significantly different from the interaction under normal blood pressure. The transient behavior of the blood-flow velocity, and the resulting WSS and the mechanical stress in the aneurysmal wall, are significantly affected by hypertension. The results imply that hypertension affects the growth of an aneurysm and the damage in arterial tissues.

  5. Effects of Solder Temperature on Pin Through-Hole during Wave Soldering: Thermal-Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Aziz, M. S.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Khor, C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    An efficient simulation technique was proposed to examine the thermal-fluid structure interaction in the effects of solder temperature on pin through-hole during wave soldering. This study investigated the capillary flow behavior as well as the displacement, temperature distribution, and von Mises stress of a pin passed through a solder material. A single pin through-hole connector mounted on a printed circuit board (PCB) was simulated using a 3D model solved by FLUENT. The ABAQUS solver was employed to analyze the pin structure at solder temperatures of 456.15 K (183°C) < T < 643.15 K (370°C). Both solvers were coupled by the real time coupling software and mesh-based parallel code coupling interface during analysis. In addition, an experiment was conducted to measure the temperature difference (ΔT) between the top and the bottom of the pin. Analysis results showed that an increase in temperature increased the structural displacement and the von Mises stress. Filling time exhibited a quadratic relationship to the increment of temperature. The deformation of pin showed a linear correlation to the temperature. The ΔT obtained from the simulation and the experimental method were validated. This study elucidates and clearly illustrates wave soldering for engineers in the PCB assembly industry. PMID:25225638

  6. Airway wall stiffening increases peak wall shear stress: a fluid-structure interaction study in rigid and compliant airways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-05-01

    The airflow characteristics in a computed tomography (CT) based human airway bifurcation model with rigid and compliant walls are investigated numerically. An in-house three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method is applied to simulate the flow at different Reynolds numbers and airway wall stiffness. As the Reynolds number increases, the airway wall deformation increases and the secondary flow becomes more prominent. It is found that the peak wall shear stress on the rigid airway wall can be five times stronger than that on the compliant airway wall. When adding tethering forces to the model, we find that these forces, which produce larger airway deformation than without tethering, lead to more skewed velocity profiles in the lower branches and further reduced wall shear stresses via a larger airway lumen. This implies that pathologic changes in the lung such as fibrosis or remodeling of the airway wall-both of which can serve to restrain airway wall motion-have the potential to increase wall shear stress and thus can form a positive feed-back loop for the development of altered flow profiles and airway remodeling. These observations are particularly interesting as we try to understand flow and structural changes seen in, for instance, asthma, emphysema, cystic fibrosis, and interstitial lung disease.

  7. Simulation of a pulsatile total artificial heart: Development of a partitioned Fluid Structure Interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, Simon J.; Kaufmann, Tim A. S.; Büsen, Martin R.; Laumen, Marco; Linde, Torsten; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Due to a shortage in donor organs artificial hearts can be a bridge to transplantation or even serve as a destination therapy for patients with terminal heart insufficiency. A pusher plate driven pulsatile membrane pump, the Total Artificial Heart (TAH) ReinHeart, is currently under development at the Institute of Applied Medical Engineering of RWTH Aachen University.This paper presents the methodology of a fully coupled three-dimensional time-dependent Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) simulation of the TAH using a commercial partitioned block-Gauss-Seidel coupling package. Partitioned coupling of the incompressible fluid with the slender flexible membrane as well as a high fluid/structure density ratio of about unity led inherently to a deterioration of the stability (‘artificial added mass instability’). The objective was to conduct a stable simulation with high accuracy of the pumping process. In order to achieve stability, a combined resistance and pressure outlet boundary condition as well as the interface artificial compressibility method was applied. An analysis of the contact algorithm and turbulence condition is presented. Independence tests are performed for the structural and the fluid mesh, the time step size and the number of pulse cycles. Because of the large deformation of the fluid domain, a variable mesh stiffness depending on certain mesh properties was specified for the fluid elements. Adaptive remeshing was avoided. Different approaches for the mesh stiffness function are compared with respect to convergence, preservation of mesh topology and mesh quality. The resulting mesh aspect ratios, mesh expansion factors and mesh orthogonalities are evaluated in detail. The membrane motion and flow distribution of the coupled simulations are compared with a top-view recording and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements, respectively, of the actual pump.

  8. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Cold Flow Test and Transient CFD Analysis of Out-of-Round Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Brown, Andrew; McDaniels, David; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes two nozzle fluid flow interactions. They include: 1) Cold flow nozzle tests with fluid-structure interaction at nozzle separated flow; and 2) CFD analysis for nozzle flow and side loads of nozzle extensions with various out-of-round cases.

  9. Met.3D - a new open-source tool for interactive 3D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Kern, Michael; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    We introduce Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output -- 3D visualisation, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3D context. It implements methods that address the issue of spatial perception in the 3D view as well as approaches to using the ensemble in order to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to the Met.3D approach. The tool uses modern graphics hardware technology to achieve interactive visualization of present-day numerical weather prediction datasets on standard consumer hardware. Met.3D supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and operates directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the software --illustrated with short video examples--, and give information on its availability.

  10. Analyse et caracterisation d'interactions fluide-structure instationnaires en grands deplacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cori, Jean-Francois

    Flapping wings for flying and oscillating fins for swimming stand out as the most complex yet efficient propulsion methods found in nature. Understanding the phenomena involved is a great challenge generating significant interests, especially in the growing field of Micro Air Vehicles. The thrust and lift are induced by oscillating foils thanks to a complex phenomenon of unsteady fluid-structure interaction (FSI). The aim of the dissertation is to develop an efficient CFD framework for simulating the FSI process involved in the propulsion or the power extraction of an oscillating flexible airfoil in a viscous incompressible flow. The numerical method relies on direct implicit monolithic formulation using high-order implicit time integrators. We use an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation of the equations designed to satisfy the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL) and to guarantee that the high order temporal accuracy of the time integrators observed on fixed meshes is preserved on ALE deforming meshes. Hyperelastic structural Saint-Venant Kirchhoff model, viscous incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for the flow, Newton's law for the point mass and equilibrium equations at the interface form one large monolithic system. The fully implicit FSI approach uses coincidents nodes on the fluid-structure interface, so that loads, velocities and displacements are evaluated at the same location and at the same time. The problem is solved in an implicit manner using a Newton-Raphson pseudo-solid finite element approach. High-order implicit Runge-Kutta time integrators are implemented (up to 5th order) to improve the accuracy and reduce the computational cost. In this context of stiff interaction problems, the highly stable fully implicit one-step approach is an original alternative to traditional multistep or explicit one-step finite element approaches. The methodology has been verified with three different test-cases. Thorough time-step refinement studies for a

  11. A 3D isodose manipulation tool for interactive dose shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerling, C. P.; Ziegenhein, P.; Heinrich, H.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    The interactive dose shaping (IDS) planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. In this work we introduce an interactive 3D isodose manipulation tool which enables local modifications of a dose distribution intuitively by direct manipulation of an isodose surface. We developed an in-house IMRT TPS framework employing an IDS engine as well as a 3D GUI for dose manipulation and visualization. In our software an initial dose distribution can be interactively modified through an isodose surface manipulation tool by intuitively clicking on an isodose surface. To guide the user interaction, the position of the modification is indicated by a sphere while the mouse cursor hovers the isodose surface. The sphere's radius controls the locality of the modification. The tool induces a dose modification as a direct change of dose in one or more voxels, which is incrementally obtained by fluence adjustments. A subsequent recovery step identifies voxels with violated dose features and aims to recover their original dose. We showed a proof of concept study for the proposed tool by adapting the dose distribution of a prostate case (9 beams, coplanar). Single dose modifications take less than 2 seconds on an actual desktop PC.

  12. Fluid-Structure Interaction Modeling of Intracranial Aneurysm Hemodynamics: Effects of Different Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabzadeh Oghaz, Hamidreza; Damiano, Robert; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are pathological outpouchings of cerebral vessels, the progression of which are mediated by complex interactions between the blood flow and vasculature. Image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used for decades to investigate IA hemodynamics. However, the commonly adopted simplifying assumptions in CFD (e.g. rigid wall) compromise the simulation accuracy and mask the complex physics involved in IA progression and eventual rupture. Several groups have considered the wall compliance by using fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling. However, FSI simulation is highly sensitive to numerical assumptions (e.g. linear-elastic wall material, Newtonian fluid, initial vessel configuration, and constant pressure outlet), the effects of which are poorly understood. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of the sensitivity of FSI simulations in patient-specific IAs is investigated using a multi-stage approach with a varying level of complexity. We start with simulations incorporating several common simplifications: rigid wall, Newtonian fluid, and constant pressure at the outlets, and then we stepwise remove these simplifications until the most comprehensive FSI simulations. Hemodynamic parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index are assessed and compared at each stage to better understand the sensitivity of in FSI simulations for IA to model assumptions. Supported by the National Institutes of Health (1R01 NS 091075-01).

  13. Two way fluid structure interaction analysis of a valveless micropump by CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cǎlimǎnescu, Ioan; Dumitrache, Constantin L.; Grigorescu, Lucian

    2015-02-01

    In the microfluid control system, a valve-less micropump is a necessary component. It has the ability to pump a wide variety of fluids automatically and accurately on a micro scale. The dynamic characteristics of a valve-less micropump influence the performance of the microfluid control system. Consequently, it is of great importance to be able to accurately predict the dynamic characteristics of micropumps for appropriate design and usage of the microfluid control system. In this paper, we describe a corrugated diaphragm valveless micropump approached from the Computational Fluid Dynamics point of view in which the Fluid Structure Interaction is based on the Two Way principle, meaning that the diaphragm is moving and the fluid (water like fluid) is sucked from the inlet and pushed back to the outlet using the nozzle effect. The technical solution of micropumps without valves is a very clever idea to replace the custom valves with nozzles, with the same effect but virtually without any components beside the inlet and the outlet nozzles. The paperwork is demonstrating via a complex simulation involving the structural-fluid interaction the nozzle effects and the functioning of this kind of micropumps.

  14. Computational Modeling of Fluid-Structure-Acoustics Interaction during Voice Production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The paper presented a three-dimensional, first-principle based fluid-structure-acoustics interaction computer model of voice production, which employed a more realistic human laryngeal and vocal tract geometries. Self-sustained vibrations, important convergent-divergent vibration pattern of the vocal folds, and entrainment of the two dominant vibratory modes were captured. Voice quality-associated parameters including the frequency, open quotient, skewness quotient, and flow rate of the glottal flow waveform were found to be well within the normal physiological ranges. The analogy between the vocal tract and a quarter-wave resonator was demonstrated. The acoustic perturbed flux and pressure inside the glottis were found to be at the same order with their incompressible counterparts, suggesting strong source-filter interactions during voice production. Such high fidelity computational model will be useful for investigating a variety of pathological conditions that involve complex vibrations, such as vocal fold paralysis, vocal nodules, and vocal polyps. The model is also an important step toward a patient-specific surgical planning tool that can serve as a no-risk trial and error platform for different procedures, such as injection of biomaterials and thyroplastic medialization.

  15. Fluid-Structure Interaction in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Effect of Modeling Techniques.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shengmao; Han, Xinwei; Bi, Yonghua; Ju, Siyeong; Gu, Linxia

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the impact of modeling techniques on predicting the mechanical behaviors of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is systematically investigated. The fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model for simultaneously capturing the transient interaction between blood flow dynamics and wall mechanics was compared with its simplified techniques, that is, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or computational solid stress (CSS) model. Results demonstrated that CFD exhibited relatively smaller vortexes and tends to overestimate the fluid wall shear stress, compared to FSI. On the contrary, the minimal differences in wall stresses and deformation were observed between FSI and CSS models. Furthermore, it was found that the accuracy of CSS prediction depends on the applied pressure profile for the aneurysm sac. A large pressure drop across AAA usually led to the underestimation of wall stresses and thus the AAA rupture. Moreover, the assumed isotropic AAA wall properties, compared to the anisotropic one, will aggravate the difference between the simplified models with the FSI approach. The present work demonstrated the importance of modeling techniques on predicting the blood flow dynamics and wall mechanics of the AAA, which could guide the selection of appropriate modeling technique for significant clinical implications.

  16. What causes periodic beating in sperm flagella: synchronized internal forcing or fluid-structure interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Nandagiri, Ashwin; Jadhav, Sameer

    2016-11-01

    Eucaryotic cells such as sperm propel themselves using internally driven flagella. Two different models for the origin of the whip-like beating observed in such flagella are compared. The first model assumes that internal protein motors actuate synchronously to cause a traveling active-force wave within the filament. The forcing wave is chosen such that its resultant and the total torque on the filament are zero. In contrast, the second model assumes that forces and torques exerted by the motors locally sum to zero across the scale of the filament diameter. The only effect of the motor activity is to give rise to a stresslet distribution across the filament length. In either model, the slender filament is modeled as a bead-spring chain with hydrodynamic interactions. Flagellar waveforms and trajectory patterns obtained are compared systematically while keeping the dissipation rates the same for the two models. Periodic beating emerges in freely swimming filaments with the second model without any imposed periodicity in the stresslet distribution. This suggests that periodic waveforms in eucaryotic flagella can emerge by fluid-structure interactions alone without significant internal synchronization of protein motor activity.

  17. Fluid-Structure Interaction in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Effect of Modeling Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shengmao; Han, Xinwei; Bi, Yonghua; Ju, Siyeong

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the impact of modeling techniques on predicting the mechanical behaviors of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is systematically investigated. The fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model for simultaneously capturing the transient interaction between blood flow dynamics and wall mechanics was compared with its simplified techniques, that is, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or computational solid stress (CSS) model. Results demonstrated that CFD exhibited relatively smaller vortexes and tends to overestimate the fluid wall shear stress, compared to FSI. On the contrary, the minimal differences in wall stresses and deformation were observed between FSI and CSS models. Furthermore, it was found that the accuracy of CSS prediction depends on the applied pressure profile for the aneurysm sac. A large pressure drop across AAA usually led to the underestimation of wall stresses and thus the AAA rupture. Moreover, the assumed isotropic AAA wall properties, compared to the anisotropic one, will aggravate the difference between the simplified models with the FSI approach. The present work demonstrated the importance of modeling techniques on predicting the blood flow dynamics and wall mechanics of the AAA, which could guide the selection of appropriate modeling technique for significant clinical implications. PMID:28321413

  18. Fluid-structure interaction in abdominal aortic aneurysms: Structural and geometrical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesri, Yaser; Niazmand, Hamid; Deyranlou, Amin; Sadeghi, Mahmood Reza

    2015-08-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the result of the relatively complex interaction of blood hemodynamics and material behavior of arterial walls. In the present study, the cumulative effects of physiological parameters such as the directional growth, arterial wall properties (isotropy and anisotropy), iliac bifurcation and arterial wall thickness on prediction of wall stress in fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis of five idealized AAA models have been investigated. In particular, the numerical model considers the heterogeneity of arterial wall and the iliac bifurcation, which allows the study of the geometric asymmetry due to the growth of the aneurysm into different directions. Results demonstrate that the blood pulsatile nature is responsible for emerging a time-dependent recirculation zone inside the aneurysm, which directly affects the stress distribution in aneurismal wall. Therefore, aneurysm deviation from the arterial axis, especially, in the lateral direction increases the wall stress in a relatively nonlinear fashion. Among the models analyzed in this investigation, the anisotropic material model that considers the wall thickness variations, greatly affects the wall stress values, while the stress distributions are less affected as compared to the uniform wall thickness models. In this regard, it is confirmed that wall stress predictions are more influenced by the appropriate structural model than the geometrical considerations such as the level of asymmetry and its curvature, growth direction and its extent.

  19. Using 3D Interactive Visualizations In Teacher Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D.; Cooper, I.; de Groot, R.; Shindle, W.; Mellors, R.; Benthien, M.

    2004-12-01

    Extending Earth Science learning activities from 2D to 3D was central to this year's second annual Teacher Education Workshop, which was held at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Visualization Center (SIO VizCenter; http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu/). Educational specialists and researchers from several institutions led this collaborative workshop , which was supported by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC; http://www.scec.org/education), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the SIO VizCenter, San Diego State University (SDSU) and the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). The workshop was the latest in a series of teacher workshops run by SCEC and the USGS with a focus on earthquakes and seismic hazard. A particular emphasis of the 2004 workshop was the use of sophisticated computer visualizations that easily illustrated geospatial relationships. These visualizations were displayed on a large wall-sized curved screen, which allowed the workshop participants to be literally immersed in the images being discussed. In this way, the teachers explored current geoscience datasets in a novel and interactive fashion, which increased their understanding of basic concepts relevant to the national science education standards and alleviated some of their misconceptions. For example, earthquake hypocenter data were viewed in interactive 3D and the teachers immediately understood that: (1) The faults outlined by the earthquake locations are 3D planes, not 2D lines; (2) The earthquakes map out plate tectonic boundaries, where the 3D structure of some boundaries are more complex than others; (3) The deepest earthquakes occur in subduction zones, whereas transform and divergent plate boundaries tend to have shallower quakes. A major advantage is that these concepts are immediately visible in 3D and do not require elaborate explanations, as is often necessary with traditional 2D maps. This enhances the teachers' understanding in an efficient and

  20. Interactive visualization of multiresolution image stacks in 3D.

    PubMed

    Trotts, Issac; Mikula, Shawn; Jones, Edward G

    2007-04-15

    Conventional microscopy, electron microscopy, and imaging techniques such as MRI and PET commonly generate large stacks of images of the sectioned brain. In other domains, such as neurophysiology, variables such as space or time are also varied along a stack axis. Digital image sizes have been progressively increasing and in virtual microscopy, it is now common to work with individual image sizes that are several hundred megapixels and several gigabytes in size. The interactive visualization of these high-resolution, multiresolution images in 2D has been addressed previously [Sullivan, G., and Baker, R., 1994. Efficient quad-tree coding of images and video. IEEE Trans. Image Process. 3 (3), 327-331]. Here, we describe a method for interactive visualization of multiresolution image stacks in 3D. The method, characterized as quad-tree based multiresolution image stack interactive visualization using a texel projection based criterion, relies on accessing and projecting image tiles from multiresolution image stacks in such a way that, from the observer's perspective, image tiles all appear approximately the same size even though they are accessed from different tiers within the images comprising the stack. This method enables efficient navigation of high-resolution image stacks. We implement this method in a program called StackVis, which is a Windows-based, interactive 3D multiresolution image stack visualization system written in C++ and using OpenGL. It is freely available at http://brainmaps.org.

  1. Effects of fluid structure interaction in a three dimensional model of the spinal subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaokoon; Fletcher, David; Hemley, Sarah; Stoodley, Marcus; Bilston, Lynne

    2014-08-22

    It is unknown whether spinal cord motion has a significant effect on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and therefore the importance of including fluid structure interaction (FSI) in computational fluid dynamics models (CFD) of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS) is unclear. This study aims to determine the effects of FSI on CSF pressure and spinal cord motion in a normal and in a stenosis model of the SAS. A three-dimensional patient specific model of the SAS and spinal cord were constructed from MR anatomical images and CSF flow rate measurements obtained from a healthy human being. The area of SAS at spinal level T4 was constricted by 20% to represent the stenosis model. FSI simulations in both models were performed by running ANSYS CFX and ANSYS Mechanical in tandem. Results from this study show that the effect of FSI on CSF pressure is only about 1% in both the normal and stenosis models and therefore show that FSI has a negligible effect on CSF pressure.

  2. Immersogeometric cardiovascular fluid-structure interaction analysis with divergence-conforming B-splines.

    PubMed

    Kamensky, David; Hsu, Ming-Chen; Yu, Yue; Evans, John A; Sacks, Michael S; Hughes, Thomas J R

    2017-02-01

    This paper uses a divergence-conforming B-spline fluid discretization to address the long-standing issue of poor mass conservation in immersed methods for computational fluid-structure interaction (FSI) that represent the influence of the structure as a forcing term in the fluid subproblem. We focus, in particular, on the immersogeometric method developed in our earlier work, analyze its convergence for linear model problems, then apply it to FSI analysis of heart valves, using divergence-conforming B-splines to discretize the fluid subproblem. Poor mass conservation can manifest as effective leakage of fluid through thin solid barriers. This leakage disrupts the qualitative behavior of FSI systems such as heart valves, which exist specifically to block flow. Divergence-conforming discretizations can enforce mass conservation exactly, avoiding this problem. To demonstrate the practical utility of immersogeometric FSI analysis with divergence-conforming B-splines, we use the methods described in this paper to construct and evaluate a computational model of an in vitro experiment that pumps water through an artificial valve.

  3. Extended ALE Method for fluid-structure interaction problems with large structural displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basting, Steffen; Quaini, Annalisa; Čanić, Sunčica; Glowinski, Roland

    2017-02-01

    Standard Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods for the simulation of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems fail due to excessive mesh deformations when the structural displacement is large. We propose a method that successfully deals with this problem, keeping the same mesh connectivity while enforcing mesh alignment with the structure. The proposed Extended ALE Method relies on a variational mesh optimization technique, where mesh alignment with the structure is achieved via a constraint. This gives rise to a constrained optimization problem for mesh optimization, which is solved whenever the mesh quality deteriorates. The performance of the proposed Extended ALE Method is demonstrated on a series of numerical examples involving 2D FSI problems with large displacements. Two-way coupling between the fluid and structure is considered in all the examples. The FSI problems are solved using either a Dirichlet-Neumann algorithm, or a Robin-Neumann algorithm. The Dirichlet-Neumann algorithm is enhanced by an adaptive relaxation procedure based on Aitken's acceleration. We show that the proposed method has excellent performance in problems with large displacements, and that it agrees well with a standard ALE method in problems with mild displacement.

  4. Determining an Effective Shear Modulus in Tubular Organs for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisena, Robert; Brasseur, James; Costanzo, Francesco; Gregersen, Hans; Zhao, Jingbo

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is central to the mechanics of fluid-filled tubular organs such as the intestine and esophagus. The motions of fluid chyme are driven by a muscularis wall layer of circular and longitudinal muscle fibers. The coupled motions of the fluid and elastic solid phases result from a local balance between active and passive muscle stress components, fluid pressure, and fluid viscous stresses. Model predictions depend on the passive elastic response of the muscularis layer, which is typically parameterized with an average isotropic elastic modulus (EM), currently measured in vivo and in vitro with estimates for total hoop stress within a distension experiment. We have shown that this approach contains serious error due to the overwhelming influence of incompressibility on the hydrostatic component. We present a new approach in which an effective shear modulus, containing only deviatoric contributions, is measured to overcome this serious error. Using in vitro measurements from pig intestines, we compare our new approach to the current method, showing vastly different predictions. We will also report on our current analysis which aims to determine the influence of residual stress on the EM measurements and comment on it use in FSI simulations.

  5. A hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin method for modeling fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Jason P.; Miller, Scott T.; Pitt, Jonathan S.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a novel application of the hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) finite element method to the multi-physics simulation of coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems. Recent applications of the HDG method have primarily been for single-physics problems including both solids and fluids, which are necessary building blocks for FSI modeling. Utilizing these established models, HDG formulations for linear elastostatics, a nonlinear elastodynamic model, and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Navier-Stokes are derived. The elasticity formulations are written in a Lagrangian reference frame, with the nonlinear formulation restricted to hyperelastic materials. With these individual solid and fluid formulations, the remaining challenge in FSI modeling is coupling together their disparate mathematics on the fluid-solid interface. This coupling is presented, along with the resultant HDG FSI formulation. Verification of the component models, through the method of manufactured solutions, is performed and each model is shown to converge at the expected rate. The individual components, along with the complete FSI model, are then compared to the benchmark problems proposed by Turek and Hron [1]. The solutions from the HDG formulation presented in this work trend towards the benchmark as the spatial polynomial order and the temporal order of integration are increased.

  6. Fluid-structure interaction in a free end textile vascular prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Abdessalem, S.; Durand, B.; Akesbi, S.; Chakfe, N.; Kretz, J. G.

    2005-09-01

    Textile cardiovascular prostheses are tubular structures made of polyester filaments. They present particular mechanical properties linked to wavy form of their walls allowing them to stretch under pressure. Pulsatile blood flow was studied in a moving walls vascular prosthesis. First, an image processing device was used to measure prosthesis displacement under air pressure in an free end impregnated textile prosthesis. Then, fluid-structure interaction is simulated with a numerical computation code allowing to couple prosthesis walls motion with blood flow. Navier-Stokes equations governing fluid flow are numerically solved with N3S code based on finite elements method. The numerical process is based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation allowing moving domains. The obtained results showed a particular distribution of blood flow velocities and shear stress near the graft walls. The flow velocity distribution near a prosthetic surface is strongly influenced by the crimping morphology and deformation. A local flow analysis is imperative to understanding pathologies implying hemodynamic factors and to optimize the prosthesis design.

  7. Development of a cyber physical apparatus for investigating fluid structure interaction on leading edge vortex evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghu Gowda, Belagumba Venkatachalaiah

    This dissertation examines how simple structural compliance impacts a specific transient vortex phenomenon that occurs on high angle of attack lifting surfaces termed dynamic stall. In many Fluid structure interaction (FSI) research efforts, a purely physical or purely computational approach is taken. In this work a low cost cyber-physical (CPFD) system is designed and developed for representing the FSI in the leading edge vortex (LEV) development problem. The leading edge compliance appears to be favorable in a specific spring constant range for a given wing. When the leading edge compliance prescribed via CPFD system is too low compared with the moment due to dynamic pressure or fluid unsteady effect, the LEV behavior is similar to that of a rigid wing system. When the leading edge compliance is too high, excessive compliance is introduced into the wing system and the leading edge vortex evolution is affected by the large change in wing angle. At moderate leading edge compliance, a balance appears to be achieved in which the leading edge vorticity shedding rate supports the long term evolution of the leading edge vortex. Further investigation is required to determine specific parameters governing these leading edge compliance ranges.

  8. Fluid-structure interaction in water-filled thin pipes of anisotropic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jeong Ho; Inaba, K.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of elastic anisotropy in piping materials on fluid-structure interaction are studied for water-filled carbon-fiber reinforced thin plastic pipes. When an impact is introduced to water in a pipe, there are two waves traveling at different speeds. A primary wave corresponding to a breathing mode of pipe travels slowly and a precursor wave corresponding to a longitudinal mode of pipe travels fast. An anisotropic stress-strain relationship of piping materials has been taken into account to describe the propagation of primary and precursor waves in the carbon-fiber reinforced thin plastic pipes. The wave speeds and strains in the axial and hoop directions are calculated as a function of carbon-fiber winding angles and compared with the experimental data. As the winding angle increases, the primary wave speed increases due to the increased stiffness in the hoop direction, while the precursor wave speed decreases. The magnitudes of precursor waves are much smaller than those of primary waves so that the effect of precursor waves on the deformation of pipe is not significant. The primary wave generates the hoop strain accompanying the opposite-signed axial strain through the coupling compliance of pipe. The magnitude of hoop strain induced by the primary waves decreases with increasing the winding angle due to the increased hoop stiffness of pipe. The magnitude of axial strain is small at low and high winding angles where the coupling compliance is small.

  9. Hemodynamic and thrombogenic analysis of a trileaflet polymeric valve using a fluid-structure interaction approach

    PubMed Central

    Piatti, Filippo; Sturla, Francesco; Marom, Gil; Sheriff, Jawaad; Claiborne, Thomas E.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Redaelli, Alberto; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Surgical valve replacement in patients with severe calcific aortic valve disease using either bioprosthetic or mechanical heart valves is still limited by structural valve deterioration for the former and thrombosis risk mandating anticoagulant therapy for the latter. Prosthetic polymeric heart valves have the potential to overcome the inherent material and design limitations of these valves, but their development is still ongoing. The aim of this study was to characterize the hemodynamics and thrombogenic potential of the Polynova polymeric trileaflet valve prototype using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach. The FSI model replicated experimental conditions of the valve as tested in a left heart simulator. Hemodynamic parameters (transvalvular pressure gradient, flow rate, maximum velocity, and effective orifice area) were compared to assess the validity of the FSI model. The thrombogenic footprint of the polymeric valve was evaluated using a Lagrangian approach to calculate the stress accumulation (SA) values along multiple platelet trajectories and their statistical distribution. In the commissural regions, platelets were exposed to the highest SA values because of highest stress levels combined with local reverse flow patterns and vortices. Stress-loading waveforms from representative trajectories in regions of interest were emulated in our Hemodynamic Shearing Device (HSD). Platelet activity was measured using our platelet activation state (PAS) assay and the results confirmed the higher thrombogenic potential of the commissural hotspots. In conclusion, the proposed method provides an in depth analysis of the hemodynamic and thrombogenic performance of the polymer valve prototype and identifies locations for further design optimization. PMID:26329461

  10. An immersed boundary method for fluid-structure interactions in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolie, Saverio

    2015-11-01

    The nematic phase of a liquid crystal is characterized by a spontaneous local molecular alignment leading to an anisotropic (direction-dependent) response to deformations. A body moving through such a phase can induce complex viscous and elastic structures in the flow, and the fluid's anisotropic response can generate surprising forces on the immersed body. Bacteria swimming in a liquid crystal, for instance, have been observed to align with the orientation of the underlying director field. The complexity of such problems generally makes mathematical analysis intractable, and the computation of solutions can still be very challenging. In this talk an immersed boundary method for computing fluid-structure interactions in a nematic liquid crystal will be discussed. The Ericksen-Leslie equations, or a more general Landau-de Gennes model, are solved on a fixed, regular grid. Immersed boundaries communicate forces onto the fluid as in Peskin's original method, but now also torques on the nematic director field through molecular anchoring boundary conditions. Sample applications will also be discussed, including the locomotion of undulatory bodies in anisotropic fluids.

  11. Fluid-structure interaction in the left ventricle of the human heart coupled with mitral valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschini, Valentina; de Tullio, Marco Donato; Querzoli, Giorgio; Verzicco, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    In this paper Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), implemented using a fully fluid-structure interaction model for the left ventricle, the mitral valve and the flowing blood, and laboratory experiments are performed in order to cross validate the results. Moreover a parameter affecting the flow dynamics is the presence of a mitral valve. We model two cases, one with a natural mitral valve and another with a prosthetic mechanical one. Our aim is to understand their different effects on the flow inside the left ventricle in order to better investigate the process of valve replacement. We simulate two situations, one of a healthy left ventricle and another of a failing one. While in the first case the flow reaches the apex of the left ventricle and washout the stagnant fluid with both mechanical and natural valve, in the second case the disturbance generated by the mechanical leaflets destabilizes the mitral jet, thus further decreasing its capability to penetrate the ventricular region and originating heart attack or cardiac pathologies in general.

  12. Fluid-structure interaction in case of water hammer with cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijsseling, A. S.

    1993-06-01

    The transient behavior of liquid-filled pipe systems is studied. The time scale is acoustic. Pressure waves in the liquid, and axial, lateral, and torsional stress waves in the pipes are the dominant phenomena. The phenomena in the liquid (water hammer) and the phenomena in the pipe system (structural dynamic) influence each other if significant radial and axial pipe motions occur. When, in addition, the dynamic pressure drops to the vapor pressure, vapor bubbles will form in the liquid (cavitation). The major new element of the present work is in the simultaneous occurrence of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) and cavitation, which is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. An extensive review of literature on the subject is given. One dimensional basic equations are obtained by integration of general three dimensional equations for fluid dynamics and structural linear elasticity. Three FSI-mechanisms (junction, Poisson, and friction-coupling) are taken into account. The governing equations, formulated as a hyperbolic set of fourteen first-order partial differential equations, are solved by the method of characteristics. Vapor cavitation is numerically simulated by the relatively simple concentrated cavity model.

  13. Fluid-Structure interaction analysis and performance evaluation of a membrane blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, M.; Wüchner, R.; Bletzinger, K.-U.

    2016-09-01

    Examining the potential of a membrane blade concept is the goal of the current work. In the sailwing concept the surface of the wing, or the blade in this case, is made from pre-tensioned membranes which meet at the pre-tensioned edge cable at the trailing edge. Because of the dependency between membrane deformation and applied aerodynamic load, two-way coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis is necessary for evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of such a configuration. The in-house finite element based structural solver, CARAT++, is coupled with OpenFOAM in order to tackle the multi-physics problem. The main aerodynamic characteristics of the membrane blade including lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift to drag ratio are compared with its rigid counterpart. A single non-rotating NREL phase VI blade is studied here as a first step towards analyzing the concept for the rotating case. Compared with the rigid blade, the membrane blade has a higher slope of the lift curve. For higher angles of attack, lift and drag coefficients as well as the lift to drag ratio is higher for the membrane blade. A single non-rotating blade is studied here as a first step towards analyzing the concept for the rotating case.

  14. Dynamic Behavior of Reciprocating Plunger Pump Discharge Valve Based on Fluid Structure Interaction and Experimental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guorong; Zhong, Lin; He, Xia; Lei, Zhongqing; Hu, Gang; Li, Rong; Wang, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    The influence of spring stiffness and valve quality on the motion behaviors of reciprocating plunger pump discharge valves was investigated by fluid structure interaction (FSI) simulation and experimental analysis. The mathematical model of the discharge valve motion of a 2000-fracturing pump was developed and the discrete differential equations were solved according to FSI and results obtained by ANDINA software. Results indicate that spring stiffness influences the maximum lift, the opening resistance and shut-off lag angle, as well as the fluid velocity of the clearance, the impact stress and the volume efficiency of the pump valve in relation to the valve quality. An optimal spring stiffness parameter of 14.6 N/mm was obtained, and the volumetric efficiency of the pumping valve increased by 4‰ in comparison to results obtained with the original spring stiffness of 10.09N/mm. The experimental results indicated that the mathematical model and FSI method could provide an effective approach for the subsequent improvement of valve reliability, volumetric efficiency and lifespan.

  15. Dynamic Behavior of Reciprocating Plunger Pump Discharge Valve Based on Fluid Structure Interaction and Experimental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guorong; Zhong, Lin; He, Xia; Lei, Zhongqing; Hu, Gang; Li, Rong; Wang, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    The influence of spring stiffness and valve quality on the motion behaviors of reciprocating plunger pump discharge valves was investigated by fluid structure interaction (FSI) simulation and experimental analysis. The mathematical model of the discharge valve motion of a 2000-fracturing pump was developed and the discrete differential equations were solved according to FSI and results obtained by ANDINA software. Results indicate that spring stiffness influences the maximum lift, the opening resistance and shut-off lag angle, as well as the fluid velocity of the clearance, the impact stress and the volume efficiency of the pump valve in relation to the valve quality. An optimal spring stiffness parameter of 14.6 N/mm was obtained, and the volumetric efficiency of the pumping valve increased by 4‰ in comparison to results obtained with the original spring stiffness of 10.09N/mm. The experimental results indicated that the mathematical model and FSI method could provide an effective approach for the subsequent improvement of valve reliability, volumetric efficiency and lifespan. PMID:26488290

  16. Aortic valve dynamics using a fluid structure interaction model--The physiology of opening and closing.

    PubMed

    Kalyana Sundaram, Govinda Balan; Balakrishnan, Komarakshi R; Kumar, Ramarathnam Krishna

    2015-07-16

    Comparative study among aortic valves requires the use of an unbiased and relevant boundary condition. Pressure and flow boundary conditions used in literature are not sufficient for an unbiased analysis. We need a different boundary condition to analyze the valves in an unbiased, relevant environment. The proposed boundary condition is a combination of the pressure and flow boundary condition methods, which is chosen considering the demerits of the pressure and flow boundary conditions. In order to study the valve in its natural environment and to give a comparative analysis between different boundary conditions, a fluid-structure interaction analysis is made using the pressure and the proposed boundary conditions for a normal aortic valve. Commercial software LS-DYNA is used in all our analysis. The proposed boundary condition ensures a full opening of the valve with reduced valve regurgitation. It is found that for a very marginal raise in the ventricular pressure caused by pumping a fixed stroke volume, the cardiac output is considerably raised. The mechanics of the valve is similar between these two boundary conditions, however we observe that the importance of the root to raise the cardiac output may be overstated, considering the importance of the fully open nodule of arantius. Our proposed boundary condition delivers all the insights offered by the pressure and flow boundary conditions, along with providing an unbiased framework for the analysis of different valves and hence, more suitable for comparative analysis.

  17. Toward numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Shao-Ching; White, Susan M.; Mallya, Sanjay M.; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low-pressure loads incurred during breathing. This paper describes efforts toward the development of a numerical tool for simulation of air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with sleep apnea. A procedure by which patient-specific airway geometries are segmented and processed from dental cone-beam CT scans into signed distance fields is presented. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method based on the signed distance field is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the airflow in the airway geometries. For simulation of structure mechanics with large expected displacements, a cut-cell finite element method with nonlinear Green strains is used. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled with a partitioned iterative algorithm. Preliminary results are shown for flow simulation inside the three-dimensional rigid upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Two validation cases for the fluid-structure coupling problem are also presented.

  18. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the drop impact test for helicopter fuel tank.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Jialing; Sun, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    The crashworthiness of helicopter fuel tank is vital to the survivability of the passengers and structures. In order to understand and improve the crashworthiness of the soft fuel tank of helicopter during the crash, this paper investigated the dynamic behavior of the nylon woven fabric composite fuel tank striking on the ground. A fluid-structure interaction finite element model of the fuel tank based on the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method was constructed to elucidate the dynamic failure behavior. The drop impact tests were conducted to validate the accuracy of the numerical simulation. Good agreement was achieved between the experimental and numerical results of the impact force with the ground. The influences of the impact velocity, the impact angle, the thickness of the fuel tank wall and the volume fraction of water on the dynamic responses of the dropped fuel tank were studied. The results indicated that the corner of the fuel tank is the most vulnerable location during the impact with ground.

  19. Three-Dimensional Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Flow Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Rui; Lai, Yong G.; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2005-01-01

    The wall shear stress induced by the leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase has been implicated with thrombus initiation with prosthetic valves. Detailed flow dynamic analysis in the vicinity of the leaflets and the housing during the valve-closure phase is of interest in understanding this relationship. A three-dimensional unsteady flow analysis past bileaflet valve prosthesis in the mitral position is presented incorporating a fluid-structure interaction algorithm for leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase. Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian method is employed for incorporating the leaflet motion. The forces exerted by the fluid on the leaflets are computed and applied to the leaflet equation of motion to predict the leaflet position. Relatively large velocities are computed in the valve clearance region between the valve housing and the leaflet edge with the resulting relatively large wall shear stresses at the leaflet edge during the impact-rebound duration. Negative pressure transients are computed on the surface of the leaflets on the atrial side of the valve, with larger magnitudes at the leaflet edge during the closing and rebound as well. Vortical flow development is observed on the inflow (atrial) side during the valve impact-rebound phase in a location central to the leaflet and away from the clearance region where cavitation bubbles have been visualized in previously reported experimental studies. PMID:15636108

  20. Optimum design of Hydrokinetic turbine based on Fluid structure interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolekar, Nitin; Banerjee, Arindam

    2012-11-01

    Hydrokinetic turbines, unlike conventional hydraulic turbines are zero head energy conversion devices, which utilize the kinetic energy of flowing water for power generation. Though the basic operation is similar to wind turbines, due to denser working media, these turbines are subjected to higher loads and stresses. The present work aims at hydrodynamic design and coupled fluid structure interaction (FSI) analysis for a horizontal axis hydrokinetic turbine. Blade element momentum (BEM) theory is utilized to analyze fluid forces and torque developed on turbine blades. The results of BEM are compared with a detailed three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The CFD domain is coupled with the structural domain using arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian scheme to find stresses in turbine components. A parametric study will be carried out to understand the effect of various parameters like blade pitch angle, flow velocity and RPM on the stresses developed on blades for different blade materials (aluminum and steel). Based on the one-way FSI analysis, the flow conditions and turbine design parameters will be optimized to achieve maximum possible efficiency. Authors acknowledge financial support through ONR Grant # N000141010923.

  1. Characterization of hydrofoil damping due to fluid-structure interaction using piezocomposite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Charles; Coutu, André; Monette, Christine; Nennemann, Bernd; Marmont, Hugues

    2012-03-01

    Hydroelectric power generation is an important non-fossil fuel power source to help meet the world’s energy needs. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI), in the form of mass loading and damping, governs the dynamic response of water turbines, such as Francis turbines. Although the effects of fluid mass loading are well documented, fluid damping is also a critical quantity that may limit vibration amplitudes during service, and therefore help to avoid premature failure of the turbines. However, fluid damping has received less attention in the literature. This paper presents an experimental investigation of damping due to FSI. Three hydrofoils were designed and built to investigate damping due to FSI. Piezoelectric actuation using macrofiber composites (MFCs) provided excitation to the hydrofoil test structure, independent of the flow conditions, to overcome the noisy environment. Natural frequency and damping estimates were experimentally obtained from sine sweep frequency response functions measured with a laser vibrometer through a window in the test section. The results indicate that, although the natural frequencies were not substantially affected by the flow, the damping ratios were observed to increase in a linear manner with respect to flow velocity.

  2. Computational modelling of the mechanics of trabecular bone and marrow using fluid structure interaction techniques.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, E; Grogan, J A; Niebur, G L; McNamara, L M; McHugh, P E

    2013-04-01

    Bone marrow found within the porous structure of trabecular bone provides a specialized environment for numerous cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Studies have sought to characterize the mechanical environment imposed on MSCs, however, a particular challenge is that marrow displays the characteristics of a fluid, while surrounded by bone that is subject to deformation, and previous experimental and computational studies have been unable to fully capture the resulting complex mechanical environment. The objective of this study was to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model of trabecular bone and marrow to predict the mechanical environment of MSCs in vivo and to examine how this environment changes during osteoporosis. An idealized repeating unit was used to compare FSI techniques to a computational fluid dynamics only approach. These techniques were used to determine the effect of lower bone mass and different marrow viscosities, representative of osteoporosis, on the shear stress generated within bone marrow. Results report that shear stresses generated within bone marrow under physiological loading conditions are within the range known to stimulate a mechanobiological response in MSCs in vitro. Additionally, lower bone mass leads to an increase in the shear stress generated within the marrow, while a decrease in bone marrow viscosity reduces this generated shear stress.

  3. Space-Time Fluid-Structure Interaction Computation of Flapping-Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Nikolay M.

    We present a sequentially-coupled space-time (ST) computational fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis of flapping-wing aerodynamics of a micro aerial vehicle (MAV). The wing motion and deformation data, whether prescribed fully or partially, is from an actual locust, extracted from high-speed, multi-camera video recordings of the locust in a wind tunnel. The core computational FSI technology is based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST (DSD/SST) formulation. This is supplemented with using NURBS basis functions in temporal representation of the wing and mesh motion, and in remeshing. Here we use the version of the DSD/SST formulation derived in conjunction with the variational multiscale (VMS) method, and this version is called "DSD/SST-VMST." The structural mechanics computations are based on the Kirchhoff-Love shell model. The sequential-coupling technique is applicable to some classes of FSI problems, especially those with temporally-periodic behavior. We show that it performs well in FSI computations of the flapping-wing aerodynamics we consider here. In addition to the straight-flight case, we analyze cases where the MAV body has rolling, pitching, or rolling and pitching motion. We study how all these influence the lift and thrust.

  4. Modelling of fluid-structure interaction with multiphase viscous flows using an immersed-body method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Xiang, J.; Fang, F.; Pavlidis, D.; Latham, J.-P.; Pain, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    An immersed-body method is developed here to model fluid-structure interaction for multiphase viscous flows. It does this by coupling a finite element multiphase fluid model and a combined finite-discrete element solid model. A coupling term containing the fluid stresses is introduced within a thin shell mesh surrounding the solid surface. The thin shell mesh acts as a numerical delta function in order to help apply the solid-fluid boundary conditions. When used with an advanced interface capturing method, the immersed-body method has the capability to solve problems with fluid-solid interfaces in the presence of multiphase fluid-fluid interfaces. Importantly, the solid-fluid coupling terms are treated implicitly to enable larger time steps to be used. This two-way coupling method has been validated by three numerical test cases: a free falling cylinder in a fluid at rest, elastic membrane and a collapsing column of water moving an initially stationary solid square. A fourth simulation example is of a water-air interface with a floating solid square being moved around by complex hydrodynamic flows including wave breaking. The results show that the immersed-body method is an effective approach for two-way solid-fluid coupling in multiphase viscous flows.

  5. Numerical tool development of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; White, Susan; Huang, Shao-Ching; Mallya, Sanjay; Eldredge, Jeff

    2016-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the upper airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low pressure loads incurred during breathing. The ultimate goal of this research is the development of a versatile numerical tool for simulation of air-tissue interactions in the patient specific upper airway geometry. This tool is expected to capture several phenomena, including flow-induced vibration (snoring) and large deformations during airway collapse of the complex airway geometry in respiratory flow conditions. Here, we present our ongoing progress toward this goal. To avoid mesh regeneration, for flow model, a sharp-interface embedded boundary method is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the fluid-structure interface, while for the structural model, a cut-cell finite element method is used. Also, to properly resolve large displacements, non-linear elasticity model is used. The fluid and structure solvers are connected with the strongly coupled iterative algorithm. The parallel computation is achieved with the numerical library PETSc. Some two- and three- dimensional preliminary results are shown to demonstrate the ability of this tool.

  6. Fluid-structure interaction simulations of cerebral arteries modeled by isotropic and anisotropic constitutive laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricerri, Paolo; Dedè, Luca; Deparis, Simone; Quarteroni, Alfio; Robertson, Anne M.; Sequeira, Adélia

    2015-03-01

    This paper considers numerical simulations of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems in hemodynamics for idealized geometries of healthy cerebral arteries modeled by both nonlinear isotropic and anisotropic material constitutive laws. In particular, it focuses on an anisotropic model initially proposed for cerebral arteries to characterize the activation of collagen fibers at finite strains. In the current work, this constitutive model is implemented for the first time in the context of an FSI formulation. In this framework, we investigate the influence of the material model on the numerical results and, in the case of the anisotropic laws, the importance of the collagen fibers on the overall mechanical behavior of the tissue. With this aim, we compare our numerical results by analyzing fluid dynamic indicators, vessel wall displacement, Von Mises stress, and deformations of the collagen fibers. Specifically, for an anisotropic model with collagen fiber recruitment at finite strains, we highlight the progressive activation and deactivation processes of the fibrous component of the tissue throughout the wall thickness during the cardiac cycle. The inclusion of collagen recruitment is found to have a substantial impact on the intramural stress, which will in turn impact the biological response of the intramural cells. Hence, the methodology presented here will be particularly useful for studies of mechanobiological processes in the healthy and diseased vascular wall.

  7. Haemodynamic predictors of a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer rupture using fluid-structure interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Amaducci, Andrea; Rinaudo, Antonino; Pasta, Salvatore; Follis, Fabrizio; Pilato, Michele; Baglini, Roberto

    2013-09-01

    We present preliminary data on the flow-induced haemodynamic and structural loads exerted on a penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU). Specifically, one-way fluid-structure interaction analysis was performed on the aortic model reconstructed from a 66-year-old male patient with a PAU that evolved into an intramural haematoma and rupture of the thoracic aorta. The results show that elevated blood pressure (117 mmHg) and low flow velocity at the aortic wall (0.15 m/s(2)) occurred in the region of the PAU. We also found a low value of time-averaged wall shear stress (1.24 N/m(2)) and a high value of the temporal oscillation in the wall shear stress (oscillatory shear index = 0.13) in the region of the PAU. After endovascular treatment, these haemodynamic parameters were distributed uniformly on the luminal surface of the stent graft. These findings suggest that wall shear stress could be considered one of the major haemodynamic factors indicating the structural fragility of the PAU wall, which ultimately lead to PAU growth and rupture.

  8. From video to computation of biological fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillard, Seth I.; Buchholz, James H. J.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2016-04-01

    This work deals with the techniques necessary to obtain a purely Eulerian procedure to conduct CFD simulations of biological systems with moving boundary flow phenomena. Eulerian approaches obviate difficulties associated with mesh generation to describe or fit flow meshes to body surfaces. The challenges associated with constructing embedded boundary information, body motions and applying boundary conditions on the moving bodies for flow computation are addressed in the work. The overall approach is applied to the study of a fluid-structure interaction problem, i.e., the hydrodynamics of swimming of an American eel, where the motion of the eel is derived from video imaging. It is shown that some first-blush approaches do not work, and therefore, careful consideration of appropriate techniques to connect moving images to flow simulations is necessary and forms the main contribution of the paper. A combination of level set-based active contour segmentation with optical flow and image morphing is shown to enable the image-to-computation process.

  9. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür; Kürklüoglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the

  10. Interactive 2D to 3D stereoscopic image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Mark H.; Lipton, Lenny

    2005-03-01

    Advances in stereoscopic display technologies, graphic card devices, and digital imaging algorithms have opened up new possibilities in synthesizing stereoscopic images. The power of today"s DirectX/OpenGL optimized graphics cards together with adapting new and creative imaging tools found in software products such as Adobe Photoshop, provide a powerful environment for converting planar drawings and photographs into stereoscopic images. The basis for such a creative process is the focus of this paper. This article presents a novel technique, which uses advanced imaging features and custom Windows-based software that utilizes the Direct X 9 API to provide the user with an interactive stereo image synthesizer. By creating an accurate and interactive world scene with moveable and flexible depth map altered textured surfaces, perspective stereoscopic cameras with both visible frustums and zero parallax planes, a user can precisely model a virtual three-dimensional representation of a real-world scene. Current versions of Adobe Photoshop provide a creative user with a rich assortment of tools needed to highlight elements of a 2D image, simulate hidden areas, and creatively shape them for a 3D scene representation. The technique described has been implemented as a Photoshop plug-in and thus allows for a seamless transition of these 2D image elements into 3D surfaces, which are subsequently rendered to create stereoscopic views.

  11. Simulation of upper airway occlusion without and with mandibular advancement in obstructive sleep apnea using fluid-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Moyin; Barber, Tracie; Cistulli, Peter A; Sutherland, Kate; Rosengarten, Gary

    2013-10-18

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by repetitive collapse of the upper airway (UA). One treatment option is a mandibular advancement splint (MAS) which protrudes the lower jaw, stabilizing the airway. However not all patients respond to MAS therapy and individual effects are not well understood. Simulations of airway behavior may represent a non-invasive means to understand OSA and individual treatment responses. Our aims were (1) to analyze UA occlusion and flow dynamics in OSA using the fluid structure interaction (FSI) method, and (2) to observe changes with MAS. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained at baseline and with MAS in a known treatment responder. Computational models of the patients' UA geometry were reconstructed for both conditions. The FSI model demonstrated full collapse of the UA (maximum 5.83mm) pre-treatment (without MAS). The UA collapse was located at the oropharynx with low oropharyngeal pressure (-51.18Pa to -39.08Pa) induced by velopharyngeal jet flow (maximum 10.0m/s). By comparison, simulation results from the UA with MAS, showed smaller deformation (maximum 2.03mm), matching the known clinical response. Our FSI modeling method was validated by physical experiment on a 1:1 flexible UA model fabricated using 3D steriolithography. This is the first study of airflow dynamics in a deformable UA structure and inspiratory flow. These results expand on previous UA models using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and lay a platform for application of computational models to study biomechanical properties of the UA in the pathogenesis and treatment of OSA.

  12. Fluid-structure interaction for nonlinear response of shells conveying pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    Circular cylindrical shells with flexible boundary conditions conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated. The equations of motion are obtained based on the nonlinear Novozhilov shell theory via Lagrangian approach. The flow is set in motion by a pulsatile pressure gradient. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model that contains the unsteady effects obtained from the linear potential flow theory and the pulsatile viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior. The case of shells containing quiescent fluid subjected to the action of a pulsatile transmural pressure is also addressed. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pressure are here presented via frequency-response curves and time histories. The vibrations involving both a driven mode and a companion mode, which appear due to the axial symmetry, are also investigated. This theoretical framework represents a pioneering study that could be of great interest for biomedical applications. In particular, in the future, a more refined model of the one here presented will possibly be applied to reproduce the dynamic behavior of vascular prostheses used for repairing and replacing damaged and diseased thoracic aorta in cases of aneurysm, dissection or coarctation. For this purpose, a pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is here considered by applying physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. This study provides, for the first time in literature, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model with deep insights in the nonlinear vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to pulsatile pressure and pulsatile flow.

  13. Fluid-Structure Interaction Study of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Dynamics Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wenbin; Li, Kewei; Sun, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Computational modeling of heart valve dynamics incorporating both fluid dynamics and valve structural responses has been challenging. In this study, we developed a novel fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). A previously developed nonlinear finite element (FE) model of transcatheter aortic valves (TAV) was utilized to couple with SPH to simulate valve leaflet dynamics throughout the entire cardiac cycle. Comparative simulations were performed to investigate the impact of using FE-only models vs. FSI models, as well as an isotropic vs. an anisotropic leaflet material model in TAV simulations. From the results, substantial differences in leaflet kinematics between FE-only and FSI models were observed, and the FSI model could capture the realistic leaflet dynamic deformation due to its more accurate spatial and temporal loading conditions imposed on the leaflets. The stress and the strain distributions were similar between the FE and FSI simulations. However, the peak stresses were different due to the water hammer effect induced by the fluid inertia in the FSI model during the closing phase, which led to 13-28% lower peak stresses in the FE-only model compared to that of the FSI model. The simulation results also indicated that tissue anisotropy had a minor impact on hemodynamics of the valve. However, a lower tissue stiffness in the radial direction of the leaflets could reduce the leaflet peak stress caused by the water hammer effect. It is hoped that the developed FSI models can serve as an effective tool to better assess valve dynamics and optimize next generation TAV designs.

  14. Nonlinear multiple-discipline analysis of conjugate heat transfer and fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Michael A.

    Single-discipline analysis approaches often utilize linearized descriptions of coupled system physics from other disciplines. When this level of approximation is inadequate for the purposes of the analysis, nonlinear governing equations for the separate physical disciplines must be introduced, thus producing a multiple-discipline analysis. The multiple-discipline approach can provide a deeper understanding of the underlying system physics, and can reveal deficiencies in systems designed by single-discipline means. An advantageous way to examine a nonlinear multiple-discipline system is the partitioned method, where each discipline subdomain is formulated and discretized separately, allowing separate modular solvers for each set of discretized equations. Avoiding ad hoc approaches, a unified approach is developed here and applied to analysis of conjugate heat transfer in an arc-heater wind tunnel nozzle, and fluid-structure interaction of a segmented solid rocket motor inhibitor. The specific systems examined represent actual hardware designed by single-discipline methods. The nonlinear effects present in the wind tunnel nozzle problem include separated, viscous fluid flow, forced-convection boiling, and flow-dependent heat transfer properties. Nonlinear effects present in the solid rocket motor inhibitor problem include large structural deformation, and separated, viscous fluid flow. Steady-state results obtained for the nozzle problem show distributions for wall temperature, fluid temperatures, and heat flux, as well as coolant flow field and recirculation patterns. These results indicate a design deficiency in the nozzle cooling system. For the inhibitor problem, steady and unsteady fields of stress, strain, and displacement are obtained for the structural components, accompanied by velocity and pressure fields for the surrounding gas flow. The large stress values present in the solid propellant suggest a possible mode for motor failure, and beckon examination of

  15. Hemodynamic analysis of a compliant femoral artery bifurcation model using a fluid structure interaction framework.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Jong-Eun; Ito, Yasushi; Shih, Alan M; Brott, Brigitta; Anayiotos, Andreas

    2008-11-01

    The influence of wall motion on the hemodynamic characteristics of the human femoral bifurcation and its effects on the development of peripheral artery disease has not been previously investigated. This study aimed in investigating the hemodynamics of a compliant patient-specific femoral artery bifurcation model by a fluid structure interaction (FSI) scheme. The complex physiological geometry of the femoral artery bifurcation was reproduced from sequentially obtained transverse CT scan images. Velocity waveforms derived from phase contrast MR images were extracted and mapped to define boundary conditions. Equations governing blood flow and wall motion were solved using an FSI framework that utilizes commercial codes: FLUENT for computational fluid dynamics and ANSYS for computational structural dynamics. The results showed that wall compliance decreased flow velocities at the relatively high curvature geometries including common and superficial femoral artery (SFA), and it created strong recirculation in the profunda femoris artery close to the bifurcation. In the SFA region near the apex, time averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS) differences up to 25% between compliant and rigid models were observed. The compliant model also exhibited lower TAWSS and oscillatory shear at the superior section of the common femoral artery close to the bifurcation. The presence of wall motion, however, created minor differences in the general flow-field characteristics. We conclude that wall motion does not have significant influence on the global fluid dynamic characteristics of the femoral artery bifurcation. Longer arterial segments need to be simulated to see the effect of wall motion on tortuousity which was previously cited as an important factor in the development of atherosclerosis at the femoral artery.

  16. On the necessity of modelling fluid-structure interaction for stented coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Chiastra, Claudio; Migliavacca, Francesco; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Malvè, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Although stenting is the most commonly performed procedure for the treatment of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains one of the most serious clinical complications. An important stimulus to ISR is the altered hemodynamics with abnormal shear stresses on endothelial cells generated by the stent presence. Computational fluid dynamics is a valid tool for studying the local hemodynamics of stented vessels, allowing the calculation of the wall shear stress (WSS), which is otherwise not directly possible to be measured in vivo. However, in these numerical simulations the arterial wall and the stent are considered rigid and fixed, an assumption that may influence the WSS and flow patterns. Therefore, the aim of this work is to perform fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses of a stented coronary artery in order to understand the effects of the wall compliance on the hemodynamic quantities. Two different materials are considered for the stent: cobalt-chromium (CoCr) and poly-l-lactide (PLLA). The results of the FSI and the corresponding rigid-wall models are compared, focusing in particular on the analysis of the WSS distribution. Results showed similar trends in terms of instantaneous and time-averaged WSS between compliant and rigid-wall cases. In particular, the difference of percentage area exposed to TAWSS lower than 0.4Pa between the CoCr FSI and the rigid-wall cases was about 1.5% while between the PLLA cases 1.0%. The results indicate that, for idealized models of a stented coronary artery, the rigid-wall assumption for fluid dynamic simulations appears adequate when the aim of the study is the analysis of near-wall quantities like WSS.

  17. An investigation of the fluid-structure interaction of piston/cylinder interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosi, Matteo

    The piston/cylinder lubricating interface represents one of the most critical design elements of axial piston machines. Being a pure hydrodynamic bearing, the piston/cylinder interface fulfills simultaneously a bearing and sealing function under oscillating load conditions. Operating in an elastohydrodynamic lubrication regime, it also represents one of the main sources of power loss due to viscous friction and leakage flow. An accurate prediction of the time changing tribological interface characteristics in terms of fluid film thickness, dynamic pressure field, load carrying ability and energy dissipation is necessary to create more efficient interface designs. The aim of this work is to deepen the understanding of the main physical phenomena defining the piston/cylinder fluid film and to discover the impact of surface elastic deformations and heat transfer on the interface behavior. For this purpose, a unique fully coupled multi-body dynamics model has been developed to capture the complex fluid-structure interaction phenomena affecting the non-isothermal fluid film conditions. The model considers the squeeze film effect due to the piston micro-motion and the change in fluid film thickness due to the solid boundaries elastic deformations caused by the fluid film pressure and by the thermal strain. The model has been verified comparing the numerical results with measurements taken on special designed test pumps. The fluid film calculated dynamic pressure and temperature fields have been compared. Further validation has been accomplished comparing piston/cylinder axial viscous friction forces with measured data. The model has been used to study the piston/cylinder interface behavior of an existing axial piston unit operating at high load conditions. Numerical results are presented in this thesis.

  18. FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION MODELS OF THE MITRAL VALVE: FUNCTION IN NORMAL AND PATHOLOGIC STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzelman, K. S.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Cochran, R. P.

    2007-08-29

    Successful mitral valve repair is dependent upon a full understanding of normal and abnormal mitral valve anatomy and function. Computational analysis is one such method that can be applied to simulate mitral valve function in order to analyze the roles of individual components, and evaluate proposed surgical repair. We developed the first three-dimensional, finite element (FE) computer model of the mitral valve including leaflets and chordae tendineae, however, one critical aspect that has been missing until the last few years was the evaluation of fluid flow, as coupled to the function of the mitral valve structure. We present here our latest results for normal function and specific pathologic changes using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Normal valve function was first assessed, followed by pathologic material changes in collagen fiber volume fraction, fiber stiffness, fiber splay, and isotropic stiffness. Leaflet and chordal stress and strain, and papillary muscle force was determined. In addition, transmitral flow, time to leaflet closure, and heart valve sound were assessed. Model predictions in the normal state agreed well with a wide range of available in-vivo and in-vitro data. Further, pathologic material changes that preserved the anisotropy of the valve leaflets were found to preserve valve function. By contrast, material changes that altered the anisotropy of the valve were found to profoundly alter valve function. The addition of blood flow and an experimentally driven microstructural description of mitral tissue represent significant advances in computational studies of the mitral valve, which allow further insight to be gained. This work is another building block in the foundation of a computational framework to aid in the refinement and development of a truly noninvasive diagnostic evaluation of the mitral valve. Ultimately, it represents the basis for simulation of surgical repair of pathologic valves in a clinical and educational

  19. 3D Frame Buffers For Interactive Analysis Of 3D Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gregory M.

    1984-10-01

    Two-dimensional data such as photos, X rays, various types of satellite images, sonar, radar, seismic plots, etc., in many cases must be analyzed using frame buffers for purposes of medical diagnoses, crop estimates, mineral exploration, and so forth. In many cases the same types of sensors used to gather such samples in two dimensions can gather 3D data for even more effective analysis. Just as 2D arrays of data can be analyzed using frame buffers, three-dimensional data can be analyzed using SOLIDS-BUFFEPmemories. Image processors deal with samples from two-dimensional arrays, and are based on frame buffers. The SOLIDS PROCESSOR system, deals with samples from a three-dimensional volume, or solid, and is based on a 3D frame buffer. This paper focuses upon the SOLIDS-BUFFER system, as used in the INSIGHT SOLIDS-PROCESSOR system from Phoenix Data Systems.

  20. 3D Inhabited Virtual Worlds: Interactivity and Interaction between Avatars, Autonomous Agents, and Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jens F.

    This paper addresses some of the central questions currently related to 3-Dimensional Inhabited Virtual Worlds (3D-IVWs), their virtual interactions, and communication, drawing from the theory and methodology of sociology, interaction analysis, interpersonal communication, semiotics, cultural studies, and media studies. First, 3D-IVWs--seen as a…

  1. New Approaches for Microscopic Hydrodynamics for the Study of Fluid-Structure Interactions Subject to Thermal Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atzberger, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Many problems in fluid mechanics involve the interaction of a hydrodynamic flow with an elastic structure. Recent advances in biology and engineering further motivate such studies at small length and time scales. At such scales traditional continuum mechanics descriptions must be augmented to take into account microscopic phenomena, such as spontaneous thermal fluctuations. This presents a variety of challenges both in formulating appropriate physical models and in computational simulation. In the context of fluid-structure interactions, additional challenges arise from the often subtle interplay between elastic mechanics, hydrodynamic coupling, and thermal fluctuations. In this talk, we present a set of new approaches which address central mathematical, physical, and computational issues for how to incorporate in the description of such fluid-structure interactions thermal fluctuations. We also address important numerical issues in the approximation of the resulting stochastic partial differential equations. We also discuss results for specific illustrative applications including studies of polymeric fluids, vesicles, gels, and lipid bilayer membranes.

  2. Vortex dynamics in 3D shock-bubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of shock-bubble interaction involve an interplay of vortex stretching, dilation, and baroclinic vorticity generation. Here, we quantify the interplay of these contributions through high resolution 3D simulations for several Mach and Atwood numbers. We present a volume rendering of density and vorticity magnitude fields of shock-bubble interaction at M = 3 and air/helium density ratio η = 7.25 to elucidate the evolution of the flow structures. We distinguish the vorticity growth rates due to baroclinicity, stretching, and dilatation at low and high Mach numbers as well as the late time evolution of the circulation. The results demonstrate that a number of analytical models need to be revised in order to predict the late time circulation of shock-bubble interactions at high Mach numbers. To this effect, we propose a simple model for the dependence of the circulation to Mach number and ambient to bubble density ratio for air/helium shock-bubble interactions.

  3. Code verification for unsteady 3-D fluid-solid interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kintak Raymond; Étienne, Stéphane; Hay, Alexander; Pelletier, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a procedure to synthesize Manufactured Solutions for Code Verification of an important class of Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems whose behaviors can be modeled as rigid body vibrations in incompressible fluids. We refer this class of FSI problems as Fluid-Solid Interaction problems, which can be found in many practical engineering applications. The methodology can be utilized to develop Manufactured Solutions for both 2-D and 3-D cases. We demonstrate the procedure with our numerical code. We present details of the formulation and methodology. We also provide the reasonings behind our proposed approach. Results from grid and time step refinement studies confirm the verification of our solver and demonstrate the versatility of the simple synthesis procedure. In addition, the results also demonstrate that the modified decoupled approach to verify flow problems with high-order time-stepping schemes can be employed equally well to verify code for multi-physics problems (here, those of the Fluid-Solid Interaction) when the numerical discretization is based on the Method of Lines.

  4. Interactive 3D visualization speeds well, reservoir planning

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1997-11-24

    Texaco Exploration and Production has begun making expeditious analyses and drilling decisions that result from interactive, large screen visualization of seismic and other three dimensional data. A pumpkin shaped room or pod inside a 3,500 sq ft, state-of-the-art facility in Southwest Houston houses a supercomputer and projection equipment Texaco said will help its people sharply reduce 3D seismic project cycle time, boost production from existing fields, and find more reserves. Oil and gas related applications of the visualization center include reservoir engineering, plant walkthrough simulation for facilities/piping design, and new field exploration. The center houses a Silicon Graphics Onyx2 infinite reality supercomputer configured with 8 processors, 3 graphics pipelines, and 6 gigabytes of main memory.

  5. Fluid-structure interaction in abdominal aortic aneurysms: effects of asymmetry and wall thickness

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Christine M; Shkolnik, Alexander D; Muluk, Satish C; Finol, Ender A

    2005-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a prevalent disease which is of significant concern because of the morbidity associated with the continuing expansion of the abdominal aorta and its ultimate rupture. The transient interaction between blood flow and the wall contributes to wall stress which, if it exceeds the failure strength of the dilated arterial wall, will lead to aneurysm rupture. Utilizing a computational approach, the biomechanical environment of virtual AAAs can be evaluated to study the affects of asymmetry and wall thickness on this stress, two parameters that contribute to increased risk of aneurysm rupture. Methods Ten virtual aneurysm models were created with five different asymmetry parameters ranging from β = 0.2 to 1.0 and either a uniform or variable wall thickness to study the flow and wall dynamics by means of fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses. The AAA wall was designed to have a (i) uniform 1.5 mm thickness or (ii) variable thickness ranging from 0.5 – 1.5 mm extruded normally from the boundary surface of the lumen. These models were meshed with linear hexahedral elements, imported into a commercial finite element code and analyzed under transient flow conditions. The method proposed was then compared with traditional computational solid stress techniques on the basis of peak wall stress predictions and cost of computational effort. Results The results provide quantitative predictions of flow patterns and wall mechanics as well as the effects of aneurysm asymmetry and wall thickness heterogeneity on the estimation of peak wall stress. These parameters affect the magnitude and distribution of Von Mises stresses; varying wall thickness increases the maximum Von Mises stress by 4 times its uniform thickness counterpart. A pre-peak systole retrograde flow was observed in the AAA sac for all models, which is due to the elastic energy stored in the compliant arterial wall and the expansion force of the artery

  6. Fluid-Structure Interactions of the Mitral Valve and Left Heart: Comprehensive Strategies, Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Daniel R.; Del Pin, Facundo; Jiao, Xiangmin; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.; Cochran, Richard P.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The remodeling that occurs after a posterolateral myocardial infarction can alter mitral valve function by creating conformational abnormalities in the mitral annulus and in the posteromedial papillary muscle, leading to mitral regurgitation (MR). It is generally assumed that this remodeling is caused by a volume load and is mediated by an increase in diastolic wall stress. Thus, mitral regurgitation can be both the cause and effect of an abnormal cardiac stress environment. Computational modeling of ischemic MR and its surgical correction is attractive because it enables an examination of whether a given intervention addresses the correction of regurgitation (fluid-flow) at the cost of abnormal tissue stress. This is significant because the negative effects of an increased wall stress due to the intervention will only be evident over time. However, a meaningful fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart is not trivial; it requires a careful characterization of the in-vivo cardiac geometry, tissue parameterization though inverse analysis, a robust coupled solver that handles collapsing Lagrangian interfaces, automatic grid-generation algorithms that are capable of accurately discretizing the cardiac geometry, innovations in image analysis, competent and efficient constitutive models and an understanding of the spatial organization of tissue microstructure. In this manuscript, we profile our work toward a comprehensive fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart by reviewing our early work, presenting our current work and laying out our future work in four broad categories: data collection, geometry, fluid-structure interaction and validation. PMID:20454531

  7. Modelling of a hydraulic engine mount with fluid-structure interaction finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2004-08-01

    Hydraulic engine mount (HEM) is now widely used as a highly effective vibration isolator in automotive powertrain. A lumped parameter (LP) model is a traditional model for modelling the dynamic characteristics of HEM, in which the system parameters are usually obtained by experiments. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) finite element analysis (FEA) method and a non-linear FEA technology are used to determine the system parameters, and a fully coupled FSI model is developed for modelling the static and lower-frequency performance of an HEM. A FSI FEA technique is used to estimate the parameters of volumetric compliances, equivalent piston area, inertia and resistance of the fluid in the inertia track and the decoupler of an HEM. A non-linear FEA method is applied to determine the dynamic stiffness of rubber spring of the HEM. The system parameters predicated by FEA are compared favorably with experimental data and/or analytical solutions. A numerical simulation for an HEM with an inertia track and a free decoupler is performed based on the FSI model and the LP model along with the estimated system parameters, and again the simulation results are compared with experimental data. The calculated time histories of some variables in the model, such as the pressure in the upper chamber, the displacement of the free decoupler and the volume flow through the inertia track and the decoupler, under different excitations, elucidate the working mechanism of the HEM. The pressure distribution calculated with the FSI model in the chambers of the HEM validates the assumption that the pressure distribution in the upper and lower chamber is uniform in the LP model. The work conducted in the paper demonstrates that the methods for estimating the system parameters in the LP model and the FSI model for modelling HEM are effective, with which the dynamic characteristic analysis and design optimization of an HEM can be performed before its prototype development, and this

  8. Numerical simulation of fluid/structure interaction phenomena in viscous dominated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hai Duong

    2001-12-01

    The accurate prediction of buffet boundaries is essential in modern military aircraft and suspension bridge design in order to avoid the potentially disastrous consequences of unsteady loads. The design of lightweight structures and thermal protection systems for supersonic and hypersonic vehicles depends on the accurate prediction of the aerothermal loads, the structural temperatures and their gradients, and the structural deformations and stresses. Despite their bounded nature, limit-cycle oscillations can exhibit important amplitudes which affect the fatigue life of aircraft structures. Therefore, the main objective of this thesis is to develop and design an integrated multidisciplinary computational methodology for the analyses of the coupled responses exhibited by these phenomena. To simulate fluid/structure interaction problems in turbulent flows, we formulate the k--epsilon turbulence model and Reichardt's wall law in ALE form for dynamic meshes. This law is used with the generalized boundary conditions on k and epsilon of Jaeger and Dhatt and allows a closer integration to the wall compared to standard logarithmic laws and boundary conditions on k and epsilon. In order to apply the methodology to buffeting problems dominated by vortex shedding, we validate our solution approach on the square cylinder benchmark problem. There, we stress the minimization of numerical dissipation induced by an upwinding scheme, and apply our methodology to the aeroelastic stability analysis of a sectional dynamic model of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Then, we extend the three field formulation of aeroelasticity to a four-field formulation of aerothermoelasticity for the analysis of aerodynamic heating on structures. With a k--epsilon model, the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated up to a distance delta from the real wall. This gap creates a problem for the transmission of the structural temperature to the fluid system. To resolve this problem, we exchange the

  9. Fluid-structure interaction simulation of floating wind turbines interacting with complex, large-scale ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderer, Antoni; Guo, Xin; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    We develop a numerical method for simulating coupled interactions of complex floating structures with large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulence. The Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) solver integrates the curvilinear immersed boundary method of Borazjani et al. (JCP 2008) with the level-set method of Kang et al. (Adv. in Water Res. 2012) and is capable of simulating the coupled dynamic interaction of arbitrarily complex bodies with airflow and waves. The large-scale wave model is based on the two-fluid coupled approach of Yang et al. (JCP 2011), which employs a high-order spectral method for simulating the water motion and a viscous solver with undulatory boundaries for the air motion. The large-scale wave field solver is coupled with the near-field FSI solver by feeding into the latter large-scale waves via the pressure-forcing method of Guo et al. (JCP 2009), appropriately adapted herein for the level set method. We validate the model under both simple wave trains and three-dimensional directional waves and compare the results with experimental and theoretical solutions. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of the new solver by carrying out large eddy simulation of a floating offshore wind turbine platform interacting with realistic ocean waves. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy (DE-EE0005482), the National Science Foundation (CBET-1341062), the University of Minnesota Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment, and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  10. Improving Perceptual Skills with Interactive 3-D VRML Scenes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Janet Faye

    1998-01-01

    Describes techniques developed to improve the perceptual skills of maintenance technicians who align shafts on rotating equipment. A 3-D practice environment composed of animated mechanical components and tools was enhanced with 3-D VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) scenes. (Author/AEF)

  11. Depth estimation from multiple coded apertures for 3D interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sungjoo; Choi, Changkyu; Park, Dusik

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel depth estimation method from multiple coded apertures for 3D interaction. A flat panel display is transformed into lens-less multi-view cameras which consist of multiple coded apertures. The sensor panel behind the display captures the scene in front of the display through the imaging pattern of the modified uniformly redundant arrays (MURA) on the display panel. To estimate the depth of an object in the scene, we first generate a stack of synthetically refocused images at various distances by using the shifting and averaging approach for the captured coded images. And then, an initial depth map is obtained by applying a focus operator to a stack of the refocused images for each pixel. Finally, the depth is refined by fitting a parametric focus model to the response curves near the initial depth estimates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, we construct an imaging system to capture the scene in front of the display. The system consists of a display screen and an x-ray detector without a scintillator layer so as to act as a visible sensor panel. Experimental results confirm that the proposed method accurately determines the depth of an object including a human hand in front of the display by capturing multiple MURA coded images, generating refocused images at different depth levels, and refining the initial depth estimates.

  12. On the computation of the Baer-Nunziato model using ALE formulation with HLL- and HLLC-type solvers towards fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daude, F.; Galon, P.

    2016-01-01

    Computation of compressible two-phase flows with the unsteady compressible Baer-Nunziato model in conjunction with the moving grid approach is discussed in this paper. Both HLL- and HLLC-type Finite-Volume methods are presented and implemented in the context of Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation in a multidimensional framework. The construction of suitable numerical methods is linked to proper approximations of the non-conservative terms on moving grids. The HLL discretization follows global conservation properties such as free-stream preservation and uniform pressure and velocity profiles preservation on moving grids. The HLLC solver initially proposed by Tokareva and Toro [1] for the Baer-Nunziato model is based on an approximate solution of local Riemann problems containing all the characteristic fields present in the exact solution. Both ;subsonic; and ;supersonic; configurations are considered in the construction of the present HLLC solver. In addition, an adaptive 6-wave HLLC scheme is also proposed for computational efficiency. The methods are first assessed on a variety of 1-D Riemann problems including both fixed and moving grids applications. The methods are finally tested on 2-D and 3-D applications: 2-D Riemann problems, a 2-D shock-bubble interaction and finally a 3-D fluid-structure interaction problem with a good agreement with the experiments.

  13. Discontinuous Galerkin method for the problem of linear elasticity with applications to the fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadrava, M.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, J.; Kosík, A.

    2013-10-01

    The paper is concerned with the numerical solution of static and dynamic elasticity problems. The purpose of this subject is the computation of the so-called ALE mapping (representing the mesh deformation) in the solution of flow in time-dependent domains and the computation of the time-dependent deformation of an elastic body. These two problems represent important ingredients in the fluid-structure interaction (FSI). They are discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM). Here we describe the method and present some test problems. The developed method is applied to the FSI problem treated in [2].

  14. Large-Scale Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Viscoplastic and Fracturing Thin Shells Subjected to Shocks and Detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock- and detonation-loaded thin-walled structures requires numerical methods that can cope with large deformations as well as local topology changes. We present a robust level-set-based approach that integrates a Lagrangian thin-shell finite element solver with fracture and fragmentation capabilities and an Eulerian Cartesian fluid solver with optional dynamic mesh adaptation. As computational applications, we consider the plastic deformation of a copper plate impacted by a strong piston-induced pressure wave inside a water pipe and the induction of large plastic deformations and rupture of thin aluminum tubes due to the passage of ethylene-oxygen detonations.

  15. A lattice Boltzmann-finite element model for two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction problems involving shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a numerical method for the modeling of shallow waters interacting with slender elastic structures is presented. The fluid domain is modeled through the lattice Boltzmann method, while the solid domain is idealized by corotational beam finite elements undergoing large displacements. Structure dynamics is predicted by using the time discontinuous Galerkin method and the fluid-structure interface conditions are handled by the Immersed Boundary method. An explicit coupling strategy to combine the adopted numerical methods is proposed and its effectiveness is tested by computing the error in terms of the energy that is artificially introduced at the fluid-solid interface.

  16. Helical waves and non-linear dynamics of fluid/structure interactions in a tube row

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, F.C.; Thothadri, M.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this study has been to investigate low-dimensional models for fluid-structure dynamics of flow across a row of cylindrical tubes. Four principle results of this experimental-theoretical study are discussed. (i) Experimental evidence has shown that the dynamic instability of the tube row is a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. (ii) The critical flow velocity decreases as the number of flexible cylinders increases. (iii) The linear model exhibits coupled helical wave solutions in the tube dynamics. (iv) A nonlinear model of the tube motions shows a complex subcritical Hopf bifurcation with a secondary bifurcation to a torus or quasi-periodic oscillation. In this analysis the tools of center manifolds, normal forms and numerical simulation are used.

  17. A preliminary investigation of the growth of an aneurysm with a multiscale monolithic Fluid-Structure interaction solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerroni, D.; Manservisi, S.; Pozzetti, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we investigate the potentialities of multi-scale engineering techniques to approach complex problems related to biomedical and biological fields. In particular we study the interaction between blood and blood vessel focusing on the presence of an aneurysm. The study of each component of the cardiovascular system is very difficult due to the fact that the movement of the fluid and solid is determined by the rest of system through dynamical boundary conditions. The use of multi-scale techniques allows us to investigate the effect of the whole loop on the aneurysm dynamic. A three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model for the aneurysm is developed and coupled to a mono-dimensional one for the remaining part of the cardiovascular system, where a point zero-dimensional model for the heart is provided. In this manner it is possible to achieve rigorous and quantitative investigations of the cardiovascular disease without loosing the system dynamic. In order to study this biomedical problem we use a monolithic fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model where the fluid and solid equations are solved together. The use of a monolithic solver allows us to handle the convergence issues caused by large deformations. By using this monolithic approach different solid and fluid regions are treated as a single continuum and the interface conditions are automatically taken into account. In this way the iterative process characteristic of the commonly used segregated approach, it is not needed any more.

  18. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations’ outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  19. 3D-CANVENT: An interactive mine ventilation simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hardcastle, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    3D-CANVENT is a software package that integrates advanced computer aided design (ACAD) true 3D graphics with a mine ventilation simulator. The package runs as a Windows{trademark} application to access its printer drivers environment and does not need third party CAD software. It is composed of two primary modules: DMVENT and MINEDESIGNER. DMVENT is a traditional Fortran coded Hardy-Cross iterative ventilation network solver written in 1980 with thermodynamic capabilities. This module is relatively unchanged with the traditional data input options for branch type, specified or calculated resistances, fixed flows, and fixed or variable pressure fans. MINEDESIGNER is the graphics engine that optimizes the ventilation design process. It performs the front-end transformation of input data entered in the graphical interface into the correct format for the solver. At the back-end it reconverts the historically standard tabular data output from the solver into an easily viewed graphical format. ACAD features of MINEDESIGNER are used to generate a 3D wire-frame node and branch network of the mine`s ventilation system. The network can be displayed in up to 4 views orientated to XYZ planes or a 3D view. AU the views have zoom, pan, slice and rotate options. The graphical interface efficiently permits data entry and editing via a mouse with pick-and-point item selection. Branches can be found or added with {open_quotes}search{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}join{close_quotes} options. Visual interpretation is enhanced by the 16 colour options for branches and numerous graphical attributes. Network locations are readily identified by alpha-numeric names for branches, junctions and fans, and also the logical numbering of junctions. The program is also readily expandable for pollutant simulation and control/monitoring applications.

  20. The Effect of Pressure Ratio on Unsteady Fluid-Structure Interaction Characteristics of Ball Type Control Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yang; Tu, Shan; Wang, Hongjuan

    Two-way sequential fluid-structure interaction method was used to analyze and discuss the characteristics of unsteady fluid-structure interaction of the complex flow channel of a steam turbine ball type control valve. Research indicates that when the pressure ratio changes as a sine wave, its flow rate occurs a sine wave change, and the maximum flow rate value of 57.46kg•s-1 occurs in the minimum pressure ratio condition. The longitudinal force of the structure domain decreases with the reduction of the pressure ratio, and points to the opposite direction of the flow. The lateral force increases with the decrease of the pressure ratio, and points to the opposite direction of the flow. The maximum value of deformation and force of the structure domain changes consistently with the pressure ratio fluctuation. The maximum value of the structure domain stress is 28.67MPa, which is far less than the yield strength of the structure material, and the maximum deformation value is 3.25um.

  1. SSME LOX post flow analysis/fluid structure interaction. Volume 1: Flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Roger W.

    1989-01-01

    The realization of measures to improve the performance of the Space Shuttle is, to a large extent, dependent on an improved understanding of the fluid flow phenomena occurring in the main engine. The overall arrangement of the primary components of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are presented. The impingement of the hot gases from the transfer ducts onto the LOX posts causes them to be subjected to severe thermal and gas dynamic loads, which in the past have resulted in the occasional breakage of some elements of the outer row of posts during test firings of the engine, particularly at higher power levels. Large velocities in the gap between the LOX posts may also be a contributing factor in causing dynamic stability problems. The deforming structural response of the posts to the pressure loading may likely affect the gas flowfield by producing a moving flowfield boundary, thereby creating a dynamically coupled unsteady fluid-structure system. The objective was to investigate the three-dimensional, turbulent flow around a simplified SSME LOX post array using an existing Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver and a suitable turbulence model to parameterize the turbulent shear stresses. Numerical computations were performed to analyze the effect on the flowfield of varying the spacing between the LOX posts, which were modeled as rigid, three-dimensional circular cylinders. The methodology used in the computations is described. Results are presented.

  2. VSViewer3D: a tool for interactive data mining of three-dimensional virtual screening data.

    PubMed

    Diller, Kyle I; Diller, David J

    2014-12-22

    The VSviewer3D is a simple Java tool for visual exploration of three-dimensional (3D) virtual screening data. The VSviewer3D brings together the ability to explore numerical data, such as calculated properties and virtual screening scores, structure depiction, interactive topological and 3D similarity searching, and 3D visualization. By doing so the user is better able to quickly identify outliers, assess tractability of large numbers of compounds, visualize hits of interest, annotate hits, and mix and match interesting scaffolds. We demonstrate the utility of the VSviewer3D by describing a use case in a docking based virtual screen.

  3. Free Vibration Response Comparison of Composite Beams with Fluid Structure Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    responses of the composites when subjected to these types of input forces including an array of FSI conditions surrounding marine composite structures...close to the density of water. Studies [6–9] of composites under low velocity impact have also shown that there is an increase in impact force with...Background The three dimensional (3-D) DIC technique is a noncontact , optical technique for obtaining full field deformation [12]. It utilizes a

  4. High Cycle Fatigue Prediction for Mistuned Bladed Disks with Fully Coupled Fluid-Structural Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    vibration and flutter boundary of 2D NACA 64A010 transonic airfoil, 3D plate wing structural response. The predicted results agree well with benchmark...CFD code coupled with a structural integrator based on the convolution integral to obtain the flutter boundary for a NACA 64A010 airfoil[10]. Alonso and...validation case of the scheme for moving grid system, the forced pitching NACA 64A010 airfoil is calculated. For this transonic airfoil, the Reynolds

  5. Fluid-structure interaction study of the splitter plate in a TBCC exhaust system during mode transition phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuai; Xu, Jinglei; Mo, Jianwei; Gu, Rui; Pang, Lina

    2015-07-01

    Splitter plate plays an important role in a turbine-based combined-cycle (TBCC) exhaust system during the mode transition phase when turbojet engine and ramjet engine operate simultaneously. Dissimilar pressure distribution on both sides of the plate has a potential origin in the aeroelastic coupling, which is an interesting topic while few research works have devoted to that aspect. To better understand the aeroelastic behavior of the plate and the corresponding dynamic flow features, an integrated fluid-structure interaction simulation is conducted under one particular operation condition during mode transition phase in the TBCC exhaust system. A finite-volume-based CFD solver FLUENT is adopted to solve the unsteady Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations. ABAQUS, a finite-element-method-based CSD solver, is employed to compute the plate elastic deformation. A two-way interaction between the fluid and the structure is accomplished by the mesh-based parallel-code coupling interface (MpCCI) in a loosely-coupled manner. The accuracy of the coupling procedure is validated for the flutter of a flat plate in supersonic flow. Then, features of steady flow field of the TBCC exhaust system are discussed, followed by the investigation of the aeroelastic phenomenon of the splitter plate and the evolution process of the flow field pattern. Finally, performances variation of the exhaust system is obtained and discussed. The results show that the plate vibrates with decaying amplitude and reaches a dynamic stable state eventually. The thrust, lift and pitch moment of the TBCC exhaust system are increased by 0.68%, 2.82% and 5.86%, respectively, compared with the corresponding values in steady state which does not take into account the fluid-structure interaction effects. The analysis reveals the importance of considering the fluid-structure interaction effects in designing the splitter plate in the TBCC exhaust system and demonstrates the availability of the present coupled

  6. A Unified Numerical Method for Fluid-Structure Interaction Applied to Human Cochlear Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnke, Frank; Köster, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    A main problem with the numerical simulation of mechanical wave propagation in the cochlea is the coupling of the orthotropic elastic solid (cochlear partition and further structures) and the fluid (perilymph). We developed a unified approach employing velocity and pressure in the entire domain. The numerical approach consists in a finite-volume solver for the coupled solution of equations of motion for fluid and solid working on a single three-dimensional continuum domain. We represent the perilymph as a compressible and viscous fluid with the mechanical properties of water. The cochlear partition is modelled as a 2D membrane whose orthotropicity is represented by a shear modulus. Numerical results of a 3D uncoiled box model show a frequency dependent locus of maximum displacement along the cochlear partition, representing traveling waves.

  7. Resonant frequency of the silicon micro-structure of MEMS vector hydrophone in fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-04-01

    The MEMS vector hydrophone developed by the North University of China has advantages of high Signal to Noise Ratio, ease of array integration, etc. However, the resonance frequency of the MEMS device in the liquid is different from that in the air due to the fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Based on the theory of Fluid-Solid Coupling, a generalized distributed mass attached on the micro-structure has been found, which results in the resonance frequency of the microstructure in the liquid being lower than that in the air. Then, an FSI simulation was conducted by ANSYS software. Finally, the hydrophone was measured by using a shaking table and a vector hydrophone calibration system respectively. Results show that, due to the FSI, the resonance frequency of the MEMS devices of the bionic vector hydrophone in the liquid declines approximately 30% compared to the case in the air.

  8. Refractive index and solubility control of para-cymene solutions for index-matched fluid-structure interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Charles; Fu, Christopher D.; Weichselbaum, Noah A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-12-01

    To deploy optical diagnostics such as particle image velocimetry or planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in complex geometries, it is beneficial to use index-matched facilities. A binary mixture of para-cymene and cinnamaldehyde provides a viable option for matching the refractive index of acrylic, a common material for scaled models and test sections. This fluid is particularly appropriate for large-scale facilities and when a low-density and low-viscosity fluid is sought, such as in fluid-structure interaction studies. This binary solution has relatively low kinematic viscosity and density; its use enables the experimentalist to select operating temperature and to increase fluorescence signal in PLIF experiments. Measurements of spectral and temperature dependence of refractive index, density, and kinematic viscosity are reported. The effect of the binary mixture on solubility control of Rhodamine 6G is also characterized.

  9. 1992 Calvin Rice lecture: Some curiosity-driven research in fluid structure interactions and its current applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paiedoussis, M.P. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-02-01

    This lecture has a dual purpose: (1) to present, in outline, the research on a couple of interesting topics in fluid-structure interaction; and (2) to show that, although this research was undertaken with little or no practical application in mind, unexpected uses and applications materialized ten or twenty years subsequently. The two topics of research chosen are (a) stability of pipes conveying fluid, and (b) stability of cylinders in axial flow. The applications and uses range from a marine propulsion system, to research on emphysema, to understanding and modeling of flow-induced vibration and leakage-flow-induced instabilities in power-generating equipment, and to the dynamics of deep-water risers.

  10. Visualizing the process of interaction in a 3D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Vivek; Suryanarayanan, Srikanth; Krishnan, Kajoli; Mullick, Rakesh

    2007-03-01

    As the imaging modalities used in medicine transition to increasingly three-dimensional data the question of how best to interact with and analyze this data becomes ever more pressing. Immersive virtual reality systems seem to hold promise in tackling this, but how individuals learn and interact in these environments is not fully understood. Here we will attempt to show some methods in which user interaction in a virtual reality environment can be visualized and how this can allow us to gain greater insight into the process of interaction/learning in these systems. Also explored is the possibility of using this method to improve understanding and management of ergonomic issues within an interface.

  11. Pluto: Modeling of 3-D Atmosphere-Surface Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Timothy I.

    2015-11-01

    Atmosphere-surface interactions on Pluto are of great importance to creating and maintaining the atmospheric variations and heterogeneous surface that have been observed by New Horizons and two decades' prior work. Publicly released images/data from New Horizons contain numerous fascinating surface features and constrasts. Insights into their origin, maintenance, and/or evolution may be gleaned through multidisciplinary climate modeling. Some results from such modeling will be presented, with an emphasis on shorter-timescale interactions.

  12. Whole versus Part Presentations of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azmy, Nabil Gad; Ismaeel, Dina Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present an analysis of how the structure and design of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects can be effective and efficient in terms of Performance, Time on task, and Learning Efficiency. The study explored two treatments, namely whole versus Part Presentations of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects,…

  13. Realization of real-time interactive 3D image holographic display [Invited].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jhen-Si; Chu, Daping

    2016-01-20

    Realization of a 3D image holographic display supporting real-time interaction requires fast actions in data uploading, hologram calculation, and image projection. These three key elements will be reviewed and discussed, while algorithms of rapid hologram calculation will be presented with the corresponding results. Our vision of interactive holographic 3D displays will be discussed.

  14. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  15. Numerical Analysis of Constrained Dynamical Systems, with Applications to Dynamic Contact of Solids, Nonlinear Elastodynamics and Fluid-Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF CONSTRAINED DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS, WITH APPLICATIONS TO DYNAMIC CONTACT OF SOLIDS, NONLINEAR ELASTODYNAMICS AND FLUID-STRUCTURE...2000 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Numerical Analysis of Constrained Dynamical Systems, with 5b. GRANT NUMBER Applications to Dynamic...This extension allows the analysis of fluid-structure interfaces through the Lagrangian contact logic previously developed. Similarly, we have developed

  16. Multiscale and Sequential Coupling Techniques for Fluid-Structure Interaction Computations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-04

    TEZDUYAR. ALE-VMS AND ST-VMS METHODS FOR COMPUTER MODELING OF WIND - TURBINE ROTOR AERODYNAMICS AND FLUID–STRUCTURE INTERACTION, Mathematical Models...the Stabilized Space-Time Computation of Wind - Turbine Rotor Aerodynamics, Computational Mechanics (05 2011) 2011/08/15 18:38:42 Kenji Takizawa...Bradley Henicke, Ming-Chen Hsu, Yuri Bazilevs. Stabilized Space--Time Computation of Wind - Turbine Rotor Aerodynamics, Computational Mechanics (03 2011

  17. A topological framework for interactive queries on 3D models in the Web.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Mauro; Rodrigues, José I; Silvestre, Ivo; Veiga-Pires, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies exist to create 3D content for the web. With X3D, WebGL, and X3DOM, it is possible to visualize and interact with 3D models in a web browser. Frequently, three-dimensional objects are stored using the X3D file format for the web. However, there is no explicit topological information, which makes it difficult to design fast algorithms for applications that require adjacency and incidence data. This paper presents a new open source toolkit TopTri (Topological model for Triangle meshes) for Web3D servers that builds the topological model for triangular meshes of manifold or nonmanifold models. Web3D client applications using this toolkit make queries to the web server to get adjacent and incidence information of vertices, edges, and faces. This paper shows the application of the topological information to get minimal local points and iso-lines in a 3D mesh in a web browser. As an application, we present also the interactive identification of stalactites in a cave chamber in a 3D web browser. Several tests show that even for large triangular meshes with millions of triangles, the adjacency and incidence information is returned in real time making the presented toolkit appropriate for interactive Web3D applications.

  18. Acoustic responses of coupled fluid-structure system by acoustic-structural analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Y. S.; Chargin, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    The use of an analogy between structural mechanics and acoustics makes it possible to solve fluid-structural interaction (FSI) problems using an existing structural analysis computer program. This method was implemented in MSC/NASTRAN program and the FSI analysis was performed using two dimensional coupled fluid beam model to assess and evaluate the adequacy of this approach. The coupled modal analysis of 3-D model is also briefly discussed. The normal mode, modal frequency response and transient response analysis of 2-D coupled fluid beam system is presented. The significant reduction of the acoustic pressure response at the fluid structure interface is observed as a result of fluid structure interaction.

  19. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the flow through a stenotic aortic valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Hoda; Labrosse, Michel R.; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Kadem, Lyes

    2009-11-01

    In Europe and North America, aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease and cardiovascular disease after systemic hypertension and coronary artery disease. Understanding blood flow through an aortic stenosis and developing new accurate non-invasive diagnostic parameters is, therefore, of primarily importance. However, simulating such flows is highly challenging. In this study, we considered the interaction between blood flow and the valve leaflets and compared the results obtained in healthy valves with stenotic ones. One effective method to model the interaction between the fluid and the structure is to use Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach. Our two-dimensional model includes appropriate nonlinear and anisotropic materials. It is loaded during the systolic phase by applying pressure curves to the fluid domain at the inflow. For modeling the calcified stenotic valve, calcium will be added on the aortic side of valve leaflets. Such simulations allow us to determine the effective orifice area of the valve, one of the main parameters used clinically to evaluate the severity of an AS, and to correlate it with changes in the structure of the leaflets.

  20. Fluid structure interaction model for biological systems in the presence of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Asim; Shoaib, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper a one-dimensional mathematical model of a cerebral aneurysm is considered. The model combines the interaction between the arterial wall structure, blood pressure and the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) that is around the aneurysm. CSF is considered electrically conducting in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. Therefore, it may be possible to control pressure and its flow behavior by using an appropriate magnetic field. Hence, such studies have potential for the treatment of Cerebral aneurysms, diseases of heart and blood vessels. The modeled mathematical equations are solved algebraically and the displacement of the arterial wall is plotted to visualize the wall movement. It is evident from the graphs the inclusion of magnetic field reduce the movement of the arterial wall and in turn prevent the rupture of the cerebral aneurysm. The solution is also investigated using computational tools for various other parameters involve in the model.

  1. A new multimodal interactive way of subjective scoring of 3D video quality of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewan; Lee, Kwanghyun; Lee, Sanghoon; Bovik, Alan C.

    2014-03-01

    People that watch today's 3D visual programs, such as 3D cinema, 3D TV and 3D games, experience wide and dynamically varying ranges of 3D visual immersion and 3D quality of experience (QoE). It is necessary to be able to deploy reliable methodologies that measure each viewers subjective experience. We propose a new methodology that we call Multimodal Interactive Continuous Scoring of Quality (MICSQ). MICSQ is composed of a device interaction process between the 3D display and a separate device (PC, tablet, etc.) used as an assessment tool, and a human interaction process between the subject(s) and the device. The scoring process is multimodal, using aural and tactile cues to help engage and focus the subject(s) on their tasks. Moreover, the wireless device interaction process makes it possible for multiple subjects to assess 3D QoE simultaneously in a large space such as a movie theater, and at di®erent visual angles and distances.

  2. Air-touch interaction system for integral imaging 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Han Yuan; Xiang, Lee Ming; Lee, Byung Gook

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose an air-touch interaction system for the tabletop type integral imaging 3D display. This system consists of the real 3D image generation system based on integral imaging technique and the interaction device using a real-time finger detection interface. In this system, we used multi-layer B-spline surface approximation to detect the fingertip and gesture easily in less than 10cm height from the screen via input the hand image. The proposed system can be used in effective human computer interaction method for the tabletop type 3D display.

  3. Debris flow impact on mitigation barriers: a new method for particle-fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchelli, Maddalena; Pirulli, Marina; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Channelized debris-flows are a type of mass movements that involve water-charged, predominantly coarse-grained inorganic and organic material flowing rapidly down steep confined pre-existing channels (Van Dine, 1985). Due to their rapid movements and destructive power, structural mitigation measures have become an integral part of counter measures against these phenomena, to mitigate and prevent damages resulting from debris-flow impact on urbanized areas. In particular, debris barriers and storage basins, with some form of debris-straining structures incorporated into the barrier constructed across the path of a debris-flow, have a dual role to play: (1) to stimulate deposition by presenting a physical obstruction against flow, and (2) to guarantee that during normal conditions stream water and bedload can pass through the structure; while, during and after an extreme event, the water that is in the flow and some of the fine-grained sediment can escape. A new method to investigate the dynamic interactions between the flowing mass and the debris barrier is presented, with particular emphasis on the effect of the barrier in controlling the water and sediment content of the escaping mass. This aspect is achieved by implementing a new mechanical model into an enhanced two-phase dynamical mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012), in which solid particles mixture and viscous fluid are taken into account. The complex mechanical model is defined as a function of the energy lost during impact, the physical and geometrical properties of the debris barrier, separate but strongly interacting dynamics of boulder and fluid flows during the impact, particle concentration distribution, and the slope characteristics. The particle-filtering-process results in a large variation in the rheological properties of the fluid-dominated escaping mass, including the substantial reduction in the bulk density, and the inertial forces of the debris-flows. Consequently, the destructive power and run

  4. Numerical and experimental study of expiratory flow in the case of major upper airway obstructions with fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouly, F.; van Hirtum, A.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Pelorson, X.; Payan, Y.

    2008-02-01

    This study deals with the numerical prediction and experimental description of the flow-induced deformation in a rapidly convergent divergent geometry which stands for a simplified tongue, in interaction with an expiratory airflow. An original in vitro experimental model is proposed, which allows measurement of the deformation of the artificial tongue, in condition of major initial airway obstruction. The experimental model accounts for asymmetries in geometry and tissue properties which are two major physiological upper airway characteristics. The numerical method for prediction of the fluid structure interaction is described. The theory of linear elasticity in small deformations has been chosen to compute the mechanical behaviour of the tongue. The main features of the flow are taken into account using a boundary layer theory. The overall numerical method entails finite element solving of the solid problem and finite differences solving of the fluid problem. First, the numerical method predicts the deformation of the tongue with an overall error of the order of 20%, which can be seen as a preliminary successful validation of the theory and simulations. Moreover, expiratory flow limitation is predicted in this configuration. As a result, both the physical and numerical models could be useful to understand this phenomenon reported in heavy snorers and apneic patients during sleep.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation on thermal fluid-structure interaction on ceramic plates in high enthalpy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, Sebastian; Esser, Burkard; Gülhan, Ali

    2015-12-01

    A detailed knowledge of the fluid-structure interaction in hypersonic flows is important for the design of future space transportation systems. The thermal aspect of such an interaction was investigated with the help of a generic model in the arc-heated wind tunnel L3K at the German Aerospace Center in Cologne. Flat and curved panels of the fibre-reinforced ceramics C/C-SiC with and without anti-oxidation coating where used. Several configurations with and without back plane insulation were tested at 10° and 20° angle of attack. The panel heating was measured with an infrared camera, several thermocouples and pyrometers. The experimental results show the influence of the shape as well as of radiation cooling and radiation heating. The experiments also reveal the effect of additional heating due to recombination of atomic oxygen on the surface. At certain configurations a local temperature peak moved over the panel. This thermal wave is also influenced by the silicon carbide coating. The analysis is supported by coupled fluid and structure simulations.

  6. A fluid-structure interaction model of the internal carotid and ophthalmic arteries for the noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement method.

    PubMed

    Misiulis, Edgaras; Džiugys, Algis; Navakas, Robertas; Striūgas, Nerijus

    2017-03-22

    Accurate and clinically safe measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP) are crucial for secondary brain damage prevention. There are two methods of ICP measurement: invasive and noninvasive. Invasive methods are clinically unsafe; therefore, safer noninvasive methods are being developed. One of the noninvasive ICP measurement methods implements the balance principle, which assumes that if the velocity of blood flow in both ophthalmic artery segments - the intracranial (IOA) and extracranial (EOA) - is equal, then the acting ICP on the IOA and the external pressure (Pe) on the EOA are also equal. To investigate the assumption of the balance principle, a generalized computational model incorporating a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) module was created and used to simulate noninvasive ICP measurement by accounting for the time-dependent behavior of the elastic internal carotid (ICA) and ophthalmic (OA) arteries and their interaction with pulsatile blood flow. It was found that the extra balance pressure term, which incorporates the hydrodynamic pressure drop between measurement points, must be added into the balance equation, and the corrections on a difference between the velocity of blood flow in the IOA and EOA must be made, due to a difference in the blood flow rate.

  7. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts' ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  8. Experimental validation of a Fluid-Structure interaction model for simulating offshore floating wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderer, Antoni; Feist, Christ; Ruehl, Kelley; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    A series of experiments reproducing a floating wind turbine in operational sea conditions, conducted in the St. Anthony Falls Lab. wave facility, are employed to validate the capabilities of the recently developed FSI-Levelset-CURVIB method of Calderer, Kang and Sotiropoulos (JCP 2014) to accurately predict turbine-wave interactions. The numerical approach is based on solving the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the level set method, which is capable of carrying out LES of two-phase flows (air and water) with complex floating structures and waves. The investigated floating turbine is a 1:100 Froude scaled version of the 13.2 MW prototype designed by Sandia National Lab; it is installed on a cylindrical barge style platform which is restricted to move with two degrees of freedom, heave and pitch in the vertical plane defined by the direction of the propagating 2D waves. The computed turbine kinematics as well as the free surface elevation results are compared with the experimental data for different free decay tests and wave conditions representative of the Maine and the Pacific North West coasts. The comparison shows promising results indicating the validity of the model for simulating operational floating turbines. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy (DE-EE0005482), the University of Minnesota IREE program, and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  9. Characterization of Side Load Phenomena Using Measurement of Fluid/Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ruf, Joseph; Reed, Darren; DAgostino, Mark; Keanini, Russell; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During ground-tests of most production rocket engines over the last 30 years, large asymmetric transient side loads coming from the nozzle and related steady-state vibrational loads within the nozzle have been measured. The widely varying magnitude of these loads has been large enough to fail interfacing components as well as nozzles in these engines. This paper will discuss a comprehensive test and analysis program that has been undertaken to develop a methodology to accurately predict the character and magnitude of this loading. The project to-date has incorporated analytical modeling of both the fluid flow and the nozzle structure and testing of both full-scale and sub-scale rocket nodes. Examination of the test data indicates that one of the two-nodal diameter structural modes may be interacting with flow separation from the nozzle inside-wall in a self-excited or aeroelastic vibration phenomenon. If verified, this observation will be used to develop a methodology for design and analysis. A fuller understanding of the characteristics of this vibration will provide an increase in the accuracy and confidence of side load predictions, which will be critical for the successful construction of the next generation of low-cost, reliable rocket engines.

  10. Real-time rendering method and performance evaluation of composable 3D lenses for interactive VR.

    PubMed

    Borst, Christoph W; Tiesel, Jan-Phillip; Best, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    We present and evaluate a new approach for real-time rendering of composable 3D lenses for polygonal scenes. Such lenses, usually called "volumetric lenses," are an extension of 2D Magic Lenses to 3D volumes in which effects are applied to scene elements. Although the composition of 2D lenses is well known, 3D composition was long considered infeasible due to both geometric and semantic complexity. Nonetheless, for a scene with multiple interactive 3D lenses, the problem of intersecting lenses must be considered. Intersecting 3D lenses in meaningful ways supports new interfaces such as hierarchical 3D windows, 3D lenses for managing and composing visualization options, or interactive shader development by direct manipulation of lenses providing component effects. Our 3D volumetric lens approach differs from other approaches and is one of the first to address efficient composition of multiple lenses. It is well-suited to head-tracked VR environments because it requires no view-dependent generation of major data structures, allowing caching and reuse of full or partial results. A Composite Shader Factory module composes shader programs for rendering composite visual styles and geometry of intersection regions. Geometry is handled by Boolean combinations of region tests in fragment shaders, which allows both convex and nonconvex CSG volumes for lens shape. Efficiency is further addressed by a Region Analyzer module and by broad-phase culling. Finally, we consider the handling of order effects for composed 3D lenses.

  11. Research on gaze-based interaction to 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yong-Moo; Jeon, Kyeong-Won; Kim, Sung-Kyu

    2006-10-01

    There have been reported several researches on gaze tracking techniques using monocular camera or stereo camera. The most popular used gaze estimation techniques are based on PCCR (Pupil Center & Cornea Reflection). These techniques are for gaze tracking for 2D screen or images. In this paper, we address the gaze-based 3D interaction to stereo image for 3D virtual space. To the best of our knowledge, our paper first addresses the 3D gaze interaction techniques to 3D display system. Our research goal is the estimation of both of gaze direction and gaze depth. Until now, the most researches are focused on only gaze direction for the application to 2D display system. It should be noted that both of gaze direction and gaze depth should be estimated for the gaze-based interaction in 3D virtual space. In this paper, we address the gaze-based 3D interaction techniques with glassless stereo display. The estimation of gaze direction and gaze depth from both eyes is a new important research topic for gaze-based 3D interaction. We present our approach for the estimation of gaze direction and gaze depth and show experimentation results.

  12. Interaction Design and Usability of Learning Spaces in 3D Multi-user Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shailey; Reeves, Ahmad John

    Three-dimensional virtual worlds are multimedia, simulated environments, often managed over the Web, which users can 'inhabit' and interact via their own graphical, self-representations known as 'avatars'. 3D virtual worlds are being used in many applications: education/training, gaming, social networking, marketing and commerce. Second Life is the most widely used 3D virtual world in education. However, problems associated with usability, navigation and way finding in 3D virtual worlds may impact on student learning and engagement. Based on empirical investigations of learning spaces in Second Life, this paper presents design guidelines to improve the usability and ease of navigation in 3D spaces. Methods of data collection include semi-structured interviews with Second Life students, educators and designers. The findings have revealed that design principles from the fields of urban planning, Human- Computer Interaction, Web usability, geography and psychology can influence the design of spaces in 3D multi-user virtual environments.

  13. Coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation of floating offshore wind turbines and waves: a large eddy simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderer, Antoni; Guo, Xin; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-01

    We develop a computational framework for simulating the coupled interaction of complex floating structures with large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulent winds. The near-field approach features a partitioned fluid-structure interaction model (FSI) combining the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method of Borazjani and Sotiropoulos (J. Comput. Phys. 2008) and the two-phase flow level set formulation of Kang and Sotiropoulos (Adv. in Water Res. 2012) and is capable of solving complex free-surface flows interacting non-linearly with complex real life floating structures. The near-field solver is coupled with a large-scale wave and wind model based on the two-fluid approach of Yang and Shen (J. Comput. Phys. 2011) which integrates a viscous Navier-Stokes solver with undulatory boundaries for the motion of the air and an efficient potential-flow based wave solver. The large-scale turbulent wind is incorporated from the far-field solver to the near-field solver by feeding into the latter inlet boundary conditions. The wave field is incorporated to the near-field solver by using the pressure-forcing method of Guo and Shen (J. Comput. Phys. 2009) which has been appropriately adapted to the level set method. The algorithm for coupling the two codes has been validated for a variety of wave cases including a broadband spectrum showing excellent agreement when compared to theoretical results. Finally, the capabilities of the numerical framework are demonstrated by carrying out large eddy simulation (LES) of a floating wind turbine interacting with realistic ocean wind and wave conditions.

  14. Uncovering the structural basis of protein interactions with efficient clustering of 3-D interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aung, Z; Tan, S-H; Ng, S-K; Tan, K-L

    2007-01-01

    The biological mechanisms with which proteins interact with one another are best revealed by studying the structural interfaces between interacting proteins. Protein-protein interfaces can be extracted from 3-D structural data of protein complexes and then clustered to derive biological insights. However, conventional protein interface clustering methods lack computational scalability and statistical support. In this work, we present a new method named "PPiClust" to systematically encode, cluster and analyze similar 3-D interface patterns in protein complexes efficiently. Experimental results showed that our method is effective in discovering visually consistent and statistically significant clusters of interfaces, and at the same time sufficiently time-efficient to be performed on a single computer. The interface clusters are also useful for uncovering the structural basis of protein interactions. Analysis of the resulting interface clusters revealed groups of structurally diverse proteins having similar interface patterns. We also found, in some of the interface clusters, the presence of well-known linear binding motifs which were non-contiguous in the primary sequences. These results suggest that PPiClust can discover not only statistically significant but also biologically significant protein interface clusters from protein complex structural data.

  15. A model reduction approach for the variational estimation of vascular compliance by solving an inverse fluid-structure interaction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagna, Luca; Veneziani, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Scientific computing has progressively become an important tool for research in cardiovascular diseases. The role of quantitative analyses based on numerical simulations has moved from ‘proofs of concept’ to patient-specific investigations, thanks to a strong integration between imaging and computational tools. However, beyond individual geometries, numerical models require the knowledge of parameters that are barely retrieved from measurements, especially in vivo. For this reason, recently cardiovascular mathematics considered data assimilation procedures for extracting the knowledge of patient-specific parameters from measures and images. In this paper, we consider specifically the quantification of vascular compliance, i.e. the parameter quantifying the tendency of arterial walls to deform under blood stress. Following up a previous paper, where a variational data assimilation procedure was proposed, based on solving an inverse fluid-structure interaction problem, here we consider model reduction techniques based on a proper orthogonal decomposition approach to accomplish the solution of the inverse problem in a computationally efficient way.

  16. A reduced order model for fluid-structure interaction of thin shell structures conveying fluid for physiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gary Han; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a reduced-order model (ROM) is constructed to study fluid-structure interaction of thin shell structures conveying fluid. The method of snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is used to construct the reduced-order bases based on a series of CFD results, which then are improved using a QR-factorization technique to satisfy the various boundary conditions in physiological flow problems. In the process, two sets of POD modes are extracted: those due to the shell wall's motion and those due to the pulsatile flow. The Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) technique is used for selecting the final POD modes used in the reduced-order model. The structure model is solved by Galerkin's method and the FSI coupling is done by adapting a coupled momentum method. The results show that the dynamic behavior of thin shells conveying fluid is closely related to the distribution of the shell's Gaussian curvature, the existence of imperfections and the physiological flow conditions. This method can effectively construct a computationally efficient FSI model, which allows us to examine a wide range of parameters which exist in real-life physiological problems.

  17. Numerical simulation of soft palate movement and airflow in human upper airway by fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Chi; Wang, Yuefang; Liu, Yingxi

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors present airflow field characteristics of human upper airway and soft palate movement attitude during breathing. On the basis of the data taken from the spiral computerized tomography images of a healthy person and a patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS), three-dimensional models of upper airway cavity and soft palate are reconstructed by the method of surface rendering. Numerical simulation is performed for airflow in the upper airway and displacement of soft palate by fluid-structure interaction analysis. The reconstructed three-dimensional models precisely preserve the original configuration of upper airways and soft palate. The results of the pressure and velocity distributions in the airflow field are quantitatively determined, and the displacement of soft palate is presented. Pressure gradients of airway are lower for the healthy person and the airflow distribution is quite uniform in the case of free breathing. However, the OSAHS patient remarkably escalates both the pressure and velocity in the upper airway, and causes higher displacement of the soft palate. The present study is useful in revealing pathogenesis and quantitative mutual relationship between configuration and function of the upper airway as well as in diagnosing diseases related to anatomical structure and function of the upper airway.

  18. An improved direct-forcing immersed boundary method for fluid-structure interaction of a flexible filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Zhu, Xiaojue

    2012-11-01

    We present an improved immersed boundary method for the simulation of fluid structure interaction (FSI) of a slender body. Our numerical method is based on the one proposed by Wang and Zhang (J. Comput. Phys. 30:3479-3499, 2011). Although an accurate prediction of total force can be achieved by using this method, unphysical spatial oscillation is observed in the force distribution. This oscillation is detrimental to the prediction of structure response in FSI. In this work, several modifications are made to improve this method. Firstly, the implicit forcing is replaced by an explicit forcing. Secondly, a more consistent way of computing each component of the forcing on a staggered mesh is proposed. Thirdly, for a slender body of zero thickness, the discrete delta-function with a ``negative-tail'' is adopted for the interpolation at the endpoints. Numerical simulations are performed to test the efficacy of the modifications. It is found that the measures taken successfully reduce the oscillation and the results obtained agree well with those from the literatures. This work was supported by NSFC 10872201.

  19. A discrete-forcing immersed boundary method for the fluid-structure interaction of an elastic slender body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Injae; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-01-01

    We present an immersed boundary (IB) method for the simulation of flow around an elastic slender body. The present method is based on the discrete-forcing IB method for a stationary, rigid body proposed by Kim, Kim and Choi (2001) [25]. The discrete-forcing approach is used to relieve the limitation on the computational time step size. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are implicitly coupled with the dynamic equation for an elastic slender body motion. The first is solved in the Eulerian coordinate and the latter is described in the Lagrangian coordinate. The elastic slender body is modeled as a thin and flexible solid and is segmented by finite number of thin blocks. Each block is moved by external and internal forces such as the hydrodynamic, elastic and buoyancy forces, where the hydrodynamic force is obtained directly from the discrete forcing used in the IB method. All the spatial derivative terms are discretized with the second-order central difference scheme. The present method is applied to three different fluid-structure interaction problems: flows around a flexible filament, a flapping flag in a free stream, and a flexible flapping wing in normal hovering, respectively. Computations are performed at maximum CFL numbers of 0.75-1. The results obtained agree very well with those from previous studies.

  20. Evaluation of sloshing resistance performance for LNG carrier insulation system based on fluid-structure interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chi-Seung; Cho, Jin-Rae; Kim, Wha-Soo; Noh, Byeong-Jae; Kim, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Myung

    2013-03-01

    In the present paper, the sloshing resistance performance of a huge-size LNG carrier's insulation system is evaluated by the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis. To do this, the global-local analysis which is based on the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is adopted to accurately calculate the structural behavior induced by internal LNG sloshing of a KC-1 type LNG carrier insulation system. During the global analysis, the sloshing flow and hydrodynamic pressure of internal LNG are analyzed by postulating the flexible insulation system as a rigid body. In addition, during the local analysis, the local hydroelastic response of the LNG carrier insulation system is computed by solving the local hydroelastic model where the entire and flexible insulation system is adopted and the numerical analysis results of the global analysis such as initial and boundary conditions are implemented into the local finite element model. The proposed novel analysis techniques can potentially be used to evaluate the structural integrity of LNG carrier insulation systems.

  1. In vitro flow assessment: from PC-MRI to computational fluid dynamics including fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Rengier, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases can be highly correlated to specific biomechanical parameters. To examine and assess biomechanical parameters, numerical simulation of cardiovascular dynamics has the potential to complement and enhance medical measurement and imaging techniques. As such, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have shown to be suitable to evaluate blood velocity and pressure in scenarios, where vessel wall deformation plays a minor role. However, there is a need for further validation studies and the inclusion of vessel wall elasticity for morphologies being subject to large displacement. In this work, we consider a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model including the full elasticity equation to take the deformability of aortic wall soft tissue into account. We present a numerical framework, in which either a CFD study can be performed for less deformable aortic segments or an FSI simulation for regions of large displacement such as the aortic root and arch. Both of the methods are validated by means of an aortic phantom experiment. The computational results are in good agreement with 2D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) velocity measurements as well as catheter-based pressure measurements. The FSI simulation shows a characteristic vessel compliance effect on the flow field induced by the elasticity of the vessel wall, which the CFD model is not capable of. The in vitro validated FSI simulation framework can enable the computation of complementary biomechanical parameters such as the stress distribution within the vessel wall.

  2. Calmodulin interacts with Rab3D and modulates osteoclastic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Sipin; Chim, Shek Man; Cheng, Taksum; Ang, Estabelle; Ng, Benjamin; Lim, Baysie; Chen, Kai; Qiu, Heng; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Huazi; Pavlos, Nathan; Xu, Jiake

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin is a highly versatile protein that regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis and is involved in a variety of cellular functions including cardiac excitability, synaptic plasticity and signaling transduction. During osteoclastic bone resorption, calmodulin has been reported to concentrate at the ruffled border membrane of osteoclasts where it is thought to modulate bone resorption activity in response to calcium. Here we report an interaction between calmodulin and Rab3D, a small exocytic GTPase and established regulator osteoclastic bone resorption. Using yeast two-hybrid screening together with a series of protein-protein interaction studies, we show that calmodulin interacts with Rab3D in a calcium dependent manner. Consistently, expression of a calcium insensitive form of calmodulin (i.e. CaM1234) perturbs calmodulin-Rab3D interaction as monitored by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays. In osteoclasts, calmodulin and Rab3D are constitutively co-expressed during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, co-occupy plasma membrane fractions by differential gradient sedimentation assay and colocalise in the ruffled border as revealed by confocal microscopy. Further, functional blockade of calmodulin-Rab3D interaction by calmidazolium chloride coincides with an attenuation of osteoclastic bone resorption. Our data imply that calmodulin- Rab3D interaction is required for efficient bone resorption by osteoclasts in vitro. PMID:27897225

  3. Multivalent 3D Display of Glycopolymer Chains for Enhanced Lectin Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kenneth; Kasko, Andrea M

    2015-08-19

    Synthetic glycoprotein conjugates were synthesized through the polymerization of glycomonomers (mannose and/or galactose acrylate) directly from a protein macroinitiator. This design combines the multivalency of polymer structures with 3D display of saccharides randomly arranged around a central protein structure. The conjugates were tested for their interaction with mannose binding lectin (MBL), a key protein of immune complement. Increasing mannose number (controlled through polymer chain length) and density (controlled through comonomer feed ratio of mannose versus galactose) result in greater interaction with MBL. Most significantly, mannose glycopolymers displayed in a multivalent and 3D configuration from the protein exhibit dramatically enhanced interaction with MBL compared to linear glycopolymer chains with similar total valency but lacking 3D display. These findings demonstrate the importance of the 3D presentation of ligand structures for designing biomimetic materials.

  4. The role of 3-D interactive visualization in blind surveys of H I in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzo, D.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Ramatsoku, M.; Verheijen, M. A. W.

    2015-09-01

    Upcoming H I surveys will deliver large datasets, and automated processing using the full 3-D information (two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension) to find and characterize H I objects is imperative. In this context, visualization is an essential tool for enabling qualitative and quantitative human control on an automated source finding and analysis pipeline. We discuss how Visual Analytics, the combination of automated data processing and human reasoning, creativity and intuition, supported by interactive visualization, enables flexible and fast interaction with the 3-D data, helping the astronomer to deal with the analysis of complex sources. 3-D visualization, coupled to modeling, provides additional capabilities helping the discovery and analysis of subtle structures in the 3-D domain. The requirements for a fully interactive visualization tool are: coupled 1-D/2-D/3-D visualization, quantitative and comparative capabilities, combined with supervised semi-automated analysis. Moreover, the source code must have the following characteristics for enabling collaborative work: open, modular, well documented, and well maintained. We review four state of-the-art, 3-D visualization packages assessing their capabilities and feasibility for use in the case of 3-D astronomical data.

  5. Experimental and theoretical study of fluid-structure interactions in plunging hydrofoils and gravity-driven falling plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ruijun

    Two typical unsteady fluid-structure interaction problems have been investigated in the present study. One of them was about actively plunged flexible hydrofoil; the other was about gravity-driven falling plates in water. Real-time velocity field and dynamic response on the moving objects were measured to study these unsteady and highly nonlinear problems. For a long time, scientists have believed that bird and insect flight benefits greatly from the flexibility and morphing facility of their wings via flapping motion. A significant advantage flexible wing models have over quasi-steady rigid wing models is a much higher lift generation capability. Both experimental and computational studies have shown that the leading and trailing edge vortexes (LEV and TEV) play a major role in the efficient generation of such unconventionally high lift force. In this study, two NACA0012 miniature hydrofoils, one flexible and the other rigid, were actively plunged at various frequencies in a viscous glycerol-water solution to study the influence of flexibility. Two-dimensional, phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the temporal and spacial development of LEVs and TEVs. Simultaneous measurements of lift and thrust forces were recorded to reveal the relationship between hydrodynamic force and the evolution of the surrounding flow field. Results from the flexible hydrofoil were compared to those from the rigid one in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of flexibility. The second problem focused on fluid-structure interaction of gravity driven falling plates. Falling leaves and paper cards in air has drawn plenty of research interest in the past decades to investigate the interaction between the fluid flow and the falling object. In this research, time-resolved PIV were employed to experimentally visualize the flow field evolution around the gravity-driven falling plates. The plates were made of different materials with

  6. Detached-eddy simulation of flow non-linearity of fluid-structural interactions using high order schemes and parallel computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoyuan

    The objective of this research is to develop an efficient and accurate methodology to resolve flow non-linearity of fluid-structural interaction. To achieve this purpose, a numerical strategy to apply the detached-eddy simulation (DES) with a fully coupled fluid-structural interaction model is established for the first time. The following novel numerical algorithms are also created: a general sub-domain boundary mapping procedure for parallel computation to reduce wall clock simulation time, an efficient and low diffusion E-CUSP (LDE) scheme used as a Riemann solver to resolve discontinuities with minimal numerical dissipation, and an implicit high order accuracy weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme to capture shock waves. The Detached-Eddy Simulation is based on the model proposed by Spalart in 1997. Near solid walls within wall boundary layers, the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are solved. Outside of the wall boundary layers, the 3D filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved based on large eddy simulation(LES). The Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence model is solved to provide the Reynolds stresses in the RANS region and the subgrid scale stresses in the LES region. An improved 5th order finite differencing weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme with an optimized epsilon value is employed for the inviscid fluxes. The new LDE scheme used with the WENO scheme is able to capture crisp shock profiles and exact contact surfaces. A set of fully conservative 4th order finite central differencing schemes are used for the viscous terms. The 3D Navier-Stokes equations are discretized based on a conservative finite differencing scheme. The unfactored line Gauss-Seidel relaxation iteration is employed for time marching. A general sub-domain boundary mapping procedure is developed for arbitrary topology multi-block structured grids with grid points matched on sub-domain boundaries. Extensive numerical experiments

  7. Stability of carotid artery under steady-state and pulsatile blood flow: a fluid-structure interaction study.

    PubMed

    Saeid Khalafvand, Seyed; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that arteries may buckle into tortuous shapes under lumen pressure, which in turn could alter blood flow. However, the mechanisms of artery instability under pulsatile flow have not been fully understood. The objective of this study was to simulate the buckling and post-buckling behaviors of the carotid artery under pulsatile flow using a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method. The artery wall was modeled as a nonlinear material with a two-fiber strain-energy function. FSI simulations were performed under steady-state flow and pulsatile flow conditions with a prescribed flow velocity profile at the inlet and different pressures at the outlet to determine the critical buckling pressure. Simulations were performed for normal (160 ml/min) and high (350 ml/min) flow rates and normal (1.5) and reduced (1.3) axial stretch ratios to determine the effects of flow rate and axial tension on stability. The results showed that an artery buckled when the lumen pressure exceeded a critical value. The critical mean buckling pressure at pulsatile flow was 17-23% smaller than at steady-state flow. For both steady-state and pulsatile flow, the high flow rate had very little effect (<5%) on the critical buckling pressure. The fluid and wall stresses were drastically altered at the location with maximum deflection. The maximum lumen shear stress occurred at the inner side of the bend and maximum tensile wall stresses occurred at the outer side. These findings improve our understanding of artery instability in vivo.

  8. A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid-fluid interfaces where the structural nodal positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.

  9. Fluid-structure interaction model of aortic valve with porcine-specific collagen fiber alignment in the cusps.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Peleg, Mor; Halevi, Rotem; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Raanani, Ehud; Hamdan, Ashraf; Haj-Ali, Rami

    2013-10-01

    Native aortic valve cusps are composed of collagen fibers embedded in their layers. Each valve cusp has its own distinctive fiber alignment with varying orientations and sizes of its fiber bundles. However, prior mechanical behavior models have not been able to account for the valve-specific collagen fiber networks (CFN) or for their differences between the cusps. This study investigates the influence of this asymmetry on the hemodynamics by employing two fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models, one with asymmetric-mapped CFN from measurements of porcine valve and the other with simplified-symmetric CFN. The FSI models are based on coupled structural and fluid dynamic solvers. The partitioned solver has nonconformal meshes and the flow is modeled by employing the Eulerian approach. The collagen in the CFNs, the surrounding elastin matrix, and the aortic sinus tissues have hyperelastic mechanical behavior. The coaptation is modeled with a master-slave contact algorithm. A full cardiac cycle is simulated by imposing the same physiological blood pressure at the upstream and downstream boundaries for both models. The mapped case showed highly asymmetric valve kinematics and hemodynamics even though there were only small differences between the opening areas and cardiac outputs of the two cases. The regions with a less dense fiber network are more prone to damage since they are subjected to higher principal stress in the tissues and a higher level of flow shear stress. This asymmetric flow leeward of the valve might damage not only the valve itself but also the ascending aorta.

  10. An ALE formulation of embedded boundary methods for tracking boundary layers in turbulent fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Lakshminarayan, Vinod K.

    2014-04-01

    Embedded Boundary Methods (EBMs) for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are usually constructed in the Eulerian setting. They are particularly attractive for complex Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems characterized by large structural motions and deformations. They are also critical for flow problems with topological changes and FSI problems with cracking. For all of these problems, the alternative Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods are often unfeasible because of the issue of mesh crossovers. However for viscous flows, Eulerian EBMs for CFD do not track the boundary layers around dynamic rigid or flexible bodies. Consequently, the application of these methods to viscous FSI problems requires either a high mesh resolution in a large part of the computational fluid domain, or adaptive mesh refinement. Unfortunately, the first option is computationally inefficient, and the second one is labor intensive. For these reasons, an alternative approach is proposed in this paper for maintaining all moving boundary layers resolved during the simulation of a turbulent FSI problem using an EBM for CFD. In this approach, which is simple and computationally reasonable, the underlying non-body-fitted mesh is rigidly translated and/or rotated in order to track the rigid component of the motion of the dynamic obstacle. Then, the flow computations away from the embedded surface are performed using the ALE framework, and the wall boundary conditions are treated by the chosen Eulerian EBM for CFD. Hence, the solution of the boundary layer tracking problem proposed in this paper can be described as an ALE implementation of a given EBM for CFD. Its basic features are illustrated with the Large Eddy Simulation using a non-body-fitted mesh of a turbulent flow past an airfoil in heaving motion. Its strong potential for the solution of challenging FSI problems at reasonable computational costs is also demonstrated with the simulation of turbulent flows past a family of

  11. A computational fluid-structure interaction model to predict the biomechanical properties of the artificial functionally graded aorta.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Arezoo; Bani, Milad Salimi; Bahreinizade, Hossein; Karimi, Alireza

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, three layers of the ascending aorta in respect to the time and space at various blood pressures have been simulated. Two well-known commercial finite element (FE) software have used to be able to provide a range of reliable numerical results while independent on the software type. The radial displacement compared with the time as well as the peripheral stress and von Mises stress of the aorta have calculated. The aorta model was validated using the differential quadrature method (DQM) solution and, then, in order to design functionally graded materials (FGMs) with different heterogeneous indexes for the artificial vessel, two different materials have been employed. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation has been carried out on the FGM and a natural vessel of the human body. The heterogeneous index defines the variation of the length in a function. The blood pressure was considered to be a function of both the time and location. Finally, the response characteristics of functionally graded biomaterials (FGBMs) models with different values of heterogeneous material parameters were determined and compared with the behaviour of a natural vessel. The results showed a very good agreement between the numerical findings of the FGM materials and that of the natural vessel. The findings of the present study may have implications not only to understand the performance of different FGMs in bearing the stress and deformation in comparison with the natural human vessels, but also to provide information for the biomaterials expert to be able to select a suitable material as an implant for the aorta.

  12. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013) and WebGL (Khronos, 2013), it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games. This paper

  13. Hund's Rule-Driven Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction at 3 d -5 d Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbes, A.; Bihlmayer, G.; Bechstedt, F.; Blügel, S.; Manchon, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using relativistic first-principles calculations, we show that the chemical trend of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in 3 d -5 d ultrathin films follows Hund's first rule with a tendency similar to their magnetic moments in either the unsupported 3 d monolayers or 3 d -5 d interfaces. We demonstrate that, besides the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect in inversion asymmetric noncollinear magnetic systems, the driving force is the 3 d orbital occupations and their spin-flip mixing processes with the spin-orbit active 5 d states control directly the sign and magnitude of the DMI. The magnetic chirality changes are discussed in the light of the interplay between SOC, Hund's first rule, and the crystal-field splitting of d orbitals.

  14. Web Based Interactive Anaglyph Stereo Visualization of 3D Model of Geoscience Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to create interactive online tool for generating and viewing the anaglyph 3D stereo image on a Web browser via Internet. To achieve this, we designed and developed the prototype system. Three-dimensional visualization is well known and becoming popular in recent years to understand the target object and the related physical phenomena. Geoscience data have the complex data model, which combines large extents with rich small scale visual details. So, the real-time visualization of 3D geoscience data model on the Internet is a challenging work. In this paper, we show the result of creating which can be viewed in 3D anaglyph of geoscience data in any web browser which supports WebGL. We developed an anaglyph image viewing prototype system, and some representative results are displayed by anaglyph 3D stereo image generated in red-cyan colour from pairs of air-photo/digital elevation model and geological map/digital elevation model respectively. The best viewing is achieved by using suitable 3D red-cyan glasses, although alternatively red-blue or red-green spectacles can be also used. The middle mouse wheel can be used to zoom in/out the anaglyph image on a Web browser. Application of anaglyph 3D stereo image is a very important and easy way to understand the underground geologic system and active tectonic geomorphology. The integrated strata with fine three-dimensional topography and geologic map data can help to characterise the mineral potential area and the active tectonic abnormal characteristics. To conclude, it can be stated that anaglyph 3D stereo image provides a simple and feasible method to improve the relief effect of geoscience data such as geomorphology and geology. We believe that with further development, the anaglyph 3D stereo imaging system could as a complement to 3D geologic modeling, constitute a useful tool for better understanding of the underground geology and the active tectonic

  15. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS'. The global model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but has more limited capabilities for fluid-structure interaction analysis. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of the finite element code MSC.Dytranz for performing a dynamic fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the Dytran solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions to similar problems, and to the results from ANSYS simulations. Both rigid tank and flexible tank configurations were analyzed with Dytran. The response parameters of interest that are evaluated in this study are the total hydrodynamic reaction forces, the impulsive and convective mode frequencies, the waste pressures, and slosh heights

  16. Interplay of 3 d-5 d interactions in high-TC osmium-based double perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. E.; Calder, S.; Morrow, R.; Woodward, P. M.; Yan, J. Q.; Winn, B.; Lumsden, M. D.; Christianson, A. D.

    2015-03-01

    In 3d-5d systems the strongly magnetic 3d orbitals and extended 5d orbitals with enhanced spin-orbit coupling lead to a range of high TC magnetic states and novel behavior not present in systems consisting solely of 3d or 5d ions. The two distinct octahedral sites in double perovskites A2 BB 'O6 allow an ordered 3d-5d structure to form, providing a variety of systems to be investigated. Unravelling the interactions controlling these systems, however, is an open challenge. The highest known TC in such a system, 725K, is found in insulator Sr2CrOsO6. This questions the theory for high-TCs in systems such as TC=400K Sr2FeReO6 which relies on half-metallic behavior. To unravel the nature of the interactions in 3d-5d systems, we have studied the series of compounds Sr2 X OsO6. We have utilized elastic and inelastic neutron scattering to probe the spin states in the systems, and therefore test predictions that the magnetic interactions are controlled by a frustrated AFM Heisenberg model. By studying the series, we are able to relate changes in the spin wave spectrum to dramatic changes in the magnetic order from TN = 95 K antiferromagnetism to TC = 725 K ferrimagnetism.

  17. 3D Imaging for hand gesture recognition: Exploring the software-hardware interaction of current technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periverzov, Frol; Ilieş, Horea T.

    2012-09-01

    Interaction with 3D information is one of the fundamental and most familiar tasks in virtually all areas of engineering and science. Several recent technological advances pave the way for developing hand gesture recognition capabilities available to all, which will lead to more intuitive and efficient 3D user interfaces (3DUI). These developments can unlock new levels of expression and productivity in all activities concerned with the creation and manipulation of virtual 3D shapes and, specifically, in engineering design. Building fully automated systems for tracking and interpreting hand gestures requires robust and efficient 3D imaging techniques as well as potent shape classifiers. We survey and explore current and emerging 3D imaging technologies, and focus, in particular, on those that can be used to build interfaces between the users' hands and the machine. The purpose of this paper is to categorize and highlight the relevant differences between these existing 3D imaging approaches in terms of the nature of the information provided, output data format, as well as the specific conditions under which these approaches yield reliable data. Furthermore we explore the impact of each of these approaches on the computational cost and reliability of the required image processing algorithms. Finally we highlight the main challenges and opportunities in developing natural user interfaces based on hand gestures, and conclude with some promising directions for future research. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Employing WebGL to develop interactive stereoscopic 3D content for use in biomedical visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Semay; Renambot, Luc; Sauter, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Web Graphics Library (WebGL), the forthcoming web standard for rendering native 3D graphics in a browser, represents an important addition to the biomedical visualization toolset. It is projected to become a mainstream method of delivering 3D online content due to shrinking support for third-party plug-ins. Additionally, it provides a virtual reality (VR) experience to web users accommodated by the growing availability of stereoscopic displays (3D TV, desktop, and mobile). WebGL's value in biomedical visualization has been demonstrated by applications for interactive anatomical models, chemical and molecular visualization, and web-based volume rendering. However, a lack of instructional literature specific to the field prevents many from utilizing this technology. This project defines a WebGL design methodology for a target audience of biomedical artists with a basic understanding of web languages and 3D graphics. The methodology was informed by the development of an interactive web application depicting the anatomy and various pathologies of the human eye. The application supports several modes of stereoscopic displays for a better understanding of 3D anatomical structures.

  19. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  20. Interactive Theater Experience with 3D Live Captured Actors and Spatial Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheok, Adrian David

    This chapter introduces a new reality interactive theater that combines the 3D Live human capturing system, spatial sound, augmented reality, human-oriented interaction, and ambient intelligence technologies. Actors/Dancers at different places remotely are captured by the 3D Live system and transmitted to the theater place in real time and rendered in 3D form and real size, thus they can play/dance with the local actors/dancers and virtual characters at the same place in real time. Audience interaction is allowed and handled by an Ambient Intelligence (AI) agent to generate new actions for virtual characters and send meaningful interactions to real actors. The spatial sound system provides the real 3D sound and at the same time generates special sound effects such as controlling the sound direction that only allows people in a certain direction to heard it. All these features combined together bring a totally new theater experience to both actors/dancers and audiences, and extend the grammar of the traditional theater.

  1. Role of Interaction in Enhancing the Epistemic Utility of 3D Mathematical Visualizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Hai-Ning; Sedig, Kamran

    2010-01-01

    Many epistemic activities, such as spatial reasoning, sense-making, problem solving, and learning, are information-based. In the context of epistemic activities involving mathematical information, learners often use interactive 3D mathematical visualizations (MVs). However, performing such activities is not always easy. Although it is generally…

  2. Desktop Cloud Visualization: the new technology to remote access 3D interactive applications in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Livia; Ruffino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In the proposed demonstration we will present DCV (Desktop Cloud Visualization): a unique technology that allows users to remote access 2D and 3D interactive applications over a standard network. This allows geographically dispersed doctors work collaboratively and to acquire anatomical or pathological images and visualize them for further investigations.

  3. 3D Sound Interactive Environments for Blind Children Problem Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jaime; Saenz, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    Audio-based virtual environments have been increasingly used to foster cognitive and learning skills. A number of studies have also highlighted that the use of technology can help learners to develop effective skills such as motivation and self-esteem. This study presents the design and usability of 3D interactive environments for children with…

  4. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  5. An Interactive 3D Virtual Anatomy Puzzle for Learning and Simulation - Initial Demonstration and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Messier, Erik; Wilcox, Jascha; Dawson-Elli, Alexander; Diaz, Gabriel; Linte, Cristian A

    2016-01-01

    To inspire young students (grades 6-12) to become medical practitioners and biomedical engineers, it is necessary to expose them to key concepts of the field in a way that is both exciting and informative. Recent advances in medical image acquisition, manipulation, processing, visualization, and display have revolutionized the approach in which the human body and internal anatomy can be seen and studied. It is now possible to collect 3D, 4D, and 5D medical images of patient specific data, and display that data to the end user using consumer level 3D stereoscopic display technology. Despite such advancements, traditional 2D modes of content presentation such as textbooks and slides are still the standard didactic equipment used to teach young students anatomy. More sophisticated methods of display can help to elucidate the complex 3D relationships between structures that are so often missed when viewing only 2D media, and can instill in students an appreciation for the interconnection between medicine and technology. Here we describe the design, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of a 3D virtual anatomy puzzle dedicated to helping users learn the anatomy of various organs and systems by manipulating 3D virtual data. The puzzle currently comprises several components of the human anatomy and can be easily extended to include additional organs and systems. The 3D virtual anatomy puzzle game was implemented and piloted using three display paradigms - a traditional 2D monitor, a 3D TV with active shutter glass, and the DK2 version Oculus Rift, as well as two different user interaction devices - a space mouse and traditional keyboard controls.

  6. Protein-protein interaction networks studies and importance of 3D structure knowledge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui-Chun; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca

    2013-12-01

    Protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs) are a powerful tool to study biological processes in living cells. In this review, we present the progress of PPIN studies from abstract to more detailed representations. We will focus on 3D interactome networks, which offer detailed information at the atomic level. This information can be exploited in understanding not only the underlying cellular mechanisms, but also how human variants and disease-causing mutations affect protein functions and complexes' stability. Recent studies have used structural information on PPINs to also understand the molecular mechanisms of binding partner selection. We will address the challenges in generating 3D PPINs due to the restricted number of solved protein structures. Finally, some of the current use of 3D PPINs will be discussed, highlighting their contribution to the studies in genotype-phenotype relationships and in the optimization of targeted studies to design novel chemical compounds for medical treatments.

  7. 3-D plasma boundary and plasma wall interaction research at UW-Madison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Oliver; Akerson, Adrian; Bader, Aaron; Barbui, Tullio; Effenberg, Florian; Flesch, Kurt; Frerichs, Heinke; Green, Jonathan; Hinson, Edward; Kremeyer, Thierry; Norval, Ryan; Stephey, Laurie; Waters, Ian; Winters, Victoria

    2016-10-01

    The necessity of considering 3-D effects on the plasma boundary and plasma wall interaction (PWI) in tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches has been highlighted by abundant experimental and numerical results in the recent past. Prominent examples with 3-D boundary situations are numerous: ELM controlled H-modes by RMP fields in tokamaks, research on boundary plasmas and PWI in stellarators in general, quasi-helical states in RFPs, asymmetric fueling situations, and structural and wall elements which are not aligned with the magnetic guiding fields. A systematic approach is being taken at UW-Madison to establish a targeted experimental basis for identifying the most significant effects for plasma edge transport and resulting PWI in such 3-D plasma boundary situations. We deploy advanced 3-D modeling using the EMC3-EIRENE, ERO and MCI codes in combination with laboratory experiments at UW-Madison to investigate the relevance of 3-D effects in large scale devices with a concerted approach on DIII-D, NSTX-U, and Wendelstein 7-X. Highlights of experimental results from the on-site laboratory activities at UW-Madison and the large scale facilities are presented and interlinks will be discussed. This work was supported by US DOE DE-SC0013911, DE-SC00012315 and DE-SC00014210.

  8. CFL3D Contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the CFL3D contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop, held in Orlando, Florida in January 2010. CFL3D is a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code. Four shock boundary layer interaction cases are computed using a one-equation turbulence model widely used for other aerodynamic problems of interest. Two of the cases have experimental data available at the workshop, and two of the cases do not. The effect of grid, flux scheme, and thin-layer approximation are investigated. Comparisons are made to the available experimental data. All four cases exhibit strong three-dimensional behavior in and near the interaction regions, resulting from influences of the tunnel side-walls.

  9. Virtual touch 3D interactive system for autostereoscopic display with embedded optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Pai; Wang, Guo-Zhen; Ma, Ming-Ching; Tung, Shang-Yu; Huang, Shu-Yi; Tseng, Hung-Wei; Kuo, Chung-Hong; Li, Chun-Huai

    2011-06-01

    The traidational 3D interactive sysetm which uses CCD camera to capture image is difficult to operate on near range for mobile applications.Therefore, 3D interactive display with embedded optical sensor was proposed. Based on optical sensor based system, we proposed four different methods to support differenct functions. T mark algorithm can obtain 5- axis information (x, y, z,θ, and φ)of LED no matter where LED was vertical or inclined to panel and whatever it rotated. Sequential mark algorithm and color filter based algorithm can support mulit-user. Finally, bare finger touch system with sequential illuminator can achieve to interact with auto-stereoscopic images by bare finger. Furthermore, the proposed methods were verified on a 4-inch panel with embedded optical sensors.

  10. Interactive algorithms for the segmentation and quantitation of 3-D MRI brain scans.

    PubMed

    Freeborough, P A; Fox, N C; Kitney, R I

    1997-05-01

    Interactive algorithms are an attractive approach to the accurate segmentation of 3D brain scans as they potentially improve the reliability of fully automated segmentation while avoiding the labour intensiveness and inaccuracies of manual segmentation. We present a 3D image analysis package (MIDAS) with a novel architecture enabling highly interactive segmentation algorithms to be implemented as add on modules. Interactive methods based on intensity thresholding, region growing and the constrained application of morphological operators are also presented. The methods involve the application of constraints and freedoms on the algorithms coupled with real time visualisation of the effect. This methodology has been applied to the segmentation, visualisation and measurement of the whole brain and a small irregular neuroanatomical structure, the hippocampus. We demonstrate reproducible and anatomically accurate segmentations of these structures. The efficacy of one method in measuring volume loss (atrophy) of the hippocampus in Alzheimer's disease is shown and is compared to conventional methods.

  11. NLDB: a database for 3D protein-ligand interactions in enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoichi; Omori, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-12-01

    NLDB (Natural Ligand DataBase; URL: http://nldb.hgc.jp ) is a database of automatically collected and predicted 3D protein-ligand interactions for the enzymatic reactions of metabolic pathways registered in KEGG. Structural information about these reactions is important for studying the molecular functions of enzymes, however a large number of the 3D interactions are still unknown. Therefore, in order to complement such missing information, we predicted protein-ligand complex structures, and constructed a database of the 3D interactions in reactions. NLDB provides three different types of data resources; the natural complexes are experimentally determined protein-ligand complex structures in PDB, the analog complexes are predicted based on known protein structures in a complex with a similar ligand, and the ab initio complexes are predicted by docking simulations. In addition, NLDB shows the known polymorphisms found in human genome on protein structures. The database has a flexible search function based on various types of keywords, and an enrichment analysis function based on a set of KEGG compound IDs. NLDB will be a valuable resource for experimental biologists studying protein-ligand interactions in specific reactions, and for theoretical researchers wishing to undertake more precise simulations of interactions.

  12. Functional metabolic interactions of human neuron-astrocyte 3D in vitro networks

    PubMed Central

    Simão, Daniel; Terrasso, Ana P.; Teixeira, Ana P.; Brito, Catarina; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of human neural tissue-like 3D structures holds great promise for disease modeling, drug discovery and regenerative medicine strategies. Promoting the establishment of complex cell-cell interactions, 3D culture systems enable the development of human cell-based models with increased physiological relevance, over monolayer cultures. Here, we demonstrate the establishment of neuronal and astrocytic metabolic signatures and shuttles in a human 3D neural cell model, namely the glutamine-glutamate-GABA shuttle. This was indicated by labeling of neuronal GABA following incubation with the glia-specific substrate [2-13C]acetate, which decreased by methionine sulfoximine-induced inhibition of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase. Cell metabolic specialization was further demonstrated by higher pyruvate carboxylase-derived labeling in glutamine than in glutamate, indicating its activity in astrocytes and not in neurons. Exposure to the neurotoxin acrylamide resulted in intracellular accumulation of glutamate and decreased GABA synthesis. These results suggest an acrylamide-induced impairment of neuronal synaptic vesicle trafficking and imbalanced glutamine-glutamate-GABA cycle, due to loss of cell-cell contacts at synaptic sites. This work demonstrates, for the first time to our knowledge, that neural differentiation of human cells in a 3D setting recapitulates neuronal-astrocytic metabolic interactions, highlighting the relevance of these models for toxicology and better understanding the crosstalk between human neural cells. PMID:27619889

  13. Canine neuroanatomy: Development of a 3D reconstruction and interactive application for undergraduate veterinary education

    PubMed Central

    Raffan, Hazel; Guevar, Julien; Poyade, Matthieu; Rea, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Current methods used to communicate and present the complex arrangement of vasculature related to the brain and spinal cord is limited in undergraduate veterinary neuroanatomy training. Traditionally it is taught with 2-dimensional (2D) diagrams, photographs and medical imaging scans which show a fixed viewpoint. 2D representations of 3-dimensional (3D) objects however lead to loss of spatial information, which can present problems when translating this to the patient. Computer-assisted learning packages with interactive 3D anatomical models have become established in medical training, yet equivalent resources are scarce in veterinary education. For this reason, we set out to develop a workflow methodology creating an interactive model depicting the vasculature of the canine brain that could be used in undergraduate education. Using MR images of a dog and several commonly available software programs, we set out to show how combining image editing, segmentation and surface generation, 3D modeling and texturing can result in the creation of a fully interactive application for veterinary training. In addition to clearly identifying a workflow methodology for the creation of this dataset, we have also demonstrated how an interactive tutorial and self-assessment tool can be incorporated into this. In conclusion, we present a workflow which has been successful in developing a 3D reconstruction of the canine brain and associated vasculature through segmentation, surface generation and post-processing of readily available medical imaging data. The reconstructed model was implemented into an interactive application for veterinary education that has been designed to target the problems associated with learning neuroanatomy, primarily the inability to visualise complex spatial arrangements from 2D resources. The lack of similar resources in this field suggests this workflow is original within a veterinary context. There is great potential to explore this method, and introduce

  14. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  15. Virtual performer: single camera 3D measuring system for interaction in virtual space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Taneji, Shoto

    2006-10-01

    The authors developed interaction media systems in the 3D virtual space. In these systems, the musician virtually plays an instrument like the theremin in the virtual space or the performer plays a show using the virtual character such as a puppet. This interactive virtual media system consists of the image capture, measuring performer's position, detecting and recognizing motions and synthesizing video image using the personal computer. In this paper, we propose some applications of interaction media systems; a virtual musical instrument and superimposing CG character. Moreover, this paper describes the measuring method of the positions of the performer, his/her head and both eyes using a single camera.

  16. LATIS3D: The Gold Standard for Laser-Tissue-Interaction Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Makarewicz, A.M.; Kim, B.M.; Gentile, N.A.; Yang, Y.B.; Brlik, M.; Vincent, L.

    2000-02-29

    The goal of this LDRD project has been to create LATIS3D--the world's premier computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling. The development was based on recent experience with the 2D LATIS code and the ASCI code, KULL. With LATIS3D, important applications in laser medical therapy were researched including dynamical calculations of tissue emulsification and ablation, photothermal therapy, and photon transport for photodynamic therapy. This project also enhanced LLNL's core competency in laser-matter interactions and high-energy-density physics by pushing simulation codes into new parameter regimes and by attracting external expertise. This will benefit both existing LLNL programs such as ICF and SBSS and emerging programs in medical technology and other laser applications.

  17. DYNA3D, INGRID, and TAURUS: an integrated, interactive software system for crashworthiness engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.; Hallquist, J.O.; Stillman, D.W.

    1985-04-01

    Crashworthiness engineering has always been a high priority at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory because of its role in the safe transport of radioactive material for the nuclear power industry and military. As a result, the authors have developed an integrated, interactive set of finite element programs for crashworthiness analysis. The heart of the system is DYNA3D, an explicit, fully vectorized, large deformation structural dynamics code. DYNA3D has the following four capabilities that are critical for the efficient and accurate analysis of crashes: (1) fully nonlinear solid, shell, and beam elements for representing a structure, (2) a broad range of constitutive models for representing the materials, (3) sophisticated contact algorithms for the impact interactions, and (4) a rigid body capability to represent the bodies away from the impact zones at a greatly reduced cost without sacrificing any accuracy in the momentum calculations. To generate the large and complex data files for DYNA3D, INGRID, a general purpose mesh generator, is used. It runs on everything from IBM PCs to CRAYS, and can generate 1000 nodes/minute on a PC. With its efficient hidden line algorithms and many options for specifying geometry, INGRID also doubles as a geometric modeller. TAURUS, an interactive post processor, is used to display DYNA3D output. In addition to the standard monochrome hidden line display, time history plotting, and contouring, TAURUS generates interactive color displays on 8 color video screens by plotting color bands superimposed on the mesh which indicate the value of the state variables. For higher quality color output, graphic output files may be sent to the DICOMED film recorders. We have found that color is every bit as important as hidden line removal in aiding the analyst in understanding his results. In this paper the basic methodologies of the programs are presented along with several crashworthiness calculations.

  18. Fluid-structure interaction modeling of A F/A-18 twin-tail buffet using Non-linear Eddy Viscosity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmekawy, Ahmed M. Nagib M.

    When turbulent flow generates unsteady differential pressure over an aircraft's structure, this may generate buffeting, a random oscillation of the structure. The buffet phenomenon is observed on a wide range of fighter aircraft, especially fighters with twin-tail. More research is needed to better understand the physics behind the vortical flow over a delta wing and the subsequent tail buffet. This dissertation reports the modeling and simulation of a steady-state one-way fluid-structure interaction for the tail buffet problem observed on a F/A-18 fighter. The time-averaged computational results are compared to available experimental data. Next, computations are extended to simulate an unsteady two-way fluid-structure interaction problem of the tail buffet of a F/A-18 fighter. For the modeling herein, a commercial software ANSYS version 14.0, is employed. For the fluid domain, the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) equations with different turbulent models are utilized. The first turbulence model selected is the modified Spalart-Allmaras model (SARRC) with a strain-vorticity based production and curvature treatment. The second turbulence model selected is the Non-linear Eddy Viscosity Model (NLEVM) based on the Wilcox k--o model. This model uses the formulation of an explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model. The structural simulation is conducted by a finite element analysis model with shell elements. Both SARRC and NLEVM turbulence models are in ANSYS software. The experimental data used for validation were conducted on a simplified geometry: a 0.3 Mach number flow past a 76-deg delta wing pitched to 30-deg. Two vertical tails were placed downstream of the delta wing. The present work is the first ever study of the tail buffet problem of the F/A-18 fighter with two-way fluid-structure interaction using the two advanced turbulence models. The steady-state, time-averaged, one-way fluid-structure interaction case of the present investigation indicates

  19. 3D interactive augmented reality-enhanced digital learning systems for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kai-Ten; Tseng, Po-Hsuan; Chiu, Pei-Shuan; Yang, Jia-Lin; Chiu, Chun-Jie

    2013-03-01

    With enhanced processing capability of mobile platforms, augmented reality (AR) has been considered a promising technology for achieving enhanced user experiences (UX). Augmented reality is to impose virtual information, e.g., videos and images, onto a live-view digital display. UX on real-world environment via the display can be e ectively enhanced with the adoption of interactive AR technology. Enhancement on UX can be bene cial for digital learning systems. There are existing research works based on AR targeting for the design of e-learning systems. However, none of these work focuses on providing three-dimensional (3-D) object modeling for en- hanced UX based on interactive AR techniques. In this paper, the 3-D interactive augmented reality-enhanced learning (IARL) systems will be proposed to provide enhanced UX for digital learning. The proposed IARL systems consist of two major components, including the markerless pattern recognition (MPR) for 3-D models and velocity-based object tracking (VOT) algorithms. Realistic implementation of proposed IARL system is conducted on Android-based mobile platforms. UX on digital learning can be greatly improved with the adoption of proposed IARL systems.

  20. 3D Modeling of Ultrasonic Wave Interaction with Disbonds and Weak Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, C.; Hinders, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques, such as the use of guided waves, can be ideal for finding damage in the plate and pipe-like structures used in aerospace applications. However, the interaction of waves with real flaw types and geometries can lead to experimental signals that are difficult to interpret. 3-dimensional (3D) elastic wave simulations can be a powerful tool in understanding the complicated wave scattering involved in flaw detection and for optimizing experimental techniques. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate Lamb wave scattering from realistic flaws. This paper discusses simulation results for an aluminum-aluminum diffusion disbond and an aluminum-epoxy disbond and compares results from the disbond case to the common artificial flaw type of a flat-bottom hole. The paper also discusses the potential for extending the 3D EFIT equations to incorporate physics-based weak bond models for simulating wave scattering from weak adhesive bonds.

  1. vPresent: A cloud based 3D virtual presentation environment for interactive product customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Xiaoming; Guo, Fei; He, Yifeng; Guan, Ling

    2013-09-01

    In modern society, many companies offer product customization services to their customers. There are two major issues in providing customized products. First, product manufacturers need to effectively present their products to the customers who may be located in any geographical area. Second, customers need to be able to provide their feedbacks on the product in real-time. However, the traditional presentation approaches cannot effectively convey sufficient information for the product or efficiently adjust product design according to customers' real-time feedbacks. In order to address these issues, we propose vPresent , a cloud based 3D virtual presentation environment, in this paper. In vPresent, the product expert can show the 3D virtual product to the remote customers and dynamically customize the product based on customers' feedbacks, while customers can provide their opinions in real time when they are viewing a vivid 3D visualization of the product. Since the proposed vPresent is a cloud based system, the customers are able to access the customized virtual products from anywhere at any time, via desktop, laptop, or even smart phone. The proposed vPresent is expected to effectively deliver 3D visual information to customers and provide an interactive design platform for the development of customized products.

  2. Interactive 3-D graphics workstations in stereotaxy: clinical requirements, algorithms, and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehricke, Hans-Heino; Daiber, Gerhard; Sonntag, Ralf; Strasser, Wolfgang; Lochner, Mathias; Rudi, Lothar S.; Lorenz, Walter J.

    1992-09-01

    In stereotactic treatment planning the spatial relationships between a variety of objects has to be taken into account in order to avoid destruction of vital brain structures and rupture of vasculature. The visualization of these highly complex relations may be supported by 3-D computer graphics methods. In this context the three-dimensional display of the intracranial vascular tree and additional objects, such as neuroanatomy, pathology, stereotactic devices, or isodose surfaces, is of high clinical value. We report an advanced rendering method for a depth-enhanced maximum intensity projection from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a walk-through approach to the analysis of MRA volume data. Furthermore, various methods for a multiple-object 3-D rendering in stereotaxy are discussed. The development of advanced applications in medical imaging can hardly be successful if image acquisition problems are disregarded. We put particular emphasis on the use of conventional MRI and MRA for stereotactic guidance. The problem of MR distortion is discussed and a novel three- dimensional approach to the quantification and correction of the distortion patterns is presented. Our results suggest that the sole use of MR for stereotactic guidance is highly practical. The true three-dimensionality of the acquired datasets opens up new perspectives to stereotactic treatment planning. For the first time it is possible now to integrate all the necessary information into 3-D scenes, thus enabling an interactive 3-D planning.

  3. Dynamic and fluid-structure interaction simulations of bioprosthetic heart valves using parametric design with T-splines and Fung-type material models.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ming-Chen; Kamensky, David; Xu, Fei; Kiendl, Josef; Wang, Chenglong; Wu, Michael C H; Mineroff, Joshua; Reali, Alessandro; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    This paper builds on a recently developed immersogeometric fluid-structure interaction (FSI) methodology for bioprosthetic heart valve (BHV) modeling and simulation. It enhances the proposed framework in the areas of geometry design and constitutive modeling. With these enhancements, BHV FSI simulations may be performed with greater levels of automation, robustness and physical realism. In addition, the paper presents a comparison between FSI analysis and standalone structural dynamics simulation driven by prescribed transvalvular pressure, the latter being a more common modeling choice for this class of problems. The FSI computation achieved better physiological realism in predicting the valve leaflet deformation than its standalone structural dynamics counterpart.

  4. Scalable parallel methods for monolithic coupling in fluid-structure interaction with application to blood flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Andrew T. Cai Xiaochuan

    2010-02-01

    We introduce and study numerically a scalable parallel finite element solver for the simulation of blood flow in compliant arteries. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to model the fluid and coupled to an incompressible linear elastic model for the blood vessel walls. Our method features an unstructured dynamic mesh capable of modeling complicated geometries, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework that allows for large displacements of the moving fluid domain, monolithic coupling between the fluid and structure equations, and fully implicit time discretization. Simulations based on blood vessel geometries derived from patient-specific clinical data are performed on large supercomputers using scalable Newton-Krylov algorithms preconditioned with an overlapping restricted additive Schwarz method that preconditions the entire fluid-structure system together. The algorithm is shown to be robust and scalable for a variety of physical parameters, scaling to hundreds of processors and millions of unknowns.

  5. Fluid transients in fluid-structure interaction - 1987; Proceedings of the Third Symposium, Boston, MA, Dec. 13-18, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, F. T.; Moody, F. J.

    Papers are presented on a three-dimensional analysis of liquid oxygen sloshing in the Space Shuttle external tank, the flow-induced oscillations of a novel double-wing spring-mass system, added mass and damping coefficents for a hexagonal cylinder, and a new hydraulic pressure intensifier using an oil hammer. Other topics include junction losses in pulsating flow, a finite element analysis of a slender fluid-structure system, two-phase blowdown through a short tube, and check valve behavior under transient flow conditions. Also considered are forces in initially empty pipes subject to rapid filling, a modal analysis of vibrations in liquid-filled piping systems, efficient computation of the pipeline break problem, and fluid dynamics associated with ductile pipeline fracture.

  6. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-06-07

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  7. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  8. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2.

  9. Studying Host-Pathogen Interactions In 3-D: Organotypic Models For Infectious Disease And Drug Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Richter, Emily G.; Ott, C. Mark

    2006-01-01

    Representative, reproducible and high-throughput models of human cells and tissues are critical for a meaningful evaluation of host-pathogen interactions and are an essential component of the research developmental pipeline. The most informative infection models - animals, organ explants and human trials - are not suited for extensive evaluation of pathogenesis mechanisms and screening of candidate drugs. At the other extreme, more cost effective and accessible infection models such as conventional cell culture and static co-culture may not capture physiological and three-dimensional aspects of tissue biology that are important in assessing pathogenesis, and effectiveness and cytotoxicity of therapeutics. Our lab has used innovative bioengineering technology to establish biologically meaningful 3-D models of human tissues that recapitulate many aspects of the differentiated structure and function of the parental tissue in vivo, and we have applied these models to study infectious disease. We have established a variety of different 3-D models that are currently being used in infection studies - including small intestine, colon, lung, placenta, bladder, periodontal ligament, and neuronal models. Published work from our lab has shown that our 3-D models respond to infection with bacterial and viral pathogens in ways that reflect the infection process in vivo. By virtue of their physiological relevance, 3-D cell cultures may also hold significant potential as models to provide insight into the neuropathogenesis of HIV infection. Furthermore, the experimental flexibility, reproducibility, cost-efficiency, and high throughput platform afforded by these 3-D models may have important implications for the design and development of drugs with which to effectively treat neurological complications of HIV infection.

  10. 3D analysis of interaction of Lamb waves with defects in loaded steel plates.

    PubMed

    Kazys, R; Mazeika, L; Barauskas, R; Raisutis, R; Cicenas, V; Demcenko, A

    2006-12-22

    The objective of the research presented here is the investigation of the interaction of guided waves with welds, defects and other non-uniformities in steel plates loaded by liquid. The investigation has been performed using numerical simulation for 2D and 3D cases by the finite differences method, finite element method and measurement of 3D distributions of acoustic fields. Propagation of the S(0) mode in a steel plate and its interaction with non-uniformities was investigated. It was shown that using the measured leaky wave signals in the water loading of the steel plate and by application of signal processing, the 3D ultrasonic field structure inside and outside of the plate can be reconstructed. The presence of leaky wave signals over the defect caused by the mode conversion of Lamb waves has been proved using the numerical modelling and experimental investigations. The developed signal and data processing enables to visualise dynamics of ultrasonic fields over the plate, and also to estimate spatial positions of defects inside the steel plates.

  11. Touch Interaction with 3D Geographical Visualization on Web: Selected Technological and User Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.; Stuchlík, R.; Hladík, J.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-10-01

    The use of both 3D visualization and devices with touch displays is increasing. In this paper, we focused on the Web technologies for 3D visualization of spatial data and its interaction via touch screen gestures. At the first stage, we compared the support of touch interaction in selected JavaScript libraries on different hardware (desktop PCs with touch screens, tablets, and smartphones) and software platforms. Afterward, we realized simple empiric test (within-subject design, 6 participants, 2 simple tasks, LCD touch monitor Acer and digital terrain models as stimuli) focusing on the ability of users to solve simple spatial tasks via touch screens. An in-house testing web tool was developed and used based on JavaScript, PHP, and X3DOM languages and Hammer.js libraries. The correctness of answers, speed of users' performances, used gestures, and a simple gesture metric was recorded and analysed. Preliminary results revealed that the pan gesture is most frequently used by test participants and it is also supported by the majority of 3D libraries. Possible gesture metrics and future developments including the interpersonal differences are discussed in the conclusion.

  12. 3D Brain Segmentation Using Dual-Front Active Contours with Optional User Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yezzi, Anthony; Cohen, Laurent D.

    2006-01-01

    Important attributes of 3D brain cortex segmentation algorithms include robustness, accuracy, computational efficiency, and facilitation of user interaction, yet few algorithms incorporate all of these traits. Manual segmentation is highly accurate but tedious and laborious. Most automatic techniques, while less demanding on the user, are much less accurate. It would be useful to employ a fast automatic segmentation procedure to do most of the work but still allow an expert user to interactively guide the segmentation to ensure an accurate final result. We propose a novel 3D brain cortex segmentation procedure utilizing dual-front active contours which minimize image-based energies in a manner that yields flexibly global minimizers based on active regions. Region-based information and boundary-based information may be combined flexibly in the evolution potentials for accurate segmentation results. The resulting scheme is not only more robust but much faster and allows the user to guide the final segmentation through simple mouse clicks which add extra seed points. Due to the flexibly global nature of the dual-front evolution model, single mouse clicks yield corrections to the segmentation that extend far beyond their initial locations, thus minimizing the user effort. Results on 15 simulated and 20 real 3D brain images demonstrate the robustness, accuracy, and speed of our scheme compared with other methods. PMID:23165037

  13. PROTEOME-3D: An Interactive Bioinformatics Tool for Large-Scale Data Exploration and Knowledge Discovery*

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Deborah H.; Eng, Jimmy; Wright, Michael E.; Han, David K.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of biological systems requires efficient and systematic assimilation of high-throughput datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. A major limitation in the field of proteomics is the lack of an appropriate software platform that can synthesize a large number of experimental datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. Here, we describe a software platform, termed PROTEOME-3D, that utilizes three essential features for systematic analysis of proteomics data: creation of a scalable, queryable, customized database for identified proteins from published literature; graphical tools for displaying proteome landscapes and trends from multiple large-scale experiments; and interactive data analysis that facilitates identification of crucial networks and pathways. Thus, PROTEOME-3D offers a standardized platform to analyze high-throughput experimental datasets for the identification of crucial players in co-regulated pathways and cellular processes. PMID:12960178

  14. Interaction and behaviour imaging: a novel method to measure mother-infant interaction using video 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leclère, C; Avril, M; Viaux-Savelon, S; Bodeau, N; Achard, C; Missonnier, S; Keren, M; Feldman, R; Chetouani, M; Cohen, D

    2016-05-24

    Studying early interaction is essential for understanding development and psychopathology. Automatic computational methods offer the possibility to analyse social signals and behaviours of several partners simultaneously and dynamically. Here, 20 dyads of mothers and their 13-36-month-old infants were videotaped during mother-infant interaction including 10 extremely high-risk and 10 low-risk dyads using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) sensors. From 2D+3D data and 3D space reconstruction, we extracted individual parameters (quantity of movement and motion activity ratio for each partner) and dyadic parameters related to the dynamics of partners heads distance (contribution to heads distance), to the focus of mutual engagement (percentage of time spent face to face or oriented to the task) and to the dynamics of motion activity (synchrony ratio, overlap ratio, pause ratio). Features are compared with blind global rating of the interaction using the coding interactive behavior (CIB). We found that individual and dyadic parameters of 2D+3D motion features perfectly correlates with rated CIB maternal and dyadic composite scores. Support Vector Machine classification using all 2D-3D motion features classified 100% of the dyads in their group meaning that motion behaviours are sufficient to distinguish high-risk from low-risk dyads. The proposed method may present a promising, low-cost methodology that can uniquely use artificial technology to detect meaningful features of human interactions and may have several implications for studying dyadic behaviours in psychiatry. Combining both global rating scales and computerized methods may enable a continuum of time scale from a summary of entire interactions to second-by-second dynamics.

  15. Interaction and behaviour imaging: a novel method to measure mother–infant interaction using video 3D reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leclère, C; Avril, M; Viaux-Savelon, S; Bodeau, N; Achard, C; Missonnier, S; Keren, M; Feldman, R; Chetouani, M; Cohen, D

    2016-01-01

    Studying early interaction is essential for understanding development and psychopathology. Automatic computational methods offer the possibility to analyse social signals and behaviours of several partners simultaneously and dynamically. Here, 20 dyads of mothers and their 13–36-month-old infants were videotaped during mother–infant interaction including 10 extremely high-risk and 10 low-risk dyads using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) sensors. From 2D+3D data and 3D space reconstruction, we extracted individual parameters (quantity of movement and motion activity ratio for each partner) and dyadic parameters related to the dynamics of partners heads distance (contribution to heads distance), to the focus of mutual engagement (percentage of time spent face to face or oriented to the task) and to the dynamics of motion activity (synchrony ratio, overlap ratio, pause ratio). Features are compared with blind global rating of the interaction using the coding interactive behavior (CIB). We found that individual and dyadic parameters of 2D+3D motion features perfectly correlates with rated CIB maternal and dyadic composite scores. Support Vector Machine classification using all 2D–3D motion features classified 100% of the dyads in their group meaning that motion behaviours are sufficient to distinguish high-risk from low-risk dyads. The proposed method may present a promising, low-cost methodology that can uniquely use artificial technology to detect meaningful features of human interactions and may have several implications for studying dyadic behaviours in psychiatry. Combining both global rating scales and computerized methods may enable a continuum of time scale from a summary of entire interactions to second-by-second dynamics. PMID:27219342

  16. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Engin Vrana, Nihal

    2015-05-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  17. Triplet superconductivity in 3D Dirac semi-metal due to exchange interaction.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Shapiro, B Ya; Li, Dingping; Shapiro, I

    2015-01-21

    Conventional phonon-electron interaction induces either triplet or one of two (degenerate) singlet pairing states in time reversal and inversion invariant 3D Dirac semi-metal. Investigation of the order parameters and energies of these states at zero temperature in a wide range of values of chemical potential μ, the effective electron-electron coupling constant λ and Debye energy TD demonstrates that when the exchange interaction is neglected the singlet always prevails, however, in significant portions of the (μ, λ, TD) parameter space the energy difference is very small. This means that interactions that are small, but discriminate between the spin singlet and the spin triplet, are important in order to determine the nature of the superconducting order there. The best candidate for such an interaction in the materials under consideration is the exchange (the Stoner term) characterized by constant λex. We show that at values of λex, much smaller than ones creating Stoner instability to ferromagnetism λex ∼ 1, the triplet pairing becomes energetically favored over the singlet ones. The 3D quantum critical point at μ = 0 is considered in detail. This can be realized experimentally in optically trapped cold atom systems.

  18. Time-lapse 3D electrical resistivity tomography to monitor soil-plant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Matteo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Putti, Mario

    2013-04-01

    In this work we present the application of time-lapse non-invasive 3D micro- electrical tomography (ERT) to monitor soil-plant interactions in the root zone in the framework of the FP7 Project CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the Hydrology of Mediterranean Basins). The goal of the study is to gain a better understanding of the soil-vegetation interactions by the use of non-invasive techniques. We designed, built and installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus for the monitoring of the root zone of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region, Northern Italy. The micro-ERT apparatus consists of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. We collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements for one year and performed two different controlled irrigation tests: one during a very dry Summer and one during a very wet and highly dynamic plant growing Spring period. We also ran laboratory analyses on soil specimens, in order to evaluate the electrical response at different saturation steps. The results demonstrate that 3D micro-ERT is capable of characterizing subsoil conditions and monitoring root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. In particular, we note that in very dry conditions, 3D micro ERT can image water plumes in the shallow subsoil produced by a drip irrigation system. In the very dynamic growing season, under abundant irrigation, micro 3D ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity. Even though the quantitative use of this technique for moisture content balance suffers from well-known inversion difficulties, even the pure imaging of the active root zone is a valuable contribution. However the integration of the measurements in a fully coupled hydrogeophysical inversion is the way forward for a better understanding of subsoil interactions between biomass, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

  19. A discrete-forcing immersed boundary method with a semi-implicit predictor for weakly-coupled fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woojin; Lee, Injae; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    We present a weak coupling approach for the fluid-structure interaction using a discrete-forcing immersed boundary method. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the motion of a solid body are based on the Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates, respectively. A semi-implicit Euler method is applied to the governing equation of a solid body for obtaining provisional position and velocity of a solid body prior to implicitly solving each governing equation. Then, both equations are implicitly solved to obtain a sufficiently large computational time step size. The present weak-coupling approach shows a second-order temporal accuracy and stable solutions for the problems with a low density ratio (fluid to solid) without requiring an iterative method. With the present method, we simulate several fluid-structure interaction problems including the flows around a freely vibrating circular cylinder, a flexible beam attached to a circular cylinder, a flapping flag, a flexible plate, and an elastic vocal fold. The results obtained agree well with those from previous studies. All the simulations are conducted at maximum CFL numbers of 1.0-1.5. Supported by NRF-2012M2A8A4055647 and NRF-2014M3C1B1033848.

  20. Reduced-order modeling of fluid-structure interaction and vortex-induced vibration systems using an extension of Jourdain's principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghi, S.; Benaroya, H.

    2016-11-01

    A first-principles variational approach is proposed for reduced-order modeling of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems, specifically vortex-induced vibration (VIV). FSI has to be taken into account in the design and analysis of many engineering applications, yet a comprehensive theoretical development where analytical equations are derived from first principles is nonexistent. An approach where Jourdain's principle is modified and extended for FSI is used to derive reduced-order models from an extended variational formulation where assumptions are explicitly stated. Two VIV models are considered: an elastically supported, inverted pendulum and a translating cylinder, both immersed in a flow and allowed to move transversely to the flow direction. Their reduced-order models are obtained in the form of (i) a single governing equation and (ii) two general coupled equations as well as the coupled lift-oscillator model. Comparisons are made with three existing models. Based on our theoretical results, and especially the reduced-order model, we conclude that the first principles development herein is a viable framework for the modeling of complex fluid-structure interaction problems such as vortex-induced oscillations.

  1. Open source 3D visualization and interaction dedicated to hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Julien; Giangola-Murzyn, Agathe; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Climate change and surface urbanization strongly modify the hydrological cycle in urban areas, increasing the consequences of extreme events such as floods or draughts. These issues lead to the development of the Multi-Hydro model at the Ecole des Ponts ParisTech (A. Giangola-Murzyn et al., 2012). This fully distributed model allows to compute the hydrological response of urban and peri-urban areas. Unfortunately such models are seldom user friendly. Indeed generating the inputs before launching a new simulation is usually a tricky tasks, and understanding and interpreting the outputs remains specialist tasks not accessible to the wider public. The MH-AssimTool was developed to overcome these issues. To enable an easier and improved understanding of the model outputs, we decided to convert the raw output data (grids file in ascii format) to a 3D display. Some commercial paying models provide a 3D visualization. Because of the cost of their licenses, this kind of tools may not be accessible to the most concerned stakeholders. So, we are developing a new tool based on C++ for the computation, Qt for the graphic user interface, QGIS for the geographical side and OpenGL for the 3D display. All these languages and libraries are open source and multi-platform. We will discuss some preprocessing issues for the data conversion from 2.5D to 3D. Indeed, the GIS data, is considered as a 2.5D (e.i. 2D polygon + one height) and the its transform to 3D display implies a lot of algorithms. For example,to visualize in 3D one building, it is needed to have for each point the coordinates and the elevation according to the topography. Furthermore one have to create new points to represent the walls. Finally the interactions between the model and stakeholders through this new interface and how this helps converting a research tool into a an efficient operational decision tool will be discussed. This ongoing research on the improvement of the visualization methods is supported by the

  2. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  3. 3D Modeling of Forbidden Line Emission in the Binary Wind Interaction Region of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, T. R.; Owocki, S.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present recent work using three-dimensional (3D) Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to model the high ([Fe III], [Ar III], [Ne III] and [S III]) and low ([Fe II], [Ni II]) ionization forbidden emission lines observed in Eta Carinae using the HST/STIS. These structures are interpreted as the time-averaged, outer extensions of the primary wind and the wind-wind interaction region directly excited by the FUV of the hot companion star of this massive binary system. We discuss how analyzing the results of the 3D SPH simulations and synthetic slit spectra and comparing them to the spectra obtained with the HST/STIS helps us determine the absolute orientation of the binary orbit and helps remove the degeneracy inherent to models based solely on the observed RXTE X-ray light curve. A key point of this work is that spatially resolved observations like those with HST/STIS and comparison to 3D models are necessary to determine the alignment or misalignment of the orbital angular momentum axis with the Homunculus, or correspondingly, the alignment of the orbital plane with the Homunculus skirt.

  4. Formalizing the potential of stereoscopic 3D user experience in interactive entertainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Masuch, Maic

    2015-03-01

    The use of stereoscopic 3D vision affects how interactive entertainment has to be developed as well as how it is experienced by the audience. The large amount of possibly impacting factors and variety as well as a certain subtlety of measured effects on user experience make it difficult to grasp the overall potential of using S3D vision. In a comprehensive approach, we (a) present a development framework which summarizes possible variables in display technology, content creation and human factors, and (b) list a scheme of S3D user experience effects concerning initial fascination, emotions, performance, and behavior as well as negative feelings of discomfort and complexity. As a major contribution we propose a qualitative formalization which derives dependencies between development factors and user effects. The argumentation is based on several previously published user studies. We further show how to apply this formula to identify possible opportunities and threats in content creation as well as how to pursue future steps for a possible quantification.

  5. 3D Plenoptic PIV Measurements of a Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Bolton, Johnathan; Arora, Nishul; Alvi, Farrukh

    2016-11-01

    Plenoptic particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a relatively new technique that uses the computational refocusing capability of a single plenoptic camera and volume illumination with a double-pulsed light source to measure the instantaneous 3D/3C velocity field of a flow field seeded with particles. In this work, plenoptic PIV is used to perform volumetric velocity field measurements of a shock-wave turbulent boundary layer interaction (SBLI). Experiments were performed in a Mach 2.0 flow with the SBLI produced by an unswept fin at 15°angle of attack. The measurement volume was 38 x 25 x 32 mm3 and illuminated with a 400 mJ/pulse Nd:YAG laser with 1.7 microsecond inter-pulse time. Conventional planar PIV measurements along two planes within the volume are used for comparison. 3D visualizations of the fin generated shock and subsequent SBLI are presented. The growth of the shock foot and separation region with increasing distance from the fin tip is observed and agrees with observations made using planar PIV. Instantaneous images depict 3D fluctuations in the position of the shock foot from one image to the next. The authors acknowledge the support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  6. RNA Bricks—a database of RNA 3D motifs and their interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Waleń, Tomasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    The RNA Bricks database (http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/rnabricks), stores information about recurrent RNA 3D motifs and their interactions, found in experimentally determined RNA structures and in RNA–protein complexes. In contrast to other similar tools (RNA 3D Motif Atlas, RNA Frabase, Rloom) RNA motifs, i.e. ‘RNA bricks’ are presented in the molecular environment, in which they were determined, including RNA, protein, metal ions, water molecules and ligands. All nucleotide residues in RNA bricks are annotated with structural quality scores that describe real-space correlation coefficients with the electron density data (if available), backbone geometry and possible steric conflicts, which can be used to identify poorly modeled residues. The database is also equipped with an algorithm for 3D motif search and comparison. The algorithm compares spatial positions of backbone atoms of the user-provided query structure and of stored RNA motifs, without relying on sequence or secondary structure information. This enables the identification of local structural similarities among evolutionarily related and unrelated RNA molecules. Besides, the search utility enables searching ‘RNA bricks’ according to sequence similarity, and makes it possible to identify motifs with modified ribonucleotide residues at specific positions. PMID:24220091

  7. FlySanDiego: a web-aware 3D interactive regional information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, David S.; Bailey, Michael J.

    2002-03-01

    Communication of regional geographic information to the population as a whole should be a municipal priority, but sadly it is not. From traffic patterns to weather information to emergency information to proposed highways, a city or county has, in electronic form, all of this useful information and more. With the ubiquity of web browsers and the arrival of online 3D graphics technologies such as VRML and Java 3D,this information could and should be made available. By using Java andJava3D, the rendering power of an OpenGL-type application can be combined with multithreading, allowing a program to invisibly access data sets from Internet sites with dedicated threads while processing user interaction with another. Any type of relevant data can be transformed into a three-dimensional interpretation and mapped over the terrain that the user is analyzing. This prototype is designed to be extremely extensible and expandable in order to accommodate future revisions and/or portability. This paper discusses the issues surrounding the creation of such a model, along with challenges, problems, and solutions.

  8. A brain-computer interface method combined with eye tracking for 3D interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui Chul; Woo, Jin Cheol; Kim, Jong Hwa; Whang, Mincheol; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2010-07-15

    With the recent increase in the number of three-dimensional (3D) applications, the need for interfaces to these applications has increased. Although the eye tracking method has been widely used as an interaction interface for hand-disabled persons, this approach cannot be used for depth directional navigation. To solve this problem, we propose a new brain computer interface (BCI) method in which the BCI and eye tracking are combined to analyze depth navigation, including selection and two-dimensional (2D) gaze direction, respectively. The proposed method is novel in the following five ways compared to previous works. First, a device to measure both the gaze direction and an electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern is proposed with the sensors needed to measure the EEG attached to a head-mounted eye tracking device. Second, the reliability of the BCI interface is verified by demonstrating that there is no difference between the real and the imaginary movements for the same work in terms of the EEG power spectrum. Third, depth control for the 3D interaction interface is implemented by an imaginary arm reaching movement. Fourth, a selection method is implemented by an imaginary hand grabbing movement. Finally, for the independent operation of gazing and the BCI, a mode selection method is proposed that measures a user's concentration by analyzing the pupil accommodation speed, which is not affected by the operation of gazing and the BCI. According to experimental results, we confirmed the feasibility of the proposed 3D interaction method using eye tracking and a BCI.

  9. Interactive Visualization of 3-D Mantle Convection Extended Through AJAX Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, J. C.; Czech, W.; Yuen, D.; Greensky, J.; Knox, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have designed a new software system for real-time interactive visualization of results taken directly from large-scale simulations of 3-D mantle convection and other large-scale simulations. This approach allows for intense visualization sessions for a couple of hours as opposed to storing massive amounts of data in a storage system. Our data sets consist of 3-D data for volume rendering with over 10 million unknowns at each timestep. Large scale visualization on a display wall holding around 13 million pixels has already been accomplished with extension to hand-held devices, such as the OQO and Nokia N800 and recently the iPHONE. We are developing web-based software in Java to extend the use of this system across long distances. The software is aimed at creating an interactive and functional application capable of running on multiple browsers by taking advantage of two AJAX-enabled web frameworks: Echo2 and Google Web Toolkit. The software runs in two modes allowing for a user to control an interactive session or observe a session controlled by another user. Modular build of the system allows for components to be swapped out for new components so that other forms of visualization could be accommodated such as Molecular Dynamics in mineral physics or 2-D data sets from lithospheric regional models.

  10. Interactive Retro-Deformation of Terrain for Reconstructing 3D Fault Displacements.

    PubMed

    Westerteiger, R; Compton, T; Bernadin, T; Cowgill, E; Gwinner, K; Hamann, B; Gerndt, A; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    Planetary topography is the result of complex interactions between geological processes, of which faulting is a prominent component. Surface-rupturing earthquakes cut and move landforms which develop across active faults, producing characteristic surface displacements across the fault. Geometric models of faults and their associated surface displacements are commonly applied to reconstruct these offsets to enable interpretation of the observed topography. However, current 2D techniques are limited in their capability to convey both the three-dimensional kinematics of faulting and the incremental sequence of events required by a given reconstruction. Here we present a real-time system for interactive retro-deformation of faulted topography to enable reconstruction of fault displacement within a high-resolution (sub 1m/pixel) 3D terrain visualization. We employ geometry shaders on the GPU to intersect the surface mesh with fault-segments interactively specified by the user and transform the resulting surface blocks in realtime according to a kinematic model of fault motion. Our method facilitates a human-in-the-loop approach to reconstruction of fault displacements by providing instant visual feedback while exploring the parameter space. Thus, scientists can evaluate the validity of traditional point-to-point reconstructions by visually examining a smooth interpolation of the displacement in 3D. We show the efficacy of our approach by using it to reconstruct segments of the San Andreas fault, California as well as a graben structure in the Noctis Labyrinthus region on Mars.

  11. Comparison of User Performance with Interactive and Static 3d Visualization - Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Interactive 3D visualizations of spatial data are currently available and popular through various applications such as Google Earth, ArcScene, etc. Several scientific studies have focused on user performance with 3D visualization, but static perspective views are used as stimuli in most of the studies. The main objective of this paper is to try to identify potential differences in user performance with static perspective views and interactive visualizations. This research is an exploratory study. An experiment was designed as a between-subject study and a customized testing tool based on open web technologies was used for the experiment. The testing set consists of an initial questionnaire, a training task and four experimental tasks. Selection of the highest point and determination of visibility from the top of a mountain were used as the experimental tasks. Speed and accuracy of each task performance of participants were recorded. The movement and actions in the virtual environment were also recorded within the interactive variant. The results show that participants deal with the tasks faster when using static visualization. The average error rate was also higher in the static variant. The findings from this pilot study will be used for further testing, especially for formulating of hypotheses and designing of subsequent experiments.

  12. Image informatics for studying signal transduction in cells interacting with 3D matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; Guo, Jin; Chen, Chengpin; Yannas, Ioannis V.; Wei, Xunbin; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Cells sense and respond to chemical stimuli on their environment via signal transduction pathways, complex networks of proteins whose interactions transmit chemical information. This work describes an implementation of image informatics, imaging-based methodologies for studying signal transduction networks. The methodology developed focuses on studying signal transduction networks in cells that interact with 3D matrices. It utilizes shRNA-based knock down of network components, 3D high-content imaging of cells inside the matrix by spectral multi-photon microscopy, and single-cell quantification using features that describe both cell morphology and cell-matrix adhesion pattern. The methodology is applied in a pilot study of TGFβ signaling via the SMAD pathway in fibroblasts cultured inside porous collagen-GAG scaffolds, biomaterials similar to the ones used clinically to induce skin regeneration. Preliminary results suggest that knocking down all rSMAD components affects fibroblast response to TGFβ1 and TGFβ3 isoforms in different ways, and suggest a potential role for SMAD1 and SMAD5 in regulating TGFβ isoform response. These preliminary results need to be verified with proteomic results that can provide solid evidence about the particular role of individual components of the SMAD pathway.

  13. Interactive Motion Planning for Steerable Needles in 3D Environments with Obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Bevel-tip steerable needles for minimally invasive medical procedures can be used to reach clinical targets that are behind sensitive or impenetrable areas and are inaccessible to straight, rigid needles. We present a fast algorithm that can compute motion plans for steerable needles to reach targets in complex, 3D environments with obstacles at interactive rates. The fast computation makes this method suitable for online control of the steerable needle based on 3D imaging feedback and allows physicians to interactively edit the planning environment in real-time by adding obstacle definitions as they are discovered or become relevant. We achieve this fast performance by using a Rapidly Exploring Random Tree (RRT) combined with a reachability-guided sampling heuristic to alleviate the sensitivity of the RRT planner to the choice of the distance metric. We also relax the constraint of constant-curvature needle trajectories by relying on duty-cycling to realize bounded-curvature needle trajectories. These characteristics enable us to achieve orders of magnitude speed-up compared to previous approaches; we compute steerable needle motion plans in under 1 second for challenging environments containing complex, polyhedral obstacles and narrow passages. PMID:22294214

  14. A virtual interface for interactions with 3D models of the human body.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, Lucio T; Pulimeno, Marco; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The developed system is the first prototype of a virtual interface designed to avoid contact with the computer so that the surgeon is able to visualize 3D models of the patient's organs more effectively during surgical procedure or to use this in the pre-operative planning. The doctor will be able to rotate, to translate and to zoom in on 3D models of the patient's organs simply by moving his finger in free space; in addition, it is possible to choose to visualize all of the organs or only some of them. All of the interactions with the models happen in real-time using the virtual interface which appears as a touch-screen suspended in free space in a position chosen by the user when the application is started up. Finger movements are detected by means of an optical tracking system and are used to simulate touch with the interface and to interact by pressing the buttons present on the virtual screen.

  15. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2008-09-07

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm{sup 3}) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  16. Interactive toothbrushing education by a smart toothbrush system via 3D visualization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong-Seop; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Whan; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2009-11-01

    The very first step for keeping good dental hygiene is to employ the correct toothbrushing style. Due to the possible occurrence of periodontal disease at an early age, it is critical to begin correct toothbrushing patterns as early as possible. With this aim, we proposed a novel toothbrush monitoring and training system to interactively educate on toothbrushing behavior in terms of the correct brushing motion and grip axis orientation. Our intelligent toothbrush monitoring system first senses a user's brushing pattern by analyzing the waveforms acquired from a built-in accelerometer and magnetic sensor. To discern the inappropriate toothbrushing style, a real-time interactive three dimensional display system, based on an OpenGL 3D surface rendering scheme, is applied to visualize a subject's brushing patterns and subsequently advise on the correct brushing method.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell interactions with 3D ECM modules fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Tran, Quyen A; Fong, Jimmy J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ogle, Brenda M; Campagnola, Paul J

    2012-09-10

    To understand complex micro/nanoscale ECM stem cell interactions, reproducible in vitro models are needed that can strictly recapitulate the relative content and spatial arrangement of native tissue. Additionally, whole ECM proteins are required to most accurately reflect native binding dynamics. To address this need, we use multiphoton excited photochemistry to create 3D whole protein constructs or "modules" to study how the ECM governs stem cell migration. The constructs were created from mixtures of BSA/laminin (LN) and BSA alone, whose comparison afforded studying how the migration dynamics are governed from the combination of morphological and ECM cues. We found that mesenchymal stem cells interacted for significantly longer durations with the BSA/LN constructs than pure BSA, pointing to the importance of binding cues of the LN. Critical to this work was the development of an automated system with feedback based on fluorescence imaging to provide quality control when synthesizing multiple identical constructs.

  18. A 3D Interactive Multi-object Segmentation Tool using Local Robust Statistics Driven Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Kikinis, Ron; Bouix, Sylvain; Shenton, Martha; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Extracting anatomical and functional significant structures renders one of the important tasks for both the theoretical study of the medical image analysis, and the clinical and practical community. In the past, much work has been dedicated only to the algorithmic development. Nevertheless, for clinical end users, a well designed algorithm with an interactive software is necessary for an algorithm to be utilized in their daily work. Furthermore, the software would better be open sourced in order to be used and validated by not only the authors but also the entire community. Therefore, the contribution of the present work is twofolds: First, we propose a new robust statistics based conformal metric and the conformal area driven multiple active contour framework, to simultaneously extract multiple targets from MR and CT medical imagery in 3D. Second, an open source graphically interactive 3D segmentation tool based on the aforementioned contour evolution is implemented and is publicly available for end users on multiple platforms. In using this software for the segmentation task, the process is initiated by the user drawn strokes (seeds) in the target region in the image. Then, the local robust statistics are used to describe the object features, and such features are learned adaptively from the seeds under a non-parametric estimation scheme. Subsequently, several active contours evolve simultaneously with their interactions being motivated by the principles of action and reaction — This not only guarantees mutual exclusiveness among the contours, but also no longer relies upon the assumption that the multiple objects fill the entire image domain, which was tacitly or explicitly assumed in many previous works. In doing so, the contours interact and converge to equilibrium at the desired positions of the desired multiple objects. Furthermore, with the aim of not only validating the algorithm and the software, but also demonstrating how the tool is to be used, we

  19. Towards a gestural 3D interaction for tangible and three-dimensional GIS visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Agadakos, Ioannis; Pattakos, Nikolas; Maragakis, Michail

    2014-05-01

    The last decade has been characterized by a significant increase of spatially dependent applications that require storage, visualization, analysis and exploration of geographic information. GIS analysis of spatiotemporal geographic data is operated by highly trained personnel under an abundance of software and tools, lacking interoperability and friendly user interaction. Towards this end, new forms of querying and interaction are emerging, including gestural interfaces. Three-dimensional GIS representations refer to either tangible surfaces or projected representations. Making a 3D tangible geographic representation touch-sensitive may be a convenient solution, but such an approach raises the cost significantly and complicates the hardware and processing required to combine touch-sensitive material (for pinpointing points) with deformable material (for displaying elevations). In this study, a novel interaction scheme upon a three dimensional visualization of GIS data is proposed. While gesture user interfaces are not yet fully acceptable due to inconsistencies and complexity, a non-tangible GIS system where 3D visualizations are projected, calls for interactions that are based on three-dimensional, non-contact and gestural procedures. Towards these objectives, we use the Microsoft Kinect II system which includes a time of flight camera, allowing for a robust and real time depth map generation, along with the capturing and translation of a variety of predefined gestures from different simultaneous users. By incorporating these features into our system architecture, we attempt to create a natural way for users to operate on GIS data. Apart from the conventional pan and zoom features, the key functions addressed for the 3-D user interface is the ability to pinpoint particular points, lines and areas of interest, such as destinations, waypoints, landmarks, closed areas, etc. The first results shown, concern a projected GIS representation where the user selects points

  20. Assessment of 3D Viewers for the Display of Interactive Documents in the Learning of Graphic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbero, Basilio Ramos; Pedrosa, Carlos Melgosa; Mate, Esteban Garcia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine which 3D viewers should be used for the display of interactive graphic engineering documents, so that the visualization and manipulation of 3D models provide useful support to students of industrial engineering (mechanical, organizational, electronic engineering, etc). The technical features of 26 3D…

  1. Linking market interaction intensity of 3D Ising type financial model with market volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wen; Ke, Jinchuan; Wang, Jun; Feng, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Microscopic interaction models in physics have been used to investigate the complex phenomena of economic systems. The simple interactions involved can lead to complex behaviors and help the understanding of mechanisms in the financial market at a systemic level. This article aims to develop a financial time series model through 3D (three-dimensional) Ising dynamic system which is widely used as an interacting spins model to explain the ferromagnetism in physics. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the financial model and numerical analysis for both the simulation return time series and historical return data of Hushen 300 (HS300) index in Chinese stock market, we show that despite its simplicity, this model displays stylized facts similar to that seen in real financial market. We demonstrate a possible underlying link between volatility fluctuations of real stock market and the change in interaction strengths of market participants in the financial model. In particular, our stochastic interaction strength in our model demonstrates that the real market may be consistently operating near the critical point of the system.

  2. Development of 3D interactive visual objects using the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Visualization Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D.; Reif, C.; Peach, C.; Keen, C. S.; Smith, B.; Mellors, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Within the last year scientists and educators at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), the Birch Aquarium at Scripps and San Diego State University have collaborated with education specialists to develop 3D interactive graphic teaching modules for use in the classroom and in teacher workshops at the SIO Visualization center (http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu). The unique aspect of the SIO Visualization center is that the center is designed around a 120 degree curved Panoram floor-to-ceiling screen (8'6" by 28'4") that immerses viewers in a virtual environment. The center is powered by an SGI 3400 Onyx computer that is more powerful, by an order of magnitude in both speed and memory, than typical base systems currently used for education and outreach presentations. This technology allows us to display multiple 3D data layers (e.g., seismicity, high resolution topography, seismic reflectivity, draped interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, etc.) simultaneously, render them in 3D stereo, and take a virtual flight through the data as dictated on the spot by the user. This system can also render snapshots, images and movies that are too big for other systems, and then export smaller size end-products to more commonly used computer systems. Since early 2002, we have explored various ways to provide informal education and outreach focusing on current research presented directly by the researchers doing the work. The Center currently provides a centerpiece for instruction on southern California seismology for K-12 students and teachers for various Scripps education endeavors. Future plans are in place to use the Visualization Center at Scripps for extended K-12 and college educational programs. In particular, we will be identifying K-12 curriculum needs, assisting with teacher education, developing assessments of our programs and products, producing web-accessible teaching modules and facilitating the development of appropriate teaching tools to be

  3. Excitation by flows in seals and clearances. Part 1: Introduction: Fluid-structure-interactions in rotordynamics. Part 2: Identification of rotordynamic coefficients of annular seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmann, R.

    The fluid-structure interactions in rotor dynamics and the identification of rotor dynamic coefficients of annular seals are studied. The different fluid forces acting in the neck ring, the interstage seals, the balance pistons, the impellers and the oil film bearings of pumps are reviewed. These forces can have a large influence on the bending vibrations of a pump rotor. Theoretical and experimental models of fluid elements and of rotordynamics are presented. Simulations of the rotordynamic behavior show that the fluid forces of most elements can be described by linear-force relations. A theoretical model and an indentification procedure are presented to determine the dynamic coefficients of seals. The identified parameters confirm the assumptions in modeling and point out that the stiffness and damping characteristics of seals are significant for the stability behavior of pumps.

  4. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaoyan Hao, Liang; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang; Li, Bin Guo, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D) has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS), stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS), non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT) is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  5. Presenting Cultural Heritage Landscapes - from GIS via 3d Models to Interactive Presentation Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prechtel, N.; Münster, S.; Kröber, C.; Schubert, C.; Schietzold, S.

    2013-07-01

    Two current projects of the authors try to approach cultural heritage landscapes from both cultural sciences and geography through a combination of customised geo-information (GIS) and visualisation/presentation technology. In excess of a mere academic use, easyto- handle virtual 3D web presentations may contribute to knowledge, esteem, commemoration and preservation. The examples relate to pre-historic Scythian burial sites in the South-Siberian Altay Mountains ("Uch Enmek") as well as to a "virtual memorial" of contemporary history ("GEPAM"), a chapter of Jewish prosecution in the "Third Reich", which historically connects the town of Dresden with the Czech Terezin (Theresienstadt). It is common knowledge that a profound understanding of (pre-)historic artefacts and places may reflect a larger environment as well as an individual geographic setting. Coming from this background, the presented projects try to find technical solutions. They start from GIS models and aim at customised interactive presentations of 3D models. In using the latter a widely-spanned public is invited to a land- or townscape of specific cultural importance. The geographic space is thought to work as a door to a repository of educational exhibits under the umbrella of a web application. Within this concept a landscape/townscape also accounts for the time dimension in different scales (time of construction/operation versus actual state, and in sense of a season and time of the day as a principal modulator of visual perception of space).

  6. Novel 3D/VR interactive environment for MD simulations, visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Doblack, Benjamin N; Allis, Tim; Dávila, Lilian P

    2014-12-18

    The increasing development of computing (hardware and software) in the last decades has impacted scientific research in many fields including materials science, biology, chemistry and physics among many others. A new computational system for the accurate and fast simulation and 3D/VR visualization of nanostructures is presented here, using the open-source molecular dynamics (MD) computer program LAMMPS. This alternative computational method uses modern graphics processors, NVIDIA CUDA technology and specialized scientific codes to overcome processing speed barriers common to traditional computing methods. In conjunction with a virtual reality system used to model materials, this enhancement allows the addition of accelerated MD simulation capability. The motivation is to provide a novel research environment which simultaneously allows visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis. The research goal is to investigate the structure and properties of inorganic nanostructures (e.g., silica glass nanosprings) under different conditions using this innovative computational system. The work presented outlines a description of the 3D/VR Visualization System and basic components, an overview of important considerations such as the physical environment, details on the setup and use of the novel system, a general procedure for the accelerated MD enhancement, technical information, and relevant remarks. The impact of this work is the creation of a unique computational system combining nanoscale materials simulation, visualization and interactivity in a virtual environment, which is both a research and teaching instrument at UC Merced.

  7. Novel 3D/VR Interactive Environment for MD Simulations, Visualization and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doblack, Benjamin N.; Allis, Tim; Dávila, Lilian P.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing development of computing (hardware and software) in the last decades has impacted scientific research in many fields including materials science, biology, chemistry and physics among many others. A new computational system for the accurate and fast simulation and 3D/VR visualization of nanostructures is presented here, using the open-source molecular dynamics (MD) computer program LAMMPS. This alternative computational method uses modern graphics processors, NVIDIA CUDA technology and specialized scientific codes to overcome processing speed barriers common to traditional computing methods. In conjunction with a virtual reality system used to model materials, this enhancement allows the addition of accelerated MD simulation capability. The motivation is to provide a novel research environment which simultaneously allows visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis. The research goal is to investigate the structure and properties of inorganic nanostructures (e.g., silica glass nanosprings) under different conditions using this innovative computational system. The work presented outlines a description of the 3D/VR Visualization System and basic components, an overview of important considerations such as the physical environment, details on the setup and use of the novel system, a general procedure for the accelerated MD enhancement, technical information, and relevant remarks. The impact of this work is the creation of a unique computational system combining nanoscale materials simulation, visualization and interactivity in a virtual environment, which is both a research and teaching instrument at UC Merced. PMID:25549300

  8. Functional classification of protein 3D structures from predicted local interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Parasuram, Ramya; Lee, Joslynn S; Yin, Pengcheng; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2010-12-01

    A new approach to the functional classification of protein 3D structures is described with application to some examples from structural genomics. This approach is based on functional site prediction with THEMATICS and POOL. THEMATICS employs calculated electrostatic potentials of the query structure. POOL is a machine learning method that utilizes THEMATICS features and has been shown to predict accurate, precise, highly localized interaction sites. Extension to the functional classification of structural genomics proteins is now described. Predicted functionally important residues are structurally aligned with those of proteins with previously characterized biochemical functions. A 3D structure match at the predicted local functional site then serves as a more reliable predictor of biochemical function than an overall structure match. Annotation is confirmed for a structural genomics protein with the ribulose phosphate binding barrel (RPBB) fold. A putative glucoamylase from Bacteroides fragilis (PDB ID 3eu8) is shown to be in fact probably not a glucoamylase. Finally a structural genomics protein from Streptomyces coelicolor annotated as an enoyl-CoA hydratase (PDB ID 3g64) is shown to be misannotated. Its predicted active site does not match the well-characterized enoyl-CoA hydratases of similar structure but rather bears closer resemblance to those of a dehalogenase with similar fold.

  9. MEVA - An Interactive Visualization Application for Validation of Multifaceted Meteorological Data with Multiple 3D Devices

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Carolin; Bilke, Lars; Bauer, Hans-Stefan; Böttinger, Michael; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Background To achieve more realistic simulations, meteorologists develop and use models with increasing spatial and temporal resolution. The analyzing, comparing, and visualizing of resulting simulations becomes more and more challenging due to the growing amounts and multifaceted character of the data. Various data sources, numerous variables and multiple simulations lead to a complex database. Although a variety of software exists suited for the visualization of meteorological data, none of them fulfills all of the typical domain-specific requirements: support for quasi-standard data formats and different grid types, standard visualization techniques for scalar and vector data, visualization of the context (e.g., topography) and other static data, support for multiple presentation devices used in modern sciences (e.g., virtual reality), a user-friendly interface, and suitability for cooperative work. Methods and Results Instead of attempting to develop yet another new visualization system to fulfill all possible needs in this application domain, our approach is to provide a flexible workflow that combines different existing state-of-the-art visualization software components in order to hide the complexity of 3D data visualization tools from the end user. To complete the workflow and to enable the domain scientists to interactively visualize their data without advanced skills in 3D visualization systems, we developed a lightweight custom visualization application (MEVA - multifaceted environmental data visualization application) that supports the most relevant visualization and interaction techniques and can be easily deployed. Specifically, our workflow combines a variety of different data abstraction methods provided by a state-of-the-art 3D visualization application with the interaction and presentation features of a computer-games engine. Our customized application includes solutions for the analysis of multirun data, specifically with respect to data

  10. The numerical study of the cavitation-structure interaction around 3D flexible hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-liang, Hu; Ying, Chen; Chuan-jing, Lu

    2015-12-01

    The closely coupled approach combined the Finite Volume Method (FVM) solver and the Finite Element Method (FEM) solver is applied to simulation the cavitation-structure interaction of a 3D cantilevered flexible hydrofoil in water tunnel. In the cavitating flow, the elastic hydrofoil would deform or vibrate in bending and twisting mode. And the motion of the foil would affect the characteristics of the cavity and the hydrodynamic load on the foil in turn. With smaller cavitation numbers (σv=2.15), the frequency spectrum of the lift on the foil would contain two frequencies which are associated to the cavity shedding and the first bend frequency of the hydrofoil. With larger cavitation number (σv=2.55), the frequency of the lift is completely dominated by the natural frequency of the foil.

  11. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment.

  12. Web-based interactive 2D/3D medical image processing and visualization software.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Seyyed Ehsan; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Rahmani, Roohollah; Faghih-Roohi, Shahrooz; Taimouri, Vahid; Sabouri, Ahmad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2010-05-01

    There are many medical image processing software tools available for research and diagnosis purposes. However, most of these tools are available only as local applications. This limits the accessibility of the software to a specific machine, and thus the data and processing power of that application are not available to other workstations. Further, there are operating system and processing power limitations which prevent such applications from running on every type of workstation. By developing web-based tools, it is possible for users to access the medical image processing functionalities wherever the internet is available. In this paper, we introduce a pure web-based, interactive, extendable, 2D and 3D medical image processing and visualization application that requires no client installation. Our software uses a four-layered design consisting of an algorithm layer, web-user-interface layer, server communication layer, and wrapper layer. To compete with extendibility of the current local medical image processing software, each layer is highly independent of other layers. A wide range of medical image preprocessing, registration, and segmentation methods are implemented using open source libraries. Desktop-like user interaction is provided by using AJAX technology in the web-user-interface. For the visualization functionality of the software, the VRML standard is used to provide 3D features over the web. Integration of these technologies has allowed implementation of our purely web-based software with high functionality without requiring powerful computational resources in the client side. The user-interface is designed such that the users can select appropriate parameters for practical research and clinical studies.

  13. CAST: Effective and Efficient User Interaction for Context-Aware Selection in 3D Particle Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyun; Efstathiou, Konstantinos; Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We present a family of three interactive Context-Aware Selection Techniques (CAST) for the analysis of large 3D particle datasets. For these datasets, spatial selection is an essential prerequisite to many other analysis tasks. Traditionally, such interactive target selection has been particularly challenging when the data subsets of interest were implicitly defined in the form of complicated structures of thousands of particles. Our new techniques SpaceCast, TraceCast, and PointCast improve usability and speed of spatial selection in point clouds through novel context-aware algorithms. They are able to infer a user's subtle selection intention from gestural input, can deal with complex situations such as partially occluded point clusters or multiple cluster layers, and can all be fine-tuned after the selection interaction has been completed. Together, they provide an effective and efficient tool set for the fast exploratory analysis of large datasets. In addition to presenting Cast, we report on a formal user study that compares our new techniques not only to each other but also to existing state-of-the-art selection methods. Our results show that Cast family members are virtually always faster than existing methods without tradeoffs in accuracy. In addition, qualitative feedback shows that PointCast and TraceCast were strongly favored by our participants for intuitiveness and efficiency.

  14. A 3D character animation engine for multimodal interaction on mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandali, Enrico; Lavagetto, Fabio; Pisano, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Talking virtual characters are graphical simulations of real or imaginary persons that enable natural and pleasant multimodal interaction with the user, by means of voice, eye gaze, facial expression and gestures. This paper presents an implementation of a 3D virtual character animation and rendering engine, compliant with the MPEG-4 standard, running on Symbian-based SmartPhones. Real-time animation of virtual characters on mobile devices represents a challenging task, since many limitations must be taken into account with respect to processing power, graphics capabilities, disk space and execution memory size. The proposed optimization techniques allow to overcome these issues, guaranteeing a smooth and synchronous animation of facial expressions and lip movements on mobile phones such as Sony-Ericsson's P800 and Nokia's 6600. The animation engine is specifically targeted to the development of new "Over The Air" services, based on embodied conversational agents, with applications in entertainment (interactive story tellers), navigation aid (virtual guides to web sites and mobile services), news casting (virtual newscasters) and education (interactive virtual teachers).

  15. Potentiometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of 3d transition metal ions with inositol hexakisphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, Nicolás; Macho, Israel; Gómez, Kerman; González, Gabriel; Kremer, Carlos; Torres, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Among myo-inositol phosphates, the most abundant in nature is the myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP6. Although it is known to be vital to cell functioning, the biochemical research into its metabolism needs chemical and structural analysis of all the protonation, complexation and precipitation processes that it undergoes in the biological media. In view of its high negative charge at physiological level, our group has been leading a thorough research into the InsP6 chemical and structural behavior in the presence of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions essential for life. The aim of this article is to extend these studies, dealing with the chemical and structural features of the InsP6 interaction with biologically relevant 3d transition metal ions (Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), in a non-interacting medium and under simulated physiological conditions. The metal-complex stability constants were determined by potentiometry, showing under ligand-excess conditions the formation of mononuclear species in different protonation states. Under metal ion excess, polymetallic species were detected for Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II). Additionally, the 31P NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic studies provided interesting structural aspects of the strong metal ion-InsP6 interaction.

  16. A 3D, fully Eulerian, VOF-based solver to study the interaction between two fluids and moving rigid bodies using the fictitious domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) and fully Eulerian approach to capturing the interaction between two fluids and moving rigid structures by using the fictitious domain and volume-of-fluid (VOF) methods. The solid bodies can have arbitrarily complex geometry and can pierce the fluid-fluid interface, forming contact lines. The three-phase interfaces are resolved and reconstructed by using a VOF-based methodology. Then, a consistent scheme is employed for transporting mass and momentum, allowing for simulations of three-phase flows of large density ratios. The Eulerian approach significantly simplifies numerical resolution of the kinematics of rigid bodies of complex geometry and with six degrees of freedom. The fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is computed using the fictitious domain method. The methodology was developed in a message passing interface (MPI) parallel framework accelerated with graphics processing units (GPUs). The computationally intensive solution of the pressure Poisson equation is ported to GPUs, while the remaining calculations are performed on CPUs. The performance and accuracy of the methodology are assessed using an array of test cases, focusing individually on the flow solver and the FSI in surface-piercing configurations. Finally, an application of the proposed methodology in simulations of the ocean wave energy converters is presented.

  17. Multiscale Interactions in a 3D Model of the Contracting Ventricle.

    PubMed

    Amar, Ani; Zlochiver, Sharon; Barnea, Ofer

    2015-12-01

    A biophysical detailed multiscale model of the myocardium is presented. The model was used to study the contribution of interrelated cellular mechanisms to global myocardial function. The multiscale model integrates cellular electrophysiology, excitation propagation dynamics and force development models into a geometrical fiber based model of the ventricle. The description of the cellular electrophysiology in this study was based on the Ten Tusscher-Noble-Noble-Panfilov heterogeneous model for human ventricular myocytes. A four-state model of the sarcomeric control of contraction developed by Negroni and Lascano was employed to model the intracellular mechanism of force generation. The propagation of electrical excitation was described by a reaction-diffusion equation. The 3D geometrical model of the ventricle, based on single fiber contraction was used as a platform for the evaluation of proposed models. The model represents the myocardium as an anatomically oriented array of contracting fibers with individual fiber parameters such as size, spatial location, orientation and mechanical properties. Moreover, the contracting ventricle model interacts with intraventricular blood elements linking the contractile elements to the heart's preload and afterload, thereby producing the corresponding pressure-volume loop. The results show that the multiscale ventricle model is capable of simulating mechanical contraction, pressure generation and load interactions as well as demonstrating the individual contribution of each ion current.

  18. Competitive interaction of monovalent cations with DNA from 3D-RISM

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Gebala, Magdalena K.; Panteva, Maria T.; Luchko, Tyler; Case, David A.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the ion atmosphere surrounding nucleic acids affects their folding, condensation and binding to other molecules. It is thus of fundamental importance to gain predictive insight into the formation of the ion atmosphere and thermodynamic consequences when varying ionic conditions. An early step toward this goal is to benchmark computational models against quantitative experimental measurements. Herein, we test the ability of the three dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) to reproduce preferential interaction parameters determined from ion counting (IC) experiments for mixed alkali chlorides and dsDNA. Calculations agree well with experiment with slight deviations for salt concentrations >200 mM and capture the observed trend where the extent of cation accumulation around the DNA varies inversely with its ionic size. Ion distributions indicate that the smaller, more competitive cations accumulate to a greater extent near the phosphoryl groups, penetrating deeper into the grooves. In accord with experiment, calculated IC profiles do not vary with sequence, although the predicted ion distributions in the grooves are sequence and ion size dependent. Calculations on other nucleic acid conformations predict that the variation in linear charge density has a minor effect on the extent of cation competition. PMID:26304542

  19. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions. PMID:27399692

  20. 3D magnetospheric parallel hybrid multi-grid method applied to planet–plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leclercq, L.; Mancini, M.

    2016-03-15

    We present a new method to exploit multiple refinement levels within a 3D parallel hybrid model, developed to study planet–plasma interactions. This model is based on the hybrid formalism: ions are kinetically treated whereas electrons are considered as a inertia-less fluid. Generally, ions are represented by numerical particles whose size equals the volume of the cells. Particles that leave a coarse grid subsequently entering a refined region are split into particles whose volume corresponds to the volume of the refined cells. The number of refined particles created from a coarse particle depends on the grid refinement rate. In order to conserve velocity distribution functions and to avoid calculations of average velocities, particles are not coalesced. Moreover, to ensure the constancy of particles' shape function sizes, the hybrid method is adapted to allow refined particles to move within a coarse region. Another innovation of this approach is the method developed to compute grid moments at interfaces between two refinement levels. Indeed, the hybrid method is adapted to accurately account for the special grid structure at the interfaces, avoiding any overlapping grid considerations. Some fundamental test runs were performed to validate our approach (e.g. quiet plasma flow, Alfven wave propagation). Lastly, we also show a planetary application of the model, simulating the interaction between Jupiter's moon Ganymede and the Jovian plasma.

  1. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores' 3D-Interactions.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-07-08

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners' (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions.

  2. Development of a unique 3D interaction model of endogenous and synthetic peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinone, Nunzia; Höltje, Hans-Dieter; Carotti, Angelo

    2000-11-01

    Different classes of Peripheral-type Benzodiazepine Receptor (PBR) ligands were examined and common structural elements were detected and used to develop a rational binding model based on energetically allowed ligand conformations. Two lipophilic regions and one electrostatic interaction site are essential features for high affinity ligand binding, while a further lipophilic region plays an important modulator role. A comparative molecular field analysis, performed over 130 PBR ligands by means of the GRID/GOLPE methodology, led to a PLS model with both high fitting and predictive values (r2 = 0.898, Q2 = 0.761). The outcome from the 3D QSAR model and the GRID interaction fields computed on the putative endogenous PBR ligands DBI (Diazepam Binding Inhibitor) and TTN (Tetracontatetraneuropeptide) was used to identify the amino acids most probably involved in PBR binding. Three amino acids, bearing lipophilic side chains, were detected in DBI (Phe49, Leu47 and Met46) and in TTN (Phe33, Leu31 and Met30) as likely residues underlying receptor binding. Moreover, a qualitative comparison of the molecular electrostatic potentials of DBI, TTN and selected synthetic ligands indicated also similar electronic properties. Convergent results from the modeling studies of synthetic and endogenous ligands suggest a common binding mode to PBRs. This may help the rational design of new high affinity PBR ligands.

  3. Earthscape, a Multi-Purpose Interactive 3d Globe Viewer for Hybrid Data Visualization and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarthou, A.; Mas, S.; Jacquin, M.; Moreno, N.; Salamon, A.

    2015-08-01

    The hybrid visualization and interaction tool EarthScape is presented here. The software is able to display simultaneously LiDAR point clouds, draped videos with moving footprint, volume scientific data (using volume rendering, isosurface and slice plane), raster data such as still satellite images, vector data and 3D models such as buildings or vehicles. The application runs on touch screen devices such as tablets. The software is based on open source libraries, such as OpenSceneGraph, osgEarth and OpenCV, and shader programming is used to implement volume rendering of scientific data. The next goal of EarthScape is to perform data analysis using ENVI Services Engine, a cloud data analysis solution. EarthScape is also designed to be a client of Jagwire which provides multisource geo-referenced video fluxes. When all these components will be included, EarthScape will be a multi-purpose platform that will provide at the same time data analysis, hybrid visualization and complex interactions. The software is available on demand for free at france@exelisvis.com.

  4. The plasma interaction of Enceladus: 3D hybrid simulations and comparison with Cassini MAG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegel, H.; Simon, S.; Müller, J.; Motschmann, U.; Saur, J.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    We study the interaction of Saturn's small, icy moon Enceladus and its plume with the corotating magnetospheric plasma by means of a 3D hybrid simulation model, which treats the ions as individual particles and the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid. We analyze systematically how Enceladus' internal conductivity and plasma absorption at the surface as well as charge exchange and pick-up in the plume contribute to the overall structure of the interaction region. Furthermore, we provide a comparison of our simulation results to data obtained by the Cassini magnetometer instrument. The major findings of this study are: (1) the magnetic field diffuses through the solid body of Enceladus almost unaffected, whereas plasma absorption gives rise to a symmetric depletion wake downstream of the moon; (2) due to the small gyroradii of the newly generated plume ions, the pick-up tail possesses a 2D structure; (3) the magnetic field lines drape around the plume, which triggers an Alfvén wing system that dominates the structure of Enceladus' plasma environment. Inside the plume itself, a magnetic cavity is formed; (4) besides the reproduction of the key features of the observed magnetic field signatures, evidence for variability in the locations of the active jets and in the total gas content of the plume are shown.

  5. HANFORD DST THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ANSYS BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS. The overall model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but the capabilities and limitations of ANSYS to perform fluid-structure interaction are less well understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the ANSYS solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions of similar problems and to the results from Dytran simulations. The capabilities and limitations of the finite element code Dytran for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation (Abatt 2006). In conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS analysis

  6. A potential-flow, deformable-body model for fluid structure interactions with compact vorticity: application to animal swimming measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O.

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents an approach to quantify the unsteady fluid forces, moments and mass transport generated by swimming animals, based on measurements of the surrounding flow field. These goals are accomplished within a framework that is independent of the vorticity field, making it unnecessary to directly resolve boundary layers on the animal, body vortex interactions, or interactions among vortex lines in the wake. Instead, the method identifies Lagrangian coherent structures in the flow, whose dynamics in flows with compact vorticity are shown to be well approximated by potential flow concepts, especially the Kirchhoff and deformation potentials from deformable body theory. Examples of the application of these methods are given for pectoral fin locomotion of the bluegill sunfish and undulatory swimming of jellyfish, and the methods are validated by analysis of a canonical starting vortex ring flow. The transition to a Lagrangian approach toward animal swimming measurements suggests the possibility of implementing recently developed particle tracking (vis-à-vis DPIV) techniques for fully three-dimensional measurements of animal swimming.

  7. User's guide for ENSAERO: A multidisciplinary program for fluid/structural/control interaction studies of aircraft (release 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1994-01-01

    Strong interactions can occur between the flow about an aerospace vehicle and its structural components resulting in several important aeroelastic phenomena. These aeroelastic phenomena can significantly influence the performance of the vehicle. At present, closed-form solutions are available for aeroelastic computations when flows are in either the linear subsonic or supersonic range. However, for aeroelasticity involving complex nonlinear flows with shock waves, vortices, flow separations, and aerodynamic heating, computational methods are still under development. These complex aeroelastic interactions can be dangerous and limit the performance of aircraft. Examples of these detrimental effects are aircraft with highly swept wings experiencing vortex-induced aeroelastic oscillations, transonic regime at which the flutter speed is low, aerothermoelastic loads that play a critical role in the design of high-speed vehicles, and flow separations that often lead to buffeting with undesirable structural oscillations. The simulation of these complex aeroelastic phenomena requires an integrated analysis of fluids and structures. This report presents a summary of the development, applications, and procedures to use the multidisciplinary computer code ENSAERO. This code is based on the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations and modal/finite-element structural equations.

  8. Saturn's magnetosphere interaction with Titan for T5 encounter: 3D hybrid modeling. First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a very important role in the plasma dynamics near Titan: mass loading, excitation of low-frequency waves and formation of the particle velocity distribution function (e.g. ring/shell-like distributions, etc.) The kinetic approach is important for estimating collision processes; e.g., charge exchange. In this report we discuss results of 3D hybrid modeling of the interaction between Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's atmosphere/ionosphere. The modeling is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the Cassini Ion, and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements during the T5 flyby through Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere [1,2]. Magnetic field data was used from the MAG instrument [3]. In our model the background ions (O+, H+), all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization (in the dayside ionosphere), electron-impact ionization, and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperature of the background electrons and pickup electrons was also incorporated into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account collisions between ions and neutrals. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention will be paid to comparing the modeling results with a single-fluid multi-species 3D MHD model [4], which included complex chemistry but does not produce finite gyroradius and kinetic effects. References [1] Sittler, E.C., et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton, J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds., Springer, (Dordrecht, Heidelberg, London, New York), pp. 393-455. [2] Agren, K., et al., On magnetosphere electron impact ionization and dynamics in Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere -- a Cassini case study, Ann

  9. Tctex-1, a Novel Interaction Partner of Rab3D, Is Required for Osteoclastic Bone Resorption ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pavlos, Nathan J.; Cheng, Tak Sum; Qin, An; Ng, Pei Ying; Feng, Hao-Tian; Ang, Estabelle S. M.; Carrello, Amerigo; Sung, Ching-Hwa; Jahn, Reinhard; Zheng, Ming-Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular transport along microtubules must be strictly regulated to sustain the unique structural and functional polarization of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the molecular mechanisms bridging these vesicle-microtubule interactions remain largely obscure. Rab3D, a member of the Rab3 subfamily (Rab3A/B/C/D) of small exocytotic GTPases, represents a core component of the osteoclastic vesicle transport machinery. Here, we identify a new Rab3D-interacting partner, Tctex-1, a light chain of the cytoplasmic dynein microtubule motor complex, by a yeast two-hybrid screen. We demonstrate that Tctex-1 binds specifically to Rab3D in a GTP-dependent manner and co-occupies Rab3D-bearing vesicles in bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Tctex-1 and Rab3D intimately associate with the dynein motor complex and microtubules in osteoclasts. Finally, targeted disruption of Tctex-1 by RNA interference significantly impairs bone resorption capacity and mislocalizes Rab3D vesicles in osteoclasts, attesting to the notion that components of the Rab3D-trafficking pathway contribute to the maintenance of osteoclastic resorptive function. PMID:21262767

  10. Unsteady aerodynamics of flapping flight - A fluid-structure interaction study of fore-hind wing phase difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasani, M. R.; Shamsudeen, A.; Sulaiman, M. N.

    2016-11-01

    Flights of dragonflies, various insects and birds have been a subject of active research that may offer insight towards enhanced aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers. To that end, we mimick the flapping biomechanics of a dragonfly by two thin flat airfoils plunging in tandem with each other. In the present study, we aim to investigate the effect of difference in flapping phase between fore and hind wings towards their aerodynamic performances. We computationally simulate incompressible, viscous, laminar flow around two thin flat airfoils that are purely plunging, at a Strouhal number of 0.25 and Reynolds number of 6500, using a flow solver in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework. Kinematics of both fore and hind wing flapping followed a similar sinusoidal function but with relative phase angle difference to each other, that were varied between -50° to +50° including two cases were phase difference is 0° (i.e. in-phase fore-hind wing flapping) and +90° (i.e. fore wing lags hind wing by 90°). Numerical results indicate that maximum lift and drag forces for each fore and hind wings occur at phase angle of -40° and that power efficiency of tandem wings are better at phase angles when hind wing leads the fore wing, with maximum power efficiency occurring at a fore-hind wing phase difference of +30°. The complex fore-hind wing vortex interaction indicate likely benefit on the hind wing as it interacts with the fore wing at different phase angles.

  11. Interviews3D: a platform for interactive handling of massive data sets.

    PubMed

    Brüderlin, Beat; Heyer, Mathias; Pfützner, Sebastian

    2007-01-01

    Interviews3D confronts the CAD data explosion problem with new approaches that let users process fully detailed 3D models in real time, even on standard PCs or 32-bit laptops. It has demonstrated efficiency in real-time rendering and clash detection for automotive, aerospace, and construction models too large for previous systems.

  12. Molecular interaction study of flavonoid derivative 3d with human serum albumin using multispectroscopic and molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juntong; Jin, Feng; Wu, Qin; Jiang, Yuyang; Gao, Dan; Liu, Hongxia

    2014-08-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) has been developed as a model protein to study drug-protein interaction. In the present work, the interaction between our synthesized flavonoid derivative 3d (possessing potent antitumor activity against HepG2 cells) and HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and molecular modeling approach. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the fluorescence of HSA can be quenched remarkably by 3d under physiological condition with a slight shift of maximum fluorescence emission bands from 360nm to 363nm. Calculated results from Stern-Volmer equation and modified Stern-Volmer equation indicated that the fluorescence was quenched by static quenching processing with association constant 5.26±0.04×10(4)L mol(-1) at 298K. After comprehensive consideration of the free energy change ΔG, enthalpy change ΔH and entropy change ΔS, electrostatic interactions were confirmed as the main factor that participate in stabilizing the 3d-HSA complex. Both dichroism spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy indicated conformational change of HSA after binding to 3d. Moreover, the structure of HSA was loosened and the percentage of α-helix decreased with increasing concentration of 3d. Molecular modeling results demonstrated that 3d could bind to HSA well into subdomain IIA, which is related to its capability of deposition and delivery. Three cation-π interactions and three hydrogen bonds occurred between 3d and amino acid residuals ARG218, ARG222 and LYS199. In conclusion, flavonoid derivative 3d can bind to HSA with noncovalent bond in a relatively stable way, so it can be delivered by HSA in a circulatory system.

  13. Coupling the Actuator Line and Finite Element Methods to Model Fluid Structure Interaction of a Commercial Wind Turbine in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Javier; Jha, Pankaj; Campbell, Robert; Schmitz, Sven; Brasseur, James

    2013-11-01

    Wind turbine blades deform in response to unsteady loadings from atmospheric turbulence, causing changes in local angle-of-attack and blade loadings. This interaction is modeled by a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver that combines a finite element (FE) solver with an actuator line method (ALM) model for aerodynamic blade loads and vorticity shedding developed by Jha et al. (2013). The FSI solver is embedded within an OpenFOAM large-eddy simulation (LES) solver for daytime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The flow and structure solvers are tightly coupled to ensure convergence of blade deformation and its impact on the flow field. The structural deformations are computed using a modal summation approach, where the required modal matrix and resonant frequencies are extracted using Abaqus. The ALM and FE algorithms are being optimized to provide a reasonable balance between accuracy of prediction and computation time, particularly due to the sub-iterations required for blade deformation convergence. We also aim to present an analysis of the coupling between blade loading and deformation on the NREL 5MW turbine operating in the ABL. Supported by the DOE. Graduate Research Assistant, Mechanical Engineering.

  14. Verification and Validation of Numerical Models for Air/Water Flow on Coastal and Navigation Fluid-Structure Interaction Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M.; Dimakopoulos, A.; DeLataillade, T.

    2015-12-01

    Performance analysis and optimization of coastal and navigation structures is becoming feasible due to recent improvements in numerical methods for multiphase flows and the steady increase in capacity and availability of high performance computing resources. Now that the concept of fully three-dimensional air/water flow modelling for real world engineering analysis is achieving acceptance by the wider engineering community, it is critical to expand careful comparative studies on verification,validation, benchmarking, and uncertainty quantification for the variety of competing numerical methods that are continuing to evolve. Furthermore, uncertainty still remains about the relevance of secondary processes such as surface tension, air compressibility, air entrainment, and solid phase (structure) modelling so that questions about continuum mechanical theory and mathematical analysis of multiphase flow are still required. Two of the most popular and practical numerical approaches for large-scale engineering analysis are the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) and Level Set (LS) approaches. In this work we will present a publically available verification and validation test set for air-water-structure interaction problems as well as computational and physical model results including a hybrid VOF-LS method, traditional VOF methods, and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) results. The test set repository and test problem formats will also be presented in order to facilitate future comparative studies and reproduction of scientific results.

  15. Turbulent fluid-structure interaction of water-entry/exit of a rotating circular cylinder using SPH method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Saghatchi, Roozbeh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the two-dimensional (2D) water-entry and exit of a rotating circular cylinder using the Sub-Particle Scale (SPS) turbulence model of a Lagrangian particle-based Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations along with the continuity have been solved as the governing equations of the problem. The accuracy of the numerical code is verified using the case of water-entry and exit of a nonrotating circular cylinder. The numerical simulations of water-entry and exit of the rotating circular cylinder are performed at Froude numbers of 2, 5, 8, and specific gravities of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.75, rotating at the dimensionless rates of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75. The effect of governing parameters and vortex shedding behind the cylinder on the trajectory curves, velocity components in the flow field, and the deformation of free surface for both cases have been investigated in detail. It is seen that the rotation has a great effect on the curvature of the trajectory path and velocity components in water-entry and exit cases due to the interaction of imposed lift and drag forces with the inertia force.

  16. 3D Numeric modeling of slab-plume interaction in Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Portnyagin, Maxim; Manea, Marina

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic rocks located in the central segment of the Eastern Volcanic Belt of Kamchatka show a high variability, both in age as well as in the geochemical composition. Three principal groups have been identified, an older group (7-12 my) represented by rich alkaline and transitional basalts, a 7-8 my group exemplified by alkaline basalts of extreme plume type, and a younger group (3-8 my) characterized by calc-alkaline andesites and dacites rocks. Moreover, the younger group shows an adakitic signature. The magmas are assumed to originate from two principle sources: from a subduction modified Pacific MORB-type and from plume-type mantle. In this paper we study the interaction of a cold subducting slab and a hot plume by means of 3D numeric modeling integrated 30 my back in time. Our preliminary modeling results show a short episode of plume material inflowing into the mantle wedge at ~10 my consistent with the second rocks group (plume like). Also our models predict slab edge melting consistent with the youngest group.

  17. Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking system applied to aquatic predator-prey interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2013-02-01

    Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking are combined to measure evolving volumetric velocity fields and organism trajectories during aquatic predator-prey interactions. The technique was used to study zebrafish foraging on both non-evasive and evasive prey species. Measurement volumes of 22.5 mm × 10.5 mm × 12 mm were reconstructed from images captured on a set of four high-speed cameras. To obtain accurate fluid velocity vectors within each volume, fish were first masked out using an automated visual hull method. Fish and prey locations were identified independently from the same image sets and tracked separately within the measurement volume. Experiments demonstrated that fish were not influenced by the infrared laser illumination or the tracer particles. Results showed that the zebrafish used different strategies, suction and ram feeding, for successful capture of non-evasive and evasive prey, respectively. The two strategies yielded different variations in fluid velocity between the fish mouth and the prey. In general, the results suggest that the local flow field, the direction of prey locomotion with respect to the predator and the relative accelerations and speeds of the predator and prey may all be significant in determining predation success.

  18. 3D localized photoactivation of pa-GFP in living cells using two-photon interactions.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Testa, Ilaria; Faretta, Mario; Magrassi, Raffaella; Barozzi, Sara; Parazzoli, Dario; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    We report about two-photon activation of a photoactivatable derivative of the Aequorea Victoria green fluorescent protein (paGFP). This special form of the molecule increases its fluorescence intensity when excited by 488 nm after irradiation with high intensity light at 413 nm. The aim in this work was to evaluate the use of two-photon interactions for confining the molecular switching of pa-GFP in the bright state. Therefore experiments were performed using fixed and living cells which were expressing the paGFP fluorophore and microspheres whose surface was modified by specific adsorption of the chromophores. The molecular switches were activated in a range of wavelength from 720 nm to 840 nm. The optimal wavelength for activation was then chosen for cell imaging. A comparison between the conventional activation and two-photon mode demonstrates clearly the better three- dimensional (3D) confinement and the possibility of selection of cell volumes of interest. This enables molecular trafficking studies at high signal to noise ratio.

  19. Key parameters in blood-surface interactions of 3D bioinspired ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, P; González, P; Serra, J; Landin, M

    2014-08-01

    Direct contact of materials with blood components may trigger numerous processes which ultimately lead to hemolysis, clot formation and recruitment of inflammatory cells. In this study, the blood-surface interactions for two inert bioinspired ceramic scaffolds obtained from natural resources; biomorphic carbon and silicon carbides (bioSiC) from different origins have been studied. The response of the blood in contact with carbon is well known, however little has been identified on the influence of their 3D porous structure. Moreover, to our knowledge, there is no reference in the literature about the hemocompatibility of biomorphic silicon carbide as a porous scaffold. The experimental results showed the surface energy to be crucial to evaluate the hemocompatibility of a material however the surface topography and material porosity are also parameters to be considered. Surface roughness modifies clot formation whereas for protein adsorption total sample porosity seems to be the key parameter to be considered for hydrophilic materials (biomorphic silicon carbides), while the size of the pores determines the hemolytic response.

  20. Fluid/Structure Interaction Computational Investigation of Blast-Wave Mitigation Efficacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Pandurangan, B.; Glomski, P. S.

    2011-08-01

    To combat the problem of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a signature injury of the current military conflicts, there is an urgent need to design head protection systems with superior blast/ballistic impact mitigation capabilities. Toward that end, the blast impact mitigation performance of an advanced combat helmet (ACH) head protection system equipped with polyurea suspension pads and subjected to two different blast peak pressure loadings has been investigated computationally. A fairly detailed (Lagrangian) finite-element model of a helmet/skull/brain assembly is first constructed and placed into an Eulerian air domain through which a single planar blast wave propagates. A combined Eulerian/Lagrangian transient nonlinear dynamics computational fluid/solid interaction analysis is next conducted in order to assess the extent of reduction in intra-cranial shock-wave ingress (responsible for TBI). This was done by comparing temporal evolutions of intra-cranial normal and shear stresses for the cases of an unprotected head and the helmet-protected head and by correlating these quantities with the three most common types of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), i.e., axonal damage, contusion, and subdural hemorrhage. The results obtained show that the ACH provides some level of protection against all investigated types of mTBI and that the level of protection increases somewhat with an increase in blast peak pressure. In order to rationalize the aforementioned findings, a shockwave propagation/reflection analysis is carried out for the unprotected head and helmet-protected head cases. The analysis qualitatively corroborated the results pertaining to the blast-mitigation efficacy of an ACH, but also suggested that there are additional shockwave energy dissipation phenomena which play an important role in the mechanical response of the unprotected/protected head to blast impact.

  1. Particle-image velocimetry investigation of the fluid-structure interaction mechanisms of a natural owl wing.

    PubMed

    Winzen, A; Roidl, B; Schröder, W

    2015-09-15

    The increasing interest in the development of small flying air vehicles has given rise to a strong need to thoroughly understand low-speed aerodynamics. The barn owl is a well-known example of a biological system that possesses a high level of adaptation to its habitat and as such can inspire future small-scale air vehicle design. The combination of the owl-specific wing geometry and plumage adaptations with the flexibility of the wing structure yields a highly complex flow field, still enabling the owl to perform stable and at the same time silent low-speed gliding flight. To investigate the effects leading to such a characteristic flight, time-resolved stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry (TR-SPIV) measurements are performed on a prepared natural owl wing in a range of angles of attack 0° ≤ α ≤ 6° and Reynolds numbers 40,000 ≤ Re(c) ≤ 120,000 based on the chord length at a position located at 30% of the halfspan from the owl's body. The flow field does not show any flow separation on the suction side, whereas flow separation is found on the pressure side for all investigated cases. The flow field on the pressure side is characterized by large-scale vortices which interact with the flexible wing structure. The good agreement of the shedding frequency of the pressure side vortices with the frequency of the trailing-edge deflection indicates that the structural deformation is induced by the flow field on the pressure side. Additionally, the reduction of the time-averaged mean wing curvature at high Reynolds numbers indicates a passive lift-control mechanism that provides constant lift in the entire flight envelope of the owl.

  2. A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet–Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid–fluid interfaces where the structural nodal positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.

  3. Calibration Method for ML Estimation of 3D Interaction Position in a Thick Gamma-Ray Detector

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, William C. J.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2010-01-01

    High-energy (> 100 keV) photon detectors are often made thick relative to their lateral resolution in order to improve their photon-detection efficiency. To avoid issues of parallax and increased signal variance that result from random interaction depth, we must determine the 3D interaction position in the imaging detector. With this goal in mind, we examine a method of calibrating response statistics of a thick-detector gamma camera to produce a maximum-likelihood estimate of 3D interaction position. We parameterize the mean detector response as a function of 3D position, and we estimate these parameters by maximizing their likelihood given prior knowledge of the pathlength distribution and a complete list of camera signals for an ensemble of gamma-ray interactions. Furthermore, we describe an iterative method for removing multiple-interaction events from our calibration data and for refining our calibration of the mean detector response to single interactions. We demonstrate this calibration method with simulated gamma-camera data. We then show that the resulting calibration is accurate and can be used to produce unbiased estimates of 3D interaction position. PMID:20191099

  4. The effects of 3D interactive animated graphics on student learning and attitudes in computer-based instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hye Sun

    Visuals are most extensively used as instructional tools in education to present spatially-based information. Recent computer technology allows the generation of 3D animated visuals to extend the presentation in computer-based instruction. Animated visuals in 3D representation not only possess motivational value that promotes positive attitudes toward instruction but also facilitate learning when the subject matter requires dynamic motion and 3D visual cue. In this study, three questions are explored: (1) how 3D graphics affects student learning and attitude, in comparison with 2D graphics; (2) how animated graphics affects student learning and attitude, in comparison with static graphics; and (3) whether the use of 3D graphics, when they are supported by interactive animation, is the most effective visual cues to improve learning and to develop positive attitudes. A total of 145 eighth-grade students participated in a 2 x 2 factorial design study. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of four computer-based instructions: 2D static; 2D animated; 3D static; and 3D animated. The results indicated that: (1) Students in the 3D graphic condition exhibited more positive attitudes toward instruction than those in the 2D graphic condition. No group differences were found between the posttest score of 3D graphic condition and that of 2D graphic condition. However, students in the 3D graphic condition took less time for information retrieval on posttest than those in the 2D graphic condition. (2) Students in the animated graphic condition exhibited slightly more positive attitudes toward instruction than those in the static graphic condition. No group differences were found between the posttest score of animated graphic condition and that of static graphic condition. However, students in the animated graphic condition took less time for information retrieval on posttest than those in the static graphic condition. (3) Students in the 3D animated graphic condition

  5. Graphics to H.264 video encoding for 3D scene representation and interaction on mobile devices using region of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Minh Tuan; Nguyen, Congdu; Yoon, Dae-Il; Jung, Eun Ku; Jia, Jie; Kim, Hae-Kwang

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a method of 3D graphics to video encoding and streaming that are embedded into a remote interactive 3D visualization system for rapidly representing a 3D scene on mobile devices without having to download it from the server. In particular, a 3D graphics to video framework is presented that increases the visual quality of regions of interest (ROI) of the video by performing more bit allocation to ROI during H.264 video encoding. The ROI are identified by projection 3D objects to a 2D plane during rasterization. The system offers users to navigate the 3D scene and interact with objects of interests for querying their descriptions. We developed an adaptive media streaming server that can provide an adaptive video stream in term of object-based quality to the client according to the user's preferences and the variation of network bandwidth. Results show that by doing ROI mode selection, PSNR of test sample slightly change while visual quality of objects increases evidently.

  6. Fluid-Structure Interaction Model of a Percutaneous Aortic Valve: Comparison with an In Vitro Test and Feasibility Study in a Patient-Specific Case.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Pott, Desiree; Mazza, Beniamino; Sironi, Tommaso; Dordoni, Elena; Chiastra, Claudio; Petrini, Lorenza; Pennati, Giancarlo; Dubini, Gabriele; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon; Kuetting, Maximilian; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) represents an established recent technology in a high risk patient base. To better understand TAVR performance, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of a self-expandable transcatheter aortic valve was proposed. After an in vitro durability experiment was done to test the valve, the FSI model was built to reproduce the experimental test. Lastly, the FSI model was used to simulate the virtual implant and performance in a patient-specific case. Results showed that the leaflet opening area during the cycle was similar to that of the in vitro test and the difference of the maximum leaflet opening between the two methodologies was of 0.42%. Furthermore, the FSI simulation quantified the pressure and velocity fields. The computed strain amplitudes in the stent frame showed that this distribution in the patient-specific case is highly affected by the aortic root anatomy, suggesting that the in vitro tests that follow standards might not be representative of the real behavior of the percutaneous valve. The patient-specific case also compared in vivo literature data on fast opening and closing characteristics of the aortic valve during systolic ejection. FSI simulations represent useful tools in determining design errors or optimization potentials before the fabrication of aortic valve prototypes and the performance of tests.

  7. A Poroelastic Fluid/Structure-Interaction Model of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cord With Syringomyelia and Adjacent Subarachnoid-Space Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bertram, C D; Heil, M

    2017-01-01

    An existing axisymmetric fluid/structure-interaction (FSI) model of the spinal cord, pia mater, subarachnoid space, and dura mater in the presence of syringomyelia and subarachnoid-space stenosis was modified to include porous solids. This allowed investigation of a hypothesis for syrinx fluid ingress from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Gross model deformation was unchanged by the addition of porosity, but pressure oscillated more in the syrinx and the subarachnoid space below the stenosis. The poroelastic model still exhibited elevated mean pressure in the subarachnoid space below the stenosis and in the syrinx. With realistic cord permeability, there was slight oscillatory shunt flow bypassing the stenosis via the porous tissue over the syrinx. Weak steady streaming flow occurred in a circuit involving craniocaudal flow through the stenosis and back via the syrinx. Mean syrinx volume was scarcely altered when the adjacent stenosis bisected the syrinx, but increased slightly when the syrinx was predominantly located caudal to the stenosis. The fluid content of the tissues over the syrinx oscillated, absorbing most of the radial flow seeping from the subarachnoid space so that it did not reach the syrinx. To a lesser extent, this cyclic swelling in a boundary layer of cord tissue just below the pia occurred all along the cord, representing a mechanism for exchange of interstitial fluid (ISF) and cerebrospinal fluid which could explain recent tracer findings without invoking perivascular conduits. The model demonstrates that syrinx volume increase is possible when there is subarachnoid-space stenosis and the cord and pia are permeable.

  8. A new formulation for air-blast fluid-structure interaction using an immersed approach: part II—coupling of IGA and meshfree discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Moutsanidis, G.; Bueno, J.; Kamran, K.; Kamensky, D.; Hillman, M. C.; Gomez, H.; Chen, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this two-part paper we begin the development of a new class of methods for modeling fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena for air blast. We aim to develop accurate, robust, and practical computational methodology, which is capable of modeling the dynamics of air blast coupled with the structure response, where the latter involves large, inelastic deformations and disintegration into fragments. An immersed approach is adopted, which leads to an a-priori monolithic FSI formulation with intrinsic contact detection between solid objects, and without formal restrictions on the solid motions. In Part I of this paper, the core air-blast FSI methodology suitable for a variety of discretizations is presented and tested using standard finite elements. Part II of this paper focuses on a particular instantiation of the proposed framework, which couples isogeometric analysis (IGA) based on non-uniform rational B-splines and a reproducing-kernel particle method (RKPM), which is a meshfree technique. The combination of IGA and RKPM is felt to be particularly attractive for the problem class of interest due to the higher-order accuracy and smoothness of both discretizations, and relative simplicity of RKPM in handling fragmentation scenarios. A collection of mostly 2D numerical examples is presented in each of the parts to illustrate the good performance of the proposed air-blast FSI framework.

  9. A new formulation for air-blast fluid-structure interaction using an immersed approach. Part I: basic methodology and FEM-based simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Kamran, K.; Moutsanidis, G.; Benson, D. J.; Oñate, E.

    2017-03-01

    In this two-part paper we begin the development of a new class of methods for modeling fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena for air blast. We aim to develop accurate, robust, and practical computational methodology, which is capable of modeling the dynamics of air blast coupled with the structure response, where the latter involves large, inelastic deformations and disintegration into fragments. An immersed approach is adopted, which leads to an a-priori monolithic FSI formulation with intrinsic contact detection between solid objects, and without formal restrictions on the solid motions. In Part I of this paper, the core air-blast FSI methodology suitable for a variety of discretizations is presented and tested using standard finite elements. Part II of this paper focuses on a particular instantiation of the proposed framework, which couples isogeometric analysis (IGA) based on non-uniform rational B-splines and a reproducing-kernel particle method (RKPM), which is a Meshfree technique. The combination of IGA and RKPM is felt to be particularly attractive for the problem class of interest due to the higher-order accuracy and smoothness of both discretizations, and relative simplicity of RKPM in handling fragmentation scenarios. A collection of mostly 2D numerical examples is presented in each of the parts to illustrate the good performance of the proposed air-blast FSI framework.

  10. Low-density lipoprotein accumulation within a carotid artery with multilayer elastic porous wall: fluid-structure interaction and non-Newtonian considerations.

    PubMed

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza

    2015-09-18

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is recognized as bad cholesterol, typically has been regarded as a main cause of atherosclerosis. LDL infiltration across arterial wall and subsequent formation of Ox-LDL could lead to atherogenesis. In the present study, combined effects of non-Newtonian fluid behavior and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on LDL mass transfer inside an artery and through its multilayer arterial wall are examined numerically. Navier-Stokes equations for the blood flow inside the lumen and modified Darcy's model for the power-law fluid through the porous arterial wall are coupled with the equations of mass transfer to describe LDL distributions in various segments of the artery. In addition, the arterial wall is considered as a heterogeneous permeable elastic medium. Thus, elastodynamics equation is invoked to examine effects of different wall elasticity on LDL distribution in the artery. Findings suggest that non-Newtonian behavior of filtrated plasma within the wall enhances LDL accumulation meaningfully. Moreover, results demonstrate that at high blood pressure and due to the wall elasticity, endothelium pores expand, which cause significant variations on endothelium physiological properties in a way that lead to higher LDL accumulation. Additionally, results describe that under hypertension, by increasing angular strain, endothelial junctions especially at leaky sites expand more dramatic for the high elastic model, which in turn causes higher LDL accumulation across the intima layer and elevates atherogenesis risk.

  11. Computational and Experimental Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of a High-Lift Wing with a Slat-Cove Filler for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholten, William D.; Patterson, Ryan D.; Hartl, Darren J.; Strganac, Thomas W.; Chapelon, Quentin H. C.; Turner, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant component of overall noise produced by transport aircraft during landing and approach (low speed maneuvers). A significant source for this noise is the cove of the leading-edge slat. The slat-cove filler (SCF) has been shown to be effective at mitigating slat noise. The objective of this work is to understand the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) behavior of a superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) SCF in flow using both computational and physical models of a high-lift wing. Initial understanding of flow around the SCF and wing is obtained using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis at various angles of attack. A framework compatible with an SMA constitutive model (implemented as a user material subroutine) is used to perform FSI analysis for multiple flow and configuration cases. A scaled physical model of the high-lift wing is constructed and tested in the Texas A&M 3 ft-by-4-foot wind tunnel. Initial validation of both CFD and FSI analysis is conducted by comparing lift, drag and pressure distributions with experimental results.

  12. MGLab3D: An interactive environment for iterative solvers for elliptic PDEs in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bordner, J.; Saied, F.

    1996-12-31

    GLab3D is an enhancement of an interactive environment (MGLab) for experimenting with iterative solvers and multigrid algorithms. It is implemented in MATLAB. The new version has built-in 3D elliptic pde`s and several iterative methods and preconditioners that were not available in the original version. A sparse direct solver option has also been included. The multigrid solvers have also been extended to 3D. The discretization and pde domains are restricted to standard finite differences on the unit square/cube. The power of this software studies in the fact that no programming is needed to solve, for example, the convection-diffusion equation in 3D with TFQMR and a customized V-cycle preconditioner, for a variety of problem sizes and mesh Reynolds, numbers. In addition to the graphical user interface, some sample drivers are included to show how experiments can be composed using the underlying suite of problems and solvers.

  13. A Workstation for Interactive Display and Quantitative Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R.A.; Heffeman, P.B.; Camp, J.J.; Hanson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to extract objective and quantitatively accurate information from 3-D radiographic biomedical images has not kept pace with the capabilities to produce the images themselves. This is rather an ironic paradox, since on the one hand the new 3-D and 4-D imaging capabilities promise significant potential for providing greater specificity and sensitivity (i.e., precise objective discrimination and accurate quantitative measurement of body tissue characteristics and function) in clinical diagnostic and basic investigative imaging procedures than ever possible before, but on the other hand, the momentous advances in computer and associated electronic imaging technology which have made these 3-D imaging capabilities possible have not been concomitantly developed for full exploitation of these capabilities. Therefore, we have developed a powerful new microcomputer-based system which permits detailed investigations and evaluation of 3-D and 4-D (dynamic 3-D) biomedical images. The system comprises a special workstation to which all the information in a large 3-D image data base is accessible for rapid display, manipulation, and measurement. The system provides important capabilities for simultaneously representing and analyzing both structural and functional data and their relationships in various organs of the body. This paper provides a detailed description of this system, as well as some of the rationale, background, theoretical concepts, and practical considerations related to system implementation. ImagesFigure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16

  14. Application and Evaluation of Interactive 3D PDF for Presenting and Sharing Planning Results for Liver Surgery in Clinical Routine

    PubMed Central

    Newe, Axel; Becker, Linda; Schenk, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objectives The Portable Document Format (PDF) is the de-facto standard for the exchange of electronic documents. It is platform-independent, suitable for the exchange of medical data, and allows for the embedding of three-dimensional (3D) surface mesh models. In this article, we present the first clinical routine application of interactive 3D surface mesh models which have been integrated into PDF files for the presentation and the exchange of Computer Assisted Surgery Planning (CASP) results in liver surgery. We aimed to prove the feasibility of applying 3D PDF in medical reporting and investigated the user experience with this new technology. Methods We developed an interactive 3D PDF report document format and implemented a software tool to create these reports automatically. After more than 1000 liver CASP cases that have been reported in clinical routine using our 3D PDF report, an international user survey was carried out online to evaluate the user experience. Results Our solution enables the user to interactively explore the anatomical configuration and to have different analyses and various resection proposals displayed within a 3D PDF document covering only a single page that acts more like a software application than like a typical PDF file (“PDF App”). The new 3D PDF report offers many advantages over the previous solutions. According to the results of the online survey, the users have assessed the pragmatic quality (functionality, usability, perspicuity, efficiency) as well as the hedonic quality (attractiveness, novelty) very positively. Conclusion The usage of 3D PDF for reporting and sharing CASP results is feasible and well accepted by the target audience. Using interactive PDF with embedded 3D models is an enabler for presenting and exchanging complex medical information in an easy and platform-independent way. Medical staff as well as patients can benefit from the possibilities provided by 3D PDF. Our results open the door for a

  15. Art-Science-Technology collaboration through immersive, interactive 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    At the W. M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES), a group of geoscientists and computer scientists collaborate to develop and use of interactive, immersive, 3D visualization technology to view, manipulate, and interpret data for scientific research. The visual impact of immersion in a CAVE environment can be extremely compelling, and from the outset KeckCAVES scientists have collaborated with artists to bring this technology to creative works, including theater and dance performance, installations, and gamification. The first full-fledged collaboration designed and produced a performance called "Collapse: Suddenly falling down", choreographed by Della Davidson, which investigated the human and cultural response to natural and man-made disasters. Scientific data (lidar scans of disaster sites, such as landslides and mine collapses) were fully integrated into the performance by the Sideshow Physical Theatre. This presentation will discuss both the technological and creative characteristics of, and lessons learned from the collaboration. Many parallels between the artistic and scientific process emerged. We observed that both artists and scientists set out to investigate a topic, solve a problem, or answer a question. Refining that question or problem is an essential part of both the creative and scientific workflow. Both artists and scientists seek understanding (in this case understanding of natural disasters). Differences also emerged; the group noted that the scientists sought clarity (including but not limited to quantitative measurements) as a means to understanding, while the artists embraced ambiguity, also as a means to understanding. Subsequent art-science-technology collaborations have responded to evolving technology for visualization and include gamification as a means to explore data, and use of augmented reality for informal learning in museum settings.

  16. Cardiac tissue structure. Electric field interactions in polarizing the heart: 3D computer models and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entcheva, Emilia

    1998-11-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the interactions between the cardiac tissue structure and applied electric fields in producing complex polarization patterns. It is hypothesized that the response of the heart in the conditions of strong electric shocks, as those applied in defibrillation, is dominated by mechanisms involving the cardiac muscle structure perceived as a continuum. Analysis is carried out in three-dimensional models of the heart with detailed fiber architecture. Shock-induced transmembrane potentials are calculated using the bidomain model in its finite element implementation. The major new findings of this study can be summarized as follows: (1) The mechanisms of polarization due to cardiac fiber curvature and fiber rotation are elucidated in three-dimensional ellipsoidal hearts of variable geometry; (2) Results are presented showing that the axis of stimulation and the polarization axis on a whole heart level might differ significantly due to geometric and anisotropic factors; (3) Virtual electrode patterns are demonstrated numerically inside the ventricular wall in internal defibrillation conditions. The role of the tissue-bath interface in shaping the shock-induced polarization is revealed; (4) The generation of 3D phase singularity scrolls by shock-induced intramural virtual electrode patterns is proposed as evidence for a possible new mechanism for the failure to defibrillate. The results of this study emphasize the role of unequal anisotropy in the intra- and extracellular domains, as well as the salient fiber architecture characteristics, such as curvature and transmural rotation, in polarizing the myocardium. Experimental support of the above findings was actively sought and found in recent optical mapping studies using voltage-sensitive dyes. If validated in vivo, these findings would significantly enrich the prevailing concepts about the mechanisms of stimulation and defibrillation of the heart.

  17. Electrostatic Contributions Drive the Interaction Between Staphylococcus aureus Protein Efb-C and its Complement Target C3d

    SciTech Connect

    Haspel, N.; Ricklin, D.; Geisbrecht, B.V.; Kavraki, L.E.; Lambris, J.D.

    2008-11-13

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  18. Electrostatic contributions drive the interaction between Staphylococcus aureus protein Efb-C and its complement target C3d.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Nurit; Ricklin, Daniel; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Kavraki, Lydia E; Lambris, John D

    2008-11-01

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  19. Investigation of material modeling in fluid-structure interaction analysis of an idealized three-layered abdominal aorta: aneurysm initiation and fully developed aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Fatma Gulden; Kwon, Young W

    2015-03-01

    Different material models for an idealized three-layered abdominal aorta are compared using computational techniques to study aneurysm initiation and fully developed aneurysms. The computational model includes fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the blood vessel and the blood. In order to model aneurysm initiation, the medial region was degenerated to mimic the medial loss occurring in the inception of an aneurysm. Various cases are considered in order to understand their effects on the initiation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The layers of the blood vessel were modeled using either linear elastic materials or Mooney-Rivlin (otherwise known as hyperelastic) type materials. The degenerated medial region was also modeled in either linear elastic or hyperelastic-type materials and assumed to be in the shape of an arc with a thin width or a circular ring with different widths. The blood viscosity effect was also considered in the initiation mechanism. In addition, dynamic analysis of the blood vessel was performed without interaction with the blood flow by applying time-dependent pressure inside the lumen in a three-layered abdominal aorta. The stresses, strains, and displacements were compared for a healthy aorta, an initiated aneurysm and a fully developed aneurysm. The study shows that the material modeling of the vessel has a sizable effect on aneurysm initiation and fully developed aneurysms. Different material modeling of degeneration regions also affects the stress-strain response of aneurysm initiation. Additionally, the structural analysis without considering FSI (called noFSI) overestimates the peak von Mises stress by 52% at the interfaces of the layers.

  20. Plaque and arterial vulnerability investigation in a three-layer atherosclerotic human coronary artery using computational fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the common form of cardiovascular diseases and known to be the main reason of deaths in the world. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) simulations can be employed to assess the interactions of artery/plaque and blood to provide a more precise anticipation for rupture of arterial tissue layers and plaque tissues inside an atherosclerotic artery. To date, the arterial tissue in computational FSI simulations has been considered as a one-layer structure. However, a single layer assumption might have deeply bounded the results and, consequently, more computational simulation is needed by considering the arterial tissue as a three-layer structure. In this study, a three-dimensional computational FSI model of an atherosclerotic artery with a three-layer structure and different plaque types was established to perform a more accurate arterial wall/plaque tissue vulnerability assessment. The hyperelastic material coefficients of arterial layers were calculated and implemented in the computational model. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved using the explicit dynamics finite element code LS-DYNA. The results revealed the significant role of plaque types in the normal and shear stresses induced within the arterial tissue layers. The highest von Mises and shear stresses were observed on the stiffest calcified plaque with 3.59 and 3.27 MPa, while the lowest von Mises and shear stresses were seen on the hypocellular plaque with 1.15 and 0.63 MPa, respectively. Regardless of plaque types, the media and adventitia layers were played protective roles by displaying less stress on their wall, whilst the intima layer was at a high risk of rupture. The findings of this study have implications not only for determining the most vulnerable arterial layer/plaque tissue inside an atherosclerotic coronary artery but also for balloon-angioplasty, stenting, and bypass surgeries.

  1. Prototype Development Capabilities of 3D Spatial Interactions and Failures During Scenario Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Tony Koonce

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a prototype for using 3D modeling and simulation engine to improve risk analysis and evaluate reactor structures and components for a given scenario. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  2. NewVision: a program for interactive navigation and analysis of multiple 3-D data sets using coordinated virtual cameras.

    PubMed

    Pixton, J L; Belmont, A S

    1996-01-01

    We describe "NewVision", a program designed for rapid interactive display, sectioning, and comparison of multiple large three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions. User tools for navigating within large 3-D data sets and selecting local subvolumes for display, combined with view caching, fast integer interpolation, and background tasking, provide highly interactive viewing of arbitrarily sized data sets on Silicon Graphics systems ranging from simple workstations to supercomputers. Multiple windows, each showing different views of the same 3-D data set, are coordinated through mapping of local coordinate systems to a single global world coordinate system. Mapping to a world coordinate system allows quantitative measurements from any open window as well as creation of linked windows in which operations such as panning, zooming, and 3-D rotations of the viewing perspective in any one window are mirrored by corresponding transformations in the views shown in other linked windows. The specific example of tracing 3-D fiber trajectories is used to demonstrate the potential of the linked window concept. A global overview of NewVision's design and organization is provided, and future development directions are briefly discussed.

  3. Fully Kinetic 3D Simulations of the Interaction of the Solar Wind with Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, J.; Deca, J.; Lembege, B.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The planet Mercury has been studied by the space mission Mariner 10, in the 1970's, and by the MESSENGER mission launched in 2004. Interest in the first planet of the Solar System has now been renewed by the launch in 2017 of the BepiColombo mission. MESSENGER and BepiColombo give access to information about the local conditions of the magnetosphere of Mercury. This data must be evaluated in the context of the global interaction between the solar wind and the planet's magnetosphere. Global scale simulations of the planet's environment are necessary to fully understand the data gathered from in-situ measurements. We use three-dimensional simulations to support the scientific goals of the two missions. In contrast with the results based on MHD (Kabin et al., 2000) and hybrid codes (Kallio et Janhumen, 2003; Travnicek et al., 2007, 2010; Richer et al., 2012), the present work is based on the implicit moment Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method, which allows to use large time and space steps, while granting access to the dynamics of the smaller electron scales in the plasma. The purpose of these preliminary PIC simulations is to retrieve the top-level features of Mercury's magnetosphere and its frontiers. We compare the results obtained with the implicit moment PiC method against 3D hybrid simulations. We perform simulations of the global plasma environment of Mercury using the solar wind conditions measured by MESSENGER. We show that complex flows form around the planet, including the development of Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities at the flanks. We evaluate the dynamics of the shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, the reconnection areas, the formation of plasma sheet and magnetotail, and the variation of ion/electron plasma flows when crossing these frontiers. The simulations also give access to detailed information about the particle dynamics and their velocity distribution at locations that can be used for comparison with data from MESSENGER and later on with the forthcoming

  4. Web-Based Interactive 3D Visualization as a Tool for Improved Anatomy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersson, Helge; Sinkvist, David; Wang, Chunliang; Smedby, Orjan

    2009-01-01

    Despite a long tradition, conventional anatomy education based on dissection is declining. This study tested a new virtual reality (VR) technique for anatomy learning based on virtual contrast injection. The aim was to assess whether students value this new three-dimensional (3D) visualization method as a learning tool and what value they gain…

  5. Combined particle-image velocimetry and force analysis of the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction of a natural owl wing.

    PubMed

    Winzen, A; Roidl, B; Schröder, W

    2016-04-01

    Low-speed aerodynamics has gained increasing interest due to its relevance for the design process of small flying air vehicles. These small aircraft operate at similar aerodynamic conditions as, e.g. birds which therefore can serve as role models of how to overcome the well-known problems of low Reynolds number flight. The flight of the barn owl is characterized by a very low flight velocity in conjunction with a low noise emission and a high level of maneuverability at stable flight conditions. To investigate the complex three-dimensional flow field and the corresponding local structural deformation in combination with their influence on the resulting aerodynamic forces, time-resolved stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry and force and moment measurements are performed on a prepared natural barn owl wing. Several spanwise positions are measured via PIV in a range of angles of attack [Formula: see text] 6° and Reynolds numbers 40 000 [Formula: see text] 120 000 based on the chord length. Additionally, the resulting forces and moments are recorded for -10° ≤ α ≤ 15° at the same Reynolds numbers. Depending on the spanwise position, the angle of attack, and the Reynolds number, the flow field on the wing's pressure side is characterized by either a region of flow separation, causing large-scale vortical structures which lead to a time-dependent deflection of the flexible wing structure or wing regions showing no instantaneous deflection but a reduction of the time-averaged mean wing curvature. Based on the force measurements the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction is assumed to considerably impact the aerodynamic forces acting on the wing leading to a strong mechanical loading of the interface between the wing and body. These time-depending loads which result from the flexibility of the wing should be taken into consideration for the design of future small flying air vehicles using flexible wing structures.

  6. A moving-least-squares immersed boundary method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction of elastic bodies with arbitrary thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tullio, M. D.; Pascazio, G.

    2016-11-01

    A versatile numerical method is presented to predict the fluid-structure interaction of bodies with arbitrary thickness immersed in an incompressible fluid, with the aim of simulating different biological engineering applications. A direct-forcing immersed boundary method is adopted, based on a moving-least-squares approach to reconstruct the solution in the vicinity of the immersed surface. A simple spring-network model is considered for describing the dynamics of deformable structures, so as to easily model and simulate different biological systems that not always may be described by simple continuum models, without affecting the computational time and simplicity of the overall method. The fluid and structures are coupled in a strong way, in order to avoid instabilities related to large accelerations of the bodies. The effectiveness of the method is validated by means of several test cases involving: rigid bodies, either falling in a quiescent fluid, fluttering or tumbling, or transported by a shear flow; infinitely thin elastic structures with mass, such as a two-dimensional flexible filament and, concerning three-dimensional cases, a flapping flag and an inverted flag in a free stream; finally, a three-dimensional model of a bio-prosthetic aortic valve opening and closing under a pulsatile flowrate. A very good agreement is obtained in all the cases, comparing with available experimental data and numerical results obtained by different methods. In particular, the method is shown to be second-order accurate by means of a mesh-refinement study. Moreover, it is able to provide results comparable with those of sharp direct-forcing approaches, and can manage high pressure differences across the surface, still obtaining very smooth hydrodynamic forces.

  7. Load Assembly of the Ignitor Machine with 3D Interactive Virtual Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, S.; Pierattini, S.

    2003-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to assist the Ignitor team in every phase of the project using the new Virtual Reality Technology (VR). Through the VR it is possible to see, plan and test the machine assembly sequence and the total layout. We are also planning to simulate in VR the remote handling systems. The complexity of the system requires a large and powerful graphical device. The ENEA?s "Advanced Visualization Technology" team has implemented a repository file data structure integrated with the CATIA drawing cams from the designer of Ignitor. The 3D virtual mockup software is used to view and analyze all objects that compose the mockup and also to analyze the correct assembly sequences. The ENEA?s 3D immersive system and software are fully integrated in the ENEA?s supercomputing GRID infrastructure. At any time all members of the Ignitor Project can view the status of the mockup in 3D (draft and/or final objects) through the net. During the conference examples of the assembly sequence and load assembly structure will be presented.

  8. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  9. Interactive 3D Visualization of the Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) as a Tool to Facilitate Informal Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yikilmaz, M.; Harwood, C. L.; Hsi, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; McDermott, J.; Pellett, B.; Schladow, G.; Segale, H. M.; Yalowitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization is a powerful research tool that has been used to investigate complex scientific problems in various fields. It allows researchers to explore and understand processes and features that are not directly observable and help with building of new models. It has been shown that 3D visualization creates a more engaging environment for public audiences. Interactive 3D visualization can allow individuals to explore scientific concepts on their own. We present an NSF funded project developed in collaboration with UC Davis KeckCAVES, UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center, ECHO Lake Aquarium & Science Center, and Lawrence Hall of Science. The Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) project aims to build interactive 3D visualization of some of the major lakes and reservoirs of the world to enhance public awareness and increase understanding and stewardship of freshwater lake ecosystems, habitats, and earth science processes. The project includes a collection of publicly available satellite imagery and digital elevation models at various resolutions for the 20 major lakes of the world as well as the bathymetry data for the 12 lakes. It also includes the vector based 'Global Lakes and Wetlands Database (GLWD)' by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) and the Center for Environmental System Research University of Kassel, Germany and the CIA World DataBank II data sets to show wetlands and water reservoirs at global scale. We use a custom virtual globe (Crusta) developed at the UC Davis KeckCAVES. Crusta is designed to specifically allow for visualization and mapping of features in very high spatial resolution (< 1m) and large extent (1000's of km2) raster imagery and topographic data. In addition to imagery, a set of pins, labels and billboards are used to provide textual information about these lakes. Users can interactively learn about the lake and watershed processes as well as geologic processes (e.g. faulting, landslide, glacial, volcanic

  10. Modified Immersed Finite Element Method For Fully-Coupled Fluid-Structure Interations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a “modified” immersed finite element method (mIFEM), a non-boundary-fitted numerical technique, to study fluid-structure interactions. Using this method, we can more precisely capture the solid dynamics by solving the solid governing equation instead of imposing it based on the fluid velocity field as in the original immersed finite element (IFEM). Using the IFEM may lead to severe solid mesh distortion because the solid deformation is been over-estimated, especially for high Reynolds number flows. In the mIFEM, the solid dynamics is solved using appropriate boundary conditions generated from the surrounding fluid, therefore produces more accurate and realistic coupled solutions. We show several 2-D and 3-D testing cases where the mIFEM has a noticeable advantage in handling complicated fluid-structure interactions when the solid behavior dominates the fluid flow. PMID:24223445

  11. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Guillaume; Perera, Upamali; Gillett, Cheryl; Naba, Alexandra; Law, Ah-Lai; Sharma, Ved P.; Wang, Jian; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Balsamo, Michele; Mosis, Fuad; De Piano, Mario; Monypenny, James; Woodman, Natalie; McConnell, Russell E.; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Cao, Yihai; Condeelis, John; Hynes, Richard O.; Gertler, Frank B.; Krause, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlates with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation, and matrix degradation were impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identify a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, while Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of EGF gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis. PMID:26996666

  12. 3D Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Interaction Observed in Collocated MODIS and ASTER Images of Cumulus Cloud Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.

    2007-01-01

    3D aerosol-cloud interaction is examined by analyzing two images containing cumulus clouds in biomass burning regions in Brazil. The research consists of two parts. The first part focuses on identifying 3D clo ud impacts on the reflectance of pixel selected for the MODIS aerosol retrieval based purely on observations. The second part of the resea rch combines the observations with radiative transfer computations to identify key parameters in 3D aerosol-cloud interaction. We found that 3D cloud-induced enhancement depends on optical properties of nearb y clouds as well as wavelength. The enhancement is too large to be ig nored. Associated biased error in 1D aerosol optical thickness retrie val ranges from 50% to 140% depending on wavelength and optical prope rties of nearby clouds as well as aerosol optical thickness. We caution the community to be prudent when applying 1D approximations in comp uting solar radiation in dear regions adjacent to clouds or when usin g traditional retrieved aerosol optical thickness in aerosol indirect effect research.

  13. Interactive 3D visualization of structural changes in the brain of a person with corticobasal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hänel, Claudia; Pieperhoff, Peter; Hentschel, Bernd; Amunts, Katrin; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    The visualization of the progression of brain tissue loss in neurodegenerative diseases like corticobasal syndrome (CBS) can provide not only information about the localization and distribution of the volume loss, but also helps to understand the course and the causes of this neurodegenerative disorder. The visualization of such medical imaging data is often based on 2D sections, because they show both internal and external structures in one image. Spatial information, however, is lost. 3D visualization of imaging data is capable to solve this problem, but it faces the difficulty that more internally located structures may be occluded by structures near the surface. Here, we present an application with two designs for the 3D visualization of the human brain to address these challenges. In the first design, brain anatomy is displayed semi-transparently; it is supplemented by an anatomical section and cortical areas for spatial orientation, and the volumetric data of volume loss. The second design is guided by the principle of importance-driven volume rendering: A direct line-of-sight to the relevant structures in the deeper parts of the brain is provided by cutting out a frustum-like piece of brain tissue. The application was developed to run in both, standard desktop environments and in immersive virtual reality environments with stereoscopic viewing for improving the depth perception. We conclude, that the presented application facilitates the perception of the extent of brain degeneration with respect to its localization and affected regions.

  14. Spline-based deforming ellipsoids for interactive 3D bioimage segmentation.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Chenouard, Nicolas; Unser, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We present a new fast active-contour model (a.k.a. snake) for image segmentation in 3D microscopy. We introduce a parametric design that relies on exponential B-spline bases and allows us to build snakes that are able to reproduce ellipsoids. We design our bases to have the shortest-possible support, subject to some constraints. Thus, computational efficiency is maximized. The proposed 3D snake can approximate blob-like objects with good accuracy and can perfectly reproduce spheres and ellipsoids, irrespective of their position and orientation. The optimization process is remarkably fast due to the use of Gauss' theorem within our energy computation scheme. Our technique yields successful segmentation results, even for challenging data where object contours are not well defined. This is due to our parametric approach that allows one to favor prior shapes. In addition, this paper provides a software that gives full control over the snakes via an intuitive manipulation of few control points.

  15. Integrated VR platform for 3D and image-based models: a step toward interactive image-based virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jayoung; Kim, Gerard J.

    2003-04-01

    Traditionally, three dimension models have been used for building virtual worlds, and a data structure called the "scene graph" is often employed to organize these 3D objects in the virtual space. On the other hand, image-based rendering has recently been suggested as a probable alternative VR platform for its photo-realism, however, due to limited interactivity, it has only been used for simple navigation systems. To combine the merits of these two approaches to object/scene representations, this paper proposes for a scene graph structure in which both 3D models and various image-based scenes/objects can be defined, traversed, and rendered together. In fact, as suggested by Shade et al., these different representations can be used as different LOD's for a given object. For instance, an object might be rendered using a 3D model at close range, a billboard at an intermediate range, and as part of an environment map at far range. The ultimate objective of this mixed platform is to breath more interactivity into the image based rendered VE's by employing 3D models as well. There are several technical challenges in devising such a platform: designing scene graph nodes for various types of image based techniques, establishing criteria for LOD/representation selection, handling their transitions, implementing appropriate interaction schemes, and correctly rendering the overall scene. Currently, we have extended the scene graph structure of the Sense8's WorldToolKit, to accommodate new node types for environment maps billboards, moving textures and sprites, "Tour-into-the-Picture" structure, and view interpolated objects. As for choosing the right LOD level, the usual viewing distance and image space criteria are used, however, the switching between the image and 3D model occurs at a distance from the user where the user starts to perceive the object's internal depth. Also, during interaction, regardless of the viewing distance, a 3D representation would be used, it if

  16. Interactive reconstructions of cranial 3D implants under MeVisLab as an alternative to commercial planning software.

    PubMed

    Egger, Jan; Gall, Markus; Tax, Alois; Ücal, Muammer; Zefferer, Ulrike; Li, Xing; von Campe, Gord; Schäfer, Ute; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Chen, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    In this publication, the interactive planning and reconstruction of cranial 3D Implants under the medical prototyping platform MeVisLab as alternative to commercial planning software is introduced. In doing so, a MeVisLab prototype consisting of a customized data-flow network and an own C++ module was set up. As a result, the Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software prototype guides a user through the whole workflow to generate an implant. Therefore, the workflow begins with loading and mirroring the patients head for an initial curvature of the implant. Then, the user can perform an additional Laplacian smoothing, followed by a Delaunay triangulation. The result is an aesthetic looking and well-fitting 3D implant, which can be stored in a CAD file format, e.g. STereoLithography (STL), for 3D printing. The 3D printed implant can finally be used for an in-depth pre-surgical evaluation or even as a real implant for the patient. In a nutshell, our research and development shows that a customized MeVisLab software prototype can be used as an alternative to complex commercial planning software, which may also not be available in every clinic. Finally, not to conform ourselves directly to available commercial software and look for other options that might improve the workflow.

  17. A Web platform for the interactive visualization and analysis of the 3D fractal dimension of MRI data.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J; López, A M; Cruz, J; Esteban, F J; Navas, J; Villoslada, P; Ruiz de Miras, J

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a Web platform (http://3dfd.ujaen.es) for computing and analyzing the 3D fractal dimension (3DFD) from volumetric data in an efficient, visual and interactive way. The Web platform is specially designed for working with magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the brain. The program estimates the 3DFD by calculating the 3D box-counting of the entire volume of the brain, and also of its 3D skeleton. All of this is done in a graphical, fast and optimized way by using novel technologies like CUDA and WebGL. The usefulness of the Web platform presented is demonstrated by its application in a case study where an analysis and characterization of groups of 3D MR images is performed for three neurodegenerative diseases: Multiple Sclerosis, Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Alzheimer's disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Web platform that allows the users to calculate, visualize, analyze and compare the 3DFD from MRI images in the cloud.

  18. An extracellular-matrix-specific GEF-GAP interaction regulates Rho GTPase crosstalk for 3D collagen migration.

    PubMed

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases govern distinct types of cell migration on different extracellular matrix proteins in tissue culture or three-dimensional (3D) matrices. We searched for mechanisms selectively regulating 3D cell migration in different matrix environments and discovered a form of Cdc42-RhoA crosstalk governing cell migration through a specific pair of GTPase activator and inhibitor molecules. We first identified βPix, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a specific regulator of migration in 3D collagen using an affinity-precipitation-based GEF screen. Knockdown of βPix specifically blocks cell migration in fibrillar collagen microenvironments, leading to hyperactive cellular protrusion accompanied by increased collagen matrix contraction. Live FRET imaging and RNAi knockdown linked this βPix knockdown phenotype to loss of polarized Cdc42 but not Rac1 activity, accompanied by enhanced, de-localized RhoA activity. Mechanistically, collagen phospho-regulates βPix, leading to its association with srGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), needed to suppress RhoA activity. Our results reveal a matrix-specific pathway controlling migration involving a GEF-GAP interaction of βPix with srGAP1 that is critical for maintaining suppressive crosstalk between Cdc42 and RhoA during 3D collagen migration.

  19. Low-cost real-time 3D PC distributed-interactive-simulation (DIS) application for C4I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, David L.; Veron, Harry

    1998-04-01

    A 3D Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) application was developed and demonstrated in a PC environment. The application is capable of running in the stealth mode or as a player which includes battlefield simulations, such as ModSAF. PCs can be clustered together, but not necessarily collocated, to run a simulation or training exercise on their own. A 3D perspective view of the battlefield is displayed that includes terrain, trees, buildings and other objects supported by the DIS application. Screen update rates of 15 to 20 frames per second have been achieved with fully lit and textured scenes thus providing high quality and fast graphics. A complete PC system can be configured for under $2,500. The software runs under Windows95 and WindowsNT. It is written in C++ and uses a commercial API called RenderWare for 3D rendering. The software uses Microsoft Foundation classes and Microsoft DirectPlay for joystick input. The RenderWare libraries enhance the performance through optimization for MMX and the Pentium Pro processor. The RenderWare and the Righteous 3D graphics board from Orchid Technologies with an advertised rendering rate of up to 2 million texture mapped triangles per second. A low-cost PC DIS simulator that can partake in a real-time collaborative simulation with other platforms is thus achieved.

  20. Upgrades and application of FIT3D NBI-plasma interaction code in view of LHD deuterium campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzi, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Murakami, S.; Osakabe, M.; Seki, R.; Yokoyama, M.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an upgrade of the FIT3D neutral beam-plasma interaction code, part of TASK3D, a transport suite of codes, and its application to LHD experiments in the framework of the preparation for the first deuterium experiments in the LHD. The neutral beam injector (NBI) system will be upgraded to D injection, and efforts have been recently made to extend LHD modelling capabilities to D operations. The implemented upgrades for FIT3D to enable D NBI modelling in D plasmas are presented, with a discussion and benchmark of the models used. In particular, the beam ionization module has been modified and a routine for neutron production estimation has been implemented. The upgraded code is then used to evaluate the NBI power deposition in experiments with different plasma compositions. In the recent LHD campaign, in fact, He experiments have been run to help the prediction of main effects which may be relevant in future LHD D plasmas. Identical H/He experiments showed similar electron density and temperature profiles, while a higher ion temperature with an He majority has been observed. From first applications of the upgraded FIT3D code it turns out that, although more NB power appears to be coupled with the He plasma, the NBI power deposition is unaffected, suggesting that heat deposition does not play a key role in the increased ion temperature with He plasma.

  1. Interactive reconstructions of cranial 3D implants under MeVisLab as an alternative to commercial planning software

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Gall, Markus; Tax, Alois; Ücal, Muammer; Zefferer, Ulrike; Li, Xing; von Campe, Gord; Schäfer, Ute; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Chen, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    In this publication, the interactive planning and reconstruction of cranial 3D Implants under the medical prototyping platform MeVisLab as alternative to commercial planning software is introduced. In doing so, a MeVisLab prototype consisting of a customized data-flow network and an own C++ module was set up. As a result, the Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software prototype guides a user through the whole workflow to generate an implant. Therefore, the workflow begins with loading and mirroring the patients head for an initial curvature of the implant. Then, the user can perform an additional Laplacian smoothing, followed by a Delaunay triangulation. The result is an aesthetic looking and well-fitting 3D implant, which can be stored in a CAD file format, e.g. STereoLithography (STL), for 3D printing. The 3D printed implant can finally be used for an in-depth pre-surgical evaluation or even as a real implant for the patient. In a nutshell, our research and development shows that a customized MeVisLab software prototype can be used as an alternative to complex commercial planning software, which may also not be available in every clinic. Finally, not to conform ourselves directly to available commercial software and look for other options that might improve the workflow. PMID:28264062

  2. Human Lumbar Ligamentum Flavum Anatomy for Epidural Anesthesia: Reviewing a 3D MR-Based Interactive Model and Postmortem Samples.

    PubMed

    Reina, Miguel A; Lirk, Philipp; Puigdellívol-Sánchez, Anna; Mavar, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    The ligamentum flavum (LF) forms the anatomic basis for the loss-of-resistance technique essential to the performance of epidural anesthesia. However, the LF presents considerable interindividual variability, including the possibility of midline gaps, which may influence the performance of epidural anesthesia. We devise a method to reconstruct the anatomy of the digitally LF based on magnetic resonance images to clarify the exact limits and edges of LF and its different thickness, depending on the area examined, while avoiding destructive methods, as well as the dissection processes. Anatomic cadaveric cross sections enabled us to visually check the definition of the edges along the entire LF and compare them using 3D image reconstruction methods. Reconstruction was performed in images obtained from 7 patients. Images from 1 patient were used as a basis for the 3D spinal anatomy tool. In parallel, axial cuts, 2 to 3 cm thick, were performed in lumbar spines of 4 frozen cadavers. This technique allowed us to identify the entire ligament and its exact limits, while avoiding alterations resulting from cutting processes or from preparation methods. The LF extended between the laminas of adjacent vertebrae at all vertebral levels of the patients examined, but midline gaps are regularly encountered. These anatomical variants were reproduced in a 3D portable document format. The major anatomical features of the LF were reproduced in the 3D model. Details of its structure and variations of thickness in successive sagittal and axial slides could be visualized. Gaps within LF previously studied in cadavers have been identified in our interactive 3D model, which may help to understand their nature, as well as possible implications for epidural techniques.

  3. Sign Language for K-8 Mathematics by 3D Interactive Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamo-Villani, Nicoletta; Doublestein, John; Martin, Zachary

    2005-01-01

    We present a new highly interactive computer animation tool to increase the mathematical skills of deaf children. We aim at increasing the effectiveness of (hearing) parents in teaching arithmetic to their deaf children, and the opportunity of deaf children to learn arithmetic via interactive media. Using state-of-the-art computer animation…

  4. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are a major component of the bone marrow that can critically affect metastatic progression in bone. Understanding how the marrow fat cells influence growth, behavior, and survival of tumor cells requires utilization of in vitro cell systems that can closely mimic the physiological microenvironment. Herein, we present two new three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to study adipocyte-tumor cell interactions in vitro. The first is a transwell-based system composed of the marrow-derived adipocytes in 3D collagen I gels and reconstituted basement membrane-overlayed prostate tumor cell spheroids. Tumor cells cultured under these 3D conditions are continuously exposed to adipocyte-derived factors, and their response can be evaluated by morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. We show via immunofluorescence analysis of metabolism-associated proteins that under 3D conditions tumor cells have significantly different metabolic response to adipocytes than tumor cells grown in 2D culture. We also demonstrate that this model allows for incorporation of other cell types, such as bone marrow macrophages, and utilization of dye-quenched collagen substrates for examination of proteolysis-driven responses to adipocyte- and macrophage-derived factors. Our second 3D culture system is designed to study tumor cell invasion toward the adipocytes and the consequent interaction between the two cell types. In this model, marrow adipocytes are separated from the fluorescently labeled tumor cells by a layer of collagen I. At designated time points, adipocytes are stained with BODIPY and confocal z-stacks are taken through the depth of the entire culture to determine the distance traveled between the two cell types over time. We demonstrate that this system can be utilized to study effects of candidate factors on tumor invasion toward the adipocytes. We also show that immunohistochemical analyses can be performed to evaluate the impact of direct interaction of prostate

  5. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Perera, U; Gillett, C; Naba, A; Law, A-L; Sharma, V P; Wang, J; Wyckoff, J; Balsamo, M; Mosis, F; De Piano, M; Monypenny, J; Woodman, N; McConnell, R E; Mouneimne, G; Van Hemelrijck, M; Cao, Y; Condeelis, J; Hynes, R O; Gertler, F B; Krause, M

    2016-09-29

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlate with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement, we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation and matrix degradation was impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not with Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identified a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, whereas Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not to Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of epidermal growth factor (EGF) gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis.

  6. Prediction of Protein–Protein Interaction Sites in Sequences and 3D Structures by Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    Šikić, Mile; Tomić, Sanja; Vlahoviček, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Identifying interaction sites in proteins provides important clues to the function of a protein and is becoming increasingly relevant in topics such as systems biology and drug discovery. Although there are numerous papers on the prediction of interaction sites using information derived from structure, there are only a few case reports on the prediction of interaction residues based solely on protein sequence. Here, a sliding window approach is combined with the Random Forests method to predict protein interaction sites using (i) a combination of sequence- and structure-derived parameters and (ii) sequence information alone. For sequence-based prediction we achieved a precision of 84% with a 26% recall and an F-measure of 40%. When combined with structural information, the prediction performance increases to a precision of 76% and a recall of 38% with an F-measure of 51%. We also present an attempt to rationalize the sliding window size and demonstrate that a nine-residue window is the most suitable for predictor construction. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our prediction methods by modeling the Ras–Raf complex using predicted interaction sites as target binding interfaces. Our results suggest that it is possible to predict protein interaction sites with quite a high accuracy using only sequence information. PMID:19180183

  7. Fluid–Structure Interaction Analysis of Papillary Muscle Forces Using a Comprehensive Mitral Valve Model with 3D Chordal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, Milan; Jensen, Morten Ø.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Cochran, Richard P.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.

    2015-07-17

    Numerical models of native heart valves are being used to study valve biomechanics to aid design and development of repair procedures and replacement devices. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems. Such simulations are useful for predicting the mechanical and hemodynamic loading on implanted valve devices. A current challenge for improving the accuracy of these predictions is choosing and implementing modeling boundary conditions. In order to address this challenge, we are utilizing an advanced in-vitro system to validate FSI conditions for the mitral valve system. Explanted ovine mitral valves were mounted in an in vitro setup, and structural data for the mitral valve was acquired with *CT. Experimental data from the in-vitro ovine mitral valve system were used to validate the computational model. As the valve closes, the hemodynamic data, high speed lea et dynamics, and force vectors from the in-vitro system were compared to the results of the FSI simulation computational model. The total force of 2.6 N per papillary muscle is matched by the computational model. In vitro and in vivo force measurements are important in validating and adjusting material parameters in computational models. The simulations can then be used to answer questions that are otherwise not possible to investigate experimentally. This work is important to maximize the validity of computational models of not just the mitral valve, but any biomechanical aspect using computational simulation in designing medical devices.

  8. Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR studies on gag peptide analogue inhibitors interacting with human cyclophilin A.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Huang, Xiaoqin; Luo, Xiaomin; Briggs, James M; Ji, Ruyun; Chen, Kaixian; Shen, Jianhua; Jiang, Hualiang

    2002-11-21

    The interaction of a series gag peptide analogues with human cyclophilin A (hCypA) have been studied employing molecular docking and 3D-QSAR approaches. The Lamarckian Genetic Algorithm (LGA) and divide-and-conquer methods were applied to locate the binding orientations and conformations of the inhibitors interacting with hCypA. Good correlations between the calculated interaction free energies and experimental inhibitory activities suggest that the binding conformations of these inhibitors are reasonable. A novel interaction model was identified for inhibitors 11, 15, and 17 whose N-termini were modified by addition of the deaminovaline (Dav) group and the C-termini of 15 and 17 were modified by addition of a benzyl group. Accordingly, two new binding sites (sites A and D in Figure 1) were revealed, which show a strong correlation with inhibitor potency and thus can be used as a starting point for new inhibitor design. In addition, two predictive 3D-QSAR models were obtained by CoMFA and CoMSIA analyses based on the binding conformations derived from the molecular docking calculations. The reasonable r(cross)(2) (cross-validated) values 0.738 and 0.762 were obtained for CoMFA and CoMSIA models, respectively. The predictive ability of these models was validated by four peptide analogues test set. The CoMFA and CoMSIA field distributions are in general agreement with the structural characteristics of the binding groove of hCypA. This indicates the reasonableness of the binding model of the inhibitors with hCypA. Considering all these results together with the valuable clues of binding from references published recently, reasonable pharmacophore elements have been suggested, demonstrating that the 3D-QSAR models about peptide analogue inhibitors are expected to be further employed in predicting activities of the novel compounds for inhibiting hCypA.

  9. Electromagnetic 2D/3D Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal anomalies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lembège, Bertrand; Divin, Andrey; Markidis, Stefano; Amaya, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    We present the first 2D/3D fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies. The simulations are performed using the implicit electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code iPIC3D [Markidis, Lapenta & Rizwan-uddin, 2010]. Multiscale physics is resolved for all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) in the code, recently updated with a set of open boundary conditions designed for solar wind-body interactions. We use a dipole to model the crustal anomaly. The dipole center is located outside the computational domain and the boundary representing the lunar surface is modeled as a particle-absorbing plane. Photo-emission from the lunar surface is at this point not included, but will be in future work. We study the behaviour of the dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD simulations [Harnett & Winglee, 2000, 2002, 2003] and spacecraft observations [Kurata et al., 2005; Halekas et al., 2008; Wieser et al., 2010]. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Finally we will present preliminary results on the interaction of the solar wind with weaker magnetic anomalies in which highly non-adiabatic interactions are expected.

  10. Cart3D Analysis of Plume and Shock Interaction Effects on Sonic Boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    A plume and shock interaction study was developed to collect data and perform CFD on a configuration where a nozzle plume passed through the shock generated from the wing or tail of a supersonic vehicle. The wing or tail was simulated with a wedge-shaped shock generator. Three configurations were analyzed consisting of two strut mounted wedges and one propulsion pod with an aft deck from a low boom vehicle concept. Research efforts at NASA were intended to enable future supersonic flight over land in the United States. Two of these efforts provided data for regulatory change and enabled design of low boom aircraft. Research has determined that sonic boom is a function of aircraft lift and volume distribution. Through careful tailoring of these variables, the sonic boom of concept vehicles has been reduced. One aspect of vehicle tailoring involved how the aircraft engine exhaust interacted with aft surfaces on a supersonic aircraft, such as the tail and wing trailing edges. In this work, results from Euler CFD simulations are compared to experimental data collected on sub-scale components in a wind tunnel. Three configurations are studied to simulate the nozzle plume interaction with representative wing and tail surfaces. Results demonstrate how the plume and tail shock structure moves with increasing nozzle pressure ratio. The CFD captures the main features of the plume and shock interaction. Differences are observed in the plume and deck shock structure that warrant further research and investigation.

  11. WebTOP: A 3D Interactive System for Teaching and Learning Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mzoughi, Taha; Herring, S. Davis; Foley, John T.; Morris, Matthew J.; Gilbert, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    WebTOP is a three-dimensional, Web-based, interactive computer graphics system that helps instructors teach and students learn about waves and optics. Current subject areas include waves, geometrical optics, reflection and refraction, polarization, interference, diffraction, lasers, and scattering. Some of the topics covered are suited for…

  12. Real-Time Climate Simulations in the Interactive 3D Game Universe Sandbox ²

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenson, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    Exploration in an open-ended computer game is an engaging way to explore climate and climate change. Everyone can explore physical models with real-time visualization in the educational simulator Universe Sandbox ² (universesandbox.com/2), which includes basic climate simulations on planets. I have implemented a time-dependent, one-dimensional meridional heat transport energy balance model to run and be adjustable in real time in the midst of a larger simulated system. Universe Sandbox ² is based on the original game - at its core a gravity simulator - with other new physically-based content for stellar evolution, and handling collisions between bodies. Existing users are mostly science enthusiasts in informal settings. We believe that this is the first climate simulation to be implemented in a professionally developed computer game with modern 3D graphical output in real time. The type of simple climate model we've adopted helps us depict the seasonal cycle and the more drastic changes that come from changing the orbit or other external forcings. Users can alter the climate as the simulation is running by altering the star(s) in the simulation, dragging to change orbits and obliquity, adjusting the climate simulation parameters directly or changing other properties like CO2 concentration that affect the model parameters in representative ways. Ongoing visuals of the expansion and contraction of sea ice and snow-cover respond to the temperature calculations, and make it accessible to explore a variety of scenarios and intuitive to understand the output. Variables like temperature can also be graphed in real time. We balance computational constraints with the ability to capture the physical phenomena we wish to visualize, giving everyone access to a simple open-ended meridional energy balance climate simulation to explore and experiment with. The software lends itself to labs at a variety of levels about climate concepts including seasons, the Greenhouse effect

  13. 3DIANA: 3D Domain Interaction Analysis: A Toolbox for Quaternary Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joan; Sanchez-Garcia, Ruben; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Cuenca-Alba, Jesus; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S.; Carazo, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is experiencing a revolution with the advent of a new generation of Direct Electron Detectors, enabling a broad range of large and flexible structures to be resolved well below 1 nm resolution. Although EM techniques are evolving to the point of directly obtaining structural data at near-atomic resolution, for many molecules the attainable resolution might not be enough to propose high-resolution structural models. However, accessing information on atomic coordinates is a necessary step toward a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow proteins to perform specific tasks. For that reason, methods for the integration of EM three-dimensional maps with x-ray and NMR structural data are being developed, a modeling task that is normally referred to as fitting, resulting in the so called hybrid models. In this work, we present a novel application—3DIANA—specially targeted to those cases in which the EM map resolution is medium or low and additional experimental structural information is scarce or even lacking. In this way, 3DIANA statistically evaluates proposed/potential contacts between protein domains, presents a complete catalog of both structurally resolved and predicted interacting regions involving these domains and, finally, suggests structural templates to model the interaction between them. The evaluation of the proposed interactions is computed with DIMERO, a new method that scores physical binding sites based on the topology of protein interaction networks, which has recently shown the capability to increase by 200% the number of domain-domain interactions predicted in interactomes as compared to previous approaches. The new application displays the information at a sequence and structural level and is accessible through a web browser or as a Chimera plugin at http://3diana.cnb.csic.es. PMID:26772592

  14. The Exopolysaccharide Matrix Modulates the Interaction between 3D Architecture and Virulence of a Mixed-Species Oral Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Klein, Marlise I.; Falsetta, Megan L.; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M.; Yates, John R.; Heydorn, Arne; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Virulent biofilms are responsible for a range of infections, including oral diseases. All biofilms harbor a microbial-derived extracellular-matrix. The exopolysaccharides (EPS) formed on tooth-pellicle and bacterial surfaces provide binding sites for microorganisms; eventually the accumulated EPS enmeshes microbial cells. The metabolic activity of the bacteria within this matrix leads to acidification of the milieu. We explored the mechanisms through which the Streptococcus mutans-produced EPS-matrix modulates the three-dimensional (3D) architecture and the population shifts during morphogenesis of biofilms on a saliva-coated-apatitic surface using a mixed-bacterial species system. Concomitantly, we examined whether the matrix influences the development of pH-microenvironments within intact-biofilms using a novel 3D in situ pH-mapping technique. Data reveal that the production of the EPS-matrix helps to create spatial heterogeneities by forming an intricate network of exopolysaccharide-enmeshed bacterial-islets (microcolonies) through localized cell-to-matrix interactions. This complex 3D architecture creates compartmentalized acidic and EPS-rich microenvironments throughout the biofilm, which triggers the dominance of pathogenic S. mutans within a mixed-species system. The establishment of a 3D-matrix and EPS-enmeshed microcolonies were largely mediated by the S. mutans gtfB/gtfC genes, expression of which was enhanced in the presence of Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis. Acidic pockets were found only in the interiors of bacterial-islets that are protected by EPS, which impedes rapid neutralization by buffer (pH 7.0). As a result, regions of low pH (<5.5) were detected at specific locations along the surface of attachment. Resistance to chlorhexidine was enhanced in cells within EPS-microcolony complexes compared to those outside such structures within the biofilm. Our results illustrate the critical interaction between matrix architecture and p

  15. Data-driven interactive 3D medical image segmentation based on structured patch model.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel three dimensional interactive medical image segmentation method based on high level knowledge of training set. Since the interactive system should provide intermediate results to an user quickly, insufficient low level models are used for most of previous methods. To exploit the high level knowledge within a short time, we construct a structured patch model that consists of multiple corresponding patch sets. The structured patch model includes the spatial relationships between neighboring patch sets and the prior knowledge of the corresponding patch set on each local region. The spatial relationships accelerate the search of corresponding patch in test time, while the prior knowledge improves the segmentation accuracy. The proposed framework provides not only fast editing tool, but the incremental learning system through adding the segmentation result to the training set. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is useful for fast and accurate segmentation of target objects from the multiple medical images.

  16. Graph-cut Based Interactive Segmentation of 3D Materials-Science Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-26

    while still quickly and conveniently allowing manual addition and removal of segments in real -time, (2) multiple extensions to the interactive tools...inside the region, and – The mean intensity inside the region. These properties can be computed quickly, which fits well with the real -time...10), 1731–1744 (2000) 14. Cortes , C., Vapnik, V.: Support-vector networks. Mach. Learn. 20(3), 273–297 (1995) 15. Django Software Foundation: Django

  17. Brave New (Interactive) Worlds: A Review of the Design Affordances and Constraints of Two 3D Virtual Worlds as Interactive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional virtual worlds are an emerging medium currently being used in both traditional classrooms and for distance education. Three-dimensional (3D) virtual worlds are a combination of desk-top interactive Virtual Reality within a chat environment. This analysis provides an overview of Active Worlds Educational Universe and Adobe…

  18. Quantitative characterization of 3D deformations of cell interactions with soft biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Christian

    In recent years, the importance of mechanical forces in directing cellular function has been recognized as a significant factor in biological and physiological processes. In fact, these physical forces are now viewed equally as important as biochemical stimuli in controlling cellular response. Not only do these cellular forces, or cell tractions, play an important role in cell migration, they are also significant to many other physiological and pathological processes, both at the tissue and organ level, including wound healing, inflammation, angiogenesis, and embryogenesis. A complete quantification of cell tractions during cell-material interactions can lead to a deeper understanding of the fundamental role these forces play in cell biology. Thus, understanding the function and role of a cell from a mechanical framework can have important implications towards the development of new implant materials and drug treatments. Previous research has contributed significant descriptions of cell-tissue interactions by quantifying cell tractions in two-dimensional environments; however, most physiological processes are three-dimensional in nature. Recent studies have shown morphological differences in cells cultured on two-dimensional substrates versus three-dimensional matrices, and that the intrinsic extracellular matrix interactions and migration behavior are different in three dimensions versus two dimensions. Hence, measurement techniques are needed to investigate cellular behavior in all three dimensions. This thesis presents a full-field imaging technique capable of quantitatively measuring cell traction forces in all three spatial dimensions, and hence addresses the need of a three-dimensional quantitative imaging technique to gain insight into the fundamental role of physical forces in biological processes. The technique combines laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) with digital volume correlation (DVC) to track the motion of fluorescent particles during cell

  19. Toward a 3D model of human brain development for studying gene/environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Hogberg, Helena T; Bressler, Joseph; Christian, Kimberly M; Harris, Georgina; Makri, Georgia; O'Driscoll, Cliona; Pamies, David; Smirnova, Lena; Wen, Zhexing; Hartung, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This project aims to establish and characterize an in vitro model of the developing human brain for the purpose of testing drugs and chemicals. To accurately assess risk, a model needs to recapitulate the complex interactions between different types of glial cells and neurons in a three-dimensional platform. Moreover, human cells are preferred over cells from rodents to eliminate cross-species differences in sensitivity to chemicals. Previously, we established conditions to culture rat primary cells as three-dimensional aggregates, which will be humanized and evaluated here with induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The use of iPSCs allows us to address gene/environment interactions as well as the potential of chemicals to interfere with epigenetic mechanisms. Additionally, iPSCs afford us the opportunity to study the effect of chemicals during very early stages of brain development. It is well recognized that assays for testing toxicity in the developing brain must consider differences in sensitivity and susceptibility that arise depending on the time of exposure. This model will reflect critical developmental processes such as proliferation, differentiation, lineage specification, migration, axonal growth, dendritic arborization and synaptogenesis, which will probably display differences in sensitivity to different types of chemicals. Functional endpoints will evaluate the complex cell-to-cell interactions that are affected in neurodevelopment through chemical perturbation, and the efficacy of drug intervention to prevent or reverse phenotypes. The model described is designed to assess developmental neurotoxicity effects on unique processes occurring during human brain development by leveraging human iPSCs from diverse genetic backgrounds, which can be differentiated into different cell types of the central nervous system. Our goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of the personalized model using iPSCs derived from individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders

  20. 3D Imaging of Microbial Biofilms: Integration of Synchrotron Imaging and an Interactive Visualization Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Mathew; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miller, Erin A.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.

    2014-08-26

    Understanding the interactions of structured communities known as “biofilms” and other complex matrixes is possible through the X-ray micro tomography imaging of the biofilms. Feature detection and image processing for this type of data focuses on efficiently identifying and segmenting biofilms and bacteria in the datasets. The datasets are very large and often require manual interventions due to low contrast between objects and high noise levels. Thus new software is required for the effectual interpretation and analysis of the data. This work specifies the evolution and application of the ability to analyze and visualize high resolution X-ray micro tomography datasets.

  1. Eta Carinae: An Observational Testbed for 3-D Interacting Wind Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore; Madura, Tom; Groh, Jose; Corcoran, Mike; Owocki, Stan

    2011-01-01

    Eta Car, with its very massive interacting winds, provides shocked arc-like structures dense enough to trace in forbidden emission lines out to 0.7" (1700 AU). As the massive binary is in a very elliptical orbit (e approx. 0.9), the spatial and velocity structures of these winds change over the 5.54 year period. We can tract ionization structures by several forbidden emission lines. With the addition of radiative transfer on a time-step frame-by-frame basis, we are learning much new information on the ballistic structures, and may gain insight on how molecules and dust might form in these very massive systems.

  2. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  3. a Web-Based Interactive Tool for Multi-Resolution 3d Models of a Maya Archaeological Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agugiaro, G.; Remondino, F.; Girardi, G.; von Schwerin, J.; Richards-Rissetto, H.; De Amicis, R.

    2011-09-01

    Continuous technological advances in surveying, computing and digital-content delivery are strongly contributing to a change in the way Cultural Heritage is "perceived": new tools and methodologies for documentation, reconstruction and research are being created to assist not only scholars, but also to reach more potential users (e.g. students and tourists) willing to access more detailed information about art history and archaeology. 3D computer-simulated models, sometimes set in virtual landscapes, offer for example the chance to explore possible hypothetical reconstructions, while on-line GIS resources can help interactive analyses of relationships and change over space and time. While for some research purposes a traditional 2D approach may suffice, this is not the case for more complex analyses concerning spatial and temporal features of architecture, like for example the relationship of architecture and landscape, visibility studies etc. The project aims therefore at creating a tool, called "QueryArch3D" tool, which enables the web-based visualisation and queries of an interactive, multi-resolution 3D model in the framework of Cultural Heritage. More specifically, a complete Maya archaeological site, located in Copan (Honduras), has been chosen as case study to test and demonstrate the platform's capabilities. Much of the site has been surveyed and modelled at different levels of detail (LoD) and the geometric model has been semantically segmented and integrated with attribute data gathered from several external data sources. The paper describes the characteristics of the research work, along with its implementation issues and the initial results of the developed prototype.

  4. Mapping the Complement Factor H-Related Protein 1 (CFHR1):C3b/C3d Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Jennifer; Thurman, Joshua M.; Hageman, Gregory S.; Holers, V. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1) is a complement regulator which has been reported to regulate complement by blocking C5 convertase activity and interfering with C5b surface association. CFHR1 also competes with complement factor H (CFH) for binding to C3b, and may act as an antagonist of CFH-directed regulation on cell surfaces. We have employed site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA-based and functional assays to isolate the binding interaction that CFHR1 undertakes with complement components C3b and C3d to a single shared interface. The C3b/C3d:CFHR1 interface is identical to that which occurs between the two C-terminal domains (SCR19-20) of CFH and C3b. Moreover, we have been able to corroborate that dimerization of CFHR1 is necessary for this molecule to bind effectively to C3b and C3d, or compete with CFH. Finally, we have established that CFHR1 competes with complement factor H-like protein 1 (CFHL-1) for binding to C3b. CFHL-1 is a CFH gene splice variant, which is almost identical to the N-terminal 7 domains of CFH (SCR1-7). CFHR1, therefore, not only competes with the C-terminus of CFH for binding to C3b, but also sterically blocks the interaction that the N-terminus of CFH undertakes with C3b, and which is required for CFH-regulation. PMID:27814381

  5. Skin-Friction Measurements in a 3-D, Supersonic Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wideman, J. K.; Brown, J. L.; Miles, J. B.; Ozcan, O.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental documentation of a three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction in a nominal Mach 3 cylinder, aligned with the free-stream flow, and 20 deg. half-angle conical flare offset 1.27 cm from the cylinder centerline. Surface oil flow, laser light sheet illumination, and schlieren were used to document the flow topology. The data includes surface-pressure and skin-friction measurements. A laser interferometric skin friction data. Included in the skin-friction data are measurements within separated regions and three-dimensional measurements in highly-swept regions. The skin-friction data will be particularly valuable in turbulence modeling and computational fluid dynamics validation.

  6. 3D magnetic interactions of stars with their close-in planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Brun, Allan Sacha; Matt, Sean; Réville, Victor

    2015-08-01

    Close-in planets generally orbit in a sub-alfv ´enic stellar wind, where the perturbations they excite in the corona are able to travel upwind to the stellar surface and potentially induce observable phenomena. The effective connection between the planet and its host takes the form of two Aflv ´en wings. Depending on the topology of the planetary and stellar magnetic fields, the rotation profile of the corona, and the orbital parameters, it is possible that none, one, or the two Aflv ´en wings connect together the star and the planet.We explore the formation and sustainment of Alfv ´en wings in global three dimensional simulations under the magneto-hydrodynamic formalism with the PLUTO code. We model the stellar wind of a typical cool star in which a close-in orbiting planet is introduced as a boundary condition. By varying the magnetic topologies of the planetary and stellar magnetic fields, we explore the variety of Alfv ´en wings that can develop and quantify the Poynting flux flowing through those wings. We thus provide estimates of the amount of magnetic energy these magnetic interactions can channel to the lower corona. We also quantify the phase and latitude offsets that can be expected between the planetary subpoint on the stellar surface and the actual location where energy is deposited. We summarize the typical situations (in terms of magnetic topology, stellar type, and orbital parameters) where the star-planet magnetic interaction could trigger observable flares. We conclude by extending our results to the cases of more complex, non-axisymmetric topologies of the observed magnetic fields for a few particular stars.

  7. High-Resolution Multibeam Sonar Survey and Interactive 3-D Exploration of the D-Day Wrecks off Normandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L. A.; Calder, B.; Schmidt, J. S.

    2003-12-01

    Historically, archaeological investigations use sidescan sonar and marine magnetometers as initial search tools. Targets are then examined through direct observation by divers, video, or photographs. Magnetometers can demonstrate the presence, absence, and relative susceptibility of ferrous objects but provide little indication of the nature of the target. Sidescan sonar can present a clear image of the overall nature of a target and its surrounding environment, but the sidescan image is often distorted and contains little information about the true 3-D shape of the object. Optical techniques allow precise identification of objects but suffer from very limited range, even in the best of situations. Modern high-resolution multibeam sonar offers an opportunity to cover a relatively large area from a safe distance above the target, while resolving the true three-dimensional (3-D) shape of the object with centimeter-level resolution. The combination of 3-D mapping and interactive 3-D visualization techniques provides a powerful new means to explore underwater artifacts. A clear demonstration of the applicability of high-resolution multibeam sonar to wreck and artifact investigations occurred when the Naval Historical Center (NHC), the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) at the University of New Hampshire, and Reson Inc., collaborated to explore the state of preservation and impact on the surrounding environment of a series of wrecks located off the coast of Normandy, France, adjacent to the American landing sectors The survey augmented previously collected magnetometer and high-resolution sidescan sonar data using a Reson 8125 high-resolution focused multibeam sonar with 240, 0.5° (at nadir) beams distributed over a 120° swath. The team investigated 21 areas in water depths ranging from about three -to 30 meters (m); some areas contained individual targets such as landing craft, barges, a destroyer, troop carrier, etc., while others contained multiple smaller

  8. Flow interactions with cells and tissues: cardiovascular flows and fluid-structure interactions. Sixth International Bio-Fluid Mechanics Symposium and Workshop, March 28-30, 2008, Pasadena, California.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Morton H; Krams, Rob; Chandran, Krishnan B

    2010-03-01

    Interactions between flow and biological cells and tissues are intrinsic to the circulatory, respiratory, digestive and genitourinary systems. In the circulatory system, an understanding of the complex interaction between the arterial wall (a living multi-component organ with anisotropic, nonlinear material properties) and blood (a shear-thinning fluid with 45% by volume consisting of red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells) is vital to our understanding of the physiology of the human circulation and the etiology and development of arterial diseases, and to the design and development of prosthetic implants and tissue-engineered substitutes. Similarly, an understanding of the complex dynamics of flow past native human heart valves and the effect of that flow on the valvular tissue is necessary to elucidate the etiology of valvular diseases and in the design and development of valve replacements. In this paper we address the influence of biomechanical factors on the arterial circulation. The first part presents our current understanding of the impact of blood flow on the arterial wall at the cellular level and the relationship between flow-induced stresses and the etiology of atherosclerosis. The second part describes recent advances in the application of fluid-structure interaction analysis to arterial flows and the dynamics of heart valves.

  9. Two-Species, 3D, MHD Simulation of Europa's Interaction with Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yifan; Nagy, Andrew F.; Kabin, Konstantin; Combi, Michael R.; DeZeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of Europa with the Jovian a magnetosphere has been studied by using a two species in ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model. This model considers the upstream plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere and the molecular oxygen ions in the ionosphere of Europa, separately. We present results a from simulation studies, which take into account impact ionization, recombination, and the effect of a possible induced dipole magnetic field of Europa. The total mass loading of the magnetospheric flow and the ionization frequency used in the model are consistent with the estimates of Europa's ionosphere and atmosphere. The multi-species MHD equations are solved by using a finite volume, high-order, Godunov-type method on an adoptively refined unstructured grid, which allows a detailed modeling of the region near Europa's surface, while still resolving both the upstream region and the satellite's wake. We have paid special attention to the wake of Europa, in order to be able to make comparisons with the Galileo's E4 flyby observations, as well as other model calculations. The calculated escape flux of a O2+ down the tail was found to be about 5.6 x 10(exp 25) s(sup -1).

  10. Fluid–structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration. PMID:24415796

  11. Jovian Plasma Torus Interaction with Europa: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation. First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa-moon-magnetosphere system with respect to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements, (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy etal.,2007;Shematovichetal.,2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyro radius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions).Non-thermal distributions of upstream plasma will be addressed in future work. Photoionization,electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider two models for background plasma:(a) with O(++) ions; (b) with O(++) and S(++) ions. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended cold population (Cassidyetal.,2007). A few first simulations already include an induced magnetic dipole; however, several important effects of induced magnetic fields arising from oceanic shell conductivity will be addressed in later work.

  12. Study on the Before Cavity Interaction in a Second Harmonic Gyrotron Using 3D CFDTD PIC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Illy, S.; Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J.

    2016-10-01

    A computational study on before cavity interaction (BCI) in a 28 GHz second harmonic (SH) gryotron for industrial applications has been performed using a 3-D conformal finite-difference time-domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method. On the contrary to the after cavity interaction (ACI), i.e. beam wave interaction in the non-linear uptaper after the cavity, which has been widely investigated, the BCI, i.e. beam wave interaction in the non-linear downtaper before the cavity connected to the beam tunnel with an entrance, is less noticed and discussed. Usually the BCI might be considered easy to be eliminated. However, this is not always the case. As the SH gyrotron had been designed for SH TE12 mode operation, the first harmonic (FH) plays the main competition. In the 3-D CFDTD PIC simulations, a port boundary has been employed for the gyro-beam entrance of the gyrotron cavity instead of a metallic short one which is not reflecting a realistic situation as an FH backward wave oscillation (BWO) is competing with the desired SH generation. A numerical instability has been found and identified as a failure of the entrance port boundary caused by an evanescent wave or mode conversion. This indicates the entrance and downtaper are not fully cut-off for some oscillations. A further study shows that the undesired oscillation is the FH TE11 BWO mode concentrated around the beam tunnel entrance and downtaper. A mitigation strategy has been found to suppress this undesired BCI and avoid possible damage to the gun region.

  13. Study on the After Cavity Interaction in a 140 GHz Gyrotron Using 3D CFDTD PIC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Illy, S.; Avramidis, K.; Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J.

    2016-10-01

    A computational study on after cavity interaction (ACI) in a 140 GHz gryotron for fusion research has been performed using a 3-D conformal finite-difference time-domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The ACI, i.e. beam wave interaction in the non-linear uptaper after the cavity has attracted a lot of attention and been widely investigated in recent years. In a dynamic ACI, a TE mode is excited by the electron beam at the same frequency as in the cavity, and the same mode is also interacting with the spent electron beam at a different frequency in the non-linear uptaper after the cavity while in a static ACI, a mode interacts with the beam both at the cavity and at the uptaper, but at the same frequency. A previous study on the dynamic ACI on a 140 GHz gyrotron has concluded that more advanced numerical simulations such as particle-in-cell (PIC) modeling should be employed to study or confirm the dynamic ACI in addition to using trajectory codes. In this work, we use a 3-D full wave time domain simulation based on the CFDTD PIC method to include the rippled-wall launcher of the quasi-optical output coupler into the simulations which breaks the axial symmetry of the original model employing a symmetric one. A preliminary simulation result has confirmed the dynamic ACI effect in this 140 GHz gyrotron in good agreement with the former study. A realistic launcher will be included in the model for studying the dynamic ACI and compared with the homogenous one.

  14. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  15. Lab Experiments Probe Interactions Between Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents and 3D Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauria, K.; Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted scaled laboratory experiments of unconfined dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) to examine interactions between three - dimensional obstacles and dilute PDCs. While it is known that PDCs can surmount barriers by converting kinetic energy into potential energy, the signature of topography on PDC dynamics is unclear. To examine the interplay between PDCs and topography, we turbulently suspended heated and ambient-temperature 20 μm talc powder in air within an 8.5 x 6.1 x 2.6 m tank. Experimental parameters (Froude number, densimetric and thermal Richardson number, particle Stokes and Settling numbers) were scaled such that the experimental currents were dynamically similar to natural PCS. The Reynolds number, however, is much smaller than in natural currents, but still large enough for the flows to be turbulent. We placed cylindrical and ridge-like objects in the path of the currents, illuminated the currents with orthogonal laser sheets, and recorded each experiment with high definition cameras. We observed currents surmounting ridge-like barriers (barrier height = current height). Slanted ridges redirected the currents upward and parallel to the upstream face of the ridges (~45° from horizontal). Down stream of the slanted ridges, ambient-temperature currents reattached to the floor. By comparison, hot currents reversed buoyancy and lifted off. These observations suggest that obstacles enhance air entrainment, a process key to affecting runout distance and the depletion of fine particles in ignimbrites. Moreover, we observed vortex shedding in the wake of cylinders. Our experiments demonstrate that barriers of various shapes affect PDC dynamics and can shorten PDC runout distances. Understanding the effects of topography on PDCs is required for interpreting many deposits because processes such as vortex shedding and topographically-induced changes in turbulent length scales and entrainment likely leave depositional signatures.

  16. 3D Modeling of interactions between Jupiter’s ammonia clouds and large anticyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palotai, Csaba; Dowling, Timothy E.; Fletcher, Leigh N.

    2014-04-01

    The motions of Jupiter’s tropospheric jets and vortices are made visible by its outermost clouds, which are expected to be largely composed of ammonia ice. Several groups have demonstrated that much of this dynamics can be reproduced in the vorticity fields of high-resolution models that, surprisingly, do not contain any clouds. While this reductionist approach is valuable, it has natural limitations. Here we report on numerical simulations that use the EPIC Jupiter model with a realistic ammonia-cloud microphysics module, focusing on how observable ammonia clouds interact with the Great Red Spot (GRS) and Oval BA. Maps of column-integrated ammonia-cloud density in the model resemble visible-band images of Jupiter and potential-vorticity maps. On the other hand, vertical cross sections through the model vortices reveal considerable heterogeneity in cloud density values between pressure levels in the vicinity of large anticyclones, and interestingly, ammonia snow appears occasionally. Away from the vortices, the ammonia clouds form at the levels expected from traditional one-dimensional models, and inside the vortices, the clouds are elevated and thick, in agreement with Galileo NIMS observations. However, rather than gathering slowly into place as a result of Jupiter’s weak secondary circulation, the ammonia clouds instead form high and thick inside the large anticyclones as soon as the cloud microphysics module is enabled. This suggests that any weak secondary circulation that might be present in Jupiter’s anticyclones, such as may arise because of radiative damping of their temperature anomalies, may have little or no direct effect on the altitude or thickness of the ammonia clouds. Instead, clouds form at those locations because the top halves of large anticyclones must be cool for the vortex to be able to fit under the tropopause, which is a primary-circulation, thermal-wind-shear effect of the stratification, not a secondary-circulation thermal feature

  17. Interactive 3D segmentation of the prostate in magnetic resonance images using shape and local appearance similarity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahedi, Maysam; Fenster, Aaron; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Ward, Aaron D.

    2013-03-01

    3D segmentation of the prostate in medical images is useful to prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy guidance, but is time-consuming to perform manually. Clinical translation of computer-assisted segmentation algorithms for this purpose requires a comprehensive and complementary set of evaluation metrics that are informative to the clinical end user. We have developed an interactive 3D prostate segmentation method for 1.5T and 3.0T T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2W MRI) acquired using an endorectal coil. We evaluated our method against manual segmentations of 36 3D images using complementary boundary-based (mean absolute distance; MAD), regional overlap (Dice similarity coefficient; DSC) and volume difference (ΔV) metrics. Our technique is based on inter-subject prostate shape and local boundary appearance similarity. In the training phase, we calculated a point distribution model (PDM) and a set of local mean intensity patches centered on the prostate border to capture shape and appearance variability. To segment an unseen image, we defined a set of rays - one corresponding to each of the mean intensity patches computed in training - emanating from the prostate centre. We used a radial-based search strategy and translated each mean intensity patch along its corresponding ray, selecting as a candidate the boundary point with the highest normalized cross correlation along each ray. These boundary points were then regularized using the PDM. For the whole gland, we measured a mean+/-std MAD of 2.5+/-0.7 mm, DSC of 80+/-4%, and ΔV of 1.1+/-8.8 cc. We also provided an anatomic breakdown of these metrics within the prostatic base, mid-gland, and apex.

  18. A 3D model of tumour angiogenic microenvironment to monitor hypoxia effects on cell interactions and cancer stem cell selection.

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Krzysztof; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Collet, Guillaume; Paprocka, Maria; Guichard, Alan; Sarna, Michal; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Sarna, Tadeusz; Grillon, Catherine; Kieda, Claudine

    2017-03-10

    Tumour microenvironment determines the fate of treatments. Reconstitution of tumour conditions is mandatory for alternative in vitro methods devoted to cancer development and the selection of therapeutic strategies. This work describes a 3D model of melanoma growth in its environment. Introducing means to mimic tumour angiogenesis, which turns on tumour progression, the model shows that melanoma tumour spheroids allow reconstitution of solid tumours with stromal cells. Angiogenesis evidenced the differential recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) from early progenitors (EEPCs) to mature ECs. Hypoxia was the key parameter that selected and stabilized melanoma cancer stem like cells (CSCs) phenotype based on aldehyde dehydrogenase expression as the best criterion. The 3D-tumour-model demonstrated the distinct reactivity of ECs toward tumour cells in terms of cellular cross-talk and humoral response. Intra-spheroid cell-to-cell membrane dye exchanges, mediated by intercellular interactions, uncovered the melanoma-to-EEPC cooperation. The resulting changes in tumour milieu were evidenced by the chemokinic composition and hypoxia-related variations in microRNA expression assessed in each cellular component of the spheroids. This method brings new tools to decipher the molecular mechanism of tumour-mediated cell recruitment and for in vitro assessment of therapeutic approaches.

  19. Mechanism of Enzymatic Reaction and Protein-Protein Interactions of PLD from a 3D Structural Model

    PubMed Central

    Mahankali, Madhu; Alter, Gerald; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    The phospholipase D (PLD) superfamily catalyzes the hydrolysis of cell membrane phospholipids generating the key intracellular lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. However, there is not yet any resolved structure either from a crystallized protein or from NMR of any mammalian PLDs. We propose here a 3D model of the PLD2 by combining homology and ab initio 3 dimensional structural modeling methods, and docking conformation. This model is in agreement with the biochemical and physiological behavior of PLD in cells. For the lipase activity, the N- and C-terminal histidines of the HKD motifs (His 442/His 756) form a catalytic pocket, which accommodates phosphatidylcholine head group (but not phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidyl serine). The model explains the mechanism of the reaction catalysis, with nucleophilic attacks of His 442 and water, the latter aided by His 756. Further, the secondary structure regions superimposed with bacterial PLD crystal structure, which indicated an agreement structure model obtained. It also explains protein-protein interactions, such as PLD2-Rac2 transmodulation (with a 1:2 stoichiometry), PLD2 GEF activity on Rac2 that is relevant for actin polymerization and cell migration, and a biding site for phosphoinositides. Since tumor-aggravating properties have been found in mice overexpressing PLD2 enzyme, the 3D model of PLD2 will be also useful, to a large extent, in developing pharmaceuticals to modulate its in vivo activity. PMID:25308783

  20. Development of a system based on 3D vision, interactive virtual environments, ergonometric signals and a humanoid for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ibarra Zannatha, Juan Manuel; Tamayo, Alejandro Justo Malo; Sánchez, Angel David Gómez; Delgado, Jorge Enrique Lavín; Cheu, Luis Eduardo Rodríguez; Arévalo, Wilson Alexander Sierra

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a stroke rehabilitation (SR) system for the upper limbs, developed as an interactive virtual environment (IVE) based on a commercial 3D vision system (a Microsoft Kinect), a humanoid robot (an Aldebaran's Nao), and devices producing ergonometric signals. In one environment, the rehabilitation routines, developed by specialists, are presented to the patient simultaneously by the humanoid and an avatar inside the IVE. The patient follows the rehabilitation task, while his avatar copies his gestures that are captured by the Kinect 3D vision system. The information of the patient movements, together with the signals obtained from the ergonometric measurement devices, is used also to supervise and to evaluate the rehabilitation progress. The IVE can also present an RGB image of the patient. In another environment, that uses the same base elements, four game routines--Touch the balls 1 and 2, Simon says, and Follow the point--are used for rehabilitation. These environments are designed to create a positive influence in the rehabilitation process, reduce costs, and engage the patient.

  1. Investigating the interaction between positions and signals of height-channel loudspeakers in reproducing immersive 3d sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampourniotis, Antonios

    Since transmission capacities have significantly increased over the past few years, researchers are now able to transmit a larger amount of data, namely multichannel audio content, in the consumer applications. What has not been investigated in a systematic way yet is how to deliver the multichannel content. Specifically, researchers' attention is focused on the quest of a standardized immersive reproduction format that incorporates height loudspeakers coupled with the new high-resolution and three-dimensional (3D) media content for a comprehensive 3D experience. To better understand and utilize the immersive audio reproduction, this research focused on the (1) interaction between the positioning of height loudspeakers and the signals fed to the loudspeakers, (2) investigation of the perceptual characteristics associated with the height ambiences, and (3) the influence of inverse filtering on perceived sound quality for the realistic 3D sound reproduction. The experiment utilized the existence of two layers of loudspeakers: horizontal layer following the ITU-R BS.775 five-channel loudspeaker configuration and height layer locating a total of twelve loudspeakers at the azimuth of +/-30°, +/-50°, +/-70°, +/-90°, +/-110° and +/-130° and elevation of 30°. Eight configurations were formed, each of which selected four height-loudspeakers from twelve. In the subjective evaluation, listeners compared, ranked and described the eight randomly presented configurations of 4-channel height ambiences. The stimuli for the experiment were four nine-channel (5 channels for the horizontal and 4 for the height loudspeakers) multichannel music. Moreover, an approach of Finite Impulse Response (FIR) inverse filtering was attempted, in order to remove the particular room's acoustic influence. Another set of trained professionals was informally asked to use descriptors to characterize the newly presented multichannel music with height ambiences rendered with inverse filtering. The

  2. Bioconjugation of peptides using advanced nanomaterials to examine their interactions in 3D printed flow-through device.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Petr; Richtera, Lukas; Krejcova, Ludmila; Nejdl, Lukas; Kensova, Renata; Zitka, Jan; Kopel, Pavel; Heger, Zbynek; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2016-02-01

    Peptide-peptide interactions are crucial in the living cell as they lead to the formation of the numerous types of complexes. In this study, synthetic peptides containing 11 of cysteines (α-domain of metallothionein (MT)) and sialic acid binding region (130-loop of hemagglutinin (HA)) were employed. The aim of the experiment was studying the interactions between MT and HA-derived peptides. For this purpose, fragments were tagged with cysteines at C-terminal part to serve as ligand sites for PbS and CuS quantum dots (QDs), and therefore these conjugates can be traced and quantified during wide spectrum of methods. As a platform for interaction, γ-Fe2O3 paramagnetic particles modified with tetraethyl orthosilicate and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (hydrodynamic diameter 30-40 nm) were utilized and MT/HA interactions were examined using multi-instrumental approach including electrochemistry, electrophoretic methods, and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. It was found that peptides enter mutual creation of complexes, which are based on some of nonbonded interactions. The higher willingness to interact was observed in MT-derived peptides toward immobilized HA. Finally, we designed and manufactured flow-through electrochemical 3D printed device (reservoir volume 150 μL) and utilized it for automated analysis of the HA/MT metal labels. Under the optimal conditions, (deposition time and flow rate 80 s and 1.6 mL/min for CuS and 120 s and 1.6 mL/min PbS, respectively), the results of peptide-conjugated QDs were comparable with atomic absorption spectrometry.

  3. Investigation of the fluid-structure interaction of a high head Francis turbine using OpenFOAM and Code_Aster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, M.; Doujak, E.; Waldner, L.

    2016-11-01

    The increasing energy consumption and highly stressed power grids influence the operating conditions of turbines and pump turbines in the present situation. To provide or use energy as quick as possible, hydraulic turbines are operated more frequent and over longer periods of time in lower part load at off-design conditions. This leads to a more turbulent behavior and to higher requirements of the strength of stressed components (e.g. runner, guide or stay vanes). The modern advantages of computational capabilities regarding numerical investigations allow a precise prediction of appearing flow conditions and thereby induced strains in hydraulic machines. This paper focuses on the calculation of the unsteady pressure field of a high head Francis turbine with a specific speed of nq ≈ 24 min-1 and its impact on the structure at different operating conditions. In the first step, unsteady numerical flow simulations are performed with the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. To obtain the appearing dynamic flow phenomena, the entire machine, consisting of the spiral casing, the stay vanes, the wicket gate, the runner and the draft tube, is taken into account. Additionally, a reduced model without the spiral casing and with a simplified inlet boundary is used. To evaluate the accuracy of the CFD simulations, operating parameters such as head and torque are compared with the results of site measurements carried out on the corresponding prototype machine. In the second part, the obtained pressure fields are used for a fluid-structure analysis with the open-source Finite Element software Code_Aster, to predict the static loads on the runner.

  4. Exploring single-molecule interactions through 3D optical trapping and tracking: From thermal noise to protein refolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley Philip

    The focus of this thesis is the development and application of a novel technique for investigating the structure and dynamics of weak interactions between and within single-molecules. This approach is designed to explore unusual features in bi-directional transitions near equilibrium. The basic idea is to infer molecular events by observing changes in the three-dimensional Brownian fluctuations of a functionalized microsphere held weakly near a reactive substrate. Experimentally, I have developed a unique optical tweezers system that combines an interference technique for accurate 3D tracking (˜1 nm vertically, and ˜2-3 nm laterally) with a continuous autofocus system which stabilizes the trap height to within 1-2 mn over hours. A number of different physical and biological systems were investigated with this instrument. Data interpretation was assisted by a multi-scale Brownian Dynamics simulation that I have developed. I have explored the 3D signatures of different molecular tethers, distinguishing between single and multiple attachments, as well as between stiff and soft linkages. As well, I have developed a technique for measuring the force-dependent compliance of molecular tethers from thermal noise fluctuations and demonstrated this with a short ssDNA oligomer. Another practical approach that I have developed for extracting information from fluctuation measurements is Inverse Brownian Dynamics, which yields the underlying potential of mean force and position dependent diffusion coefficient from the Brownian motion of a particle. I have also developed a new force calibration method that takes into account video motion blur, and that uses this information to measure bead dynamics. Perhaps most significantly, I have trade the first direct observations of the refolding of spectrin repeats under mechanical force, and investigated the force-dependent kinetics of this transition.

  5. 3-D Full-kinetic Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Particle Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Wang, X.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present three-dimensional full-kinetic electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the full-kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to self-consistently investigate space charge effects, and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general mechanism of the interaction of both a horizontal and vertical dipole model embedded just below the lunar surface focussing on the ion and electron kinetic behaviour of the system. It is shown that the configurations are largely dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyro-radius of the solar wind ions. The formation of mini-magnetospheres is an electrostatic effect. Additionally, we discuss typical particle trajectories as well as complete particle distribution functions covering thermal and suprathermal energies, within the interaction region and on viable spacecraft altitudes. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board

  6. Insights into the effects of oblique extension on continental rift interaction from 3D analogue and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwaan, Frank; Schreurs, Guido; Naliboff, John; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Continental rifts often develop from linkage of distinct rift segments under varying degrees of extension obliquity. These rift segments arise from rift initiation at non-aligned crustal heterogeneities and need to interact to develop a full-scale rift system. Here, we test the effects of 1) oblique extension and 2) initial heterogeneity (seed) offset on continental rift interaction with the use of an improved analogue model set-up. X-ray computer tomography (CT) techniques are used to analyse the 3D models through time and the results are compared with additional numerical models and natural examples. The experimental results reveal that increasing extension obliquity strongly changes rift segment structures from wide rifts in orthogonal settings to narrower rifts with oblique internal structures under oblique extension conditions to narrow strike-slip dominated systems towards the strike-slip domain. We also find that both decreasing seed offset and increasing extension obliquity promote hard linkage of rift segments through the formation of continuous rift boundary faults at the surface. (Initial) soft linkage through the formation of relay ramps is more likely when seed offset increases or extension is more orthogonal. Rather than linking at depth, the rift boundary faults curve around each other at depth and merge towards the surface to form a continuous trough. Orthogonal extension promotes the formation of intra-rift horsts, which may provide hydrocarbon traps in nature.

  7. Laser-plasma interaction in ignition relevant plasmas: benchmarking our 3D modelling capabilities versus recent experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Divol, L; Froula, D H; Meezan, N; Berger, R; London, R A; Michel, P; Glenzer, S H

    2007-09-27

    We have developed a new target platform to study Laser Plasma Interaction in ignition-relevant condition at the Omega laser facility (LLE/Rochester)[1]. By shooting an interaction beam along the axis of a gas-filled hohlraum heated by up to 17 kJ of heater beam energy, we were able to create a millimeter-scale underdense uniform plasma at electron temperatures above 3 keV. Extensive Thomson scattering measurements allowed us to benchmark our hydrodynamic simulations performed with HYDRA [1]. As a result of this effort, we can use with much confidence these simulations as input parameters for our LPI simulation code pF3d [2]. In this paper, we show that by using accurate hydrodynamic profiles and full three-dimensional simulations including a realistic modeling of the laser intensity pattern generated by various smoothing options, fluid LPI theory reproduces the SBS thresholds and absolute reflectivity values and the absence of measurable SRS. This good agreement was made possible by the recent increase in computing power routinely available for such simulations.

  8. A Comprehensive Software System for Interactive, Real-time, Visual 3D Deterministic and Stochastic Groundwater Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.

    2002-05-01

    Taking advantage of the recent developments in groundwater modeling research and computer, image and graphics processing, and objected oriented programming technologies, Dr. Li and his research group have recently developed a comprehensive software system for unified deterministic and stochastic groundwater modeling. Characterized by a new real-time modeling paradigm and improved computational algorithms, the software simulates 3D unsteady flow and reactive transport in general groundwater formations subject to both systematic and "randomly" varying stresses and geological and chemical heterogeneity. The software system has following distinct features and capabilities: Interactive simulation and real time visualization and animation of flow in response to deterministic as well as stochastic stresses. Interactive, visual, and real time particle tracking, random walk, and reactive plume modeling in both systematically and randomly fluctuating flow. Interactive statistical inference, scattered data interpolation, regression, and ordinary and universal Kriging, conditional and unconditional simulation. Real-time, visual and parallel conditional flow and transport simulations. Interactive water and contaminant mass balance analysis and visual and real-time flux update. Interactive, visual, and real time monitoring of head and flux hydrographs and concentration breakthroughs. Real-time modeling and visualization of aquifer transition from confined to unconfined to partially de-saturated or completely dry and rewetting Simultaneous and embedded subscale models, automatic and real-time regional to local data extraction; Multiple subscale flow and transport models Real-time modeling of steady and transient vertical flow patterns on multiple arbitrarily-shaped cross-sections and simultaneous visualization of aquifer stratigraphy, properties, hydrological features (rivers, lakes, wetlands, wells, drains, surface seeps), and dynamically adjusted surface flooding area

  9. Insights into bonding interactions and excitation energies of 3d-4f mixed lanthanide transition metal macrocyclic complexes.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2016-12-07

    In this contribution, a computational study of equatorial bound tetranuclear macrocycle (butylene linked) [LnZn(HOM(Bu))](3+) (Ln = La(3+), Ce(3+)) complexes was carried out. Here, the electronic structure, bonding interaction and excitation energies were studied within the relativistic density functional theory framework. From the electronic structure analysis, the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) were strongly localized in the d-orbitals of the Zn centers and the f-orbitals of the lanthanide ions. Besides, the inner MOs were found to exhibit a π-character from the organic part of the macrocyclic chain. EDA-NOCV was used as a tool for evaluating the bonding interaction, taking the trinuclear metallomacrocycle (ZnHOM(Bu)) and the lanthanide center as fragments. This analysis showed that the interaction between these fragments was slightly covalent; with this covalency being the result of a charge transfer from the metallomacrocyclic ring to the lanthanide. This phenomenon was observed in the deformation density channels obtained from the EDA-NOCV study; in which π- and σ-charge transfer was observed. Finally, the TD-DFT study of the excitation energies evidenced three sets of bands: the first set with the highest intensity represented the ligand to metal charge transfer bands; the second set could be attributed to the 3d-4f electronic transitions between the metal centers; and the third set represented the f-f bands found for the open-shell cerium complex. This class of complexes accomplishes the "antenna effect" principle, which states that highly absorptive transition-metal (TM) complexes can be used to enhance the luminescence of poorly emissive systems, and are introduced in this study as self-sensitizer bimetallic d-f systems with potential applications in near infra-red (NIR) technologies.

  10. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McClay, Wilbert A; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-09-30

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user's intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI's data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject's MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse.

  11. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Wilbert A.; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2015-01-01

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user’s intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI’s data analytics of a subject’s MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse. PMID:26437432

  12. Liver segmentation in contrast enhanced CT data using graph cuts and interactive 3D segmentation refinement methods

    SciTech Connect

    Beichel, Reinhard; Bornik, Alexander; Bauer, Christian; Sorantin, Erich

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Liver segmentation is an important prerequisite for the assessment of liver cancer treatment options like tumor resection, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), radiofrequency ablation, etc. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a new approach for liver segmentation. Methods: A graph cuts segmentation method was combined with a three-dimensional virtual reality based segmentation refinement approach. The developed interactive segmentation system allowed the user to manipulate volume chunks and/or surfaces instead of 2D contours in cross-sectional images (i.e, slice-by-slice). The method was evaluated on twenty routinely acquired portal-phase contrast enhanced multislice computed tomography (CT) data sets. An independent reference was generated by utilizing a currently clinically utilized slice-by-slice segmentation method. After 1 h of introduction to the developed segmentation system, three experts were asked to segment all twenty data sets with the proposed method. Results: Compared to the independent standard, the relative volumetric segmentation overlap error averaged over all three experts and all twenty data sets was 3.74%. Liver segmentation required on average 16 min of user interaction per case. The calculated relative volumetric overlap errors were not found to be significantly different [analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, p = 0.82] between experts who utilized the proposed 3D system. In contrast, the time required by each expert for segmentation was found to be significantly different (ANOVA test, p = 0.0009). Major differences between generated segmentations and independent references were observed in areas were vessels enter or leave the liver and no accepted criteria for defining liver boundaries exist. In comparison, slice-by-slice based generation of the independent standard utilizing a live wire tool took 70.1 min on average. A standard 2D segmentation refinement approach applied to all twenty data sets required on average 38.2 min of

  13. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Juliany C.F.; Viana, Nathan B.; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F.A.; Silva-Filho, Fernando C.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model. PMID:24765565

  14. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Petropolis, Debora B; Rodrigues, Juliany C F; Viana, Nathan B; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F A; Silva-Filho, Fernando C

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited "freeze and run" migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular "home"-macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model.

  15. Effects of multiple-interaction photon events in a high-resolution PET system that uses 3-D positioning detectors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yi; Pratx, Guillem; Lau, Frances W. Y.; Levin, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors’ laboratory is developing a dual-panel, breast-dedicated PET system. The detector panels are built from dual-LSO-position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) modules—units holding two 8×8 arrays of 1 mm3 LSO crystals, where each array is coupled to a PSAPD. When stacked to form an imaging volume, these modules are capable of recording the 3-D coordinates of individual interactions of a multiple-interaction photon event (MIPE). The small size of the scintillation crystal elements used increases the likelihood of photon scattering between crystal arrays. In this article, the authors investigate how MIPEs impact the system photon sensitivity, the data acquisition scheme, and the quality and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET images. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulated PET scan using the dual-panel system was performed on a uniformly radioactive phantom for the photon sensitivity study. To establish the impact of MIPEs on a proposed PSAPD multiplexing scheme, experimental data were collected from a dual-LSO-PSAPD module edge-irradiated with a 22Na point source, the data were compared against simulation data based on an identical setup. To assess the impact of MIPEs on the dual-panel PET images, a simulated PET of a phantom comprising a matrix of hot spherical radiation sources of varying diameters immersed in a warm background was performed. The list-mode output data were used for image reconstruction, where various methods were used for estimating the location of the first photon interaction in MIPEs for more accurate line of response positioning. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), contrast to noise ratio (CNR), and the full width at half maximum spatial resolution of the spheres in the reconstructed images were used as figures of merit to facilitate comparison. Results: Compared to image reconstruction employing only events with interactions confined to one LSO array, a potential single photon sensitivity gain of >46.9% (>115

  16. Evaluation of a 3-D interactive tooth atlas by dental students in dental anatomy and endodontics courses.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward F; Hendricson, William D

    2010-02-01

    Advances in information and communication technology continually offer innovations to assist faculty in their efforts to help students learn new information or develop new skills. However, faculty members are often hesitant to incorporate these innovations into their courses out of fear that these new methods may not provide the anticipated outcomes. Hence, students are often the subjects of educational trials to evaluate curriculum innovations by comparing a new teaching/learning method to traditional lecture-based instruction. The most typical finding is that students can learn equally well by either method. However, two questions that have not been studied extensively in dental education are whether dental students will actually use computer-based educational resources made available to them and whether students perceive these materials to provide a value-added learning experience. Accordingly, the goals of this study were to determine whether first-year dental students (D1), second-year dental students (D2), and third-year dental students (D3) would 1) use an interactive tooth atlas, available on a DVD, as a study aid and 2) perceive that the atlas provided sufficient value-added benefit for their dental anatomy (D1), preclinical laboratory endodontics (D2), and clinical endodontics (D3) courses to recommend adding it to their school's comprehensive electronic resources. A low percentage of the students (14 percent; 40/289) voluntarily downloaded the atlas from a DVD to their laptops prior to the addition of incentives in the form of atlas-related examination questions. Even after incentives were added, only 43 percent of the students (126/289) downloaded the DVD. After using the atlas, students responded to the statement "Using the 3D Interactive Tooth Atlas was beneficial for me" on a 0 to 10 scale with 0 representing strongly disagree, 5 representing unsure, and 10 representing strongly agree. The mean rankings were 5.34 for D1s, 6.79 for D2s, and 7.28 for D

  17. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  18. A potential-flow, deformable-body model for fluid-structure interactions with compact vorticity: application to animal swimming measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O.

    This paper presents an approach to quantify the unsteady fluid forces, moments and mass transport generated by swimming animals, based on measurements of the surrounding flow field. These goals are accomplished within a framework that is independent of the vorticity field, making it unnecessary to directly resolve boundary layers on the animal, body-vortex interactions, or interactions among vortex lines in the wake. Instead, the method identifies Lagrangian coherent structures in the flow, whose dynamics in flows with compact vorticity are shown to be well approximated by potential flow concepts, especially the Kirchhoff and deformation potentials from deformable body theory. Examples of the application of these methods are given for pectoral fin locomotion of the bluegill sunfish and undulatory swimming of jellyfish, and the methods are validated by analysis of a canonical starting vortex ring flow. The transition to a Lagrangian approach toward animal swimming measurements suggests the possibility of implementing recently developed particle tracking (vis-à-vis DPIV) techniques for fully three-dimensional measurements of animal swimming.

  19. Cx43-Dependent Skeletal Phenotypes Are Mediated by Interactions between the Hapln1a-ECM and Sema3d during Fin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Jayalakshmi; Tun, Kyaw Min; Iovine, M Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal development is a tightly regulated process and requires proper communication between the cells for efficient exchange of information. Analysis of fin length mutants has revealed that the gap junction protein Connexin43 (Cx43) coordinates cell proliferation (growth) and joint formation (patterning) during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration. Previous studies have shown that the extra cellular matrix (ECM) protein Hyaluronan and Proteoglycan Link Protein1a (Hapln1a) is molecularly and functionally downstream of Cx43, and that hapln1a knockdown leads to reduction of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan. Here we find that the proteoglycan aggrecan is similarly reduced following Hapln1a knockdown. Notably, we demonstrate that both hyaluronan and aggrecan are required for growth and patterning. Moreover, we provide evidence that the Hapln1a-ECM stabilizes the secreted growth factor Semaphorin3d (Sema3d), which has been independently shown to mediate Cx43 dependent phenotypes during regeneration. Double knockdown of hapln1a and sema3d reveal synergistic interactions. Further, hapln1a knockdown phenotypes were rescued by Sema3d overexpression. Therefore, Hapln1a maintains the composition of specific components of the ECM, which appears to be required for the stabilization of at least one growth factor, Sema3d. We propose that the Hapln1a dependent ECM provides the required conditions for Sema3d stabilization and function. Interactions between the ECM and signaling molecules are complex and our study demonstrates the requirement for components of the Hapln1a-ECM for Sema3d signal transduction.

  20. Cx43-Dependent Skeletal Phenotypes Are Mediated by Interactions between the Hapln1a-ECM and Sema3d during Fin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Jayalakshmi; Tun, Kyaw Min; Iovine, M. Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal development is a tightly regulated process and requires proper communication between the cells for efficient exchange of information. Analysis of fin length mutants has revealed that the gap junction protein Connexin43 (Cx43) coordinates cell proliferation (growth) and joint formation (patterning) during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration. Previous studies have shown that the extra cellular matrix (ECM) protein Hyaluronan and Proteoglycan Link Protein1a (Hapln1a) is molecularly and functionally downstream of Cx43, and that hapln1a knockdown leads to reduction of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan. Here we find that the proteoglycan aggrecan is similarly reduced following Hapln1a knockdown. Notably, we demonstrate that both hyaluronan and aggrecan are required for growth and patterning. Moreover, we provide evidence that the Hapln1a-ECM stabilizes the secreted growth factor Semaphorin3d (Sema3d), which has been independently shown to mediate Cx43 dependent phenotypes during regeneration. Double knockdown of hapln1a and sema3d reveal synergistic interactions. Further, hapln1a knockdown phenotypes were rescued by Sema3d overexpression. Therefore, Hapln1a maintains the composition of specific components of the ECM, which appears to be required for the stabilization of at least one growth factor, Sema3d. We propose that the Hapln1a dependent ECM provides the required conditions for Sema3d stabilization and function. Interactions between the ECM and signaling molecules are complex and our study demonstrates the requirement for components of the Hapln1a-ECM for Sema3d signal transduction. PMID:26828861