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Sample records for 3d fluorescence spectra

  1. [Application of PARAFAC method and 3-D fluorescence spectra in petroleum pollutant measurement and analysis].

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhao; Wang, Yu-tian; Shao, Xiao-qing; Wu, Xi-jun; Yang, Li-li

    2012-03-01

    A method for identification and concentration measurement of petroleum pollutant by combining three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence spectra with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was proposed. The main emphasis of research was the measurement of coexisting different kinds of petroleum. The CCl4 solutions of a 0# diesel sample, a 97# gasoline sample, and a kerosene sample were used as measurement objects. The condition of multiple petroleum coexistence was simulated by petroleum solutions with different mixed ratios. The character of PARAFAC in complex mixture coexisting system analysis was studied. The spectra of three kinds of solutions and the spectra of gasoline-diesel mixed samples, diesel-kerosene mixed samples, and gas oline-diesel mixed with small counts of kerosene interference samples were analyzed respectively. The core consistency diagnostic method and residual sum of squares method were applied to calculate the number of factors in PARAFAC. In gasoline-diesel experiment, gasoline or diesel can be identified and measured as a whole respectively by 2-factors parallel factors analysis. In diesel-kerosene experiment, 2-factors parallel factors analysis can only obtain the characters of diesel, and the 3rd factor is needed to separate the kerosene spectral character from the mixture spectrum. When small counts of kerosene exist in gasoline-diesel solution, gasoline and diesel still can be identified and measured as principal components by a 2-factors parallel factor analysis, and the effect of interference on qualitative analysis is not significant. The experiment verified that the PARAFAC method can obtain characteristic spectrum of each kind of petroleum, and the concentration of petroleum in solutions can be predicted simultaneously, with recoveries shown in the paper. The results showed the possibility of petroleum pollutant identification and concentration measurement based on the 3-D fluorescence spectra and PARAFAC.

  2. Saliency detection for videos using 3D FFT local spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zhiling; AlRegib, Ghassan

    2015-03-01

    Bottom-up spatio-temporal saliency detection identifies perceptually important regions of interest in video sequences. The center-surround model proves to be useful for visual saliency detection. In this work, we explore using 3D FFT local spectra as features for saliency detection within the center-surround framework. We develop a spectral location based decomposition scheme to divide a 3D FFT cube into two components, one related to temporal changes and the other related to spatial changes. Temporal saliency and spatial saliency are detected separately using features derived from each spectral component through a simple center-surround comparison method. The two detection results are then combined to yield a saliency map. We apply the same detection algorithm to different color channels (YIQ) and incorporate the results into the final saliency determination. The proposed technique is tested with the public CRCNS database. Both visual and numerical evaluations verify the promising performance of our technique.

  3. Discrimination of petroleum fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszewski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents studies of the total spectra (fluorescence-excitation matrix) of petroleum with regard to the utilization of fluorescence for determining petroleum pollutants. Thorough testing of one group, comprising almost forty lubricating oils in the form of their hexane solutions, points out their discrimination.

  4. Validation of image processing tools for 3-D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dieterlen, Alain; Xu, Chengqi; Gramain, Marie-Pierre; Haeberlé, Olivier; Colicchio, Bruno; Cudel, Christophe; Jacquey, Serge; Ginglinger, Emanuelle; Jung, Georges; Jeandidier, Eric

    2002-04-01

    3-D optical fluorescent microscopy becomes nowadays an efficient tool for volumic investigation of living biological samples. Using optical sectioning technique, a stack of 2-D images is obtained. However, due to the nature of the system optical transfer function and non-optimal experimental conditions, acquired raw data usually suffer from some distortions. In order to carry out biological analysis, raw data have to be restored by deconvolution. The system identification by the point-spread function is useful to obtain the knowledge of the actual system and experimental parameters, which is necessary to restore raw data. It is furthermore helpful to precise the experimental protocol. In order to facilitate the use of image processing techniques, a multi-platform-compatible software package called VIEW3D has been developed. It integrates a set of tools for the analysis of fluorescence images from 3-D wide-field or confocal microscopy. A number of regularisation parameters for data restoration are determined automatically. Common geometrical measurements and morphological descriptors of fluorescent sites are also implemented to facilitate the characterisation of biological samples. An example of this method concerning cytogenetics is presented.

  5. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Gartia, Manas; Hsiao, Austin; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Chen, Yi; Logan Liu, G.

    2011-09-01

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  6. High resolution 3D fluorescence tomography using ballistic photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Kwong, Jessica; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a ballistic-photon based approach for improving the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography using time-domain measurements. This approach uses early photon information contained in measured time-of-fight distributions originating from fluorescence emission. The time point spread functions (TPSF) from both excitation light and emission light are acquired with gated single photon Avalanche detector (SPAD) and time-correlated single photon counting after a short laser pulse. To determine the ballistic photons for reconstruction, the lifetime of the fluorophore and the time gate from the excitation profiles will be used for calibration, and then the time gate of the fluorescence profile can be defined by a simple time convolution. By mimicking first generation CT data acquisition, the sourcedetector pair will translate across and also rotate around the subject. The measurement from each source-detector position will be reshaped into a histogram that can be used by a simple back-projection algorithm in order to reconstruct high resolution fluorescence images. Finally, from these 2D sectioning slides, a 3D inclusion can be reconstructed accurately. To validate the approach, simulation of light transport is performed for biological tissue-like media with embedded fluorescent inclusion by solving the diffusion equation with Finite Element Method using COMSOL Multiphysics simulation. The reconstruction results from simulation studies have confirmed that this approach drastically improves the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography. Moreover, all the results have shown the feasibility of this technique for high resolution small animal imaging up to several centimeters.

  7. Unsupervised noise removal algorithms for 3-D confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roysam, Badrinath; Bhattacharjya, Anoop K.; Srinivas, Chukka; Szarowski, Donald H.; Turner, James N.

    1992-06-01

    Fast algorithms are presented for effective removal of the noise artifact in 3-D confocal fluorescence microscopy images of extended spatial objects such as neurons. The algorithms are unsupervised in the sense that they automatically estimate and adapt to the spatially and temporally varying noise level in the microscopy data. An important feature of the algorithms is the fact that a 3-D segmentation of the field emerges jointly with the intensity estimate. The role of the segmentation is to limit any smoothing to the interiors of regions and hence avoid the blurring that is associated with conventional noise removal algorithms. Fast computation is achieved by parallel computation methods, rather than by algorithmic or modelling compromises. The noise-removal proceeds iteratively, starting from a set of approximate user- supplied, or default initial guesses of the underlying random process parameters. An expectation maximization algorithm is used to obtain a more precise characterization of these parameters, that are then input to a hierarchical estimation algorithm. This algorithm computes a joint solution of the related problems corresponding to intensity estimation, segmentation, and boundary-surface estimation subject to a combination of stochastic priors and syntactic pattern constraints. Three-dimensional stereoscopic renderings of processed 3-D images of murine hippocampal neurons are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The processed images exhibit increased contrast and significant smoothing and reduction of the background intensity while avoiding any blurring of the neuronal structures.

  8. Discrimination of Rhizoma Gastrodiae (Tianma) using 3D synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qimeng; Chen, Chaoyin; Huang, Zaiqiang; Zhang, Chunmei; Liang, Pengjuan; Zhao, Shenglan

    2015-02-01

    Rhizoma Gastrodiae (Tianma) of different variants and different geographical origins has vital difference in quality and physiological efficacy. This paper focused on the classification and identification of Tianma of six types (two variants from three different geographical origins) using three dimensional synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (3D-SFS) coupled with principal component analysis (PCA). 3D-SF spectra of aqueous extracts, which were obtained from Tianma of the six types, were measured by a LS-50B luminescence spectrofluorometer. The experimental results showed that the characteristic fluorescent spectral regions of the 3D-SF spectra were similar, while the intensities of characteristic regions are different significantly. Coupled these differences in peak intensities with PCA, Tianma of six types could be discriminated successfully. In conclusion, 3D-SFS coupled with PCA, which has such advantages as effective, specific, rapid, non-polluting, has an edge for discrimination of the similar Chinese herbal medicine. And the proposed methodology is a useful tool to classify and identify Tianma of different variants and different geographical origins.

  9. Quantitative analysis of autophagy using advanced 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Changou, Chun A; Wolfson, Deanna L; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y S

    2013-05-03

    Prostate cancer is the leading form of malignancies among men in the U.S. While surgery carries a significant risk of impotence and incontinence, traditional chemotherapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful. Hormone therapy is effective at early stage, but often fails with the eventual development of hormone-refractory tumors. We have been interested in developing therapeutics targeting specific metabolic deficiency of tumor cells. We recently showed that prostate tumor cells specifically lack an enzyme (argininosuccinate synthase, or ASS) involved in the synthesis of the amino acid arginine(1). This condition causes the tumor cells to become dependent on exogenous arginine, and they undergo metabolic stress when free arginine is depleted by arginine deiminase (ADI)(1,10). Indeed, we have shown that human prostate cancer cells CWR22Rv1 are effectively killed by ADI with caspase-independent apoptosis and aggressive autophagy (or macroautophagy)(1,2,3). Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that allows cells to metabolize unwanted proteins by lysosomal breakdown during nutritional starvation(4,5). Although the essential components of this pathway are well-characterized(6,7,8,9), many aspects of the molecular mechanism are still unclear - in particular, what is the role of autophagy in the death-response of prostate cancer cells after ADI treatment? In order to address this question, we required an experimental method to measure the level and extent of autophagic response in cells - and since there are no known molecular markers that can accurately track this process, we chose to develop an imaging-based approach, using quantitative 3D fluorescence microscopy(11,12). Using CWR22Rv1 cells specifically-labeled with fluorescent probes for autophagosomes and lysosomes, we show that 3D image stacks acquired with either widefield deconvolution microscopy (and later, with super-resolution, structured-illumination microscopy) can clearly capture the early

  10. 3D fluorescence anisotropy imaging using selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Ranjit, Suman; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging is a popular method to visualize changes in organization and conformation of biomolecules within cells and tissues. In such an experiment, depolarization effects resulting from differences in orientation, proximity and rotational mobility of fluorescently labeled molecules are probed with high spatial resolution. Fluorescence anisotropy is typically imaged using laser scanning and epifluorescence-based approaches. Unfortunately, those techniques are limited in either axial resolution, image acquisition speed, or by photobleaching. In the last decade, however, selective plane illumination microscopy has emerged as the preferred choice for three-dimensional time lapse imaging combining axial sectioning capability with fast, camera-based image acquisition, and minimal light exposure. We demonstrate how selective plane illumination microscopy can be utilized for three-dimensional fluorescence anisotropy imaging of live cells. We further examined the formation of focal adhesions by three-dimensional time lapse anisotropy imaging of CHO-K1 cells expressing an EGFP-paxillin fusion protein. PMID:26368202

  11. Electro-holography display using computer generated hologram of 3D objects based on projection spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sujuan; Wang, Duocheng; He, Chao

    2012-11-01

    A new method of synthesizing computer-generated hologram of three-dimensional (3D) objects is proposed from their projection images. A series of projection images of 3D objects are recorded with one-dimensional azimuth scanning. According to the principles of paraboloid of revolution in 3D Fourier space and 3D central slice theorem, spectra information of 3D objects can be gathered from their projection images. Considering quantization error of horizontal and vertical directions, the spectrum information from each projection image is efficiently extracted in double circle and four circles shape, to enhance the utilization of projection spectra. Then spectra information of 3D objects from all projection images is encoded into computer-generated hologram based on Fourier transform using conjugate-symmetric extension. The hologram includes 3D information of objects. Experimental results for numerical reconstruction of the CGH at different distance validate the proposed methods and show its good performance. Electro-holographic reconstruction can be realized by using an electronic addressing reflective liquid-crystal display (LCD) spatial light modulator. The CGH from the computer is loaded onto the LCD. By illuminating a reference light from a laser source to the LCD, the amplitude and phase information included in the CGH will be reconstructed due to the diffraction of the light modulated by the LCD.

  12. A 3-D fluorescence imaging system incorporating structured illumination technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, L.; Emord, P.; Luquette, B.; McGee, B.; Nguyen, D.; Phipps, A.; Phillips, D.; Helguera, M.

    2010-02-01

    A currently available 2-D high-resolution, optical molecular imaging system was modified by the addition of a structured illumination source, OptigridTM, to investigate the feasibility of providing depth resolution along the optical axis. The modification involved the insertion of the OptigridTM and a lens in the path between the light source and the image plane, as well as control and signal processing software. Projection of the OptigridTM onto the imaging surface at an angle, was resolved applying the Scheimpflug principle. The illumination system implements modulation of the light source and provides a framework for capturing depth resolved mages. The system is capable of in-focus projection of the OptigridTM at different spatial frequencies, and supports the use of different lenses. A calibration process was developed for the system to achieve consistent phase shifts of the OptigridTM. Post-processing extracted depth information using depth modulation analysis using a phantom block with fluorescent sheets at different depths. An important aspect of this effort was that it was carried out by a multidisciplinary team of engineering and science students as part of a capstone senior design program. The disciplines represented are mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and imaging science. The project was sponsored by a financial grant from New York State with equipment support from two industrial concerns. The students were provided with a basic imaging concept and charged with developing, implementing, testing and validating a feasible proof-of-concept prototype system that was returned to the originator of the concept for further evaluation and characterization.

  13. 3D simulations of fluctuation spectra in the hall-MHD plasma.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P K

    2009-01-30

    Turbulent spectral cascades are investigated by means of fully three-dimensional (3D) simulations of a compressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (H-MHD) plasma in order to understand the observed spectral break in the solar wind turbulence spectra in the regime where the characteristic length scales associated with electromagnetic fluctuations are smaller than the ion gyroradius. In this regime, the results of our 3D simulations exhibit that turbulent spectral cascades in the presence of a mean magnetic field follow an omnidirectional anisotropic inertial-range spectrum close to k(-7/3). The latter is associated with the Hall current arising from nonequal electron and ion fluid velocities in our 3D H-MHD plasma model.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization applications for super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Cremer, Marion; Schermelleh, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) is an efficient tool to analyze the subcellular localization and spatial arrangement of targeted DNA sequences and RNA transcripts at the single cell level. 3D reconstructions from serial optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have long been considered the gold standard for 3D-FISH analyses. Recent super-resolution techniques circumvent the diffraction-limit of optical resolution and have defined a new state-of-the-art in bioimaging. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) represents one of these technologies. Notably, 3D-SIM renders an eightfold improved volumetric resolution over conventional imaging, and allows the simultaneous visualization of differently labeled target structures. These features make this approach highly attractive for the analysis of spatial relations and substructures of nuclear targets that escape detection by conventional light microscopy. Here, we focus on the application of 3D-SIM for the visualization of subnuclear 3D-FISH preparations. In comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy, the quality of 3D-SIM data is dependent to a much greater extent on the optimal sample preparation, labeling and acquisition conditions. We describe typical problems encountered with super-resolution imaging of in situ hybridizations in mammalian tissue culture cells and provide optimized DNA-/(RNA)-FISH protocols including combinations with immunofluorescence staining (Immuno-FISH) and DNA replication labeling using click chemistry.

  15. Fluorescent stereo microscopy for 3D surface profilometry and deformation mapping.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenxing; Luo, Huiyang; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing

    2013-05-20

    Recently, mechanobiology has received increased attention. For investigation of biofilm and cellular tissue, measurements of the surface topography and deformation in real-time are a pre-requisite for understanding the growth mechanisms. In this paper, a novel three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent microscopic method for surface profilometry and deformation measurements is developed. In this technique a pair of cameras are connected to a binocular fluorescent microscope to acquire micrographs from two different viewing angles of a sample surface doped or sprayed with fluorescent microparticles. Digital image correlation technique is used to search for matching points in the pairing fluorescence micrographs. After calibration of the system, the 3D surface topography is reconstructed from the pair of planar images. When the deformed surface topography is compared with undeformed topography using fluorescent microparticles for movement tracking of individual material points, the full field deformation of the surface is determined. The technique is demonstrated on topography measurement of a biofilm, and also on surface deformation measurement of the biofilm during growth. The use of 3D imaging of the fluorescent microparticles eliminates the formation of bright parts in an image caused by specular reflections. The technique is appropriate for non-contact, full-field and real-time 3D surface profilometry and deformation measurements of materials and structures at the microscale.

  16. Brain morphology imaging by 3D microscopy and fluorescent Nissl staining.

    PubMed

    Lazutkin, A A; Komissarova, N V; Toptunov, D M; Anokhin, K V

    2013-07-01

    Modern optical methods (multiphoton and light-sheet fluorescent microscopy) allow 3D imaging of large specimens of the brain with cell resolution. It is therefore essential to refer the resultant 3D pictures of expression of transgene, protein, and other markers in the brain to the corresponding structures in the atlas. This implies counterstaining of specimens with morphological dyes. However, there are no methods for contrasting large samples of the brain without their preliminary slicing. We have developed a method for fluorescent Nissl staining of whole brain samples. 3D reconstructions of specimens of the hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, and cortex were created. The method can be used for morphological control and evaluation of the effects of various factors on the brain using 3D microscopy technique.

  17. Tunable fluorescence enhancement based on bandgap-adjustable 3D Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fei; Gao, Suning; Zhu, Lili; Liao, Fan; Yang, Lulu; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-06-01

    Great progress has been made in fluorescence-based detection utilizing solid state enhanced substrates in recent years. However, it is still difficult to achieve reliable substrates with tunable enhancement factors. The present work shows liquid fluorescence enhanced substrates consisting of suspensions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), which can assemble 3D photonic crystal under the external magnetic field. The photonic bandgap induced by the equilibrium of attractive magnetic force and repulsive electrostatic force between adjacent Fe3O4 NPs is utilized to enhance fluorescence intensity of dye molecules (including R6G, RB, Cy5, DMTPS-DCV) in a reversible and controllable manner. The results show that a maximum of 12.3-fold fluorescence enhancement is realized in the 3D Fe3O4 NP substrates without the utilization of metal particles for PCs/DMTPS-DCV (1.0 × 10-7 M, water fraction (f w) = 90%).

  18. Laser irradiated fluorescent perfluorocarbon microparticles in 2-D and 3-D breast cancer cell models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chengcheng; Wang, Long; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yan; Hu, Yihe; Peng, Qinghai

    2017-03-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets were studied as new generation ultrasound contrast agents via acoustic or optical droplet vaporization (ADV or ODV). Little is known about the ODV irradiated vaporization mechanisms of PFC-microparticle complexs and the stability of the new bubbles produced. In this study, fluorescent perfluorohexane (PFH) poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles were used as a model to study the process of particle vaporization and bubble stability following excitation in two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cell models. We observed localization of the fluorescent agent on the microparticle coating material initially and after vaporization under fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the stability and growth dynamics of the newly created bubbles were observed for 11 min following vaporization. The particles were co-cultured with 2-D cells to form 3-D spheroids and could be vaporized even when encapsulated within the spheroids via laser irradiation, which provides an effective basis for further work.

  19. Multiple-scattering approach to the x-ray-absorption spectra of 3d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Michihide; Muramatsu, Shinji; Sugiura, Chikara

    1986-04-01

    The x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) has been calculated for the 3d transition metals Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu from a multiple-scattering approach within the muffin-tin-potential approximation, as a first step to studying the XANES for complicated materials. The muffin-tin potential is constructed via the Mattheiss prescription using the atomic data of Herman and Skillman. It is found that the XANES is sensitive to the potential used and that the calculated XANES spectra reproduce the number of peaks and their separations observed experimentally. The final spectra, including the lifetime-broadening effect, show the general features of each material. We emphasize that the multiple-scattering theory which can be applied to the disordered systems as well as the ordered ones may be promising as a tool to analyze the XANES of complicated materials.

  20. 3D-front-face fluorescence spectroscopy and independent components analysis: A new way to monitor bread dough development.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rebeca; Boussard, Aline; Rakotozafy, Lalatiana; Nicolas, Jacques; Potus, Jacques; Rutledge, Douglas N; Cordella, Christophe B Y

    2016-01-15

    Following bread dough development can be a hard task as no reliable method exists to give the optimal mixing time. Dough development is linked to the evolution of gluten proteins, carbohydrates and lipids which can result in modifications in the spectral properties of the various fluorophores naturally present in the system. In this paper, we propose to use 3-D-front-face-fluorescence (3D-FFF) spectroscopy in the 250-550nm domain to follow the dough development as influenced by formulation (addition or not of glucose, glucose oxidase and ferulic acid in the dough recipe) and mixing time (2, 4, 6 and 8min). In all the 32 dough samples as well as in flour, three regions of maximum fluorescence intensities have been observed at 320nm after excitation at 295nm (Region 1), at 420nm after excitation at 360nm (Region 2) and 450nm after excitation at 390nm (Region 3). The principal components analysis (PCA) of the evolution of these maxima shows that the formulations with and without ferulic acid are clearly separated since the presence of ferulic acid induces a decrease of fluorescence in Region 1 and an increase in Regions 2 and 3. In addition, a kinetic effect of the mixing time can be observed (decrease of fluorescence in the Regions 1 and 2) mainly in the absence of ferulic acid. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) on these maximum values statistically confirms these observations. Independent components analysis (ICA) is also applied to the complete 3-D-FFF spectra in order to extract interpretable signals from spectral data which reflect the complex contribution of several fluorophores as influenced by their environment. In all cases, 3 signals can be clearly separated matching the 3 regions of maximal fluorescence. The signals corresponding to regions 1 and 2 can be ascribed to proteins and ferulic acid respectively, whereas the fluorophores associated with the 3rd signal (corresponding to region 3) remain unidentified. Good correlations are obtained between the IC

  1. The 3d9-3d84p Transitions in the Spectra of Highly-Ionized Elements Yttrium to Silver (Y XIII-Ag XXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyart, Jean-François; Klapisch, Marcel; Schwob, Jean-Louis; Schweitzer, Naftaly

    1982-09-01

    Two hundred and ninety-five lines of the spectra of cobalt-like ions Y XII, Zr XIV, Nb XV, Mo XVI, Ru XVIII, Rh XIX, Pd XX and Ag XXI have been classified as 3d9-3d84p transitions. They involve 250 energy levels which are described by 21 parameters with a root-mean-square deviation of 290 cm-1. The scaling factors of radial integrals calculated by the Hartree-Fock method have been fitted as well as effective electrostatic parameters. The validity of the results is based on isoelectronic regularities and has been checked by extrapolations to the known spectra of Br IX and Sn XXIV. Predictions are given for Kr X, Rb XI, Sr XII, Cd XXII and In XXIII.

  2. Fluorescence Enhancement on Large Area Self-Assembled Plasmonic-3D Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guojian; Wang, Dongzhu; Hong, Wei; Sun, Lu; Zhu, Yongxiang; Chen, Xudong

    2017-03-01

    Discontinuous plasmonic-3D photonic crystal hybrid structures are fabricated in order to evaluate the coupling effect of surface plasmon resonance and the photonic stop band. The nanostructures are prepared by silver sputtering deposition on top of hydrophobic 3D photonic crystals. The localized surface plasmon resonance of the nanostructure has a symbiotic relationship with the 3D photonic stop band, leading to highly tunable characteristics. Fluorescence enhancements of conjugated polymer and quantum dot based on these hybrid structures are studied. The maximum fluorescence enhancement for the conjugated polymer of poly(5-methoxy-2-(3-sulfopropoxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) potassium salt by a factor of 87 is achieved as compared with that on a glass substrate due to the enhanced near-field from the discontinuous plasmonic structures, strong scattering effects from rough metal surface with photonic stop band, and accelerated decay rates from metal-coupled excited state of the fluorophore. It is demonstrated that the enhancement induced by the hybrid structures has a larger effective distance (optimum thickness ≈130 nm) than conventional plasmonic systems. It is expected that this approach has tremendous potential in the field of sensors, fluorescence-imaging, and optoelectronic applications.

  3. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  4. Quantitative analyses of the 3D nuclear landscape recorded with super-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Volker J; Cremer, Marion; Cremer, Thomas

    2017-03-18

    Recent advancements of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy have revolutionized microscopic studies of cells, including the exceedingly complex structural organization of cell nuclei in space and time. In this paper we describe and discuss tools for (semi-) automated, quantitative 3D analyses of the spatial nuclear organization. These tools allow the quantitative assessment of highly resolved different chromatin compaction levels in individual cell nuclei, which reflect functionally different regions or sub-compartments of the 3D nuclear landscape, and measurements of absolute distances between sites of different chromatin compaction. In addition, these tools allow 3D mapping of specific DNA/RNA sequences and nuclear proteins relative to the 3D chromatin compaction maps and comparisons of multiple cell nuclei. The tools are available in the free and open source R packages nucim and bioimagetools. We discuss the use of masks for the segmentation of nuclei and the use of DNA stains, such as DAPI, as a proxy for local differences in chromatin compaction. We further discuss the limitations of 3D maps of the nuclear landscape as well as problems of the biological interpretation of such data.

  5. Cloud 3D Effects Evidenced in Landsat Power Spectra and Autocorrelation Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.; Wen, Guoyong

    1999-01-01

    the spectral signatures of decorrelation between reflectance and optical depth at large scales becoming stronger as the magnitude of cloud top variations increase. Finally, the usefulness of power spectral analysis in evaluating the skill of novel optical depth retrieval techniques in removing 3D radiative effects is demonstrated. New techniques using inverse Non-local Independent Pixel Approximation (NIPA) and Normalized Difference of Nadir Reflectivity (NDNR) yield optical depth fields which better match the scale-by-scale variability of the true optical depth field.

  6. Using pH variations to improve the discrimination of wines by 3D front face fluorescence spectroscopy associated to Independent Components Analysis.

    PubMed

    Saad, Rita; Bouveresse, Delphine Jouan-Rimbaud; Locquet, Nathalie; Rutledge, Douglas N

    2016-06-01

    Wine composition in polyphenols is related to the variety of grape that it contains. These polyphenols play an essential role in its quality as well as a possible protective effect on human health. Their conjugated aromatic structure renders them fluorescent, which means that 3D front-face fluorescence spectroscopy could be a useful tool to differentiate among the grape varieties that characterize each wine. However, fluorescence spectra acquired simply at the natural pH of wine are not always sufficient to discriminate the wines. The structural changes in the polyphenols resulting from modifications in the pH induce significant changes in their fluorescence spectra, making it possible to more clearly separate different wines. 9 wines belonging to three different grape varieties (Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir) and from 9 different producers, were analyzed over a range of pHs. Independent Components Analysis (ICA) was used to extract characteristic signals from the matrix of unfolded 3D front-face fluorescence spectra and showed that the introduction of pH as an additional parameter in the study of wine fluorescence improved the discrimination of wines.

  7. 3D optical sectioning with a new hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging system.

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, Linda T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2007-02-01

    A novel hyperspectral fluorescence microscope for high-resolution 3D optical sectioning of cells and other structures has been designed, constructed, and used to investigate a number of different problems. We have significantly extended new multivariate curve resolution (MCR) data analysis methods to deconvolve the hyperspectral image data and to rapidly extract quantitative 3D concentration distribution maps of all emitting species. The imaging system has many advantages over current confocal imaging systems including simultaneous monitoring of numerous highly overlapped fluorophores, immunity to autofluorescence or impurity fluorescence, enhanced sensitivity, and dramatically improved accuracy, reliability, and dynamic range. Efficient data compression in the spectral dimension has allowed personal computers to perform quantitative analysis of hyperspectral images of large size without loss of image quality. We have also developed and tested software to perform analysis of time resolved hyperspectral images using trilinear multivariate analysis methods. The new imaging system is an enabling technology for numerous applications including (1) 3D composition mapping analysis of multicomponent processes occurring during host-pathogen interactions, (2) monitoring microfluidic processes, (3) imaging of molecular motors and (4) understanding photosynthetic processes in wild type and mutant Synechocystis cyanobacteria.

  8. 3D reconstruction of cortical microtubules using multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Luhong; Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Fan, Jiannan; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu; Xu, Yingke

    2017-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been widely used in biomedical research to visualize cellular processes near the cell surface. In this study, a novel multi-angle ring-illuminated TIRFM system, equipped with two galvo mirrors that are on conjugate plan of a 4f optical system was developed. Multi-angle TIRFM generates images with different penetration depths through the controlled variation of the incident angle of illuminating laser. We presented a method to perform three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of microtubules from multi-angle TIRFM images. The performance of our method was validated in simulated microtubules with variable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and the axial resolution and accuracy of reconstruction were evaluated in selecting different numbers of illumination angles or in different SNR conditions. In U373 cells, we reconstructed the 3-D localization of microtubules near the cell surface with high resolution using over a hundred different illumination angles. Theoretically, the presented TIRFM setup and 3-D reconstruction method can achieve 40 nm axial resolution in experimental conditions where SNR is as low as 2, with 35 different illumination angles. Moreover, our system and reconstruction method have the potential to be used in live cells to track membrane dynamics in 3-D.

  9. Laser irradiated fluorescent perfluorocarbon microparticles in 2-D and 3-D breast cancer cell models

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chengcheng; Wang, Long; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yan; Hu, Yihe; Peng, Qinghai

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets were studied as new generation ultrasound contrast agents via acoustic or optical droplet vaporization (ADV or ODV). Little is known about the ODV irradiated vaporization mechanisms of PFC-microparticle complexs and the stability of the new bubbles produced. In this study, fluorescent perfluorohexane (PFH) poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles were used as a model to study the process of particle vaporization and bubble stability following excitation in two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cell models. We observed localization of the fluorescent agent on the microparticle coating material initially and after vaporization under fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the stability and growth dynamics of the newly created bubbles were observed for 11 min following vaporization. The particles were co-cultured with 2-D cells to form 3-D spheroids and could be vaporized even when encapsulated within the spheroids via laser irradiation, which provides an effective basis for further work. PMID:28262671

  10. Fluorescence fluctuation microscopy to reveal 3D architecture and function in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lenser, Thorsten; Weisshart, Klaus; Ulbricht, Tobias; Klement, Karolin; Hemmerich, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus is determined not only by the presence of subnuclear domains, such as the nuclear envelope, chromosome territories, and nuclear bodies, but also by smaller domains which form in response to specific functions, such as RNA transcription, DNA replication, and DNA repair. Since both stable and dynamic structures contribute to nuclear morphology, it is important to study the biophysical principles of the formation of macromolecular assemblies within the nucleus. For this purpose, a variety of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy techniques can be applied. Here, we summarize our current knowledge on the 3D architecture of the mammalian cell nucleus and describe in detail how the assembly of functional nuclear protein complexes can be analyzed in living cells using fluorescence bleaching techniques, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and mathematical modeling. In conclusion, the application of all these techniques in combination is a powerful tool to assess the full spectrum of nuclear protein dynamics and to understand the biophysical principles underlying nuclear structure and function.

  11. 4Pi fluorescence detection and 3D particle localization with a single objective

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzbauer, J.; McGorty, R.; Huang, B.

    2013-01-01

    Coherent detection through two opposing objectives (4Pi configuration) improves the precision of three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule localization substantially along the axial direction, but suffers from instrument complexity and maintenance difficulty. To address these issues, we have realized 4Pi fluorescence detection by sandwiching the sample between the objective and a mirror, and create interference of direct incidence and mirror-reflected signal at the camera with a spatial light modulator. Multifocal imaging using this single-objective mirror interference scheme offers improvement in the axial localization similar to the traditional 4Pi method. We have also devised several PSF engineering schemes to enable 3D localization with a single emitter image, offering better axial precision than normal single-objective localization methods such as astigmatic imaging. PMID:24105517

  12. X-Ray Emission Spectra and Electronic Structures of Red Phosphorus, 3d Transition-Metal Phosphides and III V Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1995-07-01

    The P Kβ emission spectra in fluorescence from red amorphous phosphorus, 3d transition-metal phosphides TiP, CrP, FeP, Fe2P, Fe3P, CoP, Co2P, Ni5P4, Ni2P, Ni3P, Cu3P, ZnP2 (black) and Zn3P2, and the semiconducting phosphides of the III-V type, BP, AlP, GaP and InP are measured with a high-resolution two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with Ge(111) crystals. The influence of the metal atoms appears distinctly on the P Kβ fluorescence emission spectra. The measured spectra are compared with available X-ray emission and XPS valence-band spectra and theoretical energy-band calculations on a common energy scale. It is shown that considerable p-d, s mixing occurs in the valence bands of the 3d transition-metal phosphides and the P 3p states mix fairly with the P 3s states in the valence bands of red phosphorus, Gap and InP

  13. Identifying well contamination through the use of 3-D fluorescence spectroscopy to classify coalbed methane produced water.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Katharine G; Van Straaten, Colette M; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Drewes, Jörg E

    2013-01-02

    Production of unconventional gas resources commonly requires the use of hydraulic fracturing and chemical production well additives. Concern exists for the use of chemical compounds in gas wells due to the risk of groundwater contamination. This study focuses on a proposed method of identifying groundwater contamination from gas production. The method focuses on the classification of naturally occurring organic signatures of coalbed methane (CBM) produced water compared to anthropogenic organic compounds. The 3-D fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of coalbed methane produced water samples revealed four peaks characteristic of coalbed methane produced water: Peak P (aromatic proteins region), Peak M(1) (microbial byproducts region), Peak M(2) (microbial byproducts region), and Peak H (humic acid-like region). Peak H is characteristic of the coal-water equilibria present in all basins, while peaks P and M(2) correlate with microbial activity in basins with biogenic methane generation pathways. Anthropogenic well additives produce EEM signatures with notable flooding of peaks P, M(1), M(2), and H, relatively higher overall fluorescence intensity, and slightly higher DOC concentrations. Fluorescence spectroscopy has the potential to be used in conjunction with groundwater contamination studies to determine if detected organic compounds originate from naturally occurring sources or well production additives.

  14. XUV spectra of 2nd transition row elements: identification of 3d-4p and 3d-4f transition arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokasani, Ragava; Long, Elaine; Maguire, Oisin; Sheridan, Paul; Hayden, Patrick; O'Reilly, Fergal; Dunne, Padraig; Sokell, Emma; Endo, Akira; Limpouch, Jiri; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-12-01

    The use of laser produced plasmas (LPPs) in extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray lithography and metrology at 13.5 nm has been widely reported and recent research efforts have focused on developing next generation sources for lithography, surface morphology, patterning and microscopy at shorter wavelengths. In this paper, the spectra emitted from LPPs of the 2nd transition row elements from yttrium (Z = 39) to palladium (Z = 46), with the exception of zirconium (Z = 40) and technetium (Z = 43), produced by two Nd:YAG lasers which delivered up to 600 mJ in 7 ns and 230 mJ in 170 ps, respectively, are reported. Intense emission was observed in the 2-8 nm spectral region resulting from unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) due to 3d-4p, 3d-4f and 3p-3d transitions. These transitions in a number of ion stages of yttrium, niobium, ruthenium and rhodium were identified by comparison with results from Cowan code calculations and previous studies. The theoretical data were parameterized using the UTA formalism and the mean wavelength and widths were calculated and compared with experimental results.

  15. Pico-projector-based optical sectioning microscopy for 3D chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of mesophyll cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Yu John; Yeh, Chia-Hua; Chen, S.-Wei; Chung, Chien-Han

    2015-03-01

    A pico-projector-based optical sectioning microscope (POSM) was constructed using a pico-projector to generate structured illumination patterns. A net rate of 5.8 × 106 pixel/s and sub-micron spatial resolution in three-dimensions (3D) were achieved. Based on the pico-projector’s flexibility in pattern generation, the characteristics of POSM with different modulation periods and at different imaging depths were measured and discussed. With the application of different modulation periods, 3D chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of mesophyll cells was carried out in freshly plucked leaves of four species without sectioning or staining. For each leaf, an average penetration depth of 120 μm was achieved. Increasing the modulation period along with the increment of imaging depth, optical sectioning images can be obtained with a compromise between the axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. After ∼30 min imaging on the same area, photodamage was hardly observed. Taking the advantages of high speed and low damages of POSM, the investigation of the dynamic fluorescence responses to temperature changes was performed under three different treatment temperatures. The three embedded blue, green and red light-emitting diode light sources were applied to observe the responses of the leaves with different wavelength excitation.

  16. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  17. The integration of 3-D cell printing and mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography of vascular constructs within thick hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingling; Lee, Vivian K; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Dai, Guohao; Intes, Xavier

    2012-07-01

    Developing methods that provide adequate vascular perfusion is an important step toward engineering large functional tissues. Meanwhile, an imaging modality to assess the three-dimensional (3-D) structures and functions of the vascular channels is lacking for thick matrices (>2 ≈ 3 mm). Herein, we report on an original approach to construct and image 3-D dynamically perfused vascular structures in thick hydrogel scaffolds. In this work, we integrated a robotic 3-D cell printing technology with a mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography imaging system, and demonstrated the capability of the platform to construct perfused collagen scaffolds with endothelial lining and to image both the fluid flow and fluorescent-labeled living endothelial cells at high-frame rates, with high sensitivity and accuracy. These results establish the potential of integrating both 3-D cell printing and fluorescence mesoscopic imaging for functional and molecular studies in complex tissue-engineered tissues.

  18. Exact spectra of strong coulomb correlations of 3-D 2-e harmonic dots in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Priyanka; Sharma, Shivalika; Kaur, Harsimran; Singh, Sunny; Hazra, Ram Kuntal

    2017-01-01

    Applications of 3-D 2-e systems have proliferated very fast due to technological advancements in wide range of phenomena from atomic landscape to mesoscopic scale. The unusual properties of atomic/mesoscopic systems are the results of interplaying charge interactions among different bound states. The non-trivial e-e correlations in electrically and/or magnetically confined systems improvise wealth of intriguing challenges at fundamental level due to lack of exact solution of Schrödinger equations. For the first time, a novel methodology of exactly finite summed coulomb correlations invented by us is so handy that even usual programmable calculator can be used to examine the electronic structures of 3-D 2-e harmonic dots in perpendicular magnetic field (symmetric gauge). Statistics of electronic levels, heat capacity measurements and magnetization (T∼1 K) are also investigated in brief to probe the degree of disorderedness.

  19. 3D Fluorescent and Reflective Imaging of Whole Stardust Tracks in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2011-11-07

    The NASA Stardust mission returned to earth in 2006 with the cometary collector having captured over 1,000 particles in an aerogel medium at a relative velocity of 6.1 km/s. Particles captured in aerogel were heated, disaggregated and dispersed along 'tracks' or cavities in aerogel, singular tracks representing a history of one capture event. It has been our focus to chemically and morphologically characterize whole tracks in 3-dimensions, utilizing solely non-destructive methods. To this end, we have used a variety of methods: 3D Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM), synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF), and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD). In the past months we have developed two new techniques to aid in data collection. (1) We have received a new confocal microscope which has enabled autofluorescent and spectral imaging of aerogel samples. (2) We have developed a stereo-SXRF technique to chemically identify large grains in SXRF maps in 3-space. The addition of both of these methods to our analytic abilities provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms and results of track formation.

  20. Study on fluorescence spectra of thiamine, riboflavin and pyridoxine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Xiao, Xue; Zhao, Xuesong; Hu, Lan; Lv, Caofang; Yin, Zhangkun

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of vitamin B1, B2 and B6 measured with 3D fluorescence Spectrophotometer. Three strong fluorescence areas of vitamin B2 locate at λex/λem=270/525nm, 370/525nm and 450/525nm, one fluorescence areas of vitamin B1 locates at λex/λem=370/460nm, two fluorescence areas of vitamin B6 locate at λex/λem=250/370nm and 325/370nm were found. The influence of pH of solution to the fluorescence profile was also discussed. Using the PARAFAC algorithm, 10 vitamin B1, B2 and B6 mixed solutions were successfully decomposed, and the emission profiles, excitation profiles, central wavelengths and the concentration of the three components were retrieved precisely through about 5 iteration times.

  1. Independent components analysis coupled with 3D-front-face fluorescence spectroscopy to study the interaction between plastic food packaging and olive oil.

    PubMed

    Kassouf, Amine; El Rakwe, Maria; Chebib, Hanna; Ducruet, Violette; Rutledge, Douglas N; Maalouly, Jacqueline

    2014-08-11

    Olive oil is one of the most valued sources of fats in the Mediterranean diet. Its storage was generally done using glass or metallic packaging materials. Nowadays, plastic packaging has gained worldwide spread for the storage of olive oil. However, plastics are not inert and interaction phenomena may occur between packaging materials and olive oil. In this study, extra virgin olive oil samples were submitted to accelerated interaction conditions, in contact with polypropylene (PP) and polylactide (PLA) plastic packaging materials. 3D-front-face fluorescence spectroscopy, being a simple, fast and non destructive analytical technique, was used to study this interaction. Independent components analysis (ICA) was used to analyze raw 3D-front-face fluorescence spectra of olive oil. ICA was able to highlight a probable effect of a migration of substances with antioxidant activity. The signals extracted by ICA corresponded to natural olive oil fluorophores (tocopherols and polyphenols) as well as newly formed ones which were tentatively identified as fluorescent oxidation products. Based on the extracted fluorescent signals, olive oil in contact with plastics had slower aging rates in comparison with reference oils. Peroxide and free acidity values validated the results obtained by ICA, related to olive oil oxidation rates. Sorbed olive oil in plastic was also quantified given that this sorption could induce a swelling of the polymer thus promoting migration.

  2. Fast high-resolution 3D total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy by incidence angle scanning and azimuthal averaging

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jérôme; Gueudry, Charles; Münch, Daniel; Cinquin, Bertrand; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Bardin, Sabine; Guérin, Christophe; Senger, Fabrice; Blanchoin, Laurent; Salamero, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is the method of choice to visualize a variety of cellular processes in particular events localized near the plasma membrane of live adherent cells. This imaging technique not relying on particular fluorescent probes provides a high sectioning capability. It is, however, restricted to a single plane. We present here a method based on a versatile design enabling fast multiwavelength azimuthal averaging and incidence angles scanning to computationally reconstruct 3D images sequences. We achieve unprecedented 50-nm axial resolution over a range of 800 nm above the coverslip. We apply this imaging modality to obtain structural and dynamical information about 3D actin architectures. We also temporally decipher distinct Rab11a-dependent exocytosis events in 3D at a rate of seven stacks per second. PMID:25404337

  3. Fast high-resolution 3D total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy by incidence angle scanning and azimuthal averaging.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Jérôme; Gueudry, Charles; Münch, Daniel; Cinquin, Bertrand; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Bardin, Sabine; Guérin, Christophe; Senger, Fabrice; Blanchoin, Laurent; Salamero, Jean

    2014-12-02

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is the method of choice to visualize a variety of cellular processes in particular events localized near the plasma membrane of live adherent cells. This imaging technique not relying on particular fluorescent probes provides a high sectioning capability. It is, however, restricted to a single plane. We present here a method based on a versatile design enabling fast multiwavelength azimuthal averaging and incidence angles scanning to computationally reconstruct 3D images sequences. We achieve unprecedented 50-nm axial resolution over a range of 800 nm above the coverslip. We apply this imaging modality to obtain structural and dynamical information about 3D actin architectures. We also temporally decipher distinct Rab11a-dependent exocytosis events in 3D at a rate of seven stacks per second.

  4. Model-based segmentation and quantification of subcellular structures in 2D and 3D fluorescent microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Heinzer, Stephan; Weiss, Matthias; Rohr, Karl

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a model-based approach for segmenting and quantifying GFP-tagged subcellular structures of the Golgi apparatus in 2D and 3D microscopy images. The approach is based on 2D and 3D intensity models, which are directly fitted to an image within 2D circular or 3D spherical regions-of-interest (ROIs). We also propose automatic approaches for the detection of candidates, for the initialization of the model parameters, and for adapting the size of the ROI used for model fitting. Based on the fitting results, we determine statistical information about the spatial distribution and the total amount of intensity (fluorescence) of the subcellular structures. We demonstrate the applicability of our new approach based on 2D and 3D microscopy images.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of 3D-inertial Alfvén wave and turbulent spectra in Auroral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinawa, M. L.; Modi, K. V.; Sharma, R. P.

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, we have investigated nonlinear interaction of three dimensional (3D) inertial Alfvén wave and perpendicularly propagating magnetosonic wave for low β-plasma ( β≪ m e / m i ). We have developed the set of dimensionless equations in the presence of ponderomotive nonlinearity due to 3D-inertial Alfvén wave in the dynamics of perpendicularly propagating magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis and numerical simulation has been carried out to study the effect of nonlinear coupling on the formation of localized structures and turbulent spectra, applicable to auroral region. The results reveal that the localized structures become more and more complex as the nonlinear interaction progresses. Further, we have studied the turbulent spectrum which follows spectral index (˜ k -3.57) at smaller scales. Relevance of the obtained results has been shown with the observations received by various spacecrafts like FAST, Hawkeye and Heos 2.

  6. Doppler effects on 3-D non-LTE radiation transport and emission spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Davis, J.; DasGupta, A.; Apruzese, John P.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Clark, R. W.; Ampleford, David J.; Bailey, James E.; Thornhill, Joseph W.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-10-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved X-ray emission lines contain information about temperatures, densities, velocities, and the gradients in a plasma. Extracting this information from optically thick lines emitted from complex ions in dynamic, three-dimensional, non-LTE plasmas requires self-consistent accounting for both non-LTE atomic physics and non-local radiative transfer. We present a brief description of a hybrid-structure spectroscopic atomic model coupled to an iterative tabular on-the-spot treatment of radiative transfer that can be applied to plasmas of arbitrary material composition, conditions, and geometries. The effects of Doppler line shifts on the self-consistent radiative transfer within the plasma and the emergent emission and absorption spectra are included in the model. Sample calculations for a two-level atom in a uniform cylindrical plasma are given, showing reasonable agreement with more sophisticated transport models and illustrating the potential complexity - or richness - of radially resolved emission lines from an imploding cylindrical plasma. Also presented is a comparison of modeled L- and K-shell spectra to temporally and radially resolved emission data from a Cu:Ni plasma. Finally, some shortcomings of the model and possible paths for improvement are discussed.

  7. Analytic 3D Imaging of Mammalian Nucleus at Nanoscale Using Coherent X-Rays and Optical Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Changyong; Takagi, Masatoshi; Park, Jaehyun; Xu, Rui; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Imamoto, Naoko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Despite the notable progress that has been made with nano-bio imaging probes, quantitative nanoscale imaging of multistructured specimens such as mammalian cells remains challenging due to their inherent structural complexity. Here, we successfully performed three-dimensional (3D) imaging of mammalian nuclei by combining coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy, explicitly visualizing nuclear substructures at several tens of nanometer resolution, and optical fluorescence microscopy, cross confirming the substructures with immunostaining. This demonstrates the successful application of coherent x-rays to obtain the 3D ultrastructure of mammalian nuclei and establishes a solid route to nanoscale imaging of complex specimens. PMID:25185543

  8. Accurate first-principles calculations for 12CH3D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Michaël; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm-1 are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane (12CH3D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue 12CH4. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  9. Accurate first-principles calculations for 12CH3D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Michaël; Nikitin, Andrei V; Tyuterev, Vladimir G

    2014-07-28

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm(-1) are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane ((12)CH3D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue (12)CH4. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  10. Accurate first-principles calculations for {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, Michaël Tyuterev, Vladimir G.; Nikitin, Andrei V.

    2014-07-28

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm{sup −1} are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane ({sup 12}CH{sub 3}D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue {sup 12}CH{sub 4}. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  11. Effect of solvents on the fluorescence spectra of bacterial luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukovataya, Irina E.; Tyulkova, Natalya A.; Kaykova, Elisaveta V.

    2006-08-01

    Bacteria luciferases catalyze the oxidation reaction of the long-chain aliphatic aldehyde and reduced flavinmononucleotide involving molecular oxygen to a respective fatty acid emitting light quanta in the visible spectrum. Fluorescence emission of luciferases from Photobacterium leiognathi dissolved in organic solvent-water mixtures was investigated. Methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide were used as organic solvents. As the methanol and acetone concentration is increased the emission maximum peak is decrease. In contrast, with dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide addition induced a increasing of the emission maximum intensity. The values of wavelength maximum (λ max) at the addition of this solvent can shows the spectra shifted to the red by about 12 nm. These increasing in the fluorescence intensity and in the λ max may be due to luciferase denaturation, resulting from the more intensive contact of chromospheres of luciferase with the solvent. At all used concentrations of methanol, acetone and formamide the shape of the fluorescence spectra was not changed. These studies demonstrate that the luciferase tryptophan fluorescence is sensitive to changes of physical-chemical property of enzyme environment. A comparison of activation/inactivation and fluorescence spectra of luciferase in methanol or acetone solutions shows that the extent of inactivation is larger than the extent of fluorescence changes at the same methanol or acetone concentration.

  12. Preparation and characterization of polymer layer systems for validation of 3D Micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, Ina; Malzer, Wolfgang; Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Lühl, Lars; Kanngießer, Birgit; Dargel, Rainer; Giese, Ulrich; Vogt, Carla

    2009-04-01

    For the validation of the quantification of the newly-developed method of 3D Micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (3D Micro-XRF) samples with a low average Z matrix and minor high Z elements are best suited. In a light matrix the interferences by matrix effects are minimized so that organic polymers are appropriate as basis for analytes which are more easily detected by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Polymer layer systems were assembled from single layers of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber (EPDM) filled with changing concentrations of silica and zinc oxide as inorganic additives. Layer thicknesses were in the range of 30-150 μm. Before the analysis with 3D Micro-XRF all layers have been characterized by scanning micro-XRF with regard to filler dispersion, by infrared microscopy and light microscopy in order to determine the layer thicknesses and by ICP-OES to verify the concentration of the X-ray sensitive elements in the layers. With the results obtained for stacked polymer systems the validity of the analytical quantification model for the determination of stratified materials by 3D Micro-XRF could be demonstrated.

  13. 3D visualization of additive occlusion and tunable full-spectrum fluorescence in calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David C.; Ihli, Johannes; Thornton, Paul D.; Holden, Mark A.; Marzec, Bartosz; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alex N.; Levenstein, Mark A.; Tang, Chiu; Lynch, Christophe; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-11-01

    From biomineralization to synthesis, organic additives provide an effective means of controlling crystallization processes. There is growing evidence that these additives are often occluded within the crystal lattice. This promises an elegant means of creating nanocomposites and tuning physical properties. Here we use the incorporation of sulfonated fluorescent dyes to gain new understanding of additive occlusion in calcite (CaCO3), and to link morphological changes to occlusion mechanisms. We demonstrate that these additives are incorporated within specific zones, as defined by the growth conditions, and show how occlusion can govern changes in crystal shape. Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime imaging microscopy also show that the dyes experience unique local environments within different zones. Our strategy is then extended to simultaneously incorporate mixtures of dyes, whose fluorescence cascade creates calcite nanoparticles that fluoresce white. This offers a simple strategy for generating biocompatible and stable fluorescent nanoparticles whose output can be tuned as required.

  14. 3D visualization of additive occlusion and tunable full-spectrum fluorescence in calcite

    PubMed Central

    Green, David C.; Ihli, Johannes; Thornton, Paul D.; Holden, Mark A.; Marzec, Bartosz; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alex N.; Levenstein, Mark A.; Tang, Chiu; Lynch, Christophe; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    From biomineralization to synthesis, organic additives provide an effective means of controlling crystallization processes. There is growing evidence that these additives are often occluded within the crystal lattice. This promises an elegant means of creating nanocomposites and tuning physical properties. Here we use the incorporation of sulfonated fluorescent dyes to gain new understanding of additive occlusion in calcite (CaCO3), and to link morphological changes to occlusion mechanisms. We demonstrate that these additives are incorporated within specific zones, as defined by the growth conditions, and show how occlusion can govern changes in crystal shape. Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime imaging microscopy also show that the dyes experience unique local environments within different zones. Our strategy is then extended to simultaneously incorporate mixtures of dyes, whose fluorescence cascade creates calcite nanoparticles that fluoresce white. This offers a simple strategy for generating biocompatible and stable fluorescent nanoparticles whose output can be tuned as required. PMID:27857076

  15. Assessing the maturity of crude petroleum oils using total synchronous fluorescence scan spectra.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Alan G

    2004-01-01

    There have been many applications of fluorescence methods for the analysis of crude petroleum oils down through the years. However, none of these studies has yielded a robust qualitative or quantitative method for quantifying the chemical composition, or assessing the maturity of crude oils. Simple fluorescence parameters such as lifetime, intensity, and intensity ratios do not correlate well with chemical composition particularly for medium weight crude oils [A. G. Ryder, T. J. Glynn, and M. Feely (2003). Proc. SPIE-Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 4876, 1188-1195.]. A better approach may be to use the Total Synchronous Fluorescence Scan (TSFS) method to fully interrogate the complex chemical composition of the oils [D. Patra and A. K. Mishra (2002). Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 373, 304-309.]. We present TSFS spectra from 18 crude petroleum oils of varying composition, sourced from around the world. The TSFS plots of these oils are very complex, with the contours being spread over the full 250-700 nm wavelength range (lambda(ex)) and 40-200 nm wavelength interval (delta lambda) sampled. The 3-D contour maps tend to two contour concentrations one at lambda(em) < 300 nm, delta lambda = 120-200 nm, and a second near lambda(ex) approximately 380-400 nm, delta lambda = 40-60 nm. The first feature represents fluorescence emission originating mainly from energy transfer processes with the second, longer wavelength feature originating from fluorescence emission generated by a higher proportion of direct excitation as opposed to emission resulting from energy transfer. The topography of the 3D contour plots is therefore influenced by the balance between energy transfer and direct fluorescence emission, which is governed by the chemical composition of the crude oils. We discuss how the gross chemical composition affects TSFS spectra and how TSFS can be used to assess oil maturity with a view to developing quantitative methods.

  16. Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy for wide-field fluorescence and 3D phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Xia, Peng; Matoba, Osamu; Nitta, Koichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy is a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and digital holographic microscopy, the main function of which is to obtain images from fluorescence intensity and quantified phase contrasts, simultaneously. The proposed system is mostly beneficial to biological studies, with the reason that often the studies are depending on fluorescent labeling techniques to detect certain intracellular molecules, while phase information reflecting properties of unstained transparent elements. This paper is presenting our latest researches on applications such as randomly moving micro-fluorescent beads and living cells of Physcomitrella patens. The experiments are succeeded on obtaining a succession of wide-field fluorescent images and holograms from micro-beads, and different depths focusing is realized via numerical reconstruction. Living cells of Physcomitrella patens are recorded in the static manner, the reconstruction distance indicates thickness of cellular structure. These results are implementing practical applications toward many biomedical science researches.

  17. Gold nanoparticle-mediated fluorescence enhancement by two-photon polymerized 3D microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aekbote, Badri L.; Schubert, Félix; Ormos, Pál; Kelemen, Lóránd

    2014-12-01

    Fluorescence enhancement achieved by functionalized microstructures made by two-photon polymerization (TPP) is reported for the first time. Microstructures of various shapes made of SU-8 photoresist were prepared and coated with gold nanoparticles (NP) of 80 nm. Localized fluorescence enhancement was demonstrated by microstructures equipped with tips of sub-micron dimensions. The enhancement was realized by positioning the NP-coated structures over fluorescent protein layers. Two fluorophores with their absorption in the red and in the green region of the VIS spectrum were used. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to quantify the enhancement. The enhancement factor was as high as 6 in areas of several square-micrometers and more than 3 in the case of local enhancement, comparable with literature values for similar nanoparticles. The structured pattern of the observed fluorescence intensity indicates a classic enhancement mechanism realized by standing waves over reflecting surfaces. With further development mobile microtools made by TPP and functionalized by metal NPs can be actuated by optical tweezers and position to any fluorescent micro-object, such as single cells to realize localized, targeted fluorescence enhancement.

  18. 3D restoration microscopy improves quantification of enzyme-labeled fluorescence-based single-cell phosphatase activity in plankton.

    PubMed

    Diaz-de-Quijano, Daniel; Palacios, Pilar; Horňák, Karel; Felip, Marisol

    2014-10-01

    The ELF or fluorescence-labeled enzyme activity (FLEA) technique is a culture-independent single-cell tool for assessing plankton enzyme activity in close-to-in situ conditions. We demonstrate that single-cell FLEA quantifications based on two-dimensional (2D) image analysis were biased by up to one order of magnitude relative to deconvolved 3D. This was basically attributed to out-of-focus light, and partially to object size. Nevertheless, if sufficient cells were measured (25-40 cells), biases in individual 2D cell measurements were partially compensated, providing useful and comparable results to deconvolved 3D. We also discuss how much caution should be used when comparing the single-cell enzyme activities of different sized bacterio- and/or phytoplankton populations measured on 2D images. Finally, a novel method based on deconvolved 3D images (wide field restoration microscopy; WFR) was devised to improve the discrimination of similar single-cell enzyme activities, the comparison of enzyme activities between different size cells, the measurement of low fluorescence intensities, the quantification of less numerous species, and the combination of the FLEA technique with other single-cell methods. These improvements in cell enzyme activity measurements will provide a more precise picture of individual species' behavior in nature, which is essential to understand their functional role and evolutionary history.

  19. MDL constrained 3-D grayscale skeletonization algorithm for automated extraction of dendrites and spines from fluorescence confocal images.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaosong; Trachtenberg, Joshua T; Potter, Steve M; Roysam, Badrinath

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a method for improved automatic delineation of dendrites and spines from three-dimensional (3-D) images of neurons acquired by confocal or multi-photon fluorescence microscopy. The core advance presented here is a direct grayscale skeletonization algorithm that is constrained by a structural complexity penalty using the minimum description length (MDL) principle, and additional neuroanatomy-specific constraints. The 3-D skeleton is extracted directly from the grayscale image data, avoiding errors introduced by image binarization. The MDL method achieves a practical tradeoff between the complexity of the skeleton and its coverage of the fluorescence signal. Additional advances include the use of 3-D spline smoothing of dendrites to improve spine detection, and graph-theoretic algorithms to explore and extract the dendritic structure from the grayscale skeleton using an intensity-weighted minimum spanning tree (IW-MST) algorithm. This algorithm was evaluated on 30 datasets organized in 8 groups from multiple laboratories. Spines were detected with false negative rates less than 10% on most datasets (the average is 7.1%), and the average false positive rate was 11.8%. The software is available in open source form.

  20. The 3D Structure of Eta Carinae's Nebula: A Definitive Picture from High-Dispersion Near-IR Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, N.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution long-slit spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini South provide our most accurate probe of the 3D structure of the Homunculus Nebula around Eta Carinae. Emission from molecular hydrogen at 2.122 microns traces a very thin outer skin, which contains the vast majority of the more than 10 solar masses of material in the nebula. This emission, in turn, yields our first definitive picture of the exact shape of the nebula, plus the latitude dependence of the mass-loss rate, speed, kinetic energy, shell thickness, and other properties associated with Eta Car's 19th century explosion. This will be critical for testing any models for the outburst mechanism. A preliminary analysis suggests that explosion from a critically rotating star was the dominant mechanism that gave rise to both the bipolar shape of the nebula and the production of its equatorial disk. [Fe II] emission in the near IR traces a geometrically thicker but less massive shell found on the inner surface of the H2 skin --- this is either a reverse shock that decelerates Eta Car's wind or a warm PDR. [Fe Ill emission also clarifies the structure of an inner "Little Homunculus" seen previously in HST/STlS spectra. Comparing these two tracers of cool molecular gas and warm partially-ionized gas resolves some significant confusion about the complex structure noted in previous studies.

  1. 3D Fluorescence Quenching of Dissolved Organic Matter Applying PARAFAC Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. A.; Garnier, C.; Redon, R.; Mounier, S.

    2009-12-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) exists everywhere in the environment. The studies of DOM in aquatic ecosystems enable us to obtain some information on its coming future and the importance of its role in the bio-geochemical processes. The fluorescence technique makes analyzes possible on the basis of the optical propriety of the DOM including its fluorophores composition and its complexation propriety face to face to certain metal (3). Recently for luminescence spectrum it is possible to determine the fluorescent component composition by the statistical analysis of parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) with excitation-emission matrix (EEM) (1). The complexation propriety between DOM and metals is accessible by measuring the fluorescence quenching (FQ) functional to the metal additions. The EEMs in the FQ experiments contain maximal information as a whole of fluorescent DOM (FDOM). This work presents a quenching experience brought from copper ions titration onto a tropical river water sample (Rio Negro à Sao Gabriel Brésil) of 5mgC/L carbon concentration and 1.68 nano-molaire initial copper ions concentration (pH=4.5). A titration of copper ions (Cu(NO3)2) has been applied at total analytical concentration of copper-ions from 10-9M jusqu’à 10-3M. Fifty (50) EEM were obtained and gathered in order to analyze the FQ by PARAFAC. This statistic treatment permits us to extract 2 fluorescent components with the whole EEM: C1 (λex=225-235nm/λem=420-425nm) and C2 (λex=250-260nm and 345-355nm/λem=470-480nm) corresponding to the peaks already descript in the literature. Using the participation to the total fluorescence of these peaks, we have observed clearly that the fluorescence diminution was not uniform. The measurement of complexation propriety by this new approach gives the values following: K1=10E4.6; L1=10E-7.8 et K2=10E4.46; L2=10E-9 respectively the components C1 et C2. These results conform that determined in the literature by FQ. The utilisation of PARAFAC has

  2. Computer Modeling of the Structure and Spectra of Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grigorenko, B.L.; Savitsky, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins from the family of green fluorescent proteins are intensively used as biomarkers in living systems. The chromophore group based on the hydroxybenzylidene-imidazoline molecule, which is formed in nature from three amino-acid residues inside the protein globule and well shielded from external media, is responsible for light absorption and fluorescence. Along with the intense experimental studies of the properties of fluorescent proteins and their chromophores by biochemical, X-ray, and spectroscopic tools, in recent years, computer modeling has been used to characterize their properties and spectra. We present in this review the most interesting results of the molecular modeling of the structural parameters and optical and vibrational spectra of the chromophorecontaining domains of fluorescent proteins by methods of quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, and combined quantum-mechanical-molecular-mechanical approaches. The main emphasis is on the correlation of theoretical and experimental data and on the predictive power of modeling, which may be useful for creating new, efficient biomarkers. PMID:22649601

  3. High-Resolution Solid Modeling of Biological Samples Imaged with 3D Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ferko, Michael C.; Patterson, Brian W.; Butler, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Optical-sectioning, digital fluorescence microscopy provides images representing temporally- and spatially-resolved molecular-scale details of the substructures of living cells. To render such images into solid models for further computational analyses, we have developed an integrated system of image acquisition, processing, and rendering, which includes a new empirical technique to correct for axial distortions inherent in fluorescence microscopy due to refractive index mismatches between microscope objective immersion medium, coverslip glass, and water. This system takes advantage of the capabilities of ultra-high numerical aperture objectives (e.g. total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy) and enables faithful three-dimensional rendering of living cells into solid models amenable to further computational analysis. An example of solid modeling of bovine aortic endothelial cells and their nuclei is presented. Since many cellular level events are temporally and spatially confined, such integrated image acquisition, processing, rendering, and computational analysis, will enable, in silico, the generation of new computational models for cell mechanics and signaling. PMID:16758474

  4. Anomalous Fluorescence Enhancement from Double Heterostructure 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals–A Multifunctional Fluorescence-Based Sensor Platform

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Kim, Tak H.; Gan, Zongsong; Cole, Ivan S.; Zhao, Dongyuan; Kielpinski, Dave; Gu, Min; Li, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Augmenting fluorescence intensity is of vital importance to the development of chemical and biochemical sensing, imaging and miniature light sources. Here we report an unprecedented fluorescence enhancement with a novel architecture of multilayer three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals self-assembled from polystyrene spheres. The new technique uses a double heterostructure, which comprises a top and a bottom layer with a periodicity overlapping the excitation wavelength (E) of the emitters, and a middle layer with a periodicity matching the fluorescence wavelength (F) and a thickness that supports constructive interference for the excitation wavelength. This E-F-E double heterostructure displays direction-dependent light trapping for both excitation and fluorescence, coupling the modes of photonic crystal with multiple-beam interference. The E-F-E double heterostructure renders an additional 5-fold enhancement to the extraordinary FL amplification of Rhodamine B in monolithic E CPhCs, and 4.3-fold acceleration of emission dynamics. Such a self-assembled double heterostructue CPhCs may find significant applications in illumination, laser, chemical/biochemical sensing, and solar energy harvesting. We further demonstrate the multi-functionality of the E-F-E double heterostructure CPhCs in Hg (II) sensing. PMID:26400503

  5. Highly effective surface-enhanced fluorescence substrates with roughened 3D flowerlike silver nanostructures fabricated in liquid crystalline phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Chengliang; Xiang, Xiangjun; Zhang, Peiguang; Peng, Zenghui; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Xuan, Li

    2017-04-01

    Highly effective surface-enhanced fluorescence substrates with roughened 3D flowerlike silver nanostructures were fabricated by electrodeposition in liquid crystalline template which is simple and controllable. Due to the localized surface plasmon resonance of silver nanostructures, the substrates were used as surface enhanced fluorescence substrates. The morphology and optical properties of the substrates were studied. The fluorescence experiments of the Rhodamine 6G on the substrates for different growth times were carried out and the best enhancement factor of 181 was achieved. Eight substrates with the same growth conditions were used to study the reproducibility of the substrate which shows that the fluctuations are within 9%. This substrate was used in organic distributed feedback lasers and the amplified spontaneous emission of poly(2-methoxy-5-(2‧-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene) was enhanced dramatically which means the reduced threshold and improved slope efficiency. Such easily fabricated flower-like silver nanostructure substrates with strong surface enhanced fluorescence effect and good reproducibility are good candidate for potential applications in optical imaging, biotechnology and material detections.

  6. An algorithm to correct 2D near-infrared fluorescence signals using 3D intravascular ultrasound architectural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallas, Georgios; Brooks, Dana H.; Rosenthal, Amir; Vinegoni, Claudio; Calfon, Marcella A.; Razansky, R. Nika; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-03-01

    Intravascular Near-Infrared Fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is a promising imaging modality to image vessel biology and high-risk plaques in vivo. We have developed a NIRF fiber optic catheter and have presented the ability to image atherosclerotic plaques in vivo, using appropriate NIR fluorescent probes. Our catheter consists of a 100/140 μm core/clad diameter housed in polyethylene tubing, emitting NIR laser light at a 90 degree angle compared to the fiber's axis. The system utilizes a rotational and a translational motor for true 2D imaging and operates in conjunction with a coaxial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) device. IVUS datasets provide 3D images of the internal structure of arteries and are used in our system for anatomical mapping. Using the IVUS images, we are building an accurate hybrid fluorescence-IVUS data inversion scheme that takes into account photon propagation through the blood filled lumen. This hybrid imaging approach can then correct for the non-linear dependence of light intensity on the distance of the fluorescence region from the fiber tip, leading to quantitative imaging. The experimental and algorithmic developments will be presented and the effectiveness of the algorithm showcased with experimental results in both saline and blood-like preparations. The combined structural and molecular information obtained from these two imaging modalities are positioned to enable the accurate diagnosis of biologically high-risk atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries that are responsible for heart attacks.

  7. Interpretation of fluorescence correlation spectra of biopolymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Phillies, George D J

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is regularly used to study diffusion in non-dilute "crowded" biopolymer solutions, including the interior of living cells. For fluorophores in dilute solution, the relationship between the FCS spectrum G(t) and the diffusion coefficient D is well-established. However, the dilute-solution relationship between G(t) and D has sometimes been used to interpret FCS spectra of fluorophores in non-dilute solutions. Unfortunately, the relationship used to interpret FCS spectra in dilute solutions relies on an assumption that is not always correct in non-dilute solutions. This paper obtains the correct form for interpreting FCS spectra of non-dilute solutions, writing G(t) in terms of the statistical properties of the fluorophore motions. Approaches for applying this form are discussed.

  8. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T.

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  9. Robust incremental compensation of the light attenuation with depth in 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kervrann, C; Legland, D; Pardini, L

    2004-06-01

    Summary Fluorescent signal intensities from confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM) suffer from several distortions inherent to the method. Namely, layers which lie deeper within the specimen are relatively dark due to absorption and scattering of both excitation and fluorescent light, photobleaching and/or other factors. Because of these effects, a quantitative analysis of images is not always possible without correction. Under certain assumptions, the decay of intensities can be estimated and used for a partial depth intensity correction. In this paper we propose an original robust incremental method for compensating the attenuation of intensity signals. Most previous correction methods are more or less empirical and based on fitting a decreasing parametric function to the section mean intensity curve computed by summing all pixel values in each section. The fitted curve is then used for the calculation of correction factors for each section and a new compensated sections series is computed. However, these methods do not perfectly correct the images. Hence, the algorithm we propose for the automatic correction of intensities relies on robust estimation, which automatically ignores pixels where measurements deviate from the decay model. It is based on techniques adopted from the computer vision literature for image motion estimation. The resulting algorithm is used to correct volumes acquired in CLSM. An implementation of such a restoration filter is discussed and examples of successful restorations are given.

  10. Experimental research of fluorescence spectra of watercress stressed by lack or excess of watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullo, O. A.; Fedotov, Yu. V.; Belov, M. L.; Gorodnichev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental laboratory investigations of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of watercress were conducted. The fluorescence spectra were excited by a YAG:Nd laser emitting at 532 nm. The laboratory setup was described and fluorescence spectra of watercress in stressed states caused by lack and excess of water were presented. It was established that the influence of stress caused by lack and excess of watering is manifested in changes of fluorescence spectra.

  11. 2D map projections for visualization and quantitative analysis of 3D fluorescence micrographs

    PubMed Central

    Sendra, G. Hernán; Hoerth, Christian H.; Wunder, Christian; Lorenz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    We introduce Map3-2D, a freely available software to accurately project up to five-dimensional (5D) fluorescence microscopy image data onto full-content 2D maps. Similar to the Earth’s projection onto cartographic maps, Map3-2D unfolds surface information from a stack of images onto a single, structurally connected map. We demonstrate its applicability for visualization and quantitative analyses of spherical and uneven surfaces in fixed and dynamic live samples by using mammalian and yeast cells, and giant unilamellar vesicles. Map3-2D software is available at http://www.zmbh.uni-heidelberg.de//Central_Services/Imaging_Facility/Map3-2D.html. PMID:26208256

  12. Characterisation of natural organic matter (NOM) in depth profile of Mediterranean Sea by 3D-Fluorescence following with PARAFAC treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huiyu, Z.; Durrieu, G.; Redon, R.; Heimbuerger, L.; Mounier, S.

    2009-12-01

    A periodic series of samplings have made during one year(2008) organized by Ifremer into the central Ligurian Sea(DYFAMED site, 43°25’N, 07°52’E, Mediterranean Sea). Spectra were mesured by spectrofluorimetry(HITACHI 4500) at excitation wavelengths from 250nm to 500nm and emission wavelengths from 200nm to 550nm, both wavelength slits for 5nm, scan speed is 2400nm/min. Parallel factors analysis(PARAFAC) software is a powerful statistical technique to treat the 3D-fluorescence spectra leading to the decomposition by a number of independent fluorescent compounds 1 and 2. Found 4 fluorescent components representing the fluorescence maxima of previously identified moieties: [Tyr] maximal excitation wavelength and emission wavelength 265nm/305nm (tyrosine-like); [Trp] maximal λEX/λEM=280nm/340nm(Peak T, tryptophan-like group); [M] maximal λEX/λEM=295nm/410nm(Peak M, marine humic-like substance) and a double maximum component [CA] with maximal λEX/λEM=335nm/445nm(Peak C, visible humic-like group) and λEX/λEM=250nm/445nm(Peak A, UV humic-like substance). Fluorescence contribution of each component at different logarithmic depths(Fig.2) shows that the most concentrated fluorophores zone is deeper than 100m, which is different from the results of dissolved organic carbon(DOC) concentration which the most concentrated zone is on the seasurface(B.Avril,2002).The humic-like substances are generally less fluorescent, particularly the M compound. An important peak contribution of marine humic-like substance has appeared in May at the profound 100m and 2200m, although the other fluorophores kept their values reasonable. The intensity maxima was closed to 100m, while an augmentation of protein substances in the deep sea(about 400 m) following by a shut immediate at 600 m in the months July, August and September. It is probably due to the sufficient heat from the sea surface; micro-organism could modify their position in the depth profile in the seawater. Thanks to

  13. Fluorescence polarization and dichroic spectra of stilbene derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Nekadamov, S.; Senyuk, M.A.; Bobrovich, V.P.

    1987-09-01

    Fluorescence polarization spectra were measured by means of the single photon counting technique with the use of a setup comprising two quartz monochromators. The relative experiment error did not exceed 3% for polarizations close to the limiting value of 6% for p approx. 0.1. Dichroic spectra of stilbene derivatives were measured with a Specord UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The polarization of the fluorescence emission band for the oxazole derivatives of stilbene is practically constant exhibiting slight increases in the vibration maxima. This polarization behavior indicates that the emission is due to a single electronic transition. The absorption spectra of the oxazole derivatives of stilbene contain three broad bands in the near-UV region. The long-wavelength absorption band (A band) is due to the excitation of the entire ..pi..-electron system of the molecule. Phenyl and oxazole rings lead to the appearance of a new absorption band (R band) with the maximum near 290 nm. The short-wavelength B band is due to the ..pi..-excitation of the benzene rings.

  14. Analysis of nuclear organization with TANGO, software for high-throughput quantitative analysis of 3D fluorescence microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Ollion, Jean; Cochennec, Julien; Loll, François; Escudé, Christophe; Boudier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly organized cellular organelle that contains the genome. An important step to understand the relationships between genome positioning and genome functions is to extract quantitative data from three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence imaging. However, such approaches are limited by the requirement for processing and analyzing large sets of images. Here we present a practical approach using TANGO (Tools for Analysis of Nuclear Genome Organization), an image analysis tool dedicated to the study of nuclear architecture. TANGO is a generic tool able to process large sets of images, allowing quantitative study of nuclear organization. In this chapter a practical description of the software is drawn in order to give an overview of its different concepts and functionalities. This description is illustrated with a precise example that can be performed step-by-step on experimental data provided on the website http://biophysique.mnhn.fr/tango/HomePage.

  15. DNA-Dye-Conjugates: Conformations and Spectra of Fluorescence Probes

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, Frank R.; Paradas Palomo, Miguel; Sharapa, Dmitry I.; Zozulia, Oleksii; Mokhir, Andriy; Clark, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Extensive molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate DNA-dye and DNA-photosensitizer conjugates, which act as reactants in templated reactions leading to the generation of fluorescent products in the presence of specific desoxyribonucleic acid sequences (targets). Such reactions are potentially suitable for detecting target nucleic acids in live cells by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. The simulations show how the attached dyes/photosensitizers influence DNA structure and reveal the relative orientations of the chromophores with respect to each other. Our results will help to optimize the reactants for the templated reactions, especially length and structure of the spacers used to link reporter dyes or photosensitizers to the oligonucleotides responsible for target recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the structural ensembles obtained from the simulations can be used to calculate steady-state UV-vis absorption and emission spectra. We also show how important quantities describing the quenching of the reporter dye via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be calculated from the simulation data, and we compare these for different relative chromophore geometries. PMID:27467071

  16. Stratospheric Observations of CH3D and HDO from ATMOS Infrared Solar Spectra: Enrichments of Deuterium in Methane and Implications for HD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irion, F. W.; Moyer, E. J.; Gunson, M. R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Yung, Y. L.; Michelsen, H. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Chang, A. Y.; Newchurch, M. J.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    Stratospheric mixing ratios of CH3D from 100 mb to 17mb (approximately equals 15 to 28 km)and HDO from 100 mb to 10 mb (approximately equals 15 to 32 km) have been inferred from high resolution solar occultation infrared spectra from the Atmospheric Trace MOlecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier-transform interferometer. The spectra, taken on board the Space Shuttle during the Spacelab 3 and ATLAS-1, -2, and -3 missions, extend in latitude from 70 deg S to 65 deg N. We find CH3D entering the stratosphere at an average mixing ratio of (9.9 +/- 0.8) x 10(exp -10) with a D/H ratio in methane (7.1 +/- 7.4)% less than that in Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW) (1 sigma combined precision and systematic error). In the mid to lower stratosphere, the average lifetime of CH3D is found to be (1.19 +/- 0.02) times that of CH4, resulting in an increasing D/H ratio in methane as air 'ages' and the methane mixing ratio decreases. We find an average of (1.0 +/- 0.1) molecules of stratospheric HDO are produced for each CH3D destroyed (1 sigma combined precision and systematic error), indicating that the rate of HDO production is approximately equal to the rate of CH3D destruction. Assuming negligible amounts of deuterium in species other than HDO, CH3D and HD, this limits the possible change in the stratospheric HD mixing ratio below about 10 mb to be +/- 0.1 molecules HD created per molecule CH3D destroyed.

  17. DVR3D: a program suite for the calculation of rotation-vibration spectra of triatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Kostin, Maxim A.; Barletta, Paolo; Harris, Gregory J.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Ramanlal, Jayesh; Zobov, Nikolai F.

    2004-11-01

    The DVR3D program suite calculates energy levels, wavefunctions, and where appropriate dipole transition moments, for rotating and vibrating triatomic molecules. Potential energy and, where necessary, dipole surfaces must be provided. Expectation values of geometrically defined functions can be calculated, a feature which is particularly useful for fitting potential energy surfaces. The programs use an exact (within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation) Hamiltonian and offer a choice of Jacobi or Radau internal coordinates and several body-fixed axes. Rotationally excited states are treated using an efficient two-step algorithm. The programs uses a Discrete Variable Representation (DVR) based on Gauss-Jacobi and Gauss-Laguerre quadrature for all 3 internal coordinates and thus yields a fully point-wise representation of the wavefunctions. The vibrational step uses successive diagonalisation and truncation which is implemented for a number of possible coordinate orderings. The rotational, expectation value and transition dipole programs exploit the savings offered by performing integrals on a DVR grid. The new version has been rewritten in FORTRAN 90 to exploit the dynamic array allocations and the algorithm for dipole and spectra calculations have been substantially improved. New modules allow the z-axis to be embedded perpendicular to the plane of the molecule and for the calculation of expectation values. Program summaryTitle of the program: DVR3D suite Catalogue number: ADTI Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTI Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Programming language: Fortran 90 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 61 574 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 972 404 Distribution format: tar.gz New version summaryTitle of program: DVR3DRJZ Catalogue number: ADTB Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTB Program obtainable

  18. Investigation of fluorescence spectra disturbances influencing the classification performance of fluorescently labeled plastic flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Petr; Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The recycling of plastic products becomes increasingly attractive not only from an environmental point of view, but also economically. For recycled (engineering) plastic products with the highest possible quality, plastic sorting technologies must provide clean and virtually mono-fractional compositions from a mixture of many different types of (shredded) plastics. In order to put this high quality sorting into practice, the labeling of virgin plastics with specific fluorescent markers at very low concentrations (ppm level or less) during their manufacturing process is proposed. The emitted fluorescence spectra represent "optical fingerprints" - each being unique for a particular plastic - which we use for plastic identification and classification purposes. In this study we quantify the classification performance using our prototype measurement system and 15 different plastic types when various influence factors most relevant in practice cause disturbances of the fluorescence spectra emitted from the labeled plastics. The results of these investigations help optimize the development and incorporation of appropriate fluorescent markers as well as the classification algorithms and overall measurement system in order to achieve the lowest possible classification error rates.

  19. Fluorescence Emission and Excitation Spectra of Photo-Fragmented Nitrobenzene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Christopher J.; Tanjaroon, Chakree; Johnson, J. Bruce; Allen, Susan D.; Reeve, Scott W.

    2012-06-01

    Upon absorption of a UV photon, nitrobenzene readily dissociates into C_6H_5, NO_2, C_6H_5NO, O, C_6H_5O, and NO through three different channels. We have recorded high resolution emission and excitation spectra of the NO resulting from photo-fragmented nitrobenzene using a pulsed picosecond tunable laser and a nanosecond dye laser. Specifically, the lasers probed the A^2Σ^+→ X^2π(1/2,3/2) NO band system between 225-260 nm using an one or two color process. In a one color process, the same energy (wavelength) photon is used to dissociate nitrobenzene and excite NO. In a two color process, photons of a particular energy are used to dissociate the nitrobenzene while photons of a different energy are used to probe the resultant NO. We have determined the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the nascent NO. And, we have examined the effect of the relative timing of the two photons on the fluorescence spectra to extract information about the photodissociation dynamics. Lin, M.-F.; Lee, Y. T.; Ni, C.-K.; Xu, S. and Lin, M. C. J. Chem. Phys., AIP, 2007, 126.

  20. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Geng, Yang; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2013-11-01

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy.

  1. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  2. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  3. Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment: Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2012-01-01

    The main theme for our research is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars, shortwave spectrometers, and microwave radiometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools developed by our group. In particular, we define first a large number of cloudy test cases spanning all 3D possibilities not just the customary uniform-overcast ones. Second, for each case, we define a "Best Estimate of Clouds That Affect Shortwave Radiation" using all relevant ARM instruments, notably the new scanning radars, and contribute this to the ARM Archive. Third, we test the ASR-signature radiative transfer model RRTMG_SW for those cases, focusing on the near-IR because of long-standing problems in this spectral region, and work with the developers to improve RRTMG_SW in order to increase its penetration into the modeling community.

  4. Final Report – Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment. Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2015-09-14

    ARM set out 20 years ago to “close” the radiation problem, that is, to improve radiation models to the point where they could routinely predict the observed spectral radiation fluxes knowing the optical properties of the surface and of gases, clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. Only then could such radiation models form a proper springboard for global climate model (GCM) parameterizations of spectral radiation. Sustained efforts have more or less achieved that goal with regard to longwave radiation; ASR models now routinely predict ARM spectral longwave radiances to 1–2%. Similar efforts in the shortwave have achieved far less; the successes are mainly for carefully selected 1D stratiform cloud cases. Such cases amount, even with the most optimistic interpretation, to no more than 30% of all cases at SGP. The problem has not been lack of effort but lack of appropriate instruments.The new ARM stimulus-funded instruments, with their new capabilities, will dramatically improve this situation and once again make progress possible on the shortwave problem. The new shortwave spectrometers will provide a reliable, calibrated record including the near infrared – and for other climatic regimes than SGP. The new scanning radars will provide the 3D cloud view, making it possible to tackle fully 3D situations. Thus, our main theme for the project is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars and shortwave spectrometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools.

  5. 3D in-vivo imaging of GFP-expressing T-cells in mice with non-contact fluorescence molecular tomography (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalakis, Anikitos; Meyer, Heiko; Zacharakis, Giannis; Economou, Eleftherios N.; Mamalaki, Clio; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Ripoll, Jorge

    2005-06-01

    Optical imaging and tomography in tissues can facilitate the quantitative study of several important chromophores and fluorophores in-vivo. Due to this fact, there has been great interest in developing imaging systems offering quantitative information on the location and concentration of chromophores and fluorescent probes. In this study we present a novel imaging system that enables three dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent signals in bodies of arbitrary shapes in a non-contact geometry, in combination with a 3D surface reconstruction algorithm, which is appropriate for in-vivo small animal imaging of fluorescent probes. The system consists of a rotating sample holder and a lens coupled Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera in combination with a fiber coupled laser scanning device. An Argon ion laser is used as the source and different filters are used for the detection of various fluorophores or fluorescing proteins. With this new setup a large measurements dataset can be achieved while the use of inversion models give a high capacity for quantitative 3D reconstruction of fluorochrome distributions as well as high spatial resolution. The system has already been tested in the observation of the distribution of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expressing T-lymphocytes in order to study the function of the immune system in a murine model, which can then be related to the function of the human immune system.

  6. Calibration-free absolute quantification of optical absorption coefficients using acoustic spectra in 3D photoacoustic microscopy of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zijian; Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V

    2010-06-15

    Optical absorption is closely associated with many physiological important parameters, such as the concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and it can be used to quantify the concentrations of nonfluorescent molecules. We propose a method to use acoustic spectra of photoacoustic signals to quantify the absolute optical absorption. This method is self-calibrating and thus insensitive to variations in the optical fluence. Factors such as system bandwidth and acoustic attenuation can affect the quantification but can be canceled by dividing the acoustic spectra measured at two optical wavelengths. Using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy, we quantified the absolute optical absorption of black ink samples with various concentrations. We also quantified both the concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in a live mouse in absolute units.

  7. The change of the LMM auger spectra in 3d-metals due to oxidation and its correlation with the change of the atomic magnetic moment.

    PubMed

    Zheltysheva, Olga R; Surnin, Dmitry V; Guy, Dmitry E; Gil'mutdinov, Faat Z; Ruts, Yuri V; Grebennikov, Vladimir I

    2005-12-01

    The surfaces of crystalline samples of 3d-metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) and their stoichiometric oxides have been studied by Auger spectroscopy. A correlation between the change in the LVV (L-inner level-valence-valence electron transition) Auger intensities and the change of the squares of the corresponding atomic-magnetic moments has been observed. This is because of the complicated nature of the Auger process. That is, the Auger electron emission is a result of the inner atomic level excitation by electron impact and Auger annihilation of the inner-level hole. Therefore, the Auger process has been considered a second-order process, and spin polarization of the valence states has been taken into account for the LMM (L-inner level-M-inner level-M-inner level electron transition) Auger spectra of 3d-metals.

  8. Time-lapse 3-D measurements of a glucose biosensor in multicellular spheroids by light sheet fluorescence microscopy in commercial 96-well plates

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Vincent; Chennell, George; Sparks, Hugh; Lana, Tobia; Kumar, Sunil; Carling, David; Sardini, Alessandro; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has previously been demonstrated on a commercially available inverted fluorescence microscope frame using the method of oblique plane microscopy (OPM). In this paper, OPM is adapted to allow time-lapse 3-D imaging of 3-D biological cultures in commercially available glass-bottomed 96-well plates using a stage-scanning OPM approach (ssOPM). Time-lapse 3-D imaging of multicellular spheroids expressing a glucose Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor is demonstrated in 16 fields of view with image acquisition at 10 minute intervals. As a proof-of-principle, the ssOPM system is also used to acquire a dose response curve with the concentration of glucose in the culture medium being varied across 42 wells of a 96-well plate with the whole acquisition taking 9 min. The 3-D image data enable the FRET ratio to be measured as a function of distance from the surface of the spheroid. Overall, the results demonstrate the capability of the OPM system to measure spatio-temporal changes in FRET ratio in 3-D in multicellular spheroids over time in a multi-well plate format. PMID:27886235

  9. Time-lapse 3-D measurements of a glucose biosensor in multicellular spheroids by light sheet fluorescence microscopy in commercial 96-well plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maioli, Vincent; Chennell, George; Sparks, Hugh; Lana, Tobia; Kumar, Sunil; Carling, David; Sardini, Alessandro; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has previously been demonstrated on a commercially available inverted fluorescence microscope frame using the method of oblique plane microscopy (OPM). In this paper, OPM is adapted to allow time-lapse 3-D imaging of 3-D biological cultures in commercially available glass-bottomed 96-well plates using a stage-scanning OPM approach (ssOPM). Time-lapse 3-D imaging of multicellular spheroids expressing a glucose Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor is demonstrated in 16 fields of view with image acquisition at 10 minute intervals. As a proof-of-principle, the ssOPM system is also used to acquire a dose response curve with the concentration of glucose in the culture medium being varied across 42 wells of a 96-well plate with the whole acquisition taking 9 min. The 3-D image data enable the FRET ratio to be measured as a function of distance from the surface of the spheroid. Overall, the results demonstrate the capability of the OPM system to measure spatio-temporal changes in FRET ratio in 3-D in multicellular spheroids over time in a multi-well plate format.

  10. Time-lapse 3-D measurements of a glucose biosensor in multicellular spheroids by light sheet fluorescence microscopy in commercial 96-well plates.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Vincent; Chennell, George; Sparks, Hugh; Lana, Tobia; Kumar, Sunil; Carling, David; Sardini, Alessandro; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-11-25

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has previously been demonstrated on a commercially available inverted fluorescence microscope frame using the method of oblique plane microscopy (OPM). In this paper, OPM is adapted to allow time-lapse 3-D imaging of 3-D biological cultures in commercially available glass-bottomed 96-well plates using a stage-scanning OPM approach (ssOPM). Time-lapse 3-D imaging of multicellular spheroids expressing a glucose Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor is demonstrated in 16 fields of view with image acquisition at 10 minute intervals. As a proof-of-principle, the ssOPM system is also used to acquire a dose response curve with the concentration of glucose in the culture medium being varied across 42 wells of a 96-well plate with the whole acquisition taking 9 min. The 3-D image data enable the FRET ratio to be measured as a function of distance from the surface of the spheroid. Overall, the results demonstrate the capability of the OPM system to measure spatio-temporal changes in FRET ratio in 3-D in multicellular spheroids over time in a multi-well plate format.

  11. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D. PMID:27619347

  12. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-09-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D.

  13. Rapid, simple and inexpensive production of custom 3D printed equipment for large-volume fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Adam L.; Hilton, Stephen T.; Andreae, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    The cost of 3D printing has reduced dramatically over the last few years and is now within reach of many scientific laboratories. This work presents an example of how 3D printing can be applied to the development of custom laboratory equipment that is specifically adapted for use with the novel brain tissue clearing technique, CLARITY. A simple, freely available online software tool was used, along with consumer-grade equipment, to produce a brain slicing chamber and a combined antibody staining and imaging chamber. Using standard 3D printers we were able to produce research-grade parts in an iterative manner at a fraction of the cost of commercial equipment. 3D printing provides a reproducible, flexible, simple and cost-effective method for researchers to produce the equipment needed to quickly adopt new methods. PMID:25797056

  14. Orphan spin operators enable the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-05-01

    We propose a general method that enables the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D solid-state NMR spectra for U-13C, 15N-labeled proteins. This method, called MEIOSIS (Multiple ExperIments via Orphan SpIn operatorS), makes it possible to detect four coherence transfer pathways simultaneously, utilizing orphan (i.e., neglected) spin operators of nuclear spin polarization generated during 15N-13C cross polarization (CP). In the MEIOSIS experiments, two phase-encoded free-induction decays are decoded into independent nuclear polarization pathways using Hadamard transformations. As a proof of principle, we show the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra of U-13C, 15N-labeled microcrystalline ubiquitin. Hadamard decoding of CP coherences into multiple independent spin operators is a new concept in solid-state NMR and is extendable to many other multidimensional experiments. The MEIOSIS method will increase the throughput of solid-state NMR techniques for microcrystalline proteins, membrane proteins, and protein fibrils.

  15. Determination of rice syrup adulterant concentration in honey using three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and multivariate calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Quansheng; Qi, Shuai; Li, Huanhuan; Han, Xiaoyan; Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen

    2014-10-01

    To rapidly and efficiently detect the presence of adulterants in honey, three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (3DFS) technique was employed with the help of multivariate calibration. The data of 3D fluorescence spectra were compressed using characteristic extraction and the principal component analysis (PCA). Then, partial least squares (PLS) and back propagation neural network (BP-ANN) algorithms were used for modeling. The model was optimized by cross validation, and its performance was evaluated according to root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and correlation coefficient (R) in prediction set. The results showed that BP-ANN model was superior to PLS models, and the optimum prediction results of the mixed group (sunflower ± longan ± buckwheat ± rape) model were achieved as follow: RMSEP = 0.0235 and R = 0.9787 in the prediction set. The study demonstrated that the 3D fluorescence spectroscopy technique combined with multivariate calibration has high potential in rapid, nondestructive, and accurate quantitative analysis of honey adulteration.

  16. Nonnegative matrix factorization: a blind spectra separation method for in vivo fluorescent optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Montcuquet, Anne-Sophie; Hervé, Lionel; Navarro, Fabrice; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Mars, Jérôme I

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging in diffusive media is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications that uses injected fluorescent markers that bind to specific targets, e.g., carcinoma. The region of interest is illuminated with near-IR light and the emitted back fluorescence is analyzed to localize the fluorescence sources. To investigate a thick medium, as the fluorescence signal decreases with the light travel distance, any disturbing signal, such as biological tissues intrinsic fluorescence (called autofluorescence) is a limiting factor. Several specific markers may also be simultaneously injected to bind to different molecules, and one may want to isolate each specific fluorescent signal from the others. To remove the unwanted fluorescence contributions or separate different specific markers, a spectroscopic approach is explored. The nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is the blind positive source separation method we chose. We run an original regularized NMF algorithm we developed on experimental data, and successfully obtain separated in vivo fluorescence spectra.

  17. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  18. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  19. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled NiF: AN Investigation of the Ω-TYPE Doubling in the Ω=1/2 States of the 3d^9 Ground Electronic Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, D. L.; Tokaryk, D. W.; Linton, C.; Adam, A. G.

    2012-06-01

    A recent paper by Hougen presents the hypothesis that the relative parities of Ω=1/2 levels in the 3d^9 complex of NiF may need to be reconsidered, since the experimental determinations reported in the literature via Ω-doubling parameters differ by a sign from those obtained from Hougen's theoretical treatment. We report on an experiment that attempts to resolve the discrepancy via laser-induced fluorescence and dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of NiF created in the molecular-jet laser-ablation apparatus at the University of New Brunswick. New data involving the [22.9]^2π3/2--X ^2π3/2 and [22.9]^2π3/2--[0.25] ^2Σ1/2 transitions were obtained, in which several isotopologues of NiF could be resolved and their spectra analyzed. Dispersed fluorescence spectra were obtained by exciting parity-resolved transitions of the [22.9]^2π3/2--X ^2π3/2 spectrum with a narrow-bandwidth cw laser, then observing the fluorescence to the [0.25] ^2Σ1/2 and [1.5] ^2Σ^+1/2 states with a grating spectrometer. Changes in the dispersed fluorescence pattern as levels of the same J' with different parities were excited will be discussed, and the implications for verifying or refuting Hougen's claim will be presented. [1] J T. Hougen, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 267 (2011) 23--35. [2] C. Dufour and B. Pinchemel, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 173 (1995) 70--78. [3] Y. Krouti, T. Hirao, C. Dufour, A. Boulezhar, B. Pinchemel, and P. F. Bernath, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 214 (2002) 152-174. [4] M. Tanimoto, T. Sakamaki, and T. Okabayashi, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 207 (2001) 66--69.

  20. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha.

  1. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  2. [Application of fluorescence spectra and parallel factor analysis in the classification of edible vegetable oils].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi-jun; Pan, Zhao; Zhao, Yan-peng; Liu, Hai-long; Zheng, Long-jiang

    2014-08-01

    The fluorescence spectra of 22 samples of 8 kinds of edible vegetable oils (soybean oil, maize oil, olive oil, rice oil, peanut oil, walnut oil, sunflower oil and sesame oil) were measured with FS920 fluorescence spectrometer and the fluorescence matrixs (EEMs) were analyzed with parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis model. To synthesize the capabilities of material characterization and component identification, fluorescence spectra combined with PARAFAC fulfill the classification of vegetable oils. The map feature (peak position, peak value and peak number) was obtained by analyzing three dimensional spectra and con tour maps in the range of emission wavelength from 260 to 750 nm, and excitation wavelengths from 250 to 550 nm. The fluorescent substances (unsaturated fatty acids, vitamin E and its derivatives, chlorophyll and carotenoid) corresponding to spectrum peaks were determined. The factor-number was selected and the components (vitamin E and its derivatives, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, fatty acid oxidation products, vegetable oil oxidation products) corresponding to each factor were ascertained. The four-factor excitation and emission profiles and projection score plots of PARAFAC model were plotted. Different vegetable oils can be characterized and distinguished with the map features of fluorescence spectra and sample projection plots of PARAFAC model. The results demonstrate the capability of the combination of fluorescence spectra technology and four-factor PARAFAC model for differentiating and characterizing vegetable oils.

  3. Fluorescence Spectra Of Corneal Tissue Under Excimer Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loree, Thomas R.; Johnson, Tamara M.; Birmingham, Brian S.; McCord, Roy C.

    1988-06-01

    The corneas of pigs' eyes were irradiated with ablative levels of 193, 248, and 308 nm and the spectra of the produced light recorded. In all cases there was an appreciable amount of uv light produced in the 300-400 nm band. The 193 nm irradiation exhibited a threshold at 0.5 J/cm2; markedly different spectra were produced below and above that threshold.

  4. Intrinsic fluorescence spectra characteristics of vitamin B1, B2, and B6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Xiao, Xue; Zhao, Xuesong; Hu, Lan; Lv, Caofang; Yin, Zhangkun

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of vitamin B1, B2 and B6 measured with 3D fluorescence Spectrophotometer. Three strong fluorescence areas of vitamin B2 locate at λex/λem=270/525nm, 370/525nm and 450/525nm, one fluorescence areas of vitamin B1 locates at λex/λem=370/460nm, two fluorescence areas of vitamin B6 locates at λex/λem=250/370nm and 325/370nm were found. The influence of pH of solution to the fluorescence profile was also discussed. Using the PARAFAC algorithm, 10 vitamin B1, B2 and B6 mixed solutions were successfully decomposed, and the emission profiles, excitation profiles, central wavelengths and the concentration of the three components were retrieved precisely through about 5 iteration times.

  5. Primordial non-Gaussianity in the forest: 3D bispectrum of Lyman-α flux spectra along multiple lines of sight.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Guha Sarkar, Tapomoy

    2012-09-21

    We investigate the possibility of constraining primordial non-Gaussianity using the 3D bispectrum of the Lyman (Ly)-α forest. The strength of the quadratic non-Gaussian correction to an otherwise Gaussian primordial gravitational field is assumed to be dictated by a single parameter f(NL). We present the first prediction for bounds on f(NL) using Ly-α flux spectra along multiple lines of sight. The 3D Ly-α transmitted flux field is modeled as a biased tracer of the underlying matter distribution sampled along 1D skewers corresponding to quasar sight lines. The precision to which f(NL) can be constrained depends on the survey volume, pixel noise, and aliasing noise (arising from discrete sampling of the density field). We consider various combinations of these factors to predict bounds on f(NL). We find that in an idealized situation of full sky survey and negligible Poisson noise one may constrain f(NL)∼23 in the equilateral limit. Assuming a Ly-α survey covering large parts of the sky (k(min) = 8 × 10(-4) Mpc(-1)) and with a quasar density of n = 5 × 10(-3) Mpc(-2), it is possible to constrain f(NL)∼100 for equilateral configurations. The possibility of measuring f(NL) at a precision comparable to large scale structure studies maybe useful for joint constraining of inflationary scenarios using different data sets.

  6. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-08

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  7. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  8. 2D/3D cryo x-ray fluorescence imaging at the bionanoprobe at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. Vine, D. J.; Lai, B.; Paunesku, T.; Yuan, Y.; Woloschak, G. E.; Deng, J.; Jin, Q.; Hong, Y. P.; Flachenecker, C.; Hornberger, B.; Brister, K.; Jacobsen, C.; Vogt, S.

    2016-01-28

    Trace elements, particularly metals, play very important roles in biological systems. Synchrotron-based hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy offers the most suitable capabilities to quantitatively study trace metals in thick biological samples, such as whole cells and tissues. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated X-ray fluorescence imaging of frozen-hydrated whole cells using the recent developed Bionanoprobe (BNP). The BNP provides spatial resolution down to 30 nm and cryogenic capabilities. Frozen-hydrated biological cells have been directly examined on a sub-cellular level at liquid nitrogen temperatures with minimal sample preparation.

  9. Synthesis and study of fluorescence properties of novel pyrazolo[4‧,3‧:5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5(6H)-one derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga, Jairo; Acosta, Paola; Ortiz, Alejandro; Insuasty, Braulio; Abonia, Rodrigo

    2015-10-01

    New pyrazolo[4‧,3‧:5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5(6H)-one derivatives 5 were prepared by cyclocondensation reaction between heterocyclic o-aminonitriles 3 and carboxylic acids 4 in the presence of sulfuric acid as catalyst. This procedure provides the desired compound in good yield with a simple one-step methodology. The obtained products show interesting fluorescence properties in both solution and solid state; in this way several spectra of absorption and emission were measured for selected compounds 5b, 5e, 5g and 5j, showing a broad and intense emission band around of 470 nm. In other to understand the electronic transition processes, theoretical calculations were performed at TD-DFT level, using B3LYP as functional and 6-31(d,p) as basis set, finding a good agreement with experimental measurements.

  10. Analyzing LED-induced haemal fluorescent spectra on laboratory small albino rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shumei; Luo, Xiaosen; Lan, Xiufeng; Jiao, Fangxiang; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu; Xu, Jiaying; Lu, Shiyue; Shen, Jian; Liu, Jiangang

    2002-04-01

    Native fluorescence spectral characteristics of red blood cells were studied in the visible region in this paper. Blood samples were collected from normal small albino rats. Native fluorescence spectra of the erythrocyte were induced using Light Emitting Diode (LED) at yellow wavelength about 570+/- 16 nm ((Delta) (lambda) 0.5approximately equals 32nm). As the rat's erythrocyte content of in physiological water is increasing, the fluorescent primary emission peak is red shifted from 588 nm to above 615 nm. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensity at about 600 nm was found to be maximal while the rat's erythrocyte consistence is 1%. Moreover, it is shown in large numbers of experiments that LED-induced fluorescence spectra of the erythrocyte are similar with the whole blood. It may make sense for low- intensity light therapy.

  11. The 3D-HST Survey: Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/G141 Grism Spectra, Redshifts, and Emission Line Measurements for ~ 100,000 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Nelson, Erica J.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Maseda, Michael V.; Leja, Joel; Franx, Marijn; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bezanson, Rachel; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Dickey, Claire; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Illingworth, Garth; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Ulf Lange, Johannes; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Oesch, Pascal; Pacifici, Camilla; Patel, Shannon G.; Price, Sedona; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2016-08-01

    We present reduced data and data products from the 3D-HST survey, a 248-orbit HST Treasury program. The survey obtained WFC3 G141 grism spectroscopy in four of the five CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-S, and UDS, along with WFC3 H 140 imaging, parallel ACS G800L spectroscopy, and parallel I 814 imaging. In a previous paper, we presented photometric catalogs in these four fields and in GOODS-N, the fifth CANDELS field. Here we describe and present the WFC3 G141 spectroscopic data, again augmented with data from GO-1600 in GOODS-N (PI: B. Weiner). We developed software to automatically and optimally extract interlaced two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) spectra for all objects in the Skelton et al. (2014) photometric catalogs. The 2D spectra and the multi-band photometry were fit simultaneously to determine redshifts and emission line strengths, taking the morphology of the galaxies explicitly into account. The resulting catalog has redshifts and line strengths (where available) for 22,548 unique objects down to {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 24 (79,609 unique objects down to {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 26). Of these, 5459 galaxies are at z\\gt 1.5 and 9621 are at 0.7\\lt z\\lt 1.5, where Hα falls in the G141 wavelength coverage. The typical redshift error for {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 24 galaxies is {σ }z≈ 0.003× (1+z), i.e., one native WFC3 pixel. The 3σ limit for emission line fluxes of point sources is 2.1× {10}-17 erg s-1 cm-2. All 2D and 1D spectra, as well as redshifts, line fluxes, and other derived parameters, are publicly available.18

  12. Cardiac muscle organization revealed in 3-D by imaging whole-mount mouse hearts using two-photon fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Sivaguru, Barghav S; Sivaguru, Vignesh A; Lu, Xiaochen; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Saif, M Taher A; Lin, Brian; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2015-11-01

    The ability to image the entire adult mouse heart at high resolution in 3-D would provide enormous advantages in the study of heart disease. However, a technique for imaging nuclear/cellular detail as well as the overall structure of the entire heart in 3-D with minimal effort is lacking. To solve this problem, we modified the benzyl alcohol:benzyl benzoate (BABB) clearing technique by labeling mouse hearts with periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stain. We then imaged the hearts with a combination of two-photon fluorescence microscopy and automated tile-scan imaging/stitching. Utilizing the differential spectral properties of PAS, we could identify muscle and nuclear compartments in the heart. We were also able to visualize the differences between a 3-month-old normal mouse heart and a mouse heart that had undergone heart failure due to the expression of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) gene mutation (t/t). Using 2-D and 3-D morphometric analysis, we found that the t/t heart had anomalous ventricular shape, volume, and wall thickness, as well as a disrupted sarcomere pattern. We further validated our approach using decellularized hearts that had been cultured with 3T3 fibroblasts, which were tracked using a nuclear label. We were able to detect the 3T3 cells inside the decellularized intact heart tissue, achieving nuclear/cellular resolution in 3-D. The combination of labeling, clearing, and two-photon microscopy together with tiling eliminates laborious and time-consuming physical sectioning, alignment, and 3-D reconstruction.

  13. Accurate modeling of fluorescence line narrowing difference spectra: Direct measurement of the single-site fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Naibo, Virginia; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2010-07-01

    Accurate lineshape functions for modeling fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) difference spectra (ΔFLN spectra) in the low-fluence limit are derived and examined in terms of the physical interpretation of various contributions, including photoproduct absorption and emission. While in agreement with the earlier results of Jaaniso [Proc. Est. Acad. Sci., Phys., Math. 34, 277 (1985)] and Fünfschilling et al. [J. Lumin. 36, 85 (1986)], the derived formulas differ substantially from functions used recently [e.g., M. Rätsep et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 479, 140 (2009)] to model ΔFLN spectra. In contrast to traditional FLN spectra, it is demonstrated that for most physically reasonable parameters, the ΔFLN spectrum reduces simply to the single-site fluorescence lineshape function. These results imply that direct measurement of a bulk-averaged single-site fluorescence lineshape function can be accomplished with no complicated extraction process or knowledge of any additional parameters such as site distribution function shape and width. We argue that previous analysis of ΔFLN spectra obtained for many photosynthetic complexes led to strong artificial lowering of apparent electron-phonon coupling strength, especially on the high-energy side of the pigment site distribution function.

  14. Fluorescence spectra of blood plasma treated with ultraviolet irradiation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Maslova, T. O.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the fluorescence spectra of blood plasma from patients with acute coronary syndrome, and also the effect of therapeutic doses of in vivo ultraviolet blood irradiation (UBI) on the spectra. We have established that the maxima in the fluorescence spectra of the original plasma samples, obtained from unirradiated blood, are located in the wavelength interval 330-340 nm, characteristic for the fluorescence of tryptophan residues. In extracorporeal UBI ( λ = 254 nm), we observed changes in the shape and also both a blue and a red shift in the maxima of the fluorescence spectra, differing in magnitude for blood plasma samples from different patients in the test group. We show that UBI-initiated changes in the fluorescence spectra of the plasma depend on the original pathological disturbances of metabolite levels, and also on the change in the oxygen-transport function of the blood and the acid-base balance, affecting the oxidative stability of the plasma. We have concluded that UV irradiation, activating buffer systems in the blood, has an effect on the universal and specific interactions of the tryptophan residue with the amino acid residues and water surrounding it.

  15. Estimating the biodegradability of treated sewage samples using synchronous fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tien M; Shin, Jae-Ki; Hur, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) and the first derivative spectra of the influent versus the effluent wastewater samples were compared and the use of fluorescence indices is suggested as a means to estimate the biodegradability of the effluent wastewater. Three distinct peaks were identified from the SFS of the effluent wastewater samples. Protein-like fluorescence (PLF) was reduced, whereas fulvic and/or humic-like fluorescence (HLF) were enhanced, suggesting that the two fluorescence characteristics may represent biodegradable and refractory components, respectively. Five fluorescence indices were selected for the biodegradability estimation based on the spectral features changing from the influent to the effluent. Among the selected indices, the relative distribution of PLF to the total fluorescence area of SFS (Index II) exhibited the highest correlation coefficient with total organic carbon (TOC)-based biodegradability, which was even higher than those obtained with the traditional oxygen demand-based parameters. A multiple regression analysis using Index II and the area ratio of PLF to HLF (Index III) demonstrated the enhancement of the correlations from 0.558 to 0.711 for TOC-based biodegradability. The multiple regression equation finally obtained was 0.148 × Index II - 4.964 × Index III - 0.001 and 0.046 × Index II - 1.128 × Index III + 0.026. The fluorescence indices proposed here are expected to be utilized for successful development of real-time monitoring using a simple fluorescence sensing device for the biodegradability of treated sewage.

  16. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2013-06-04

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines, and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of water-soluble SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and α-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ∼100 ppb ammonia in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (∼0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for λexcitation = 420 ± 50 nm and λemission = 475 ± 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to λexcitation = 320 ± 25 nm and λemission = 425 ± 38 nm for the α-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the EEM spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles may have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  17. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  18. Modeling hyperspectral observations of vegetation fluorescence from photosystem level to top-of-atmosphere radiance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoef, W.

    2011-12-01

    In support of the candidate ESA mission FLEX, models have been developed to simulate vegetation chlorophyll fluorescence and its observation on the level of single leaves, the canopy and from space. The Fluspect model is based on the PROSPECT leaf model and includes an additional module which calculates the excitation-fluorescence matrix for both sides of the leaf by means of an efficient doubling algorithm. Fluorescence spectra for white incident light, and of course the spectra of reflectance and transmittance, are computed as well. The FluorSAIL model is a numerical variant of SAIL which calculates top-of-canopy fluorescent radiance in the direction of viewing for given incident radiation spectra from the sun and the sky, obtained from the MODTRAN radiative transfer code. In a recent version called FluorSAIL3, high spectral resolution data (0.1 nm) from MODTRAN5 (beta) are used by the model to simulate observations by the candidate FLEX mission. The model computes the directional canopy reflectance with and without fluorescence for the given incident radiation spectra obtained from MODTRAN and the results have been used to evaluate several algorithms for the retrieval of fluorescence from the apparent reflectance signal. In this contribution emphasis will be on the detection of the fluorescence signal, the dependence of fluorescence observations on leaf chlorophyll content and other PROSPECT parameters, canopy structure, and observational conditions, including the properties of the atmosphere. In addition, some attention is paid to the definition of fluorescence quantum efficiencies at photosystem level, leaf level, and canopy level. This is important for the study of the relation between canopy fluorescence and actual photosynthesis. From the simulations it can be concluded that the interpretation of the fluorescence signal is complex, and probably the comparison of actual observations of spectra of fluorescence and reflectance with spectra simulated by a

  19. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra of mineral oil and extraction method of characteristic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Liping; Liu, Xianyong; Xu, Xiaoxuan; Xu, Jingjun

    2005-02-01

    To realize the on-line fluorescence monitoring of mineral oil pollution in water, three-dimensional spectral characteristic of oil-water intermixtures must be studied and the characteristic must be extracted. Using excitation wavelength, fluorescence wavelength and fluorescence intensity as three-dimensional system of coordinate, through sampling and surface fitting, three-dimensional fluorogram is gotten, which can provide gist for oil discrimination when presented in contour chart (finger-print map of oils). But there is little difference between characteristics of three-dimensional fluorogram because of the similarity of constituent and structure of similar oils. Therefore this paper introduces quantitative analysis method-characteristic parameter method which starts with analyzing statistical characteristic of three-dimensional fluorogram. Using RFPC fluorescence spectrometer (Shimadzu, Japan), three-dimensional fluorescence spectra of diesel oil, machine oil, gasoline oil, crude oil are measured and parameterized. The result shows that as a quantitative classified discrimination method of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, the parameter of characteristic parameter method possesses definiteness for three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, and it is applicable, available when used in oil discrimination.

  20. Evaluation of potential emission spectra for the reliable classification of fluorescently coded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2011-06-01

    The conservation and efficient use of natural and especially strategic resources like oil and water have become global issues, which increasingly initiate environmental and political activities for comprehensive recycling programs. To effectively reutilize oil-based materials necessary in many industrial fields (e.g. chemical and pharmaceutical industry, automotive, packaging), appropriate methods for a fast and highly reliable automated material identification are required. One non-contacting, color- and shape-independent new technique that eliminates the shortcomings of existing methods is to label materials like plastics with certain combinations of fluorescent markers ("optical codes", "optical fingerprints") incorporated during manufacture. Since time-resolved measurements are complex (and expensive), fluorescent markers must be designed that possess unique spectral signatures. The number of identifiable materials increases with the number of fluorescent markers that can be reliably distinguished within the limited wavelength band available. In this article we shall investigate the reliable detection and classification of fluorescent markers with specific fluorescence emission spectra. These simulated spectra are modeled based on realistic fluorescence spectra acquired from material samples using a modern VNIR spectral imaging system. In order to maximize the number of materials that can be reliably identified, we evaluate the performance of 8 classification algorithms based on different spectral similarity measures. The results help guide the design of appropriate fluorescent markers, optical sensors and the overall measurement system.

  1. Characterization by combined optical and FT infrared spectra of 3d-transition metal ions doped-bismuth silicate glasses and effects of gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    ElBatal, F H; Abdelghany, A M; ElBatal, H A

    2014-03-25

    Optical and infrared absorption spectral measurements were carried out for binary bismuth silicate glass and other derived prepared samples with the same composition and containing additional 0.2% of one of 3d transition metal oxides. The same combined spectroscopic properties were also measured after subjecting the prepared glasses to a gamma dose of 8 Mrad. The experimental optical spectra reveal strong UV-near visible absorption bands from the base and extended to all TMs-doped samples and these specific extended and strong UV-near visible absorption bands are related to the contributions of absorption from both trace iron (Fe(3+)) ions present as contaminated impurities within the raw materials and from absorption of main constituent trivalent bismuth (Bi(3+)) ions. The strong UV-near visible absorption bands are observed to suppress any further UV bands from TM ions. The studied glasses show obvious resistant to gamma irradiation and only small changes are observed upon gamma irradiation. This observed shielding behavior is related to the presence of high Bi(3+) ions with heavy mass causing the observed stability of the optical absorption. Infrared absorption spectra of the studied glasses reveal characteristic vibrational bands due to both modes from silicate network and the sharing of Bi-O linkages and the presence of TMs in the doping level (0.2%) causes no distinct changes within the number or position of the vibrational modes. The presence of high Bi2O3 content (70 mol%) appears to cause stability of the structural building units towards gamma irradiation as revealed by FTIR measurements.

  2. Computer-controlled multi-parameter mapping of 3D compressible flowfields using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.; Victor, Kenneth G.; Mcdaniel, James C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-controlled technique, using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence, for measuring complex compressible flowfields is presented. A new laser permits the use of a planar two-line temperature technique so that all parameters can be measured with the laser operated narrowband. Pressure and temperature measurements in a step flowfield show agreement within 10 percent of a CFD model except in regions close to walls. Deviation of near wall temperature measurements from the model was decreased from 21 percent to 12 percent compared to broadband planar temperature measurements. Computer-control of the experiment has been implemented, except for the frequency tuning of the laser. Image data storage and processing has been improved by integrating a workstation into the experimental setup reducing the data reduction time by a factor of 50.

  3. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G; Werner, John S; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed.

  4. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B.; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G.; Werner, John S.; Burns, Marie E.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed. PMID:26114038

  5. Multivariate discriminating algorithm for analyzing laser-induced fluorescence spectra of human gastrointestinal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Wei, Guang Hui

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the laser- induced fluorescence characters of normal and malignant stomach tissue in Vitro and in Vivo. The stepwise multivariate discrimination analysis was used to make a multivariate statistical algorithm for analyzing the diagnostic parameters of human stomach tissues fluorescence spectrum. The resulting spectra could be differentiating histologically stomach abnormal tissue from normal tissue with a sensitivity and specificity value of 95% and 97%. The diagnosis results were in excellent agreement with histopathological results.

  6. Principal-components analysis of fluorescence cross-section spectra from pathogenic and simulant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Harold I.

    2005-10-01

    Principal-components analysis of a new set of highly resolved (<1 nm) fluorescence cross-section spectra excited at 354.7 nm over the 370 646 nm band has been used to demonstrate the potential ability of UV standoff lidars to discriminate among particular biological warfare agents and simulants over short ranges. The remapped spectra produced by this technique from Bacillus globigii (Bg) and Bacillus anthracis (Ba) spores were sufficiently different to allow them to be cleanly separated, and the Ba spectra obtained from Sterne and Ames strain spores were distinguishable. These patterns persisted as the spectral resolution was subsequently degraded in processing from ˜1 to 34 nm. This is to the author's knowledge the first time that resolved fluorescence spectra from biological warfare agents have been speciated or shown to be distinguishably different from those normally used surrogates by optical spectroscopy.

  7. A model considering light reabsorption processes to correct in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence spectra in apples.

    PubMed

    Ramos, María E; Lagorio, María G

    2006-05-01

    Chlorophyll-a contained in the peel of Granny Smith apples emits fluorescence upon excitation with blue light. The observed emission, collected by an external detector and corrected by its spectral response, is still distorted by light reabsorption processes taking place in the fruit skin and differs appreciably from the true spectral distribution of fluorescence emerging from chlorophyll molecules in the biological tissue. Reabsorption processes particularly affect the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 680 nm and at 730 nm. A model to obtain the correct spectral distribution of the emission, from the experimental fluorescence recorded at a fluorometer detector and corrected for the detector spectral sensitivity, is developed in the present work. Measurements of the whole fruit reflectance, the peel transmittance and the flesh reflectance allow the calculation of the reabsorption-corrected spectra. The model is validated by comparing the corrected emission spectra with that obtained for a thin layer of apple-peel-chloroplasts, where no reabsorption takes place. It is recommended to correct distortions in emission spectra of intact fruits due to light reabsorption effects whenever a correlation between the physiological state of the fruit and its fluorescence spectra is investigated.

  8. Synthesis and infrared and fluorescent spectra of rare earth complexes with a new amide ligand.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haixia; Chen, Jianmin; Zhou, Huidi; Lu, Yanhua

    2007-11-01

    Solid complexes of rare earth nitrates and picrates with a new amide ligand, 1,6-bis[(2'-benzylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]hexane (L) have been prepared. These complexes are characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis spectra and IR spectra. The fluorescent and luminescent properties of the Eu(III) and Tb(III) nitrates and picrates complexes in solid state are also investigated. Under the excitation of UV light, these complexes except Tb(III) picrate complex exhibit characteristic emission of europium and terbium ions. The influence of the counter anion on the fluorescent intensity is also discussed.

  9. 3D in vivo imaging of GFP-expressing T-cells in mice with non-contact fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalakis, Anikitos; Meyer, Heiko; Zacharakis, Giannis; Mamalaki, Clio; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Economou, Eleftherios N.; Ripoll, J.

    2006-03-01

    Optical tomography has been proposed as a promising technique for probing deep in tissue with many medical applications. Recently, the adaptation of fluorescent probes by the radiologists, gave rise to a new imaging tool in the area of molecular imaging. Optical tomography can, provide three-dimensional images of fluorescent concentrations inside living systems of sizes in the order of many cm. Our optical tomographer was based on a technique which is called Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) and can quantify fluorescent signals in mice. The imaging procedure is performed in a non-contact geometry so that living subjects of arbitrary shapes can be imaged with no fibers attached to them. We have developed a way to reconstruct the 3D surface of the subject and we use theoretical models to account for the propagation of the emerging signal in the free space. The system consists of a rotating sample holder and a CCD camera in combination with a laser-scanning device. An Argon-ion laser is used as the source and different filters are used for the detection of various fluorophores or fluorescing proteins. So far, we have observed of the distribution of GFP expressing T-lymphocytes in-vivo for the study of the function of the immune system in a murine model. Then we investigated the performance of the FMT setup to quantify the different amounts of migrated cells in the different organs by comparing our results with the FACS measurements. Further experiments included the measurement of the variations of the T cell's concentration in-vivo, over time.

  10. Expression of green fluorescent protein in human foreskin fibroblasts for use in 2D and 3D culture models.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Peña, Tiffany; Heimann, Dean G; Hansen, Chris; Doyle, David A; Yanala, Ujwal R; Guenther, Timothy M; Carlson, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The availability of fibroblasts that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) would be of interest for the monitoring of cell growth, migration, contraction, and other processes within the fibroblast-populated collagen matrix and other culture systems. A plasmid lentiviral vector-GFP (pLV-GFP) was utilized for gene delivery to produce primary human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) that stably express GFP. Cell morphology, cell migration, and collagen contraction were compared between nontransduced HFFs and transduced GFP-HFFs; no differences were observed. Immunocytochemical staining showed no differences in cell morphology between nontransduced and GFP-HFFs in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture systems. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in cellular population growth within the collagen matrix populated with nontransduced vs. GFP-HFFs. Within the limits of our assays, we conclude that transduction of GFP into HFFs did not alter the observed properties of HFFs compared with nontransduced fibroblasts. The GFP-HFFs may represent a new tool for the convenient monitoring of living primary fibroblast processes in two-dimensional or three-dimensional culture.

  11. Absorption spectra and spectral-kinetic characteristics of the fluorescence of Sanguinarine in complexes with polyelectrolytes and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevich, I. G.; Strekal, N. D.; Nowicky, J. W.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    The absorption spectra and stationary and time resolved fluorescence spectra of the isoquinoline alkaloid sanguinarine are studied in aqueous media and during interactions with synthetic polyelectrolytes (polystyrene sulfonate and polyallylamine) and a natural polyelectrolyte (DNA).

  12. Modeling biological fluorescence emission spectra using Lorentz line shapes and nonlinear optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, Paul D.; Howard, A. Q.; Webb, Lincoln J.

    2007-08-01

    Using the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear optimization algorithm and a series of Lorentzian line shapes, the fluorescence emission spectra from BG (Bacillus globigii) bacteria can be accurately modeled. This method allows data from both laboratory and field sources to model the return signal from biological aerosols using a typical LIF (lidar induced fluorescence) system. The variables found through this procedure match individual fluorescence components within the biological material and therefore have a physically meaningful interpretation. The use of this method also removes the need to calculate phase angles needed in autoregressive all-pole models.

  13. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) oligomers: an ab initio simulation.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Thiago M; Aquino, Adélia J A; Barbatti, Mario; Borges, Itamar; Lischka, Hans

    2015-03-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) oligomers with up to seven repeat units were theoretically investigated using the algebraic diagrammatic construction method to second order, ADC(2), combined with the resolution-of-the-identity (RI) approach. The ground and first excited state geometries of the oligomers were fully optimized. Vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths of the first four transitions were computed. The vibrational broadening of the absorption and fluorescence spectra was studied using a semiclassical nuclear ensemble method. After correcting for basis set and solvent effects, we achieved a balanced description of the absorption and fluorescence spectra by means of the ADC(2) approach. This fact is documented by the computed Stokes shift along the PPV series, which is in good agreement with the experimental values. The experimentally observed band width of the UV absorption and fluorescence spectra is well reproduced by the present simulations showing that the nuclear ensemble generated should be well suitable for consecutive surface hopping dynamics simulations.

  14. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  15. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  16. Discrete electronic-vibrational fluorescence spectra in the low-pressure phenanthrene and naphthacene vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Mirumyants, S.O.; Kozlov, V.K.; Vandyukov, E.A.

    1986-10-01

    In recent years considerable attention has been paid to developing methods for analysis and control of air pollutants. In this work the results of the study on quasiline fluorescence spectra for phenathrene and naphthacene in the gas phase are presented. Despite the fact that phenanthrene is a stereoisomer of anthracene, the shapes and intensities of their absorption and fluorescence spectra are markedly different. The oscillator strength of the first electronic transition in anthracene vapors is 50 times larger than that for the phenanthrene vapor (0.1 and 0.002, respectively). Therefore, the studies of the quasiline fluorescence spectrum of the phenanthrene vapor required a long exposition period (from 7 to 31 h) during the photographic detection. It is known that phenanthrene exhibits a characteristic quasiline spectrum in the 34584000-A range in frozen solutions. The authors have also investigated the possibility of obtaining structured quasiline vapor spectra for a more complex aromatic compound such as naphthacene which comprises four benzyl rings. In conclusion, the quasiline fluorescence spectra for phenanthrene and naphthacene in the gas phase have been obtained for the first time. In certain experimental conditions, phenanthrene and naphthacene emit wellresolved quasiline spectra which are dependent on the excitation frequency, temperature, and vapor pressure. For both compounds there is a frequency range for quasiline fluorescence excitation for which a shift of the quasiline spectrum occurs if the excitation frequency is changed within that range. Also more accurate values for the frequencies of the O-O electronic transition in phenanthrene and naphthacene have been obtained. Diagrams are included.

  17. Laser Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Spectra of Cajanus Cajan L Plant Growing Under Cadmium Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ram; Pandey, J. K.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-induced Chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) spectra of Cajanus cajan L leaves treated with different concentrations of Cd (0.05, 0.5 and 1 mM) are recorded at 10 and 20 days after first treatment of cadmium. LICF spectra are recorded in the region of 650-780 nm using violet diode laser (405 nm). LICF spectra of plant leaves show two maxima near 685 and 730nm. Fluorescence induction kinetics (FIK) curve are recorded at 685 and 730 nm with red diode laser (635 nm) for excitation. The fluorescence intensity ratios (FIR) F685/F730 are calculated from LICF spectra and vitality index (Rfd) are determined from FIK curve. FIR and Rfd value are good stress indicator of plant health. These parameters along with chlorophyll content are used to analyze the effect of Cd on wheat plants. The result indicates that higher concentrations of Cd hazardous for photosynthetic activity and health of Arhar plants. The lower concentration of 0.05 mM shows stimulatory response up to 10 days while after 20 days this concentration also shows inhibitory response. R. Gopal, K. B. Mishra, M. Zeeshan, S. M. Prasad, and M. M. Joshi Curr. Sci., 83, 880, 2002 K. B. Mishra and R. Gopal Int. J. Rem. Sen., 29, 157, 2008 R. Maurya, S. M. Prasad, and R. Gopal J. Photochem. Photobio. C: Photochem. Rev., 9, 29, 2008

  18. In situ phytoplankton absorption, fluorescence emission, and particulate backscattering spectra determined from reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roesler, Collin S.; Pery, Mary Jane

    1995-01-01

    An inverse model was developed to extract the absortion and scattering (elastic and inelastic) properties of oceanic constituents from surface spectral reflectance measurements. In particular, phytoplankton spectral absorption coefficients, solar-stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence spectra, and particle backscattering spectra were modeled. The model was tested on 35 reflectance spectra obtained from irradiance measurements in optically diverse ocean waters (0.07 to 25.35 mg/cu m range in surface chlorophyll a concentrations). The universality of the model was demonstrated by the accurate estimation of the spectral phytoplankton absorption coefficents over a range of 3 orders of magnitude (rho = 0.94 at 500 nm). Under most oceanic conditions (chlorophyll a less than 3 mg/cu m) the percent difference between measured and modeled phytoplankton absorption coefficents was less than 35%. Spectral variations in measured phytoplankton absorption spectra were well predicted by the inverse model. Modeled volume fluorescence was weakly correlated with measured chl a; fluorescence quantum yield varied from 0.008 to 0.09 as a function of environment and incident irradiance. Modeled particle backscattering coefficients were linearly related to total particle cross section over a twentyfold range in backscattering coefficents (rho = 0.996, n = 12).

  19. Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves photoexcited by sunlight measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Saeka; Yano, Ayako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Satoh, Chikahiro; Akai, Nobuyuki; Nakata, Munetaka

    2013-06-01

    Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves of Green pak choi (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) were measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer, which we developed recently. The intact samples, photoexcited by sunlight without artificial light sources, showed delayed fluorescence around 740 nm with a lifetime of ˜6 s. The observed spectra were deconvoluted into two Gaussian bands: the delayed fluorescence from photosystem II and photosystem I complexes. Their relative intensities depended on the chlorophyll concentration, but their wavelengths were unchanged.

  20. Effect of arsenic on reflectance spectra and chlorophyll fluorescence of aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Iriel, Analia; Dundas, Gavin; Fernández Cirelli, Alicia; Lagorio, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic pollution of groundwater is a serious problem in many regions of Latin America that causes severe risks to human health. As a consequence, non-destructive monitoring methodologies, sensitive to arsenic presence in the environment and able to perform a rapid screening of large polluted areas, are highly sought-after. Both chlorophyll - a fluorescence and reflectance of aquatic plants may be potential indicators to sense toxicity in water media. In this work, the effects of arsenic on the optical and photophysical properties of leaves of different aquatic plants (Vallisneria gigantea, Azolla filiculoides and Lemna minor) were evaluated. Reflectance spectra were recorded for the plant leaves from 300 to 2400 nm. The spectral distribution of the fluorescence was also studied and corrected for light re-absorption processes. Photosynthetic parameters (Fv/Fm and ΦPSII) were additionally calculated from the variable chlorophyll fluorescence recorded with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer. Fluorescence and reflectance properties for V. gigantea and A. filiculoides were sensitive to arsenic presence in contrast to the behaviour of L. minor. Observed changes in fluorescence spectra could be interpreted in terms of preferential damage in photosystem II. The quantum efficiency of photosystem II for the first two species was also affected, decreasing upon arsenic treatment. As a result of this research, V. gigantea and A. filiculoides were proposed as bioindicators of arsenic occurrence in aquatic media.

  1. Simultaneous acquisition of absorption and fluorescence spectra of strong absorbers utilizing an evanescent supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes

    2016-12-15

    The determination of the absorption and emission spectra of strongly absorbing molecules is challenging, and the data can be biased by self-absorption of the fluorescence signal. To overcome this problem, a total internal reflection approach is proposed. The strongly absorbing sample is placed in an evanescent field of the radiation of a supercontinuum source. The collimated reflected light encodes the absorption spectrum, and the isotropic fluorescence emission is collected in a direction perpendicular to the surface at the same time. This ensures that the emitted light has a minimum possibility of self-absorption inside the sample.

  2. Investigation of relations between skin cancer lesions' images and their fluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, P.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.; Petkova, El.; Troyanova, P.

    2010-03-01

    This investigation is based on images obtained from healthy tissue and skin cancer lesions and their fluorescent spectra of cutaneous lesions derived after optical stimulation. Our analyses show that the lesions’ spectra of are different of those, obtained from normal tissue and the differences depend on the type of cancer. We use a comparison between these “healthy” and “unhealthy” spectra to define forms of variations and corresponding diseases. However, the value of the emitted light varies not only between the patients, but also depending on the position of the tested area inside of one lesion. These variations could be result from two reasons: different degree of damaging and different thickness of the suspicious lesion area. Regarded to the visible image of the lesion, it could be connected with the chroma of colour of the tested area and the lesion homogeneity that corresponds to particular disease. For our investigation, images and spectra of three non-melanoma cutanous malignant tumors are investigated, namely—basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and keratoacanthoma. The images were processed obtaining the chroma by elimination of the background—healthy tissue, and applying it as a basic signal for transformation from RGB to Lab colorimetric model. The chroma of the areas of emission is compared with the relative value of fluorescence spectra. Specific spectral features are used to develop hybrid diagnostic algorithm (including image and spectral features) for differentiation of these three kinds of malignant cutaneous pathologies.

  3. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P; De Cremer, Gert; Kubarev, Alexey V; Rohnke, Marcus; Meirer, Florian; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-05-27

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by ensemble-averaging characterization methods. In this work, a detailed 3D single molecule, single turnover sensitive fluorescence microscopy study is presented to quantify the reactivity of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals upon steaming. This approach, in combination with the oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol as a probe reaction, allowed the stochastic behavior of single catalytic turnovers and temporally resolved turnover frequencies of zeolite domains smaller than the diffraction limited resolution to be investigated with great precision. It was found that the single turnover kinetics of the parent zeolite crystal proceeds with significant spatial differences in turnover frequencies on the nanoscale and noncorrelated temporal fluctuations. Mild steaming of zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals at 500 °C led to an enhanced surface reactivity, with up to 4 times higher local turnover rates than those of the parent H-ZSM-5 crystals, and revealed remarkable heterogeneities in surface reactivity. In strong contrast, severe steaming at 700 °C significantly dealuminated the zeolite H-ZSM-5 material, leading to a 460 times lower turnover rate. The differences in measured turnover activities are explained by changes in the 3D aluminum distribution due to migration of extraframework Al-species and their subsequent effect on pore accessibility, as corroborated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) sputter depth profiling data.

  4. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by ensemble-averaging characterization methods. In this work, a detailed 3D single molecule, single turnover sensitive fluorescence microscopy study is presented to quantify the reactivity of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals upon steaming. This approach, in combination with the oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol as a probe reaction, allowed the stochastic behavior of single catalytic turnovers and temporally resolved turnover frequencies of zeolite domains smaller than the diffraction limited resolution to be investigated with great precision. It was found that the single turnover kinetics of the parent zeolite crystal proceeds with significant spatial differences in turnover frequencies on the nanoscale and noncorrelated temporal fluctuations. Mild steaming of zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals at 500 °C led to an enhanced surface reactivity, with up to 4 times higher local turnover rates than those of the parent H-ZSM-5 crystals, and revealed remarkable heterogeneities in surface reactivity. In strong contrast, severe steaming at 700 °C significantly dealuminated the zeolite H-ZSM-5 material, leading to a 460 times lower turnover rate. The differences in measured turnover activities are explained by changes in the 3D aluminum distribution due to migration of extraframework Al-species and their subsequent effect on pore accessibility, as corroborated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) sputter depth profiling data. PMID:25867455

  5. Predicting accurate fluorescent spectra for high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jacob; Heider, Emily C.; Campiglia, Andres; Harper, James K.

    2016-10-01

    The ability of density functional theory (DFT) methods to predict accurate fluorescence spectra for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is explored. Two methods, PBE0 and CAM-B3LYP, are evaluated both in the gas phase and in solution. Spectra for several of the most toxic PAHs are predicted and compared to experiment, including three isomers of C24H14 and a PAH containing heteroatoms. Unusually high-resolution experimental spectra are obtained for comparison by analyzing each PAH at 4.2 K in an n-alkane matrix. All theoretical spectra visually conform to the profiles of the experimental data but are systematically offset by a small amount. Specifically, when solvent is included the PBE0 functional overestimates peaks by 16.1 ± 6.6 nm while CAM-B3LYP underestimates the same transitions by 14.5 ± 7.6 nm. These calculated spectra can be empirically corrected to decrease the uncertainties to 6.5 ± 5.1 and 5.7 ± 5.1 nm for the PBE0 and CAM-B3LYP methods, respectively. A comparison of computed spectra in the gas phase indicates that the inclusion of n-octane shifts peaks by +11 nm on average and this change is roughly equivalent for PBE0 and CAM-B3LYP. An automated approach for comparing spectra is also described that minimizes residuals between a given theoretical spectrum and all available experimental spectra. This approach identifies the correct spectrum in all cases and excludes approximately 80% of the incorrect spectra, demonstrating that an automated search of theoretical libraries of spectra may eventually become feasible.

  6. Effects of ozone and relative humidity on fluorescence spectra of octapeptide bioaerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Coleman, Mark; Bare, Christopher; Kinahan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ozone and relative humidity (RH) at common atmospheric levels on the properties of single octapeptide bioaerosol particles were studied using an improved rotating reaction chamber, an aerosol generator, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS), an improved single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS), and equipments to generate, monitor and control the ozone and RH. Aerosol particles (mean diameter 2 μm) were generated from a slurry of octapeptide in phosphate buffered saline, injected into the rotating chamber, and kept airborne for hours. Bioaerosols were sampled from the chamber hourly for the measurements of particle-size distribution, concentration, total fluorescence excited at 355-nm, and single particle fluorescence spectra excited at 266-nm and 351-nm under different controlled RH (20%, 50%, or 80%) and ozone concentration (0 or 150 ppb). The results show that: (1) Particle size, concentration, and the 263-nm-excited fluorescence intensity decrease at different rates under different combinations of the RH and ozone concentrations used. (2) The 263-nm-excited UV fluorescence (280-400 nm) decreased more rapidly than the 263-nm-excited visible fluorescence (400-560 nm), and decreased most rapidly when ozone is present and RH is high. (3) The UV fluorescence peak near 340 nm slightly shifts to the shorter wavelength (blue-shift), consistent with a more rapid oxidation of tryptophan than tyrosine. (4) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence (430-580 nm/380-700 nm) increases when ozone is present, especially when the RH is high. (5) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence increase that occurs as the tryptophan emission in the UV decreases, and the observation that these changes occur more rapidly at higher RH with the present of ozone, are consistent with the oxidation of tryptophan by ozone and the conversion of the resulting ozonides to N-formyl kynurenine and kynurenine.

  7. Dipole moment of benzonitrile in its excited S 1 state from thermochromic shifts of fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2006-02-01

    The effect of temperature T ranging from 293 to 393 K on absorption and fluorescence spectra of benzonitrile (BN) in ethyl acetate is studied. The absorption spectra of BN remain unchanged with increasing T. The analysis of fluorescence band shift by the Bilot and Kawski theory [L. Bilot, A. Kawski, Z. Naturforsch. 17a (1962) 621], for the known dipole moment value in the ground state μg = 4.18 D and α/ a3 = 0.5 ( α is the polarizability and a is the Onsager interaction radius of the solute), yield the average value of excited state dipole moment μe = 4.42 D. This value is in satisfactory agreement with 4.45, 4.51 and 4.57 D obtained previously from the Stark shift of rotational lines.

  8. Accelerated Monte Carlo models to simulate fluorescence spectra from layered tissues.

    PubMed

    Swartling, Johannes; Pifferi, Antonio; Enejder, Annika M K; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2003-04-01

    Two efficient Monte Carlo models are described, facilitating predictions of complete time-resolved fluorescence spectra from a light-scattering and light-absorbing medium. These are compared with a third, conventional fluorescence Monte Carlo model in terms of accuracy, signal-to-noise statistics, and simulation time. The improved computation efficiency is achieved by means of a convolution technique, justified by the symmetry of the problem. Furthermore, the reciprocity principle for photon paths, employed in one of the accelerated models, is shown to simplify the computations of the distribution of the emitted fluorescence drastically. A so-called white Monte Carlo approach is finally suggested for efficient simulations of one excitation wavelength combined with a wide range of emission wavelengths. The fluorescence is simulated in a purely scattering medium, and the absorption properties are instead taken into account analytically afterward. This approach is applicable to the conventional model as well as to the two accelerated models. Essentially the same absolute values for the fluorescence integrated over the emitting surface and time are obtained for the three models within the accuracy of the simulations. The time-resolved and spatially resolved fluorescence exhibits a slight overestimation at short delay times close to the source corresponding to approximately two grid elements for the accelerated models, as a result of the discretization and the convolution. The improved efficiency is most prominent for the reverse-emission accelerated model, for which the simulation time can be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude.

  9. Copper and cadmium effects on growth and extracellular exudation of the marine toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella: 3D-fluorescence spectroscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Herzi, Faouzi; Jean, Natacha; Zhao, Huiyu; Mounier, Stéphane; Mabrouk, Hassine Hadj; Hlaili, Asma Sakka

    2013-10-01

    In this study, metal contamination experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of copper and cadmium on the growth of the marine toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella and on the production of dissolved organic matter (Dissolved Organic Carbon: DOC; Fluorescent Dissolved Organic Matter: FDOM). This species was exposed to increasing concentrations of Cu(2+) (9.93 × 10(-10)-1.00 × 10(-7)M) or Cd(2+) (1.30 × 10(-8)-4.38 × 10(-7)M), to simulate polluted environments. The drastic effects were observed at pCu(2+)=7.96 (Cu(2+): 1.08 × 10(-8)M) and pCd(2+)=7.28 (Cd(2+): 5.19 × 10(-8)M), where cyst formation occurred. Lower levels of Cu(2+) (pCu(2+)>9.00) and Cd(2+) (pCd(2+)>7.28) had no effect on growth. However, when levels of Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) were beyond 10(-7)M, the growth was totally inhibited. The DOC released per cell (DOC/Cell) was different depending on the exposure time and the metal contamination, with higher DOC/Cell values in response to Cu(2+) and Cd(2+), comparatively to the control. Samples were also analyzed by 3D-fluorescence spectroscopy, using the Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) algorithm to characterize the FDOM. The PARAFAC analytical treatment revealed four components (C1, C2, C3 and C4) that could be associated with two contributions: one, related to the biological activity; the other, linked to the decomposition of organic matter. The C1 component combined a tryptophan peak and a characteristic humic substances response, and the C2 component was considered as a tryptophan protein fluorophore. The C3 and C4 components were associated to marine organic matter production.

  10. The minimizing of fluorescence background in Raman optical activity and Raman spectra of human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Tatarkovič, Michal; Synytsya, Alla; Šťovíčková, Lucie; Bunganič, Bohuš; Miškovičová, Michaela; Petruželka, Luboš; Setnička, Vladimír

    2015-02-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA) is inherently sensitive to the secondary structure of biomolecules, which makes it a method of interest for finding new approaches to clinical applications based on blood plasma analysis, for instance the diagnostics of several protein-misfolding diseases. Unfortunately, real blood plasma exhibits strong background fluorescence when excited at 532 nm; hence, measuring the ROA spectra appears to be impossible. Therefore, we established a suitable method using a combination of kinetic quenchers, filtering, photobleaching, and a mathematical correction of residual fluorescence. Our method reduced the background fluorescence approximately by 90%, which allowed speedup for each measurement by an average of 50%. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio was significantly increased, while the baseline distortion remained low. We assume that our method is suitable for the investigation of human blood plasma by ROA and may lead to the development of a new tool for clinical diagnostics.

  11. Possible use of pattern recognition for the analysis of Mars rover X-ray fluorescence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, Lo I; Trombka, Jacob I.; Seltzer, Stephen M.; Johnson, Robert G.; Philpotts, John A.

    1989-01-01

    On the Mars rover sample-return mission, the rover vehicle will collect and select samples from different locations on the Martian surface to be brought back to earth for laboratory studies. It is anticipated that an in situ energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer will be on board the rover. On such a mission, sample selection is of higher priority than in situ quantitative chemical anlaysis. With this in mind, a pattern recognition technique is proposed as a simple, direct, and speedy alternative to detailed chemical analysis of the XRF spectra. The validity and efficacy of the pattern recognition technique are demonstrated by the analyses of laboratory XRF spectra obtained from a series of geological samples, in the form both of standardized pressed pellets and as unprepared rocks. It is found that pattern recognition techniques applied to the raw XRF spectra can provide for the same discrimination among samples as a knowledge of their actual chemical composition.

  12. Possible use of pattern recognition for the analysis of Mars rover X ray fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombka, Jacob I.; Seltzer, Stephen M.; Johnson, Robert G.; Philpotts, John A.

    1989-10-01

    On the Mars rover sample return mission the rover vehicle will collect and select samples from different locations on the Martial surface to be brought back to Earth for laboratory studies. It is anticipated that an in situ energy-dispersive X ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer will be on board the rover. On such a mission, sample selection is of higher priority than in situ quantitative chemical analysis. With this in mind we propose pattern recognition as a simple, direct, and speedy alternative to detailed chemical analysis of the XRF spectra. The validity and efficacy of the pattern recognition technique are demonstrated by the analyses of laboratory XRF spectra obtained from a series of geological samples, in the form both of standardized pressed pellets and as unprepared rocks. It is found that pattern recognition techniques applied to the raw XRF spectra can provide for the same discrimination among samples as knowledge of their actual chemical composition.

  13. Predictions of non-LTE spectra from large scale 3D magneto-hydrodynamic modelling of wire array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niasse, Nicolas; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2012-10-01

    The last few years have seen considerable advances in the application of high performance computing techniques to 3D simulations of wire array Z-pinches. Whilst the intense soft X-ray radiation output is the principle application of wire arrays, the ability to encompass spectrally detailed models of this emission within such 3D calculations was thought to be computationally prohibitive. We have developed a non-LTE atomic and radiation physics model with detailed configuration accounting and n-l splitting which is sufficiently streamlined to run in-line with large scale 3D simulations. In order to handle the volume of data generated by the spectral treatment of the billions of numerical cells, a novel data structure derived from a self-balancing binary search tree was developed, enabling the use of non-LTE DCA calculations within large scale 3D simulations for the first time. A brief description of the model is provided and the application of the simulations to understanding the X-ray generation processes within wire array Z-pinches on the Z generator at Sandia National Laboratory is reported. The contribution of the ion temperature and the motion of the unstable plasma at stagnation to the Doppler widths of the lines is described in detail.

  14. Preliminary Analysis of Apparent Reflectance Spectra at SIFLEX: Observation of Fluorescence Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.; Moya, I.; Garcia, J.; Pedros, R.

    Introduction: The SIFLEX-2002 campaign objective to observe the fluorescence signal over a conifer forest canopy and to determine the viability of remote measurement from space has yielded investigations from three perspectives: CO2 and H2 O flux measurements, diurnal fluorescence measurements, and spectroscopic measurements of the radiation field. This paper focuses on the third thrust with a view to supporting the other two perspectives. In addition, spectroscopic measurements for SIFLEX provide the opportunity for an evaluation of the potential of current advanced remote sensing technology to detect the weak fluorescence signal, in the presence of the much stronger solar-scattered radiation from vegetated targets. Canopy Characterisation: Although the solar-induced fluorescence signal is thought to be only weakly dependent on canopy structure, it was considered important to characterise the canopy at the Sodankyla test site in detail because the dominant reflected radiance signal is known to be strongly affected by the geometrical arrangement of photosynthetic elements, as well as by the understory which may be both a confounding effect for model inversions as well as a source of fluorescence emission. Accordingly, preparations for modelling the spectral radiance, and the canopy fluorescence, once appropriate specification of yield efficiencies is available, have been undertaken. Canopy characterisation has included: (a) defining a 25 m by 25 m square area within which with a laser ranger has been used to locate all tree stems along with crown dimensions, and within which a dominant understory map has been generated, (b) superposition on the square area, two parallel 50 m transect lines, spaced 10 apart, which locate a total of 12 points (with 10 m spacing) at which fish eye photographs have been taken to be used to measure gap fraction distributions, canopy clumping and estimate LAI, (c) measurements of understory reflectance spectra for dominant species

  15. Ultrabright fluorescent silica particles with a large number of complex spectra excited with a single wavelength for multiplex applications.

    PubMed

    Palantavida, S; Peng, B; Sokolov, I

    2017-02-08

    We report on a novel approach to synthesize ultrabright fluorescent silica particles capable of producing a large number of complex spectra. The spectra can be excited using a single wavelength which is paramount in quantitative fluorescence imaging, flow cytometry and sensing applications. The approach employs the physical encapsulation of organic fluorescent molecules inside a nanoporous silica matrix with no dye leakage. As was recently demonstrated, such an encapsulation allowed for the encapsulation of very high concentrations of organic dyes without quenching their fluorescent efficiency. As a result, dye molecules are distanced within ∼5 nm from each other; it theoretically allows for efficient exchange of excitation energy via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here we present the first experimental demonstration of the encapsulation of fluorescent dyes in the FRET sequence. Attaining a FRET sequence of up to five different dyes is presented. The number of distinguishable spectra can be further increased by using different relative concentrations of encapsulated dyes. Combining these approaches allows for creating a large number of ultrabright fluorescent particles with substantially different fluorescence spectra. We also demonstrate the utilization of these particles for potential multiplexing applications. Though fluorescence spectra of the obtained multiplex probes are typically overlapping, they can be distinguished by using standard linear decomposition algorithms.

  16. Variability in chlorophyll fluorescence spectra of eggplant fruit grown under different light environments: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ospina Calvo, Brian; Parapugna, Tamara L; Lagorio, M Gabriela

    2017-03-13

    The main goal of the present work was to clarify physiological strategies in plants whose chloroplasts were developed under different light environments. The specific objective was to elucidate the influence of the spectral distribution of light on the chlorophyll fluorescence ratio and on photosynthetic parameters. To achieve this purpose, three species of eggplant fruit (black, purple and white striped and white) were used as a case study and their chlorophyll fluorescence was analyzed in detail. Spectra of the non-variable fluorescence in each part of the fruit were corrected for distortions by light reabsorption processes using a physical model. The main conclusion of this work was that the corrected fluorescence ratio was dependent on the contribution of each photosystem to the fluorescence and consequently on the environmental lighting conditions, becoming higher when illumination was rich in long wavelengths. Variable chlorophyll fluorescence, similar to that observed from plant leaves, was detected for the pulp of the black eggplant, for the pulp of the purple and white striped eggplant and for the intact fruit of the black eggplant. The maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II in the light-adapted state (F'v/F'm), the quantum efficiency of photosystem II (ΦPSII), and the photochemical and non-photochemical quenching coefficients (qP and qNP/NPQ respectively) were determined in each case. The results could be explained very interestingly, in relation with the proportion of exciting light reaching each photosystem (I and II). The photochemical parameters obtained from variable chlorophyll fluorescence, allowed us to monitor non-destructively the physiological state of the black fruit during storage under both chilled or room-temperature conditions.

  17. A Passive Method for Detecting Vegetation Stress from Orbit: Chlorophyll Fluorescence Spectra from Fraunhofer Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theisen, Arnold F.

    2000-01-01

    Solar-stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence measured with the Fraunhofer line depth method has correlated well with vegetation stress in previous studies. However, the instruments used in those studies were limited to a single solar absorption line (e.g. 656.3 nm), obviating the red/far-red ratio (R/FR) method. Optics and detector technology have reached the level whereby multiple, very narrow Fraunhofer lines are resolvable. Thirteen such lines span the visible spectrum in the red to far-red region where chlorophyll fluorescence occurs. Fluorescence intensities at the 13 Fraunhofer line wavelengths were used to model emission spectra. The source data were collected for summer and fall bean crops (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) subjected to various levels of nitrogen fertilization. The intensities were adjusted to account for Fraunhofer line depth and atmospheric transmittance. Multiple R/FR fluorescence ratios, calculated from the modeled fluorescence spectra, correlated strongly with leaf chlorophyll concentration and well with applied nitrogen. The ratio yielding the best correlation with chlorophyll utilized red fluorescence at the 694.5 nm Fraunhofer line and farred fluorescence at the 755.6 nm Fraunhofer line. Twenty R/FR ratios, each evaluated for the maximum differential between low and high (optimal) nitrogen treatments, ranked higher in some cases and lower in others, possibly related to the time of year the crops were grown and the stage of growth of the crops. Ratios with 728.9 nm and 738.9 nm in the denominator consistently ranked in the lowest and next lowest quartile, respectively. Ratios of the 656.3 nm Fraunhofer line and the 755.6 nm line consistently ranked highest for the summer crop. Ratios with 755.6 nm in the denominator ranked in the upper quartile for 10 out of 12 measurement dates. Differences in ratio ranking indicate that physiological conditions may be estimated using selected ratios of Fraunhofer lines within the context of R/FR analysis. A

  18. Effects of isoflurane on measurement of fluorescence spectra and CLSM imaging in Acetabularia acetabulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, WenLi; Quan, Zhou; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    The volatile halogenated methyl ethyl ether is used as anesthetic to inhibit actin-based dynamics directly or indirectly in animal cells. In plant cells, most intracellular movements are related with actin pathways too. We utilized isoflurane to study the dynamic choloroplast organization in unicellular baby and adult alga Acetabularia acetabulum. Fluorescence spectra were measured and choloroplast movements were recorded by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) imaging in in Acetabularia acetabulum. Isoflurane was effective in the unicellular baby and adult organisms and showed time- dependent actin-inhibition patterns. Acetabularia acetabulum cells were treated for different times with isoflurane saturated solutions in artificial seawater (it was defined to be 100% isoflurane). The intensity of fluorescence at 680nm and 730nm were progressively decreased at 100% isoflurane. It was remarkable difference between fluorescence spectra of baby and adult Acetabularia were inhibited by isoflurance, adult Acetabularia cells showed more sensitive. Whereas the choloroplast in Acetabularia acetabulum was commendably imaged by CLSM at 20 and 40 zoom.

  19. A support vector machine approach to the automatic identification of fluorescence spectra emitted by biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfusa, M.; Murari, A.; Lungaroni, M.; Malizia, A.; Parracino, S.; Peluso, E.; Cenciarelli, O.; Carestia, M.; Pizzoferrato, R.; Vega, J.; Gaudio, P.

    2016-10-01

    Two of the major new concerns of modern societies are biosecurity and biosafety. Several biological agents (BAs) such as toxins, bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are able to cause damage to living systems either humans, animals or plants. Optical techniques, in particular LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR), based on the transmission of laser pulses and analysis of the return signals, can be successfully applied to monitoring the release of biological agents into the atmosphere. It is well known that most of biological agents tend to emit specific fluorescence spectra, which in principle allow their detection and identification, if excited by light of the appropriate wavelength. For these reasons, the detection of the UVLight Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) emitted by BAs is particularly promising. On the other hand, the stand-off detection of BAs poses a series of challenging issues; one of the most severe is the automatic discrimination between various agents which emit very similar fluorescence spectra. In this paper, a new data analysis method, based on a combination of advanced filtering techniques and Support Vector Machines, is described. The proposed approach covers all the aspects of the data analysis process, from filtering and denoising to automatic recognition of the agents. A systematic series of numerical tests has been performed to assess the potential and limits of the proposed methodology. The first investigations of experimental data have already given very encouraging results.

  20. Evaluation of algorithm methods for fluorescence spectra of cancerous and normal human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The paper focus on the various algorithms on to unravel the fluorescence spectra by unmixing methods to identify cancerous and normal human tissues from the measured fluorescence spectroscopy. The biochemical or morphologic changes that cause fluorescence spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological approach; therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases for in vivo use. The method can further identify tissue biomarkers by decomposing the spectral contributions of different fluorescent molecules of interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of blind source un-mixing methods (backward model) and spectral fitting approaches (forward model) in decomposing the contributions of key fluorescent molecules from the tissue mixture background when certain selected excitation wavelength is applied. Pairs of adenocarcinoma as well as normal tissues confirmed by pathologist were excited by selective wavelength of 340 nm. The emission spectra of resected fresh tissue were used to evaluate the relative changes of collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and Flavin by various spectral un-mixing methods. Two categories of algorithms: forward methods and Blind Source Separation [such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF)] will be introduced and evaluated. The purpose of the spectral analysis is to discard the redundant information which conceals the difference between these two types of tissues, but keep their diagnostically significance. The facts predicted by different methods were compared to the gold standard of histopathology. The results indicate that these key fluorophores within tissue, e.g. tryptophan, collagen, and NADH, and flavin, show differences of relative contents of fluorophores among different types of human cancer and normal tissues. The

  1. Re-Analysis of the Dispersed Fluorescence Spectra of the C_3-RARE Gas Atom Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Jen; Merer, Anthony; Hsu, Yen-Chu

    2015-06-01

    The dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of the C_3Ne, C_3Ar, C_3Kr, and C_3Xe complexes near the 0 2^- 0- 000, 0 4^- 0- 000, 0 2^+ 0- 000 and 100-000 bands of the {A}- {X} system of C_3 have been revisited. Some of the DF spectra of the Ne and Ar complexes have been recently obtained with a slightly improved resolution of 6-10 wn. All the DF spectra have been reassigned as emission from van der Waals (vdW) complexes and C_3 fragments. The optically excited C_3-Rg (Rg = rare-gas atom) complexes fluorescence and/or decay down to slightly lower (about 2-30 wn) vibrational levels without changing the internal energy of C_3 and then predissociate via the continua of the nearby vibronic states of C_3. The available dissociation channels depend on the binding energy of the ground electronic state complex. Exceptions have been found at the vdW bands near the 0 4^- 0- 000 band of C_3. The binding energies of the ground electronic states of these four complexes will be discussed. G. Zhang, B.-G. Lin, S.-M. Wen, and Y.-C. Hsu, J. Chem. Phys. 20, 3189(2004) J.-M. Chao, K. S. Tham, G. Zhang, A. J. Merer, Y.-C. Hsu, and W.-P. Hu, J. Chem. Phys. 34, 074313(2011)

  2. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2011-09-15

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  3. Designing 3D Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Merging Magnetic and Fluorescent Features: When Cell Sheet Technology Meets Image-Guided Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rahmi, Gabriel; Pidial, Laetitia; Silva, Amanda K A; Blondiaux, Eléonore; Meresse, Bertrand; Gazeau, Florence; Autret, Gwennhael; Balvay, Daniel; Cuenod, Charles André; Perretta, Silvana; Tavitian, Bertrand; Wilhelm, Claire; Cellier, Christophe; Clément, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell sheet technology opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration therapy by providing readily implantable, scaffold-free 3D tissue constructs. Many studies have focused on the therapeutic effects of cell sheet implantation while relatively little attention has concerned the fate of the implanted cells in vivo. The aim of the present study was to track longitudinally the cells implanted in the cell sheets in vivo in target tissues. To this end we (i) endowed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) with imaging properties by double labeling with fluorescent and magnetic tracers, (ii) applied BMMSC cell sheets to a digestive fistula model in mice, (iii) tracked the BMMSC fate in vivo by MRI and probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), and (iv) quantified healing of the fistula. We show that image-guided longitudinal follow-up can document both the fate of the cell sheet-derived BMMSCs and their healing capacity. Moreover, our theranostic approach informs on the mechanism of action, either directly by integration of cell sheet-derived BMMSCs into the host tissue or indirectly through the release of signaling molecules in the host tissue. Multimodal imaging and clinical evaluation converged to attest that cell sheet grafting resulted in minimal clinical inflammation, improved fistula healing, reduced tissue fibrosis and enhanced microvasculature density. At the molecular level, cell sheet transplantation induced an increase in the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-ß2 and IL-10) and host intestinal growth factors involved in tissue repair (EGF and VEGF). Multimodal imaging is useful for tracking cell sheets and for noninvasive follow-up of their regenerative properties.

  4. Designing 3D Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Merging Magnetic and Fluorescent Features: When Cell Sheet Technology Meets Image-Guided Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rahmi, Gabriel; Pidial, Laetitia; Silva, Amanda K. A.; Blondiaux, Eléonore; Meresse, Bertrand; Gazeau, Florence; Autret, Gwennhael; Balvay, Daniel; Cuenod, Charles André; Perretta, Silvana; Tavitian, Bertrand; Wilhelm, Claire; Cellier, Christophe; Clément, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell sheet technology opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration therapy by providing readily implantable, scaffold-free 3D tissue constructs. Many studies have focused on the therapeutic effects of cell sheet implantation while relatively little attention has concerned the fate of the implanted cells in vivo. The aim of the present study was to track longitudinally the cells implanted in the cell sheets in vivo in target tissues. To this end we (i) endowed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) with imaging properties by double labeling with fluorescent and magnetic tracers, (ii) applied BMMSC cell sheets to a digestive fistula model in mice, (iii) tracked the BMMSC fate in vivo by MRI and probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), and (iv) quantified healing of the fistula. We show that image-guided longitudinal follow-up can document both the fate of the cell sheet-derived BMMSCs and their healing capacity. Moreover, our theranostic approach informs on the mechanism of action, either directly by integration of cell sheet-derived BMMSCs into the host tissue or indirectly through the release of signaling molecules in the host tissue. Multimodal imaging and clinical evaluation converged to attest that cell sheet grafting resulted in minimal clinical inflammation, improved fistula healing, reduced tissue fibrosis and enhanced microvasculature density. At the molecular level, cell sheet transplantation induced an increase in the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-ß2 and IL-10) and host intestinal growth factors involved in tissue repair (EGF and VEGF). Multimodal imaging is useful for tracking cell sheets and for noninvasive follow-up of their regenerative properties. PMID:27022420

  5. Relating the 4s{sigma}{sup -1} inner-valence photoelectron spectrum of HBr with the Br 3d{sup -1}5l{lambda} resonant Auger spectra: An approach to the assignments

    SciTech Connect

    Puettner, R.; Hu, Y. F.; Bancroft, G. M.; Kivimaeki, A.; Jurvansuu, M.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.

    2003-09-01

    The high resolution Br 4s{sigma}{sup -1} photoelectron spectrum of HBr is presented together with the resonant Auger spectra resulting from excitations from the 3d core levels to the low-n Rydberg orbitals 5s{sigma}, 5p{sigma}, and 5p{pi}. The very complex spectra can be broadly assigned using two observations. First, the energy splittings of the 4p{pi}{sup -2}5s and 4p{pi}{sup -2}5p states are very similar to the splittings of the 4p{pi}{sup -2}({sup 1}{sigma}{sup +},{sup 1}{delta}, and {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -}) final states seen previously in the normal Auger spectra. Second, the {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} states, which are the dominant correlation satellites in the complex 4s{sigma}{sup -1} photoelectron spectrum, are often enhanced in the 5s{sigma} resonance Auger spectra. Electron correlation and spin-orbit interaction in the final states are important to understand all of these spectra. Unlike the normal Auger spectra, vibrational excitations play only a minor role in these spectra, showing that the 5s and 5p Rydberg orbitals have some bonding character.

  6. Molecular iodine fluorescence spectra generated with helium-neon lasers for spectrometer calibration.

    PubMed

    Williamson, J Charles

    2010-12-01

    Gas-phase molecular iodine laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra were recorded out to 815 nm at 1 cm(-1) resolution using green, yellow, and red helium-neon (HeNe) lasers as excitation sources. Nine previously unreported I(2) B←X absorption transitions accessed by these lasers were identified, and specific rovibronic transition assignments were made for two hundred LIF peaks--more than sixty per laser. These I(2) LIF peaks can be used to calibrate the vacuum wavenumber coordinate of spectrometers to better than 0.1 cm(-1) accuracy. In particular, green HeNe excitation of the I(2) R(106) 28-0 transition leads to strong fluorescence well suited for calibration, with a rotational doublet spacing of 15 cm(-1) and a doublet-to-doublet spacing of 190 cm(-1). Calibration by HeNe I(2) LIF may be an especially valuable technique for Raman spectroscopy applications.

  7. Raman scattering and fluorescence spectra of water from the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, V. V.; Burikov, S. A.; Volkov, P. A.; Lapshin, V. B.; Syroeshkin, A. V.

    2009-04-01

    The Raman scattering and fluorescence spectra were first obtained for the water of sea surface microlayers (SML) of 1 and 0.2 mm thickness (sampled with a Garrett net and a Lapshin capillary sampler, respectively). For reference, samples of water below the SML (from the layer of 0.5 m) were also taken. Substantial differences were found for the values of the normalized intensity of the fluorescence (the number of photons from the volume unit in response to a unit of excitation) between the aqueous humic substances and, presumably, oil hydrocarbons and proteins. Some slight but analyzable differences in the shapes and location of spectral bands were also found. These latter allow one to determine the content of salts and the characteristics of complicated organic compounds in the SML and to compare them to those within the water volume.

  8. Continuous Fluorescence Imaging of Intracellular Calcium by Use of Ion-Selective Nanospheres with Adjustable Spectra.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenye; Qin, Yu; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-08-10

    Continuous fluorescence imaging of intracellular ions in various spectral ranges is important for biological studies. In this paper, fluorescent calcium-selective nanospheres, including calix[4]arene-functionalized bodipy (CBDP) or 9-(diethylamino)-5-[(2-octyldecyl)imino]benzo[a]phenoxazine (ETH 5350) as the chromoionophore, were prepared to demonstrate intracellular calcium imaging in visible or near-IR regions, respectively. The fluorescence of the nanospheres was controlled by the chromoionophore, and thus the spectral range for detection was adjustable by choosing the proper chromoionophore. The response time of the nanospheres to calcium was typically 1 s, which allowed accurate measurement of intracellular calcium. These nanospheres were loaded into cells through free endocytosis and exhibited fluorescence for 24 h, and their intensity was correlated with the elevation of intracellular calcium upon stimulation. The successful demonstration of calcium imaging by use of ion-selective nanospheres within two spectral ranges in 24 h supported that these nanospheres could be applied for continuous imaging of intracellular ions with adjustable spectra.

  9. Deriving chlorophyll fluorescence emissions of vegetation canopies from high resolution field reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Daughtry, Craig S.; Entcheva Campbell, Petya K.; Butcher, L. Maryn

    2005-11-01

    Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) peaks centered at 685 nm and 735 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SIF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops and small tree plots of three deciduous species (red maple, tulip poplar, sweet gum). Leaf level measurements were also made of foliage which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) contents). As part of ongoing experiments, measurements were made on N application plots within corn (280, 140, 70, and 0 kg N/ha) and tree (0, 37.5, 75, 112.5, 150 kg N /ha) sites at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrow- band regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red SIF ratio (SIFratio) derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment ratios altered by N application rates in both corn crops. This ratio was also positively correlated to the C/N ratio at leaf and canopy levels, for the available corn data (e.g., 2004). No consistent N treatment or species differences in SIF were detected in the tree foliage, but additional 2005 data are forthcoming. This study has relevance to future passive satellite remote sensing approaches to monitoring C dynamics from space.

  10. High-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzyl and p-methylbenzyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tai-Yuan David; Tan, Xue-Qing; Cerny, Timothy M.; Williamson, James M.; Cullin, David W.; Miller, Terry A.

    1992-11-01

    High-resolution, rotationally resolved, laser-induced, fluorescence excitation spectra of the A 1 and 6a 10 bands of benzyl and the 0 00 band of p-methylbenzyl radicals were obtained in supersonic expansions. All three spectra were assigned and fit, using the rigid rotor Hamiltonian as well as methyl group internal rotation theory. The results of the rotational analysis provide good rotation constants for benzyl and p-methylbenzyl and establish unambiguously that the symmetry of the excited electronic state in this transition of p-methylbenzyl is 2A 2 (in C 2v). The heights of torsional barriers that hinder the internal rotation of the methyl group in p-methylbenzyl also are determined. The torsional results are compared to those obtained previously for this radical in a vibrational analysis and to other open shell radicals.

  11. Laser induced fluorescence spectra of fluorophenol cations in a Ne matrix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Miller, T.A.; Shiley, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence and/or absorption spectra of the cations of 2,3,5,6‐tetrafluorophenol, 2,3,5,6‐tetrafluorothiophenol, and 3,5‐difluorophenol have been obtained in a Ne matrix. The spectra of C6HF4OH+ are much better resolved than in the gas phase. The gas phase congestion is likely caused by the near degeneracy of the and electronic states whose separation is now measured at 207 cm−1. The spectrum of C6H3F2OH+ represents a deperturbed example of the Jahn–Teller distorted sym‐C6F3H3+ ion. C6H3F2SH+ shows only a broad featureless absorption.

  12. Three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence spectroscopy analysis of the fluorescent dissolved organic matter released by the marine toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella exposed to metal stress by zinc or lead.

    PubMed

    Herzi, Faouzi; Jean, Natacha; Sakka Hlaili, Asma; Mounier, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the effects of zinc or lead on growth and on exudation of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) by the marine toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella (Whedon & Kofoid) Balech. The species was exposed to increasing free zinc (1.34 × 10(-7) M-3.98 × 10(-6) M) or lead (5.13 × 10(-9) M-1.82 × 10(-7) M) concentra-tions. Low metal levels ([Zn(2+) ] = 1.34 × 10(-7) M; [Pb(2+) ] = 5.13 × 10(-9) M) had no effect on cell growth. Toxic effects were observed from higher metal contamination ([Zn(2+) ] = 3.98 × 10(-6) M; [Pb(2+) ] = 6.54 × 10(-8) M), as a conversion of vegetative cells into cysts. Analysis of the released FDOM by three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence spectroscopy was achieved, using the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The PARAFAC modeling revealed four components associated with two contributions: one related to the biological activity; the other linked to the organic matter decomposition in the culture medium. The C1 component combined a tryptophan peak and characteristics of humic substances, whereas the C2 component was considered as a tryptophan protein fluorophore. The two others C3 and C4 components were associated with marine organic matter production. Relea-sed fluorescent substances were induced by low ([Zn(2+) ]= 1.34 × 10(-7) M; [Pb(2+) ] = 5.13 × 10(-9) M) and moderate ([Zn(2+) ] = 6.21 × 10(-7) M; [Pb(2+) ] = 2.64× 10(-9) M) metal concentrations, suggesting the activation of cellular mechanisms in response to metal stress, to exudate FDOM that could complex metal cations and reduce their toxicity toward A. catenella cells.

  13. Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Regional Integration to Quantify Spectra for Dissolved Organic Matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, W.; Westerhoff, P.; Leenheer, J.A.; Booksh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water and soil. However, interpreting the >10,000 wavelength-dependent fluorescence intensity data points represented in EEMs has posed a significant challenge. Fluorescence regional integration, a quantitative technique that integrates the volume beneath an EEM, was developed to analyze EEMs. EEMs were delineated into five excitation-emission regions based on fluorescence of model compounds, DOM fractions, and marine waters or freshwaters. Volumetric integration under the EEM within each region, normalized to the projected excitation-emission area within that region and dissolved organic carbon concentration, resulted in a normalized region-specific EEM volume (??i,n). Solid-state carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, and EEMs were obtained for standard Suwannee River fulvic acid and 15 hydrophobic or hydrophilic acid, neutral, and base DOM fractions plus nonfractionated DOM from wastewater effluents and rivers in the southwestern United States. DOM fractions fluoresced in one or more EEM regions. The highest cumulative EEM volume (??T,n = ????i,n) was observed for hydrophobic neutral DOM fractions, followed by lower ??T,n values for hydrophobic acid, base, and hydrophilic acid DOM fractions, respectively. An extracted wastewater biomass DOM sample contained aromatic protein- and humic-like material and was characteristic of bacterial-soluble microbial products. Aromatic carbon and the presence of specific aromatic compounds (as indicated by solid-state 13C NMR and FTIR data) resulted in EEMs that aided in differentiating wastewater effluent DOM from drinking water DOM.

  14. Recovering fluorescent spectra with an RGB digital camera and color filters using different matrix factorizations.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Juan L; Valero, Eva M; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Romero, Javier

    2007-07-01

    The aim of a multispectral system is to recover a spectral function at each image pixel, but when a scene is digitally imaged under a light of unknown spectral power distribution (SPD), the image pixels give incomplete information about the spectral reflectances of objects in the scene. We have analyzed how accurately the spectra of artificial fluorescent light sources can be recovered with a digital CCD camera. The red-green-blue (RGB) sensor outputs are modified by the use of successive cutoff color filters. Four algorithms for simplifying the spectra datasets are used: nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), independent component analysis (ICA), a direct pseudoinverse method, and principal component analysis (PCA). The algorithms are tested using both simulated data and data from a real RGB digital camera. The methods are compared in terms of the minimum rank of factorization and the number of sensors required to derive acceptable spectral and colorimetric SPD estimations; the PCA results are also given for the sake of comparison. The results show that all the algorithms surpass the PCA when a reduced number of sensors is used. The experimental results suggest a significant loss of quality when more than one color filter is used, which agrees with the previous results for reflectances. Nevertheless, an RGB digital camera with or without a prefilter is found to provide good spectral and colorimetric recovery of indoor fluorescent lighting and can be used for color correction without the need of a telespectroradiometer.

  15. Solvent effects on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of rhaponticin: Experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Liang, Xuhua; Zhao, Yingyong; Fan, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Rhaponticin (RH) possesses a variety of pharmacological activities including potent antitumor, antitumor-promoting, antithrombotic, antioxidant and vasorelaxant effects. The fundamental photophysics of RH is not well understood. In this work, solvent effect on the photoluminescence behavior of RH was studied by fluorescence and absorption spectra. The bathchromic shift was observed in absorption and fluorescence spectra with the increase of solvents polarity, which implied that transition involved was π → π*. A quantitative estimation of the contribution from different solvatochromic parameters, like normalized transition energy value (ETN), was made using the linear stokes shift (Δν) relationship based on the Lippert-Suppan equation. The ground state and excited state dipole moments were calculated by quantum-mechanical second-order perturbation method as a function of the dielectric constant (ɛ) and refractive index (n). The result was found to be 2.23 and 3.67 D in ground state and excited state respectively. The density functional theory (DFT) was used to obtain the most stable structure, electronic excitation energy, dipole moments and charge distribution. The analysis revealed that the RH exhibited strong photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), and the intermolecular hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent was the most important parameter to characterize the photophysics behavior of RH. The hydrogen bonding effect occurred at the localized electron-acceptor oxygen at the glycoside bond. The experimental and theoretical results would help us better understand the photophysical properties of RH.

  16. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emissions of Vegetation Canopies From High Resolution Field Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Corp, L. A.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva

    2006-01-01

    A two-year experiment was performed on corn (Zea mays L.) crops under nitrogen (N) fertilization regimes to examine the use of hyperspectral canopy reflectance information for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vegetation production. Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll ChlF peaks centered at 685V10 nm and 735V5 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops, as part of an ongoing multi-year experiment at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. A spectroradiometer (ASD-FR Fieldspec Pro, Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., Boulder, CO) was used to measure canopy radiances 1 m above plant canopies with a 22deg field of view and a 0deg nadir view zenith angle. Canopy and plant measurements were made at the R3 grain fill reproductive stage on 3-4 replicate N application plots provided seasonal inputs of 280, 140, 70, and 28 kg N/ha. Leaf level measurements were also made which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and N contents). Crop yields were determined at harvest. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrowband regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red S F ratio derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment levels (e.g., total chlorophyll, Chl) associated with N application rates in both corn crops. This canopy-level spectral ratio was also

  17. Fluorescence and Raman spectra on surface of K9 glass by high fluence ultraviolet laser irradiation at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Geng, Feng; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Feng, Shiquan; Ren, Dahua; Cheng, Xinlu; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-11-01

    In order to explore the damage mechanisms of K9 glass irradiated by high energy density ultraviolet laser, laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectra were investigated. Compared the fluorescence spectra of damaged area, undamaged area and sub-damaged area, it can be conclude that the fluorescence spectrum of sub-damaged area is different from the structure of the other two areas. Especially, the main peak of the spectra at 415 nm reveals the unique characteristics of K9 glass. The structure at the sub-damaged area enhances intensity of the Raman scattering spectra. Three peaks of the spectra at about 500 nm and two characteristic peaks at about 550 nm exhibit the characterization of damaged area. A peak of the Raman scattering spectra at 350 nm which related to water can be observed. The relationship between intensity of Raman scattering and laser intensity at 355 nm is investigated by confocal Raman microscopy. At sub-damage area, signal of Raman scattering is rather high and decreased dramatically with respect to energy density. The major band at about 1470 cm-1 sharpened and moved to higher frequency with densification. These phenomena demonstrate that the structure of sub-damaged area has some characterization compared with the damaged area. The investigation of defect induced fluorescence and Raman spectra on surface of K9 glass is important to explore the damage mechanisms of optical materials irradiated by ultraviolet laser irradiation at 355 nm.

  18. Linear expansion of the eigenvalues of a Hermitian matrix and its application to the analysis of the electronic spectra of 3 d ions in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijo, L.; Pueyo, L.

    1985-02-01

    It is shown that the eigenvalues Ei of a Hermitian matrix H with matrix elements Hij = ΣkAkijak, where Akij are known numbers and ak a set of parameters, can be exactly expanded as E i = Σ k( {∂E i}/{∂a k})a k. This property is applied to the analysis of the optical spectra of transition metal ions in crystals proposed by L. Pueyo, M. Bermejo, and J. W. Richardson ( J. Solid State Chem.31, 217, 1980), and it is shown that this method represents the best fit of the Hamiltonian eigenvalues to the observed (or calculated) spectrum. Further advantages of using this property, in connection with the spectral analysis, are the minimization of the errors associated with the numerical approximations and a reduction in computer time. In the molecular orbital calculation of the optical or uv spectra of these systems, this linear expansion of the eigenvalues give a detailed interpretation of the improvements produced by refined calculations, such as those including configuration interaction. In particular, the changes in one-electron energy and in open-shell repulsion interactions associated with the refinement can be clearly and easily formulated. As examples, the computed spectra of CrF 4-6 and CrF 3-6 are discussed.

  19. Photoemission spectra and density functional theory calculations of 3d transition metal-aqua complexes (Ti-Cu) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Diana; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Blumberger, Jochen; Jaque, Pablo

    2014-06-19

    Photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and density functional calculations are combined to determine the lowest electron binding energies of first-row transition-metal aqua ions, titanium through copper, with 3d(1) through 3d(9) electronic configurations, in their most common oxidation states. Vertical ionization energies are found to oscillate considerably between 6.76 and 9.65 eV for the dications and between 7.05 and 10.28 eV for the respective trivalent cations. The metal cations are modeled as [M(H2O)n](q+) clusters (q = 2, 3, and 4; n = 6 and 18) surrounded by continuum solvent. The performance of 10 exchange-correlation functionals, two GGAs, three MGGAs, two HGGAs and three HMGGAs, combined with the MDF10(ECP)/6-31+G(d,p) basis set is assessed for 11 M-O bond distances, 10 vertical ionization energies, 6 adiabatic ionization energies, and the associated reorganization free energies. We find that for divalent cations the HGGA and HMGGA functionals in combination with the 18 water model show the best agreement with experimental vertical ionization energies and geometries; for trivalent ions, the MGGA functionals perform best. The corresponding reorganization free energies (λo) of the oxidized ions are significantly underestimated with all DFT functionals and cluster models. This indicates that the structural reorganization of the solvation shell upon ionization is not adequately accounted for by the simple solvation models used, emphasizing the importance of extended sampling of thermally accessible solvation structures for an accurate computation of this quantity. The photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reported herein provide a comprehensive set of transition-metal redox energetic quantities for future electronic structure benchmarks.

  20. Femtosecond Fluorescence Spectra of Tryptophan in Human γ-Crystallin Mutants: Site-Dependent Ultrafast Quenching

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Jiejin; Toptygin, Dmitri; Tcherkasskaya, Olga; Callis, Patrik; King, Jonathan; Brand, Ludwig; Knutson, Jay R.

    2012-01-01

    The eye lens crystallin proteins are subject to UV irradiation throughout life, and the photochemistry of damage proceeds through the excited state; thus, their tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence lifetimes are physiologically important properties. The time resolved fluorescence spectra of single Trps in human γD- and γS-crystallins have been measured with both an upconversion spectrophotofluorometer on the 300fs to 100ps time scale, and a time correlated single photon counting apparatus on the 100ps to 10ns time scale, respectively. Three Trps in each wild type protein were replaced by phenylalanine, leading to single-Trp mutants: W68-only and W156-only of HγD- and W72-only and W162-only of HγS-crystallin. These proteins exhibit similar ultrafast signatures: positive definite decay associated spectra (DAS) for 50 – 65ps decay constants that indicate dominance of fast, heterogeneous quenching. The quenched population (judged by amplitude) of this DAS differs among mutants. Trps 68, 156 in human γD- and Trp72 in human γS-crystallin are buried, but water can reach amide oxygen and ring HE1 atoms through narrow channels. QM-MM simulations of quenching by electron transfer predict heterogeneous decay times from 50–500 ps that agree with our experimental results. Further analysis of apparent radiative lifetimes allow us to deduce that substantial subpopulations of Trp are fully quenched in even faster (sub-300 fs) processes for several of the mutants. The quenching of Trp fluorescence of human γD- and γS-crystallin may protect them from ambient light induced photo damage. PMID:19919143

  1. Estimation of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand for combined sewer systems using synchronous fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Bo-Mi; Lee, Tae-Hwan; Park, Dae-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of water quality for sewer system is required for efficient sewer network design because it provides information on the precise loading of pollutant to wastewater treatment facilities and the impact of loading on receiving water. In this study, synchronous fluorescence spectra and its first derivatives were investigated using a number of wastewater samples collected in sewer systems in urban and non-urban areas, and the optimum fluorescence feature was explored for the estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations of sewer samples. The temporal variations in BOD and COD showed a regular pattern for urban areas whereas they were relatively irregular for non-urban areas. Irrespective of the sewer pipes and the types of the areas, two distinct peaks were identified from the synchronous fluorescence spectra, which correspond to protein-like fluorescence (PLF) and humic-like fluorescence (HLF), respectively. HLF in sewer samples appears to be associated with fluorescent whitening agents. Five fluorescence characteristics were selected from the synchronous spectra and the first-derivatives. Among the selected fluorescence indices, a peak in the PLF region (i.e., Index I) showed the highest correlation coefficient with both BOD and COD. A multiple regression approach based on suspended solid (SS) and Index I used to compensate for the contribution of SS to BOD and COD revealed an improvement in the estimation capability, showing good correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.94 for BOD and COD, respectively.

  2. Mathematical model to interpret localized reflectance spectra measured in the presence of a strong fluorescence marker

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Jaime J.; Davis, Scott C.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Kanick, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Quantification of multiple fluorescence markers during neurosurgery has the potential to provide complementary contrast mechanisms between normal and malignant tissues, and one potential combination involves fluorescein sodium (FS) and aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). We focus on the interpretation of reflectance spectra containing contributions from elastically scattered (reflected) photons as well as fluorescence emissions from a strong fluorophore (i.e., FS). A model-based approach to extract μa and μs′ in the presence of FS emission is validated in optical phantoms constructed with Intralipid (1% to 2% lipid) and whole blood (1% to 3% volume fraction), over a wide range of FS concentrations (0 to 1000  μg/ml). The results show that modeling reflectance as a combination of elastically scattered light and attenuation-corrected FS-based emission yielded more accurate tissue parameter estimates when compared with a nonmodified reflectance model, with reduced maximum errors for blood volume (22% versus 90%), microvascular saturation (21% versus 100%), and μs′ (13% versus 207%). Additionally, quantitative PpIX fluorescence sampled in the same phantom as FS showed significant differences depending on the reflectance model used to estimate optical properties (i.e., maximum error 29% versus 86%). These data represent a first step toward using quantitative optical spectroscopy to guide surgeries through simultaneous assessment of FS and PpIX. PMID:26836297

  3. Mathematical model to interpret localized reflectance spectra measured in the presence of a strong fluorescence marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Jaime J.; Davis, Scott C.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Kanick, Stephen C.

    2016-06-01

    Quantification of multiple fluorescence markers during neurosurgery has the potential to provide complementary contrast mechanisms between normal and malignant tissues, and one potential combination involves fluorescein sodium (FS) and aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). We focus on the interpretation of reflectance spectra containing contributions from elastically scattered (reflected) photons as well as fluorescence emissions from a strong fluorophore (i.e., FS). A model-based approach to extract μa and μs‧ in the presence of FS emission is validated in optical phantoms constructed with Intralipid (1% to 2% lipid) and whole blood (1% to 3% volume fraction), over a wide range of FS concentrations (0 to 1000 μg/ml). The results show that modeling reflectance as a combination of elastically scattered light and attenuation-corrected FS-based emission yielded more accurate tissue parameter estimates when compared with a nonmodified reflectance model, with reduced maximum errors for blood volume (22% versus 90%), microvascular saturation (21% versus 100%), and μs‧ (13% versus 207%). Additionally, quantitative PpIX fluorescence sampled in the same phantom as FS showed significant differences depending on the reflectance model used to estimate optical properties (i.e., maximum error 29% versus 86%). These data represent a first step toward using quantitative optical spectroscopy to guide surgeries through simultaneous assessment of FS and PpIX.

  4. Improved Savitzky-Golay-method-based fluorescence subtraction algorithm for rapid recovery of Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we propose an improved subtraction algorithm for rapid recovery of Raman spectra that can substantially reduce the computation time. This algorithm is based on an improved Savitzky-Golay (SG) iterative smoothing method, which involves two key novel approaches: (a) the use of the Gauss-Seidel method and (b) the introduction of a relaxation factor into the iterative procedure. By applying a novel successive relaxation (SG-SR) iterative method to the relaxation factor, additional improvement in the convergence speed over the standard Savitzky-Golay procedure is realized. The proposed improved algorithm (the RIA-SG-SR algorithm), which uses SG-SR-based iteration instead of Savitzky-Golay iteration, has been optimized and validated with a mathematically simulated Raman spectrum, as well as experimentally measured Raman spectra from non-biological and biological samples. The method results in a significant reduction in computing cost while yielding consistent rejection of fluorescence and noise for spectra with low signal-to-fluorescence ratios and varied baselines. In the simulation, RIA-SG-SR achieved 1 order of magnitude improvement in iteration number and 2 orders of magnitude improvement in computation time compared with the range-independent background-subtraction algorithm (RIA). Furthermore the computation time of the experimentally measured raw Raman spectrum processing from skin tissue decreased from 6.72 to 0.094 s. In general, the processing of the SG-SR method can be conducted within dozens of milliseconds, which can provide a real-time procedure in practical situations.

  5. A wavelength-dispersive instrument for characterizing fluorescence and scattering spectra of individual aerosol particles on a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Donald R.; Swanson, Benjamin E.; Huffman, J. Alex

    2016-08-01

    We describe a novel, low-cost instrument to acquire both elastic and inelastic (fluorescent) scattering spectra from individual supermicron-size particles in a multi-particle collection on a microscope slide. The principle of the device is based on a slitless spectroscope that is often employed in astronomy to determine the spectra of individual stars in a star cluster but had not been applied to atmospheric particles. Under excitation, most commonly by either a 405 nm diode laser or a UV light-emitting diode (LED), fluorescence emission spectra of many individual particles can be determined simultaneously. The instrument can also acquire elastic scattering spectra from particles illuminated by a white-light source. The technique also provides the ability to detect and rapidly estimate the number fraction of fluorescent particles that could contaminate a collection of non-fluorescent material, even without analyzing full spectra. Advantages and disadvantages of using black-and-white cameras compared to color cameras are given. The primary motivation for this work has been to develop an inexpensive technique to characterize fluorescent biological aerosol particles, especially particles such as pollen and mold spores that can cause allergies. An example of an iPhone-enabled device is also shown as a means for collecting data on biological aerosols at lower cost or by utilizing citizen scientists for expanded data collection.

  6. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J.

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  7. A theoretical investigation of the effect of water on the structure and fluorescence spectra of L-tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten, G. N.; Glukhova, O. E.; Slepchenkov, M. M.; Shcherbakova, N. E.; Baranov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Fluorescence spectra of two long-wavelength electron transitions S 0 ← 1 L b and S 0 ← 1 L a in uncharged and zwitterionic forms of L-tryptophan (Trp) in aqueous solution and in the complex of Trp with water molecule were calculated using the Frank-Condon approximation. Geometric parameters of Trp in electronically excited states were determined, and the vibrational structure of vibronic spectra was analyzed. It was shown that the relative position of structural fragments of alanine (R-Ala) and indole (R-In) could have a determining effect on the fluorescence and formation of the vibrational structure of electronic spectra. The increase of the rotation angle between the R-Ala and R-In, which depends on the Trp environment, results in the Trp fluorescence originating only from the singlet excited state 1 L a .

  8. pH-Induced changes in electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of phenazine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazanova, O. A.; Voloshin, I. M.; Makitruk, V. L.; Zozulya, V. N.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2007-04-01

    The visible electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence polarization degrees of imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F1), 2-methylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F2), 2-trifluoridemethylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F3), 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F4) and their glycosides, imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine-N1-β- D-ribofuranoside (F1rib), 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine-N1-β- D-glucopyranoside (F4gl), were investigated in aqueous buffered solutions over the pH range of 0-12, where the spectral transformations were found to be reversible. The effects of protonation and deprotonation on spectral properties of these dyes were studied. We have determined the ranges of pH, where individual ionic species are predominant. In aqueous buffered solutions the fluorescence was found only for neutral species of F1, F1rib, F2, and F4gl dyes, whereas for the ionic forms of these dyes, as well as for F3 and F4 ones, the fluorescence has not been detected. The concentrational deprotonation p Ka values were evaluated from experimental data. It was shown that donor-acceptor properties of the substituent group in the second position of the pentagonal ring substantially affect the values of the deprotonation constants and the character of protonation for chromophore. The substitution of a hydrogen atom in the NH-group by the sugar residue blocks the formation of the anionic species, and results in enhancement of the dye emission intensity. The steep emission dependence for F1 and F1rib over pH range of 0-7 with intensities ratio of IpH 7/ IpH 1 = 60 allows us to propose them as possible indicator dyes in luminescence based pH sensors for investigation of processes accompanied by acidification, e.g. as gastric pH-sensors. A comparative analysis of the studied dyes has shown that F4gl is the most promising compound to be used as a fluorescent probe for investigation of molecular hybridization of nucleic acids.

  9. Role of non-Condon vibronic coupling and conformation change on two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yuejie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) often show a blue-shift band compared to their conventional one-photon absorption spectra, which is an intriguing feature that has not been well understood. We present here a systematic study on one- and two-photon spectra of GFP chromophore by means of the density functional response theory and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods. It shows that the popular density functional fails to provide correct vibrational progression for the spectra. The non-Condon vibronic coupling, through the localised intrinsic vibrational modes of the chromophore, is responsible for the blue-shift in the TPA spectra. The cis to trans isomerisation can be identified in high-resolution TPA spectra. Our calculations demonstrate that the high level ab initio multiconfigurational CASSCF method, rather than the conventional density functional theory is required for investigating the essential excited-state properties of the GFP chromophore.

  10. Inner filter effect and the onset of concentration dependent red shift of synchronous fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Tarai, Madhumita; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2016-10-12

    The phenomenon of concentration dependent red shift, often observed in synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) of monofluorophoric as well as multifluorophoric systems at high chromophore concentrations, is known to have good analytical advantages. This was previously understood in terms of large inner filter effect (IFE) through the introduction of a derived absorption spectral profile that closely corresponds to the SFS profile. Using representative monofluorophoric and multifluorophoric systems, it is now explained how the SF spectral maximum changes with concentration of the fluorophore. For dilute solutions of monofluorophores the maximum is unchanged as expected. It is shown here that the onset of red shift of SFS maximum of both the mono as well as the multifluorophoric systems must occur at the derived absorption spectral parameter value of 0.32 that corresponds to the absorbance value of 0.87. This value is unique irrespective of the nature of the fluorophore under study. For monofluorophoric systems, the wavelength of derived absorption spectral maximum and the wavelength of synchronous fluorescence spectral maximum closely correspond with each other in the entire concentration range. In contrast, for multifluorophoric systems like diesel and aqueous humic acid, large deviations were noted that could be explained as to be due to the presence of non-fluorescing chromophores in the system. This work bridges the entire fluorophore concentration range over which the red shift of SFS maximum sets in; and in the process it establishes the importance of the derived absorption spectral parameter in understanding the phenomenon of concentration dependent red shift of SFS maximum.

  11. Solvent effects on the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra of uracil, thymine and 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Sarkar, Nilmoni; Bányász, Akos; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    We report a comparison of the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra of three representative uracil derivatives (uracil, thymine and 5-fluorouracil) in alcoholic solutions. The present results are compared with those from our previous experimental and computational studies of the same compounds in water and acetonitrile. The effects of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the spectra are discussed in the light of theoretical predictions. This comparative analysis provides a more complete picture of the solvent effects on the absorption and fluorescence properties of pyrimidine nucleobases, with special emphasis on the mechanism of the excited state deactivation.

  12. Diagnosis of liver cancer and cirrhosis by the fluorescence spectra of blood and urine.

    PubMed

    AlSalhi, M; Al Mehmadi, A M; Abdo, Ayman Assad; Prasad, S; Masilamani, V

    2012-08-01

    Liver cancer or hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC) is a serious malady with only 10% survival rate and is fatal next only to pancreatic cancer. This disease is conventionally detected and diagnosed by ultra sound, CT or MRI scans which are quite expensive. Also the discrimination between cirrhosis and HCC, by these imaging techniques, is poor. The conventional tissue biopsy is quite invasive and painful. In the new diagnostic procedure presented in this paper we have obtained fluorescence emission spectra with excitation at 400 nm and the synchronous emission spectra (Δλ = 10 nm) for a set of blood and urine samples (Normal control N = 25, Liver Malfunction N = 58). Based on the ratio fluorometric parameters, all the three liver maladies (minor inflammation like Hepatitis C, serious diseases like Cirrhosis and hepatoma) could be detected and discriminated with an accuracy of about 80%. Hence this inexpensive, non invasive, optical technique may have significant impact in screening, diagnosis and also prognosis of HCC in large segment of people in the populous Asian countries.

  13. Investigation of antigen-antibody interactions of sulfonamides with a monoclonal antibody in a fluorescence polarization immunoassay using 3D-QSAR models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model of sulfonamide analogs binding a monoclonal antibody (MAbSMR) produced against sulfamerazine was carried out by Distance Comparison (DISCOtech), comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), and comparative molecular si...

  14. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  15. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra coupled with parallel factor and regional integration analysis to characterize organic matter humification.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Li, Xiang; Pan, Hong-Wei; An, Da; Bai, Shuo-Guo; Li, Dan; Cui, Dong-Yu

    2013-11-01

    The present several humification indexes cannot provide the whole fluorescence information on organic matter composition and the evaluation results from them are inconsistent sometimes. In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis and fluorescence regional integration analysis were utilized to investigate organic matter humification, and the projection pursuit cluster (PPC) model was applied to form a suitable index for overcoming the difficulties in multi-index evaluation. The result showed that the ratio between the volume of humic- and fulvic-like fluorescence region and the volume of protein-like fluorescence region not only revealed the heterogeneity of organic matter, but also provided more accurate information on organic matter humification. In addition, the results showed that the PPC model could be used to characterize integrally the humification, and the projected characteristic value calculated from the PPC model could be used as the integrated humification evaluation index.

  16. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  17. High-resolution 3D structural and optical analyses of hybrid or composite materials by means of scanning probe microscopy combined with the ultramicrotome technique: an example of application to engineering of liquid crystals doped with fluorescent quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, Konstantin E.; Efimov, Anton E.; Bobrovsky, Alexey Yu.; Agapov, Igor I.; Chistyakov, Anton A.; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Nabiev, Igor

    2013-05-01

    Combination of nanometer-scale 3D structural analysis with optical characterization of the same material is a challenging task. Its results may be important for nanophotonics, materials science, and quality control. We have developed a new technique for complementary high-resolution structural and optical characterization followed by optical spectroscopic and microscopic measurements accompanied by reconstruction of the 3D structure in the same area of the sample. The 3D structure is reconstructed by combination of ultramicrotomic and SPM techniques allowing the study of the 3D distribution of implanted nanoparticles and their effect on the matrix structure. The combination of scanning probe nanotomography (SPN) and optical microspectroscopy makes it possible to direct estimate how the 3D structural characteristics of materials affect their macroscopic optical properties. The technique developed has been applied to the engineering of materials made from cholesteric liquid crystals and fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). These materials permit photochemical patterning and image recording through the changes in the dissymmetry factor of circular polarization of QD emission. The differences in the polarisation images and morphological characteristics of the liquid crystal matrix have proved to be correlated with the arrangement of the areas of homogeneous distribution and nonhomogeneous clustering of QDs. The reconstruction of the 3D structure of the liquid crystal matrix in the areas of homogeneous QD distribution has shown that QDs embedded into cholesteric liquid crystal matrices do not perturb their periodic planar texture. The combined optical/SPM/ultramicrotome technique will be indispensable for evaluating the effects of inorganic nanoparticles on the organisation of organic and liquid crystal matrices, biomedical materials, cells, and tissues.

  18. A comparison of the fluorescence spectra of murine and bovine central nervous system (CNS) and other tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe a comparison of the fluorescence spectra of bovine tissues with murine tissues in order to determine whether spectral features are conserved and whether an appropriate and practical laboratory small animal model system could be identified to be used for investigation of tissue and a...

  19. A New Method for the Determination of Potassium Sorbate Combining Fluorescence Spectra Method with PSO-BP Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-tao; Chen, Dong-ying; Wang, Xing-long; Wei, Meng; Wang, Zhi-fang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, fluorescence spectra properties of potassium sorbate in aqueous solution and orange juice are studied, and the result.shows that in two solution there are many difference in fluorescence spectra of potassium sorbate, but the fluorescence characteristic peak exists in λ(ex)/λ(em) = 375/490 nm. It can be seen from the two dimensional fluorescence spectra that the relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of potassium sorbate is very complex, so there is no linear relationship between them. To determine the concentration of potassium sorbate in orange juice, a new method combining Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm with Back Propagation (BP) neural network is proposed. The relative error of two predicted concentrations is 1.83% and 1.53% respectively, which indicate that the method is feasible. The PSO-BP neural network can accurately measure the concentration of potassium sorbate in orange juice in the range of 0.1-2.0 g · L⁻¹.

  20. Investigation on the spectral properties of 2D asynchronous fluorescence spectra generated by using variable excitation wavelengths as a perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingdan; He, Anqi; Guo, Ran; Wei, Yongju; Feng, Juan; Xu, Yizhuang; Noda, Isao; Wu, Jinguang

    2016-11-01

    Properties of 2D asynchronous spectra generated from a series of fluorescence emission spectra are investigated. Variable excitation wavelengths are utilized as an external perturbation. Based on the results of mathematical analysis and computer simulation, we find that no cross peak will be produced on the 2D asynchronous spectrum if the fluorescent solute under investigation occurs in a single micro-environment. The observation of cross peaks implies that the fluorescent molecule may occur in different micro-environments in a solution. Based on these results, we use 2D asynchronous spectra to investigate the emission spectra of anthracene dissolved in cyclohexane. When the concentration of anthracene is low, no cross peak is produced in the resultant 2D asynchronous spectrum, confirming that anthracene is dissolved as single molecule in the solution. As the concentration elevated, cross peaks appear in the corresponding 2D asynchronous spectra. A plausible explanation of this phenomenon is that anthracene may undergo aggregation via π-π interaction or π-C-H interaction.

  1. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  2. Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Houck, Joshua D. T.; Clark, Pamela A.; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2013-08-01

    A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate open-air burning of garbage. Although the particulate emissions are likely dominated by particles <1 μm diameter, only the spectra of supermicron particles were measured here. The overall fluorescence spectral profiles exhibit either one or two broad bands peaked around 300-450 nm within the 280-650 nm spectral range, when the particles are illuminated with a 263-nm laser. Different burning materials have different profiles, some of them (cigarette, hair, uniform, paper, and plastics) show small changes during the burning process, and while others (beef, bread, carrot, Styrofoam, and wood) show big variations, which initially exhibit a single UV peak (around 310-340 nm) and a long shoulder in visible, and then gradually evolve into a bimodal spectrum with another visible peak (around 430-450 nm) having increasing intensity during the burning process. These spectral profiles could mainly derive from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with the combinations of tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, and other humic-like substances. About 68 % of these single-particle fluorescence spectra can be grouped into 10 clustered spectral templates that are derived from the spectra of millions of atmospheric aerosol particles observed in three locations; while the others, particularly these bimodal spectra, do not fall into any of the 10 templates. Therefore, the spectra from particulate emissions of burning materials can be easily discriminated from that of common atmospheric aerosol particles. The SFFS technology could be a good tool for monitoring burning pit emissions and possibly for distinguishing them from atmospheric aerosol particles.

  3. Modeling of fluorescence line-narrowed spectra in weakly coupled dimers in the presence of excitation energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chen; Reppert, Mike; Feng, Ximao; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2014-07-21

    This work describes simple analytical formulas to describe the fluorescence line-narrowed (FLN) spectra of weakly coupled chromophores in the presence of excitation energy transfer (EET). Modeling studies for dimer systems (assuming low fluence and weak coupling) show that the FLN spectra (including absorption and emission spectra) calculated for various dimers using our model are in good agreement with spectra calculated by: (i) the simple convolution method and (ii) the more rigorous treatment using the Redfield approach [T. Renger and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9997 (2002)]. The calculated FLN spectra in the presence of EET of all three approaches are very similar. We argue that our approach provides a simplified and computationally more efficient description of FLN spectra in the presence of EET. This method also has been applied to FLN spectra obtained for the CP47 antenna complex of Photosystem II reported by Neupane et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 4214 (2010)], which indicated the presence of uncorrelated EET between pigments contributing to the two lowest energy (overlapping) exciton states, each mostly localized on a single chromophore. Calculated and experimental FLN spectra for CP47 complex show very good qualitative agreement.

  4. Multivariate curve resolution of synchronous fluorescence spectra matrices of fulvic acids obtained as a function of pH.

    PubMed

    Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G; Tauler, Romá

    2006-11-01

    Synchronous fluorescence spectra (excitation wavelength range between 280 and 510 nm and wavelength interval of 25 nm) of three samples of fulvic acids (FA) were obtained as a function of the pH, in the range from 2.0 to 10.5, and as a function of the FA concentration, in the range from 20 to 180 mg/L. FA were obtained from composted livestock materials (lsFA), composted sewage sludge (csFA), and Laurentian soil (laFA). Three-dimensional spectral matrices were obtained (wavelength, pH, and FA concentration) and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) was used to calculate spectra and fluorescence intensity profiles for the detected components. Cluster analysis of the calculated spectra showed the existence of similar and unique fluorescent properties in the three FA samples. Some of the calculated fluorescence intensity profiles have a shape compatible with acid-base species distribution diagrams, which allowed pKa values to be estimated, namely, a well-defined acid-base equilibrium with pKa 5.7 +/- 0.2 (lsFA), 6.9 +/- 0.4 (csFA), and 5.5 +/- 0.2 (laFA); and other acid-base systems not well defined with pKa at about 3.0 and 8.6. Other spectral variations revealed the existence of inner-filter effects or self-quenching as the concentration of FA increases.

  5. Binding phenomena and fluorescence quenching. II: Photophysics of aromatic residues and dependence of fluorescence spectra on protein conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callis, Patrik R.

    2014-12-01

    The three amino acids with aromatic ring side chains-phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and especially tryptophan (Trp) have played a long and productive role in helping unlock the secrets of protein behavior by optical spectroscopy (absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, etc.) In principle, an appropriately placed Trp will undergo fluorescence wavelength and/or intensity changes upon whatever functional process a protein performs. Although perceived to be enigmatic and not well understood, Trp is arguably now better understood than many of the extrinsic probes currently in use. Basic principles of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quenching and wavelength shifts in proteins are presented, with strong emphasis on the importance of electrostatics. The condensed description of findings from recent experiments and simulations of tryptophan fluorescence and intrinsic quenching in proteins is designed to help authors in planning and interpreting experimental results of ligand binding studies.

  6. Specific features of Tm 3+ doped BiB 3O 6 glasses fluorescence spectra and their kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrowski, A.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Kuznik, W.; Brik, M. G.; Klosowicz, S.; Kityk, I. V.

    2012-02-01

    Synthesis and spectral fluorescent features of the thulium-doped BiB 3O 6 glasses are presented. All spectra were recorded using a pulsed (pulse energy ca. 1 μJ, pulse duration 10 ns) 355 nm third harmonic of 10 kHz Nd:YAG laser as an excitation source. A laser beam was focused in a backscattering geometry onto about 1 mm 2 spot on the surface of a sample. The Andor SR-303 i spectrograph equipped with an Andor DH-501 intensified charge coupled device with spectral resolution up to 1 nm was used as a spectra recorder. The time-resolution of this system can be as low as 5 ns. The decay kinetics was derived from integrated time-resolved spectra. Additionally the absorption and excitation spectra were measured. The main parameters of the Judd-Ofelt analysis were calculated and comparison of the obtained results with corresponding data for other materials was carried out.

  7. Specific features of Tm3+ doped BiB3O6 glasses fluorescence spectra and their kinetics.

    PubMed

    Majchrowski, A; Jaroszewicz, L; Kuznik, W; Brik, M G; Klosowicz, S; Kityk, I V

    2012-02-15

    Synthesis and spectral fluorescent features of the thulium-doped BiB(3)O(6) glasses are presented. All spectra were recorded using a pulsed (pulse energy ca. 1μJ, pulse duration 10ns) 355nm third harmonic of 10kHz Nd:YAG laser as an excitation source. A laser beam was focused in a backscattering geometry onto about 1mm(2) spot on the surface of a sample. The Andor SR-303i spectrograph equipped with an Andor DH-501 intensified charge coupled device with spectral resolution up to 1nm was used as a spectra recorder. The time-resolution of this system can be as low as 5ns. The decay kinetics was derived from integrated time-resolved spectra. Additionally the absorption and excitation spectra were measured. The main parameters of the Judd-Ofelt analysis were calculated and comparison of the obtained results with corresponding data for other materials was carried out.

  8. Theoretical studies on the vibrationally-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectra of H-Pyrene+ and H-Coronene+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, JunFeng; Tian, GuanJun; Luo, Yi; Cao, ZeXing

    2015-11-01

    H-Pyrene+ and H-Coronene+ are important carrier candidates for the diffuse interstellar band. In order to understand the observed absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of H-Pyrene+ and H-Coronene+, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method and Franck-Condon approximation have been employed to simulate the corresponding vibrationally-resolved optical spectra. For H-Pyrene+, the calculated absorption, emission and 0-0 band energies are in good agreement with the experimental values. The strong absorption and emission vibrational peaks near the 0-0 band match well with the experiment peaks. A noticeable deviation for several weak peaks far away from the origin band is observed, as a result of the vibronic coupling with other excited states. For H-Coronene+, the predicted vibrationally resolved electronic absorption and emission spectra resemble very well their experimental counterparts spectra, allowing to fully assign the observed vibronic peaks.

  9. In vivo kinetics and spectra of 5-aminolaevulinic acid-induced fluorescence in an amelanotic melanoma of the hamster.

    PubMed Central

    Abels, C.; Heil, P.; Dellian, M.; Kuhnle, G. E.; Baumgartner, R.; Goetz, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    For successful photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and effective photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the clinically used 'photosensitiser' 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA), knowledge of the maximal fluorescence intensity and of the maximal tumour-host tissue fluorescence ratio following systemic or local application is required. Therefore, time course and type of porphyrin accumulation were investigated in neoplastic and surrounding host tissue by measuring the kinetics and spectra of ALA-induced fluorescence in vivo. Experiments were performed in the amelanotic melanoma A-Mel-3 grown in the dorsal skinfold chamber preparation of Syrian golden hamsters. The kinetics of fluorescent porphyrins was quantified up to 24 h after i.v. injection of 100 mg kg-1, 500 mg kg-1 or 1,000 mg kg-1 body weight ALA by intravital fluorescence microscopy and digital image analysis (n = 18). In separate experiments fluorescence spectra were obtained for each dose by a simultaneous optical multichannel analysing device (n = 3). A three-compartment model was developed to simulate fluorescence kinetics in tumours. Maximal fluorescence intensity (per cent of reference standard; mean +/- s.e.) in the tumour arose 150 min post injection (p.i.) (1,000 mg kg-1, 109 +/- 34%; 500 mg kg-1, 148 +/- 36%) and 120 min p.i. (100 mg kg-1, 16 +/- 8%). The fluorescence in the surrounding host tissue was far less and reached its maximum at 240 min (100 mg kg-1, 6 +/- 3%) and 360 min p.i. (500 mg kg-1, 50 +/- 8%) and (1,000 mg kg-1, 6 +/- 19%). Maximal tumour-host tissue ratio (90:1) was encountered at 90 min after injection of 500 mg kg-1. The spectra of tissue fluorescence showed maxima at 637 nm and 704 nm respectively. After 300 min (host tissue) and 360 min (tumour tissue) additional emission bands at 618 nm and 678 nm were detected. These bands indicate the presence of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) and of another porphyrin species in the tumour not identified yet. Tumour selectivity of ALA-induced PPIX accumulation

  10. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  11. Electronic spectra of 2- and 3-tolunitrile in the gas phase. II. Geometry changes from Franck-Condon fits of fluorescence emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Gmerek, Felix; Stuhlmann, Benjamin; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-02-28

    We determined the changes of the geometries of 2- and 3-tolunitrile upon excitation to the lowest excited singlet states from Franck-Condon fits of the vibronic intensities in several fluorescence emission spectra and of the rotational constant changes upon excitation. These structural changes can be connected to the altered electron distribution in the molecules and are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. We show how the torsional barriers of the methyl groups in both components are used as probe of the molecular changes upon electronic excitation.

  12. Electronic spectra of 2- and 3-tolunitrile in the gas phase. II. Geometry changes from Franck-Condon fits of fluorescence emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmerek, Felix; Stuhlmann, Benjamin; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W.; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We determined the changes of the geometries of 2- and 3-tolunitrile upon excitation to the lowest excited singlet states from Franck-Condon fits of the vibronic intensities in several fluorescence emission spectra and of the rotational constant changes upon excitation. These structural changes can be connected to the altered electron distribution in the molecules and are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. We show how the torsional barriers of the methyl groups in both components are used as probe of the molecular changes upon electronic excitation.

  13. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  14. Using violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for crop yield assessment of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Tetteh, Jonathan P.

    2004-07-01

    The use of violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra to monitor the growth of five varieties of cowpea in the University of Cape Coast Botanical Garden is presented. Radiation from a continuous-wave violet laser diode emitting at 396 nm through a fibre is closely incident on in vivo leaves of cowpea to excite chlorophyll fluorescence, which is detected by an integrated spectrometer with CCD readout. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra with peaks at 683 and 731 nm were used for growth monitoring of the cowpea plants over three weeks and analysed using Gaussian spectral functions with curve fitted parameters to determine the peak positions, area under the spectral curve and the intensity ratio F683/F731. The variation in the intensity ratio of the chlorophyll bands showed sensitive changes indicating the photosynthetic activity of the cowpea varieties. A discussion of the fluorescence result as compared to conventional assessment is presented with regard to discrimination between the cowpea varieties in terms of crop yield performance.

  15. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  16. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-01-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters. PMID:27181496

  17. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra.

    PubMed

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I; Er, Ali O; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A

    2016-05-16

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  18. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  19. Effects of p67phox on the mitochondrial oxidative state in the kidney of Dahl salt-sensitive rats: optical fluorescence 3-D cryoimaging.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, F; Ghanian, Z; Yang, C; Zheleznova, N N; Kurth, T; Dash, R K; Cowley, A W; Ranji, M

    2015-08-15

    The goal of the present study was to quantify and correlate the contribution of the cytosolic p67(phox) subunit of NADPH oxidase 2 to mitochondrial oxidative stress in the kidneys of the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) hypertensive rat. Whole kidney redox states were uniquely assessed using a custom-designed optical fluorescence three-dimensional cryoimager to acquire multichannel signals of the intrinsic fluorophores NADH and FAD. SS rats were compared with SS rats in which the cytosolic subunit p67(phox) was rendered functionally inactive by zinc finger nuclease mutation of the gene (SS(p67phox)-null rats). Kidneys of SS rats fed a 0.4% NaCl diet exhibited significantly (P = 0.023) lower tissue redox ratio (NADH/FAD; 1.42 ± 0.06, n = 5) than SS(p67phox)-null rats (1.64 ± 0.07, n = 5), indicating reduced levels of mitochondrial electron transport chain metabolic activity and enhanced oxidative stress in SS rats. When fed a 4.0% salt diet for 21 days, both strains exhibited significantly lower tissue redox ratios (P < 0.001; SS rats: 1.03 ± 0.05, n = 9, vs. SS(p67phox)-null rats: 1.46 ± 0.04, n = 7) than when fed a 0.4% salt, but the ratio was still significantly higher in SS(p67phox) rats at the same salt level as SS rats. These results are consistent with results from previous studies that found elevated medullary interstitial fluid concentrations of superoxide and H2O2 in the medulla of SS rats. We conclude that the p67(phox) subunit of NADPH oxidase 2 plays an important role in the excess production of ROS from mitochondria in the renal medulla of the SS rat.

  20. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hyroxyflavone isolated in solid argon: fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectra and tautomer fluorescence rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, B.; Ernsting, N.P.

    1987-07-30

    The fluorescence properties of 3-hydroxyflavone isolated in solid argon at 15 K have been investigated. Upon electronic excitation the molecules undergo rapid intramolecular proton transfer. No fluorescence from the excited state of the normal form of the molecule could be detected. Perturbations due to hydrogen-bonding impurities which produce serious experimental problems in hydrocarbon glasses are largely suppressed in argon matrices. The rise of the green fluorescence of the tautomer was studied with excitation pulses of 230-fs duration and streak camera detection. An apparent tautomer fluorescence rise time of 2.7 ps was obtained by deconvolution. A comparative measurement of the dye coumarine 6 yielded an apparent fluorescence rise time of 2.5 ps, which can be entirely attributed to the group velocity dispersion of the streak camera optics. This indicates a rate constant for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone of greater than 10/sup 12/ s/sup -1/.

  1. In vivo fluorescence spectra unmixing and autofluorescence removal by sparse nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Montcuquet, Anne-Sophie; Hervé, Lionel; Navarro, Fabrice; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Mars, Jérôme I

    2011-09-01

    Fluorescence imaging locates fluorescent markers that specifically bind to targets; like tumors, markers are injected to a patient, optimally excited with near-infrared light, and located thanks to backward-emitted fluorescence analysis. To investigate thick and diffusive media, as the fluorescence signal decreases exponentially with the light travel distance, the autofluorescence of biological tissues comes to be a limiting factor. To remove autofluorescence and isolate specific fluorescence, a spectroscopic approach, based on nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), is explored. To improve results on spatially sparse markers detection, we suggest a new constrained NMF algorithm that takes sparsity constraints into account. A comparative study between both algorithms is proposed on simulated and in vivo data.

  2. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  3. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  4. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Sara; Zhou, Jianfeng; Gustafson, Johan; Zetterberg, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  5. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Sara; Zhou, Jianfeng; Gustafson, Johan; Zetterberg, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-11-16

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  6. Short-Range Characterization of the MeAr (Me=Zn, Cd) Ground-State Potentials from Fluorescence Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koperski, J.; Czajkowski, M.

    2002-04-01

    First-time observed D1(1Π)v‧=10→X0+(1Σ) fluorescence in ZnAr, and A0+(3Π)v‧=4→X0+ and D1(1Π)v‧=7,8→X0+ fluorescence in CdAr van der Waals (vdW) molecules were produced in a continuous supersonic molecular beam crossed with a pulsed dye-laser beam, following excitation of single vibronic levels. The dispersed fluorescence spectra displayed characteristic Condon internal diffraction (CID) patterns consisting of bound-free, reflection type, continuous spectra, and, in certain cases, bound-bound discrete features. An analysis of the A0+→X0+ and D1→X0+ bound-bound spectra indicates that Morse functions are adequate representations of the X0+ potential energy (PE) curves below their dissociation limits. In simulation of the A0+→X0+ and D1→X0+ bound-free spectra, the Morse, Lennard-Jones L-J(n-6), and Maitland-Smith M-S(n0,n1) functions were tested, and the respective M-S(11.3, 9.0) and M-S(10.6, 7.0) potentials were found to be good representations for the repulsive walls of the X0+ PE curves of ZnAr and CdAr, respectively, over the short range, R=2.45-4.38 Å (ZnAr) and R=2.85-4.31 Å (CdAr), of internuclear separations.

  7. Natural and anthropogenic impacts on biogeochemical cycle in Yangtze River basin: Source, transformation and fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM) characterized by 3-D fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Shuchai; Wu, Ying; Bao, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing

    2013-04-01

    Inland waters play an important role in the global carbon cycle as reactors for DOM cycling, transformation and transportation. With large amounts of terrestrial DOM, the Yangtze River is vital for coastal environment and ecosystem. In the context of climate change, it's critical to evaluate both hydrodynamic conditions and increasing human activities' impacts on biogeochemical cycle of DOM in Yangtze River across different climatic and hydrologic regions which are poorly understood. What's more, the hydrologic condition changes caused by the Three Gorges Dam (TGD, world's largest power station in terms of installed capacity) have recently proven to be a partition factor for fluvial particle. However, it's still an enigma for dissolved matter cycle. To address those issues, this study applies EEMs combined with bulk characteristics, chlorophyll and absorption spectrum in an attempt to assess characteristics and dynamics of DOM in Yangtze River. It's a novel optical approach that could 'see' molecular structure of DOM without the limits of time-consuming and laborious molecular measurements. Combined with parallel factor analysis, 5 individual fluorescent components have been identified: 3 humic-like (H1, H2, H3) and 2 protein-like components (P1, P2). With typical bioavailability and photo-reactivity, these components suggest different sources and dynamics. On the whole, both DOC and the sum of all 5 components (? Fluo) increased remarkably from the upper reach especially to the Three Gorge Dam and thereafter remained constant (R2between DOC and - Fluo: 0.92). The protein-like components (- P) accounted for 1/4 of - Fluo with apparently weak correlations with DOC and chlorophyll, which implied that the DOM is not dominated by autochthonous production, especially for the upper reach with high concentration of total suspended matter. As for Humic-like component, increasing H1 and DOC in the TGD reservoir area implied impacts from human activities there with intercept

  8. Study on the interaction between fluoroquinolones and erythrosine by absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra and their application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Jiangtao; Liu, Shaopu; Shen, Wei

    2008-03-01

    In pH 4.4-4.5 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FLQs) including ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), levofloxacin (LEV) and lomefloxacin (LOM) could react with erythrosine (Ery) to form 1:1 ion-association complexes, which not only resulted in the changes of the absorption spectra and the quenching of fluorescence, but also resulted in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). These offered some indications of the determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by spectrophotometric, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering methods. The detection limits for fluoroquinolone antibiotics were in the range of 0.097-0.265 μg/mL for absorption methods, 0.022-0.100 μg/mL for fluorophotometry and 0.014-0.027 μg/mL for RRS method, respectively. Among them, the RRS method had the highest sensitivity. In this work, the spectral characteristics of the absorption, fluorescence and RRS, the optimum conditions of the reactions and the properties of the analytical chemistry were investigated. The methods have been successfully applied to determination of some fluoroquinolone antibiotics in human urine samples and tablets. Taking CIP-Ery system as an example, the charge distribution, the enthalpy of formation and the mean polarizability were calculated by density function theory (DFT) method. In addition, the reasons for the enhancement of scattering spectra were discussed.

  9. [The absorption and fluorescence spectra of the cyanobacterial phycobilins of cryptoendolithic lichens in the high-polar region of Antarctica].

    PubMed

    Erokhina, L G; Shatilovich, A V; Kaminskaia, O P; Gilichinskiĭ, D A

    2002-01-01

    The algologically pure cultures of the green-brown cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp. and three cyanobacteria of the genus Gloeocapsa, the blue-green Gloeocapsa sp.1, the brown Gloeocapsa sp.2, and the red-orange Gloeocapsa sp.3, were isolated from sandstones and rock fissures in the high-polar regions of Antarctica. These cyanobacteria are the most widespread phycobionts of cryptoendolithic lichens in these regions. The comparative analysis of the absorption and the second-derivative absorption spectra of the cyanobacteria revealed considerable differences in the content of chlorophyll a and in the content and composition of carotenoids and phycobiliproteins. In addition to phycocyanin, allophycocyanin, and allophycocyanin B, which were present in all of the cyanobacteria studied, Gloeocapsa sp.2 also contained phycoerythrocyanin and Gloeocapsa sp.3 phycoerythrocyanin and C-phycoerythrin (the latter pigment is typical of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria). The fluorescence spectra of Gloeocapsa sp.2 and Gloeocapsa sp.3 considerably differed from the fluorescence spectra of the other cyanobacteria as well. The data obtained suggest that various zones of the lichens may be dominated either by photoheterotrophic or photoautotrophic cyanobacterial phycobionts, which differ in the content and composition of photosynthetic pigments.

  10. Synthesis and infrared and fluorescence spectra of rare earth complexes with a novel amide-based ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Yong; Tang, Ning

    2007-04-01

    A novel amide-based open-chain crown ether, N,N'-1,3-propanediyl-bis[2-(benzyl -carbamoyl-methoxy)-benzamide] (L) and its solid complexes with rare earth nitrates and picrates have been prepared. The complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductivity and IR spectra. The fluorescence properties of the Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes in solid and in organic solvents were studied. Under the excitation of ultraviolet light, these complexes exhibit characteristic emission of europium and terbium ions. The results show that the ligand favor energy transfers to the emitting energy level of Tb(III). Some factors that influence the fluorescent intensity were also discussed.

  11. Solvent dependence of two-photon absorption spectra of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Haruko; Tayama, Ryo; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of 4‧-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone, a model chromophore of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), were measured in various solvents. The two-photon absorption band of its anionic form is markedly blue-shifted from the corresponding one-photon absorption band in all solvents. Moreover, the magnitude of the blue shift varies largely depending on the solvent, which does not accord with the assignment of the two-photon absorption band to the transitions to the vibrationally excited S1 state. Our finding is readily rationalized by considering overlapping contributions of the S1 ← S0 and S2 ← S0 transitions, suggesting the involvement of the S2 state also in two-photon fluorescence of eGFP.

  12. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of 1,5-dihydroxyanthraquinone-d2 in n-hexane at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulevich, Giulietta; Foggi, Paolo

    1987-11-01

    The fluorescence excitation, between 430 and 505 nm, and emission, between 505 and 725 nm, spectra in n-hexane of 1,5-dihydroxyanthraquinone-d0 and -d2 at 10 K have been measured. Dual excitation and emission associated to excited state proton transfer were observed. Apart from the long wavelength emission, well resolved vibrational structures were obtained. A remarkable spectral shift (684 cm-1) of the origin of the high frequency transition was observed upon deuteration. The energy gaps between the transition origins both in excitation and emission as well as the isotopic shifts of the origins, were interpreted in terms of Lippincott-Schroeder asymmetric double minimum potential functions along the OH coordinate. An extra fluorescence occurs in the low frequency range, vanishing upon deuteration. It was explained as due to the ν(OH) stretching mode of the high frequency emission enhanced via vibronic coupling between the two ground states.

  13. Research of fluorescent spectra of oleic acid-stabilized ZnSe nanocrystals based on UV light modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Licai; Bai, Zhongchen; Huang, Zhaoliang; Liao, Sha; Zhang, Zhengping

    2016-11-01

    The non-aqueous synthesized and post-preparative treatment of oleic acid (OA)-stabilized ZnSe nanocrystals were studied systematically. ZnSe nanocrystals were successfully synthesized via paraffin liquid and oleic acid system by using OA as stabilizer. Synthesized nanocrystals were characterized by means of absorption and fluorescent spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Furthermore, solutions of ZnSe nanocrystals were illuminated with UV light. The experimental results showed that the fluorescent peak was red-shifted from 445 to 510 nm. The results suggested that, when the solution under illumination, OA was removed from the surface of ZnSe nanocrystals and the surface of ZnSe nanocrystals was oxidized to ZnO nanocrystals. ZnSe/ZnO core/shell nanocrystals were formed when the solution of ZnSe nanocrystals illuminated with UV light.

  14. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  15. On Photospheric Fluorescence and the Nature of the 17.62 Angstrom Feature in Solar X-ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Greg; Kahn, S.

    1999-01-01

    The identification of the emission line feature at 17.62 Angstroms in solar x-ray spectra is re-examined. Using a Monte Carlo technique, we compute a realistic theoretical upper limit to the observed Fe L-alpha photospheric fluorescent line strength caused by irradiation from an overlying corona. These calculations demonstrate that the photospheric Fe L-alpha characteristic line is much too weak to account for the observed 17.62 Angstrom line flux. Instead, we identify this line with the configuration interaction 2s2p3p2P-2s2p6 2S transition in Fe XVIII seen in Electron Beam Ion Trap spectra and predicted in earlier theoretical work on the Fe XVIII x-ray spectrum.

  16. Time-Resolved Emission Spectra Of Tryptophan And Proteins From Frequency-Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmacineki, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1988-06-01

    We report measurements of time-resolved emission spectra of N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATA), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, residues 1-24), and of S. Nuclease. These spectra were calculated from the frequency-response of the emission, measured at several wavelengths across the emission spectra. Measurements were performed on samples not quenched and quenched by acrylamide, the latter providing additional information on the short time events. The time-resolved center-of-gravity does not decay as a single exponential. At least two spectral relaxation times are needed to account for the present data. NATA and ACTH each display relaxation times near 50 and 800 ps, which may be characteristic of exposed tryptophan residues. S. nuclease displayed slower relaxation times near 0.5 and 10 ns, which probably reflect the dynamic protein matrix which surrounds the residue.

  17. Using hyperspectral fluorescence spectra of deli commodities to select wavelengths for surveying deli food contact surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Problems with assessing the efficacy of cleaning and sanitation procedures in delicatessen departments is a recognized food safety concern. Our laboratory demonstrated that cleaning procedures in produce processing plants can be enhanced using a portable fluorescence imaging device. To explore the f...

  18. A Structural Basis for Reversible Photoswitching of Absorbance Spectra in Red Fluorescent Protein rsTagRFP

    PubMed Central

    Pletnev, Sergei; Subach, Fedor V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2012-01-01

    rsTagRFP the first monomeric red fluorescent protein with reversibly photoswitchable absorbance spectra. The switching is realized by irradiation of rsTagRFP with blue (440 nm) and yellow (567 nm) light, turning the protein fluorescence ON and OFF, respectively. It is perhaps the most useful probe in this color class that has yet been reported. Because of the photoswitchable absorbance, rsTagRFP can be used as an acceptor in photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer (pcFRET). Yellow fluorescent proteins YPet and mVenus have been demonstrated to be excellent pcFRET donors for the rsTagRFP acceptor in its fusion constructs. Analysis of X-ray structures has shown that photoswitching of rsTagRFP is accompanied by cis-trans isomerization and protonation/deprotonation of the chromophore, with the deprotonated cis- and protonated trans- isomers corresponding to its ON and OFF states. Unlike in other photoswitchable fluorescent proteins, both conformers of rsTagRFP chromophore are essentially coplanar. Two other peculiarities of the rsTagRFP chromophore are an essentially hydrophobic environment of its p-hydroxyphenyl site and the absence of direct hydrogen bonding between this moiety and the protein scaffold. The influence of the immediate environment on rsTagRFP chromophore was probed by site-directed mutagenesis. Residues Glu145 and His197 were found to participate in protonation/deprotonation of the chromophore accompanying the photoswitching of rsTagRFP fluorescence, whereas the residues Met160 and Leu174 were shown to spatially restrict chromophore isomerization, favoring its radiative decay. PMID:22310052

  19. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  20. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  1. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  2. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  3. Use of Soller slits to remove reference foil fluorescence from transmission spectra.

    PubMed

    Tse, Justin J; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J

    2011-05-01

    Measurement of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in transmission is the method of choice for strong or concentrated samples. In a typical XAS experiment above 5 keV the sample is placed between the first (I(0)) and second (I(1)) ion chambers and a standard foil is placed between the second (I(1)) and third (I(2)) ion chambers for simultaneous calibration of energy during sample analysis. However, some fluorescence from the foil may be registered in I(1), causing anomalies in the transmission signal of the sample, especially when the sample edge jump is relatively small. To remedy this, Soller slits were constructed and placed between the foil and I(1) to minimize back-fluorescence from the foil. A comparison of blank and standard samples, measured with or without Soller slits or under a worst-case scenario, demonstrates the advantages of Soller slits when analyzing weak signal samples via transmission XAS.

  4. Environmental effects on laser-induced fluorescence spectra of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vodacek, Anthony; Philpot, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laser fluorosensing can be used to monitor dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but analysis of the data can be hindered by several environmental phenomena. These phenomena include attenuation of the laser beam and differential attenuation of the fluorescence by the water column, variability in the molecular weight composition of the DOC, and temperature, pH, and metal ion effects on DOC fluorescence. These factors are discussed in terms of their effect on laboratory and remote field data analysis. Experimental results are provided. Analysis of fluorosensor data of DOC may be improved by compensating for the environmental factors. An improved methodology is discussed, and a suggestion is made for indirect monitoring of pH and metal ion concentration.

  5. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  6. Effect of CdSe nanoparticles on the fluorescence spectra of conjugate polymer P3HT: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastour, Nouha; Bouchriha, Habib

    2016-11-01

    In this work we have investigated the effect of CdSe nanoparticles (Nps) on the fluorescence spectra of conjugate polymer Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT). The fluorescence intensity is significantly decreased in both solution and solid films by the incorporation of CdSe Nps. This observed effect in the nanocomposite P3HT-CdSe is analyzed by using the Franck-Condon theory which reproduces correctly the decrease of the fluorescence with the Nps concentration and permits to reach the Huang-Rhys factor and the relaxation energy which are shown efficient to explain the fluorescence quenching.

  7. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  8. Multi-Photon Absorption Spectra: A Comparison Between Transmittance Change and Fluorescence Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0134 multi-photon absorption spectra Cleber Mendonca INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 05/21/2015 DISTRIBUTION A...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos - Universidade de Sao Paulo Av...Trabalhador Saocarlense 400 Sao Carlos, SP, 13566-590 Brazil 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Report 3 - Final 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY

  9. Decomposition of protein tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components. III. Correlation between fluorescence and microenvironment parameters of individual tryptophan residues.

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Y K; Koshevnik, Y; Burstein, E A

    2001-01-01

    In our previous paper (Reshetnyak, Ya. K., and E. A. Burstein. 2001. Biophys. J. 81:1710-1734) we confirmed the existence of five statistically discrete classes of emitting tryptophan fluorophores in proteins. The differences in fluorescence properties of tryptophan residues of these five classes reflect differences in interactions of excited states of tryptophan fluorophores with their microenvironment in proteins. Here we present a system of describing physical and structural parameters of microenvironments of tryptophan residues based on analysis of atomic crystal structures of proteins. The application of multidimensional statistical methods of cluster and discriminant analyses for the set of microenvironment parameters of 137 tryptophan residues of 48 proteins with known three-dimensional structures allowed us to 1) demonstrate the discrete nature of ensembles of structural parameters of tryptophan residues in proteins; 2) assign spectral components obtained after decomposition of tryptophan fluorescence spectra to individual tryptophan residues; 3) find a correlation between spectroscopic and physico-structural features of the microenvironment; and 4) reveal differences in structural and physical parameters of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues belonging to various spectral classes. PMID:11509384

  10. Quantification of two forms of green sulfur bacteria in their natural habitat using bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Zhiltsova, Anna A.; Lunina, Olga N.; Savvichev, Alexander S.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of phototropic organisms in their natural habitat using optical instruments operating under water is urgently needed for many tasks of ecological monitoring. While fluorescence methods are widely applied nowadays to detect and characterize phytoplankton communities, the techniques for detection and recognition of anoxygenic phototrophs are considered challenging. Differentiation of the forms of anoxygenic green sulfur bacteria in natural water using spectral techniques remains problematic. Green sulfur bacteria could be found in two forms, green-colored (containing BChl d in pigment compound) and brown-colored (containing BChl e), have the special ecological niche in such reservoirs. Separate determination of these microorganisms by spectral methods is complicated because of similarity of spectral characteristics of their pigments. We describe the novel technique of quantification of two forms of green sulfur bacteria directly in water using bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence without pigment extraction. This technique is noninvasive and could be applied in remote mode in the water bodies with restricted water circulation to determine simultaneously concentrations of two forms of green sulfur bacteria in their natural habitat.

  11. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  12. Assessment of the Fluorescence Spectra Characteristics of Dissolved Organic Matter Derived from Organic Waste Composting Based on Projection Pursuit Classification (PPC).

    PubMed

    Wei, Zi-min; Wang, Xing-lei; Pan, Hong-wei; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xin-yu; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Lin-xue; Zhao, Tao-zhi

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of fluorescence spectra of dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from composting is one of the key ways to assess the compost maturity. However, the existing methods mainly focus on the qualitative description for the humification degree of compost. In this paper, projection pursuit classification (PPC) was conducted to quantitative assess the grades of compost maturity, based on the characteristics of fluorescence spectra of DOM. Eight organic wastes (chicken manure, swine manure, kitchen waste, lawn waste, fruits and vegetables waste, straw, green waste, and municipal solid waste) composting were conducted, the germination percentage (GI) and fluorescence spectra of DOM were measured during composting. Statistic analysis with all fluorescence parameters of DOM indicated that I436/I383 (a ratio between the fluorescence intensities at 436 and 383 nm in excitation spectra), FLR (an area ratio between fulvic-like region from 308 to 363 nm and total region in emission spectra), P(HA/Pro) (a regional integration ratio between humic acid-like region to protein-like region in excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectra), A4/A1 (an area ratio of the last quarter to the first quarter in emission spectra), r(A,C) (a ratio between the fluorescence intensities of peak A and peak C in EEM spectra) were correlated with each other (p < 0.01), suggesting that this fluorescence parameters could be considered as comprehensive evaluation index system of PPC. Subsequently, the four degrades of compost maturity included the best degree of maturity (I, GI > 80%), better degree of compost maturity (II, 60% < GI < 80%), maturity (III, 50% < GI < 60%), and immaturity (IV, GI < 50%) were divided according the GI value during composting. The corresponding fluorescence parameter values were calculated at each degrade of compost maturity. Then the projection values were calculated based on PPC considering the above fluorescence parameter values. The projection value was 2

  13. Absorption, Fluorescence and Emission Anisotropy Spectra of 4-Cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline in Different Media and at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Piszczek, G.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of temperature on fluorescence and emission anisotropy spectra of 4-cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline (CDMA) was investigated in viscous (glycerol and paraffin oil) and rigid (polyvinyl alcohol) PVA and polyvinyl chloride) PVC) media. A strong effect of temperature on the intensity of a and b emission bands was observed. It was also found that the emission anisotropy, r, does not vary in the longwave emission band a at a fixed temperature but decreases in the emission band b together with the decreasing wavelength. The latter effect is due to the fact that the transition moment in this band is perpendicular to the long axis of the CDMA molecule. For CDMA in paraffin oil, a normal b band with negative emission anisotropy only occurs. In all other media used, the emission anisotropy has lower values, approaching zero, which results from the considerable covering of band b with a broad emission band a.

  14. Non-Destructive Observation of the Laser Treatment Effect on Historical Paper via the Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, K.; Sliwinski, G.

    The fluorescence spectra of historical and model paper samples, previously irradiated with the laser beam at wavelengths of 1,064, 532, 355, and 266 nm, are recorded under excitation at 266 nm, and the nonirradiated samples are used for reference. The spectral profiles obtained for the laser-treated model papers made of cotton and/or linen only reveal differences compared to the reference ones. After irradiation at 532 and 1,064 nm, a decrease of the band intensities of the entire spectral profile is observed. In contrary, the UV irradiation at 355nm of the same samples results in the increase of bands centered at 341 and 370nm compared to the visible region only. Prolonged treatment at 266nm results in the marked increase of band intensities in the visible region and corresponds to the independently observed yellowing.

  15. Temperature measurements using a projection to latent structures of fluorescence spectra of potassium-aluminum borate glasses with copper-containing molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkina, A. N.; Khodasevich, M. A.; Shirshnev, P. S.

    2017-02-01

    Luminescence spectra of a potassium-aluminum borate glass with copper-containing molecular clusters are presented in the temperature range of 295-624 K. Two methods of temperature measurement are compared with the aim of evaluating the possibility of their further application in optical temperature sensors: specifically, the classical method of measuring a temperature based on the spectral position of the fluorescence band peak and the measurement method based on projection to latent structures of fluorescence spectra in the visible range. It is shown that, concerning the accuracy of measuring a temperature, the fourdimensional space of latent structures is preferred for the case under consideration; it allows one to determine (using a training set of fluorescence spectra) a temperature with the relative error of no more than 1.2%.

  16. Hydroxylated fluorescent dyes for live cell labeling: synthesis, spectra and superresolution STED** microscopy.

    PubMed

    Belov, Vladimir N; Butkevich, Alexey N; Kolmakov, Kirill; Sokolov, Viktor V; Shojaei, Heydar; Sidenstein, Sven C; Kamin, Dirk; Matthias, Jessica; Vlijm, Rifka; Engelhardt, Johann; Hell, Stefan W

    2017-03-29

    Hydroxylated rhodamines, carbopyronines, silico- and germanorhodamines with absorption maxima in the range of 530-640 nm were prepared and applied in specific labeling of living cells. The direct and high-yielding entry to germa- and silaxanthones tolerates the presence of protected heteroatoms and may be considered for the syntheses of various sila- and germafluoresceins, as well as -rhodols. Application in stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy revealed a resolution of 50-75 nm in one- and two-color imaging of vimentin-HaloTag fused protein and native tubulin. The established structure-property relationships allow prediction of the spectral properties and the positions of spirolactone/zwitterion equilibria for the new analogs of rhodamines, carbo-, silico- and germanorhodamines using simple additive schemes.

  17. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. 1: Iron line fluorescence from a subrelativistic shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1 was observed in the energy range 2-24 keV from August 29 to September 3, 1975. A broad iron line feature is observed in the normal high state spectrum. The line equivalent width is given along with its full-width-half-maximum energy. Iron line fluorescence from an opaque, cool shell of material at the Alfven surface provides the necessary luminosity in this feature. The line energy width can be due to Doppler broadening if the shell is forced to corotate with the pulsar at a radius 800 million cm. Implications of this model regarding physical conditions near Her X-1 are discussed.

  18. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. I - Iron line fluorescence from a subrelativistic shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Her X-1 was observed in the energy range from 2 to 24 keV from August 29 to September 3, 1975. Emission features are observed near the K-alpha iron-line energy which exhibit both broadening and a double line structure. The total luminosity in these features is about 4 by 10 to the 35th power ergs/s. Iron line fluorescence from an opaque cool (not exceeding 1 million K) shell of material at the Alfven surface provides the necessary luminosity in this feature. The double line structure and the line energy width can be due to Doppler shifts if the shell is forced to corotate with the pulsar at a radius of at least 800 million cm. Implications of this model regarding physical conditions near Her X-1 are discussed.

  19. UV and fluorescent spectra study the reaction between 1, 8-Naphthalimide derivative and hypochlorite their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Liu, Tao; Huo, Fangjun; Chao, Jianbin; Zhang, Yongbin; Yin, Caixia

    2017-03-01

    Two simple, efficient turn-on fluorescent probes for hypochlorite have been rationally designed and developed by utilizing the oxidation of hypochlorite. Notably, probe 1 and 2 displayed rapid and remarkable turn-on responses to ClO- in PBS buffer solution (pH 7.4). Further, the optical properties of two probes and their ClO--addition products were confirmed by density functional theory calculations. And detection limits of two probes for ClO- based on the definition by IUPAC were calculated for 2.882 nM and 0.354 μM. More importantly, cell imaging experiments demonstrated that probe 1 was more suitable for detecting the ClO- in living A549 cells. And both two probes had the possibility of potentially applied in practical applications such as detecting the hypochlorite concentration of tap water and river water.

  20. Modeling cellular processes in 3D.

    PubMed

    Mogilner, Alex; Odde, David

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in photonic imaging and fluorescent protein technology offer unprecedented views of molecular space-time dynamics in living cells. At the same time, advances in computing hardware and software enable modeling of ever more complex systems, from global climate to cell division. As modeling and experiment become more closely integrated we must address the issue of modeling cellular processes in 3D. Here, we highlight recent advances related to 3D modeling in cell biology. While some processes require full 3D analysis, we suggest that others are more naturally described in 2D or 1D. Keeping the dimensionality as low as possible reduces computational time and makes models more intuitively comprehensible; however, the ability to test full 3D models will build greater confidence in models generally and remains an important emerging area of cell biological modeling.

  1. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence spectra for the monitoring of Cd toxicity in a bio-energy crop (Jatropha curcas).

    PubMed

    Marques, Marise Conceição; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo

    2013-10-05

    The vegetation of metal-contaminated soils using non-edible crops can be a safe and economical technique for Cd immobilization and the remediation of contaminated sites. Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) exhibits a relative tolerance to heavy metals and potential for biofuel production. The study was performed to monitor the Cd-induced alterations in jatropha plants by X-ray chlorophyll fluorescence. The Cd effects on photosynthetic pigments, the mineral composition of plants, defense enzyme activity and soluble proteins were also studied. Plants were grown for 20days in a nutrient solution with five Cd contents: 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40μmolL(-1); a control with no Cd addition was also monitored. The analysis of the chlorophyll fluorescence spectra allowed detecting alterations caused by Cd toxicity in the jatropha plants. The mineral composition of the plants was affected by the Cd doses; however, the Fe and Mg contents were not significantly reduced, which most likely improved the effects on the contents of the photosynthetic pigments. Because of its relative tolerance to Cd, Jatropha curcas may be a promising species to revegetate Cd-contaminated sites. Considering the long period needed to phytoremediate soils, the combination of remediation with bioenergy production could be an attractive option.

  2. Excited state dipole moments of N, N-dimethylaniline from thermochromic effect on electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of temperature on absorption and fluorescence spectra of N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA) in ethyl acetate has been studied for temperature ranging from 293 to 388 K. The permittivity ɛ and refractive index n of the solvent decrease with temperature increase and the absorption and fluorescence bands are blue shifted (so-called "thermochromic shift"). Based on this phenomenon, the dipole moment μe in the excited singlet state and the Onsager interaction radius a for DMA were determined using the Bilot and Kawski theory [L. Bilot, A. Kawski, Z. Naturforsch. 17a (1962) 621; 18a (1963) 10, 256]. For the known dipole moment in the ground state μg = 1.61 D and for α/ a3 = 0.54 ( α is the polarizability of the solute) the average value of μe = 3.55 D and a = 3.1 Å were determined. The obtained values for DMA are compared with the experimental values determined by other authors.

  3. Determination of the in vivo redox potential using roGFP and fluorescence spectra obtained from one-wavelength excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierer, S.; Elgass, K.; Bieker, S.; Zentgraf, U.; Meixner, A. J.; Schleifenbaum, F.

    2011-02-01

    The analysis of molecular processes in living (plant) cells such as signal transduction, DNA replication, carbon metabolism and senescence has been revolutionized by the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants as specific cellular markers. Many cell biological processes are accompanied by changes in the intracellular redox potential. To monitor the redox potential, a redox-sensitive mutant of GFP (roGFP) was created, which shows changes in its optical properties in response to changes in the redox state of its surrounding medium. For a quantitative analysis in living systems, it is essential to know the optical properties of roGFP in vitro. Therefore, we applied spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on purified roGFP exposed to different redox potentials to determine shifts in both the absorption and the emission spectra of roGFP. Based on these in vitro findings, we introduce a new approach using one-wavelength excitation to use roGFP for the in vivo analysis of cell biological processes. We demonstrate the ability this technique by investigating chloroplast-located Grx1-roGFP2 expressing Arabidopsis thaliana cells as example for dynamically moving intracellular compartments. This is not possible with the two-wavelength excitation technique established so far, which hampers a quantitative analysis of highly mobile samples due to the time delay between the two measurements and the consequential displacement of the investigated area.

  4. A novel quantitative analysis method of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra for vegetable oils contents in edible blend oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Yu-Tian; Liu, Xiao-Fei

    2015-04-01

    Edible blend oil is a mixture of vegetable oils. Eligible blend oil can meet the daily need of two essential fatty acids for human to achieve the balanced nutrition. Each vegetable oil has its different composition, so vegetable oils contents in edible blend oil determine nutritional components in blend oil. A high-precision quantitative analysis method to detect the vegetable oils contents in blend oil is necessary to ensure balanced nutrition for human being. Three-dimensional fluorescence technique is high selectivity, high sensitivity, and high-efficiency. Efficiency extraction and full use of information in tree-dimensional fluorescence spectra will improve the accuracy of the measurement. A novel quantitative analysis is proposed based on Quasi-Monte-Carlo integral to improve the measurement sensitivity and reduce the random error. Partial least squares method is used to solve nonlinear equations to avoid the effect of multicollinearity. The recovery rates of blend oil mixed by peanut oil, soybean oil and sunflower are calculated to verify the accuracy of the method, which are increased, compared the linear method used commonly for component concentration measurement.

  5. CdSe/ZnS quantum dot fluorescence spectra shape-based thermometry via neural network reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Troy; Liu, Liwang; Glorieux, Christ; Ban, Heng

    2016-06-01

    As a system of interest gets small, due to the influence of the sensor mass and heat leaks through the sensor contacts, thermal characterization by means of contact temperature measurements becomes cumbersome. Non-contact temperature measurement offers a suitable alternative, provided a reliable relationship between the temperature and the detected signal is available. In this work, exploiting the temperature dependence of their fluorescence spectrum, the use of quantum dots as thermomarkers on the surface of a fiber of interest is demonstrated. The performance is assessed of a series of neural networks that use different spectral shape characteristics as inputs (peak-based—peak intensity, peak wavelength; shape-based—integrated intensity, their ratio, full-width half maximum, peak normalized intensity at certain wavelengths, and summation of intensity over several spectral bands) and that yield at their output the fiber temperature in the optically probed area on a spider silk fiber. Starting from neural networks trained on fluorescence spectra acquired in steady state temperature conditions, numerical simulations are performed to assess the quality of the reconstruction of dynamical temperature changes that are photothermally induced by illuminating the fiber with periodically intensity-modulated light. Comparison of the five neural networks investigated to multiple types of curve fits showed that using neural networks trained on a combination of the spectral characteristics improves the accuracy over use of a single independent input, with the greatest accuracy observed for inputs that included both intensity-based measurements (peak intensity) and shape-based measurements (normalized intensity at multiple wavelengths), with an ultimate accuracy of 0.29 K via numerical simulation based on experimental observations. The implications are that quantum dots can be used as a more stable and accurate fluorescence thermometer for solid materials and that use of

  6. Synchrotron-radiation study of weak fluorescence from neat liquids of simple alkenes: Anomalous excitation spectra as evidence for wavelength-dependent photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshihisa; Daino, Yoshihiko; Tai, Akira; Hakushi, Tadao ); Okada, Tadashi )

    1989-07-19

    Fluorescence excitation spectra of trans-2-octene, trans-cyclooctene, 2-methyl-2-butene, and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene were measured by using synchrotron radiation as a tunable light source in the vacuum UV and UV region. The wavelength dependence of the fluorescence yields provides direct evidence for the long-proposed assignment that the emissive state is the {pi},R(3s) Rydberg state, which in turn gives the carbene-derived photoproducts.

  7. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  8. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  9. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  10. Quantitative measurement of PM10 by means of X-ray fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busetto, E.; Peloi, M.; Rebuffi, L.; Tefouet Kana, E.

    2013-05-01

    We developed an automatic device able to sample and analyze in situ and in real time airborne particulate matter (PM) using the X-ray fluorescence of the chemical species layered on a filter, having atomic numbers between 19 (Potassium) and 82 (Lead). Furthermore, we developed a calibration technique, which gives the parameters for real time automatic determination of the absolute mass of the chemical species present on the sample, with a sensitivity varying from 1 to 100 μg per sample. Our system could represent a simpler alternative to the complex and sophisticated laboratory measurements, such as Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) or Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES), officially used by environmental agencies. A 6 month in-situ test, carried out in collaboration with the local Regional Environmental Agency, showed that our system gives results comparable with the ones obtained using existing techniques, but with smaller errors. The methodology developed has been submitted for a patent.

  11. How to Collect National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Traceable Fluorescence Excitation and Emission Spectra.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Adam Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary spectrofluorimeters comprise exciting light sources, excitation and emission monochromators, and detectors that without correction yield data not conforming to an ideal spectral response. The correction of the spectral properties of the exciting and emission light paths first requires calibration of the wavelength and spectral accuracy. The exciting beam path can be corrected up to the sample position using a spectrally corrected reference detection system. The corrected reference response accounts for both the spectral intensity and drift of the exciting light source relative to emission and/or transmission detector responses. The emission detection path must also be corrected for the combined spectral bias of the sample compartment optics, emission monochromator, and detector. There are several crucial issues associated with both excitation and emission correction including the requirement to account for spectral band-pass and resolution, optical band-pass or neutral density filters, and the position and direction of polarizing elements in the light paths. In addition, secondary correction factors are described including (1) subtraction of the solvent's fluorescence background, (2) removal of Rayleigh and Raman scattering lines, as well as (3) correcting for sample concentration-dependent inner-filter effects. The importance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable calibration and correction protocols is explained in light of valid intra- and interlaboratory studies and effective spectral qualitative and quantitative analyses including multivariate spectral modeling.

  12. Towards understanding the stabilization process in vermicomposting using PARAFAC analysis of fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Lv, Baoyi; Xing, Meiyan; Zhao, Chunhui; Yang, Jian; Xiang, Liang

    2014-12-01

    In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was employed to trace the behavior of water extractable organic matter and assess the stabilization process during vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cattle dung. Experiments using different mixing ratios of sewage sludge and cattle dung were conducted using Eisenia fetida. The results showed that vermicomposting reduced the DOC, DOC/DON ratio and ammonia, while increased the nitrate content. A three-component model containing two humic-like materials (components 1 and 2) and a protein-like material (component 3) was successfully developed using PARAFAC analysis. Moreover, the initial waste composition had a significant effect on the distribution of each component and the addition of cattle dung improved the stability of sewage sludge in vermicomposting. The PARAFAC results also indicated that protein-like materials were degraded and humic acid-like compounds were evolved during vermicomposting. Pearson correlation analysis showed that components 2 and 3 are more suitable to assess vermicompost maturity than component 1. In all, EEM-PARAFAC can be used to track organic transformation and assess biological stability during the vermicomposting process.

  13. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  14. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  16. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  17. Analysis of the 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f-5g supermultiplet of Fe I in laboratory and solar infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, S.; Nave, G.; Geller, M.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.; Schoenfeld, W. G.; Change, E. S.; Farmer, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    The combined laboratory and solar analysis of the highly excited subconfigurations 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f and 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)5g of Fe I has allowed us to classify 87 lines of the 4f-5g supermultiplet in the spectral region 2545-2585 per cm. The level structure of these JK-coupled configurations is predicted by semiempirical calculations and the quardrupolic approximation. Semiempirical gf-values have been calculated and are compared to gf-values derived from the solar spectrum. The solar analysis has shown that these lines, which should be much less sensitive than lower excitation lines to departures from Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) and to temperature uncertanties, lead to a solar abundance of iron which is consistent with the meteoritic value (A(sub Fe) = 7.51).

  18. Time-dependent distribution functions and resulting synthetic NPA spectra in C-Mod calculated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA full-wave, and DC Lorentz codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.

    2015-12-01

    A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed TCRF power is made obtaining minority hydrogen ion distributions with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. Cyclotron-resonant TCRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full wave code. The RF diffusion coefficients used in CQL3D are obtained with the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code for perturbed particle trajectories in the combined equilibrium and TCRF electromagnetic fields. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL3D/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, and this substantially increased the rampup rate of the observed vertically-viewed neutral particle analyzer (NPA) flux, in general agreement with experiment. However, ramp down of the NPA flux after the pulse, remained long compared to the experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these new effects on the the NPA time-dependence.

  19. The composition of Saturn's atmosphere at northern temperate latitudes from Voyager IRIS spectra - NH3, PH3, C2H2, C2H6, CH3D, CH4, and the Saturnian D/H isotopic ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courtin, R.; Gautier, D.; Marten, A.; Bezard, B.; Hanel, R.

    1984-01-01

    The vertical distributions and mixing ratios of minor constituents in the northern hemisphere of Saturn are investigated. Results are obtained for NH3, PH3, C2H2, C2H6, CH3D, and CH4; the D/H ratio is obtained from the CH4 and CH3D abundances. The NH3 mixing ratio in the upper atmosphere is found to be compatible with the saturated partial pressure. The inferred PH3/H2 ratio of 1.4 + or - 0.8 x 10 to the -6th is higher than the value derived from the solar P/H ratio. The stratospheric C2H2/H2 and C2H6/H2 ratios are, respectively, 2.1 + or - 1.4 x 10 to the -7th and 3.0 + or - 1.1 x 10 to the -6th; the latter decreases sharply below the 20-50 mbar level. The results for CH3D/H2 and CH4/H2 imply an enrichment of Saturn's upper atmosphere in carbon by a factor of at least three over the solar abundance. The interpretation of two NH3 lines in the five-micron window suggests a NH3/H2 ratio at the two bar level below the solar value.

  20. Distinguishing Micron-Sized UO2, UO3, etc. Particles from Other Common Mineral Particles by Single-Shot Fluorescence Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, J.E.

    2003-02-05

    An optical system for detecting the single-shot fluorescence spectrum from a single flowing particle was built. With this system, the single-shot fluorescence spectrum was observed from an individual UO3 particle around 50 um in diameter. The fluorescence spectra from UO2, UO3, U3O8 were centered around 520 nm when excited by a 266 nm or 355 nm laser. The fluorescence spectra from UOx showed different peak wavelengths and different spectral profiles from those of SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, CdO, CrO3, Cr2O3, FeO, Fe2O3, Li2O, PbO, PbO2, and Pb3O4, which could be the main interfering mineral-oxide particles. These differences provide the possibility of a quick and simple method for distinguishing UO2, UO3, U3O8, and other uranium oxide particles from many common mineral-oxide particles. By measuring single-shot, single-particle fluorescence spectra, it also may be possible to monitor the ambient aerosols that are contaminated with uranium oxide in the respiratory size aerosols (1-10 um in diameter).

  1. FLUORESCENCE EMISSION SPECTRA OF MARINE AND BRACKISH-WATER ECOTYPES OF FUCUS VESICULOSUS AND FUCUS RADICANS (PHAEOPHYCEAE) REVEAL DIFFERENCES IN LIGHT-HARVESTING APPARATUS(1).

    PubMed

    Maria Gylle, Anna; Rantamäki, Susanne; Ekelund, Nils G A; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2011-02-01

    The Bothnian Sea in the northerly part of the Baltic Sea is a geologically recent brackish-water environment, and rapid speciation is occurring in the algal community of the Bothnian Sea. We measured low-temperature fluorescence emission spectra from the Bothnian Sea and the Norwegian Sea ecotypes of Fucus vesiculosus L., a marine macroalga widespread in the Bothnian Sea. Powdered, frozen thallus was used to obtain undistorted emission spectra. The spectra were compared with spectra measured from the newly identified species Fucus radicans Bergström et L. Kautsky, which is a close relative of F. vesiculosus and endemic to the Bothnian Sea. The spectrum of variable fluorescence was used to identify fluorescence peaks originating in PSI and PSII in this chl c-containing alga. The spectra revealed much higher PSII emission, compared to PSI emission, in the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus than in F. radicans or in the Norwegian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus. The results suggest that more light-harvesting chl a/c proteins serve PSII in the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus than in the two other algal strains. Treatment of the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus in high salinity (10, 20, and 35 practical salinity units) for 1 week did not lead to spectral changes, indicating that the measured features of the Bothnian Sea F. vesiculosus are stable and not simply a direct result of exposure to low salinity.

  2. Franck-Condon factors perturbed by damped harmonic oscillators: Solvent enhanced X 1Ag ↔ A1B1u absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen-Wen; Yang, Ling; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Yu, Jian-Guo; Lin, Sheng-Hsien

    2014-08-01

    Damped harmonic oscillators are utilized to calculate Franck-Condon factors within displaced harmonic oscillator approximation. This is practically done by scaling unperturbed Hessian matrix that represents local modes of force constants for molecule in gaseous phase, and then by diagonalizing perturbed Hessian matrix it results in direct modification of Huang-Rhys factors which represent normal modes of solute molecule perturbed by solvent environment. Scaling parameters are empirically introduced for simulating absorption and fluorescence spectra of an isolated solute molecule in solution. The present method is especially useful for simulating vibronic spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in which hydrogen atom vibrations in solution can be scaled equally, namely the same scaling factor being applied to all hydrogen atoms in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present method is demonstrated in simulating solvent enhanced X 1Ag ↔ A1B1u absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene (medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) in benzene solution. It is found that one of six active normal modes v10 is actually responsible to the solvent enhancement of spectra observed in experiment. Simulations from all functionals (TD) B3LYP, (TD) B3LYP35, (TD) B3LYP50, and (TD) B3LYP100 draw the same conclusion. Hence, the present method is able to adequately reproduce experimental absorption and fluorescence spectra in both gas and solution phases.

  3. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  4. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  5. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  6. Solvent Effects on the Electronic Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of HNP: Estimation of Ground and Excited State Dipole Moments.

    PubMed

    Desai, Vani R; Hunagund, Shirajahammad M; Basanagouda, Mahantesha; Kadadevarmath, Jagadish S; Sidarai, Ashok H

    2016-07-01

    We report the effect of solvents on absorption and fluorescence spectra of biologically active 3(2H)-pyridazinone namely 5-(2-hydroxy-naphthalen-1-yl)-2-phenyl-2H-pyridazin-3-one (HNP) in different solvents at room temperature. The ground and the excited state dipole moments of HNP molecule was estimated from Lippert's, Bakshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's equations using the solvatochromic shift method. The ground state dipole moment (μ g ) was also estimated by Guggenheim and Higasi method using the dielectric constant and refractive index of solute at different concentrations, the μ g value obtained from these two methods are comparable to the μ g value obtained by the solvatochromic shift method. The excited state dipole moment (μ e ) is greater than the ground state dipole moment (μ g ), which indicates that the excited state is more polar than the ground state. Further, we have evaluated the change in dipole moment (Δμ) from the solvatochromic shift method and on the basis of molecular-microscopic solvent polarity parameter[Formula: see text], later on the values were compared.

  7. Spectroradiometric characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    Spectroradiometric measurements have been made for the experimental characterization of the RGB channels of autostereoscopic 3D displays, giving results for different measurement angles with respect to the normal direction of the plane of the display. In the study, 2 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and resolutions were used, making measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). From the measurements made, goniometric results were recorded for luminance contrast, and the fundamental hypotheses have been evaluated for the characterization of the displays: independence of the RGB channels and their constancy. The results show that the display with the lower angle variability in the contrast-ratio value and constancy of the chromaticity coordinates nevertheless presented the greatest additivity deviations with the measurement angle. For both displays, when the parameters evaluated were taken into account, lower angle variability consistently resulted in the 2D mode than in the 3D mode.

  8. Anharmonic Franck-Condon simulation of the absorption and fluorescence spectra for the low-lying S1 and S2 excited states of pyridine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Yu, Jian-Guo; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2009-12-31

    Anharmonic effects of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of pyridine molecule are studied and analyzed for the two-low lying singlet excited states S(1)((1)B(1)) and S(2)((1)B(2)). The complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method is utilized to compute equilibrium geometries and all 27 vibrational normal-mode frequencies for the ground state and the two excited states. The present calculations show that the frequency differences between the ground and two excited states are small for the ten totally symmetric vibrational modes so that the displaced oscillator approximation can be used for spectrum simulations. The Franck-Condon factors within harmonic approximation basically grasp the main features of molecular spectra, but simulated 0-0 transition energy position and spectrum band shapes are not satisfactorily good for S(1)((1)B(1)) absorption and fluorescence spectra in comparison with experiment observation. As the first-order anharmonic correction added to Franck-Condon factors, both spectrum positions and band shapes can be simultaneously improved for both absorption and fluorescence spectra. It is concluded that the present anharmonic correction produces a significant dynamic shifts for spectrum positions and improves spectrum band shapes as well. The detailed structures of absorption spectrum of S(2)((1)B(2)) state observed from experiment can be also reproduced with anharmonic Franck-Condon simulation, and these were not shown in the harmonic Franck-Condon simulation with either distorted or Duschinsky effects in the literature.

  9. Crystal momentum dependence of the correlation satellite intensity in the 3p → 3d resonant photoemission spectra of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 + δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoni, A.; Corradini, V.; del Pennino, U.; Sangalli, P.; Parmigiani, F.; Avila, J.; Teodorescu, C.

    2000-05-01

    Angle-resolved resonant photoemission measurements at the Cu3p → Cu3d threshold have been performed on the superconducting cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 + δ. We have investigated in particular the correlation satellite appearing in the valence band photoemission spectrum to investigate the effect of solid state on the interference effect occurring at resonance. We found that the intensity of the correlation satellite changes with the electron take-off angle in a way that depends on the particular crystallographic direction and on the sample hole doping. These results indicate that the intensity enhancement at the absorption edge is a real resonance albeit the intermediate state in the autoionization process is partly delocalised. This fact does not prevent the occurrence of interference between indirect and direct photoemission.

  10. Feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Voormolen, M M; Bouakaz, A; Krenning, B J; Lancée, C T; ten Cate, F J; de Jong, N

    2004-04-01

    Improved endocardial border delineation with the application of contrast agents should allow for less complex and faster tracing algorithms for left ventricular volume analysis. We developed a fast rotating phased array transducer for 3D imaging of the heart with harmonic capabilities making it suitable for contrast imaging. In this study the feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging is evaluated in vitro. A commercially available tissue mimicking flow phantom was used in combination with Sonovue. Backscatter power spectra from a tissue and contrast region of interest were calculated from recorded radio frequency data. The spectra and the extracted contrast to tissue ratio from these spectra were used to optimize the excitation frequency, the pulse length and the receive filter settings of the transducer. Frequencies ranging from 1.66 to 2.35 MHz and pulse lengths of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 cycles were explored. An increase of more than 15 dB in the contrast to tissue ratio was found around the second harmonic compared with the fundamental level at an optimal excitation frequency of 1.74 MHz and a pulse length of 2.5 cycles. Using the optimal settings for 3D harmonic contrast recordings volume measurements of a left ventricular shaped agar phantom were performed. Without contrast the extracted volume data resulted in a volume error of 1.5%, with contrast an accuracy of 3.8% was achieved. The results show the feasibility of accurate volume measurements from 3D harmonic contrast images. Further investigations will include the clinical evaluation of the presented technique for improved assessment of the heart.

  11. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  12. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  13. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  14. Precision frequency measurements of He,43 2 3P→3 3D transitions at 588 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Peng, Jin-Long; Hu, Jinmeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Li-Bang; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-12-01

    We report the frequency measurements of the 2 3P→3 3D transitions in He,43 at 588 nm using an optical frequency comb stabilized laser system. The Doppler-free spectra of the 2 3P→3 3D transitions are demonstrated in an rf discharged sealed-off helium cell using intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy. The measured absolute frequency of the 4He2 3P0→3 3D1 transition is 510 059 755.352(28) MHz, which is more precise than the previous measurement by two orders of magnitude. The ionization energies of the 4He2 3P0 and 2 3S1 states can be derived from our result and agree very well with the previous experimental values. More importantly, the Lamb shift of the 2 3S1 state can be deduced to be 4057.086(34) MHz, which is two times more precise than the previous result. In addition, the absolute frequencies of the 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D1,3 /2 , 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D1,1 /2 , and 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D2,3 /2 transitions in 3He are measured. Our precision surpasses the theoretical calculations by more than one to two orders of magnitude. The hyperfine separations of the 3 3D states in 3He and the frequency differences between 4He and 3He transitions are also presented.

  15. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  16. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  17. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  18. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  19. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  20. 3D Structures of Responsive Nanocompartmentalized Microgels.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, Arjan P H; Oppermann, Alex; Caumanns, Tobias; Hebbeker, Pascal; Turnhoff, Sarah K; Tiwari, Rahul; Eisold, Sabine; Simon, Ulrich; Lu, Yan; Mayer, Joachim; Richtering, Walter; Walther, Andreas; Wöll, Dominik

    2016-11-09

    Compartmentalization in soft matter is important for segregating and coordinating chemical reactions, sequestering (re)active components, and integrating multifunctionality. Advances depend crucially on quantitative 3D visualization in situ with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we show the direct visualization of different compartments within adaptive microgels using a combination of in situ electron and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. We unravel new levels of structural details and address the challenge of reconstructing 3D information from 2D projections for nonuniform soft matter as opposed to monodisperse proteins. Moreover, we visualize the thermally induced shrinkage of responsive core-shell microgels live in water. This strategy opens doors for systematic in situ studies of soft matter systems and their application as smart materials.

  1. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  2. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  3. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  4. Excitation and propagation of X-ray fluorescence through thin devices with hollowed ordered structures: comparison of experimental and theoretical spectra.

    PubMed

    Mazuritskiy, M I; Dabagov, S B; Marcelli, A; Lerer, A M; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K

    2016-01-01

    The lack of models describing the propagation of X-rays in waveguides and the interference mechanism between incident and reflected radiation waves hamper the understanding and the control of wave propagation phenomena occurring in many real systems. Here, experimental spectra collected at the exit of microchannel plates (MCPs) under the total X-ray reflection condition are presented. The results are discussed in the framework of a theoretical model in which the wave propagation is enhanced by the presence of a transition layer at the surface. The angular distributions of the propagating radiation at the exit of these MCPs with microchannels of ∼3 µm diameter will also be presented and discussed. These spectra show contributions associated with the reflection of the primary monochromatic beam and with the fluorescence radiation originating from the excitation of atoms composing the surface of the microchannel. The soft X-ray fluorescence spectra collected at the exit of microcapillaries were analyzed in the framework of a wave approximation while diffraction contributions observed at the exit of these hollow X-ray waveguides have been calculated using the Fraunhofer diffraction model for waves in the far-field domain. Data collected at the Si L-edge show that in glassy MCPs the fluorescence radiation can be detected only when the energy of the primary monochromatic radiation is above the absorption edge for grazing angles higher than half of the critical angle of the total reflection phenomenon. Experimental data and simulations of the propagating radiation represent a clear experimental confirmation of the channeling phenomenon of the excited fluorescence radiation inside a medium and point out that a high transmission can be obtained in waveguide optics for parameters relevant to X-ray imaging.

  5. The effect of atebrine and an acridine analog (BCMA) on the coenzyme fluorescence spectra of cultured melanoma and Ehrlich ascites (EL2) cells.

    PubMed

    Viallet, P; Kohen, E; Schachtschabel, D O; Marty, A; Salmon, J M; Kohen, C; Leising, H B; Thorell, B

    1978-09-15

    Coenzyme fluorescence spectra of single living cells are due to free pyridine nucleotides (folded configuration), bound pyridine nucleotides (unfolded configuration) and a third component, possibly a mixture or flavins. Such spectra can be used to recognize possible differences in coenzyme composition between cell lines or changes of metabolic pathways due to chemicals acting at levels below or above cytotoxicity, by high resolution spectrofluorometry. A study of spectra recorded from cultured Ehrlich ascites (EL2), and Harding Passey melanoma cells (HPM-67 and HPM-73 line) grown under comparable conditions, shows that free NAD(P)H predominates in HPM-67 and EL2, while this coenzyme is bound in HPM-73. The free/bound ratio may be profoundly modifed by chemicals, e.g. in the HPM-73 increase of free and decrease of bound NAD(P)H occurred upon treatment with 10(-6) oligomycin. When atebrine at levels (10(-6) M) below cytotoxicity was added, there was a decrease of the free NAD(P)H spectrum possibly through energy transfer from NAD(P)H to atebrine. Consideration of long range energy transfer i.e., excitation of atebrine by fluorescence of NAD(P)H vs. short range transfer of excitation energy from free NAD(P)H to atebrine, favors the latter mechanism. A transient (reversible) increase in atebrine fluorescence is seen following intracellular microinjection of substrate (e.g. glucose-6-P) leading to an increase in free NAD(P)H. At cytotoxic levels of atebrine (e.g 2 x 10(-5) M) an irreversible increase of atebrine fluorescence is seen. The microspectrofluorometric technique appears therefore well suited to study physiological processes at the level of intracellular coenzymes, as well as possible processes of intermolecular energy transfer in the microenvironment.

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  8. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-03-01

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  9. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  10. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    DOE PAGES

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; ...

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometermore » (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.« less

  11. Combined scanning probe nanotomography and optical microspectroscopy: a correlative technique for 3D characterization of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mochalov, Konstantin E; Efimov, Anton E; Bobrovsky, Alexey; Agapov, Igor I; Chistyakov, Anton A; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor

    2013-10-22

    Combination of 3D structural analysis with optical characterization of the same sample area on the nanoscale is a highly demanded approach in nanophotonics, materials science, and quality control of nanomaterial. We have developed a correlative microscopy technique where the 3D structure of the sample is reconstructed on the nanoscale by means of a "slice-and-view" combination of ultramicrotomy and scanning probe microscopy (scanning probe nanotomography, SPNT), and its optical characteristics are analyzed using microspectroscopy. This approach has been used to determine the direct quantitative relationship of the 3D structural characteristics of nanovolumes of materials with their microscopic optical properties. This technique has been applied to 3D structural and optical characterization of a hybrid material consisting of cholesteric liquid crystals doped with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) that can be used for photochemical patterning and image recording through the changes in the dissymmetry factor of the circular polarization of QD emission. The differences in the polarization images and fluorescent spectra of this hybrid material have proved to be correlated with the arrangement of the areas of homogeneous distribution and heterogeneous clustering of QDs. The reconstruction of the 3D nanostructure of the liquid crystal matrix in the areas of homogeneous QDs distribution has shown that QDs do not perturb the periodic planar texture of the cholesteric liquid crystal matrix, whereas QD clusters do perturb it. The combined microspectroscopy-nanotomography technique will be important for evaluating the effects of nanoparticles on the structural organization of organic and liquid crystal matrices and biomedical materials, as well as quality control of nanotechnology fabrication processes and products.

  12. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  13. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  14. The action of oxygen on chlorophyll fluorescence quenching and absorption spectra in pea thylakoid membranes under the steady-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Garstka, Maciej; Nejman, Patrycja; Rosiak, Małgorzata

    2004-12-02

    The effect of oxygen concentration on both absorption and chlorophyll fluorescence spectra was investigated in isolated pea thylakoids at weak actinic light under the steady-state conditions. Upon the rise of oxygen concentration from anaerobiosis up to 412 microM a gradual absorbance increase around both 437 and 670 nm was observed, suggesting the disaggregation of LHCII and destacking of thylakoids. Simultaneously, an increase in oxygen concentration resulted in a decline in the Chl fluorescence at 680 nm to about 60% of the initial value. The plot of normalized Chl fluorescence quenching, F(-O(2))/F(+O(2)), showed discontinuity above 275 microM O(2), revealing two phases of quenching, at both lower and higher oxygen concentrations. The inhibition of photosystem II by DCMU or atrazine as well as that of cyt b(6)f by myxothiazol attenuated the oxygen-induced quenching events observed above 275 microM O(2), but did not modify the first phase of oxygen action. These data imply that the oxygen mediated Chl fluorescence quenching is partially independent on non-cyclic electron flow. The second phase of oxygen-induced decline in Chl fluorescence is diminished in thylakoids with poisoned PSII and cyt b(6)f activities and treated with rotenone or N-ethylmaleimide to inhibit NAD(P)H-plastoquinone dehydrogenase. The data suggest that under weak light and high oxygen concentration the Chl fluorescence quenching results from interactions between oxygen and PSI, cyt b(6)f and Ndh. On the contrary, inhibition of non-cyclic electron flow by antimycin A or uncoupling of thylakoids by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone did not modify the steady-state oxygen effect on Chl fluorescence quenching. The addition of NADH protected thylakoids against oxygen-induced Chl fluorescence quenching, whereas in the presence of exogenic duroquinone the decrease in Chl fluorescence to one half of the initial level did not result from the oxygen effect, probably due to oxygen action as a

  15. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  16. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  17. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  18. Electrically tunable lens speeds up 3D orbital tracking

    PubMed Central

    Annibale, Paolo; Dvornikov, Alexander; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    3D orbital particle tracking is a versatile and effective microscopy technique that allows following fast moving fluorescent objects within living cells and reconstructing complex 3D shapes using laser scanning microscopes. We demonstrated notable improvements in the range, speed and accuracy of 3D orbital particle tracking by replacing commonly used piezoelectric stages with Electrically Tunable Lens (ETL) that eliminates mechanical movement of objective lenses. This allowed tracking and reconstructing shape of structures extending 500 microns in the axial direction. Using the ETL, we tracked at high speed fluorescently labeled genomic loci within the nucleus of living cells with unprecedented temporal resolution of 8ms using a 1.42NA oil-immersion objective. The presented technology is cost effective and allows easy upgrade of scanning microscopes for fast 3D orbital tracking. PMID:26114037

  19. Microscopy in 3D: a biologist’s toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Robert S.; Wu, Yicong; Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Shroff, Hari; Waterman, Clare M.

    2012-01-01

    The power of fluorescence microscopy to study cellular structures and macromolecular complexes spans a wide range of size scales, from studies of cell behavior and function in physiological, three-dimensional (3D) environments, to understanding the molecular architecture of organelles. At each length scale, the challenge in 3D imaging is to extract the most spatial and temporal resolution possible while limiting photodamage/bleaching to living cells. A number of advancements in 3D fluorescence microscopy now offer higher resolution, improved speed, and reduced photobleaching relative to traditional point-scanning microscopy methods. Here, we discuss a few specific microscopy modalities that we believe will be particularly advantageous in imaging cells and subcellular structures in physiologically relevant 3D environments. PMID:22047760

  20. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone-d0 and -d2 in n-octane at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulevich, Giulietta; Foggi, Paolo; Feis, Alessandro; Marzocchi, Mario P.

    1987-11-01

    The fluorescence excitation and emission spectra in n-octane of 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone-d0 and -d2 at 10 K have been measured. Dual excitation and emission were observed as a consequence of excited state intramolecular proton transfer. A model, based on the Lippincott-Schroeder potential function, is proposed to predict the observed energy gaps and relative intensities of the transition. The isotopic effects are also explained. The Shpolskii matrices in n-octane show only one main site allowing a detailed vibrational analysis of the ground and the excited states. This furnished further evidence for the existence of excited state tautomers. The occurrence of an extra fluorescence was explained in terms of the ν(OH) stretching mode of the high frequency transition enhanced via vibronic coupling between the two ground states.

  1. Reverse engineering a spectrum: using fluorescent spectra of molecular hydrogen to recreate the missing Lyman-α line of pre-main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Herczeg, G.; Wood, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    The hydrogen Lyman-α (Lyα) line, a major source of ionization of metals in the circumstellar disks of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, is usually not observed due to absorption by interstellar and circumstellar hydrogen. We have developed a technique to reconstruct the intrinsic Lyα line using the observed emission in the H2 B-X lines that are fluoresced by Lyα. We describe this technique and the subsequent analysis of the ultraviolet (UV) spectra of the TW Hya, RU Lupi and other PMS stars. We find that the reconstructed Lyα lines are indeed far brighter than any other feature in the UV spectra of these stars and therefore play an important role in the ionization and heating of the outer layers of circumstellar disks.

  2. Estimation of ground- and excited-state dipole moments of Nile Red dye from solvatochromic effect on absorption and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Bojarski, P.; Kukliński, B.

    2008-10-01

    The effect of various nonpolar and polar solvents on the location of absorption and fluorescence of Nile Red at room temperature was investigated. Based on the batochromic shift of electronic spectra of Nile Red and Bilot-Kawski theory the following values of ground- and excited-state dipole moments μg = 8.2 ± 1.0 D and μe = 10.0 ± 1.0 D were found. The reasons of high discrepancy between the literature results were discussed.

  3. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  4. Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA ); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. )

    1993-09-23

    At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the rates of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state absorption spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K absorption spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore absorption spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Decomposition of protein tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components. II. The statistical proof of discreteness of tryptophan classes in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Y K; Burstein, E A

    2001-01-01

    The physical causes for wide variation of Stokes shift values in emission spectra of tryptophan fluorophores in proteins have been proposed in the model of discrete states (Burstein, E. A., N. S. Vedenkina, and M. N. Ivkova. 1973. Photochem. Photobiol. 18:263-279; Burstein, E. A. 1977a. Intrinsic Protein Luminescence (The Nature and Application). In Advances in Science and Technology (Itogi Nauki i Tekhniki), Biophysics Vol. 7. VINITI, Moscow [In Russian]; Burstein, E. A. 1983. Molecular Biology (Moscow) 17:455-467 [In Russian; English translation]). It was assumed that the existence of the five most probable spectral classes of emitting tryptophan residues and differences among the classes were analyzed in terms of various combinations of specific and universal interactions of excited fluorophores with their environment. The development of stable algorithms of decomposition of tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components gave us an opportunity to apply two mathematically different algorithms, SImple fitting with Mean-Square criterion (SIMS) and PHase-plot-based REsolving with Quenchers (PHREQ) for the decomposition of a representative set of emission spectra of proteins. Here we present the results of decomposition of tryptophan emission spectra of >100 different proteins, some in various structural states (native and denatured, in complexes with ions or organic ligands, in various pH-induced conformations, etc.). Analysis of the histograms of occurrence of >300 spectral log-normal components with various maximum positions confirmed the statistical discreteness of several states of emitting tryptophan fluorophores in proteins. PMID:11509383

  6. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  7. Unmixing of fluorescence spectra to resolve quantitative time-series measurements of gene expression in plate readers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To connect gene expression with cellular physiology, we need to follow levels of proteins over time. Experiments typically use variants of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), and time-series measurements require specialist expertise if single cells are to be followed. Fluorescence plate readers, however, a standard in many laboratories, can in principle provide similar data, albeit at a mean, population level. Nevertheless, extracting the average fluorescence per cell is challenging because autofluorescence can be substantial. Results Here we propose a general method for correcting plate reader measurements of fluorescent proteins that uses spectral unmixing and determines both the fluorescence per cell and the errors on that fluorescence. Combined with strain collections, such as the GFP fusion collection for budding yeast, our methodology allows quantitative measurements of protein levels of up to hundreds of genes and therefore provides complementary data to high throughput studies of transcription. We illustrate the method by following the induction of the GAL genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for over 20 hours in different sugars and argue that the order of appearance of the Leloir enzymes may be to reduce build-up of the toxic intermediate galactose-1-phosphate. Further, we quantify protein levels of over 40 genes, again over 20 hours, after cells experience a change in carbon source (from glycerol to glucose). Conclusions Our methodology is sensitive, scalable, and should be applicable to other organisms. By allowing quantitative measurements on a per cell basis over tens of hours and over hundreds of genes, it should increase our understanding of the dynamic changes that drive cellular behaviour. PMID:24495318

  8. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  9. Catalog of total excitation-emission and total synchronous fluorescence maps with synchronous fluorescence spectra of homologated fluorescent pesticides in large use in Morocco: development of a spectrometric low cost and direct analysis as an alert method in case of massive contamination of soils and waters by fluorescent pesticides.

    PubMed

    Foudeil, S; Hassoun, H; Lamhasni, T; Ait Lyazidi, S; Benyaich, F; Haddad, M; Choukrad, M; Boughdad, A; Bounakhla, M; Bounouira, H; Duarte, R M B O; Cachada, A; Duarte, A C

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a direct spectrometric approach to monitor soils and waters, at a lower cost than the widely used chromatographic techniques; a spectrometric approach that is effective, reliable, fast, easy to implement, and without any use of organic solvents whose utilization is subject to law limitation. It could be suitable at least as an alert method in case of massive contamination. Here, we present for the first time a catalog of excitation-emission and total synchronous fluorescence maps that may be considered as fingerprints of a series of homologated pesticides, in large use in Morocco, aiming at a direct detection of their remains in agricultural soils and neighboring waters. After a large survey among farmers, agricultural workers and product distributors in two important agricultural regions of Morocco (Doukkala-Abda and Sebou basin), 48 commercial pesticides, which are fluorescent, were chosen. A multi-component spectral database of these targeted commercial pesticides was elaborated. For each pesticide, dissolved in water at the lowest concentration giving a no-noise fluorescence spectrum, the total excitation-emission matrix (TEEM), the total synchronous fluorescence matrix (TSFM) in addition to synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) at those offsets giving the highest fluorescence intensity were recorded. To test this preliminary multi-component database, two real soil samples, collected at a wheat field and at a vine field in the region of Doukkala, were analyzed. Remains of the commercial Pirimor (Carbamate) and Atlantis (Sulfonylurea) were identified by comparison of the recorded TEEM, TSFM, and SFS to those of the preliminary catalog at one hand, and on the basis of the results of a field pre-survey. The developed approach seems satisfactory, and the fluorimetric fingerprint database is under extension to a higher number of fluorescent pesticides in common use among the Moroccan agricultural regions.

  10. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  11. Inferential modeling of 3D chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyu; Xu, Jinbo; Zeng, Jianyang

    2015-04-30

    For eukaryotic cells, the biological processes involving regulatory DNA elements play an important role in cell cycle. Understanding 3D spatial arrangements of chromosomes and revealing long-range chromatin interactions are critical to decipher these biological processes. In recent years, chromosome conformation capture (3C) related techniques have been developed to measure the interaction frequencies between long-range genome loci, which have provided a great opportunity to decode the 3D organization of the genome. In this paper, we develop a new Bayesian framework to derive the 3D architecture of a chromosome from 3C-based data. By modeling each chromosome as a polymer chain, we define the conformational energy based on our current knowledge on polymer physics and use it as prior information in the Bayesian framework. We also propose an expectation-maximization (EM) based algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters of the Bayesian model and infer an ensemble of chromatin structures based on interaction frequency data. We have validated our Bayesian inference approach through cross-validation and verified the computed chromatin conformations using the geometric constraints derived from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. We have further confirmed the inferred chromatin structures using the known genetic interactions derived from other studies in the literature. Our test results have indicated that our Bayesian framework can compute an accurate ensemble of 3D chromatin conformations that best interpret the distance constraints derived from 3C-based data and also agree with other sources of geometric constraints derived from experimental evidence in the previous studies. The source code of our approach can be found in https://github.com/wangsy11/InfMod3DGen.

  12. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    at {approx} 10 nm resolution over hundreds of microns in 3 spatial dimensions. Super-resolution microcopy methods based upon single molecule localization were originally limited to 2D slices. Recent advances in this field have extended these methods to three dimensions. However, the 3D rendering was limited to viewing sparsely labeled cellular structures over a z-depth of less than 1 micron. Our first goal is to extend super resolution microscopy to z-depths of hundreds of microns. This substantial improvement is needed to image polymer nanostructure over functionally relevant length scales. (2) Benchmark this instrument by studying the 3D nanostructure of diblock co-polymer morphologies. We will test and benchmark our instrument by imaging fluorescently labeled diblock copolymers, molecules that self-assemble into a variety of 3D nano-structures. We reiterate these polymers are useful for a variety of applications ranging from lithography to light harvesting.

  13. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  14. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  16. Rapid and non-destructive analysis of metallic dental restorations using X-ray fluorescence spectra and light-element sampling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuhashi, K.; Uo, M.; Kitagawa, Y.; Watari, F.

    2012-12-01

    IntroductionRecently, allergic diseases caused by dental metals have been increasing. Therefore, rapid and accurate analytical methods for the metal restorations in the oral cavities of patients are required. The purpose of this study was to develop a non-destructive extraction method for dental alloys, along with a subsequent, rapid and accurate elemental analysis. Materials and methodSamples were obtained by polishing the surfaces of metal restorations using a dental rotating tool with disposable buffs and polishing pastes. As materials for the analysis, three dental alloys were used. To compare the sampling and analysis efficiencies, two buffs and seven pastes were used. After polishing the surface of a metal restoration, the buff was analyzed using X-ray scanning analytical microscopy (XSAM). ResultsThe efficiency of the analysis was judged based on the sampling rate achieved and the absence of disturbing elements in the background in fluorescence X-ray spectra. The best results were obtained for the combination of TexMet as a buff with diamond as a paste. This combination produced a good collection efficiency and a plain background in the fluorescence X-ray spectra, resulting in a high precision of the analysis.

  17. 3D multifocus astigmatism and compressed sensing (3D MACS) based superresolution reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqing; Sun, Mingzhai; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule based superresolution techniques (STORM/PALM) achieve nanometer spatial resolution by integrating the temporal information of the switching dynamics of fluorophores (emitters). When emitter density is low for each frame, they are located to the nanometer resolution. However, when the emitter density rises, causing significant overlapping, it becomes increasingly difficult to accurately locate individual emitters. This is particularly apparent in three dimensional (3D) localization because of the large effective volume of the 3D point spread function (PSF). The inability to precisely locate the emitters at a high density causes poor temporal resolution of localization-based superresolution technique and significantly limits its application in 3D live cell imaging. To address this problem, we developed a 3D high-density superresolution imaging platform that allows us to precisely locate the positions of emitters, even when they are significantly overlapped in three dimensional space. Our platform involves a multi-focus system in combination with astigmatic optics and an ℓ1-Homotopy optimization procedure. To reduce the intrinsic bias introduced by the discrete formulation of compressed sensing, we introduced a debiasing step followed by a 3D weighted centroid procedure, which not only increases the localization accuracy, but also increases the computation speed of image reconstruction. We implemented our algorithms on a graphic processing unit (GPU), which speeds up processing 10 times compared with central processing unit (CPU) implementation. We tested our method with both simulated data and experimental data of fluorescently labeled microtubules and were able to reconstruct a 3D microtubule image with 1000 frames (512×512) acquired within 20 seconds. PMID:25798314

  18. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  19. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  20. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  1. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  2. Near infrared excited micro-Raman spectra of 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture and ruby fluorescence at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. B.; Shen, Z. X.; Tang, S. H.; Kuok, M. H.

    1999-06-01

    Near infrared (NIR) lasers, as a new excitation source for Raman spectroscopy, has shown its unique advantages and is being increasingly used for some special samples, such as those emitting strong fluorescence in the visible region. This article focuses on some issues related to high-pressure micro-Raman spectroscopy using NIR excitation source. The Raman spectra of 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture (4:1 M-E) show a linear variation in both Raman shifts and linewidths under pressure up to 18 GPa. This result is useful in distinguishing Raman scattering of samples from that of the alcohol mixture, an extensively used pressure-transmitting medium. The R1 fluorescence in the red region induced by two-photon absorption of the NIR laser is strong enough to be used as pressure scale. The frequency and line width of the R1 lines are very sensitive to pressure change and the glass transition of the pressure medium. Our results manifest that it is reliable and convenient to use NIR induced two-photon excited fluorescence of ruby for both pressure calibration and distribution of pressure in the 4:1 M-E pressure transmitting medium.

  3. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  4. Effects of solvent polarity on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid compounds: determination of the dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Libnedengel, Ermias; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-02-01

    The effects of solvent polarity on absorption and fluorescence spectra of biologically active compounds (chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeic acids (CA)) have been investigated. In both spectra pronounced solvatochromic effects were observed with shift of emission peaks larger than the corresponding UV-vis electronic absorption spectra. From solvatochromic theory the ground and excited-state dipole moments were determined experimentally and theoretically. The differences between the excited and ground state dipole moment determined by Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet and Reichardt equations are quite similar. The ground and excited-state dipole moments were determined by theoretical quantum chemical calculation using density function theory (DFT) method (Gaussian 09) and were also similar to the experimental results. The HOMO-LUMO energy band gaps for CGA and CFA were calculated and found to be 4.1119 and 1.8732 eV respectively. The results also indicated the CGA molecule is more stable than that of CFA. It was also observed that in both compounds the excited state possesses a higher dipole moment than that of the ground state. This confirms that the excited state of the hydroxycinnamic compounds is more polarized than that of the ground state and therefore is more sensitive to the solvent.

  5. A Newly Developed Fluorescence Model for C2H6 v5 and Application to Cometary Spectra Acquired with NIRSPEC at Keck II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radeva, Yana L.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; A?Hearn, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate rotational temperatures are essential for extracting production rates for parent volatiles in comets. Two strong bands of ethane (v7 at 2985.39/cm and v5 at 2895.67/cm) are seen in infrared cometary spectra, but the Q-branches of v7 are not resolved by current instruments and cannot provide an accurate rotational temperature with current models.We developed a fluorescence model for the C2H6 v5 band that can be used to derive a rotational temperature.We applied our C2H6 5 model to high-resolution infrared spectra of the comets C/2004 Q2 Machholz and C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), acquired with the Near-infrared Echelle Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope. We demonstrate agreement among the rotational temperatures derived from C2H6 v5 and other species, and between mixing ratios derived from C2H6 v5 and C2H6 v7. As a symmetric hydrocarbon, C2H6 is observed only in the infrared, and it is now the fifth molecule (along with H2O, HCN, CO, and H2CO) for which we can derive a reliable rotational temperature from cometary infrared spectra.

  6. A Newly Developed Fluorescence Model for C2H6 ν5 and Application to Cometary Spectra Acquired with NIRSPEC at Keck II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeva, Yana L.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    2011-03-01

    Accurate rotational temperatures are essential for extracting production rates for parent volatiles in comets. Two strong bands of ethane (ν7 at 2985.39 cm-1 and ν5 at 2895.67 cm-1) are seen in infrared cometary spectra, but the Q-branches of ν7 are not resolved by current instruments and cannot provide an accurate rotational temperature with current models. We developed a fluorescence model for the C2H6 ν5 band that can be used to derive a rotational temperature. We applied our C2H6 ν5 model to high-resolution infrared spectra of the comets C/2004 Q2 Machholz and C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), acquired with the Near-infrared Echelle Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope. We demonstrate agreement among the rotational temperatures derived from C2H6 ν5 and other species, and between mixing ratios derived from C2H6 ν5 and C2H6 ν7. As a symmetric hydrocarbon, C2H6 is observed only in the infrared, and it is now the fifth molecule (along with H2O, HCN, CO, and H2CO) for which we can derive a reliable rotational temperature from cometary infrared spectra.

  7. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  8. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  9. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  10. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  11. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  12. Enhanced sensitivity of pHluorin-based monitoring of intracellular pH changes achieved through synchronously scanned fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Plášek, Jaromír; Melcrová, Adéla; Gášková, Dana

    2015-10-06

    Since its introduction in 1998, genetically encoded pH-sensitive sensor ratiometric pHluorin proved to be a valuable tool for cell physiology studies. Here, we show how the sensitivity of pHluorin-based monitoring of intracellular pH changes performed with cell suspensions can be enhanced by using synchronously scanned fluorescence spectroscopy. In the suspensions of S. cerevisiae cells subjected to varying extracellular pH values, we have been able to measure statistically significant changes in intracellular pH of less than 0.1 unit, which were not detectable using a standard ratiometric approach.

  13. Synthesis, characterization of 1,2,4-triazole Schiff base derived 3d-metal complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2, MCF-7 cell line, BSA binding fluorescence and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Prateek; Tyagi, Monika; Agrawal, Swati; Chandra, Sulekh; Ojha, Himanshu; Pathak, Mallika

    2017-01-01

    Two novel Schiff base ligands H2L1 and H2L2 have been synthesized by condensation reaction of amine derivative of 1,2,4-triazole moiety with 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde. Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) of the synthesized Schiff bases were prepared by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 1:1. The structure of the Schiff bases and synthesized metal complexes were established by 1H NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass spectrometry and molar conductivity. The thermal stability of the complexes was study by TGA. Fluorescence quenching mechanism of metal complexes 1-4 show that Zn(II) and Cu(II) complex binds more strongly to BSA. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff bases and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31 + g(d,p) basis set. The spectral data shows that the ligands behaves as binegative tridentate. On the basis of the spectral studies, TGA and DFT data an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II), Ni(II), square planar for Cu(II) and tetrahedral for Zn(II) complexes. The anticancer activity were screened against human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (Hep-G2). Result indicates that metal complexes shows increase cytotoxicity in proliferation to cell lines as compared to free ligand.

  14. Synthesis, characterization of 1,2,4-triazole Schiff base derived 3d-metal complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2, MCF-7 cell line, BSA binding fluorescence and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Prateek; Tyagi, Monika; Agrawal, Swati; Chandra, Sulekh; Ojha, Himanshu; Pathak, Mallika

    2017-01-15

    Two novel Schiff base ligands H2L(1) and H2L(2) have been synthesized by condensation reaction of amine derivative of 1,2,4-triazole moiety with 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde. Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) of the synthesized Schiff bases were prepared by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 1:1. The structure of the Schiff bases and synthesized metal complexes were established by (1)H NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass spectrometry and molar conductivity. The thermal stability of the complexes was study by TGA. Fluorescence quenching mechanism of metal complexes 1-4 show that Zn(II) and Cu(II) complex binds more strongly to BSA. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff bases and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. The spectral data shows that the ligands behaves as binegative tridentate. On the basis of the spectral studies, TGA and DFT data an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II), Ni(II), square planar for Cu(II) and tetrahedral for Zn(II) complexes. The anticancer activity were screened against human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (Hep-G2). Result indicates that metal complexes shows increase cytotoxicity in proliferation to cell lines as compared to free ligand.

  15. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  16. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bruce Weisman, R

    2016-05-21

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.

  17. Fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) for comparing spectra from corn ears naturally and artificially infected with aflatoxin producing fungus.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Zuzana; Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Darlington, Dawn; Brown, Robert L; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2013-08-01

    In an effort to address the problem of rapid detection of aflatoxin in grain, particularly oilseeds, the current study assessed the spectral differences of aflatoxin production in kernels from a cornfield inoculated with spores from 2 different strains of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus. Aflatoxin production in corn from the same field due to natural infestation was also assessed. A small corn plot in Baton Rouge, La., U.S.A., was used during the 2008-growing season. Two groups of 400 plants were inoculated with 2 different inocula and 1 group of 400 plants was designated as controls. Any contamination detected in the controls was attributed to natural infestation. A subset of each group was imaged with a visible near infra red (VNIR) hyperspectral system under ultra violet (UV) excitation and subsequently analyzed for aflatoxin using affinity column fluorometry. Group differences were statistically analyzed. Results indicate that when all the spectral data across all groups were averaged, any potential differences between groups (treated and untreated) were obscured. However, spectral analysis based on contaminated "hot" pixel classification showed a distinct spectral shift/separation between contaminated and clean ears with fluorescence peaks at 501 and 478 nm, respectively. All inoculated and naturally infected control ears had fluorescence peaks at 501 nm that differed from uninfected corn ears. Results from this study may be useful in evaluating rapid, noninvasive instrumentation and/or methodology for aflatoxin detection in grain.

  18. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  19. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  20. Ultraviolet high-excitation Fe II fluorescence lines excited by O VI, C IV, and H I resonance emission as seen in IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, Walter A.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Johansson, Sveneric

    1991-01-01

    Archival high-dispersion spectra from the IUE are used in a search for Bowen emission lines of Fe II excited by the stronger transition of the O VI resonance doublet. The possibility of using these Fe II emission lines as a diagnostic of the strength of the far-ultraviolet emission of O VI at 1032 A is explored. It is found that the Fe II emission lines are quite common and strong in symbiotic stars, particularly those of the type known as 'symbiotic novae', as well as in normal novae. The lines are observed in central stars of some planetary nebulae of the O VI sequence besides a few central stars of type WR. High density, high excitation, and high temperature are suggested to be requirements for the excitation of the Fe II fluorescence lines. It is pointed out that while these lines were observed in PG 1159-035 and K1-16, they were not observed in AGNs.

  1. Identifying the Assembly Configuration and Fluorescence Spectra of Nanoscale Zinc-Tetraphenylporphyrin Aggregates with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Jiang, Jian-Wei; Liu, Yi-Ting; Lou, Shi-Tao; Gao, Chun-Lei; Jin, Qing-Yuan

    2016-03-07

    ZnTPP (Zinc-Tetraphenylporphyrin) is one of the most common nanostructured materials, having high stability and excellent optoelectronic properties. In this paper, the fluorescence features of self-assembled ZnTPP monomers and aggregates on Au(111) surface are investigated in detail on the nanometer scale with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The formation of ZnTPP dimers is found in thick layers of a layer-by-layer molecular assembly on Au substrate with its specific molecular arrangement well characterized. Tip-induced luminescence shows a red shift from tilted dimers comparing with the behavior from monomers, which can be attributed to the change of vibrational states due to the intermolecular interaction and the increasing dielectric effect. The nanoscale configuration dependence of electroluminescence is demonstrated to provide a powerful tool aiding the design of functional molecular photoelectric devices.

  2. Far-ultraviolet fluorescence of carbon monoxide in the red giant Arcturus. II - Analysis of high-dispersion IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    1986-01-01

    Faint, diffuse emissions near 1380 A in deeply exposed IUE spectrograms of the red giant Arcturus very likely are associated with bands of the A-X fourth-positive system of carbon monoxide, fluoresced by multiplet UV2 of neutral oxygen near 1305 A. Numerical simulations indicate that the strength of the CO bands is exceedingly sensitive, in the best available one-dimensional model of the chromosphere of Arcturus, to a delicate balance between the rapid inward attenuation of the oxygen radiation field and the rapid outward decline of the molecular absorptivity. The fortuitous character of the overlap region in the single-component model argues that one should also consider the possibility that the pumping occurs in a highly inhomogeneous chromosphere, of the type proposed in previous studies of Arcturus based on observations of the infrared absorption bands of CO.

  3. 3D microscopy - new powerful tools in geomaterials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauko Pranjić, Alenka; Mladenovič, Ana; Turk, Janez; Šajna, Aljoša; Čretnik, Janko

    2016-04-01

    Microtomography (microCT) is becoming more and more widely recognized in geological sciences as a powerful tool for the spatial characterization of rock and other geological materials. Together with 3D image analysis and other complementary techniques, it has the characteristics of an innovative and non-destructive 3D microscopical technique. On the other hand its main disadvantages are low availability (only a few geological laboratories are equipped with high resolution tomographs), the relatively high prices of testing connected with the use of an xray source, technical limitations connected to the resolution and imaging of certain materials, as well as timeconsuming and complex 3D image analysis, necessary for quantification of 3D tomographic data sets. In this work three examples are presented of optimal 3D microscopy analysis of geomaterials in construction such as porosity characterization of impregnated sandstone, aerated concrete and marble prone to bowing. Studies include processes of microCT imaging, 3D data analysis and fitting of data with complementary analysis, such as confocal microscopy, mercury porosimetry, gas sorption, optical/fluorescent microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Present work has been done in the frame of national research project 3D and 4D microscopy development of new powerful tools in geosciences (ARRS J1-7148) funded by Slovenian Research Agency.

  4. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  5. 3D Nanostructuring of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blick, Robert

    2000-03-01

    Modern semiconductor technology allows to machine devices on the nanometer scale. I will discuss the current limits of the fabrication processes, which enable the definition of single electron transistors with dimensions down to 8 nm. In addition to the conventional 2D patterning and structuring of semiconductors, I will demonstrate how to apply 3D nanostructuring techniques to build freely suspended single-crystal beams with lateral dimension down to 20 nm. In transport measurements in the temperature range from 30 mK up to 100 K these nano-crystals are characterized regarding their electronic as well as their mechanical properties. Moreover, I will present possible applications of these devices.

  6. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  7. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  8. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  9. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  10. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity by Nanoscale 3D Phononic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal. PMID:23378898

  11. Reduction of thermal conductivity by nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

  12. [Characteristics of absorption and fluorescence spectra of dissolved organic matter from confluence of rivers: case study of Qujiang River-Jialing River and Fujiang River-Jialing River].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Long; Jiang, Tao; Gao, Jie; Wei, Shi-Qiang; Lu, Song; Liu, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy combined with ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra was used to investigate the change characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in confluences water of Qujiang River-Jialing River and Fujiang River-Jialing River, respectively. The results suggested that DOM showed a significant terrestrial input signal in all the sampling sites, FI < 1.4, HIX > 0.8, possibly representing remarkable signals of humus resulted from humic-like component. Moreover, the mixing zone of this study showed a non-conservative mixed behavior, which had a limited contribution, and was not the dominant factor to interpret the change characteristics of DOM in confluences zones. Different land-use types along all the rivers had an obvious impact on DOM inputs. Results of cluster analysis showed that a higher degree of aromaticity and humification components was observed as the predominant contributor to DOM when the land-use type was forest and farmland ecosystem, for example the confluences of Qujiang River-Jialing River. On the other hand, high concentrations of DOM with relative simple structures were found in the water when the urban land-use type was predominant, for example the confluences of Fujiang River-Jialing River. Meanwhile, a new fluorescent signal of protein-like components (peak T) appeared, which manifested a significant effect on the water quality resulted from anthropogenic activities.

  13. Insights into the interaction between carbamazepine and natural dissolved organic matter in the Yangtze Estuary using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Manman; Fu, Jun; Li, Tingting; Wang, Jinggang; Fu, Yingyu

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between carbamazepine (CBZ) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from three zones (the nearshore, the river channel, and the coastal areas) in the Yangtze Estuary was investigated using fluorescence quenching titration combined with excitation emission matrix spectra and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The complexation between CBZ and DOM was demonstrated by the increase in hydrogen bonding and the disappearance of the C=O stretch obtained from the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The results indicated that two protein-like substances (component 2 and component3) and two humic-like substances (component 1 and 4) were identified in the DOM from the Yangtze Estuary. The fluorescence quenching curves of each component with the addition of CBZ and the Ryan and Weber model calculation results both demonstrated that the different components exhibited different complexation activities with CBZ. The protein-like components had a stronger affinity with CBZ than did the humic-like substances. On the other hand, the autochthonous tyrosine-like C2 played an important role in the complexation with DOM from the river channel and coastal areas, while C3 influenced by anthropogenic activities showed an obvious effect in the nearshore area. DOMs from the river channel have the highest binding capacity for CBZ, which may ascribe to the relatively high phenol content group in the DOM.

  14. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H. M.; Inamdar, S. R.; Wari, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π → π* transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μe). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μe) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state.

  15. Fluorescence Excitation Spectra of Photo-Fragmented Nitrobenzene Using a Picosecond Laser: Potential Evidence for no Produced by Two Distinct Channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Christopher J.; Tanjaroon, Chakree; Johnson, J. Bruce; Reeve, Scott W.; Allen, Susan D.

    2013-06-01

    Upon absorption of a UV photon, nitrobenzene can dissociate into C_6H_5O and NO through two different mechanisms. Evidence for these mechanisms was obtained from velocity map imaging (VMI) studies and theoretical calculations. VMI experiments showed NO produced with two distinct rotational distributions, which the calculations explained as a fast and a slow channel for NO production. We have recorded high resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of the NO resulting from photo-fragmented nitrobenzene using a pulsed picosecond tunable laser (pulse width ≈ 15 ps) by means of a two-color process. In the two-color process, photons of a particular energy dissociated the nitrobenzene while photons of a different energy probed the A^2Σ^+← X^2Π_{(1/2,3/2)} NO band system between 225-260 nm. This laser system allowed us to vary the delay between the photolysis and excitation pulses. At longer delays (>1 ns), we observed an increase in the population of NO, which may be evidence that at least two photolysis channels produce NO. We present the spectra we recorded at various photolysis/probe delays ranging from 0.025 to 1.5 ns. The spectral subtraction method we used to observe the production increase is introduced. Hause, M. L.; Herath, N.; Zhu, R.; Lin, M. C. and Suits, A. G. Nat Chem, Nature Publishing Group, 2011, 3, 932-937

  16. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Basavaraja, Jana; Kumar, H M Suresh; Inamdar, S R; Wari, M N

    2016-02-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π→π⁎ transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μ(e)). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μ(e)) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state.

  17. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  18. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  19. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  20. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  1. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  2. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  3. Spectroscopic study of 2-[2-(4-cyclaminophenyl)ethen-1-yl] benzothiazoles and their N-allylbenzothiazolium bromides. Solvent and substituent effects on their ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gáplovský, Anton; Donovalová, Jana; Magdolen, Peter; Toma, Štefan; Zahradník, Pavol

    2002-01-01

    UV-vis and fluorescence spectra of 2-[2-(4-cyclaminophenyl)ethen-1-yl] benzothiazoles 1 and their N-allylbenzothiazolium bromides 2 have been measured and interpreted. The substitution and solvent effects on electronic structure and spectra have been investigated. The benzothiazolium salts substituted with saturated cyclamines show strong push-pull character and can be used as potential NLO materials. Formation of aggregated structures was observed at higher concentrations of the benzothiazolium bromides.

  4. Visual automated fluorescence electrophoresis provides simultaneous quality, quantity, and molecular weight spectra for genomic DNA from archived neonatal blood spots.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Tara L; Drabek, Janice; Tomson, Torjbörn; Sveinsson, Olafur; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Goldman, Alicia M

    2013-05-01

    The Guthrie 903 card archived dried blood spots (DBSs) are a unique but terminal resource amenable for individual and population-wide genomic profiling. The limited amounts of DBS-derived genomic DNA (gDNA) can be whole genome amplified, producing sufficient gDNA for genomic applications, albeit with variable success; optimizing the isolation of high-quality DNA from these finite, low-yield specimens is essential. Agarose gel electrophoresis and spectrophotometry are established postextraction quality control (QC) methods but lack the power to disclose detailed structural, qualitative, or quantitative aspects that underlie gDNA failure in downstream applications. Visual automated fluorescence electrophoresis (VAFE) is a novel QC technology that affords precise quality, quantity, and molecular weight of double-stranded DNA from a single microliter of sample. We extracted DNA from 3-mm DBSs archived in the Swedish Neonatal Repository for >30 years and performed the first quantitative and qualitative analyses of DBS-derived DNA on VAFE, before and after whole genome amplified, in parallel with traditional QC methods. The VAFE QC data were correlated with subsequent sample performance in PCR, sequencing, and high-density comparative genome hybridization array. We observed improved standardization of nucleic acid quantity, quality and integrity, and high performance in the downstream genomic technologies. Addition of VAFE measures in QC increases confidence in the validity of genetic data and allows cost-effective downstream analysis of gDNA for investigational and diagnostic applications.

  5. 3D Printed Micro Free-Flow Electrophoresis Device.

    PubMed

    Anciaux, Sarah K; Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-08-02

    The cost, time, and restrictions on creative flexibility associated with current fabrication methods present significant challenges in the development and application of microfluidic devices. Additive manufacturing, also referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, provides many advantages over existing methods. With 3D printing, devices can be made in a cost-effective manner with the ability to rapidly prototype new designs. We have fabricated a micro free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) device using a low-cost, consumer-grade 3D printer. Test prints were performed to determine the minimum feature sizes that could be reproducibly produced using 3D printing fabrication. Microfluidic ridges could be fabricated with dimensions as small as 20 μm high × 640 μm wide. Minimum valley dimensions were 30 μm wide × 130 μm wide. An acetone vapor bath was used to smooth acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surfaces and facilitate bonding of fully enclosed channels. The surfaces of the 3D-printed features were profiled and compared to a similar device fabricated in a glass substrate. Stable stream profiles were obtained in a 3D-printed μFFE device. Separations of fluorescent dyes in the 3D-printed device and its glass counterpart were comparable. A μFFE separation of myoglobin and cytochrome c was also demonstrated on a 3D-printed device. Limits of detection for rhodamine 110 were determined to be 2 and 0.3 nM for the 3D-printed and glass devices, respectively.

  6. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  7. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  8. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    ScienceCinema

    Love, Lonnie

    2016-11-02

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  9. Fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA: Variability of concentrations and possible constituents and sources of particles in various spectral clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Fernandez, E.; Rosen, J. M.; Hill, S. C.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y. L.

    2013-02-01

    The UV-excited laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectra of single atmospheric particles and the three-band integrating-nephelometer elastic scattering of atmospheric aerosol were measured during four approximately 24-h periods on May 2007 in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. Aerosol scattering measurements in the nephelometer red channel (50-nm band centered at 700-nm) ranged from around 3-10 times the molecular (Rayleigh) scattering background. On average 22.8% of particles with size greater than about 1 μm diameter have fluorescence above a preset fluorescence threshold. A hierarchical cluster analysis indicates that most of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra fall into about 10 categories (spectral clusters) as found previously at other geographic sites (Pinnick et al., 2004; Pan et al., 2007). The clusters include spectra characteristic of various humic/fulvic acids, humic-like-substances (HULIS), chemically aged terpenes, fungal spores, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bacteria, cellulose/pollens, and mixtures of various organic carbon compounds. By far the most populated cluster category is similar to those of chemically aged terpenes/humic-materials; on average this population comprises about 62% of fluorescent particles. Clusters with spectra similar to that of some HULIS aerosol contain on average 10.0% of particles; those characteristic of some fungal spores (or perhaps mixtures of aromatic organic compounds) 8.4% of particles; bacteria-like spectra 1.6% of particles; and cellulose/pollen-like spectra 0.8% of particles. Measurements of fluorescent particles over relatively short (24 min) periods reveal that the concentrations of particles in the most populated clusters are highly correlated, suggesting that the particles populating them derive from the same region; these particles might be composed of crustal material coated with secondary organic carbon. On the other hand, concentrations of particles having cellulose-like spectra are generally

  10. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  11. Single-particle laser-induced-fluorescence spectra of biological and other organic-carbon aerosols in the atmosphere: Measurements at New Haven, Connecticut, and Las Cruces, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Hill, Steven C.; Rosen, James M.; Chang, Richard K.

    2007-12-01

    This study focuses on organic carbon (OC) aerosols, including natural biological aerosols, in the Earth's troposphere, and on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectral methods for studying these aerosols. LIF spectra of atmospheric OC and biological aerosols (having diameters greater than approximately 3 μm) measured at New Haven, Connecticut, and Las Cruces, New Mexico, are reported. A hierarchical clustering method was used to cluster approximately 90% of the single-particle LIF spectra into 8-10 groups. Some of these groups have spectra that are similar to spectra of some important classes of atmospheric aerosol, such as humic/fulvic acids and humic-like substances, bacteria, cellulose, marine aerosol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). A comparison with previous measurements made at Adelphi, Maryland, reveals that the most highly populated clusters found at Adelphi, and some of the less populated ones, also appear in the LIF spectra at New Haven and Las Cruces, even though the regional climates at these locations is different (New England/Atlantic Coastal, for New Haven and Adelphi, and Chihuahuan Desert for Las Cruces), and the measurements were made in different seasons. The results are consistent with some (perhaps most) of the fluorors in OC and biological atmospheric aerosols being common to these three sites. On average, spectra characteristic of humic/fulvic acids and humic-like substances (HULIS) comprise 28-43% of fluorescent particles at all three sites; whereas cellulose-like spectra contribute only 1-3%.

  12. In vivo 3D measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distributions in the mouse cornea using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Yeoreum; Chung, Wan Kyun; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-05-01

    Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin are fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotics used in the clinic to prevent or treat ocular infections. Their pharmacokinetics in the cornea is usually measured from extracted ocular fluids or tissues, and in vivo direct measurement is difficult. In this study multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is a 3D optical microscopic technique based on multiphoton fluorescence, was applied to the measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distribution in the cornea. Intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence properties of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were characterized, and their distributions in mouse cornea in vivo were measured by 3D MPM imaging. Both moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin had similar multiphoton spectra, while moxifloxacin had stronger fluorescence than gatifloxacin. MPM imaging of mouse cornea in vivo showed (1) moxifloxacin had good penetration through the superficial corneal epithelium, while gatifloxacin had relatively poor penetration, (2) both ophthalmic solutions had high intracellular distribution. In vivo MPM results were consistent with previous studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MPM as a method for in vivo direct measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin in the cornea.

  13. Determination of Interatomic Potentials for the X0 +, A0 +, and B1 States of HgKr from Fluorescence and Excitation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koperski, J.; Atkinson, J. B.; Krause, L.

    2001-06-01

    We present an analysis of the A0+(63P1)→X0+(61S0) bound-bound and bound-free fluorescence spectrum, and of the A0+(63P1)←X0+(61S0) and B1(63P1)←X0+(61S0) bound-bound excitation spectrum of the HgKr van der Waals molecule. The A→X fluorescence spectrum, which was observed for the first time, as well as the excitation spectra were recorded using a pulsed supersonic molecular beam crossed with a pulsed dye laser beam. An analysis of the A(v‧)←X(v″), B(v‧)←X(v″), and A(v‧=8)→X(v″) bound-bound bands indicates that a Morse function combined with a long-range approximation represents the interatomic potential energy curve of the A, B, and X states below the dissociation limit. In the simulation of the A(v‧=8)→X bound-free spectrum the Morse, Lennard-Jones (n-6), and Maitland-Smith (n0, n1) functions were tested, and the Maitland-Smith (11.39, 10.50) potential was found to be a good representation of the repulsive part of the X-state PE curve above the dissociation limit, over the internuclear separation range R=2.85-3.55 Å. The spectroscopic characteristics for the A, B, and X states obtained in this work are compared with other available experimental and theoretical results.

  14. H-bonding vs non-H-bonding in 100% pyrene methacrylate comb polymers: self-assembly probed by time-resolved emission spectra and temperature dependent fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kaushlendra, K; Asha, S K

    2014-05-08

    The differences in self-organization behavior in novel 100% pyrene labeled comb methacrylate polymers probed as a function of their varied origins of excimer formation are presented. The different structural variations in the polymers included the presence or absence of hydrogen bonding interactions in the form of urethane linkages, short or long alkyl spacer segments separating the pyrene units from the polymer backbone and linear versus kinked urethane linkage. The effect of variable concentration and temperature on the chemical shift of the NH proton of the urethane linkage was probed using (1)H NMR experiments conducted at temperatures varying from 25 to 70 °C at two different concentrations (2.5 and 25 mmol) in DMSO-d6 as solvent. The photophysical properties of the polymers in dilute DMF solutions were investigated by steady state emission, fluorescence decay studies, time-resolved emission spectra (TRES), and variable temperature emission studies. It was observed that the polymer poly(PBH) having a non-hydrogen-bondable ester linkage in the pendant chains formed an excimer completely via a static mechanism and the ground state aggregate species were not broken even at higher temperatures. The polymer poly(PIC) having a short hydrogen-bondable urethane linkage formed an excimer via a static as well as dynamic mechanism. The other hydrogen-bondable urethane methacrylate polymers having a linear linker poly(PHH) and kinked linker (PIHP) formed excimer mostly via a dynamic mechanism with a very small contribution from the static route. The TRES studies carried out for the polymers provided significant insight into the excimer formation mechanism in these polymers. The variable temperature fluorescence studies highlighted the differences in the H-bonded vs non-H-bonded polymer as a function of their excimer recovery upon cooling.

  15. Franck-Condon factors perturbed by damped harmonic oscillators: Solvent enhanced X {sup 1}A{sub g} ↔ A{sup 1}B{sub 1u} absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen-Wen; Zhu, Chaoyuan Lin, Sheng-Hsien; Yang, Ling; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-28

    Damped harmonic oscillators are utilized to calculate Franck-Condon factors within displaced harmonic oscillator approximation. This is practically done by scaling unperturbed Hessian matrix that represents local modes of force constants for molecule in gaseous phase, and then by diagonalizing perturbed Hessian matrix it results in direct modification of Huang–Rhys factors which represent normal modes of solute molecule perturbed by solvent environment. Scaling parameters are empirically introduced for simulating absorption and fluorescence spectra of an isolated solute molecule in solution. The present method is especially useful for simulating vibronic spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in which hydrogen atom vibrations in solution can be scaled equally, namely the same scaling factor being applied to all hydrogen atoms in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present method is demonstrated in simulating solvent enhanced X {sup 1}A{sub g} ↔ A{sup 1}B{sub 1u} absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene (medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) in benzene solution. It is found that one of six active normal modes v{sub 10} is actually responsible to the solvent enhancement of spectra observed in experiment. Simulations from all functionals (TD) B3LYP, (TD) B3LYP35, (TD) B3LYP50, and (TD) B3LYP100 draw the same conclusion. Hence, the present method is able to adequately reproduce experimental absorption and fluorescence spectra in both gas and solution phases.

  16. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  17. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  18. 3D Protein Dynamics in the Cell Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand P; Galland, Rémi; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Grenci, Gianluca; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Studer, Vincent; Viasnoff, Virgile; Saunders, Timothy E

    2017-01-10

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus plays an important role in protein dynamics and in regulating gene expression. However, protein dynamics within the 3D nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a novel combination of 1) single-objective based light-sheet microscopy, 2) photoconvertible proteins, and 3) fluorescence correlation microscopy, to quantitatively measure 3D protein dynamics in the nucleus. We are able to acquire >3400 autocorrelation functions at multiple spatial positions within a nucleus, without significant photobleaching, allowing us to make reliable estimates of diffusion dynamics. Using this tool, we demonstrate spatial heterogeneity in Polymerase II dynamics in live U2OS cells. Further, we provide detailed measurements of human-Yes-associated protein diffusion dynamics in a human gastric cancer epithelial cell line.

  19. [3D emulation of epicardium dynamic mapping].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Yang, Cui-Wei; Fang, Zu-Xiang

    2005-03-01

    In order to realize epicardium dynamic mapping of the whole atria, 3-D graphics are drawn with OpenGL. Some source codes are introduced in the paper to explain how to produce, read, and manipulate 3-D model data.

  20. An interactive multiview 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Zhang, Mei; Dong, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The progresses in 3D display systems and user interaction technologies will help more effective 3D visualization of 3D information. They yield a realistic representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them. In this paper, we describe an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system with capability of real-time user interaction. Design principle of this autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system is presented, together with the details of its hardware/software architecture. A prototype is built and tested based upon multi-projectors and horizontal optical anisotropic display structure. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of this novel 3D display and user interaction system.

  1. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV/Vis spectra and fluorescence imaging studies on 2-(bromoacetyl)benzo(b)furan by ab initio DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Veeraiah, A

    2015-08-05

    The vibrational and electronic properties of 2-(bromoacetyl)benzo(b)furan have been studied in the ground state using experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The theoretically calculated optimized parameters, vibrational frequencies etc., were compared with the experimental values, which yield good agreement between the observed and calculated values. The complete assignments of fundamental modes were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED). UV-visible spectrum of the compound was recorded in the region 300-600 nm and compared with the theoretical spectrum obtained from SAC-CI calculations. A good agreement is observed between the experimental and theoretical spectra. Fluorescence microscopic imaging studies proved that the compound can be used as one of the potential light sources in the yellow region with suitable excitation. Further, the predicted electronic transitions between the MOs 47→64, 52→62, 56→65, 56→72, 56→77 of the compound show a strong line at 569.8 nm.

  2. Quantitative treatment of the solvent effects on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of acridines and phenazines. The ground and first excited singlet-state dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Jean Jacques; Maafi, Mounir; Párkányi, Cyril; Boniface, Christian

    1995-04-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of four acridines (acridine, Acridine Yellow, 9-aminoacridine and proflavine) and three phenazines (phenazine, neutral Red and safranine) are determined at room temperature (298 K) in several solvents of various polarities (dioxane, chloroform, ethyl ether, ethyl acetate, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, ethanol, methanol, dimethylformamide, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide). The effect of the solvent upon the spectral characteristics of the above compounds, is studied. In combination with the ground-state dipole moments of these compounds, the spectral data are used to evaluate their first excited singlet-state dipole moments by means of the solvatochromic shift method (Bakhshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's correlations). The theoretical ground and excited singlet-state dipole moments for acridines and phenazines are also calculated as a vector sum of the π-component (obtained by the PPP method) and the σ-component (obtained from σ-bond moments). For most acridines and phenazines under study, the experimental excited singlet-state dipole moments are found to be higher than their ground state counterpart. The application of the Kamlet-Abboud-Taft solvatochromic parameters to the solvent effect on spectral properties of acridine and phenazine derivatives is discussed.

  3. Solvent effect on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin: determination of ground and excited state dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Gülseven Sıdır, Yadigar; Sıdır, Isa

    2013-02-01

    The ground state (μ(g)) and excited state (μ(e)) dipole moments of 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin (abbreviated as 7ADDC) are estimated from solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra as a function of the dielectric constant (ε) and refractive index (n). While the ground state dipole moment is determined by using Bilot-Kawski method, the excited state dipole moment is calculated by using Bilot-Kawski, Lippert-Mataga, Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet and Reichardt correlation methods. Excited state dipole moment is observed as larger than the ground state dipole moment due to substantial π-electron density redistribution. The ground state and excited state dipole moments are observed as parallel to each other with angle of 0°. Solute-solvent interactions are analyzed by means of linear solvation free energy relationships (LSER) using dielectric constant function (f(ε)), refractive index function (f(n)) and Kamlet-Taft parameters (α and β). Atomic charges, electron densities and molecular orbitals are calculated in vacuum and with solvent effect by using both DFT and TDDFT methods. Solvent accessible surface, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and electrostatic potential (ESP) are visualized as a result of DFT calculations.

  4. Quantitative treatment of the effect of solvent on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of substituted coumarins: Evaluation of the first excited singlet-state dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Aaron, J J; Buna, M; Parkanyi, C; Antonious, M S; Tine, A; Cisse, L

    1995-12-01

    The electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of coumarin and 11 substituted coumarins were measured in several solvents (dioxane, ethyl ether, ethyl acetate, ethanol, dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfoxide). Ground-state dipole moments were determined in dioxane at 298 K. The results were used to obtain the first excited singlet-state dipole moments of the coumarins under study by the solvatochromic shift method (Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet, McRae, and Suppan correlations). Also, the ground- and the first excited singlet-state dipole moments were calculated using a combination of the PPP method (π-contribution) and the vector sum of the σ-bond and group moments (σ-contribution). In general, the first excited singlet-state dipole moments of the coumarins are noticeably higher than the corresponding ground-state values, indicating a substantial redistribution of theπ-electron densities resulting in a more polar excited state. There is a reasonably good agreement between the calculated and the experimental dipole moments.

  5. Solvent effects on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of some laser dyes: estimation of ground and excited-state dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Thipperudrappa, J; Biradar, D S; Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Inamadar, S R; Manekutla, R J

    2008-03-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of three extensively used laser dyes namely 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB), 2-(4'-t-butylphenyl)-5-(4''-biphenylyl)-1-oxa-3,4-diazole (BPBD), 1,4-bis[2-(2-methylphenyl)ethenyl]-benzene (Bis-MSB) have been recorded at room temperature (300K) in solvents of different polarities. The effects of the solvents upon the spectral properties are discussed. The ground-state dipole moments (mu(g)) were determined experimentally by Guggenheim and Higasi method separately and were compared with theoretical values obtained using quantum chemical method. The ground-state dipole moments obtained by using Guggenheim method were then used in the estimation of excited-state dipole moments (mu(e)) by using Lippert's, Bakhshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's equations. In all the above three equations the variation of the Stokes shift with the solvent dielectric constant and refractive index was made use of. It was observed that dipole moments of excited state were higher than those of the ground state for all the dyes.

  6. Solvent effect on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin: Determination of ground and excited state dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülseven Sıdır, Yadigar; Sıdır, İsa

    2013-02-01

    The ground state (μg) and excited state (μe) dipole moments of 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin (abbreviated as 7ADDC) are estimated from solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra as a function of the dielectric constant (ɛ) and refractive index (n). While the ground state dipole moment is determined by using Bilot-Kawski method, the excited state dipole moment is calculated by using Bilot-Kawski, Lippert-Mataga, Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet and Reichardt correlation methods. Excited state dipole moment is observed as larger than the ground state dipole moment due to substantial π-electron density redistribution. The ground state and excited state dipole moments are observed as parallel to each other with angle of 0°. Solute-solvent interactions are analyzed by means of linear solvation free energy relationships (LSER) using dielectric constant function (f(ɛ)), refractive index function (f(n)) and Kamlet-Taft parameters (α and β). Atomic charges, electron densities and molecular orbitals are calculated in vacuum and with solvent effect by using both DFT and TDDFT methods. Solvent accessible surface, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and electrostatic potential (ESP) are visualized as a result of DFT calculations.

  7. Solvent effects on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of some laser dyes: Estimation of ground and excited-state dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thipperudrappa, J.; Biradar, D. S.; Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Inamadar, S. R.; Manekutla, R. J.

    2008-03-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of three extensively used laser dyes namely 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB), 2-(4'- t-butylphenyl)-5-(4″-biphenylyl)-1-oxa-3,4-diazole (BPBD), 1,4-bis[2-(2-methylphenyl)ethenyl]-benzene (Bis-MSB) have been recorded at room temperature (300 K) in solvents of different polarities. The effects of the solvents upon the spectral properties are discussed. The ground-state dipole moments ( μg) were determined experimentally by Guggenheim and Higasi method separately and were compared with theoretical values obtained using quantum chemical method. The ground-state dipole moments obtained by using Guggenheim method were then used in the estimation of excited-state dipole moments ( μe) by using Lippert's, Bakhshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's equations. In all the above three equations the variation of the Stokes shift with the solvent dielectric constant and refractive index was made use of. It was observed that dipole moments of excited state were higher than those of the ground state for all the dyes.

  8. First-principles characterization of the energy landscape and optical spectra of green fluorescent protein along the A→I→B proton transfer route.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Polyakov, Igor V; Morozov, Dmitry I; Krylov, Anna I

    2013-08-07

    Structures and optical spectra of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) forms along the proton transfer route A→I→B are characterized by first-principles calculations. We show that in the ground electronic state the structure representing the wild-type (wt) GFP with the neutral chromophore (A-form) is lowest in energy, whereas the systems with the anionic chromophore (B- and I-forms) are about 1 kcal/mol higher. In the S65T mutant, the structures with the anionic chromophore are significantly lower in energy than the systems with the neutral chromophore. The role of the nearby amino acid residues in the chromophore-containing pocket is re-examined. Calculations reveal that the structural differences between the I- and B-forms (the former has a slightly red-shifted absorption relative to the latter) are based not on the Thr203 orientation, but on the Glu222 position. In the case of wt-GFP, the hydrogen bond between the chromophore and the His148 residue stabilizes the structures with the deprotonated phenolic ring in the I- and B-forms. In the S65T mutant, concerted contributions from the His148 and Thr203 residues are responsible for a considerable energy gap between the lowest energy structure of the B type with the anionic chromophore from other structures.

  9. Surface induced vibrational modes in the fluorescence spectra of PTCDA adsorbed on the KCl(100) and NaCl(100) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Paulheim, A; Marquardt, C; Sokolowski, M; Hochheim, M; Bredow, T; Aldahhak, H; Rauls, E; Schmidt, W G

    2016-12-07

    We report a combined experiment-theory study on low energy vibrational modes in fluorescence spectra of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules. Using very low coverages, isolated molecules were adsorbed on terrace sites or at sites located at residual steps on (100) oriented alkali halide films (KCl and NaCl). The low energy modes couple to the optical transition only because the PTCDA molecule is geometrically distorted (C2v) upon adsorption on the surface; they would be absent for the parent planar (D2h) PTCDA molecule. The modes differ in number and energy for molecules adsorbed on regular terrace sites and molecules adsorbed at step edge sites. Modes appearing for step edge sites have the character of frustrated rotations. Their coupling to the optical transition is a consequence of the further reduced symmetry of the step edge sites. We find a larger number of vibrational modes on NaCl than on KCl. We explain this by the stronger electrostatic bonding of the PTCDA on NaCl compared to KCl. It causes the optical transition to induce stronger changes in the molecular coordinates, thus leading to larger Franck-Condon factors and thus stronger coupling. Our results demonstrate how optical spectroscopy can be used to gain information on adsorption sites of molecules at low surface concentrations.

  10. Characterizing the compositional variation of dissolved organic matter over hydrophobicity and polarity using fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis and two-dimensional correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Ben-Sheng; Qu, Zhen; He, Xiao-Song; Song, Ying-Hao; Jia, Li-Min

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from three leachates with different landfill ages was fractionated, and its compositional variation based on hydrophobicity and polarity was characterized by synchronous fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and two-dimensional correlation technique. The results showed that the bulk DOM and its fractions were comprised of tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances. Tyrosine-like matter was dominant in the young leachate DOM and its fractions, while tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances were the main components in the intermediate and old leachate DOMs and their fractions. Tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances varied concurrently with the hydrophobicity and polarity. However, the change ratio of these substances was different for the three leachates. Tyrosine-like matter, humic-like materials, and fulvic-like substances were the most sensitive to the hydrophobicity and polarity in the young, intermediate, and old leachates, respectively. Such an integrated approach jointly enhances the characterization of the hydrophobicity- and polarity-dependent DOM fractions and provides a promising way to elucidate the environmental behaviors of different DOM species.

  11. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  12. True 3d Images and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; wang@hzgeospace., zheng.

    2012-07-01

    A true 3D image is a geo-referenced image. Besides having its radiometric information, it also has true 3Dground coordinates XYZ for every pixels of it. For a true 3D image, especially a true 3D oblique image, it has true 3D coordinates not only for building roofs and/or open grounds, but also for all other visible objects on the ground, such as visible building walls/windows and even trees. The true 3D image breaks the 2D barrier of the traditional orthophotos by introducing the third dimension (elevation) into the image. From a true 3D image, for example, people will not only be able to read a building's location (XY), but also its height (Z). true 3D images will fundamentally change, if not revolutionize, the way people display, look, extract, use, and represent the geospatial information from imagery. In many areas, true 3D images can make profound impacts on the ways of how geospatial information is represented, how true 3D ground modeling is performed, and how the real world scenes are presented. This paper first gives a definition and description of a true 3D image and followed by a brief review of what key advancements of geospatial technologies have made the creation of true 3D images possible. Next, the paper introduces what a true 3D image is made of. Then, the paper discusses some possible contributions and impacts the true 3D images can make to geospatial information fields. At the end, the paper presents a list of the benefits of having and using true 3D images and the applications of true 3D images in a couple of 3D city modeling projects.

  13. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  14. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  15. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  16. Beowulf 3D: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Rob

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the creative and technical challenges encountered during the production of "Beowulf 3D," director Robert Zemeckis' adaptation of the Old English epic poem and the first film to be simultaneously released in IMAX 3D and digital 3D formats.

  17. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  18. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-08

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  19. Seeing More Is Knowing More: V3D Enables Real-Time 3D Visualization and Quantitative Analysis of Large-Scale Biological Image Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hanchuan; Long, Fuhui

    Everyone understands seeing more is knowing more. However, for large-scale 3D microscopic image analysis, it has not been an easy task to efficiently visualize, manipulate and understand high-dimensional data in 3D, 4D or 5D spaces. We developed a new 3D+ image visualization and analysis platform, V3D, to meet this need. The V3D system provides 3D visualization of gigabyte-sized microscopy image stacks in real time on current laptops and desktops. V3D streamlines the online analysis, measurement and proofreading of complicated image patterns by combining ergonomic functions for selecting a location in an image directly in 3D space and for displaying biological measurements, such as from fluorescent probes, using the overlaid surface objects. V3D runs on all major computer platforms and can be enhanced by software plug-ins to address specific biological problems. To demonstrate this extensibility, we built a V3Dbased application, V3D-Neuron, to reconstruct complex 3D neuronal structures from high-resolution brain images. V3D-Neuron can precisely digitize the morphology of a single neuron in a fruitfly brain in minutes, with about a 17-fold improvement in reliability and tenfold savings in time compared with other neuron reconstruction tools. Using V3D-Neuron, we demonstrate the feasibility of building a high-resolution 3D digital atlas of neurite tracts in the fruitfly brain. V3D can be easily extended using a simple-to-use and comprehensive plugin interface.

  20. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  1. Quantitative 3D structured illumination microscopy of nuclear structures.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Felix; Miron, Ezequiel; Demmerle, Justin; Chitiashvili, Tsotne; Budco, Alexei; Alle, Quentin; Matsuda, Atsushi; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Markaki, Yolanda

    2017-05-01

    3D structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) is the super-resolution technique of choice for multicolor volumetric imaging. Here we provide a validated sample preparation protocol for labeling nuclei of cultured mammalian cells, image acquisition and registration practices, and downstream image analysis of nuclear structures and epigenetic marks. Using immunostaining and replication labeling combined with image segmentation, centroid mapping and nearest-neighbor analyses in open-source environments, 3D maps of nuclear structures are analyzed in individual cells and normalized to fluorescence standards on the nanometer scale. This protocol fills an unmet need for the application of 3D-SIM to the technically challenging nuclear environment, and subsequent quantitative analysis of 3D nuclear structures and epigenetic modifications. In addition, it establishes practical guidelines and open-source solutions using ImageJ/Fiji and the TANGO plugin for high-quality and routinely comparable data generation in immunostaining experiments that apply across model systems. From sample preparation through image analysis, the protocol can be executed within one week.

  2. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  3. Mini 3D for shallow gas reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, T. des; Enns, D.; Kuehn, H.; Parron, D.; Lafet, Y.; Van Hulle, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Mini 3D project was undertaken by TOTAL and ELF with the support of CEPM (Comite d`Etudes Petrolieres et Marines) to define an economical method of obtaining 3D seismic HR data for shallow gas assessment. An experimental 3D survey was carried out with classical site survey techniques in the North Sea. From these data 19 simulations, were produced to compare different acquisition geometries ranging from dual, 600 m long cables to a single receiver. Results show that short offset, low fold and very simple streamer positioning are sufficient to give a reliable 3D image of gas charged bodies. The 3D data allow a much more accurate risk delineation than 2D HR data. Moreover on financial grounds Mini-3D is comparable in cost to a classical HR 2D survey. In view of these results, such HR 3D should now be the standard for shallow gas surveying.

  4. Three-Dimensional Maximum-Quantum Correlation HMQC NMR Spectroscopy (3D MAXY-HMQC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maili; Mao, Xi-An; Ye, Chaohui; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.

    1997-11-01

    The extension of two-dimensional maximum-quantum correlation spectroscopy (2D MAXY NMR), which can be used to simplify complex NMR spectra, to three dimensions (3D) is described. A new pulse sequence for 3D MAXY-HMQC is presented and exemplified using the steroid drug dexamethasone. The sensitivity and coherence transfer efficiency of the MAXY NMR approach has also been assessed in relation to other HMQC- and HSQC-based 3D methods.

  5. Analysis of temporal stability of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the stability of the images generated by electronic autostereoscopic 3D displays, studying the time course of the photometric and colorimetric parameters. The measurements were made on the basis of the procedure recommended in the European guideline EN 61747-6 for the characterization of electronic liquid-crystal displays (LCD). The study uses 3 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and numbers of pixels, taking the measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). For each of the displays, the time course is shown for the tristimulus values and the chromaticity coordinates in the XYZ CIE 1931 system and values from the time periods required to reach stable values of these parameters are presented. For the analysis of how the procedure recommended in the guideline EN 61747-6 for 2D displays influenced the results, and for the adaption of the procedure to the characterization of 3D displays, the experimental conditions of the standard procedure were varied, making the stability analysis in the two ocular channels (RE and LE) of the 3D mode and comparing the results with those corresponding to the 2D. The results of our study show that the stabilization time of a autostereoscopic 3D display with parallax barrier technology depends on the tristimulus value analysed (X, Y, Z) as well as on the presentation mode (2D, 3D); furthermore, it was found that whether the 3D mode is used depends on the ocular channel evaluated (RE, LE).

  6. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Bruce Weisman, R.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and

  7. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  8. The fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra study on the interactions of palladium (II)-Nootropic chelate with Congo red and their analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Jingdong; Liu, Shaopu; Peng, Huanjun; Pan, Ziyu; Bu, Lingli; Xiao, Huan; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2017-04-01

    A highly sensitive detection approach of resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra (RRS) is firstly applied to analyzing nootropic drugs including piracetam (PIR) and oxiracetam (OXI). In HCl-NaAc buffer solution (pH = 3.0), the OXI chelated with palladium (II) to form the chelate cation [Pd2·OXI]2 +, and then reacted with Congo red (CGR) by virtue of electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic force to form binary complex [Pd2·OXI]. CGR2, which could result in the great enhancement of RRS. The resonance Rayleigh scattering signal was recorded at λex = λem = 375 nm. This mixture complex not only has higher RRS, but also makes contribution to significant increase of fluorescence, and the same phenomena also were discovered in PIR. The enhanced RRS intensity is in proportion to the PIR and OXI concentration in the range of 0.03-3.0 μg mL- 1, and the detection limit (DL) of RRS method for PIR and OXI is 2.3 ng mL- 1 and 9.7 ng mL- 1. In addition, the DL of fluorescence method for PIR and OXI is 8.4 μg mL- 1 and 19.5 μg mL- 1. Obviously, the RRS is the highly sensitive method, and the recoveries of the two kinds of nootropic drugs were range from 100.4% to 101.8.0% with RSD (n = 5) from 1.1% to 3.1% by RRS method. This paper not only investigated the optimum conditions for detecting nootropics with using RRS method, but also focused on the reasons for enhancing RRS intensity and the reaction mechanism, which in order to firm and contract the resultant. Finally, The RRS method has been applied to detect nootropic drugs in human urine samples with satisfactory results. Fig. S2. The effect of ionic strength: Pd (II)-CGR system (curve a); Pd (II)-OXI-CGR system (curve b); Pd (II)-PIR- CGR system (curve c). Pd (II): 2.0 × 10- 4 mol L- 1; CGR: 1.0 × 10- 5 mol L- 1; OXI: 1.5 μg mL- 1; PIR: 2 μg mL- 1; NaCl: 1 mol L- 1. Fig. S3. The effect of time: Pd (II)-OXI-CGR system (curve a); Pd (II)-PIR-CGR system (curve b). Pd (II): 2.0 × 10- 4 mol L- 1; CGR: 1.0 × 10- 5 mol L- 1

  9. 3D change detection - Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Tian, Jiaojiao; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Due to the unprecedented technology development of sensors, platforms and algorithms for 3D data acquisition and generation, 3D spaceborne, airborne and close-range data, in the form of image based, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) based point clouds, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and 3D city models, become more accessible than ever before. Change detection (CD) or time-series data analysis in 3D has gained great attention due to its capability of providing volumetric dynamics to facilitate more applications and provide more accurate results. The state-of-the-art CD reviews aim to provide a comprehensive synthesis and to simplify the taxonomy of the traditional remote sensing CD techniques, which mainly sit within the boundary of 2D image/spectrum analysis, largely ignoring the particularities of 3D aspects of the data. The inclusion of 3D data for change detection (termed 3D CD), not only provides a source with different modality for analysis, but also transcends the border of traditional top-view 2D pixel/object-based analysis to highly detailed, oblique view or voxel-based geometric analysis. This paper reviews the recent developments and applications of 3D CD using remote sensing and close-range data, in support of both academia and industry researchers who seek for solutions in detecting and analyzing 3D dynamics of various objects of interest. We first describe the general considerations of 3D CD problems in different processing stages and identify CD types based on the information used, being the geometric comparison and geometric-spectral analysis. We then summarize relevant works and practices in urban, environment, ecology and civil applications, etc. Given the broad spectrum of applications and different types of 3D data, we discuss important issues in 3D CD methods. Finally, we present concluding remarks in algorithmic aspects of 3D CD.

  10. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  11. A Newly Developed Model for Fluorescence of C2H6 ν5 in Comets and Application to Infrared Spectra Acquired with NIRSPEC at Keck II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeva, Yana L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the compositional diversity of cometary nuclei is key to understanding the formation and evolution of the Solar System, and the origin of water and prebiotic organics on the Earth. For most polyatomic gases, a production rate can be obtained from measured ro-vibrational intensities if an accurate rotational temperature is available, and the comparison of temperatures displayed by individual molecular species can reveal additional insights into physics in the cometary inner coma. Until now, accurate temperatures could be derived for HCN, CO, and H2O, but not for ethane (C2H6). As a symmetric hydrocarbon, C2H6 is uniquely sampled in the infrared, but the fine rotational structure of the ν7 Q-branches at 3.3 μm cannot be resolved by current infrared spectrometers, ultimately limiting the retrievals of rotational temperatures from these lines. However, the complex ro-vibrational structure (P- and R-branches) of the ν5 band at 3.5 μm is resolved by the Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope (NIRSPEC). We developed a fluorescence model for the infrared ν5 band of C2H6, and applied it to interpret high-resolution infrared spectra acquired with NIRSPEC. We present rotational temperatures and production rates for C2H6 in multiple comets. We compare the extracted rotational temperatures for ethane with those obtained from simultaneous measurements of other species (H2O and HCN). We also compare mixing ratios derived from the C2H6 ν5 band with those derived from the previously analyzed (by NASA GSFC team members) ν7 band. This work now establishes a robust method for quantifying additional physical parameters for ethane in comets.

  12. 3D measurement for rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Peter; Lilienblum, Tilo; Sommerkorn, Gerd; Michaelis, Bernd

    1996-08-01

    Optical 3-D measurement is an interesting approach for rapid prototyping. On one hand it's necessary to get the 3-D data of an object and on the other hand it's necessary to check the manufactured object (quality checking). Optical 3-D measurement can realize both. Classical 3-D measurement procedures based on photogrammetry cause systematic errors at strongly curved surfaces or steps in surfaces. One possibility to reduce these errors is to calculate the 3-D coordinates from several successively taken images. Thus it's possible to get higher spatial resolution and to reduce the systematic errors at 'problem surfaces.' Another possibility is to process the measurement values by neural networks. A modified associative memory smoothes and corrects the calculated 3-D coordinates using a-priori knowledge about the measurement object.

  13. The Near-Ir Spectrum of CH_3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaoyue; Lehmann, Kevin; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.; Rey, Michael; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    The near-IR spectrum, from 5000-8960 cm-1, of isotopically pure CH_3D was taken at temperatures of 294, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, and 900K with a high resolution Fourier Transform machine at Old Dominion University. The spectra where analyzed to give the wavenumbers, integrated line intensities, and lower state term values (using lines observed in at least 3 different spectra). For the 294 K spectrum 12080 lines with S between 3.6x10-22 and 1x10-27 cm (not corrected for CH_3D natural abundance) were determined for this spectral interval. A theoretical spectrum of CH_3D has also been calculated at the Univ. of Reins, with >400,000 transitions predicted between 5000-6300 cm-1 with S values between 2.1x10-22 and 1 x 10-27 cm at 294K. Comparison of the predictions with 175 J" = 0 and 1 transitions previously assigned by the ETH group^1 shows that for 130 of these the absolute difference between the observed and predicted line wavenumbers is less than 0.1 cm-1 and for all but one transition the absolute difference is less than 1 cm-1. In this project, we are combining the temperature dependence of the line intensities, combination differences, and comparisons of line positions and strengths with the theoretical spectrum to extend the assignments of CH_3D lines in this spectral region. Selected assignments will be confirmed by IR-IR double resonance measurements at the University of Virginia. Ultimately, we hope to give a global analysis of CH_3D spectrum using a global effective Hamiltonian model. 1. Ulenikov, O.N. et al., Molecular Physics 108, 1209-1240 (2010)

  14. Potassium uranyl borate 3D framework compound resulted from temperature directed hydroborate condensation: structure, spectroscopy, and dissolution studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaomei; Liu, Zhiyong; Yang, Shitong; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2016-10-04

    The equatorial coordination nature of the uranyl unit has resulted in only three uranyl borate 3D framework compounds reported so far formed from boric acid flux reactions conducted at 190 °C while all others are 2D layers. Here in this work, by increasing the reaction temperature to 250 °C, a new potassium uranyl borate K[(UO2)B6O10(OH)] (KUBO-4) framework compound is synthesized that shares the same layer topology with the previously reported 2D layered KUBO-1. The 3D structure of KUBO-4 is achieved by interlayer hydroborate condensation. The KUBO-4 was further characterized with single crystal XRD, SHG and fluorescence spectra, and TG/DSC measurements. A deep understanding regarding the dissolution behaviours of uranyl borate is achieved via solubility studies of the KUBO-1 and KUBO-4 performed using a combination of ICP-MS, powder XRD, and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The results confirm the lack of stability of borates in aqueous solutions with the presence of coordinating ligands in the environment regardless of the structure types.

  15. Photorefractive Polymers for Updateable 3D Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-24

    Final Performance Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-01-2007 to 11-30-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photorefractive Polymers for Updateable 3D ...ABSTRACT During the tenure of this project a large area updateable 3D color display has been developed for the first time using a new co-polymer...photorefractive polymers have been demonstrated. Moreover, a 6 inch × 6 inch sample was fabricated demonstrating the feasibility of making large area 3D

  16. 3D Microperfusion Model of ADPKD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Stratasys 3D printer . PDMS was cast in the negative molds in order to create permanent biocompatible plastic masters (SmoothCast 310). All goals of task...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0304 TITLE: 3D Microperfusion Model of ADPKD PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David L. Kaplan CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual Report 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D

  17. 3D carotid plaque MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS There has been significant progress made in 3D carotid plaque magnetic resonance imaging techniques in recent years. 3D plaque imaging clearly represents the future in clinical use. With effective flow suppression techniques, choices of different contrast weighting acquisitions, and time-efficient imaging approaches, 3D plaque imaging offers flexible imaging plane and view angle analysis, large coverage, multi-vascular beds capability, and even can be used in fast screening. PMID:26610656

  18. 3-D Extensions for Trustworthy Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    3- D Extensions for Trustworthy Systems (Invited Paper) Ted Huffmire∗, Timothy Levin∗, Cynthia Irvine∗, Ryan Kastner† and Timothy Sherwood...address these problems, we propose an approach to trustworthy system development based on 3- D integration, an emerging chip fabrication technique in...which two or more integrated circuit dies are fabricated individually and then combined into a single stack using vertical conductive posts. With 3- D

  19. Hardware Trust Implications of 3-D Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    enhancing a commod- ity processor with a variety of security functions. This paper examines the 3-D design approach and provides an analysis concluding...of key components. The question addressed by this paper is, “Can a 3-D control plane provide useful secure services when it is conjoined with an...untrust- worthy computation plane?” Design-level investigation of this question yields a definite yes. This paper explores 3- D applications and their

  20. Digital holography and 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Partha; Barbastathis, George; Kim, Myung; Kukhtarev, Nickolai

    2011-03-01

    This feature issue on Digital Holography and 3-D Imaging comprises 15 papers on digital holographic techniques and applications, computer-generated holography and encryption techniques, and 3-D display. It is hoped that future work in the area leads to innovative applications of digital holography and 3-D imaging to biology and sensing, and to the development of novel nonlinear dynamic digital holographic techniques.

  1. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  2. 3-D imaging and illustration of mouse intestinal neurovascular complex.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ya-Yuan; Peng, Shih-Jung; Lin, Hsin-Yao; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Because of the dispersed nature of nerves and blood vessels, standard histology cannot provide a global and associated observation of the enteric nervous system (ENS) and vascular network. We prepared transparent mouse intestine and combined vessel painting and three-dimensional (3-D) neurohistology for joint visualization of the ENS and vasculature. Cardiac perfusion of the fluorescent wheat germ agglutinin (vessel painting) was used to label the ileal blood vessels. The pan-neuronal marker PGP9.5, sympathetic neuronal marker tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), serotonin, and glial markers S100B and GFAP were used as the immunostaining targets of neural tissues. The fluorescently labeled specimens were immersed in the optical clearing solution to improve photon penetration for 3-D confocal microscopy. Notably, we simultaneously revealed the ileal microstructure, vasculature, and innervation with micrometer-level resolution. Four examples are given: 1) the morphology of the TH-labeled sympathetic nerves: sparse in epithelium, perivascular at the submucosa, and intraganglionic at myenteric plexus; 2) distinct patterns of the extrinsic perivascular and intrinsic pericryptic innervation at the submucosal-mucosal interface; 3) different associations of serotonin cells with the mucosal neurovascular elements in the villi and crypts; and 4) the periganglionic capillary network at the myenteric plexus and its contact with glial fibers. Our 3-D imaging approach provides a useful tool to simultaneously reveal the nerves and blood vessels in a space continuum for panoramic illustration and analysis of the neurovascular complex to better understand the intestinal physiology and diseases.

  3. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  4. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-07

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  5. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  6. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  7. 3D Medical Volume Reconstruction Using Web Services

    PubMed Central

    Kooper, Rob; Shirk, Andrew; Lee, Sang-Chul; Lin, Amy; Folberg, Robert; Bajcsy, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of 3D medical volume reconstruction using web services. The use of proposed web services is motivated by the fact that the problem of 3D medical volume reconstruction requires significant computer resources and human expertise in medical and computer science areas. Web services are implemented as an additional layer to a dataflow framework called Data to Knowledge. In the collaboration between UIC and NCSA, pre-processed input images at NCSA are made accessible to medical collaborators for registration. Every time UIC medical collaborators inspected images and selected corresponding features for registration, the web service at NCSA is contacted and the registration processing query is executed using the Image to Knowledge library of registration methods. Co-registered frames are returned for verification by medical collaborators in a new window. In this paper, we present 3D volume reconstruction problem requirements and the architecture of the developed prototype system at http://isda.ncsa.uiuc.edu/MedVolume. We also explain the tradeoffs of our system design and provide experimental data to support our system implementation. The prototype system has been used for multiple 3D volume reconstructions of blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry patterns in histological sections of uveal melanoma studied by fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscope. PMID:18336808

  8. Potential energy curve of the X0 +( 1Σ ++) ground state of HgAr determined from A0 +( 3Π) → X0 +andB1( 3Σ + → X0 + fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koperski, J.

    1996-11-01

    A0 +( 3Π) → X0 +( 1Σ +) andB1( 3Σ +) → X0 +( 1Σ +) fluorescence spectra of HgAr van der Waals molecules were previously produced in a pulsed supersonic molecular beam crossed with a pulsed dye-laser beam, following excitation of single vibronic levels. The dispersed fluorescence displayed characteristic Condon internal diffraction (CID) patterns consisting of bound-free reflection type, continuous spectra, and also bound-bound discrete features. An analysis of the A O+ → X0 + and B1 → X O+ bound-bound spectra indicates that a Morese function is an adequate representatation of the X0 + potential energy (PE) curve below the dissociation limit. In simulation of the A O+ → X0 + bound-free spectra of the Morse, Lennard-Jones ( n - 6) and Maitland-Smith functions were tested, and the Maitland-Smith potential was found to be a good representation of the repulsive wall of the X0 + PE curve above the dissociation limit over the internuclear separation range R = 2.8-3.5 Å.

  9. Integration of real-time 3D image acquisition and multiview 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Li, Wei; Wang, Jingyi; Liu, Yongchun

    2014-03-01

    Seamless integration of 3D acquisition and 3D display systems offers enhanced experience in 3D visualization of the real world objects or scenes. The vivid representation of captured 3D objects displayed on a glasses-free 3D display screen could bring the realistic viewing experience to viewers as if they are viewing real-world scene. Although the technologies in 3D acquisition and 3D display have advanced rapidly in recent years, effort is lacking in studying the seamless integration of these two different aspects of 3D technologies. In this paper, we describe our recent progress on integrating a light-field 3D acquisition system and an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display for real-time light field capture and display. This paper focuses on both the architecture design and the implementation of the hardware and the software of this integrated 3D system. A prototype of the integrated 3D system is built to demonstrate the real-time 3D acquisition and 3D display capability of our proposed system.

  10. Immersive 3D Geovisualization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how immersive 3D geovisualization can be used in higher education. Based on MacEachren and Kraak's geovisualization cube, we examine the usage of immersive 3D geovisualization and its usefulness in a research-based learning module on flood risk, called GEOSimulator. Results of a survey among participating students…

  11. A 3D Geostatistical Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, W. W.; Stevenson, Graig; Patel, Ketan; Wang, Jun

    1999-02-09

    This software provides accurate 3D reservoir modeling tools and high quality 3D graphics for PC platforms enabling engineers and geologists to better comprehend reservoirs and consequently improve their decisions. The mapping algorithms are fractals, kriging, sequential guassian simulation, and three nearest neighbor methods.

  12. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  13. Topology dictionary for 3D video understanding.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tony; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that achieves 3D video understanding. 3D video consists of a stream of 3D models of subjects in motion. The acquisition of long sequences requires large storage space (2 GB for 1 min). Moreover, it is tedious to browse data sets and extract meaningful information. We propose the topology dictionary to encode and describe 3D video content. The model consists of a topology-based shape descriptor dictionary which can be generated from either extracted patterns or training sequences. The model relies on 1) topology description and classification using Reeb graphs, and 2) a Markov motion graph to represent topology change states. We show that the use of Reeb graphs as the high-level topology descriptor is relevant. It allows the dictionary to automatically model complex sequences, whereas other strategies would require prior knowledge on the shape and topology of the captured subjects. Our approach serves to encode 3D video sequences, and can be applied for content-based description and summarization of 3D video sequences. Furthermore, topology class labeling during a learning process enables the system to perform content-based event recognition. Experiments were carried out on various 3D videos. We showcase an application for 3D video progressive summarization using the topology dictionary.

  14. 3D elastic control for mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Martin; Pouderoux, Joachim; Guitton, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    To increase the input space of mobile devices, the authors developed a proof-of-concept 3D elastic controller that easily adapts to mobile devices. This embedded device improves the completion of high-level interaction tasks such as visualization of large documents and navigation in 3D environments. It also opens new directions for tomorrow's mobile applications.

  15. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  16. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  17. Infrastructure for 3D Imaging Test Bed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-11

    analysis. (c.) Real time detection & analysis of human gait: using a video camera we capture walking human silhouette for pattern modeling and gait ... analysis . Fig. 5 shows the scanning result result that is fed into a Geo-magic software tool for 3D meshing. Fig. 5: 3D scanning result In

  18. Wow! 3D Content Awakens the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2010-01-01

    From her first encounter with stereoscopic 3D technology designed for classroom instruction, Megan Timme, principal at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet School in Dallas, sensed it could be transformative. Last spring, when she began pilot-testing 3D content in her third-, fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, Timme wasn't disappointed. Students…

  19. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  20. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion"…

  1. 3D, or Not to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Keith

    2012-01-01

    It may be too soon for students to be showing up for class with popcorn and gummy bears, but technology similar to that behind the 3D blockbuster movie "Avatar" is slowly finding its way into college classrooms. 3D classroom projectors are taking students on fantastic voyages inside the human body, to the ruins of ancient Greece--even to faraway…

  2. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  3. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  4. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  5. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  6. 6D Interpretation of 3D Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfray, Yannick; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We show that 3D gravity, in its pure connection formulation, admits a natural 6D interpretation. The 3D field equations for the connection are equivalent to 6D Hitchin equations for the Chern–Simons 3-form in the total space of the principal bundle over the 3-dimensional base. Turning this construction around one gets an explanation of why the pure connection formulation of 3D gravity exists. More generally, we interpret 3D gravity as the dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory. To this end, we show that any \\text{SU}(2) invariant closed 3-form in the total space of the principal \\text{SU}(2) bundle can be parametrised by a connection together with a 2-form field on the base. The dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory then gives rise to 3D gravity coupled to a topological 2-form field.

  7. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  8. Quon 3D language for quantum information

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengwei; Wozniakowski, Alex; Jaffe, Arthur M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D topological picture-language for quantum information. Our approach combines charged excitations carried by strings, with topological properties that arise from embedding the strings in the interior of a 3D manifold with boundary. A quon is a composite that acts as a particle. Specifically, a quon is a hemisphere containing a neutral pair of open strings with opposite charge. We interpret multiquons and their transformations in a natural way. We obtain a type of relation, a string–genus “joint relation,” involving both a string and the 3D manifold. We use the joint relation to obtain a topological interpretation of the C∗-Hopf algebra relations, which are widely used in tensor networks. We obtain a 3D representation of the controlled NOT (CNOT) gate that is considerably simpler than earlier work, and a 3D topological protocol for teleportation. PMID:28167790

  9. Characterizing Properties and Performance of 3D Printed Plastic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    We are determining various characteristics of the performance of 3D printed scintillators. A scintillator luminesces when an energetic particle raises electrons to an excited state by depositing some of its energy in the atom. When these excited electrons fall back down to their stable states, they emit the excess energy as light. We have characterized the transmission spectrum, emission spectrum, and relative intensity of light produced by 3D printed scintillators. We are also determining mechanical properties such as tensile strength and compressibility, and the refractive index. The emission and transmission spectra were measured using a monochromator. By observing the transmission spectrum, we can see which optical wavelengths are absorbed by the scintillator. This is then used to correct the emission spectrum, since this absorption is present in the emission spectrum. Using photomultiplier tubes in conjunction with integration hardware (QDC) to measure the intensity of light emitted by 3D printed scintillators, we compare with commercial plastic scintillators. We are using the characterizations to determine if 3D printed scintillators are a viable alternative to commercial scintillators for use at Jefferson Lab in nuclear and accelerated physics detectors. I would like to thank Wouter Deconinck, as well as the Parity group at the College of William and Mary for all advice and assistance with my research.

  10. An in-depth spectroscopic examination of molecular bands from 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. II. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, A. J.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Homeier, D.; Plez, B.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Tighter constraints on metal-poor stars we observe are needed to better understand the chemical processes of the early Universe. Computing a stellar spectrum in 3D allows one to model complex stellar behaviours, which cannot be replicated in 1D. Aims: We examine the effect that the intrinsic CNO abundances have on a 3D model structure and the resulting 3D spectrum synthesis. Methods: Model atmospheres were computed in 3D for three distinct CNO chemical compositions using the CO5BOLD model atmosphere code, and their internal structures were examined. Synthetic spectra were computed from these models using Linfor3D and they were compared. New 3D abundance corrections for the G-band and a selection of UV OH lines were also computed. Results: The varying CNO abundances change the metal content of the 3D models. This had an effect on the model structure and the resulting synthesis. However, it was found that the C/O ratio had a larger effect than the overall metal content of a model. Conclusions: Our results suggest that varying the C/O ratio has a substantial impact on the internal structure of the 3D model, even in the hot turn-off star models explored here. This suggests that bespoke 3D models, for specific CNO abundances should be sought. Such effects are not seen in 1D at these temperature regimes.

  11. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  12. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  13. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D presentations could provide additional sensorial cues (e.g., depth cues) that lead to a higher sense of being surrounded by the stimulus; a connection through general interest such that 3D presentation increases a viewer’s interest that leads to greater attention paid to the stimulus (e.g., "involvement"); and a connection through discomfort, with the 3D goggles causing discomfort that interferes with involvement and thus with memory. The memories of 396 participants who viewed two-dimensional (2D) or 3D movies at movie theaters in Southern California were tested. Within three days of viewing a movie, participants filled out an online anonymous questionnaire that queried them about their movie content memories, subjective movie-going experiences (including emotional reactions and "presence") and demographic backgrounds. The responses to the questionnaire were subjected to path analyses in which several different links between 3D presentation to memory (and other variables) were explored. The results showed there were no effects of 3D presentation, either directly or indirectly, upon memory. However, the largest effects of 3D presentation were on emotions and immersion, with 3D presentation leading to reduced positive emotions, increased negative emotions and lowered immersion, compared to 2D presentations. PMID:28078331

  14. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.

  15. Multielectron spectroscopy: Auger decays of the krypton 3d hole

    SciTech Connect

    Palaudoux, J.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Andric, L.; Ito, K.; Shigemasa, E.; Eland, J. H. D.; Jonauskas, V.; Kucas, S.; Karazija, R.

    2010-10-15

    The emission of one or two Auger electrons, following Kr 3d inner-shell ionization by synchrotron light, has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. All electrons emitted in the process are detected in coincidence and analyzed in energy thanks to a magnetic-bottle electron time-of-flight spectrometer. In addition, noncoincident high-resolution electron spectra have been measured to characterize the cascade double-Auger paths more fully. Combination of the two experimental approaches and of our calculations allows a full determination of the decay pathways and branching ratios in the case of Kr 3d single- and double-Auger decays. The Kr{sup 3+} threshold is found at 74.197{+-}0.020 eV.

  16. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology.

  17. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  18. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233

  19. 3D imaging in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sam; Jones, Carl; Plassmann, Peter

    2010-06-16

    This paper describes the investigation of a new 3D capture method for acquiring and subsequent forensic analysis of bite mark injuries on human skin. When documenting bite marks with standard 2D cameras errors in photographic technique can occur if best practice is not followed. Subsequent forensic analysis of the mark is problematic when a 3D structure is recorded into a 2D space. Although strict guidelines (BAFO) exist, these are time-consuming to follow and, due to their complexity, may produce errors. A 3D image capture and processing system might avoid the problems resulting from the 2D reduction process, simplifying the guidelines and reducing errors. Proposed Solution: a series of experiments are described in this paper to demonstrate that the potential of a 3D system might produce suitable results. The experiments tested precision and accuracy of the traditional 2D and 3D methods. A 3D image capture device minimises the amount of angular distortion, therefore such a system has the potential to create more robust forensic evidence for use in courts. A first set of experiments tested and demonstrated which method of forensic analysis creates the least amount of intra-operator error. A second set tested and demonstrated which method of image capture creates the least amount of inter-operator error and visual distortion. In a third set the effects of angular distortion on 2D and 3D methods of image capture were evaluated.

  20. NUBEAM developments and 3d halo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Medley, S. S.; Kaye, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments related to the 3D halo model in NUBEAM code are described. To have a reliable halo neutral source for diagnostic simulation, the TRANSP/NUBEAM code has been enhanced with full implementation of ADAS atomic physic ground state and excited state data for hydrogenic beams and mixed species plasma targets. The ADAS codes and database provide the density and temperature dependence of the atomic data, and the collective nature of the state excitation process. To be able to populate 3D halo output with sufficient statistical resolution, the capability to control the statistics of fast ion CX modeling and for thermal halo launch has been added to NUBEAM. The 3D halo neutral model is based on modification and extension of the ``beam in box'' aligned 3d Cartesian grid that includes the neutral beam itself, 3D fast neutral densities due to CX of partially slowed down fast ions in the beam halo region, 3D thermal neutral densities due to CX deposition and fast neutral recapture source. More details on the 3D halo simulation design will be presented.

  1. Optically rewritable 3D liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Srivastava, A K; Zhang, W; Wang, L; Chigrinov, V G; Kwok, H S

    2014-11-01

    Optically rewritable liquid crystal display (ORWLCD) is a concept based on the optically addressed bi-stable display that does not need any power to hold the image after being uploaded. Recently, the demand for the 3D image display has increased enormously. Several attempts have been made to achieve 3D image on the ORWLCD, but all of them involve high complexity for image processing on both hardware and software levels. In this Letter, we disclose a concept for the 3D-ORWLCD by dividing the given image in three parts with different optic axis. A quarter-wave plate is placed on the top of the ORWLCD to modify the emerging light from different domains of the image in different manner. Thereafter, Polaroid glasses can be used to visualize the 3D image. The 3D image can be refreshed, on the 3D-ORWLCD, in one-step with proper ORWLCD printer and image processing, and therefore, with easy image refreshing and good image quality, such displays can be applied for many applications viz. 3D bi-stable display, security elements, etc.

  2. Nanoimaging of Focal Adhesion Dynamics in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Aguilar, Jose S.; Tsai, Connie Y.; Wu, GuiKai; Gratton, Enrico; Digman, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Organization and dynamics of focal adhesion proteins have been well characterized in cells grown on two-dimensional (2D) cell culture surfaces. However, much less is known about the dynamic association of these proteins in the 3D microenvironment. Limited imaging technologies capable of measuring protein interactions in real time and space for cells grown in 3D is a major impediment in understanding how proteins function under different environmental cues. In this study, we applied the nano-scale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation (nSPIRO) technique and combined the scaning-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (sFCS) and the number and molecular brightness (N&B) methods to investigate paxillin and actin dynamics at focal adhesions in 3D. Both MDA-MB-231 cells and U2OS cells produce elongated protrusions with high intensity regions of paxillin in cell grown in 3D collagen matrices. Using sFCS we found higher percentage of slow diffusing proteins at these focal spots, suggesting assembling/disassembling processes. In addition, the N&B analysis shows paxillin aggregated predominantly at these focal contacts which are next to collagen fibers. At those sites, actin showed slower apparent diffusion rate, which indicated that actin is either polymerizing or binding to the scaffolds in these locals. Our findings demonstrate that by multiplexing these techniques we have the ability to spatially and temporally quantify focal adhesion assembly and disassembly in 3D space and allow the understanding tumor cell invasion in a more complex relevant environment. PMID:24959851

  3. 3D packaging for integrated circuit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Palmer, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    A goal was set for high density, high performance microelectronics pursued through a dense 3D packing of integrated circuits. A {open_quotes}tool set{close_quotes} of assembly processes have been developed that enable 3D system designs: 3D thermal analysis, silicon electrical through vias, IC thinning, mounting wells in silicon, adhesives for silicon stacking, pretesting of IC chips before commitment to stacks, and bond pad bumping. Validation of these process developments occurred through both Sandia prototypes and subsequent commercial examples.

  4. FUN3D Manual: 12.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.5, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational uid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables ecient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  5. FUN3D Manual: 12.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.4, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixedelement unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  6. 3D Immersive Visualization with Astrophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2017-01-01

    We present the refinement of a new 3D immersion technique for astrophysical data visualization.Methodology to create 360 degree spherical panoramas is reviewed. The 3D software package Blender coupled with Python and the Google Spatial Media module are used together to create the final data products. Data can be viewed interactively with a mobile phone or tablet or in a web browser. The technique can apply to different kinds of astronomical data including 3D stellar and galaxy catalogs, images, and planetary maps.

  7. A high capacity 3D steganography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-hung; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a very high-capacity and low-distortion 3D steganography scheme. Our steganography approach is based on a novel multilayered embedding scheme to hide secret messages in the vertices of 3D polygon models. Experimental results show that the cover model distortion is very small as the number of hiding layers ranges from 7 to 13 layers. To the best of our knowledge, this novel approach can provide much higher hiding capacity than other state-of-the-art approaches, while obeying the low distortion and security basic requirements for steganography on 3D models.

  8. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high