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Sample records for 3d geologic framework

  1. Evolution of 3-D geologic framework modeling and its application to groundwater flow studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, Charles D.; Smith, David V.

    2012-01-01

    In this Fact Sheet, the authors discuss the evolution of project 3-D subsurface framework modeling, research in hydrostratigraphy and airborne geophysics, and methodologies used to link geologic and groundwater flow models.

  2. The Importance of Communicating Uncertainty to the 3D Geological Framework Model of Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCormack, Kelsey

    2015-04-01

    The Alberta Geological Survey (AGS) has been tasked with developing a 3-dimensional (3D) geological framework for Alberta (660,000 km2). Our goal is to develop 'The Framework' as a sophisticated platform, capable of integrating a variety of data types from multiple sources enabling the development of multi-scale, interdisciplinary models with built-in feedback mechanisms, allowing the individual components of the model to adapt and evolve over time as our knowledge and understanding of the subsurface increases. The geoscience information within these models is often taken at face value and assumed that the attribute accuracy is equivalent to the digital accuracy recorded by the computer, which can lead to overconfidence in the model results. We need to make sure that decision makers understand that models are simply versions of reality and all contain a certain amount of error and uncertainty. More importantly, it is necessary to convey that error and uncertainty are not bad, and should be quantified and understood rather than ignored. This presentation will focus on how the AGS is quantifying and communicating uncertainty within the Geologic Framework to decision makers and the general public, as well as utilizing uncertainty results to strategically prioritize future work.

  3. Construction of 3-D geologic framework and textural models for Cuyama Valley groundwater basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Hanson, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is the sole source of water supply in Cuyama Valley, a rural agricultural area in Santa Barbara County, California, in the southeasternmost part of the Coast Ranges of California. Continued groundwater withdrawals and associated water-resource management concerns have prompted an evaluation of the hydrogeology and water availability for the Cuyama Valley groundwater basin by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Water Agency Division of the Santa Barbara County Department of Public Works. As a part of the overall groundwater evaluation, this report documents the construction of a digital three-dimensional geologic framework model of the groundwater basin suitable for use within a numerical hydrologic-flow model. The report also includes an analysis of the spatial variability of lithology and grain size, which forms the geologic basis for estimating aquifer hydraulic properties. The geologic framework was constructed as a digital representation of the interpreted geometry and thickness of the principal stratigraphic units within the Cuyama Valley groundwater basin, which include younger alluvium, older alluvium, and the Morales Formation, and underlying consolidated bedrock. The framework model was constructed by creating gridded surfaces representing the altitude of the top of each stratigraphic unit from various input data, including lithologic and electric logs from oil and gas wells and water wells, cross sections, and geologic maps. Sediment grain-size data were analyzed in both two and three dimensions to help define textural variations in the Cuyama Valley groundwater basin and identify areas with similar geologic materials that potentially have fairly uniform hydraulic properties. Sediment grain size was used to construct three-dimensional textural models that employed simple interpolation between drill holes and two-dimensional textural models for each stratigraphic unit that incorporated spatial structure of the textural data.

  4. Empirical assessment of the uncertainty in a 3-D geological framework model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, Murray; Mathers, Steve; Thorpe, Steve; Arkley, Sarah; Morgan, Dave; Lawrence, Dave

    2013-04-01

    Three-dimensional framework models are the state of the art to present geologists' understanding of a region in a form that can be used to support planning and decision making. However, there is little information on the uncertainty of such framework models. We report a statistically-designed experiment in which each of five geologists independently produced a framework model of a single region in the east of England. Each geologist used a unique set of borehole observations from which to make their model. Each set was made by withholding five unique validation boreholes from the set of all available boreholes. The models were then compared with the validation observations. Between-modeller differences were not a significant source of variation in framework model error. There was no evidence of systematic bias in the modelled depth for any unit, but there was a statistically significant but small tendency for the mean error to increase with depth below the surface. The confidence interval for the predicted height of a surface at a point ranged from ±5.6 m to ±6.4 m. There was some evidence that the variance of the model error increased with depth, but no evidence that it differed between modellers or varied with the number of close-neighbouring boreholes or distance to the outcrop. These results are specific to the area that has been modelled, with relatively simple geology, and they must also reflect the relatively dense set of boreholes available for modelling. The method should be applied under a range of conditions to derive more general conclusions, and benchmark quality measures for three-dimensional models of contrasting terranes.

  5. 3D Geological modelling - towards a European level infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kathryn A.; van der Krogt, Rob; Busschers, Freek S.

    2013-04-01

    The joint European Geological Surveys are preparing the ground for a "European Geological Data Infrastructure" (EGDI), under the framework of the FP7-project EGDI-Scope. This scoping study, started in June 2012, for a pan-European e-Infrastructure is based on the successes of earlier joint projects including 'OneGeology-Europe' and aims to provide the backbone for serving interoperable, geological data currently held by European Geological Surveys. Also data from past, ongoing and future European projects will be incorporated. The scope will include an investigation of the functional and technical requirements for serving 3D geological models and will look to research the potential for providing a framework to integrate models at different scales, and form a structure for enabling the development of new and innovative model delivery mechanisms. The EGDI-scope project encourages pan-European inter-disciplinary collaboration between all European Geological Surveys. It aims to enhance emerging web based technologies that will facilitate the delivery of geological data to user communities involved in European policy making and international industry, but also to geoscientific research communities and the general public. Therefore, stakeholder input and communication is imperative to the success, as is the collaboration with all the Geological Surveys of Europe. The most important functional and technical requirements for delivery of such information at pan-European level will be derived from exchanges with relevant European stakeholder representatives and providers of geological data. For handling and delivering 3D geological model data the project will need to address a number of strategic issues: • Which are the most important issues and queries for the relevant stakeholders, requiring 3D geological models? How can this be translated to functional requirements for development and design of an integrated European application? • How to handle the very large

  6. Fallon FORGE 3D Geologic Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    An x,y,z scattered data file for the 3D geologic model of the Fallon FORGE site. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  7. Geological mapping goes 3-D in response to societal needs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorleifson, H.; Berg, R.C.; Russell, H.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The transition to 3-D mapping has been made possible by technological advances in digital cartography, GIS, data storage, analysis, and visualization. Despite various challenges, technological advancements facilitated a gradual transition from 2-D maps to 2.5-D draped maps to 3-D geological mapping, supported by digital spatial and relational databases that can be interrogated horizontally or vertically and viewed interactively. Challenges associated with data collection, human resources, and information management are daunting due to their resource and training requirements. The exchange of strategies at the workshops has highlighted the use of basin analysis to develop a process-based predictive knowledge framework that facilitates data integration. Three-dimensional geological information meets a public demand that fills in the blanks left by conventional 2-D mapping. Two-dimensional mapping will, however, remain the standard method for extensive areas of complex geology, particularly where deformed igneous and metamorphic rocks defy attempts at 3-D depiction.

  8. 3D Geologic Model of the San Diego Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danskin, W. R.; Cromwell, G.; Glockhoff, C.; Martin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Prior geologic studies of the San Diego area, including northern Baja California, Mexico, focused on site investigations, characterization of rock formations, or earthquake hazards. No comprehensive, quantitative model characterizing the three-dimensional (3D) geology of the entire area has been developed. The lack of such a model limits understanding of large-scale processes, such as development of ancient landforms, and groundwater movement and availability. To evaluate these regional processes, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study to better understand the geologic structure of the San Diego area. A cornerstone of this study is the installation and analysis of 77 wells at 12 multiple-depth monitoring-well sites. Geologic information from these wells was combined with lithologic data from 81 oil exploration wells and municipal and private water wells, gravity and seismic interpretations, and paleontological interpretations. These data were analyzed in conjunction with geologic maps and digital elevation models to develop a 3D geologic model of the San Diego area, in particular of the San Diego embayment. Existing interpretations of regional surficial geology, faulting, and tectonic history provided the framework for this model, which was refined by independent evaluation of subsurface geology. Geologic formations were simplified into five sedimentary units (Quaternary, Plio-Pleistocene, Oligocene, Eocene and Cretaceous ages), and one basal crystalline unit (primarily Cretaceous and Jurassic). Complex fault systems are represented in the model by ten fault strands that maintain overall displacement. The 3D geologic model corroborates existing geologic concepts of the San Diego area, refines the extent of subsurface geology, and allows users to holistically evaluate subsurface structures and regional hydrogeology.

  9. 3D Geological Model for "LUSI" - a Deep Geothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Mazzini, Adriano; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal applications require the correct simulation of flow and heat transport processes in porous media, and many of these media, like deep volcanic hydrothermal systems, host a certain degree of fracturing. This work aims to understand the heat and fluid transport within a new-born sedimentary hosted geothermal system, termed Lusi, that began erupting in 2006 in East Java, Indonesia. Our goal is to develop conceptual and numerical models capable of simulating multiphase flow within large-scale fractured reservoirs such as the Lusi region, with fractures of arbitrary size, orientation and shape. Additionally, these models can also address a number of other applications, including Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), CO2 sequestration (Carbon Capture and Storage CCS), and nuclear waste isolation. Fractured systems are ubiquitous, with a wide-range of lengths and scales, making difficult the development of a general model that can easily handle this complexity. We are developing a flexible continuum approach with an efficient, accurate numerical simulator based on an appropriate 3D geological model representing the structure of the deep geothermal reservoir. Using previous studies, borehole information and seismic data obtained in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n°308126), we present here the first 3D geological model of Lusi. This model is calculated using implicit 3D potential field or multi-potential fields, depending on the geological context and complexity. This method is based on geological pile containing the geological history of the area and relationship between geological bodies allowing automatic computation of intersections and volume reconstruction. Based on the 3D geological model, we developed a new mesh algorithm to create hexahedral octree meshes to transfer the structural geological information for 3D numerical simulations to quantify Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) physical processes.

  10. Summary on Several Key Techniques in 3D Geological Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several key techniques in 3D geological modeling including planar mesh generation, spatial interpolation, and surface intersection are summarized in this paper. Note that these techniques are generic and widely used in various applications but play a key role in 3D geological modeling. There are two essential procedures in 3D geological modeling: the first is the simulation of geological interfaces using geometric surfaces and the second is the building of geological objects by means of various geometric computations such as the intersection of surfaces. Discrete geometric surfaces that represent geological interfaces can be generated by creating planar meshes first and then spatially interpolating; those surfaces intersect and then form volumes that represent three-dimensional geological objects such as rock bodies. In this paper, the most commonly used algorithms of the key techniques in 3D geological modeling are summarized. PMID:24772029

  11. Modelling of 3D fractured geological systems - technique and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Cherubini, Y.; Kaiser, B. O.; Bloecher, G.

    2011-12-01

    All rocks in the earth's crust are fractured to some extent. Faults and fractures are important in different scientific and industry fields comprising engineering, geotechnical and hydrogeological applications. Many petroleum, gas and geothermal and water supply reservoirs form in faulted and fractured geological systems. Additionally, faults and fractures may control the transport of chemical contaminants into and through the subsurface. Depending on their origin and orientation with respect to the recent and palaeo stress field as well as on the overall kinematics of chemical processes occurring within them, faults and fractures can act either as hydraulic conductors providing preferential pathways for fluid to flow or as barriers preventing flow across them. The main challenge in modelling processes occurring in fractured rocks is related to the way of describing the heterogeneities of such geological systems. Flow paths are controlled by the geometry of faults and their open void space. To correctly simulate these processes an adequate 3D mesh is a basic requirement. Unfortunately, the representation of realistic 3D geological environments is limited by the complexity of embedded fracture networks often resulting in oversimplified models of the natural system. A technical description of an improved method to integrate generic dipping structures (representing faults and fractures) into a 3D porous medium is out forward. The automated mesh generation algorithm is composed of various existing routines from computational geometry (e.g. 2D-3D projection, interpolation, intersection, convex hull calculation) and meshing (e.g. triangulation in 2D and tetrahedralization in 3D). All routines have been combined in an automated software framework and the robustness of the approach has been tested and verified. These techniques and methods can be applied for fractured porous media including fault systems and therefore found wide applications in different geo-energy related

  12. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  13. Managing Geological Profiles in Databases for 3D Visualisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarna, A.; Grøtan, B. O.; Henderson, I. H. C.; Iversen, S.; Khloussy, E.; Nordahl, B.; Rindstad, B. I.

    2016-10-01

    Geology and all geological structures are three-dimensional in space. GIS and databases are common tools used by geologists to interpret and communicate geological data. The NGU (Geological Survey of Norway) is the national institution for the study of bedrock, mineral resources, surficial deposits and groundwater and marine geology. 3D geology is usually described by geological profiles, or vertical sections through a map, where you can look at the rock structure below the surface. The goal is to gradually expand the usability of existing and new geological profiles to make them more available in the retail applications as well as build easier entry and registration of profiles. The project target is to develop the methodology for acquisition of data, modification and use of data and its further presentation on the web by creating a user-interface directly linked to NGU's webpage. This will allow users to visualise profiles in a 3D model.

  14. 3-D seismic imaging of complex geologies

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, D.E.; Dosanjh, S.S.; VanDyke, J.P.; Oldfield, R.A.; Greenberg, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    We present three codes for the Intel Paragon that address the problem of three-dimensional seismic imaging of complex geologies. The first code models acoustic wave propagation and can be used to generate data sets to calibrate and validate seismic imaging codes. This code reported the fastest timings for acoustic wave propagation codes at a recent SEG (Society of Exploration Geophysicists) meeting. The second code implements a Kirchhoff method for pre-stack depth migration. Development of this code is almost complete, and preliminary results are presented. The third code implements a wave equation approach to seismic migration and is a Paragon implementation of a code from the ARCO Seismic Benchmark Suite.

  15. 3-D seismic imaging of complex geologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, David E.; Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Vandyke, John P.; Oldfield, Ron A.; Greenberg, David S.

    We present three codes for the Intel Paragon that address the problem of three-dimensional seismic imaging of complex geologies. The first code models acoustic wave propagation and can be used to generate data sets to calibrate and validate seismic imaging codes. This code reported the fastest timings for acoustic wave propagation codes at a recent SEG (Society of Exploration Geophysicists) meeting. The second code implements a Kirchhoff method for pre-stack depth migration. Development of this code is almost complete, and preliminary results are presented. The third code implements a wave equation approach to seismic migration and is a Paragon implementation of a code from the ARCO Seismic Benchmark Suite.

  16. Formal representation of 3D structural geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhangang; Qu, Honggang; Wu, Zixing; Yang, Hongjun; Du, Qunle

    2016-05-01

    The development and widespread application of geological modeling methods has increased demands for the integration and sharing services of three dimensional (3D) geological data. However, theoretical research in the field of geological information sciences is limited despite the widespread use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in geology. In particular, fundamental research on the formal representations and standardized spatial descriptions of 3D structural models is required. This is necessary for accurate understanding and further applications of geological data in 3D space. In this paper, we propose a formal representation method for 3D structural models using the theory of point set topology, which produces a mathematical definition for the major types of geological objects. The spatial relationships between geologic boundaries, structures, and units are explained in detail using the 9-intersection model. Reasonable conditions for describing the topological space of 3D structural models are also provided. The results from this study can be used as potential support for the standardized representation and spatial quality evaluation of 3D structural models, as well as for specific needs related to model-based management, query, and analysis.

  17. Teaching the geological subsurface with 3D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Steve; Ward, Emma

    2014-05-01

    3D geological models have great potential as a resource when teaching geological concepts as it allows the student to visualise and interrogate UK geology. They are especially useful when dealing with the conversion of 2D field, map and GIS outputs into three dimensional geological units, which is a common problem for many students. Today's earth science students use a variety of skills and processes during their learning experience including spatial thinking, image construction, detecting patterns, making predictions and deducing the orientation of themselves. 3D geological models can reinforce spatial thinking strategies and encourage students to think about processes and properties, in turn helping the student to recognise pre-learnt geological principles in the field and to convert what they see at the surface into a picture of what is going on at depth. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has been producing digital 3D geological models for over 10 years. The models produced are revolutionising the working practices, data standards and products of the BGS. Sharing our geoscience information with academia is highlighted throughout the BGS strategy as is instilling practical skills in future geoscience professionals, such as model building and interpretation. In 2009 a project was launched to investigate the potential of the models as a teaching resource. The study included justifying if and how the models help students to learn, how models have been used historically, and how other forms of modelling are being used today. BGS now produce 3D geological models for use by anyone teaching or learning geoscience. They incorporate educational strategies that will develop geospatial skills and alleviate potential problems that some students experience. They are contained within contemporary case studies and show standard geological concepts, structures, sedimentary rocks, cross sections and field techniques. 3D geological models of the Isle of Wight and Ingleborough

  18. Canada in 3D - Toward a Sustainable 3D Model for Canadian Geology from Diverse Data Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodaric, B.; Pilkington, M.; Snyder, D. B.; St-Onge, M. R.; Russell, H.

    2015-12-01

    Many big science issues span large areas and require data from multiple heterogeneous sources, for example climate change, resource management, and hazard mitigation. Solutions to these issues can significantly benefit from access to a consistent and integrated geological model that would serve as a framework. However, such a model is absent for most large countries including Canada, due to the size of the landmass and the fragmentation of the source data into institutional and disciplinary silos. To overcome these barriers, the "Canada in 3D" (C3D) pilot project was recently launched by the Geological Survey of Canada. C3D is designed to be evergreen, multi-resolution, and inter-disciplinary: (a) it is to be updated regularly upon acquisition of new data; (b) portions vary in resolution and will initially consist of four layers (surficial, sedimentary, crystalline, and mantle) with intermediary patches of higher-resolution fill; and (c) a variety of independently managed data sources are providing inputs, such as geophysical, 3D and 2D geological models, drill logs, and others. Notably, scalability concerns dictate a decentralized and interoperable approach, such that only key control objects, denoting anchors for the modeling process, are imported into the C3D database while retaining provenance links to original sources. The resultant model is managed in the database, contains full modeling provenance as well as links to detailed information on rock units, and is to be visualized in desktop and online environments. It is anticipated that C3D will become the authoritative state of knowledge for the geology of Canada at a national scale.

  19. Geodiversity: Exploration of 3D geological model space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, M. D.; Jessell, M. W.; Ailleres, L.; Perrouty, S.; de Kemp, E.; Betts, P. G.

    2013-05-01

    The process of building a 3D model necessitates the reconciliation of field observations, geophysical interpretation, geological data uncertainty and the prevailing tectonic evolution hypotheses and interpretations. Uncertainty is compounded when clustered data points collected at local scales are statistically upscaled to one or two points for use in regional models. Interpretation is required to interpolate between sparse field data points using ambiguous geophysical data in covered terranes. It becomes clear that multiple interpretations are possible during model construction. The various interpretations are considered as potential natural representatives, but pragmatism typically dictates that just a single interpretation is offered by the modelling process. Uncertainties are introduced into the 3D model during construction from a variety of sources and through data set optimisation that produces a single model. Practices such as these are likely to result in a model that does not adequately represent the target geology. A set of geometrical ‘geodiversity’ metrics are used to analyse a 3D model of the Gippsland Basin, southeastern Australia after perturbing geological input data via uncertainty simulation. The resulting sets of perturbed geological observations are used to calculate a suite of geological 3D models that display a range of geological architectures. The concept of biodiversity has been adapted for the geosciences to quantify geometric variability, or geodiversity, between models in order to understand the effect uncertainty has models geometry. Various geometrical relationships (depth, volume, contact surface area, curvature and geological complexity) are used to describe the range of possibilities exhibited throughout the model suite. End-member models geodiversity metrics are classified in a similar manner to taxonomic descriptions. Further analysis of the model suite is performed using principal component analysis (PCA) to determine

  20. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE 3D geologic model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    This is an x,y,z file of the West Flank FORGE 3D geologic model. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  1. 3D magnetic sources' framework estimation using Genetic Algorithm (GA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte-Neto, C. F.; Barbosa, V. C.

    2008-05-01

    We present a method for inverting total-field anomaly for determining simple 3D magnetic sources' framework such as: batholiths, dikes, sills, geological contacts, kimberlite and lamproite pipes. We use GA to obtain magnetic sources' frameworks and their magnetic features simultaneously. Specifically, we estimate the magnetization direction (inclination and declination) and the total dipole moment intensity, and the horizontal and vertical positions, in Cartesian coordinates , of a finite set of elementary magnetic dipoles. The spatial distribution of these magnetic dipoles composes the skeletal outlines of the geologic sources. We assume that the geologic sources have a homogeneous magnetization distribution and, thus all dipoles have the same magnetization direction and dipole moment intensity. To implement the GA, we use real-valued encoding with crossover, mutation, and elitism. To obtain a unique and stable solution, we set upper and lower bounds on declination and inclination of [0,360°] and [-90°, 90°], respectively. We also set the criterion of minimum scattering of the dipole-position coordinates, to guarantee that spatial distribution of the dipoles (defining the source skeleton) be as close as possible to continuous distribution. To this end, we fix the upper and lower bounds of the dipole moment intensity and we evaluate the dipole-position estimates. If the dipole scattering is greater than a value expected by the interpreter, the upper bound of the dipole moment intensity is reduced by 10 % of the latter. We repeat this procedure until the dipole scattering and the data fitting are acceptable. We apply our method to noise-corrupted magnetic data from simulated 3D magnetic sources with simple geometries and located at different depths. In tests simulating sources such as sphere and cube, all estimates of the dipole coordinates are agreeing with center of mass of these sources. To elongated-prismatic sources in an arbitrary direction, we estimate

  2. Coherence cube technology adds geologic insight to 3-D data

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.

    1997-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic technology is now widely applied to assess the risk associated with hydrocarbon trap definition, including faulting, stratigraphic features, and reservoir description. Critical new technologies to exploit the wealth of information contained within 3-D seismic have recently begun to emerge; most notably, coherence cube technology, developed by Amoco Production Research and licensed to Coherence Technology Co. (CTC). Coherence cube processing produces interpretable images of faults and subtle stratigraphic features, such as buried deltas, river channels, and beaches, by quantifying seismic coherence attributes. The technique has important implications for geophysical, geological, and reservoir engineering applications. The paper discusses how coherency works, applications, and an example in delineating southern North Sea faulting.

  3. 3D Geologic Model of the Southern Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner, J. L.; Myers, S. C.

    2006-12-01

    We have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern Great Basin, in support of a seismic wave propagation investigation of the 1993 Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The model is centered on the NPE and spans longitude -119.5° to -112.6°, latitude 34.5° to 39.8°, and a depth from the surface to 150 km below sea level. Hence, the model includes the southern half of Nevada, as well as parts of eastern California, western Utah, and a portion of northwestern Arizona. The upper crust is constrained by geologic and geophysical studies, and the lower crust and upper mantle are constrained by geophysical studies. The upper crustal geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary deposits, pre-Tertiary deposits, intrusive rocks, and calderas. The lower crust and upper mantle are parameterized with 8 layers, including the Moho. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geology at the NTS. Digital geologic outcrop data were available for both Nevada and Arizona, whereas we scanned and hand digitized geologic maps for California and Utah. Published gravity data (2km spacing) were used to determine the thickness of the Cenozoic deposits and constrain the depth of the basins. The free surface is based on a 10m lateral resolution DEM at the NTS and a 90m resolution DEM elsewhere. The gross geophysical structure of the crust and upper mantle is taken from regional surface-wave studies. Variations in crustal thickness are based on receiver function analysis and a compilation of reflection/refraction studies. We used the Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) software to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is an integer index representing the geologic unit. For regional seismic simulations we convert this realistic geologic model into elastic parameters. Upper crustal units are treated as seismically homogeneous

  4. Metal-organic frameworks: 3D frameworks from 3D printers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian D.

    2014-11-01

    High-throughput screening of solvothermal crystallization conditions for MOFs and other solids may receive a boost from the application of 3D printing techniques to low-cost, disposable pressure vessels.

  5. A Highly-Ordered 3D Covalent Fullerene Framework**

    PubMed Central

    Minar, Norma K; Hou, Kun; Westermeier, Christian; Döblinger, Markus; Schuster, Jörg; Hanusch, Fabian C; Nickel, Bert; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Bein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A highly-ordered 3D covalent fullerene framework is presented with a structure based on octahedrally functionalized fullerene building blocks in which every fullerene is separated from the next by six functional groups and whose mesoporosity is controlled by cooperative self-assembly with a liquid-crystalline block copolymer. The new fullerene-framework material was obtained in the form of supported films by spin coating the synthesis solution directly on glass or silicon substrates, followed by a heat treatment. The fullerene building blocks coassemble with a liquid-crystalline block copolymer to produce a highly ordered covalent fullerene framework with orthorhombic Fmmm symmetry, accessible 7.5 nm pores, and high surface area, as revealed by gas adsorption, NMR spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and TEM. We also note that the 3D covalent fullerene framework exhibits a dielectric constant significantly lower than that of the nonporous precursor material. PMID:25958846

  6. Delivery mechanisms of 3D geological models - a perspective from the British Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrington, Ricky; Myers, Antony; Wood, Ben; Arora, Baneet

    2013-04-01

    The past decade has seen the British Geological Survey (BGS) construct over one hundred 3D geological models using software such as GOCAD®, GSI3D, EarthVision and Petrel across the United Kingdom and overseas. These models have been produced for different purposes and at different scales and resolutions in the shallow and deep subsurface. Alongside the construction of these models, the BGS and its collaborators have developed several options for disseminating these 3D geological models to external partners and the public. Initially, the standard formats for disseminating these 3D geological models by the BGS comprised of 2D images of cross-sections, GIS raster data and specialised visualisation software such as the LithoFrame Viewer. The LithoFrame Viewer is a thick-client software that allows the user to explore the 3D geometries of the geological units using a 3D interface, and generate synthetic cross-sections and boreholes on the fly. Despite the increased functionality of the LithoFrame Viewer over the other formats, the most popular data formats distributed remained 2D images of cross-sections, CAD based formats (e.g. DWG and DXF) and GIS raster data of surfaces and thicknesses, as these were the types of data that the external partners were most used too. Since 2009 software for delivering 3D geological models has advanced and types of data available have increased. Feature Manipulation Engine (FME) has been used to increase the number of outputs from 3D geological models. These include: • 3D PDFs (Adobe Acrobat) • KMZ/KML (GoogleEarth) • 3D shapefiles (ESRI) Alongside these later outputs, the BGS has developed other software such as GroundhogTM and Geovisionary (in collaboration with Virtalis). Groundhog is fully a web based application that allows the user to generate synthetic cross-sections, boreholes and horizontal slices from 3D geological models on the fly. Geovisionary provides some of the most advanced visualisation of 3D geological models in

  7. A Volume Rendering Framework for Visualizing 3D Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hsien-Hsi; Li, Liya; Shen, Han-Wei; Tai, Wen-Kai

    In this paper, we present a volume rendering framework for visualizing 3D flow fields. We introduce the concept of coherence field which evaluates the representativeness of a given streamline set for the underlying 3D vector field. Visualization of the coherence field can provide effective visual feedback to the user for incremental insertion of more streamline seeds. Given an initial set of streamlines, a coherence volume is constructed from a distance field to measure the similarity between the existing streamlines and those in their nearby regions based on the difference between the approximate and the actual vector directions. With the visual feedback obtained from rendering the coherence volume, new streamline seeds can be selected by the user or by a heuristic seed selection algorithm to adaptively improve the coherence volume. An improved volume rendering technique that can render user-defined appearance textures is proposed to facilitate macro-visualization of 3D vector fields.

  8. Hybrid segmentation framework for 3D medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Metaxas, Dimitri N.

    2003-05-01

    Medical image segmentation is the process that defines the region of interest in the image volume. Classical segmentation methods such as region-based methods and boundary-based methods cannot make full use of the information provided by the image. In this paper we proposed a general hybrid framework for 3D medical image segmentation purposes. In our approach we combine the Gibbs Prior model, and the deformable model. First, Gibbs Prior models are applied onto each slice in a 3D medical image volume and the segmentation results are combined to a 3D binary masks of the object. Then we create a deformable mesh based on this 3D binary mask. The deformable model will be lead to the edge features in the volume with the help of image derived external forces. The deformable model segmentation result can be used to update the parameters for Gibbs Prior models. These methods will then work recursively to reach a global segmentation solution. The hybrid segmentation framework has been applied to images with the objective of lung, heart, colon, jaw, tumor, and brain. The experimental data includes MRI (T1, T2, PD), CT, X-ray, Ultra-Sound images. High quality results are achieved with relatively efficient time cost. We also did validation work using expert manual segmentation as the ground truth. The result shows that the hybrid segmentation may have further clinical use.

  9. Geologic Framework Model (GFM2000)

    SciTech Connect

    T. Vogt

    2004-08-26

    The purpose of this report is to document the geologic framework model, version GFM2000 with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, and the differences between GFM2000 and previous versions. The version number of this model reflects the year during which the model was constructed. This model supersedes the previous model version, documented in Geologic Framework Model (GFM 3.1) (CRWMS M&O 2000 [DIRS 138860]). The geologic framework model represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the geology surrounding the location of the monitored geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The geologic framework model encompasses and is limited to an area of 65 square miles (168 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the geologic framework model (shown in Figure 1-1) were chosen to encompass the exploratory boreholes and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The upper surface of the model is made up of the surface topography and the depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The geologic framework model was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphic sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. The intended use of the geologic framework model is to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest consistent with the level of detailed needed for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the UZ and for repository design. The model is limited by the availability of data and relative amount of geologic complexity found in an area. The geologic framework model is inherently limited by scale and content. The grid spacing used in the

  10. Will true 3d display devices aid geologic interpretation. [Mirage

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.R. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    A description is given of true 3D display devices and techniques that are being evaluated in various research laboratories around the world. These advances are closely tied to the expected application of 3D display devices as interpretational tools for explorationists. 34 refs.

  11. Quasi-3D Multi-scale Modeling Framework Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, A.; Jung, J.

    2008-12-01

    When models are truncated in or near an energetically active range of the spectrum, model physics must be changed as the resolution changes. The model physics of GCMs and that of CRMs are, however, quite different from each other and at present there is no unified formulation of model physics that automatically provides transition between these model physics. The Quasi-3D (Q3D) Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) is an attempt to bridge this gap. Like the recently proposed Heterogeneous Multiscale Method (HMM) (E and Engquist 2003), MMF combines a macroscopic model, GCM, and a microscopic model, CRM. Unlike the traditional multiscale methods such as the multi-grid and adapted mesh refinement techniques, HMM and MMF are for solving multi-physics problems. They share the common objective "to design combined macroscopic-microscopic computational methods that are much more efficient than solving the full microscopic model and at the same time give the information we need" (E et al. 2008). The question is then how to meet this objective in practice, which can be highly problem dependent. In HHM, the efficiency is gained typically by localization of the microscale problem. Following the pioneering work by Grabowski and Smolarkiewicz (1999) and Grabowski (2001), MMF takes advantage of the fact that 2D CRMs are reasonably successful in simulating deep clouds. In this approach, the efficiency is gained by sacrificing the three-dimensionality of cloud-scale motion. It also "localizes" the algorithm through embedding a CRM in each GCM grid box using cyclic boundary condition. The Q3D MMF is an attempt to reduce the expense due to these constraints by partially including the cloud-scale 3D effects and extending the CRM beyond individual GCM grid boxes. As currently formulated, the Q3D MMF is a 4D estimation/prediction framework that combines a GCM with a 3D anelastic cloud-resolving vector vorticity equation model (VVM) applied to a network of horizontal grids. The network

  12. 3-D HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING IN A GEOSPATIAL FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, J; Alfred Garrett, A; Larry Koffman, L; David Hayes, D

    2006-08-24

    3-D hydrodynamic models are used by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to simulate the transport of thermal and radionuclide discharges in coastal estuary systems. Development of such models requires accurate bathymetry, coastline, and boundary condition data in conjunction with the ability to rapidly discretize model domains and interpolate the required geospatial data onto the domain. To facilitate rapid and accurate hydrodynamic model development, SRNL has developed a pre- and post-processor application in a geospatial framework to automate the creation of models using existing data. This automated capability allows development of very detailed models to maximize exploitation of available surface water radionuclide sample data and thermal imagery.

  13. 3D Framework DNA Origami with Layered Crossovers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Jiang, Shuoxing; Wang, Tong; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Designer DNA architectures with nanoscale geometric controls provide a programmable molecular toolbox for engineering complex nanodevices. Scaffolded DNA origami has dramatically improved our ability to design and construct DNA nanostructures with finite size and spatial addressability. Here we report a novel design strategy to engineer multilayered wireframe DNA structures by introducing crossover pairs that connect neighboring layers of DNA double helices. These layered crossovers (LX) allow the scaffold or helper strands to travel through different layers and can control the relative orientation of DNA helices in neighboring layers. Using this design strategy, we successfully constructed four versions of two-layer parallelogram structures with well-defined interlayer angles, a three-layer structure with triangular cavities, and a 9- and 15-layer square lattices. This strategy provides a general route to engineer 3D framework DNA nanostructures with controlled cavities and opportunities to design host-guest networks analogs to those produced with metal organic frameworks.

  14. 3D Framework DNA Origami with Layered Crossovers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Jiang, Shuoxing; Wang, Tong; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Designer DNA architectures with nanoscale geometric controls provide a programmable molecular toolbox for engineering complex nanodevices. Scaffolded DNA origami has dramatically improved our ability to design and construct DNA nanostructures with finite size and spatial addressability. Here we report a novel design strategy to engineer multilayered wireframe DNA structures by introducing crossover pairs that connect neighboring layers of DNA double helices. These layered crossovers (LX) allow the scaffold or helper strands to travel through different layers and can control the relative orientation of DNA helices in neighboring layers. Using this design strategy, we successfully constructed four versions of two-layer parallelogram structures with well-defined interlayer angles, a three-layer structure with triangular cavities, and a 9- and 15-layer square lattices. This strategy provides a general route to engineer 3D framework DNA nanostructures with controlled cavities and opportunities to design host-guest networks analogs to those produced with metal organic frameworks. PMID:27628457

  15. Embedding Knowledge in 3D Data Frameworks in Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughenour, C. M.; Vincent, M. L.; de Kramer, M.; Senecal, S.; Fritsch, D.; Flores Gutirrez, M.; Lopez-Menchero Bendicho, V. M.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    At present, where 3D modeling and visualisation in cultural heritage are concerned, an object's documentation lacks its interconnected memory provided by multidisciplinary examination and linked data. As the layers of paint, wood, and brick recount a structure's physical properties, the intangible, such as the forms of worship through song, dance, burning incense, and oral traditions, contributes to the greater story of its cultural heritage import. Furthermore, as an object or structure evolves through time, external political, religious, or environmental forces can affect it as well. As tangible and intangible entities associated with the structure transform, its narrative becomes dynamic and difficult to easily record. The Initial Training Network for Digital Cultural Heritage (ITN-DCH), a Marie Curie Actions project under the EU 7th Framework Programme, seeks to challenge this complexity by developing a novel methodology capable of offering such a holistic framework. With the integration of digitisation, conservation, linked data, and retrieval systems for DCH, the nature of investigation and dissemination will be augmented significantly. Examples of utilisating and evaluating this framework will range from a UNESCOWorld Heritage site, the Byzantine church of Panagia Forviotissa Asinou in the Troodos Mountains of Cyprus, to various religious icons and a monument located at the Monastery of Saint Neophytos. The application of this effort to the Asinou church, representing the first case study of the ITN-DCH project, is used as a template example in order to assess the technical challenges involved in the creation of such a framework.

  16. 3D Geological Model of Nihe ore deposit Constrained by Gravity and Magnetic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Guang; Yan, Jiayong; Lv, Qingtan; Zhao, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    We present a case study on using integrated geologic model in mineral exploration at depth. Nihe ore deposit in Anhui Province, is deep hidden ore deposit which was discovered in recent years, this finding is the major driving force of deep mineral exploration work in Luzong. Building 3D elaborate geological model has the important significance for prospecting to deep or surround in this area, and can help us better understand the metallogenic law and ore-controlling regularity. A 3D geological model, extending a depth from +200m to -1500m in Nihe ore deposit, has been compiled from surface geological map, cross-section, borehole logs and amounts of geological inference. And then the 3D geological models have been given physical property parameter for calculating the potential field. Modelling the potential response is proposed as means of evaluating the viability of the 3D geological models, and the evidence of making small changes to the uncertain parts of the original 3D geological models. It is expected that the final models not only reproduce supplied prior geological knowledge, but also explain the observed geophysical data. The workflow used to develop the 3D geologic model in this study includes the three major steps, as follows: (1) Determine the basic information of Model: Defining the 3D limits of the model area, the basic geological and structural unit, and the tectonic contact relations and the sedimentary sequences between these units. (2) 3D model construction: Firstly, a series of 2D geological cross sections over the model area are built by using all kinds of prior information, including surface geology, borehole data, seismic sections, and local geologists' knowledge and intuition. Lastly, we put these sections into a 3D environment according to their profile locations to build a 3D model by using geostatistics method. (3) 3D gravity and magnetic modeling: we calculate the potential field responses of the 3D model, and compare the predicted and

  17. Flexible simulation framework to couple processes in complex 3D models for subsurface utilization assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Nakaten, Benjamin; De Lucia, Marco; Nakaten, Natalie; Otto, Christopher; Pohl, Maik; Tillner, Elena; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of the geological subsurface for production and storage of hydrocarbons, chemical energy and heat as well as for waste disposal requires the quantification and mitigation of environmental impacts as well as the improvement of georesources utilization in terms of efficiency and sustainability. The development of tools for coupled process simulations is essential to tackle these challenges, since reliable assessments are only feasible by integrative numerical computations. Coupled processes at reservoir to regional scale determine the behaviour of reservoirs, faults and caprocks, generally demanding for complex 3D geological models to be considered besides available monitoring and experimenting data in coupled numerical simulations. We have been developing a flexible numerical simulation framework that provides efficient workflows for integrating the required data and software packages to carry out coupled process simulations considering, e.g., multiphase fluid flow, geomechanics, geochemistry and heat. Simulation results are stored in structured data formats to allow for an integrated 3D visualization and result interpretation as well as data archiving and its provision to collaborators. The main benefits in using the flexible simulation framework are the integration of data geological and grid data from any third party software package as well as data export to generic 3D visualization tools and archiving formats. The coupling of the required process simulators in time and space is feasible, while different spatial dimensions in the coupled simulations can be integrated, e.g., 0D batch with 3D dynamic simulations. User interaction is established via high-level programming languages, while computational efficiency is achieved by using low-level programming languages. We present three case studies on the assessment of geological subsurface utilization based on different process coupling approaches and numerical simulations.

  18. A Bayesian 3D data fusion and unsupervised joint segmentation approach for stochastic geological modelling using Hidden Markov random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Wellmann, Florian

    2016-04-01

    It is generally accepted that 3D geological models inferred from observed data will contain a certain amount of uncertainties. The uncertainty quantification and stochastic sampling methods are essential for gaining the insight into the geological variability of subsurface structures. In the community of deterministic or traditional modelling techniques, classical geo-statistical methods using boreholes (hard data sets) are still most widely accepted although suffering certain drawbacks. Modern geophysical measurements provide us regional data sets in 2D or 3D spaces either directly from sensors or indirectly from inverse problem solving using observed signal (soft data sets). We propose a stochastic modelling framework to extract subsurface heterogeneity from multiple and complementary types of data. In the presented work, subsurface heterogeneity is considered as the "hidden link" among multiple spatial data sets as well as inversion results. Hidden Markov random field models are employed to perform 3D segmentation which is the representation of the "hidden link". Finite Gaussian mixture models are adopted to characterize the statistical parameters of the multiple data sets. The uncertainties are quantified via a Gibbs sampling process under the Bayesian inferential framework. The proposed modelling framework is validated using two numerical examples. The model behavior and convergence are also well examined. It is shown that the presented stochastic modelling framework is a promising tool for the 3D data fusion in the communities of geological modelling and geophysics.

  19. New software for visualizing 3D geological data in coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungjae; Choi, Yosoon

    2015-04-01

    This study developed new software to visualize 3D geological data in coal mines. The Visualization Tool Kit (VTK) library and Visual Basic.NET 2010 were used to implement the software. The software consists of several modules providing functionalities: (1) importing and editing borehole data; (2) modelling of coal seams in 3D; (3) modelling of coal properties using 3D ordinary Kriging method; (4) calculating economical values of 3D blocks; (5) pit boundary optimization for identifying economical coal reserves based on the Lerchs-Grosmann algorithm; and (6) visualizing 3D geological, geometrical and economical data. The software has been applied to a small-scale open-pit coal mine in Indonesia revealed that it can provide useful information supporting the planning and design of open-pit coal mines.

  20. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J

    2009-02-23

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  1. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J

    2009-04-24

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  2. From digital mapping to GIS-based 3D visualization of geological maps: example from the Western Alps geological units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestro, Gianni; Cassulo, Roberto; Festa, Andrea; Fioraso, Gianfranco; Nicolò, Gabriele; Perotti, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Collection of field geological data and sharing of geological maps are nowadays greatly enhanced by using digital tools and IT (Information Technology) applications. Portable hardware allows accurate GPS localization of data and homogeneous storing of information in field databases, whereas GIS (Geographic Information Systems) applications enable generalization of field data and realization of geological map databases. A further step in the digital processing of geological map information consists of building virtual visualization by means of GIS-based 3D viewers, that allow projection and draping of significant geological features over photo-realistic terrain models. Digital fieldwork activities carried out by the Authors in the Western Alps, together with building of geological map databases and related 3D visualizations, are an example of application of the above described digital technologies. Digital geological mapping was performed by means of a GIS mobile software loaded on a rugged handheld device, and lithological, structural and geomorphological features with their attributes were stored in different layers that form the field database. The latter was then generalized through usual map processing steps such as outcrops interpolation, characterization of geological boundaries and selection of meaningful punctual observations. This map databases was used for building virtual visualizations through a GIS-based 3D-viewer that loaded detailed DTM (resolution of 5 meters) and aerial images. 3D visualizations were focused on projection and draping of significant stratigraphic contacts (e.g. contacts that separate different Quaternary deposits) and tectonic contacts (i.e. exhumation-related contacts that dismembered original ophiolite sequences). In our experience digital geological mapping and related databases ensured homogeneous data storing and effective sharing of information, and allowed subsequent building of 3D GIS-based visualizations. The latters gave

  3. Methods of constructing a 3D geological model from scatter data

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, J.; Bethel, W.

    1995-04-01

    Most geoscience applications, such as assessment of an oil reservoir or hazardous waste site, require geological characterization of the site. Geological characterization involves analysis of spatial distributions of lithology, porosity, etc. Because of the complexity of the spatial relationships, the authors find that a 3-D model of geology is better suited for integration of many different types of data and provides a better representation of a site than a 2-D one. A 3-D model of geology is constructed from sample data obtained from field measurements, which are usually scattered. To create a volume model from scattered data, interpolation between points is required. The interpolation can be computed using one of several computational algorithms. Alternatively, a manual method may be employed, in which an interactive graphics device is used to input by hand the information that lies between the data points. For example, a mouse can be used to draw lines connecting data points with equal values. The combination of these two methods presents yet another approach. In this study, the authors will compare selected methods of 3-D geological modeling, They used a flow-based, modular visualization environment (AVS) to construct the geological models computationally. Within this system, they used three modules, scat{_}3d, trivar and scatter{_}to{_}ucd, as examples of computational methods. They compare these methods to the combined manual and computational approach. Because there are no tools readily available in AVS for this type of construction, they used a geological modeling system to demonstrate this method.

  4. The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Holger; Mathers, Steve; Sobisch, Hans-Georg

    2009-06-01

    The Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3 Dimensions (GSI3D) software tool and methodology has been developed over the last 15 years. Since 2001 this has been in cooperation with the British Geological Survey (BGS). To-date over a hundred BGS geologists have learned to use the software that is now routinely deployed in building systematic and commercial 3D geological models. The success of the GSI3D methodology and software is based on its intuitive design and the fact that it utilises exactly the same data and methods, albeit in digital forms, that geologists have been using for two centuries in order to make geological maps and cross-sections. The geologist constructs models based on a career of observation of geological phenomena, thereby incorporating tacit knowledge into the model. This knowledge capture is a key element to the GSI3D approach. In BGS GSI3D is part of a much wider set of systems and work processes that together make up the cyberinfrastructure of a modern geological survey. The GSI3D software is not yet designed to cope with bedrock structures in which individual stratigraphic surfaces are repeated or inverted, but the software is currently being extended by BGS to encompass these more complex geological scenarios. A further challenge for BGS is to enable its 3D geological models to become part of the semantic Web using GML application schema like GeoSciML. The biggest benefits of widely available systematic geological models will be an enhanced public understanding of the sub-surface in 3D, and the teaching of geoscience students.

  5. 3D reconstruction of complex geological bodies: Examples from the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Francesca, Salvi; Stefano, Zanchetta; Simone, Sterlacchini; Graziano, Guerra

    2009-01-01

    Cartographic geological and structural data collected in the field and managed by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology can be used for 3D reconstruction of complex geological bodies. Using a link between GIS tools and gOcad, stratigraphic and tectonic surfaces can be reconstructed taking into account any geometrical constraint derived from field observations. Complex surfaces can be reconstructed using large data sets analysed by suitable geometrical techniques. Three main typologies of geometric features and related attributes are exported from a GIS-geodatabase: (1) topographic data as points from a digital elevation model; (2) stratigraphic and tectonic boundaries, and linear features as 2D polylines; (3) structural data as points. After having imported the available information into gOcad, the following steps should be performed: (1) construction of the topographic surface by interpolation of points; (2) 3D mapping of the linear geological boundaries and linear features by vertical projection on the reconstructed topographic surface; (3) definition of geometrical constraints from planar and linear outcrop data; (4) construction of a network of cross-sections based on field observations and geometrical constraints; (5) creation of 3D surfaces, closed volumes and grids from the constructed objects. Three examples of the reconstruction of complex geological bodies from the Italian Alps are presented here. The methodology demonstrates that although only outcrop data were available, 3D modelling has allows the checking of the geometrical consistency of the interpretative 2D sections and of the field geology, through a 3D visualisation of geometrical models. Application of a 3D geometrical model to the case studies can be very useful in geomechanical modelling for slope-stability or resource evaluation.

  6. Joint 3D inversion of gravity and magnetic data with geological constraints - an alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prutkin, Ilya; Vajda, Peter; Jentzsch, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Quite a popular approach now by interpretation of gravity data is a linear one - an attempt is made to find a density distribution d(x,y,z) below the Earth's surface. This approach has clear disadvantages. First, we face the problem of dimensionality: one looks for 3D function based on 2D data set (measurements on the Earth's surface), the degree of non-uniqueness is extremely high, and no regularization can save the situation. The number of unknowns is many times higher than the number of observations; otherwise, we obtain a very rough model of the lower half-space. Second, the linear approach is not reasonable from the geological point of view. It implies that density varies from one point to another. Usually, we assume big volumes with nearly homogeneous density - layers, blocks, intrusions. It looks more understandable, to search for geometry of density interfaces: 3D topography of contact surfaces and shapes of restricted bodies (intrusions). Third, in the framework of the linear approach even for a synthetic field of two separate objects we obtain clouds of points with slightly increased density. It is hardly ever possible, to isolate objects, particularly when one of them is located above another one. We suggest an alternative approach for the linear one. Our approach has been successfully applied for several case histories including a local gravity anomaly Kolarovo and a bigger area of the Thuringian Basin, where both gravity and magnetic data are inverted. First, we separate sources into deep, intermediate and shallow ones, using subsequent upward and downward continuation. All components are inverted separately. We address a problem which we name the problem of low frequencies: deep objects generate long wavelengths, but the converse implication is not necessarily true. For instance, the effect of the basin structure contributes substantially into low frequencies, though it is caused by shallow sources. However, our numerical experiments with intermediate

  7. Genetic approach to reconstruct complex regional geological setting of the Baltic basin in 3D geological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovs, K.; Saks, T.; Ukass, J.; Jatnieks, J.

    2012-04-01

    Interpretation of geological structures in 3D geological models is a relatively new research topic that is already standardized in many geological branches. Due to its wide practical application, these models are indispensable and become one of the dominant interpretation methods in reducing geological uncertainties in many geology fields. Traditionally, geological concepts complement quantitative as much as qualitative data to obtain a model deemed acceptable, however, available data very often is insufficient and modeling methods primarily focus on spatial data but geological history usually is mostly neglected for the modeling of large sedimentary basins. A need to better integrate the long and often complex geological history and geological knowledge into modeling procedure is very acute to gain geological insight and improve the quality of geological models. During this research, 3D geological model of the Baltic basin (BB) was created. Because of its complex regional geological setting - wide range of the data sources with multiple scales, resolution and density as well as its various source formats, the study area provides a challenge for the 3D geological modeling. In order to create 3D regional geometrical model for the study area algorithmic genetic approach for model geometry reconstruction was applied. The genetic approach is based on the assumption that post-depositional deformation produce no significant change in sedimentary strata volume, assuming that the strata thickness and its length in a cross sectional plane remains unchanged except as a result of erosion. Assuming that the tectonic deformation occurred in sequential cycles and subsequent tectonic stage strata is separated by regional unconformity as is the case of the BB, there is an opportunity for algorithmic approach in reconstructing these conditions by sequentially reconstructing the layer original thickness. Layer thicknesses were sliced along fault lines, where applicable layer

  8. An Integrated Multi-component Processing and Interpretation Framework for 3D Borehole Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect

    M. Karrenbach

    2004-04-01

    to perform advanced processing, imaging and analysis tests in the future during this project. Preparation of our software libraries for interfacing 3C display classes and mechanisms were carried out. We extensively tested the OIV and QT software library for usefulness in displaying 3C data and we thoroughly tested 3D scene graph communication between QT, OpenInventor and our existing software classes, which lead to optimizing the interface between them. We assembled an application skeleton which serves as a basis for future high level software tools. Based on this skeleton we implemented a 3C Work Bench tool as the primary prototyping tool for all future developments within this project. This work bench allows to load, manipulate and display data items. We demonstrated its basic functionality by loading source maps, horizons, seismic and velocity volumes, well logs into the tool, performing basic QC steps as is necessary in normal processing. All tasks were performed successfully, ensuring the continued progress of this project as outlined in the original proposal. Deliverables generated during this time period consist of reporting details and synthetically modeled seismic data for a 3D layered geological model. The numerically modeled SEGY data, as well as the model representation data, are ready to be sent out to DOE facilities for archiving. Based on the successful conclusion of work performed during this six month period we continue to generate synthetically modeled 3D borehole seismic data, according to Tasks 2 and 3. At the same time we proceed to design, implement and test according to the original plan the basic data classes and the basic framework outlined in Tasks 5 through 8.

  9. 3D geological model developed to analyse the aquifer - sewer network interaction in Bucharest city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpescu, I.; Radu, E.; Gogu, R. G.; Priceputu, A.; Boukhemacha, M. A.; Bica, I.; Gaitanaru, D.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the fact that several important Bucharest city sewer segments drain the groundwater and provide high input flow-rates for the existing waste-water treatment plant, their rehabilitation is necessary. A hydrogeological model, currently under development, will permit to compute the groundwater-sewer network interaction allowing the simulation of distinct design solutions to prevent city disturbances. For groundwater modelling the geological model represents the fundament of understanding the aquifers system behaviour. In this respect a 3D accurate and detailed geological model, covering a region of about 75 km2 has been developed to identify its contact with the major collecting sewer conduit. The shallow aquifer stratum of quaternary formations called Colentina is made of gravels and sands. This unconfined aquifer can be found mainly in the Bucharest city region at depths up to 20 m. A clayey-marl layer is located between Colentina and a lower confined aquifer called Mostistea. This second one is located at depths between 25 m and 70 m and is made of fine and medium sands with gravel intercalations. It overlays on a very thick sequence (40 m to 150 m) of marl and clay layers with slim sandy intercalations. The geological model has been developed on the basis of a large number of geological and geotechnical boreholes. A set of 400 boreholes with depths between 5m to 200 m showing a detailed geological and lithological description stored in a geospatial database have been used. The geological analysis has been performed using a software platform that integrates the spatial database and a set of tools and methodologies developed in a GIS environment with the aim of facilitating the development of 3D geological models for sedimentary media. Taking into account the first 50 m in depth, 25 geological profiles have been interpreted on the basis of chronostratigraphycal, lithological, and sedimentological criteria to delineate the geological formations and assess

  10. 3D Oxidized Graphene Frameworks for Efficient Nano Sieving.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Saxena, Sumit; Badhe, Dhanashree Kamlesh; Chaudhary, Raghvendra Pratap; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-02-19

    The small size of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions provides a bottleneck in desalination and is a challenge in providing alternatives for continuously depleting fresh water resources. Graphene by virtue of its structural properties has the potential to address this issue. Studies have indicated that use of monolayer graphene can be used to filter micro volumes of saline solution. Unfortunately it is extremely difficult, resource intensive and almost impractical with current technology to fabricate operational devices using mono-layered graphene. Nevertheless, graphene based devices still hold the key to solve this problem due to its nano-sieving ability. Here we report synthesis of oxidized graphene frameworks and demonstrate a functional device to desalinate and purify seawater from contaminants including Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, dyes and other microbial pollutants. Micro-channels in these frameworks help in immobilizing larger suspended solids including bacteria, while nano-sieving through graphene enables the removal of dissolved ions (e.g. Cl(-)). Nano-sieving incorporated with larger frameworks has been used in filtering Na(+) and Cl(-) ions in functional devices.

  11. 3D Oxidized Graphene Frameworks for Efficient Nano Sieving.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Saxena, Sumit; Badhe, Dhanashree Kamlesh; Chaudhary, Raghvendra Pratap; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    The small size of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions provides a bottleneck in desalination and is a challenge in providing alternatives for continuously depleting fresh water resources. Graphene by virtue of its structural properties has the potential to address this issue. Studies have indicated that use of monolayer graphene can be used to filter micro volumes of saline solution. Unfortunately it is extremely difficult, resource intensive and almost impractical with current technology to fabricate operational devices using mono-layered graphene. Nevertheless, graphene based devices still hold the key to solve this problem due to its nano-sieving ability. Here we report synthesis of oxidized graphene frameworks and demonstrate a functional device to desalinate and purify seawater from contaminants including Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, dyes and other microbial pollutants. Micro-channels in these frameworks help in immobilizing larger suspended solids including bacteria, while nano-sieving through graphene enables the removal of dissolved ions (e.g. Cl(-)). Nano-sieving incorporated with larger frameworks has been used in filtering Na(+) and Cl(-) ions in functional devices. PMID:26892277

  12. 3D Oxidized Graphene Frameworks for Efficient Nano Sieving

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Saxena, Sumit; Badhe, Dhanashree Kamlesh; Chaudhary, Raghvendra Pratap; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    The small size of Na+ and Cl− ions provides a bottleneck in desalination and is a challenge in providing alternatives for continuously depleting fresh water resources. Graphene by virtue of its structural properties has the potential to address this issue. Studies have indicated that use of monolayer graphene can be used to filter micro volumes of saline solution. Unfortunately it is extremely difficult, resource intensive and almost impractical with current technology to fabricate operational devices using mono-layered graphene. Nevertheless, graphene based devices still hold the key to solve this problem due to its nano-sieving ability. Here we report synthesis of oxidized graphene frameworks and demonstrate a functional device to desalinate and purify seawater from contaminants including Na+ and Cl− ions, dyes and other microbial pollutants. Micro-channels in these frameworks help in immobilizing larger suspended solids including bacteria, while nano-sieving through graphene enables the removal of dissolved ions (e.g. Cl−). Nano-sieving incorporated with larger frameworks has been used in filtering Na+ and Cl− ions in functional devices. PMID:26892277

  13. The 3D geological model of the Eastern Romania tectonics and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necula, Nicusor; Sorin Baciu, Dorin; Niculita, Mihai; Dumitriu, Tony-Cristian

    2016-04-01

    3D geologic modelling is a modern tool which allow the conceptualization of geologic relations in an interactive environment, strengthening the ability to understand and present tectonic and structural geologic models. We integrated the data available in the literature (wells, maps, cross-sections) for the geological structure of the Eastern Romania, comprising the Eastern Carpathians Orogen and its foreland. The subducting East European plate generated the Eastern Carphatians thrusts. Under the Eastern Carpathians, beside East European plate, the Tornquist-Teysseire zone is caught. East European Craton (Proterozoic), Scythian Platform (Paleozoic), North Dobrogean Orogen (Paleozoic) and Moesian Platform (Paleozoic), all neighbor Tornquist-Teysseire zone (Paleozoic), playing the role of foreland for the Eastern Carpathian Orogen. The Eastern Carphatians Orogen has two flysch belts, the Inner Carpathian called Dacides formed in Cretacic deformations and the Outer Carpathian called Moldavides and formed in Late Badenian to Sarmatian deformations. The modelling was performed in Midland Valley's Move software. The boundaries of all the structural units presented above were modelled, together with the faults which are represented on the various osurces used. The created 3D geological model is seen as a tool to better understand and represent the tectonic and structural model of the Eastern ROmania and will also allow a better quantification of the relations between geology and landforms in Eastern Romania.

  14. Quality control of 3D Geological Models using an Attention Model based on Gaze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busschers, Freek S.; van Maanen, Peter-Paul; Brouwer, Anne-Marie

    2014-05-01

    The Geological Survey of the Netherlands (GSN) produces 3D stochastic geological models of the upper 50 meters of the Dutch subsurface. The voxel models are regarded essential in answering subsurface questions on, for example, aggregate resources, groundwater flow, land subsidence studies and the planning of large-scale infrastructural works such as tunnels. GeoTOP is the most recent and detailed generation of 3D voxel models. This model describes 3D lithological variability up to a depth of 50 m using voxels of 100*100*0.5m. Due to the expected increase in data-flow, model output and user demands, the development of (semi-)automated quality control systems is getting more important in the near future. Besides numerical control systems, capturing model errors as seen from the expert geologist viewpoint is of increasing interest. We envision the use of eye gaze to support and speed up detection of errors in the geological voxel models. As a first step in this direction we explore gaze behavior of 12 geological experts from the GSN during quality control of part of the GeoTOP 3D geological model using an eye-tracker. Gaze is used as input of an attention model that results in 'attended areas' for each individual examined image of the GeoTOP model and each individual expert. We compared these attended areas to errors as marked by the experts using a mouse. Results show that: 1) attended areas as determined from experts' gaze data largely match with GeoTOP errors as indicated by the experts using a mouse, and 2) a substantial part of the match can be reached using only gaze data from the first few seconds of the time geologists spend to search for errors. These results open up the possibility of faster GeoTOP model control using gaze if geologists accept a small decrease of error detection accuracy. Attention data may also be used to make independent comparisons between different geologists varying in focus and expertise. This would facilitate a more effective use of

  15. Facets : a Cloudcompare Plugin to Extract Geological Planes from Unstructured 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.; Girardeau-Montaut, D.; Allanic, C.; Rohmer, J.

    2016-06-01

    Geological planar facets (stratification, fault, joint…) are key features to unravel the tectonic history of rock outcrop or appreciate the stability of a hazardous rock cliff. Measuring their spatial attitude (dip and strike) is generally performed by hand with a compass/clinometer, which is time consuming, requires some degree of censoring (i.e. refusing to measure some features judged unimportant at the time), is not always possible for fractures higher up on the outcrop and is somewhat hazardous. 3D virtual geological outcrop hold the potential to alleviate these issues. Efficiently segmenting massive 3D point clouds into individual planar facets, inside a convenient software environment was lacking. FACETS is a dedicated plugin within CloudCompare v2.6.2 (http://cloudcompare.org/ ) implemented to perform planar facet extraction, calculate their dip and dip direction (i.e. azimuth of steepest decent) and report the extracted data in interactive stereograms. Two algorithms perform the segmentation: Kd-Tree and Fast Marching. Both divide the point cloud into sub-cells, then compute elementary planar objects and aggregate them progressively according to a planeity threshold into polygons. The boundaries of the polygons are adjusted around segmented points with a tension parameter, and the facet polygons can be exported as 3D polygon shapefiles towards third party GIS software or simply as ASCII comma separated files. One of the great features of FACETS is the capability to explore planar objects but also 3D points with normals with the stereogram tool. Poles can be readily displayed, queried and manually segmented interactively. The plugin blends seamlessly into CloudCompare to leverage all its other 3D point cloud manipulation features. A demonstration of the tool is presented to illustrate these different features. While designed for geological applications, FACETS could be more widely applied to any planar

  16. Cognitive 3D geological voxel modelling based on AEM and seismic data - a case from the southern part of Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Flemming; Møller, Rasmus R.; Sandersen, Peter B. E.; Høyer, Anne-Sophie

    2013-04-01

    The highly complex composition of the Quaternary and Tertiary near-surface deposits in Denmark is a challenging environment for 3D modelling. Geological elements like cross-cutting buried valleys, faults, glaciotectonic thrusts and folds, delta units and erosional unconformities are vital to identify and include in 3D geological models, but at the same time they all add to the complexity of the geological picture. Borehole data are rarely sufficient for the modelling; instead much more laterally dense data are needed. Airborne electromagnetic techniques therefore serve as perfect tools for providing an overview and spatial distribution of the geological elements and their composition. Such airborne surveys are perfectly supplemented by seismic data in order to map the stratigraphic framework within a model area. Translating airborne electromagnetic data to geology is a complicated task that requires a significant amount of geophysical and geological insight. It is necessary to implement thorough geological background knowledge in the interpretations while at the same time identify and acknowledge the inherent limitations of the method. In an area covering 730 km2 across the border between Germany and Denmark a combination of an airborne transient electromagnetic survey (3200 line km performed with the SkyTEM system) and a 38 km high-resolution 2D seismic survey has proven very successful for mapping geological elements like the above-mentioned. Although the south-westernmost part of the study area is saturated with saltwater and the TEM data therefore are influenced by increased electrical conductivity, the geology is still revealed here. Geological interpretations are supported by a high number of pre-existing seismic sections originating from hydrocarbon exploration and borehole data, though most of the borehole data and several of the seismic sections have very poor quality. A couple of new 300-m deep exploration boreholes have been drilled in order to obtain

  17. Geological characterisation of complex reservoirs using 3D seismic: Case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaissa, Zahia; Benaïssa, Abdelkader; Seghir Baghaoui, Mohamed; Bendali, Mohamed; Chami, Adel; Khelifi Touhami, Médina; Ouadfeul, Sid Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2014-05-01

    3D seismic allows getting a set of numerous closely-spaced seismic lines that provide a high spatially sampled measure of subsurface reflectivity. It leads to an accurate interpretation of seismic reflection data, which is one of the most important stages of a successful hydrocarbons exploration, especially in the reservoirs characterised by complex geological setting. We present here two case studies pertaining to two Algerian hydrocarbon fields. Considering the positive results obtained from 2D seismic interpretation, several wells were drilled. Some of them have proved dry, due certainly to inaccurate seismic interpretation because of non standard geological context. For the first case, the high quality of the 3D seismic data allowed to reveal, on all the inlines and crosslines, the existence of paleovalleys under the top of the Ordovician (unit IV) reservoir. The mapping of these paleovalleys clearly showed that the dry well, contrary to the other wells, was implanted outside paleovalleys. This fact was confirmed by the analysis of well data. The second case study concerns the problem of andesitic eruptive deposits on the top of the Ordovician reservoir, which condition the geometry and continuity of this reservoir and cause uncertainties in the mapping of the Hercynian unconformity. Well data associated with 3D seismic response shows that eruptive deposits generate high impedance anomaly because of the high density and velocity of andesites. We used this information to interpret these eruptive rocks as being responsible of high impedance anomalies, inside the Ordovician reservoir, on the impedance volume generated from the 3D seismic data. A 3D extraction of the anomalies allowed an accurate localisation of the andesites. So, it appears, according to these two case studies, that for an efficient recovery of hydrocarbons, we have to rely, first of all, on an accurate seismic interpretation before we use microscopic measurements. 3D seismic, once again, remains

  18. Self-Discovery of Structural Geology Concepts using Interactive 3D Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; Saunders, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mastering structural geology concepts that depend on understanding three-dimensional (3D) geometries and imagining relationships among unseen subsurface structures are fundamental skills for geologists. Traditionally these skills are developed first, through use of 2D drawings of 3D structures that can be difficult to decipher or 3D physical block models that show only a limited set of relationships on the surfaces of the blocks, followed by application and testing of concepts in field settings. We hypothesize that this learning process can be improved by providing repeated opportunities to evaluate and explore synthetic 3D structures using interactive 3D visualization software. We present laboratory modules designed for undergraduate structural geology curriculum using a self-discovery approach to teach concepts such as: the Rule of V’s, structure separation versus fault slip, and the more general dependence of structural exposure on surface topography. The laboratory modules are structured to allow students to discover and articulate each concept from observations of synthetic data both on traditional maps and using the volume visualization software 3DVisualizer. Modules lead students through exploration of data (e.g., a dipping layered structure exposed in ridge-valley topography or obliquely offset across a fault) by allowing them to interactively view (rotate, pan, zoom) the exposure of structures on topographic surfaces and to toggle on/off the full 3D structure as a transparent colored volume. This tool allows student to easily visually understand the relationships between, for example a dipping structure and its exposure on valley walls, as well as how the structure extends beneath the surface. Using this method gives students more opportunities to build a mental library of previously-seen relationships from which to draw-on when applying concepts in the field setting. These laboratory modules, the data and software are freely available from KeckCAVES.

  19. Integrated 3-D quality control of geological interpretation through the use of simple methods and programs

    SciTech Connect

    Chatellier, J.Y.; Gustavo, F.; Magaly, Q.

    1996-12-31

    Integrating different petroleum geology disciplines gives insight and help in analyzing data and in checking the quality of different interpretations. Simple approaches and affordable programs allow rapid visualization of data in 3-D. Displaying geological data from stratigraphy, diagenesis, and structural geology together, allows identification of anomalies (i.e. development targets) and often gives clues of the controlling processes. Four case studies from world class fields are used to illustrate the vital need to integrate quality control of interpretation across disciplines. Distribution of diagenetic alterations is revealed by visualizing diagenetic and petrographic data against faults in a 3-D statistical program. Faults are transferred from 3-D seismic into such a program and then analyzed against other data. Fault intersections wrongly correlated are also easily picked. Other powerful tools include a modified use of the Bischke Plots that allow the identification of missing sections previously identified as fault cut-outs. The quality of interpretation has sometimes been assessed from the presence of stacked anomalies of various expression. In other cases repeated unexpected isopach trends revealed subtle faults such as riedels sealing and compartmentizing the reservoirs. Occasionally the timing of fault reactivation was assessed precisely whereas all other techniques failed even to identify these hidden features. Unrecognized porosity-depth trends were identified after filtering data for stratigraphy or sedimentology and studying it in its geographical and tectonic context. Three dimensional visualization was needed in cases of quartz overgrowth where grain size, depth, stratigraphy and location with respect to faults were all important.

  20. Integrated 3-D quality control of geological interpretation through the use of simple methods and programs

    SciTech Connect

    Chatellier, J.Y.; Gustavo, F.; Magaly, Q. )

    1996-01-01

    Integrating different petroleum geology disciplines gives insight and help in analyzing data and in checking the quality of different interpretations. Simple approaches and affordable programs allow rapid visualization of data in 3-D. Displaying geological data from stratigraphy, diagenesis, and structural geology together, allows identification of anomalies (i.e. development targets) and often gives clues of the controlling processes. Four case studies from world class fields are used to illustrate the vital need to integrate quality control of interpretation across disciplines. Distribution of diagenetic alterations is revealed by visualizing diagenetic and petrographic data against faults in a 3-D statistical program. Faults are transferred from 3-D seismic into such a program and then analyzed against other data. Fault intersections wrongly correlated are also easily picked. Other powerful tools include a modified use of the Bischke Plots that allow the identification of missing sections previously identified as fault cut-outs. The quality of interpretation has sometimes been assessed from the presence of stacked anomalies of various expression. In other cases repeated unexpected isopach trends revealed subtle faults such as riedels sealing and compartmentizing the reservoirs. Occasionally the timing of fault reactivation was assessed precisely whereas all other techniques failed even to identify these hidden features. Unrecognized porosity-depth trends were identified after filtering data for stratigraphy or sedimentology and studying it in its geographical and tectonic context. Three dimensional visualization was needed in cases of quartz overgrowth where grain size, depth, stratigraphy and location with respect to faults were all important.

  1. Hands-on guide for 3D image creation for geological purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Tisato, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Geological structures in outcrops or hand specimens are inherently three dimensional (3D), and therefore better understandable if viewed in 3D. While 3D models can easily be created, manipulated, and looked at from all sides on the computer screen (e.g., using photogrammetry or laser scanning data), 3D visualizations for publications or conference posters are much more challenging as they have to live in a 2D-world (i.e., on a sheet of paper). Perspective 2D visualizations of 3D models do not fully transmit the "feeling and depth of the third dimension" to the audience; but this feeling is desirable for a better examination and understanding in 3D of the structure under consideration. One of the very few possibilities to generate real 3D images, which work on a 2D display, is by using so-called stereoscopic images. Stereoscopic images are two images of the same object recorded from two slightly offset viewpoints. Special glasses and techniques have to be used to make sure that one image is seen only by one eye, and the other image is seen by the other eye, which together lead to the "3D effect". Geoscientists are often familiar with such 3D images. For example, geomorphologists traditionally view stereographic orthophotos by employing a mirror-steroscope. Nowadays, petroleum-geoscientists examine high-resolution 3D seismic data sets in special 3D visualization rooms. One of the methods for generating and viewing a stereoscopic image, which does not require a high-tech viewing device, is to create a so-called anaglyph. The principle is to overlay two images saturated in red and cyan, respectively. The two images are then viewed through red-cyan-stereoscopic glasses. This method is simple and cost-effective, but has some drawbacks in preserving colors accurately. A similar method is used in 3D movies, where polarized light or shuttering techniques are used to separate the left from the right image, which allows preserving the original colors. The advantage of red

  2. 3D geological modelling and geothermal mapping - the first results of the transboundary Polish - Saxon project "TransGeoTherm"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdrój, Wiesław; Kłonowski, Maciej; Mydłowski, Adam; Ziółkowska-Kozdrój, Małgorzata; Badura, Janusz; Przybylski, Bogusław; Russ, Dorota; Zawistowski, Karol; Domańska, Urszula; Karamański, Paweł; Krentz, Ottomar; Hofmann, Karina; Riedel, Peter; Reinhardt, Silke; Bretschneider, Mario

    2014-05-01

    TransGeoTherm is a common project of the Polish Geological Institute - National Research Institute Lower Silesian Branch (Lead Partner) and the Saxon State Agency for Environment, Agriculture and Geology, co-financed by the European Union (EU) under the framework of the Operational Programme for Transboundary Co-operation Poland-Saxony 2007-2013. It started in October 2012 and will last until June 2014. The main goal of the project is to introduce and establish the use of low temperature geothermal energy as a low emission energy source in the Saxon-Polish transboundary project area. The numerous geological, hydrogeological and geothermal data have been gathered, analysed, combined and interpreted with respect to 3D numerical modelling and subsequently processed with use of the GOCAD software. The resulting geological model covers the transboundary project area exceeding 1.000 km2 and comprises around 70 units up to the depth of about 200 metres (locally deeper) below the terrain. The division of the above units has been based on their litho-stratigraphy as well as geological, hydrogeological and geothermal settings. The model includes two lignite deposits: Berzdorf deposit in Saxony-mined out and already recultivated and Radomierzyce deposit in Poland - documented but still not excavated. At the end of the modelling procedure the raster data sets of the top, bottom and thickness of every unit will be deduced from the 3D geological model with a gridsize of 25 by 25 metres. Based on the geothermal properties of the rocks and their groundwater content a specific value of geothermal conductivity will be allocated to each layer of every borehole. Thereafter for every section of a borehole, belonging to a certain unit of the 3D geological model, a weighted mean value will be calculated. Next the horizontal distribution of these values within every unit will be interpolated. This step / procedure has to be done for all units. As a result of further calculations a series

  3. Discovery of previously unrecognised local faults in London, UK, using detailed 3D geological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiss, Don; Haslam, Richard

    2013-04-01

    In parts of London, faulting introduces lateral heterogeneity to the local ground conditions, especially where construction works intercept the Palaeogene Lambeth Group. This brings difficulties to the compilation of a ground model that is fully consistent with the ground investigation data, and so to the design and construction of engineering works. However, because bedrock in the London area is rather uniform at outcrop, and is widely covered by Quaternary deposits, few faults are shown on the geological maps of the area. This paper discusses a successful resolution of this problem at a site in east central London, where tunnels for a new underground railway station are planned. A 3D geological model was used to provide an understanding of the local geological structure, in faulted Lambeth Group strata, that had not been possible by other commonly-used methods. This model includes seven previously unrecognised faults, with downthrows ranging from about 1 m to about 12 m. The model was constructed in the GSI3D geological modelling software using about 145 borehole records, including many legacy records, in an area of 850 m by 500 m. The basis of a GSI3D 3D geological model is a network of 2D cross-sections drawn by a geologist, generally connecting borehole positions (where the borehole records define the level of the geological units that are present), and outcrop and subcrop lines for those units (where shown by a geological map). When the lines tracing the base of each geological unit within the intersecting cross-sections are complete and mutually consistent, the software is used to generate TIN surfaces between those lines, so creating a 3D geological model. Even where a geological model is constructed as if no faults were present, changes in apparent dip between two data points within a single cross-section can indicate that a fault is present in that segment of the cross-section. If displacements of similar size with the same polarity are found in a series

  4. 3d-modelling workflows for trans-nationally shared geological models - first approaches from the project GeoMol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupf, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    To meet the EU's ambitious targets for carbon emission reduction, renewable energy production has to be strongly upgraded and made more efficient for grid energy storage. Alpine Foreland Basins feature a unique geological inventory which can contribute substantially to tackle these challenges. They offer a geothermal potential and storage capacity for compressed air, as well as space for underground storage of CO2. Exploiting these natural subsurface resources will strongly compete with existing oil and gas claims and groundwater issues. The project GeoMol will provide consistent 3-dimensional subsurface information about the Alpine Foreland Basins based on a holistic and transnational approach. Core of the project GeoMol is a geological framework model for the entire Northern Molasse Basin, complemented by five detailed models in pilot areas, also in the Po Basin, which are dedicated to specific questions of subsurface use. The models will consist of up to 13 litho-stratigraphic horizons ranging from the Cenozoic basin fill down to Mesozoic and late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and the crystalline basement. More than 5000 wells and 28 000 km seismic lines serve as input data sets for the geological subsurface model. The data have multiple sources and various acquisition dates, and their interpretations have gone through several paradigm changes. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the data with regards to technical parameters and content prior to further analysis (cf. Capar et al. 2013, EGU2013-5349). Each partner will build its own geological subsurface model with different software solutions for seismic interpretation and 3d-modelling. Therefore, 3d-modelling follows different software- and partner-specific workflows. One of the main challenges of the project is to ensure a seamlessly fitting framework model. It is necessary to define several milestones for cross border checks during the whole modelling process. Hence, the main input data set of the

  5. Parameterization of training images for aquifer 3-D facies modeling integrating geological interpretations and statistical inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar; Comunian, Alessandro; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Kelly, Bryce F. J.

    2014-10-01

    We develop a stochastic approach to construct channelized 3-D geological models constrained to borehole measurements as well as geological interpretation. The methodology is based on simple 2-D geologist-provided sketches of fluvial depositional elements, which are extruded in the 3rd dimension. Multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) is used to impair horizontal variability to the structures by introducing geometrical transformation parameters. The sketches provided by the geologist are used as elementary training images, whose statistical information is expanded through randomized transformations. We demonstrate the applicability of the approach by applying it to modeling a fluvial valley filling sequence in the Maules Creek catchment, Australia. The facies models are constrained to borehole logs, spatial information borrowed from an analogue and local orientations derived from the present-day stream networks. The connectivity in the 3-D facies models is evaluated using statistical measures and transport simulations. Comparison with a statistically equivalent variogram-based model shows that our approach is more suited for building 3-D facies models that contain structures specific to the channelized environment and which have a significant influence on the transport processes.

  6. Exploration criteria for mineral target mapping based on 3D geological modeling in the Taebaek mineralized belt in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, H. J.; Kihm, Y. H.; Cho, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    We constructed a three-dimensional (3D) geological model based on a 1:50,000-scaled geologic map and determined the exploration criteria for skarn deposit target mapping in the Taebaek mineralized belt. All available geological and geophysical data were compiled in a 3D computing environment using GOCAD software. Twenty-four stratigraphic horizons and more than 100 fault surfaces are defined in the 3D geological model. The primary geological criteria for skarn mineralization in the Taebaek mineralized belt included the presence of an NE-oriented strike-slip fault, key stratigraphic horizons, and a high magnetic susceptibility anomaly based on 3D inversion of magnetic data. The 3D geological criteria were extracted from the 3D geological model for skarn deposit target mapping in the belt. The distance values of the three criteria (NE strike-slip fault, limestone horizon, and area of high magnetic susceptibility) were divided into four classes based on cutoff values determined by experts. The weight values for all of the geological criteria and the score value for each class of the distance criteria were also estimated based on expert knowledge. The weights and scores of geological criteria derived from expert knowledge serve as useful guides for target mapping in the Taebaek mineralized belt.

  7. 3D form line construction by structural field interpolation (SFI) of geologic strike and dip observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Michael; de Kemp, Eric; Schetselaar, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    Interpreting and modelling geometries of complex geologic structures from strike/dip measurements using manually-drafted structural form lines is labour intensive, irreproducible and inherently limited to two dimensions. Herein, the structural field interpolation (SFI) algorithm is presented that overcomes these limitations by constructing 3D structural form lines from the vector components of strike/dip measurements. The SFI interpolation algorithm employs an anisotropic inverse distance weighting scheme derived from eigen analysis of the poles to strike/dip measurements within a neighbourhood of user defined dimension and shape (ellipsoidal to spherical) and honours younging directions, when available. The eigen analysis also provides local estimates of the plunge vector and associated Woodcock distribution properties to assure plunge-normal structural form line reconstruction with unidirectional propagation of form lines across fold and fan structures. The method is advantageous for modelling geometries of geologic structures from a wide range of structurally anisotropic data. Modelled vector fields from three case studies are presented that reproduce the expected bedding-foliation geometry and provide reasonable representation of complex folds from local to regional scales. Results illustrate the potential for using vector fields to support geologic interpretation through the direct visualization of geometric trends of structural features in 3D.

  8. Constructing a large-scale 3D Geologic Model for Analysis of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J; Myers, S

    2008-04-09

    We have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern Great Basin, in support of a seismic wave propagation investigation of the 1993 Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The model is centered on the NPE and spans longitude -119.5{sup o} to -112.6{sup o} and latitude 34.5{sup o} to 39.8{sup o}; the depth ranges from the topographic surface to 150 km below sea level. The model includes the southern half of Nevada, as well as parts of eastern California, western Utah, and a portion of northwestern Arizona. The upper crust is constrained by both geologic and geophysical studies, while the lower crust and upper mantle are constrained by geophysical studies. The mapped upper crustal geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary deposits, pre-Tertiary deposits, intrusive rocks of all ages, and calderas. The lower crust and upper mantle are parameterized with 5 layers, including the Moho. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geology at the NTS. Digital geologic outcrop data were available for both Nevada and Arizona, whereas geologic maps for California and Utah were scanned and hand-digitized. Published gravity data (2km spacing) were used to determine the thickness of the Cenozoic deposits and thus estimate the depth of the basins. The free surface is based on a 10m lateral resolution DEM at the NTS and a 90m lateral resolution DEM elsewhere. Variations in crustal thickness are based on receiver function analysis and a framework compilation of reflection/refraction studies. We used Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. For seismic studies, the geologic units are mapped to specific seismic velocities. The gross geophysical structure of the crust and upper mantle is taken from regional surface

  9. 3D Strucutural Geological Model of the Alpi Mt. Area (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Bruna, Vincenzo; Lamarche, Juliette; Viseur, Sophie; Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo

    2016-04-01

    The study area is located in the inner portion of the southern Apennines fold-and-thrust belt. The Alpi Mt. is the only portion of the Apulian domain cropping in this sector. In fact, it is considered as a structural analogue of the Val d'Agri and Tempa Rossa reservoirs (Basilicata). The Alpi Mt. tectonic unit is composed of two main cronostratigraphic intervals, represented by a 2000m-thick Mesozoic carbonate succession and a Messinian mixed carbonate-terrigenous succession. The Messinian interval is made up of a Lower Messinian sedimentary cycle, wich form a paraconformity with the underlying Mesozoic carbonates, and an Upper Messinian cycle characterized by a marked unconformity at the bottom. This study aims to better understand the role exerted by the precontractional tectonic structures during the Messinian interval, wich are responsible for the development of the sedimentary angular unconformity. To reach this goal, a 3D structural geological model was build up by using the Gocad(R) software. The construction of the 3D model was gained through the integration of several results related to geological field mapping, well log analysis and seismic reflection data. Focusing on the Upper Messinian sedimentary horizon, in order to achieve the true geometry and kinematics of the high-angle extensional faults that bound the sedimentary depocenters, the model was restored through vertical line methodology. This process allows to obtain more information about location, geometry, and sedimentary depocenter orientations. Furthermore, the 3D structural model brings some important results from the 3D fault analysis that are represented by attitude, geometry and dimensional parameters of the fault network that affect the study area.

  10. Digital mono- and 3D stereo-photogrammetry for geological and geomorphological mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapozza, Cristian; Schenker, Filippo Luca; Castelletti, Claudio; Bozzini, Claudio; Ambrosi, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The generalization of application of digital tools for managing, mapping and updating geological data have become widely accepted in the last decennia. Despite the increasing quality and availability of digital topographical maps, orthorectified aerial photographs (orthophotos) and high resolution (5 up to 0.5 m) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), a correct recognition of the kind, the nature and the boundaries of geological formations and geomophological landforms, unconsolidated sedimentary deposits or slope instabilities is often very difficult on conventional two-dimensional (2D) products, in particular in steep zones (rock walls and talus slopes), under the forest cover, for a very complex topography and in deeply urbanised zones. In many cases, photo-interpretative maps drawn only by 2D data sets must be improved by field verifications or, at least, by field oblique photographs. This is logical, because our natural perception of the real world is three-dimensional (3D), which is partially disabled by the application of 2D visualization techniques. Here we present some examples of application of digital mapping based on a 3D visualization (for aerial and satellite images photo-interpretation) or on a terrestrial perception by digital mono-photogrammetry (for oblique photographs). The 3D digital mapping was performed thanks to an extension of the software ESRI® ArcGIS™ called ArcGDS™. This methodology was also applied on historical aerial photographs (normally analysed by optical stereo-photogrammetry), which were digitized by scanning and then oriented and aero-triangulated thanks to the ArcGDS™ software, allowing the 3D visualisation and the mapping in a GIS environment (Ambrosi and Scapozza, 2015). The mono-photogrammetry (or monoplotting) is the technique of photogrammetrical georeferentiation of single oblique unrectified photographs, which are related to a DEM. In other words, the monoplotting allows relating each pixel of the photograph to the

  11. A framework for automatic construction of 3D PDM from segmented volumetric neuroradiological data sets.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yili; Gao, Wenpeng; Xiao, Yongfei; Liu, Jimin

    2010-03-01

    3D point distribution model (PDM) of subcortical structures can be applied in medical image analysis by providing priori-knowledge. However, accurate shape representation and point correspondence are still challenging for building 3D PDM. This paper presents a novel framework for the automated construction of 3D PDMs from a set of segmented volumetric images. First, a template shape is generated according to the spatial overlap. Then the corresponding landmarks among shapes are automatically identified by a novel hierarchical global-to-local approach, which combines iterative closest point based global registration and active surface model based local deformation to transform the template shape to all other shapes. Finally, a 3D PDM is constructed. Experiment results on four subcortical structures show that the proposed method is able to construct 3D PDMs with a high quality in compactness, generalization and specificity, and more efficient and effective than the state-of-art methods such as MDL and SPHARM. PMID:19631401

  12. Estimation of uncertainties in geological 3D raster layer models as integral part of modelling procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljers, Denise; den Dulk, Maryke; ten Veen, Johan; Hummelman, Jan; Gunnink, Jan; van Gessel, Serge

    2016-04-01

    The Geological Survey of the Netherlands (GSN) develops and maintains subsurface models with regional to national coverage. These models are paramount for petroleum exploration in conventional reservoirs, for understanding the distribution of unconventional reservoirs, for mapping geothermal aquifers, for the potential to store carbon, or for groundwater- or aggregate resources. Depending on the application domain these models differ in depth range, scale, data used, modelling software and modelling technique. Depth uncertainty information is available for the Geological Survey's 3D raster layer models DGM Deep and DGM Shallow. These models cover different depth intervals and are constructed using different data types and different modelling software. Quantifying the uncertainty of geological models that are constructed using multiple data types as well as geological expert-knowledge is not straightforward. Examples of geological expert-knowledge are trend surfaces displaying the regional thickness trends of basin fills or steering points that are used to guide the pinching out of geological formations or the modelling of the complex stratal geometries associated with saltdomes and saltridges. This added a-priori knowledge, combined with the assumptions underlying kriging (normality and second-order stationarity), makes the kriging standard error an incorrect measure of uncertainty for our geological models. Therefore the methods described below were developed. For the DGM Deep model a workflow has been developed to assess uncertainty by combining precision (giving information on the reproducibility of the model results) and accuracy (reflecting the proximity of estimates to the true value). This was achieved by centering the resulting standard deviations around well-tied depths surfaces. The standard deviations are subsequently modified by three other possible error sources: data error, structural complexity and velocity model error. The uncertainty workflow

  13. Internet-based hardware/software co-design framework for embedded 3D graphics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chi-Tsai; Wang, Chun-Hao; Huang, Ing-Jer; Wong, Weng-Fai

    2011-12-01

    Advances in technology are making it possible to run three-dimensional (3D) graphics applications on embedded and handheld devices. In this article, we propose a hardware/software co-design environment for 3D graphics application development that includes the 3D graphics software, OpenGL ES application programming interface (API), device driver, and 3D graphics hardware simulators. We developed a 3D graphics system-on-a-chip (SoC) accelerator using transaction-level modeling (TLM). This gives software designers early access to the hardware even before it is ready. On the other hand, hardware designers also stand to gain from the more complex test benches made available in the software for verification. A unique aspect of our framework is that it allows hardware and software designers from geographically dispersed areas to cooperate and work on the same framework. Designs can be entered and executed from anywhere in the world without full access to the entire framework, which may include proprietary components. This results in controlled and secure transparency and reproducibility, granting leveled access to users of various roles.

  14. Impacts of a CAREER Award on Advancing 3D Visualization in Geology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    CAREER awards provide a unique opportunity to develop educational activities as an integrated part of one's research activities. This CAREER award focused on developing interactive 3D visualization tools to aid geology students in improving their 3D visualization skills. Not only is this a key skill for field geologists who need to visualize unseen subsurface structures, but it is also an important aspect of geodynamic research into the processes, such as faulting and viscous flow, that occur during subduction. Working with an undergraduate student researcher and using the KeckCAVES developed volume visualization code 3DVisualizer, we have developed interactive visualization laboratory exercises (e.g., Discovering the Rule of Vs) and a suite of mini-exercises using illustrative 3D geologic structures (e.g., syncline, thrust fault) that students can explore (e.g., rotate, slice, cut-away) to understand how exposure of these structures at the surface can provide insight into the subsurface structure. These exercises have been integrated into the structural geology curriculum and made available on the web through the KeckCAVES Education website as both data-and-code downloads and pre-made movies. One of the main challenges of implementing research and education activities through the award is that progress must be made on both throughout the award period. Therefore, while our original intent was to use subduction model output as the structures in the educational models, delays in the research results required that we develop these models using other simpler input data sets. These delays occurred because one of the other goals of the CAREER grant is to allow the faculty to take their research in a new direction, which may certainly lead to transformative science, but can also lead to more false-starts as the challenges of doing the new science are overcome. However, having created the infrastructure for the educational components, use of the model results in future

  15. An Integrated Multi-component Processing and Interpretation Framework for 3D Borehole Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect

    M. Karrenbach

    2004-10-15

    in normal processing. We improved functionality by adding multiple windowing options to each of the display items. The windows can be docked or un-docked, which is advantageous in a practical sense, since the display real estate can be spread across multiple display monitors. All windows transparently tie into the same item tree and views get updated dynamically and transparently. Each display item can be associated with a particular display widget as is the case for the multi-component hodogram display widget. All tasks were performed successfully, ensuring the continued progress of this project as outlined in the original proposal. Deliverables generated during this time period consist of reporting details and synthetically modeled seismic data for a 3D layered geological model. The numerically modeled SEGY data, as well as the model representation data, are ready to be sent out to DOE facilities for archiving. Based on the successful conclusion of work performed during this three month period we continue to occasionally generate synthetically modeled 3D borehole seismic data, according to Tasks 2 and 3. At the same time we proceed to design, implement and test according to the original plan the basic data classes and the basic framework outlined in Tasks 5 through 11, as well as 16.

  16. A framework for human spine imaging using a freehand 3D ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Purnama, Ketut E; Wilkinson, Michael H F; Veldhuizen, Albert G; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Lubbers, Jaap; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Sardjono, Tri A; Verkerke, Gijbertus J

    2010-01-01

    The use of 3D ultrasound imaging to follow the progression of scoliosis, i.e., a 3D deformation of the spine, is described. Unlike other current examination modalities, in particular based on X-ray, its non-detrimental effect enables it to be used frequently to follow the progression of scoliosis which sometimes may develop rapidly. Furthermore, 3D ultrasound imaging provides information in 3D directly in contrast to projection methods. This paper describes a feasibility study of an ultrasound system to provide a 3D image of the human spine, and presents a framework of procedures to perform this task. The framework consist of an ultrasound image acquisition procedure to image a large part of the human spine by means of a freehand 3D ultrasound system and a volume reconstruction procedure which was performed in four stages: bin-filling, hole-filling, volume segment alignment, and volume segment compounding. The overall results of the procedures in this framework show that imaging of the human spine using ultrasound is feasible. Vertebral parts such as the transverse processes, laminae, superior articular processes, and spinous process of the vertebrae appear as clouds of voxels having intensities higher than the surrounding voxels. In sagittal slices, a string of transverse processes appears representing the curvature of the spine. In the bin-filling stage the estimated mean absolute noise level of a single measurement of a single voxel was determined. Our comparative study for the hole-filling methods based on rank sum statistics proved that the pixel nearest neighbour (PNN) method with variable radius and with the proposed olympic operation is the best method. Its mean absolute grey value error was less in magnitude than the noise level of a single measurement.

  17. Dynamic 3D-visualization of merged geophysical and geological data sets from the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, M. E.

    2002-12-01

    Bringing together geophysical and geological data sets in a dynamic 3D-environment can greatly enhance our ability to comprehend earth processes. The relationship between, for example, seafloor topography and measured gravity anomalies can easily be visualized as well as the distribution of magnetic anomalies in oceanic crust and their varying offset due to seafloor spreading. In this presentation the gravity derived from ERS-1 satellite altimetry by Laxon and McAdoo (1994) and the magnetic compilation by Verhoef et al. (1996) of the Arctic Ocean is co-registered with the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO) bathymetry and brought into a dynamic 3D-environment for visualization and analysis. This exercise provides information of great value when we address the geologic origin of the Arctic Ocean physiographic provinces. Furthermore, since the ERS-1 gravity and IBCAO bathymetry are two entirely unrelated datasets the gravity may also be used for validating seafloor features seen in the IBCAO compilation that are based on sparse data. For instance, at the eastern most end of the Gakkel Ridge Axial Valley the IBCAO bathymetry is based on digitized contour information from a Russian bathymetric map published in 1999 by the Russian Federation's Head Department of Navigation and Oceanography (HDNO) with no available trackline sources. In the bathymetry, the Axial Valley is clearly seen to continue towards the continental slope of the Laptev Sea and this continuation is supported by the ERS-1 gravity. Another example of bringing together geological and geophysical data sets is from northern Russia, where huge ice lakes were dammed by the Early Weichselian ice sheet at about 90 000 years ago (Mangerud et al., 2001). The damming resulted from blocking the Russian north flowing rivers, supplying most of the fresh water to the Arctic Ocean, by the Ice Sheet margin. These proglacial lakes are reconstructed in our dynamic 3D-environment based on field

  18. Framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms in conjunction with 3D landmark localization and registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Hoegen, Philipp; Liao, Wei; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Rohr, Karl

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms. Phantoms are designed using a CAD system and created with a 3D printer, and comprise realistic shapes including branches and pathologies such as abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). To transfer ground truth information to the 3D image coordinate system, we use a landmark-based registration scheme utilizing fiducial markers integrated in the phantom design. For accurate 3D localization of the markers we developed a novel 3D parametric intensity model that is directly fitted to the markers in the images. We also performed a quantitative evaluation of different vessel segmentation approaches for a phantom of an AAA.

  19. Integrating 3D geological information with a national physically-based hydrological modelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Parkin, Geoff; Kessler, Holger; Whiteman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Robust numerical models are an essential tool for informing flood and water management and policy around the world. Physically-based hydrological models have traditionally not been used for such applications due to prohibitively large data, time and computational resource requirements. Given recent advances in computing power and data availability, a robust, physically-based hydrological modelling system for Great Britain using the SHETRAN model and national datasets has been created. Such a model has several advantages over less complex systems. Firstly, compared with conceptual models, a national physically-based model is more readily applicable to ungauged catchments, in which hydrological predictions are also required. Secondly, the results of a physically-based system may be more robust under changing conditions such as climate and land cover, as physical processes and relationships are explicitly accounted for. Finally, a fully integrated surface and subsurface model such as SHETRAN offers a wider range of applications compared with simpler schemes, such as assessments of groundwater resources, sediment and nutrient transport and flooding from multiple sources. As such, SHETRAN provides a robust means of simulating numerous terrestrial system processes which will add physical realism when coupled to the JULES land surface model. 306 catchments spanning Great Britain have been modelled using this system. The standard configuration of this system performs satisfactorily (NSE > 0.5) for 72% of catchments and well (NSE > 0.7) for 48%. Many of the remaining 28% of catchments that performed relatively poorly (NSE < 0.5) are located in the chalk in the south east of England. As such, the British Geological Survey 3D geology model for Great Britain (GB3D) has been incorporated, for the first time in any hydrological model, to pave the way for improvements to be made to simulations of catchments with important groundwater regimes. This coupling has involved

  20. A Fast Full Tensor Gravity computation algorithm for High Resolution 3D Geologic Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, V.; Crain, K.; Keller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    We present an algorithm to rapidly calculate the vertical gravity and full tensor gravity (FTG) values due to a 3-D geologic model. This algorithm can be implemented on single, multi-core CPU and graphical processing units (GPU) architectures. Our technique is based on the line element approximation with a constant density within each grid cell. This type of parameterization is well suited for high-resolution elevation datasets with grid size typically in the range of 1m to 30m. The large high-resolution data grids in our studies employ a pre-filtered mipmap pyramid type representation for the grid data known as the Geometry clipmap. The clipmap was first introduced by Microsoft Research in 2004 to do fly-through terrain visualization. This method caches nested rectangular extents of down-sampled data layers in the pyramid to create view-dependent calculation scheme. Together with the simple grid structure, this allows the gravity to be computed conveniently on-the-fly, or stored in a highly compressed format. Neither of these capabilities has previously been available. Our approach can perform rapid calculations on large topographies including crustal-scale models derived from complex geologic interpretations. For example, we used a 1KM Sphere model consisting of 105000 cells at 10m resolution with 100000 gravity stations. The line element approach took less than 90 seconds to compute the FTG and vertical gravity on an Intel Core i7 CPU at 3.07 GHz utilizing just its single core. Also, unlike traditional gravity computational algorithms, the line-element approach can calculate gravity effects at locations interior or exterior to the model. The only condition that must be met is the observation point cannot be located directly above the line element. Therefore, we perform a location test and then apply appropriate formulation to those data points. We will present and compare the computational performance of the traditional prism method versus the line element

  1. Interpretation and mapping of geological features using mobile devices for 3D outcrop modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Simon J.; Kehl, Christian; Mullins, James R.; Howell, John A.

    2016-04-01

    Advances in 3D digital geometric characterisation have resulted in widespread adoption in recent years, with photorealistic models utilised for interpretation, quantitative and qualitative analysis, as well as education, in an increasingly diverse range of geoscience applications. Topographic models created using lidar and photogrammetry, optionally combined with imagery from sensors such as hyperspectral and thermal cameras, are now becoming commonplace in geoscientific research. Mobile devices (tablets and smartphones) are maturing rapidly to become powerful field computers capable of displaying and interpreting 3D models directly in the field. With increasingly high-quality digital image capture, combined with on-board sensor pose estimation, mobile devices are, in addition, a source of primary data, which can be employed to enhance existing geological models. Adding supplementary image textures and 2D annotations to photorealistic models is therefore a desirable next step to complement conventional field geoscience. This contribution reports on research into field-based interpretation and conceptual sketching on images and photorealistic models on mobile devices, motivated by the desire to utilise digital outcrop models to generate high quality training images (TIs) for multipoint statistics (MPS) property modelling. Representative training images define sedimentological concepts and spatial relationships between elements in the system, which are subsequently modelled using artificial learning to populate geocellular models. Photorealistic outcrop models are underused sources of quantitative and qualitative information for generating TIs, explored further in this research by linking field and office workflows through the mobile device. Existing textured models are loaded to the mobile device, allowing rendering in a 3D environment. Because interpretation in 2D is more familiar and comfortable for users, the developed application allows new images to be captured

  2. Unified framework for generation of 3D web visualization for mechatronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severa, O.; Goubej, M.; Konigsmarkova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The paper deals with development of a unified framework for generation of 3D visualizations of complex mechatronic systems. It provides a high-fidelity representation of executed motion by allowing direct employment of a machine geometry model acquired from a CAD system. Open-architecture multi-platform solution based on latest web standards is achieved by utilizing a web browser as a final 3D renderer. The results are applicable both for simulations and development of real-time human machine interfaces. Case study of autonomous underwater vehicle control is provided to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach.

  3. Superior lithium storage in a 3D macroporous graphene framework/SnO2 nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaowu; Cheng, Jianxiu; Li, Weihan; Zhong, Xiongwu; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Lin; Yu, Yan

    2014-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) interconnected graphene framework (GF)-based SnO2 nanocomposite (3D SnO2/GFs) was prepared using self-assembly of polystyrene (PS)@SnO2 nanospheres and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets under suitable pH conditions, followed by a thermal treatment. The electroactive material (SnO2) is anchored to the wall of electrochemically and ionically conductive 3D interconnected GFs. When used as anodes for LIBs, the 3D SnO2/GFs deliver an excellent reversible capacity (1244 mA h g-1 in 50 cycles at 100 mA g-1) and outstanding rate capability (754 mA h g-1 in 200 cycles at 1000 mA g-1). The ultra-small size of SnO2 (sub 10 nm) and dimensional confinement of SnO2 nanoparticles by the wall of GFs limit the volume expansion upon lithium insertion, and the 3D interconnected porous structures serve as buffered spaces during charge-discharge and result in superior electrochemical performance by facilitating the electrolyte to contact the entire nanocomposite materials and reduce lithium diffusion length in the nanocomposite.A three-dimensional (3D) interconnected graphene framework (GF)-based SnO2 nanocomposite (3D SnO2/GFs) was prepared using self-assembly of polystyrene (PS)@SnO2 nanospheres and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets under suitable pH conditions, followed by a thermal treatment. The electroactive material (SnO2) is anchored to the wall of electrochemically and ionically conductive 3D interconnected GFs. When used as anodes for LIBs, the 3D SnO2/GFs deliver an excellent reversible capacity (1244 mA h g-1 in 50 cycles at 100 mA g-1) and outstanding rate capability (754 mA h g-1 in 200 cycles at 1000 mA g-1). The ultra-small size of SnO2 (sub 10 nm) and dimensional confinement of SnO2 nanoparticles by the wall of GFs limit the volume expansion upon lithium insertion, and the 3D interconnected porous structures serve as buffered spaces during charge-discharge and result in superior electrochemical performance by facilitating the electrolyte to contact

  4. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m2 g−1 present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g−1 in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g−1, respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g−1 at 0.1 A g−1 and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry. PMID:26472144

  5. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-10-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m2 g-1 present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g-1 in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g-1, respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry.

  6. A range/depth modulation transfer function (RMTF) framework for characterizing 3D imaging LADAR performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staple, Bevan; Earhart, R. P.; Slaymaker, Philip A.; Drouillard, Thomas F., II; Mahony, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    3D imaging LADARs have emerged as the key technology for producing high-resolution imagery of targets in 3-dimensions (X and Y spatial, and Z in the range/depth dimension). Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. continues to make significant investments in this technology to enable critical NASA, Department of Defense, and national security missions. As a consequence of rapid technology developments, two issues have emerged that need resolution. First, the terminology used to rate LADAR performance (e.g., range resolution) is inconsistently defined, is improperly used, and thus has become misleading. Second, the terminology does not include a metric of the system"s ability to resolve the 3D depth features of targets. These two issues create confusion when translating customer requirements into hardware. This paper presents a candidate framework for addressing these issues. To address the consistency issue, the framework utilizes only those terminologies proposed and tested by leading LADAR research and standards institutions. We also provide suggestions for strengthening these definitions by linking them to the well-known Rayleigh criterion extended into the range dimension. To address the inadequate 3D image quality metrics, the framework introduces the concept of a Range/Depth Modulation Transfer Function (RMTF). The RMTF measures the impact of the spatial frequencies of a 3D target on its measured modulation in range/depth. It is determined using a new, Range-Based, Slanted Knife-Edge test. We present simulated results for two LADAR pulse detection techniques and compare them to a baseline centroid technique. Consistency in terminology plus a 3D image quality metric enable improved system standardization.

  7. Using 3D Geologic Models to Synthesize Large and Disparate Datasets for Site Characterization and Verification Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, M. B.; Rautman, C. A.; Johnson, P. B.; Powers, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    As we are all aware, increases in computing power and efficiency have allowed for the development of many modeling codes capable of processing large and sometimes disparate datasets (e.g., geological, hydrological, geochemical, etc). Because people sometimes have difficulty visualizing in three dimensions (3D) or understanding how multiple figures of various geologic features relate as a whole, 3D geologic models can be excellent tools to illustrate key concepts and findings, especially to lay persons, such as stakeholders, customers, and other concerned parties. In this presentation, we will show examples of 3D geologic modeling efforts using data collected during site characterization and verification work at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern New Mexico, designed for the safe disposal of transuranic wastes resulting from U.S. defense programs. The 3D geologic modeling efforts focused on refining our understanding of the WIPP site by integrating a variety of geologic data. Examples include: overlaying isopach surfaces of unit thickness and overburden thickness, a map of geologic facies changes, and a transmissivity field onto a 3D structural map of a geologic unit of interest. In addition, we also present a 4D hydrogeologic model of the effects of a large-scale pumping test on water levels. All these efforts have provided additional insights into the controls on transmissivity and flow in the WIPP vicinity. Ultimately, by combining these various types of data we have increased our understanding of the WIPP site's hydrogeologic system, which is a key aspect of continued certification. Sandia is a multi program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental

  8. 1-D/3-D geologic model of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Henry, M.; Roberts, L.N.R.; Steinshouer, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    The 3-D geologic model of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin comprises 18 stacked intervals from the base of the Devonian Woodbend Group and age equivalent formations to ground surface; it includes an estimated thickness of eroded sediments based on 1-D burial history reconstructions for 33 wells across the study area. Each interval for the construction of the 3-D model was chosen on the basis of whether it is primarily composed of petroleum system elements of reservoir, hydrocarbon source, seal, overburden, or underburden strata, as well as the quality and areal distribution of well and other data. Preliminary results of the modeling support the following interpretations. Long-distance migration of hydrocarbons east of the Rocky Mountains is indicated by oil and gas accumulations in areas within which source rocks are thermally immature for oil and (or) gas. Petroleum systems in the basin are segmented by the northeast-trending Sweetgrass Arch; hydrocarbons west of the arch were from source rocks lying near or beneath the Rocky Mountains, whereas oil and gas east of the arch were sourced from the Williston Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and migration are primarily due to increased burial associated with the Laramide Orogeny. Hydrocarbon sources and migration were also influenced by the Lower Cretaceous sub-Mannville unconformity. In the Peace River Arch area of northern Alberta, Jurassic and older formations exhibit high-angle truncations against the unconformity. Potential Paleozoic though Mesozoic hydrocarbon source rocks are in contact with overlying Mannville Group reservoir facies. In contrast, in Saskatchewan and southern Alberta the contacts are parallel to sub-parallel, with the result that hydrocarbon source rocks are separated from the Mannville Group by seal-forming strata within the Jurassic. Vertical and lateral movement of hydrocarbons along the faults in the Rocky Mountains deformed belt probably also resulted in mixing of oil and gas from numerous

  9. A framework for the recognition of 3D faces and expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Barreto, Armando

    2006-04-01

    Face recognition technology has been a focus both in academia and industry for the last couple of years because of its wide potential applications and its importance to meet the security needs of today's world. Most of the systems developed are based on 2D face recognition technology, which uses pictures for data processing. With the development of 3D imaging technology, 3D face recognition emerges as an alternative to overcome the difficulties inherent with 2D face recognition, i.e. sensitivity to illumination conditions and orientation positioning of the subject. But 3D face recognition still needs to tackle the problem of deformation of facial geometry that results from the expression changes of a subject. To deal with this issue, a 3D face recognition framework is proposed in this paper. It is composed of three subsystems: an expression recognition system, a system for the identification of faces with expression, and neutral face recognition system. A system for the recognition of faces with one type of expression (happiness) and neutral faces was implemented and tested on a database of 30 subjects. The results proved the feasibility of this framework.

  10. 3D reconstruction and restoration monitoring of sculptural artworks by a multi-sensor framework.

    PubMed

    Barone, Sandro; Paoli, Alessandro; Razionale, Armando Viviano

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, optical sensors are used to digitize sculptural artworks by exploiting various contactless technologies. Cultural Heritage applications may concern 3D reconstructions of sculptural shapes distinguished by small details distributed over large surfaces. These applications require robust multi-view procedures based on aligning several high resolution 3D measurements. In this paper, the integration of a 3D structured light scanner and a stereo photogrammetric sensor is proposed with the aim of reliably reconstructing large free form artworks. The structured light scanner provides high resolution range maps captured from different views. The stereo photogrammetric sensor measures the spatial location of each view by tracking a marker frame integral to the optical scanner. This procedure allows the computation of the rotation-translation matrix to transpose the range maps from local view coordinate systems to a unique global reference system defined by the stereo photogrammetric sensor. The artwork reconstructions can be further augmented by referring metadata related to restoration processes. In this paper, a methodology has been developed to map metadata to 3D models by capturing spatial references using a passive stereo-photogrammetric sensor. The multi-sensor framework has been experienced through the 3D reconstruction of a Statue of Hope located at the English Cemetery in Florence. This sculptural artwork has been a severe test due to the non-cooperative environment and the complex shape features distributed over a large surface. PMID:23223079

  11. 3D porous metal-organic framework exhibiting selective adsorption of water over organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jin-Zhong; Lu, Wen-Guan; Jiang, Long; Zhou, Hong-Cai; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2007-07-23

    A 3D porous metal-organic framework (MOF) with 1D open channels has been constructed hydrothermally using Zn(II) and a rigid planar ligand IDC(3)- (imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylate). This MOF can adsorb water selectively over organic solvents and can be regenerated and reused. It also represents a rare example of a MOF with open channels that form/collapse reversibly upon hydration/dehydration.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Thermal Remediation in 3D Field-Scale Fractured Geologic Media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    Thermal methods are promising for remediating fractured geologic media contaminated with volatile organic compounds, and the success of this process depends on the coupled heat transfer, multiphase flow, and thermodynamics. This study analyzed field-scale removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) and heat transfer behavior in boiling fractured geologic media using the multiple interacting continua method. This method can resolve local gradients in the matrix and is less computationally demanding than alternative methods like discrete fracture-matrix models. A 2D axisymmetric model was used to simulate a single element of symmetry in a repeated pattern of extraction wells inside a large heated zone and evaluate effects of parameter sensitivity on contaminant recovery. The results showed that the removal of TCE increased with matrix permeability, and the removal rate was more sensitive to matrix permeability than any other parameter. Increasing fracture density promoted TCE removal, especially when the matrix permeability was low (e.g., <10(-17) m(2)). A 3D model was used to simulate an entire treatment zone and the surrounding groundwater in fractured material, with the interaction between them being considered. Boiling was initiated in the center of the upper part of the heated region and expanded toward the boundaries. This boiling process resulted in a large increase in the TCE removal rate and spread of TCE to the vadose zone and the peripheries of the heated zone. The incorporation of extraction wells helped control the contaminant from migrating to far regions. After 22 d, more than 99.3% of TCE mass was recovered in the simulation. PMID:25040727

  13. Numerical Analysis of Thermal Remediation in 3D Field-Scale Fractured Geologic Media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    Thermal methods are promising for remediating fractured geologic media contaminated with volatile organic compounds, and the success of this process depends on the coupled heat transfer, multiphase flow, and thermodynamics. This study analyzed field-scale removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) and heat transfer behavior in boiling fractured geologic media using the multiple interacting continua method. This method can resolve local gradients in the matrix and is less computationally demanding than alternative methods like discrete fracture-matrix models. A 2D axisymmetric model was used to simulate a single element of symmetry in a repeated pattern of extraction wells inside a large heated zone and evaluate effects of parameter sensitivity on contaminant recovery. The results showed that the removal of TCE increased with matrix permeability, and the removal rate was more sensitive to matrix permeability than any other parameter. Increasing fracture density promoted TCE removal, especially when the matrix permeability was low (e.g., <10(-17) m(2)). A 3D model was used to simulate an entire treatment zone and the surrounding groundwater in fractured material, with the interaction between them being considered. Boiling was initiated in the center of the upper part of the heated region and expanded toward the boundaries. This boiling process resulted in a large increase in the TCE removal rate and spread of TCE to the vadose zone and the peripheries of the heated zone. The incorporation of extraction wells helped control the contaminant from migrating to far regions. After 22 d, more than 99.3% of TCE mass was recovered in the simulation.

  14. Assessing quality of urban underground spaces by coupling 3D geological models: The case study of Foshan city, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weisheng; Yang, Liang; Deng, Dongcheng; Ye, Jing; Clarke, Keith; Yang, Zhijun; Zhuang, Wenming; Liu, Jianxiong; Huang, Jichun

    2016-04-01

    Urban underground spaces (UUS), especially those containing natural resources that have not yet been utilized, have been recognized as important for future sustainable development in large cities. One of the key steps in city planning is to estimate the quality of urban underground space resources, since they are major determinants of suitable land use. Yet geological constraints are rarely taken into consideration in urban planning, nor are the uncertainties in the quality of the available assessments. Based on Fuzzy Set theory and the analytic hierarchy process, a 3D stepwise process for the quality assessment of geotechnical properties of natural resources in UUS is presented. The process includes an index system for construction factors; area partitioning; the extraction of geological attributes; the creation of a relative membership grade matrix; the evaluation of subject and destination layers; and indeterminacy analysis. A 3D geological model of the study area was introduced into the process that extracted geological attributes as constraints. This 3D geological model was coupled with borehole data for Foshan City, Guangdong province, South China, and the indeterminacies caused by the cell size and the geological strata constraints were analyzed. The results of the case study show that (1) a relatively correct result can be obtained if the cell size is near to the average sampling distance of the boreholes; (2) the constraints of the 3D geological model have a major role in establishing the UUS quality level and distribution, especially at the boundaries of the geological bodies; and (3) the assessment result is impacted by an interaction between the cell resolution and the geological model used.

  15. Anisotropic thermal expansion of a 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Atsushi Maeda, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-15

    A 3D flexible metal–organic framework (MOF) with 1D hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion with relatively large thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub a}=−21×10{sup −6} K{sup −1} and α{sub c}=79×10{sup −6} K{sup −1}) between 133 K and 383 K. Temperature change gives deformation of both pores, which expand in diameter and elongate in length on cooling and vice versa. The thermally induced structural change should be derived from a unique framework topology like “lattice fence”. Silica accommodation changes not only the nature of the MOF but also thermal responsiveness of the MOF. Since the hydrophobic pores in the material are selectively blocked by the silica, the MOF with the silica is considered as a hydrophilic microporous material. Furthermore, inclusion of silica resulted in a drastic pore contraction in diameter and anisotropically changed the thermal responsiveness of the MOF. - Graphical abstract: A 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion behavior. The influence of silica filler in the hydrophobic pore was investigated. - Highlights: • Thermally induced structural change of a 3D MOF with a lattice fence topology was investigated. • The structural change was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns. • Temperature change induces anisotropic thermal expansion/contraction of the MOF. • Silica inclusion anisotropically changes the thermal responsiveness of the MOF.

  16. A template for enhanced 3-D geological modelling of wave-dominated deltaic reservoirs from the Tertiary Niger delta

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative 3-D geological models of Shell's Niger delta reservoirs are now routinely used for well and field development planning, simulation input and reserves booking. A review of these models, built with Shell's reservoir modelling package Geocap, has highlighted the successes and potential pitfalls of 3D reservoir modelling and has led to a template for better modelling of wave-dominated deltaic reservoirs. The key issues fall into two categories. The first concerns the use of soft geological knowledge. Conceptual models are a prerequisite for quality 3-D reservoir models and meaningful results can be obtained only if the geologist has a mental 3-D picture(s) of the reservoir which is used to steer the modelling. The decision to use stochastic techniques is crucial. In wave-dominated deltaic reservoirs, uncertainty may be better handled by a series of deterministic scenarios rather than many stochastic realizations. Sequence stratigraphic correlation tools and the definition of meaningful and recognizable facies types and flow units also determine the quality of the model. Integration between the petroleum engineering disciplines is the second category. The interface with the reservoir engineer is particularly important; the relevant level of geological detail must be identified and preserved during upscaling and flow simulation. Reservoir engineering and seismological data must be used to refine or validate alternative scenarios in an iterative loop. 3-D modelling is a tremendous business opportunity, but it demands more geological skills as well as a fully integrated, multidisciplinary approach.

  17. A template for enhanced 3-D geological modelling of wave-dominated deltaic reservoirs from the Tertiary Niger delta

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Quantitative 3-D geological models of Shell`s Niger delta reservoirs are now routinely used for well and field development planning, simulation input and reserves booking. A review of these models, built with Shell`s reservoir modelling package Geocap, has highlighted the successes and potential pitfalls of 3D reservoir modelling and has led to a template for better modelling of wave-dominated deltaic reservoirs. The key issues fall into two categories. The first concerns the use of soft geological knowledge. Conceptual models are a prerequisite for quality 3-D reservoir models and meaningful results can be obtained only if the geologist has a mental 3-D picture(s) of the reservoir which is used to steer the modelling. The decision to use stochastic techniques is crucial. In wave-dominated deltaic reservoirs, uncertainty may be better handled by a series of deterministic scenarios rather than many stochastic realizations. Sequence stratigraphic correlation tools and the definition of meaningful and recognizable facies types and flow units also determine the quality of the model. Integration between the petroleum engineering disciplines is the second category. The interface with the reservoir engineer is particularly important; the relevant level of geological detail must be identified and preserved during upscaling and flow simulation. Reservoir engineering and seismological data must be used to refine or validate alternative scenarios in an iterative loop. 3-D modelling is a tremendous business opportunity, but it demands more geological skills as well as a fully integrated, multidisciplinary approach.

  18. 3D Seismic Reflection Data: Has the Geological Hubble Retained Its Focus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    In their seminal paper in 2002, Joe Cartwright and Mads Huuse referred to 3D seismic reflection data as the 'Geological Hubble', illustrating how these data had the potential to revolutionise our understanding of the genesis and evolution of sedimentary basins. 14 years on, I will here outline just some of the key recent advances made in our understanding of basin structure and stratigraphy, focusing on: (i) the intrusion and extrusion of igneous rocks; (ii) salt tectonics, with particular emphasis on intrasalt structure and the kinematics and mechanics of diapirism; (iii) the geometry and growth of normal faults; and (iv) the structure and emplacement of mass-transport complexes (MTCs). I will stress that future advances at least partly relies on hydrocarbon exploration companies and government agencies continuing to make their data freely available via easy-to-access data portals. I will issue a clarion call to academics, stressing that 'geodynamicists', sedimentologists, structural geologists and geomorphologists, amongst others, can benefit from utilising what I believe are currently an underused data type.

  19. A 3D geological model of 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massironi, Matteo; Penasa, Luca; Simioni, Emanuele; Naletto, Giampiero; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    Stratification appears to be widespread and continuous on the North hemisphere of comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko which has been observed by the Rosetta probe since August 2014 (Massironi et al. 2015). This allowed us to reconstruct the true 3D subsurface geology of most of the inner structure of the comet nucleus on the basis of the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) observation and the derived photogrammetric and photo-clinometric shape models. We intend to populate the geo-model with the physical properties assumed for the cometary interior (porosity, density, strength and volatile content) and eventually use it as a base to interpret the radar sounding results obtained by CONSERT (Comet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission observations) (e.g. Ciarletti et al. 2015). This would give us important hints on the distribution and geometry of primordial structures within the comet interior. Massironi M. et al. 2015, Nature, 526, 402-405. Ciarletti V. et al. 2015, Astronomy & Astrophysic, no. aa26337-15

  20. Framework for Automated GD&T Inspection Using 3D Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Vimal Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar; Sivadasan, M.; Singh, N. K.

    2016-08-01

    Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) is a typical dialect that helps designers, production faculty and quality monitors to convey design specifications in an effective and efficient manner. GD&T has been practiced since the start of machine component assembly but without overly naming it. However, in recent times industries have started increasingly emphasizing on it. One prominent area where most of the industries struggle with is quality inspection. Complete inspection process is mostly human intensive. Also, the use of conventional gauges and templates for inspection purpose highly depends on skill of workers and quality inspectors. In industries, the concept of 3D scanning is not new but is used only for creating 3D drawings or modelling of physical parts. However, the potential of 3D scanning as a powerful inspection tool is hardly explored. This study is centred on designing a procedure for automated inspection using 3D scanner. Linear, geometric and dimensional inspection of the most popular test bar-stepped bar, as a simple example was also carried out as per the new framework. The new generation engineering industries would definitely welcome this automated inspection procedure being quick and reliable with reduced human intervention.

  1. 2D→3D polycatenated and 3D→3D interpenetrated metal–organic frameworks constructed from thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate and rigid bis(imidazole) ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Erer, Hakan; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Arıcı, Mürsel; Keskin, Seda; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2014-02-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metal–organic frameworks, namely, [Zn(µ-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(µ-dib)]{sub n} (1), [Cd(µ-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(µ-dib)]{sub n} (2), and ([Cd{sub 2}(µ{sub 3}-tdc){sub 2}(µ-dimb){sub 2}]·(H{sub 2}O)){sub n}(3). These MOFs were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental, thermal (TG, DTA, DTG and DSC), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D→3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. Moreover, these coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: In this study, hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metal–organic frameworks. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D→3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. These coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Complexes 1 and 2 display polycatenated 2D+2D→3D framework. • Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework. • Complex 1 adsorbs the highest amount of

  2. Reasoning about geological space: Coupling 3D GeoModels and topological queries as an aid to spatial data selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliot, Jacynthe; Bédard, Karine; Kirkwood, Donna; Lachance, Bernard

    2008-05-01

    Topological relationships between geological objects are of great interest for mining and petroleum exploration. Indeed, adjacency, inclusion and intersection are common relationships between geological objects such as faults, geological units, fractures, mineralized zones and reservoirs. However, in the context of 3D modeling, actual geometric data models used to store those objects are not designed to manage explicit topological relationships. For example, with Gocad© software, topological analyses are possible but they require a series of successive manipulations and are time consuming. This paper presents the development of a 3D topological query prototype, TQuery, compatible with Gocad© modeling platform. It allows the user to export Gocad© objects to a data storage model that regularizes the topological relationships between objects. The development of TQuery was oriented towards the use of volumetric objects that are composed of tetrahedrons. Exported data are then retrieved and used for 3D topological and spatial queries. One of the advantages of TQuery is that different types of objects can be queried at the same time without restricting the operations to voxel regions. TQuery allows the user to analyze data more quickly and efficiently and does not require a 3D modeling specialist to use it, which is particularly attractive in the context of a decision-making aid. The prototype was tested on a 3D GeoModel of a continental red-bed copper deposit in the Silurian Robitaille Formation (Transfiguration property, Québec, Canada).

  3. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best represented the…

  4. Surface amplitude data: 3D-seismic for interpretation of sea floor geology (Louisiana Slope)

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.H.

    1996-09-01

    Proliferation of 3D-seismic in support of hydrocarbon exploration/production has created new data for improved interpretation of sea floor and shallow subsurface geology. Processing of digital seismic data to enhance amplitude anomalies produces information for improved assessment of geohazards and identification of sensitive benthic communities protected by environmental regulations. Coupled with high resolution acoustic data and direct observation/sampling using a manned research submersible, surface amplitude maps add critical interpretive information for identification of sea floor features. Non-reflective zones (acoustic wipeouts) are associated with many slope features. Mud diapirs, mud mounds, mud volcanoes, gas-changed sediments, gas hydrates, slump deposits, carbonate hardgrounds, and various types of carbonate mounds are all features that exhibit this common response on high resolution seismic profiles. Amplitude data help make specific identifications. Since 1988, submersible data from mid-to-upper slope features (Garden Banks, Green Canyon, and Mississippi Canyon lease block areas) have been analyzed with conventional high resolution acoustic data and 313-amplitude extraction maps. Areas of rapid venting of sediment and hydrocarbon-charged formation fluids are clearly distinguishable from mud diapirs and areas of carbonate mounds (slow seepage). Gas hydrates occur as mounds and mounded zones along faults; products of moderate flux rates below (approx.) 500 in water depths. Gas hydrates function as stored trophic resources that support sensitive chemosynthetic communities. Amplitude extraction maps clearly identify these features by a strong low impedance amplitude anomaly. Refinement and {open_quotes}field calibration{close_quotes} of the surface amplitude extraction method may eventually lead to a new standard for evaluating geohazards and sensitive benthic communities.

  5. Scipion: A software framework toward integration, reproducibility and validation in 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Quintana, A; Del Cano, L; Zaldívar, A; Foche, I; Gutiérrez, J; Gómez-Blanco, J; Burguet-Castell, J; Cuenca-Alba, J; Abrishami, V; Vargas, J; Otón, J; Sharov, G; Vilas, J L; Navas, J; Conesa, P; Kazemi, M; Marabini, R; Sorzano, C O S; Carazo, J M

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) has undergone a revolution in instrumentation and methodology. One of the central players in this wide-reaching change is the continuous development of image processing software. Here we present Scipion, a software framework for integrating several 3DEM software packages through a workflow-based approach. Scipion allows the execution of reusable, standardized, traceable and reproducible image-processing protocols. These protocols incorporate tools from different programs while providing full interoperability among them. Scipion is an open-source project that can be downloaded from http://scipion.cnb.csic.es. PMID:27108186

  6. Scipion: A software framework toward integration, reproducibility and validation in 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Quintana, A; Del Cano, L; Zaldívar, A; Foche, I; Gutiérrez, J; Gómez-Blanco, J; Burguet-Castell, J; Cuenca-Alba, J; Abrishami, V; Vargas, J; Otón, J; Sharov, G; Vilas, J L; Navas, J; Conesa, P; Kazemi, M; Marabini, R; Sorzano, C O S; Carazo, J M

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) has undergone a revolution in instrumentation and methodology. One of the central players in this wide-reaching change is the continuous development of image processing software. Here we present Scipion, a software framework for integrating several 3DEM software packages through a workflow-based approach. Scipion allows the execution of reusable, standardized, traceable and reproducible image-processing protocols. These protocols incorporate tools from different programs while providing full interoperability among them. Scipion is an open-source project that can be downloaded from http://scipion.cnb.csic.es.

  7. XML-based 3D model visualization and simulation framework for dynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Fishwick, Paul A.

    2002-07-01

    Relatively recent advances in computer technology enable us to create three-dimensional (3D) dynamic models and simulate them within a 3D web environment. The use of such models is especially valuable when teaching simulation, and the concepts behind dynamic models, since the models are made more accessible to the students. Students tend to enjoy a construction process in which they are able to employ their own cultural and aesthetic forms. The challenge is to create a language that allows for a grammar for modeling, while simultaneously permitting arbitrary presentation styles. For further flexibility, we need an effective way to represent and simulate dynamic models that can be shared by modelers over the Internet. We present an Extensible Markup Language (XML)-based framework that will guide a modeler in creating personalized 3D models, visualizing its dynamic behaviors, and simulating the created models. A model author will use XML files to represent geometries and topology of a dynamic model. Model Fusion Engine, written in Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT), expedites the modeling process by automating the creation of dynamic models with the user-defined XML files. Modelers can also link simulation programs with a created model to analyze the characteristics of the model. The advantages of this system lie in the education of modeling and simulating dynamic models, and in the exploitation of visualizing the dynamic model behaviors.

  8. D Geological Framework Models as a Teaching Aid for Geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, H.; Ward, E.; Geological ModelsTeaching Project Team

    2010-12-01

    3D geological models have great potential as a resource for universities when teaching foundation geological concepts as it allows the student to visualise and interrogate UK geology. They are especially useful when dealing with the conversion of 2D field, map and GIS outputs into three dimensional geological units, which is a common problem for all students of geology. Today’s earth science students use a variety of skills and processes during their learning experience including the application of schema’s, spatial thinking, image construction, detecting patterns, memorising figures, mental manipulation and interpretation, making predictions and deducing the orientation of themselves and the rocks. 3D geological models can reinforce spatial thinking strategies and encourage students to think about processes and properties, in turn helping the student to recognise pre-learnt geological principles in the field and to convert what they see at the surface into a picture of what is going on at depth. Learning issues faced by students may also be encountered by experts, policy managers, and stakeholders when dealing with environmental problems. Therefore educational research of student learning in earth science may also improve environmental decision making. 3D geological framework models enhance the learning of Geosciences because they: ● enable a student to observe, manipulate and interpret geology; in particular the models instantly convert two-dimensional geology (maps, boreholes and cross-sections) into three dimensions which is a notoriously difficult geospatial skill to acquire. ● can be orientated to whatever the user finds comfortable and most aids recognition and interpretation. ● can be used either to teach geosciences to complete beginners or add to experienced students body of knowledge (whatever point that may be at). Models could therefore be packaged as a complete educational journey or students and tutor can select certain areas of the model

  9. 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate segmentation based on optimal feature learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter J.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a 3D prostate segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on patch-based feature learning framework. Patient-specific anatomical features are extracted from aligned training images and adopted as signatures for each voxel. The most robust and informative features are identified by the feature selection process to train the kernel support vector machine (KSVM). The well-trained SVM was used to localize the prostate of the new patient. Our segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 10 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentations (gold standard). The mean volume Dice overlap coefficient was 89.7%. In this study, we have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with manual segmentations.

  10. Integrated 3D geophysical and geological modelling of the Hercynian Suture Zone in the Champtoceaux area (south Brittany, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelet, G.; Calcagno, P.; Gumiaux, C.; Truffert, C.; Bitri, A.; Gapais, D.; Brun, J. P.

    2004-04-01

    This paper combines geological knowledge and geophysical imagery at the crustal scale to model the 3D geometry of a segment of the Hercynian suture zone of western Europe in the Champtoceaux area (Brittany, France). The Champtoceaux complex consists of a stack of metamorphic nappes of gneisses and micaschists, with eclogite-bearing units. The exhumation of the complex, during early Carboniferous times, was accompanied by deformation during regional dextral strike-slip associated with a major Hercynian shear zone (the South Armorican Shear Zone, SASZ). Dextral shearing produced a km-scale antiformal structure with a steeply dipping axial plane and a steeply eastward plunging axis. Armor 2 deep seismic profile shows that the regional structure was cut by a set of faults with northward thrusting components. Based on the seismic constraint, direct 2D crustal-scale modelling was performed throughout the Champtoceaux fold on seven radial gravity profiles, also using geological data, and density measurements from field and drill-hole samples. The 3D integration of the cross-sections, the digitised geological map, and the structural information (foliation dips) insure the geometrical and topological consistency of all sources of data. The 2D information is interpolated to the whole 3D space using a geostatistical analysis. Finally, the 3D gravity contribution of the resulting model is computed taking into account densities for each modelled geological body and compared to the Bouguer anomaly. The final 3D model is thus compatible with the seismic and gravity data, as well as with geological data. Main geological results derived from the modelling are (i) the overall 3D geometry of the south dipping thrust system interpreted on the seismic profile emphasises northward thrusting and folding of the Champtoceaux complex which was coeval with strike-slip along the South Armorican Shear Zone; (ii) the gravity modelling suggests the presence of a relatively dense body below the

  11. 3D geological modeling of the transboundary basin Berzdof-Radomierzyce in Upper Lusatia (Germany/Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloszyn, Iwona; Merkel, Broder; Stanek, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: Numerical modeling, Paradigm GOCAD, Berzdorf basin (Germany), Radomierzyce basin (Poland), Upper Lusatia. The accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) models depends on their data density and quality. Regions with a complex geology can be a challenge to model, especially if detailed models are required to support a further economic exploitation of a region. In this research, a 3D model was created based on the region's complicated geological condition. The focus area, the Berzdorf - Radomierzyce basin, located in Upper Lusatia on the Polish - German border to the south of the city of Görlitz - Zgorzelec, is such a region. The basin is divided by the volcanic threshold into the western part (Berzdorf basin) and its eastern extension (Radomierzyce basin). The connection between both parts is the so called "lignite bridge". The deposit in the Berzdorf has been exploited from 1830 until 1997. In contrast, the Radomierzyce deposit has never been exploited and is still considered as a prospective deposit for the operating Turów coal mine, which is located only around 15 km from the deposit. To represent the geology of the area a 3D modeling of the transboundary deposit was carried out. Moreover, some strategies to overcome numerical interpolation instability of the geological model with many faults were developed. Due to the large amount of data and its compatibility with other software the 3D geomodeling software Paradigm GOCAD was used. A total number of 10,102 boreholes, 60 cross sections and geological maps converted into digital format - were implemented into the model. The data density of the German part of the area of interest was much higher than the data density of the Polish part. The results demonstrate a good fit between the modeled surfaces and the real geological conditions. This is particularly evident by matching the modeled surfaces to borehole data and geological cross sections. Furthermore, simplification of the model does not decrease the

  12. An implicit dispersive transport algorithm for the US Geological Survey MOC3D solute-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents an extension to the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model that incorporates an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive transport equation, including source/sink terms. The original MOC3D transport model (Version 1) uses the method of characteristics to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The original MOC3D solution algorithm incorporates particle tracking to represent advective processes and an explicit finite-difference formulation to calculate dispersive fluxes. The new implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for the previous explicit formulation. This allows much larger transport time increments to be used in dispersion-dominated problems. The decoupling of advective and dispersive transport in MOC3D, however, is unchanged. With the implicit extension, the MOC3D model is upgraded to Version 2. A description of the numerical method of the implicit dispersion calculation, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. Version 2 of MOC3D was evaluated for the same set of problems used for verification of Version 1. These test results indicate that the implicit calculation of Version 2 matches the accuracy of Version 1, yet is more efficient than the explicit calculation for transport problems that are characterized by a grid Peclet number less than about 1.0.

  13. Obtaining valid geologic models from 3-D resistivity inversion of magnetotelluric data at Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    The 3-D inversion was generally able to reproduce the gross resistivity structure of the “known” model, but the simulated conductive volcanic composite unit horizons were often too shallow when compared to the “known” model. Additionally, the chosen computation parameters such as station spacing appear to have resulted in computational artifacts that are difficult to interpret but could potentially be removed with further refinements of the 3-D resistivity inversion modeling technique.

  14. Developing a geological 3D model for the Tanour and Rasoun spring catchment area using ArcGIS and GOCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Benhsinat, Mohamed; Wagner, Bianca; Sauter, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Key words: Karst, 3D model, GOCAD, ArcGIS, Jordan. Tanour and Rasoun karst springs (around 75 km northwest of the capital city of Amman in Jordan) are used as main local water supply for the surrounding villages. Carbonate rocks are the predominant rock type in the study area (Upper Cretaceous age). The karstification degree is moderate to high, with the availability of different karst features like dolines, caves, dry valleys, and highly fractured rocks. During the last years, the water supply from these springs had to be disconnected for several times due to microbial contamination and waste water pollution from local olive oil mills. For better understanding of the geological and the hydrogeological setting of the study area, in addition to the delineation of the groundwater catchment area for Tanour and Rasoun springs, a geological 3D model of the main geological formations within the study area was established using ArcGIS and GOCAD. The model is based on geological maps and well data; it was established for seven geological layers that act as prominent aquifers and aquicludes. ArcGIS software was used for data preparation, processing and interpolation of varying thickness, while GOCAD used for geometrical modeling steps. After the completion of the first modeling steps, major faults are included. Then the subsurface catchments will be delineated and compared with the superficial watersheds. The model still under development and open for further development.

  15. 3D subsurface geological modeling using GIS, remote sensing, and boreholes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavoura, Katerina; Konstantopoulou, Maria; Kyriou, Aggeliki; Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Sabatakakis, Nikolaos; Depountis, Nikolaos

    2016-08-01

    The current paper presents the combined use of geological-geotechnical insitu data, remote sensing data and GIS techniques for the evaluation of a subsurface geological model. High accuracy Digital Surface Model (DSM), airphotos mosaic and satellite data, with a spatial resolution of 0.5m were used for an othophoto base map compilation of the study area. Geological - geotechnical data obtained from exploratory boreholes and the 1:5000 engineering geological maps were digitized and implemented in a GIS platform for a three - dimensional subsurface model evaluation. The study is located at the North part of Peloponnese along the new national road.

  16. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) for the 3D Visualization of Integrated Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, David; Moreland, John; Baru, Chaitan; Crosby, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Data integration is increasingly important as we strive to combine data from disparate sources and assemble better models of the complex processes operating at the Earth's surface and within its interior. These data are often large, multi-dimensional, and subject to differing conventions for data structures, file formats, coordinate spaces, and units of measure. When visualized, these data require differing, and sometimes conflicting, conventions for visual representations, dimensionality, symbology, and interaction. All of this makes the visualization of integrated Earth science data particularly difficult. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) is an open-source data integration and visualization suite of applications and libraries being developed by the GEON project at the University of California, San Diego, USA. Funded by the NSF, the project is leveraging virtual globe technology from NASA's WorldWind to create interactive 3D visualization tools that combine and layer data from a wide variety of sources to create a holistic view of features at, above, and beneath the Earth's surface. The OEF architecture is open, cross-platform, modular, and based upon Java. The OEF's modular approach to software architecture yields an array of mix-and-match software components for assembling custom applications. Available modules support file format handling, web service communications, data management, user interaction, and 3D visualization. File parsers handle a variety of formal and de facto standard file formats used in the field. Each one imports data into a general-purpose common data model supporting multidimensional regular and irregular grids, topography, feature geometry, and more. Data within these data models may be manipulated, combined, reprojected, and visualized. The OEF's visualization features support a variety of conventional and new visualization techniques for looking at topography, tomography, point clouds, imagery, maps, and feature geometry. 3D data such as

  17. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Clayton

    2000-12-19

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the

  18. Two Ce-containing 3D metal–organic frameworks: In situ formation of ligand (DDPD)

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xinyu; Yu, Liqiong; Huang, Rudan

    2014-02-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of cerium nitrate and 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (OH-H{sub 2}BDC) produce two new metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), ([Ce(DDPD){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2.5}]·4H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1) and ([Ce(OH-BDC)(OH-HBDC)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O]{sub n} (2) (DDPD(II)=5,10-dioxo-5,10-dihydro-4,9-dioxapyrene-2,7-dicarboxylate(II)). These two complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TG, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. It was remarkable that the in situ reaction of OH-H{sub 2}BDC to DDPD(II) was found in complex 1. In 1, Ce(III) ions are bridged by DDPD ligands to form infinite 1D chain, which is further connected via DDPD ligands to form 3D structure. Complex 2 possesses a neutral noninterpenetrating 2D layer structure. Furthermore, the fluorescence properties and magnetic behavior of 1 and 2 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: In complex 1, the in situ reaction of OH-H{sub 2}BDC to DDPD(II) was found. Complex 1 features a 3D network structure. Adjacent Ce(III) ions are bridged by two carboxylate groups to form a 1D infinite inorganic chain, and further linked by the DDPD(II) ligands. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Complexes 1 and 2 was synthesized via hydrothermal methods. • In situ reaction of OH-H{sub 2}BDC to DDPD(II) was found in complex 1. • Ce(III) ions are bridged by the DDPD(II) ligands to generate a 3D structure in complex 1. • Complex 2 possesses a neutral noninterpenetrating 2D layer structure. • Fluorescent properties and magnetic behavior of 1 and 2 have been studied.

  19. UCVM: An Open Source Framework for 3D Velocity Model Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Plesch, A.; Taborda, R.; Callaghan, S.; Small, P.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide fundamental input data to ground motion simulations, in the form of structured or unstructured meshes or grids. Numerous models are available for California, as well as for other parts of the United States and Europe, but models do not share a common interface. Being able to interact with these models in a standardized way is critical in order to configure and run 3D ground motion simulations. The Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) software, developed by researchers at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), is an open source framework designed to provide a cohesive way to interact with seismic velocity models. We describe the several ways in which we have improved the UCVM software over the last year. We have simplified the UCVM installation process by automating the installation of various community codebases, improving the ease of use.. We discuss how UCVM software was used to build velocity meshes for high-frequency (4Hz) deterministic 3D wave propagation simulations, and how the UCVM framework interacts with other open source resources, such as NetCDF file formats for visualization. The UCVM software uses a layered software architecture that transparently converts geographic coordinates to the coordinate systems used by the underlying velocity models and supports inclusion of a configurable near-surface geotechnical layer, while interacting with the velocity model codes through their existing software interfaces. No changes to the velocity model codes are required. Our recent UCVM installation improvements bundle UCVM with a setup script, written in Python, which guides users through the process that installs the UCVM software along with all the user-selectable velocity models. Each velocity model is converted into a standardized (configure, make, make install) format that is easily downloaded and installed via the script. UCVM is often run in specialized high performance computing (HPC

  20. A Computational Framework for 3D Mechanical Modeling of Plant Morphogenesis with Cellular Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, Benjamin; Hamant, Olivier; Boudaoud, Arezki; Traas, Jan; Godin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The link between genetic regulation and the definition of form and size during morphogenesis remains largely an open question in both plant and animal biology. This is partially due to the complexity of the process, involving extensive molecular networks, multiple feedbacks between different scales of organization and physical forces operating at multiple levels. Here we present a conceptual and modeling framework aimed at generating an integrated understanding of morphogenesis in plants. This framework is based on the biophysical properties of plant cells, which are under high internal turgor pressure, and are prevented from bursting because of the presence of a rigid cell wall. To control cell growth, the underlying molecular networks must interfere locally with the elastic and/or plastic extensibility of this cell wall. We present a model in the form of a three dimensional (3D) virtual tissue, where growth depends on the local modulation of wall mechanical properties and turgor pressure. The model shows how forces generated by turgor-pressure can act both cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously to drive growth in different directions. We use simulations to explore lateral organ formation at the shoot apical meristem. Although different scenarios lead to similar shape changes, they are not equivalent and lead to different, testable predictions regarding the mechanical and geometrical properties of the growing lateral organs. Using flower development as an example, we further show how a limited number of gene activities can explain the complex shape changes that accompany organ outgrowth. PMID:25569615

  1. A computational framework for 3D mechanical modeling of plant morphogenesis with cellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Boudon, Frédéric; Chopard, Jérôme; Ali, Olivier; Gilles, Benjamin; Hamant, Olivier; Boudaoud, Arezki; Traas, Jan; Godin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The link between genetic regulation and the definition of form and size during morphogenesis remains largely an open question in both plant and animal biology. This is partially due to the complexity of the process, involving extensive molecular networks, multiple feedbacks between different scales of organization and physical forces operating at multiple levels. Here we present a conceptual and modeling framework aimed at generating an integrated understanding of morphogenesis in plants. This framework is based on the biophysical properties of plant cells, which are under high internal turgor pressure, and are prevented from bursting because of the presence of a rigid cell wall. To control cell growth, the underlying molecular networks must interfere locally with the elastic and/or plastic extensibility of this cell wall. We present a model in the form of a three dimensional (3D) virtual tissue, where growth depends on the local modulation of wall mechanical properties and turgor pressure. The model shows how forces generated by turgor-pressure can act both cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously to drive growth in different directions. We use simulations to explore lateral organ formation at the shoot apical meristem. Although different scenarios lead to similar shape changes, they are not equivalent and lead to different, testable predictions regarding the mechanical and geometrical properties of the growing lateral organs. Using flower development as an example, we further show how a limited number of gene activities can explain the complex shape changes that accompany organ outgrowth.

  2. A computational framework for 3D mechanical modeling of plant morphogenesis with cellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Boudon, Frédéric; Chopard, Jérôme; Ali, Olivier; Gilles, Benjamin; Hamant, Olivier; Boudaoud, Arezki; Traas, Jan; Godin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The link between genetic regulation and the definition of form and size during morphogenesis remains largely an open question in both plant and animal biology. This is partially due to the complexity of the process, involving extensive molecular networks, multiple feedbacks between different scales of organization and physical forces operating at multiple levels. Here we present a conceptual and modeling framework aimed at generating an integrated understanding of morphogenesis in plants. This framework is based on the biophysical properties of plant cells, which are under high internal turgor pressure, and are prevented from bursting because of the presence of a rigid cell wall. To control cell growth, the underlying molecular networks must interfere locally with the elastic and/or plastic extensibility of this cell wall. We present a model in the form of a three dimensional (3D) virtual tissue, where growth depends on the local modulation of wall mechanical properties and turgor pressure. The model shows how forces generated by turgor-pressure can act both cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously to drive growth in different directions. We use simulations to explore lateral organ formation at the shoot apical meristem. Although different scenarios lead to similar shape changes, they are not equivalent and lead to different, testable predictions regarding the mechanical and geometrical properties of the growing lateral organs. Using flower development as an example, we further show how a limited number of gene activities can explain the complex shape changes that accompany organ outgrowth. PMID:25569615

  3. A review of the quantification and communication of uncertainty associated with geological framework models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathers, Steve; Lark, Murray

    2015-04-01

    Digital Geological Framework Models show geology in three dimensions, they can most easily be thought of as 3D geological maps. The volume of the model is divided into distinct geological units using a suitable rock classification in the same way that geological maps are. Like geological maps the models are generic and many are intended to be fit for any geoscience purpose. Over the last decade many Geological Survey Organisations (GSO's) worldwide have begun to communicate their geological understanding of the subsurface through Geological Framework Models and themed derivatives, and the traditional printed geological map has been increasingly phased out. Building Geological Framework Models entails the assembly of all the known geospatial information into a single workspace for interpretation. The calculated models are commonly displayed as either a stack of geological surfaces or boundaries (unit tops, bases, unconformities) or as solid calculated blocks of 3D geology with the unit volumes infilled in with colour or symbols. The studied volume however must be completely populated so decisions on the subsurface distribution of units must be made even where considerable uncertainty exists There is naturally uncertainty associated with any Geological Framework Model and this is composed of two main components; the uncertainty in the geospatial data used to constrain the model, and the uncertainty related to the model construction, this includes factors such as choice of modeller(s), choice of software(s), and modelling workflow. Uncertainty is the inverse of confidence, reliability or certainty, other closely related terms include risk commonly used in preference to uncertainty where financial or safety matters are presented and probability used as a statistical measure of uncertainty. We can consider uncertainty in geological framework models to be of two main types: Uncertainty in the geospatial data used to constrain the model; this differs with the distinct

  4. A multi-objective optimization framework to model 3D river and landscape evolution processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzi, Simone; Castelletti, Andrea; Cominola, Andrea; Mason, Emanuele; Paik, Kyungrock

    2013-04-01

    Water and sediment interactions shape hillslopes, regulate soil erosion and sedimentation, and organize river networks. Landscape evolution and river organization occur at various spatial and temporal scale and the understanding and modelling of them is highly complex. The idea of a least action principle governing river networks evolution has been proposed many times as a simpler approach among the ones existing in the literature. These theories assume that river networks, as observed in nature, self-organize and act on soil transportation in order to satisfy a particular "optimality" criterion. Accordingly, river and landscape weathering can be simulated by solving an optimization problem, where the choice of the criterion to be optimized becomes the initial assumption. The comparison between natural river networks and optimized ones verifies the correctness of this initial assumption. Yet, various criteria have been proposed in literature and there is no consensus on which is better able to explain river network features observed in nature like network branching and river bed profile: each one is able to reproduce some river features through simplified modelling of the natural processes, but it fails to characterize the whole complexity (3D and its dynamic) of the natural processes. Some of the criteria formulated in the literature partly conflict: the reason is that their formulation rely on mathematical and theoretical simplifications of the natural system that are suitable for specific spatial and temporal scale but fails to represent the whole processes characterizing landscape evolution. In an attempt to address some of these scientific questions, we tested the suitability of using a multi-objective optimization framework to describe river and landscape evolution in a 3D spatial domain. A synthetic landscape is used to this purpose. Multiple, alternative river network evolutions, corresponding to as many tradeoffs between the different and partly

  5. The Role and Practice of Property Optimisation to Help Evaluate 3D Geological Models using Gravity and Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, R.

    2008-12-01

    As the shift from 2D to 3D geological mapping gathers strength and the number of multi-component potential field data sets increases, there is a need for greater sophistication in the gravity and magnetic modelling tools that can be used to help evaluate and refine the properties and geometry of the various units within these models. The hitherto standard approach of 2D forward modelling of selected cross-sections is progressively giving way to full 3D forward modelling. An example of a user-guided optimisation method to streamline what would otherwise be a time-consuming and frustrating manual iterative refinement process in 3D is presented. A combination of the density and magnetic properties assigned to each geological unit is derived such that the total calculated response best matches the supplied scalar, vector or tensor gravity and magnetic field observations, subject to specified levels of uncertainty (bounds) in the properties. Numerical optimisation is achieved with a standard linear least squares routine, subject to equality and bounds constraints. The user is presented with 3 standard options for every property, allowing the property values to be either (a) fixed, (b) free to vary within a specified range, or (c) free vary over a very broad range. Additionally, properties for a group of geological units can be linked so that they all return the same value. The parameterisation of density properties is relatively straight forward with a single property for each geological unit. Magnetic properties present more of a challenge. Three distinct scenarios are identified and a separate option can be selected for each geological unit. These assume (1) only induced susceptibility, (2) a combination of induced susceptibility and remanent magnetisation of know direction, or (3) a combination of induced susceptibility and remanent magnetisation of unknown direction. In this latter case, a solution is obtained for the total effective magnetisation in the form of 3

  6. Shallow subsurface control on earthquake damage patterns: first results from a 3D geological voxel model study (Tokyo Lowland, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafleu, Jan; Busschers, Freek; Tanabe, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    The Tokyo Lowland is situated in a Neogene sedimentary basin near the triple junction of the North American, Pacific, and Philippine tectonic plates. The basin is filled with Neogene and Quaternary sediments up to a thickness of 3 km. In the upper 70 m of the basin, thick sequences of soft Holocene sediments occur which are assumed to have played a key role in the spatial variation of damage intensity during the 1923 Kanto earthquake (Magnitude 7.9 to 8.3). Historical records show this earthquake destroyed large parts of the Tokyo urban area which in that time was largely made up by wooden houses. Although the epicentre was 70 km to the southwest of Tokyo, severe damage occurred north of the city centre, presumably due to ground motion amplification in the soft Holocene sediments in the shallow subsurface. In order to assess the presumed relation between the damage pattern of the 1923 earthquake and the occurrence of soft Holocene sediments in the shallow subsurface, we constructed a 3D geological voxel model of the central part of the Tokyo Lowland. The model was constructed using a methodology originally developed for the lowlands of the Netherlands. The modelling workflow basically consists of three steps. First, some 10,000 borehole descriptions (gathered for geomechanical purposes), were subdivided into geological units that have uniform sediment characteristics, using both lithological and geomechanical (N-value) criteria. Second, 2D bounding surfaces were constructed, representing tops and bases of the geological units. These surfaces were used to place each voxel (100 by 100 by 1 m) within the correct geological unit. The N-values and lithological units in the borehole descriptions were subsequently used to perform a 3D stochastic interpolation of N-value and lithological class within each geological unit. Using a vertical voxel stack analysis, we were able to create a map showing the accumulated thickness of soft muds in the Holocene succession. A

  7. iBem3D, a three-dimensional iterative boundary element method using angular dislocations for modeling geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerten, F.; Maerten, L.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-11-01

    Most analytical solutions to engineering or geological problems are limited to simple geometries. For example, analytical solutions have been found to solve for stresses around a circular hole in a plate. To solve more complex problems, mathematicians and engineers have developed powerful computer-aided numerical methods, which can be categorized into two main types: differential methods and integral methods. The finite element method (FEM) is a differential method that was developed in the 1950s and is one of the most commonly used numerical methods today. Since its development, other differential methods, including the boundary element method (BEM), have been developed to solve different types of problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe iBem3D, formally called Poly3D, a C++ and modular 3D boundary element computer program based on the theory of angular dislocations for modeling three-dimensional (3D) discontinuities in an elastic, heterogeneous, isotropic whole- or half-space. After 20 years and more than 150 scientific publications, we present in detail the formulation behind this method, its enhancements over the years as well as some important applications in several domains of the geosciences. The main advantage of using this formulation, for describing geological objects such as faults, resides in the possibility of modeling complex geometries without gaps and overlaps between adjacent triangular dislocation elements, which is a significant shortcoming for models using rectangular dislocation elements. Reliability, speed, simplicity, and accuracy are enhanced in the latest version of the computer code. Industrial applications include subseismic fault modeling, fractured reservoir modeling, interpretation and validation of fault connectivity and reservoir compartmentalization, depleted area and fault reactivation, and pressurized wellbore stability. Academic applications include earthquake and volcano monitoring, hazard mitigation, and slope

  8. 3D geological modeling of the transboundary Berzdorf-Radomierzyce basin in Upper Lusatia (Germany/Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloszyn, Iwona; Merkel, Broder; Stanek, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The management of natural resources has to follow the principles of sustainable development. Therefore, before starting new mining activities, it should be checked, whether existing deposits have been completely exploited. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) cross-border geologic model was created to generalize the existing data of the Neogene Berzdorf-Radomierzyce basin, located in Upper Lusatia on the Polish-German border south of the city of Görlitz-Zgorzelec. The model based on boreholes and cross sections of abandoned and planned lignite fields was extended to the Bernstadt and Neisse-Ręczyn Graben, an important tectonic structure at the southern rim of the basin. The partly detailed stratigraphy of Neogene sequences was combined to five stratigraphic units, considering the lithological variations and the main tectonic structures. The model was used to check the ability of a further utilization of the Bernstadt and Neisse-Ręczyn Graben, containing lignite deposits. Moreover, it will serve as a basis for the construction of a 3D cross-border groundwater model, to investigate the groundwater flow and transport in the Miocene and Quaternary aquifer systems. The large amount of data and compatibility with other software favored the application of the 3D geo-modeling software Paradigm GOCAD. The results demonstrate a very good fit between model and real geological boundaries. This is particularly evident by matching the modeled surfaces to the implemented geological cross sections. The created model can be used for planning of full-scale mining operations in the eastern part of the basin (Radomierzyce).

  9. Sustainable growth in America's heartland; 3-D geologic maps as the foundation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,

    1999-01-01

    The central Great Lakes states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio constitute one of the most productive and economically important regions in the country--America's heartland. The agriculture, industry, business, recreation, and ecology of these states are based on a common geologic heritage. During the last 1.8 million years, glaciers repeatedly advanced and retreated across the region, leaving behind a thick, complex blanket of intermixed layers of mud, clay, silt, sand, and gravel. Decisionmakers need knowledge of the glacial deposits--their characteristics, three-dimensional distribution, and thickness. To provide this knowledge, a coalition of state and federal geological surveys has formed to conduct the necessary studies in these four states to depict the three-dimensional nature of these glacial deposits and to interpret these data in cooperation with the user community for specific societal needs.

  10. Three-Dimensional Geologic Framework Model for a Karst Aquifer System, Hasty and Western Grove Quadrangles, Northern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, Kenzie J.; Hudson, Mark R.; Murray, Kyle E.; Mott, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding ground-water flow in a karst aquifer benefits from a detailed conception of the three-dimensional (3D) geologic framework. Traditional two-dimensional products, such as geologic maps, cross-sections, and structure contour maps, convey a mental picture of the area but a stronger conceptualization can be achieved by constructing a digital 3D representation of the stratigraphic and structural geologic features. In this study, a 3D geologic model was created to better understand a karst aquifer system in the Buffalo National River watershed in northern Arkansas. The model was constructed based on data obtained from recent, detailed geologic mapping for the Hasty and Western Grove 7.5-minute quadrangles. The resulting model represents 11 stratigraphic zones of Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian age. As a result of the highly dissected topography, stratigraphic and structural control from geologic contacts and interpreted structure contours were sufficient for effectively modeling the faults and folds in the model area. Combined with recent dye-tracing studies, the 3D framework model is useful for visualizing the various geologic features and for analyzing the potential control they exert on the ground-water flow regime. Evaluation of the model, by comparison to published maps and cross-sections, indicates that the model accurately reproduces both the surface geology and subsurface geologic features of the area.

  11. 3D Hollow Framework Silver Nanowire Electrodes for High-Performance Bottom-Contact Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiye; Lee, So Hee; Kim, Haekyoung; Kim, Se Hyun; Park, Chan Eon

    2015-07-01

    We successfully fabricated high performance bottom-contact organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) using silver nanowire (AgNW) network electrodes by spray deposition. The synthesized AgNWs have the dimensions of 40-80 nm in diameter and 30-80 μm in length and are randomly distributed and interconnected to form a 3D hollow framework. The AgNWs networks, deposited by spray coating, yield an average optical transmittance of up to 88% and a sheet resistance as low as 10 ohm/sq. For using AgNWs as source/drain electrodes of OFETs with a bottom-contact configuration, the large contact resistance at the AgNWs/organic channel remains a critical issue for charge injection. To enhance charge injection, we fabricate semiconductor crystals on the AgNW using an adsorbed residual poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) layer. The resulting bottom-contact OFETs exhibit high mobility up to 1.02 cm(2)/(V s) and are similar to that of the top-contact Au electrodes OFETs with low contact resistance. A morphological study shows that the pentacene crystals coalesced to form continuous morphology on the nanowires and are highly interconnected with those on the channel. These features contribute to efficient charge injection and encourage the improvement of the bottom-contact device performance. Furthermore, the large contact area of individual AgNWs spreading out to the channel at the edge of the electrode also improves device performance.

  12. A topological framework for interactive queries on 3D models in the Web.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Mauro; Rodrigues, José I; Silvestre, Ivo; Veiga-Pires, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies exist to create 3D content for the web. With X3D, WebGL, and X3DOM, it is possible to visualize and interact with 3D models in a web browser. Frequently, three-dimensional objects are stored using the X3D file format for the web. However, there is no explicit topological information, which makes it difficult to design fast algorithms for applications that require adjacency and incidence data. This paper presents a new open source toolkit TopTri (Topological model for Triangle meshes) for Web3D servers that builds the topological model for triangular meshes of manifold or nonmanifold models. Web3D client applications using this toolkit make queries to the web server to get adjacent and incidence information of vertices, edges, and faces. This paper shows the application of the topological information to get minimal local points and iso-lines in a 3D mesh in a web browser. As an application, we present also the interactive identification of stalactites in a cave chamber in a 3D web browser. Several tests show that even for large triangular meshes with millions of triangles, the adjacency and incidence information is returned in real time making the presented toolkit appropriate for interactive Web3D applications.

  13. A Topological Framework for Interactive Queries on 3D Models in the Web

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Mauro; Rodrigues, José I.; Silvestre, Ivo; Veiga-Pires, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies exist to create 3D content for the web. With X3D, WebGL, and X3DOM, it is possible to visualize and interact with 3D models in a web browser. Frequently, three-dimensional objects are stored using the X3D file format for the web. However, there is no explicit topological information, which makes it difficult to design fast algorithms for applications that require adjacency and incidence data. This paper presents a new open source toolkit TopTri (Topological model for Triangle meshes) for Web3D servers that builds the topological model for triangular meshes of manifold or nonmanifold models. Web3D client applications using this toolkit make queries to the web server to get adjacent and incidence information of vertices, edges, and faces. This paper shows the application of the topological information to get minimal local points and iso-lines in a 3D mesh in a web browser. As an application, we present also the interactive identification of stalactites in a cave chamber in a 3D web browser. Several tests show that even for large triangular meshes with millions of triangles, the adjacency and incidence information is returned in real time making the presented toolkit appropriate for interactive Web3D applications. PMID:24977236

  14. D Geological Outcrop Characterization: Automatic Detection of 3d Planes (azimuth and Dip) Using LiDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, K.; Hämmerle, M.; Miernik, G.; Drews, T.; Escalona, A.; Townsend, C.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning constitutes a powerful method in spatial information data acquisition and allows for geological outcrops to be captured with high resolution and accuracy. A crucial aspect for numerous geologic applications is the extraction of rock surface orientations from the data. This paper focuses on the detection of planes in rock surface data by applying a segmentation algorithm directly to a 3D point cloud. Its performance is assessed considering (1) reduced spatial resolution of data and (2) smoothing in the course of data pre-processing. The methodology is tested on simulations of progressively reduced spatial resolution defined by varying point cloud density. Smoothing of the point cloud data is implemented by modifying the neighborhood criteria during normals estima-tion. The considerable alteration of resulting planes emphasizes the influence of smoothing on the plane detection prior to the actual segmentation. Therefore, the parameter needs to be set in accordance with individual purposes and respective scales of studies. Fur-thermore, it is concluded that the quality of segmentation results does not decline even when the data volume is significantly reduced down to 10%. The azimuth and dip values of individual segments are determined for planes fit to the points belonging to one segment. Based on these results, azimuth and dip as well as strike character of the surface planes in the outcrop are assessed. Thereby, this paper contributes to a fully automatic and straightforward workflow for a comprehensive geometric description of outcrops in 3D.

  15. Lessons in modern digital field geology: Open source software, 3D techniques, and the new world of digital mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, Terry; Hurtado, Jose; Langford, Richard; Serpa, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Although many geologists refuse to admit it, it is time to put paper-based geologic mapping into the historical archives and move to the full potential of digital mapping techniques. For our group, flat map digital geologic mapping is now a routine operation in both research and instruction. Several software options are available, and basic proficiency with the software can be learned in a few hours of instruction and practice. The first practical field GIS software, ArcPad, remains a viable, stable option on Windows-based systems. However, the vendor seems to be moving away from ArcPad in favor of mobile software solutions that are difficult to implement without GIS specialists. Thus, we have pursued a second software option based on the open source program QGIS. Our QGIS system uses the same shapefile-centric data structure as our ArcPad system, including similar pop-up data entry forms and generic graphics for easy data management in the field. The advantage of QGIS is that the same software runs on virtually all common platforms except iOS, although the Android version remains unstable as of this writing. A third software option we are experimenting with for flat map-based field work is Fieldmove, a derivative of the 3D-capable program Move developed by Midland Valley. Our initial experiments with Fieldmove are positive, particularly with the new, inexpensive (<300Euros) Windows tablets. However, the lack of flexibility in data structure makes for cumbersome workflows when trying to interface our existing shapefile-centric data structures to Move. Nonetheless, in spring 2014 we will experiment with full-3D immersion in the field using the full Move software package in combination with ground based LiDAR and photogrammetry. One new workflow suggested by our initial experiments is that field geologists should consider using photogrammetry software to capture 3D visualizations of key outcrops. This process is now straightforward in several software packages, and

  16. The Mutual Effect of Reciprocally Moving Geokhod and Geological Environment Studied by the Discrete Element Method in Software PFC3D 5.00

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. Yu.; Kust, T. S.; Dronov, A. A.; Beloglazov, I. I.; Ikonnikov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    A numerical experiment procedure of geokhod traverse in the geological environment, based on software PFC3D 5.00 is presented in the paper; the interpretation of numerical experiment results is provided.

  17. Impact Craters on Mars: Natural 3D Exploration Probes of Geological Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The population of impact craters preserved on the surface of Mars offers fundamental constraints on the three- dimensional mechanical characteristics of the martian crust, its volatile abundance, and on the styles of erosion that have operated during essentially all epochs of martian geological history. On the basis of the present- day wealth of morphologic and geometric observations of impact landforms on Mars [ 1-31, an emerging understanding of the three-dimensional physical properties of the martian uppermost crust in space and time is at hand. In this summary, the current basis of understanding of the relatively non- degraded population of impact landforms on Mars is reviewed, and new Mars Global Surveyor (MGS)-based (MOLA) measurements of global geometric properties are summarized in the context of upcoming observations by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).

  18. Application of Cutting-Edge 3D Seismic Attribute Technology to the Assessment of Geological Reservoirs for CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Liner; Jianjun Zeng; Po Geng Heather King Jintan Li; Jennifer Califf; John Seales

    2010-03-31

    The goals of this project were to develop innovative 3D seismic attribute technologies and workflows to assess the structural integrity and heterogeneity of subsurface reservoirs with potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic attributes to aide in quantifying reservoir properies and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. Our study area is the Dickman field in Ness County, Kansas, a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontent to Indiana and beyond. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. Geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We systematically tested over a dozen seismic attributes, finding that curvature, SPICE, and ANT were particularly useful for mapping discontinuities in the data that likely indicated fracture trends. Our simulation results in the deep saline aquifer indicate two effective ways of reducing free CO{sub 2}: (a) injecting CO{sub 2} with brine water, and (b) horizontal well injection. A tuned combination of these methods can reduce the amount of free CO{sub 2} in the aquifer from over 50% to less than 10%.

  19. Nitrogen-doped 3D macroporous graphene frameworks as anode for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaowu; Wu, Ying; Yang, Zhenzhong; Pan, Fusen; Zhong, Xiongwu; Wang, Jiaqing; Gu, Lin; Yu, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen-doped 3D graphene frameworks (N-3D GFs) were synthesized by a facile two-step method: Polystyrene (PS) encapsulated in graphene oxide (GO) composites (denoted as PS@GO) are first synthesized, followed by a post-thermal annealing in ammonia step to get N-doped 3D GFs. The resulting N-3D GFs inherit the advantages of graphene, which possesses high electrical conductivity and high specific surface area. Furthermore, the well-defined 3D interconnected structure can facilitate the access of the electrolyte to the electrode surface, thus shortening the diffusion length of both Li+/e-, keeping the overall electrode highly conductive and active in lithium storage. Simultaneously, the in-situ formation of pyridinic N and pyrrolic N in 3D GFs provide high electronic conductivity and structure stability for lithium storage. The designed N-3D GFs electrode delivers a high specific capacity of 1094 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 200 mAg-1 and superior rate capability (691 mAhg-1 after 500 cycles at 1000 mAg-1) when used as anode for LIBs. We believe that such an inherently inexpensive, scalable, facile method can significantly increase the feasibility of building high performance energy storage system.

  20. Building a 3D geological near surface model from borehole and laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, P.; Tisato, N.; Pfiffner, O. A.; Frehner, M.

    2012-04-01

    The interpretation of active seismic survey data usually results in a subsurface P-wave velocity model. Such models commonly do not include the near surface, but end a few hundreds of meters beneath the Earth's surface. However, near surface effects, such as low-velocity zones or topography can influence the seismic signal significantly. Therefore, it is important to extend the P-wave velocity model all the way to the Earth's surface. As a test site of this study, we use the underground gas storage facility in Chémery (France), located at the south-western border of the Paris Basin. Velocities and lithological data of the shallow formations can be found in a public dataset, which collects data of a large number of short boreholes (BRGM online catalog: infoterre.brgm.fr/viewer). From the lithological data a structural model defined by surfaces gridded from well markers and faults derived from the analysis of these surfaces, is generated. The generation of the structural model comprised some major challenges, mainly because the borehole data represent 1D vertical pinpoints into the subsurface, rather than 2D sections as it is the case for most seismic surveys. This complicated the cross-correlation between the boreholes and the interpolation of the lithological formations in the 3D space. After the structural model has been generated, the velocity logs were upscaled to the model and interpolated to generate a near-surface P wave velocity model. To better constrain the velocity model, laboratory measurements of P-wave velocity were conducted. We collected 24 hand specimens from outcrops, from which we drilled core plugs. The sampled lithologies are 6 different sedimentary rock types, mostly calcarenites. The measurements were conducted employing the pulse transmission method for compression (Vp) and shear (Vs) waves in dry and fully water saturated conditions. Density and porosity were measured with two different methods: (1) with a helium pycnometer, and (2

  1. Observed Human Errors in Interpreting 3D visualizations: implications for Teaching Students how to Comprehend Geological Block Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Pirl, E.; Chiang, J.; Tremaine, M.

    2009-12-01

    Block diagrams are commonly used to communicate three dimensional geological structures and other phenomena relevant to geological science (e.g., water bodies in the ocean). However, several recent studies have suggested that these 3D visualizations create difficulties for individuals with low to moderate spatial abilities. We have therefore initiated a series of studies to understand what it is about the 3D structures that make them so difficult for some people and also to determine if we can improve people’s understanding of these structures through web-based training not related to geology or other underlying information. Our first study examined what mistakes subjects made in a set of 3D block diagrams designed to represent progressively more difficult internal structures. Each block was shown bisected by a plane either perpendicular or at an angle to the block sides. Five low to medium spatial subjects were asked to draw the features that would appear on the bisecting plane. They were asked to talk aloud as they solved the problem. Each session was videotaped. Using the time it took subjects to solve the problems, the subject verbalizations of their problem solving and the drawings that were found to be in error, we have been able to find common patterns in the difficulties the subjects had with the diagrams. We have used these patterns to generate a set of strategies the subjects used in solving the problems. From these strategies, we are developing methods of teaching. A problem found in earlier work on geology structures was not observed in our study, that is, one of subjects failing to recognize the 2D representation of the block as 3D and drawing the cross-section as a combined version of the visible faces of the object. We attribute this to our experiment introduction, suggesting that even this simple training needs to be carried out with students encountering 3D block diagrams. Other problems subjects had included difficulties in perceptually

  2. Carbon Quantum Dots and Their Derivative 3D Porous Carbon Frameworks for Sodium-Ion Batteries with Ultralong Cycle Life.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hongshuai; Banks, Craig E; Jing, Mingjun; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo

    2015-12-16

    A new methodology for the synthesis of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) for large production is proposed. The as-obtained CQDs can be transformed into 3D porous carbon frameworks exhibiting superb sodium storage properties with ultralong cycle life and ultrahigh rate capability, comparable to state-of-the-art carbon anode materials for sodium-ion batteries.

  3. Interactive editing of 3D geological structures and tectonic history sketching via a rigid element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Gautier; Caumon, Guillaume; Jessell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Numerical models of geological structures are generally built with a geometrical approach, which lacks an explicit representation of the deformation history and may lead to incompatible structures. We advocate that the deformation history should be investigated and represented from the very first steps of the modelling process, provided that a series of rapid, interactive or automated, deformation tools are available for local editing, forward modelling and restoration. In this paper, we define the specifications of such tools and emphasise the need for rapidity and robustness. We briefly review the different applications of deformation tools in geomodelling and the existing deformation algorithms. We select a deformation algorithm based on rigid elements, first presented in the Computer Graphics community, which we refer to as Reed. It is able to rapidly deform any kind of geometrical object, including points, lines or volumes, with an approximated mechanical behaviour. The objects to be deformed are embedded in rigid cells whose displacement is optimised by minimising a global cost function with respect to displacement boundary conditions. This cost function measures the difference in displacement between neighbouring elements. The embedded objects are then deformed based on their original position with respect to the rigid elements. We present the basis of our implementation of this algorithm and highlight its ability to fulfil the specifications we defined. Its application to geomodelling specific problems is illustrated through the construction of a synthetic structural model of multiply deformed layers with a forward modelling approach. A special boundary condition adapted to restore large folds is also presented and applied to the large anticline of Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium, which demonstrates the ability of this method to efficiently perform a volumetric restoration without global projections.

  4. High resolution 3D ERT to help GPR data interpretation for researching archaeological items in a geologically complex subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, S.; Leucci, G.; Mazzone, F.

    2008-09-01

    Muro Leccese (Lecce) contains one the most important Messapian archaeological sites in southern Italy. The archaeological interest of the site arises from the discovery of the remains of Messapian walls, tombs, roads, etc. (4th-2nd centuries BC) in the neighbourhood. The archaeological remains were found at about 0.3 m depth. At present the site belongs to the municipality, which intends to build a new sewer network through it. The risk of destroying potentially interesting ancient archaeological structures during the works prompted an archaeological survey of the area. The relatively large dimensions of the area (almost 10,000 m 2), together with time and cost constraints, made it necessary to use geophysical investigations as a faster means to ascertain the presence of archaeological items. Since the most important targets were expected to be located at a soil depth of about 0.3 m, a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out in an area located near the archaeological excavations. Unfortunately the geological complexity did not allow an easy interpretation of the GPR data. Therefore a 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) scan was conducted in order to resolve these interpretation problems. A three-way comparison of the results of the dense ERT measurements parallel to the x axis, the results of the measurements parallel to the y axis and the combined results was performed. Subsequently the synthetic model approach was used to provide a better characterization of the resistivity anomalies visible on the ERT field data. The 3D inversion results clearly illustrate the capability to resolve in view of quality 3D structures of archaeological interest. According to the presented data the inversion models along one direction ( x or y) seems to be adequate in reconstructing the subsurface structures. Naturally field data produce good quality reconstructions of the archaeological features only if the x-line and y-line measurements are considered together

  5. A new 3D nickel(II) framework composed of large rings: Ionothermal synthesis and crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Ling; Choi, Eun-Young; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2008-11-15

    Ionothermal reaction between Ni{sup 2+} and 1,3,5-benzentricarboxylic acid (H{sub 3}BTC) with [AMI]Cl (AMI=1-amyl-3-methylimidazolium) as the reaction medium produced a novel 3D mixed-ligand metal-organic framework [AMI][Ni{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}(OAc)(MI){sub 3}] (1) (MI=1-methylimidazole) with [AMI]{sup +} incorporated in the framework. The framework is formed by connecting 2D planes, made up of 32- and 48-membered rings, through 1D chains composed of 32-membered rings. The two BTC{sup 3-} ligands in 1 show the same connectivity mode with two bidentate and one {mu}{sub 2} bridging carboxylic groups. This is a new connectivity mode to the already existing 17 in the Ni-BTC system. The role of MI and [AMI]Cl in the structure formation is discussed. - Graphical Abstract: A novel 3D framework [AMI][Ni{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}(OAc)(MI){sub 3}] is obtained in ionothermal system with [AMI]{sup +} incorporating in the cavities as structure directing template and BTC{sup 3-} showing a new coordination fashion. The 3D framework is constructed by 2D layers linked with 1D double chains. The title compound has the middle thermal stability at ca. 280 deg. C.

  6. Forward and Reverse Modeling Compressive Deformation in a 3D Geologic Model along the Central San Andreas Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. A.; Graymer, R. W.; McPhee, D.

    2015-12-01

    During the late Miocene, a small change in the relative motion of the Pacific plate resulted in compressive as well as translational deformation along the central San Andreas Fault (SAF), creating thrust faults and folds throughout this region of California. We constructed a 3D model of an upper crustal volume between Pinnacles National Park and Gold Hill by assembling geologic map data and cross sections, geophysical data, and petroleum well logs in MoveTm, software which has the ability to forward and reverse model movement along faults and folds. For this study, we chose a blind thrust fault west of the SAF near Parkfield to compare deformation produced by MoveTm's forward modeling algorithm with that observed. We chose various synclines east of the SAF to explore the software's ability to unfold (reverse model) units. For the initial round of modeling, strike-slip movement has been omitted as the fault algorithm was designed primarily for extensional or compressional environments. Preliminary forward modeling of originally undeformed strata along the blind thrust produced geometries similar to those in the present-day 3D geologic model. The modeled amount of folding produced in hanging wall strata was less severe, suggesting these units were slightly folded before displacement. Based on these results, the algorithm shows potential in predicting deformation related to blind thrusts. Contraction in the region varies with fold axis location and orientation. MoveTm's unfolding algorithm can allow researchers to measure the amount of contraction a fold represents, and compare that amount across the modeled area as a way of observing regional stress patterns. The unfolding algorithm also allows for passive deformation of strata unconformably underlying the fold; one example reveals a steeper orientation of Cretaceous units prior to late Miocene deformation. Such modeling capabilities can allow for a better understanding of the structural history of the region.

  7. A drill hole query algorithm for extracting lithostratigraphic contacts in support of 3D geologic modelling in crystalline basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetselaar, Ernst M.; Lemieux, David

    2012-07-01

    The identification and extraction of lithostratigraphic contacts in crystalline basement for constraining 3D geologic models is commonly hampered by the sparseness of diagnostic lithostratigraphic features and the limited availability of geophysical well log data. This paper presents a query algorithm that, instead of using geophysical well log measurements, extracts lithostratigraphic contacts by exploiting diagnostic patterns of lithology-encoded intervals, recurrent in adjacent drill holes. The query algorithm allows defining gaps in the pattern to search across unconformable, intrusive and tectonic contacts and allows combining multiple search patterns in a single query to account for lateral lithofacies variations. The performance of the query algorithm has been tested in the Precambrian Flin Flon greenstone belt (Canada) by evaluating the agreement between queried and logged lithostratigraphic contacts in 52 lithostratigraphic reference drill holes. Results show that the automated extraction of the unconformable and partly tectonized contact between metavolcanic rocks and its metasedimentary cover was relatively unambiguous and matched all the contacts previously established by visual inspection of drill core. The 100% match was nevertheless paired with 23% false positives due to mafic and felsic sills emplaced in sandstone and conglomerate, which overlap in composition and thickness with extrusive volcanic rocks. The automated extraction of the contact between a mine horizon, defined by laterally complex volcanic and volcaniclastic lithofacies variations and overlying basalt flows, matched the visually logged contacts for 83% with 27% false positives. The query algorithm supplements geological interpretation when patterns in drilled lithostratigraphic successions, suspected to be diagnostic for lithostratigraphic contacts, need to be extracted from large drill hole datasets in a systematic and time-efficient manner. The application of the query algorithm is

  8. 3D thermo-mechanical model of the orogeny in Pamir constrained by geological and geophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, S. V.; Tympel, J.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Pamir-Hindu Kush orogenic belt is the result of the indentation of the western corner of the India plate into Eurasia. It has accommodated the highest strain over the shortest meridional distance of the India-Eurasia collision zone. Recent high-resolution seismic tomographic and receiver function studies confirm the presence of a south-dipping continental lithosphere, which has been traced to the depth of more than 200-300 km beneath the northern Pamir (Pamir slab). Balanced cross-section document crustal shortening associated with the corresponding frontal thrust system of a few tens of km, which is much less than the expected (>200-300 km) for intra-continental subduction zone, based on the seismically imaged length of the Pamir slab. Another unique feature of Pamir is the presence of large gneiss domes with the exhumation reaching a depth of 30-40 km.We employ the finite-element thermomechanical modelling technique SLIM3D to simulate the evolution of the Pamir orogeny during the last 25 Myr. The technique is using advanced non-linear elasto-visco-plastic rheology with parameters based on laboratory experiments. Our 3D model extends 1100 km N-S, 800 km E-W, and 300 km deep, and replicates indentation of the western half of India promontory into Eurasia. The moving modelling-window technique allows focusing at the most extensively deforming domains, and a 3D model setup and boundary conditions allow lateral material flow to the west, i.e. perpendicular to the direction of tectonic shortening.The model replicates major features of the lithospheric structure and geological history. For instance, we demonstrate that large part of the roll back of the Pamir slab may be caused by the delamination of the mantle lithosphere together with the lower crust, rather than classical intra-continental subduction involving thrust-imbrication of the uppermost crust. The resulting shortening at the Pamir frontal thrust system appears to be lower than 50 km in accord with

  9. 3D Geological Modeling of CoalBed Methane (CBM) Resources in the Taldykuduk Block Karaganda Coal Basin, Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, Raman; Kiponievich Ogay, Evgeniy; Royer, Jean-Jacques; Zhapbasbayev, Uzak; Panfilova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Coal Bed Methane (CBM) is gas stored in coal layers. It can be extracted from wells after hydraulic fracturing and/or solvent injection, and secondary recovery techniques such as CO2 injection. Karaganda Basin is a very favorable candidate region to develop CBM production for the following reasons: (i) Huge gas potential; (ii) Available technologies for extracting and commercializing the gas produced by CBM methods; (iii) Experience in degassing during underground mining operations for safety reasons; (iv) Local needs in energy for producing electricity for the industrial and domestic market. The objectives of this work are to model the Taldykuduk block coal layers and their properties focusing on Coal Bed Methane production. It is motivated by the availability of large coal bed methane resources in Karaganda coal basin which includes 4 300 Bm3 equivalent 2 billion tons of coal (B = billion = 109) with gas content 15-25 m3/t of coal (for comparison San Juan basin (USA) has < 20 m3/t). The CBM reserves estimations are about: Saransk block, 26.3 Bm3 and Taldykuduk block, 23.5 Bm3. Methane (CH4) can be considered as an environmentally-friendly fuel compared to coal. Actually, the methane extracted during mining is released in the atmosphere, collecting it for recovering energy will reduce CO2 equivalent emissions by 36 Mt, good news regarding climate warming issues. The exploitation method will be based on a EOR technology consisting in injecting CO2 which replaces methane in pores because it has a higher adsorption capacity than CH4; exploiting CBM by CO2 injection provides thus a safe way to sequestrate CO2 in adsorbed form. The 3D geological model was built on Gocad/Skua using the following available data set: 926 wells and large area (7 x 12 km). No seismic data; coal type and chemical components (S, ash, …); unreliable available cross-section & maps due to old acquisition; quality mature coal; complex heterogeneous fractures network reported on geological cross

  10. A nickel hydroxide-coated 3D porous graphene hollow sphere framework as a high performance electrode material for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengqiao; Zhu, Dong; Chen, Xi'an; Xu, Xin; Yang, Zhi; Zou, Chao; Yang, Keqin; Huang, Shaoming

    2014-03-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) porous graphene hollow sphere (PGHS) framework has been fabricated via a hard template method and used to anchor α-Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles with the size of about 4 nm through electrochemical deposition. It is found that a 3D PGHS framework can improve the capacitive performance of Ni(OH)2 effectively. In hybrid materials, α-Ni(OH)2 achieves the high specific capacitance of 2815 F g(-1) at a scan rate of 5 mV s(-1) and 1950 F g(-1) even at 200 mV s(-1) with a capacitance retention of about 70%, indicating that the α-Ni(OH)2-coated 3D PGHS framework exhibits high rate capability. The excellent performance of such hybrid material is believed to be due to the smaller size of Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles and the PGHS framework with large specific surface area promoting efficient electron transport and facilitating the electrolyte ions migration. These impressive results suggest that the composite is a promising electrode material for an efficient supercapacitor.

  11. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. [Quarterly] report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1994-04-22

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic interwell and reservoir-scale modeling to be used for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a 3-D representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for interwell to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduce economic risks, increase recovery from existing oil fields, and provide more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry will be an integral component of the project. The technical progress is divided into several sections corresponding to subtasks outlined in the Regional Stratigraphy Task and the Case Studies Task of the original proposal. The primary objective of the Regional Stratigraphy Task is to provide a more detailed interpretation of the stratigraphy of the Ferron Sandstone outcrop belt from Last Chance Creek to Ferron Creek. The morphological framework established from the case studies will be used to generate subsequent flow models for the reservoir types. The primary objective of the Case Study Task is to develop a detailed geological and petrophysical characterization, at well-sweep scale or smaller, of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir. Sedimentary structures, lithofacies, bounding surfaces, and permeabilities measured along closely spaced traverses (both vertical and horizontal) will be combined with data from core drilling to develop a 3-D morphology of the reservoirs within each case study area.

  12. A unified and efficient framework for court-net sports video analysis using 3D camera modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jungong; de With, Peter H. N.

    2007-01-01

    The extensive amount of video data stored on available media (hard and optical disks) necessitates video content analysis, which is a cornerstone for different user-friendly applications, such as, smart video retrieval and intelligent video summarization. This paper aims at finding a unified and efficient framework for court-net sports video analysis. We concentrate on techniques that are generally applicable for more than one sports type to come to a unified approach. To this end, our framework employs the concept of multi-level analysis, where a novel 3-D camera modeling is utilized to bridge the gap between the object-level and the scene-level analysis. The new 3-D camera modeling is based on collecting features points from two planes, which are perpendicular to each other, so that a true 3-D reference is obtained. Another important contribution is a new tracking algorithm for the objects (i.e. players). The algorithm can track up to four players simultaneously. The complete system contributes to summarization by various forms of information, of which the most important are the moving trajectory and real-speed of each player, as well as 3-D height information of objects and the semantic event segments in a game. We illustrate the performance of the proposed system by evaluating it for a variety of court-net sports videos containing badminton, tennis and volleyball, and we show that the feature detection performance is above 92% and events detection about 90%.

  13. A collaborative computing framework of cloud network and WBSN applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin-Feng; Chen, Min; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2014-03-01

    As cloud computing and wireless body sensor network technologies become gradually developed, ubiquitous healthcare services prevent accidents instantly and effectively, as well as provides relevant information to reduce related processing time and cost. This study proposes a co-processing intermediary framework integrated cloud and wireless body sensor networks, which is mainly applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction. In this study, the main focuses includes distributed computing and resource allocation of processing sensing data over the computing architecture, network conditions and performance evaluation. Through this framework, the transmissions and computing time of sensing data are reduced to enhance overall performance for the services of fall events detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

  14. Evaluating integration of inland bathymetry in the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller-Corbett, Cynthia

    2016-09-01

    Inland bathymetry survey collections, survey data types, features, sources, availability, and the effort required to integrate inland bathymetric data into the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program are assessed to help determine the feasibility of integrating three-dimensional water feature elevation data into The National Map. Available data from wading, acoustic, light detection and ranging, and combined technique surveys are provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and other sources. Inland bathymetric data accessed through Web-hosted resources or contacts provide useful baseline parameters for evaluating survey types and techniques used for collection and processing, and serve as a basis for comparing survey methods and the quality of results. Historically, boat-mounted acoustic surveys have provided most inland bathymetry data. Light detection and ranging techniques that are beneficial in areas hard to reach by boat, that can collect dense data in shallow water to provide comprehensive coverage, and that can be cost effective for surveying large areas with good water clarity are becoming more common; however, optimal conditions and techniques for collecting and processing light detection and ranging inland bathymetry surveys are not yet well defined.Assessment of site condition parameters important for understanding inland bathymetry survey issues and results, and an evaluation of existing inland bathymetry survey coverage are proposed as steps to develop criteria for implementing a useful and successful inland bathymetry survey plan in the 3D Elevation Program. These survey parameters would also serve as input for an inland bathymetry survey data baseline. Integration and interpolation techniques are important factors to consider in developing a robust plan; however, available survey data are usually in a triangulated irregular network format or other format compatible with

  15. Evaluating integration of inland bathymetry in the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller-Corbett, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Inland bathymetry survey collections, survey data types, features, sources, availability, and the effort required to integrate inland bathymetric data into the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program are assessed to help determine the feasibility of integrating three-dimensional water feature elevation data into The National Map. Available data from wading, acoustic, light detection and ranging, and combined technique surveys are provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and other sources. Inland bathymetric data accessed through Web-hosted resources or contacts provide useful baseline parameters for evaluating survey types and techniques used for collection and processing, and serve as a basis for comparing survey methods and the quality of results. Historically, boat-mounted acoustic surveys have provided most inland bathymetry data. Light detection and ranging techniques that are beneficial in areas hard to reach by boat, that can collect dense data in shallow water to provide comprehensive coverage, and that can be cost effective for surveying large areas with good water clarity are becoming more common; however, optimal conditions and techniques for collecting and processing light detection and ranging inland bathymetry surveys are not yet well defined.Assessment of site condition parameters important for understanding inland bathymetry survey issues and results, and an evaluation of existing inland bathymetry survey coverage are proposed as steps to develop criteria for implementing a useful and successful inland bathymetry survey plan in the 3D Elevation Program. These survey parameters would also serve as input for an inland bathymetry survey data baseline. Integration and interpolation techniques are important factors to consider in developing a robust plan; however, available survey data are usually in a triangulated irregular network format or other format compatible with

  16. Geological and geothermal 3D modelling of the Vienna Basin, Austria - pilot area of the project TRANSENERGY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, S.; Bottig, M.; Zekiri, F.; Fuchsluger, M.; Götzl, G.; Schubert, G.; Brüstle, A.

    2012-04-01

    In general, sedimentary basins show high potential for the use of geothermal energy. Since the Vienna Basin is a densely populated area, (approximately 1.7 million people in the city of Vienna plus surroundings) geothermal power and heat could play a significant role in the future. The Vienna basin is a relatively cold system where the 100 °C isotherm is to be found at a minimum of about 2500 meters. This fact, meaning the need of deep thus expensive wells, adding the problem of space for drillings and geothermal power plants are challenging subjects in terms of exploitation. The aim of the present work is to model the thermal regime of the Vienna basin and take a closer look on two exploitation scenarios in different hydrological systems (parts of the Bajuvaric and Juvavic nappes in the basement and the horizon of Aderklaa conglomerates in the Neogene sediments). In the first phase, a geological 3D model was created using published data (surface geology, interpreted cross sections from drilling and seismic data) as well as markers from selected wells (data derived from OMV). The geometrical model was built in GoCADTM, where in a first step surfaces were created, displaced along major faults and further exported for the following numerical simulations. In total, 14 Surfaces were created, seven Neogene layers and seven structuring the basement. The thermal modelling is realized using the finite-element software COMSOL Multiphysics© and FEFLOW. Major surfaces were imported into COMSOL as geometry objects, which is not practicable for very complex, fine structures. To represent smaller units inside the subdomains, the associated material parameters had to be imported as functions of the three space coordinates. To gain initial values for the exploitation scenario modelling a steady-state solution has to be achieved. For the lower model boundary, a Neumann boundary condition was set using a newly derived heat flow density map (project TRANSENERGY, Geological Survey

  17. Controls on hydrothermal fluid flow within the Rotokawa geothermal field, New Zealand: insights from 3D geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, C.; Sewell, S.; Cumming, W. B.; Minnick, M.; Rowland, J. V.; O'Brien, J.; Price, L.

    2012-12-01

    Identifying permeable zones is essential for economically viable exploration and development of conventional geothermal reservoirs with naturally high permeability. Except very close to boreholes, the resolution of geological and geophysical tools is at a much larger scale than the centimetre aperture of most geothermal fluid pathways important to production. A case study from the >250°C Rotokawa Geothermal Field, currently producing 175 MWe within the Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand, illustrates how a 3D visualization of a subset of available data that are conceptually relevant at the scales of interest has enhanced the understanding of fluid flow within this system. Geoscience data sets including subsurface formation geometry and permeable zones in wells; the natural state temperature pattern deduced from wells and MT resistivity; microearthquakes (MEQ) induced by injection, and surface geology have been integrated with engineering data including production pressure responses and injection rates to constrain the location and general hydraulic properties of one of the most influential faults in the field. Stratigraphic offsets of >500 m, recorded in core and cuttings from wells drilled on either side of the field, confirm the presence of this fault, initially suspected based on a surface lineation of eight young (<22 ka) hydrothermal eruption craters. The 3D visualization of the MEQ occurrence pattern in space and time helps constrain the mechanism of the MEQs themselves and, importantly, the confinement of most of the MEQs to the eastern side of the fault closest to the injection wells. Hosted within the Mesozoic meta-sedimentary basement formation, this has provided an important conceptual constraint that explains the lack of injection fluid on the western side of this fault. Further to this, if this fault is acting as a barrier at the Mesozoic meta-sedimentary level today, this could imply a switch in the behaviour of this structure as it is inferred, based

  18. Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

    2009-03-31

    Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications

  19. A Geospatial Information Grid Framework for Geological Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Xue, Lei; Li, Chaoling; Lv, Xia; Chen, Zhanlong; Guo, Mingqiang; Xie, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The use of digital information in geological fields is becoming very important. Thus, informatization in geological surveys should not stagnate as a result of the level of data accumulation. The integration and sharing of distributed, multi-source, heterogeneous geological information is an open problem in geological domains. Applications and services use geological spatial data with many features, including being cross-region and cross-domain and requiring real-time updating. As a result of these features, desktop and web-based geographic information systems (GISs) experience difficulties in meeting the demand for geological spatial information. To facilitate the real-time sharing of data and services in distributed environments, a GIS platform that is open, integrative, reconfigurable, reusable and elastic would represent an indispensable tool. The purpose of this paper is to develop a geological cloud-computing platform for integrating and sharing geological information based on a cloud architecture. Thus, the geological cloud-computing platform defines geological ontology semantics; designs a standard geological information framework and a standard resource integration model; builds a peer-to-peer node management mechanism; achieves the description, organization, discovery, computing and integration of the distributed resources; and provides the distributed spatial meta service, the spatial information catalog service, the multi-mode geological data service and the spatial data interoperation service. The geological survey information cloud-computing platform has been implemented, and based on the platform, some geological data services and geological processing services were developed. Furthermore, an iron mine resource forecast and an evaluation service is introduced in this paper. PMID:26710255

  20. A Geospatial Information Grid Framework for Geological Survey.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Xue, Lei; Li, Chaoling; Lv, Xia; Chen, Zhanlong; Guo, Mingqiang; Xie, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The use of digital information in geological fields is becoming very important. Thus, informatization in geological surveys should not stagnate as a result of the level of data accumulation. The integration and sharing of distributed, multi-source, heterogeneous geological information is an open problem in geological domains. Applications and services use geological spatial data with many features, including being cross-region and cross-domain and requiring real-time updating. As a result of these features, desktop and web-based geographic information systems (GISs) experience difficulties in meeting the demand for geological spatial information. To facilitate the real-time sharing of data and services in distributed environments, a GIS platform that is open, integrative, reconfigurable, reusable and elastic would represent an indispensable tool. The purpose of this paper is to develop a geological cloud-computing platform for integrating and sharing geological information based on a cloud architecture. Thus, the geological cloud-computing platform defines geological ontology semantics; designs a standard geological information framework and a standard resource integration model; builds a peer-to-peer node management mechanism; achieves the description, organization, discovery, computing and integration of the distributed resources; and provides the distributed spatial meta service, the spatial information catalog service, the multi-mode geological data service and the spatial data interoperation service. The geological survey information cloud-computing platform has been implemented, and based on the platform, some geological data services and geological processing services were developed. Furthermore, an iron mine resource forecast and an evaluation service is introduced in this paper.

  1. A Geospatial Information Grid Framework for Geological Survey.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Xue, Lei; Li, Chaoling; Lv, Xia; Chen, Zhanlong; Guo, Mingqiang; Xie, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The use of digital information in geological fields is becoming very important. Thus, informatization in geological surveys should not stagnate as a result of the level of data accumulation. The integration and sharing of distributed, multi-source, heterogeneous geological information is an open problem in geological domains. Applications and services use geological spatial data with many features, including being cross-region and cross-domain and requiring real-time updating. As a result of these features, desktop and web-based geographic information systems (GISs) experience difficulties in meeting the demand for geological spatial information. To facilitate the real-time sharing of data and services in distributed environments, a GIS platform that is open, integrative, reconfigurable, reusable and elastic would represent an indispensable tool. The purpose of this paper is to develop a geological cloud-computing platform for integrating and sharing geological information based on a cloud architecture. Thus, the geological cloud-computing platform defines geological ontology semantics; designs a standard geological information framework and a standard resource integration model; builds a peer-to-peer node management mechanism; achieves the description, organization, discovery, computing and integration of the distributed resources; and provides the distributed spatial meta service, the spatial information catalog service, the multi-mode geological data service and the spatial data interoperation service. The geological survey information cloud-computing platform has been implemented, and based on the platform, some geological data services and geological processing services were developed. Furthermore, an iron mine resource forecast and an evaluation service is introduced in this paper. PMID:26710255

  2. Mapping the North Sea base-Quaternary: using 3D seismic to fill a gap in the geological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Rachel; Huuse, Mads; Stewart, Margaret; Brocklehurst, Simon H.

    2014-05-01

    The identification and mapping of the base-Quaternary boundary in the central parts of the North Sea is problematic due to the change from an unconformable transition between Pliocene and Pleistocene deltaic deposits in the southern North Sea to a conformable one further north (Sejrup et al 1991; Gatliff et al 1994). The best estimates of the transition use seismic reflection data to identify a 'crenulated reflector' (Buckley 2012), or rely on correlating sparse biostratigraphy (Cameron et al 1987). Recent integration of biostratigraphy, pollen analysis, paleomagnetism and amino acid analysis in the Dutch and Danish sectors (Rasmussen et al 2005; Kuhlmann et al 2006) allows greater confidence in the correlation to a regional 3D seismic dataset and show that the base-Quaternary can be mapped across the entire basin. The base-Quaternary has been mapped using the PGS MegaSurvey dataset from wells in the Danish Sector along the initially unconformable horizon and down the delta front into the more conformable basin giving a high degree of confidence in the horizon pick. The mapped horizon is presented here alongside the difference between this new interpretation and the previously interpreted base-Quaternary (Buckley 2012). The revised base-Quaternary surface reaches a depth of 1248 ms TWT or approximately 1120 m (assuming average velocity of 1800 m/s) showing an elongate basin shape that follows the underlying structure of the Central Graben. The difference between the revised base-Quaternary and the traditional base-Quaternary reaches a maximum of over 600 ms TWT or approximately 540 m in the south-west with over 300 ms TWT or approximately 270 m at the Josephine well (56° 36.11'N, 2° 27.09'E) in the centre of the basin. Mapping this new base-Quaternary allows for the interpretation of the paleo-envionrment during the earliest Quaternary. Seismic attribute analysis indicates a deep water basin with sediment deposition from multiple deltas and redistribution by deep

  3. A nanoporous 3D zinc(II) metal–organic framework for selective absorption of benzaldehyde and formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Moradpour, Tahereh; Abbasi, Alireza; Van Hecke, Kristof

    2015-08-15

    A new 3D nanoporous metal–organic framework (MOF), [[Zn{sub 4}O(C{sub 24}H{sub 15}N{sub 6}O{sub 6}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O·DMF]{sub n} (1) based on 4,4′,4″-s-triazine-1,3,5-triyltri-p-aminobenzoate (TATAB) ligand was solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single–crystal X-ray diffraction, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses. X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis reveals that 1 exhibits a 3D network with new kvh1 topology. Semi-empirical (AM1) calculations were carried out to obtain stable conformers for TATAB ligand. In addition, the absorption of two typical aldehydes (benzaldehyde and formaldehyde) in the presence of 1 was investigated and the effect of the aldehyde concentration, exposure time and temperature was studied. It was found that compound 1 has a potential for the absorption of aldehydes under mild conditions. - Graphical abstract: Absorption of two typical aldehydes (formaldehyde and benzaldehyde) by solvothermally synthesized of a 3D nano-porous MOF based on TATAB tricarboxylate ligand and Zn (NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: • We present a 3D Zn(II)-MOF with TATAB linker by solvothermal method. • The framework possesses a new kvh1 topology. • The framework displays formaldehyde and benzaldehyde absorption property. • Conformational analysis was performed to determine the stable linker geometry.

  4. Coordinated assembly of a new 3D mesoporous Fe₃O₄@Cu₂O-graphene oxide framework as a highly efficient and reusable catalyst for the synthesis of quinoxalines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyi; Hu, Guowen; Liu, Jian; Liu, Weisheng; Zhang, Haoli; Wang, Baodui

    2015-03-25

    A new three-dimensional (3D) mesoporous hybrid framework was synthesized by coordinated layer-by-layer assembly between nanosheets of reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4@Cu2O. This 3D mesoporous framework shows an excellent catalytic performance with a remarkable activity, selectivity (>99%), and strong durability in the synthesis of quinoxalines.

  5. Coordinated assembly of a new 3D mesoporous Fe₃O₄@Cu₂O-graphene oxide framework as a highly efficient and reusable catalyst for the synthesis of quinoxalines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyi; Hu, Guowen; Liu, Jian; Liu, Weisheng; Zhang, Haoli; Wang, Baodui

    2015-03-25

    A new three-dimensional (3D) mesoporous hybrid framework was synthesized by coordinated layer-by-layer assembly between nanosheets of reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4@Cu2O. This 3D mesoporous framework shows an excellent catalytic performance with a remarkable activity, selectivity (>99%), and strong durability in the synthesis of quinoxalines. PMID:25712163

  6. Multilayered 3D Lidar image construction using spatial models in a Bayesian framework.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Marin, Sergio; Wallace, Andrew M; Gibson, Gavin J

    2008-06-01

    Standard 3D imaging systems process only a single return at each pixel from an assumed single opaque surface. However, there are situations when the laser return consists of multiple peaks due to the footprint of the beam impinging on a target with surfaces distributed in depth or with semi-transparent surfaces. If all these returns are processed, a more informative multi-layered 3D image is created. We propose a unified theory of pixel processing for Lidar data using a Bayesian approach that incorporates spatial constraints through a Markov Random Field with a Potts prior model. This allows us to model uncertainty about the underlying spatial process. To palliate some inherent deficiencies of this prior model, we also introduce two proposal distributions, one based on spatial mode jumping, the other on a spatial birth/death process. The different parameters of the several returns are estimated using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) techniques in combination with an adaptive strategy of delayed rejection to improve the estimates of the parameters. PMID:18421108

  7. Presenting Cultural Heritage Landscapes - from GIS via 3d Models to Interactive Presentation Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prechtel, N.; Münster, S.; Kröber, C.; Schubert, C.; Schietzold, S.

    2013-07-01

    Two current projects of the authors try to approach cultural heritage landscapes from both cultural sciences and geography through a combination of customised geo-information (GIS) and visualisation/presentation technology. In excess of a mere academic use, easyto- handle virtual 3D web presentations may contribute to knowledge, esteem, commemoration and preservation. The examples relate to pre-historic Scythian burial sites in the South-Siberian Altay Mountains ("Uch Enmek") as well as to a "virtual memorial" of contemporary history ("GEPAM"), a chapter of Jewish prosecution in the "Third Reich", which historically connects the town of Dresden with the Czech Terezin (Theresienstadt). It is common knowledge that a profound understanding of (pre-)historic artefacts and places may reflect a larger environment as well as an individual geographic setting. Coming from this background, the presented projects try to find technical solutions. They start from GIS models and aim at customised interactive presentations of 3D models. In using the latter a widely-spanned public is invited to a land- or townscape of specific cultural importance. The geographic space is thought to work as a door to a repository of educational exhibits under the umbrella of a web application. Within this concept a landscape/townscape also accounts for the time dimension in different scales (time of construction/operation versus actual state, and in sense of a season and time of the day as a principal modulator of visual perception of space).

  8. A Two-Stage Framework for 3D Face Reconstruction from RGBD Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangkan; Wang, Xianwang; Pan, Zhigeng; Liu, Kai

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new approach for 3D face reconstruction with RGBD images from an inexpensive commodity sensor. The challenges we face are: 1) substantial random noise and corruption are present in low-resolution depth maps; and 2) there is high degree of variability in pose and face expression. We develop a novel two-stage algorithm that effectively maps low-quality depth maps to realistic face models. Each stage is targeted toward a certain type of noise. The first stage extracts sparse errors from depth patches through the data-driven local sparse coding, while the second stage smooths noise on the boundaries between patches and reconstructs the global shape by combining local shapes using our template-based surface refinement. Our approach does not require any markers or user interaction. We perform quantitative and qualitative evaluations on both synthetic and real test sets. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is able to produce high-resolution 3D face models with high accuracy, even if inputs are of low quality, and have large variations in viewpoint and face expression.

  9. Geological and Petrophysical Characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D Simulation of a Fluvial-Deltaic Reservoir.

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial- deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone: (1) evaluation of the Ivie Creek case-study area and (2) technology transfer. The Ivie Creek case-study evaluation work during the quarter focused on the two parasequence sets, the Kf-1 and Kf-2, in the lower Ferron Sandstone. This work included: (1) clinoform characterization, (2) parasequence characterization from elevation and isopach maps, and (3) three-dimensional facies modeling. Scaled photomosaic panels from the Ivie Creek amphitheater (south-facing outcrop belt) and Quitchupah Canyon (Fig. 1) provide a deterministic framework for two apparent-dip cross sections. These panels along with other photomosaic coverage and data from five drill holes, ten stratigraphic sections, and 22 permeability transacts (Fig. 1), acquired during two field seasons, provided the necessary information for this geologic evaluation and creation of the models to be used

  10. Sparse Bayesian framework applied to 3D super-resolution reconstruction in fetal brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Laura C.; Velasco Toledo, Nelson; Romero Castro, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Magnetic Resonance (FMR) is an imaging technique that is becoming increasingly important as allows assessing brain development and thus make an early diagnostic of congenital abnormalities, spatial resolution is limited by the short acquisition time and the unpredictable fetus movements, in consequence the resulting images are characterized by non-parallel projection planes composed by anisotropic voxels. The sparse Bayesian representation is a flexible strategy which is able to model complex relationships. The Super-resolution is approached as a regression problem, the main advantage is the capability to learn data relations from observations. Quantitative performance evaluation was carried out using synthetic images, the proposed method demonstrates a better reconstruction quality compared with standard interpolation approach. The presented method is a promising approach to improve the information quality related with the 3-D fetal brain structure. It is important because allows assessing brain development and thus make an early diagnostic of congenital abnormalities.

  11. Data Management Framework of Drone-Based 3d Model Reconstruction of Disaster Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Moon, H.; Lee, W.

    2016-06-01

    To rescue peoples in the disaster site in time, information acquisition of current feature of collapsed buildings and terrain is quite important for disaster site rescue manager. Based on information about disaster site, they can accurately plan the rescue process and remove collapsed buildings or other facilities. However, due to the harsh condition of disaster areas, rapid and accurate acquisition of disaster site information is not an easy task. There are possibilities of further damages in the collapse and there are also difficulties in acquiring information about current disaster situation due to large disaster site and limited rescue resources. To overcome these circumstances of disaster sites, an unmanned aerial vehicle, commonly known as a drone is used to rapidly and effectively acquire current image data of the large disaster areas. Then, the procedure of drone-based 3D model reconstruction visualization function of developed system is presented.

  12. 3D geological to geophysical modelling and seismic wave propagation simulation: a case study from the Lalor Lake VMS (Volcanogenic Massive Sulphides) mining camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, Khalid; Bellefleur, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for base metals, uranium and precious metals has been pushing mineral explorations at greater depth. Seismic techniques and surveys have become essential in finding and extracting mineral rich ore bodies, especially for deep VMS mining camps. Geophysical parameters collected from borehole logs and laboratory measurements of core samples provide preliminary information about the nature and type of subsurface lithologic units. Alteration halos formed during the hydrothermal alteration process contain ore bodies, which are of primary interests among geologists and mining industries. It is known that the alteration halos are easier to detect than the ore bodies itself. Many 3D geological models are merely projection of 2D surface geology based on outcrop inspections and geochemical analysis of a small number of core samples collected from the area. Since a large scale 3D multicomponent seismic survey can be prohibitively expensive, performance analysis of such geological models can be helpful in reducing exploration costs. In this abstract, we discussed challenges and constraints encountered in geophysical modelling of ore bodies and surrounding geologic structures from the available coarse 3D geological models of the Lalor Lake mining camp, located in northern Manitoba, Canada. Ore bodies in the Lalor lake VMS camp are rich in gold, zinc, lead and copper, and have an approximate weight of 27 Mt. For better understanding of physical parameters of these known ore bodies and potentially unknown ones at greater depth, we constructed a fine resolution 3D seismic model with dimensions: 2000 m (width), 2000 m (height), and 1500 m (vertical depth). Seismic properties (P-wave, S-wave velocities, and density) were assigned based on a previous rock properties study of the same mining camp. 3D finite-difference elastic wave propagation simulation was performed in the model using appropriate parameters. The generated synthetic 3D seismic data was then compared to

  13. 3D hybrid-porous carbon derived from carbonization of metal organic frameworks for high performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weizhai; Mondal, Anjon Kumar; Xu, Jing; Wang, Chengyin; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu

    2016-09-01

    We report a rational design and synthesis of 3D hybrid-porous carbon with a hierarchical pore architecture for high performance supercapacitors. It contains micropores (<2 nm diameter) and mesopores (2-4 nm), derived from carbonization of unique porous metal organic frameworks (MOFs). Owning to the synergistic effect of micropores and mesopores, the hybrid-porous carbon has exceptionally high ion-accessible surface area and low ion diffusion resistance, which is desired for supercapacitor applications. When applied as electrode materials in supercapacitors, 3D hybrid-porous carbon demonstrates a specific capacitance of 332 F g-1 at a constant charge/discharge current of 500 mA g-1. The supercapacitors can endure more than 10,000 cycles without degradation of capacitance.

  14. A hybrid framework of multiple active appearance models and global registration for 3D prostate segmentation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Lladó, Xavier; Freixenet, Jordi; Mitra, Jhimli; Vilanova, Joan C.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2012-02-01

    Real-time fusion of Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Trans Rectal Ultra Sound (TRUS) images aid in the localization of malignant tissues in TRUS guided prostate biopsy. Registration performed on segmented contours of the prostate reduces computational complexity and improves the multimodal registration accuracy. However, accurate and computationally efficient 3D segmentation of the prostate in MR images could be a challenging task due to inter-patient shape and intensity variability of the prostate gland. In this work, we propose to use multiple statistical shape and appearance models to segment the prostate in 2D and a global registration framework to impose shape restriction in 3D. Multiple mean parametric models of the shape and appearance corresponding to the apex, central and base regions of the prostate gland are derived from principal component analysis (PCA) of prior shape and intensity information of the prostate from the training data. The estimated parameters are then modified with the prior knowledge of the optimization space to achieve segmentation in 2D. The 2D segmented slices are then rigidly registered with the average 3D model produced by affine registration of the ground truth of the training datasets to minimize pose variations and impose 3D shape restriction. The proposed method achieves a mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) value of 0.88+/-0.11, and mean Hausdorff distance (HD) of 3.38+/-2.81 mm when validated with 15 prostate volumes of a public dataset in leave-one-out validation framework. The results achieved are better compared to some of the works in the literature.

  15. A 3D MPI-Parallel GPU-accelerated framework for simulating ocean wave energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    We present an MPI-parallel GPU-accelerated computational framework for studying the interaction between ocean waves and wave energy converters (WECs). The computational framework captures the viscous effects, nonlinear fluid-structure interaction (FSI), and breaking of waves around the structure, which cannot be captured in many potential flow solvers commonly used for WEC simulations. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the two-step projection method, which is accelerated by porting the pressure Poisson equation to GPUs. The FSI is captured using the numerically stable fictitious domain method. A novel three-phase interface reconstruction algorithm is used to resolve three phases in a VOF-PLIC context. A consistent mass and momentum transport approach enables simulations at high density ratios. The accuracy of the overall framework is demonstrated via an array of test cases. Numerical simulations of the interaction between ocean waves and WECs are presented. Funding from the National Science Foundation CBET-1236462 grant is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Synthesis and structure of a 2D → 3D framework with coexistence of hydrogen bonds and polythreading character

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming-Dao Zhuang, Qi-Fan; Xu, Jing; Cao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    The title complex, ([Co(BPPA)(5-OH-bdc)] · (H{sub 2}O)){sub n} was prepared under hydrothermal conditions based on two ligands, namely, bis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)amine (BPPA) and 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (5-OH-H{sub 2}bdc). 5-OH-bdc{sup 2–} anions coordinated to Co atoms to give layers in crystal. BPPA ligands coordinate to Co atoms and thread into the adjacent layers. There are hydrogen bonds between adjacent layers, giving rise to a 2D → 3D framework.

  17. A general framework for face reconstruction using single still image based on 2D-to-3D transformation kernel.

    PubMed

    Fooprateepsiri, Rerkchai; Kurutach, Werasak

    2014-03-01

    Face authentication is a biometric classification method that verifies the identity of a user based on image of their face. Accuracy of the authentication is reduced when the pose, illumination and expression of the training face images are different than the testing image. The methods in this paper are designed to improve the accuracy of a features-based face recognition system when the pose between the input images and training images are different. First, an efficient 2D-to-3D integrated face reconstruction approach is introduced to reconstruct a personalized 3D face model from a single frontal face image with neutral expression and normal illumination. Second, realistic virtual faces with different poses are synthesized based on the personalized 3D face to characterize the face subspace. Finally, face recognition is conducted based on these representative virtual faces. Compared with other related works, this framework has the following advantages: (1) only one single frontal face is required for face recognition, which avoids the burdensome enrollment work; and (2) the synthesized face samples provide the capability to conduct recognition under difficult conditions like complex pose, illumination and expression. From the experimental results, we conclude that the proposed method improves the accuracy of face recognition by varying the pose, illumination and expression. PMID:24529782

  18. A general framework for face reconstruction using single still image based on 2D-to-3D transformation kernel.

    PubMed

    Fooprateepsiri, Rerkchai; Kurutach, Werasak

    2014-03-01

    Face authentication is a biometric classification method that verifies the identity of a user based on image of their face. Accuracy of the authentication is reduced when the pose, illumination and expression of the training face images are different than the testing image. The methods in this paper are designed to improve the accuracy of a features-based face recognition system when the pose between the input images and training images are different. First, an efficient 2D-to-3D integrated face reconstruction approach is introduced to reconstruct a personalized 3D face model from a single frontal face image with neutral expression and normal illumination. Second, realistic virtual faces with different poses are synthesized based on the personalized 3D face to characterize the face subspace. Finally, face recognition is conducted based on these representative virtual faces. Compared with other related works, this framework has the following advantages: (1) only one single frontal face is required for face recognition, which avoids the burdensome enrollment work; and (2) the synthesized face samples provide the capability to conduct recognition under difficult conditions like complex pose, illumination and expression. From the experimental results, we conclude that the proposed method improves the accuracy of face recognition by varying the pose, illumination and expression.

  19. A novel 3D framework indium phosphite-oxalate based on a pcu-type topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Mengmeng; Zhou, Mingdong; Hu, Dianwen; Gao, Fan; Dong, Sijie; Huang, Liangliang

    2016-05-01

    A new inorganic-organic hybrid indium phosphite-oxalate, formulated as H[In5(HPO3)6(H2PO3)2(C2O4)2]·(C4N2H11)2·H2O 1 has been hydrothermally synthesized in the presence of piperazine acting as a structure directing agent (SDA). The single crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that compound 1 shows three-dimensional open-framework with intersecting 12-ring channels along the [010] and [001] directions, which is constructed from strictly alternating double 6-ring units (D6Rs), [C2O4]2- groups and [H2PO3]- pseudo-pyramids. It is noted that the classical D6R SBU is firstly reported in main metal phosphite/phosphite-oxalate. By regarding D6R as the 6-connected nodes, the inorganic-organic hybrid framework is based on a pcu-type topology. The as-synthesized product was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ICP-AES and elemental analyses.

  20. Geologic framework of lower Cook Inlet, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Magoon, L.B.

    1978-01-01

    Three seismic reflectors are present throughout the lower Cook Inlet basin and can be correlated with onshore geologic features. The reflections come from unconformities at the base of the Tertiary sequence, at the base of Upper Cretaceous rocks, and near the base of Upper Jurassic strata. A contour map of the deepest horizon shows that Mesozoic rocks are formed into a northeast-trending syncline. Along the southeast flank of the basin, the northwest-dipping Mesozoic rocks are truncated at the base of Tertiary rocks. The Augustine-Seldovia arch trends across the basin axis between Augustine Island and Seldovia. Tertiary rocks thin onto the arch from the north and south. Numerous anticlines, smaller in structural relief and breadth than the Augustine-Seldovia arch, trend northeast parallel with the basin, and intersect the arch at oblique angles. The stratigraphic record shows four cycles of sedimentation and tectonism that are bounded by three regional unconformities in lower Cook Inlet and by four thrust faults and the modern Benioff zone in flysch rocks of the Kenai Peninsula and the Gulf of Alaska. The four cycles of sedimentation are, from oldest to youngest, the early Mesozoic, late Mesozoic, early Cenozoic, and late Cenozoic. Data on organic geochemistry of the rocks from one well suggest that Middle Jurassic strata may be a source of hydrocarbons. Seismic data show that structural traps are formed by northeast-trending anticlines and by structures formed at the intersections of these anticlines with the transbasin arch. Stratigraphic traps may be formed beneath the unconformity at the base of Tertiary strata and beneath unconformities within Mesozoic strata.

  1. Extraction of 3D Femur Neck Trabecular Bone Architecture from Clinical CT Images in Osteoporotic Evaluation: a Novel Framework.

    PubMed

    Sapthagirivasan, V; Anburajan, M; Janarthanam, S

    2015-08-01

    The early detection of osteoporosis risk enhances the lifespan and quality of life of an individual. A reasonable in-vivo assessment of trabecular bone strength at the proximal femur helps to evaluate the fracture risk and henceforth, to understand the associated structural dynamics on occurrence of osteoporosis. The main aim of our study was to develop a framework to automatically determine the trabecular bone strength from clinical femur CT images and thereby to estimate its correlation with BMD. All the 50 studied south Indian female subjects aged 30 to 80 years underwent CT and DXA measurements at right femur region. Initially, the original CT slices were intensified and active contour model was utilised for the extraction of the neck region. After processing through a novel process called trabecular enrichment approach (TEA), the three dimensional (3D) trabecular features were extracted. The extracted 3D trabecular features, such as volume fraction (VF), solidity of delta points (SDP) and boundness, demonstrated a significant correlation with femoral neck bone mineral density (r = 0.551, r = 0.432, r = 0.552 respectively) at p < 0.001. The higher area under the curve values of the extracted features (VF: 85.3 %; 95CI: 68.2-100 %, SDP: 82.1 %; 95CI: 65.1-98.9 % and boundness: 90.4 %; 95CI: 78.7-100 %) were observed. The findings suggest that the proposed framework with TEA method would be useful for spotting women vulnerable to osteoporotic risk.

  2. Understanding Evolutionary Change within the Framework of Geological Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodick, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on a learning strategy designed to overcome students' difficulty in understanding evolutionary change within the framework of geological time. Incorporated into the learning program "From Dinosaurs to Darwin: Evolution from the Perspective of Time," this strategy consists of four scaffolded investigations in which students…

  3. Solvent-modified dynamic porosity in chiral 3D kagome frameworks.

    PubMed

    Keene, Tony D; Rankine, Damien; Evans, Jack D; Southon, Peter D; Kepert, Cameron J; Aitken, Jade B; Sumby, Christopher J; Doonan, Christian J

    2013-06-14

    Dynamically porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with a chiral quartz-based structure have been synthesized from the multidentate ligand 2,2'-dihydroxybiphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate (H2diol). Compounds [Ni(II)(H2diol)(S)2]·xS (where S = DMF or DEF) show marked changes in 77 K N2 uptake between partially desolvated [Ni(II)(H2diol)(S)2] (only the pore solvent is removed) and fully desolvated [Ni(II)(H2diol)] forms. Furthermore, [Ni(II)(H2diol)(DMF)2] displays additional solvent-dependent porosity through the rotation of DMF molecules attached to the axial coordination sites of the Ni(II) centre. A unique feature of the four coordinate Ni(II) centre in [Ni(II)(H2diol)] is the dynamic response to its chemical environment. Exposure of [Ni(II)(H2diol)] to H2O and MeOH vapour leads to coordination of both axial sites of the Ni centres and to the generation of a solvated framework, whereas exposure to EtOH, DMF, acetone, and MeCN does not lead to any change in metal coordination or structure metrics. MeOH vapour adsorption was able to be tracked by time-dependent magnetometry as the solvated and desolvated structures have different magnetic moments. Solvated and desolvated forms of the MOF show remarkable differences in their thermal expansivities; [Ni(II)(H2diol)(DMF)2]·DMF displays marked positive thermal expansion (PTE) in the c-axis, yet near to zero thermal expansion, between 90 and 450 K, is observed for [Ni(II)(H2diol)]. These new MOF architectures demonstrate a dynamic structural and colourimetric response to selected adsorbates via a unique mechanism that involves a reversible change in the coordination environment of the metal centre. These coordination changes are mediated throughout the MOF by rotational mobility about the biaryl bond of the ligand.

  4. Geological interpretation and analysis of surface based, spatially referenced planetary imagery data using PRoGIS 2.0 and Pro3D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R.; Gupta, S.; Giordano, M.; Morley, J. G.; Muller, J. P.; Tao, Y.; Sprinks, J.; Traxler, C.; Hesina, G.; Ortner, T.; Sander, K.; Nauschnegg, B.; Paar, G.; Willner, K.; Pajdla, T.

    2015-10-01

    We apply the capabilities of the geospatial environment PRoGIS 2.0 and the real time rendering viewer PRo3D to geological analysis of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover-B (MER-B Opportunity rover) and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL Curiosity rover) datasets. Short baseline and serendipitous long baseline stereo Pancam rover imagery are used to create 3D point clouds which can be combined with super-resolution images derived from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE orbital data, andsuper-resolution outcrop images derived from MER Pancam, as well as hand-lens scale images for geology and outcrop characterization at all scales. Data within the PRoViDE database are presented and accessed through the PRoGIS interface. Simple geological measurement tools are implemented within the PRoGIS and PRo3D web software to accurately measure the dip and strike of bedding in outcrops, create detailed stratigraphic logs for correlation between the areas investigated, and to develop realistic 3D models for the characterization of planetary surface processes. Annotation tools are being developed to aid discussion and dissemination of the observations within the planetary science community.

  5. 3D geological modeling of the Kasserine Aquifer System, Central Tunisia: New insights into aquifer-geometry and interconnections for a better assessment of groundwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassen, Imen; Gibson, Helen; Hamzaoui-Azaza, Fadoua; Negro, François; Rachid, Khanfir; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2016-08-01

    The challenge of this study was to create a 3D geological and structural model of the Kasserine Aquifer System (KAS) in central Tunisia and its natural extension into north-east Algeria. This was achieved using an implicit 3D method, which honors prior geological data for both formation boundaries and faults. A current model is presented which provides defendable predictions for the spatial distribution of geology and water resources in aquifers throughout the model-domain. This work has allowed validation of regional scale geology and fault networks in the KAS, and has facilitated the first-ever estimations of groundwater resources in this region by a 3D method. The model enables a preliminary assessment of the hydraulic significance of the major faults by evaluating their influence and role on groundwater flow within and between four compartments of the multi-layered, KAS hydrogeological system. Thus a representative hydrogeological model of the study area is constructed. The possible dual nature of faults in the KAS is discussed in the context that some faults appear to be acting both as barriers to horizontal groundwater flow, and simultaneously as conduits for vertical flow. Also discussed is the possibility that two flow directions occur within the KAS, at a small syncline area of near Feriana. In summary, this work evaluates the influence of aquifer connectivity and the role of faults and geology in groundwater flow within the KAS aquifer system. The current KAS geological model can now be used to guide groundwater managers on the best placement for drilling to test and further refine the understanding of the groundwater system, including the faults connectivity. As more geological data become available, the current model can be easily edited and re-computed to provide an updated model ready for the next stage of investigation by numerical flow modeling.

  6. 3-D subsurface modeling within the framework of an environmental restoration information system: Prototype results using earthvision

    SciTech Connect

    Goeltz, R.T.; Zondlo, T.F.

    1994-12-31

    As a result of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE-ORR) placement on the EPA Superfund National Priorities List in December of 1989, all remedial activities, including characterization, remedial alternatives selection, and implementation of remedial measures, must meet the combined requirements of RCRA, CERCLA, and NEPA. The Environmental Restoration Program, therefore, was established with the mission of eliminating or reducing to prescribed safe levels the risks to the environment or to human health and safety posed by inactive and surplus DOE-ORR managed sites and facilities that have been contaminated by radioactive and surplus DOE-ORR managed sites and facilities that have been contaminated by radioactive, hazardous, or mixed wastes. In accordance with an established Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA), waste sites and facilities across the DOE-ORR have been inventoried, prioritized, and are being systematically investigated and remediated under the direction of Environmental Restoration. EarthVision, a product of Dynamic Graphics, Inc., that provides three-dimensional (3-D) modeling and visualization, was exercised within the framework of an environmental restoration (ER) decision support system. The goal of the prototype was to investigate framework integration issues including compatibility and value to decision making. This paper describes the ER program, study site, and information system framework; selected EarthVision results are shown and discussed. EarthVision proved effective in integrating complex data from disparate sources and in providing 3-D visualizations of the spatial relationships of the data, including contaminant plumes. Work is under way to expand the analysis to the full site, covering about 1600 acres, and to include data from new sources, particularly remote-sensing studies.

  7. Earthquake relocation using a 3D a-priori geological velocity model from the western Alps to Corsica: Implication for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, Nicole; Theunissen, Thomas; Beslier, Marie-Odile; Font, Yvonne; Thouvenot, François; Dessa, Jean-Xavier; Simon, Soazig; Courrioux, Gabriel; Guillen, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The region between the inner zones of the Alps and Corsica juxtaposes an overthickened crust to an oceanic domain, which makes difficult to ascertain the focal depth of seismic events using routine location codes and average 1D velocity models. The aim of this article is to show that, even with a rather lose monitoring network, accurate routine locations can be achieved by using realistic 3D modelling and advanced location techniques. Previous earthquake tomography studies cover the whole region with spatial resolutions of several tens of kilometres on land, but they fail to resolve the marine domain due to the absence of station coverage and sparse seismicity. To overcome these limitations, we first construct a 3D a-priori P and S velocity model integrating known geophysical and geological information. Significant progress has been achieved in the 3D numerical modelling of complex geological structures by the development of dedicated softwares (e.g. 3D GeoModeller), capable at once of elaborating a 3D structural model from geological and geophysical constraints and, possibly, of refining it by inversion processes (Calcagno et al., 2008). Then, we build an arrival-time catalogue of 1500 events recorded from 2000 to 2011. Hypocentres are then located in this model using a numerical code based on the maximum intersection method (Font et al., 2004), updated by Theunissen et al. (2012), as well as another 3D location technique, the NonLinLoc software (Lomax and Curtis, 2001). The reduction of arrival-time residuals and uncertainties (dh, dz) with respect to classical 1D locations demonstrates the improved accuracy allowed by our approach and confirms the coherence of the 3D geological model built and used in this study. Our results are also compared with previous works that benefitted from the installation of dense temporary networks surrounding the studied epicentre area. The resulting 3D location catalogue allows us to improve the regional seismic hazard assessment

  8. A nanoporous 3D zinc(II) metal-organic framework for selective absorption of benzaldehyde and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpour, Tahereh; Abbasi, Alireza; Van Hecke, Kristof

    2015-08-01

    A new 3D nanoporous metal-organic framework (MOF), [[Zn4O(C24H15N6O6)2(H2O)2]·6H2O·DMF]n (1) based on 4,4‧,4″-s-triazine-1,3,5-triyltri-p-aminobenzoate (TATAB) ligand was solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis reveals that 1 exhibits a 3D network with new kvh1 topology. Semi-empirical (AM1) calculations were carried out to obtain stable conformers for TATAB ligand. In addition, the absorption of two typical aldehydes (benzaldehyde and formaldehyde) in the presence of 1 was investigated and the effect of the aldehyde concentration, exposure time and temperature was studied. It was found that compound 1 has a potential for the absorption of aldehydes under mild conditions.

  9. A 3D multi-modal and multi-dimensional digital brain model as a framework for data sharing.

    PubMed

    Mailly, Philippe; Haber, Suzanne N; Groenewegen, Henk J; Deniau, Jean-Michel

    2010-12-15

    Computer based three-dimensional reconstruction and co-registration of experimental data provide powerful tools for integration of observation derived from various technical approaches leading to better understanding of brain functions. Here we describe a method to build a 3D multi-modal and multi-dimensional model of brain structures providing framework for data sharing. All image processing, registration and 3D reconstruction were performed using open source software IMOD package software and ImageJ. The reconstruction procedure is based on series of AChE and Nissl stained sections aligned to blockface pictures. Integration of experimental data into the reference model is achieved by co-registration of Nissl sections of experimental brain cases by positioning landmarks on corresponding anatomical structures. To overcome the challenge of comparing for experimental sections with those of the reference model, adjustment of experimental model to the brain model was done section by section and limited to the structures of interest. For this adjustment we stress the use of cytoarchitectural criteria for accurate registration of anatomical structures and co-registration procedures.

  10. Integrated geophysical and geological modelling: insights in the 3D structure and kinematics of the Hercynian Suture Zone in the Champtoceaux area (Brittany, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelet, G.; Calcagno, Ph.; Gumiaux, C.; Truffert, C.; Bitri, A.; Gapais, D.; Brun, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    Using the Editeur Géologique, a software specifically developed for the purpose of 3D geological modelling by the French Geological Survey (BRGM), we model a segment of the Hercynian suture zone of western Europe, in Champtoceaux area (Brittany, western France). The area shows exposures of strongly deformed eclogite-bearing gneisses and micaschists. These units were stacked during collision and exhumed during late Devonian to early Carboniferous times. Regional-scale dextral simple shear accompanied strike-slip movements along the SASZ (South Armorican Shear Zone). It produced a km-scale antiformal structure in the Champtoceaux metamorphic units with a steeply-dipping axial plane and a steeply eastward-plunging axis. Interpretation of the recent Armor2 seismic profile shows that the well-recognized north-dipping early lithological structuration is cross-cut by Carboniferous south-dipping inverse tectonics of crustal extension. In order to precise and extend in 3D the structures interpreted in the seismic profile, we model seven radial gravity profiles throughout Champtoceaux periclinal termination, based on data from the French gravity database. Direct 2D modelling is performed at a crustal scale, based on seismic constraints and geological field observations, as well as density measurements on samples or in drill holes. Input in the Editeur Géologique, the consistency of cross-sections, digitized geological map and structural information (foliation dips) is first checked. From the surface to the Moho, available spatialised 2D information is then interpolated in the whole 3D space using adapted geostatistical analysis. Finally, taking into account densities associated to each modelled geological body, the computation of the 3D gravity effect of the model is compared to the measured Bouguer anomaly, which insures that all complex 3D gravity effects are well taken into account. Results emphasise the usefulness of integrated geological and geophysical 3D modelling

  11. Review of electromagnetic induction for mapping barrier island framework geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymer, Bradley A.; Everett, Mark E.; de Smet, Timothy S.; Houser, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The geologic framework controls on modern barrier island transgression and the relationship of these controls to subsurface structure, hydrology and island geomorphology are not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that alongshore variations in pre-Holocene geology of barrier islands modify nearshore hydrodynamic processes and sediment transport, ultimately affecting how barrier islands will respond to relative sea-level rise. Explorations of Holocene barrier island geology are usually based on cores to supplement bathymetric, onshore/offshore seismic and/or ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. The advantages and limitations of these methods with respect to barrier island investigations are briefly described in this review. Alternative near-surface geophysical methods including electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors are increasingly being used for coastal research because they are non-invasive, provide continuous subsurface information across a variety of sub-environments, and are capable of characterizing large areas in a short time. Although these EMI sensors have shown promise in coastal applications, a number of issues primarily related to subsurface hydrology need to be addressed to fully assess the limitations of this technique. This paper reviews the theory, methodology and applications of EMI in support of geologic framework studies with particular reference to barrier islands. Resolution of these issues will allow EMI sensors to complement and offer significant advantages over traditional methods in support of an improved understanding of large-scale barrier island evolution.

  12. First-Principles Study of Electronic Structure and Hydrogen Adsorption of 3d Transition Metal Exposed Paddle Wheel Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, J. H.; Le, V. D.; Kang, J.; Wei, S. H.; Kim, Y. H.

    2012-04-05

    Open-site paddle wheels, comprised of two transition metals bridged with four carboxylate ions, have been widely used for constructing metal-organic frameworks with large surface area and high binding energy sites. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we have investigated atomic and electronic structures of various 3d transition metal paddle wheels before and after metal exposure and their hydrogen adsorption properties at open metal sites. Notably, the hydrogen adsorption is impeded by covalent metal-metal bonds in early transition metal paddle wheels from Sc to Cr and by the strong ferromagnetic coupling of diatomic Mn and Fe in the paddle wheel configurations. A significantly enhanced H{sub 2} adsorption is predicted in the nonmagnetic Co{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2} paddle wheel with the binding energy of {approx}0.2 eV per H{sub 2}. We also propose the use of two-dimensional Co{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2} paddle wheel frameworks that could have strongly adsorbed dihydrogen up to 1.35 wt % for noncryogenic hydrogen storage applications.

  13. Dysprosium complexes with mono-/di-carboxylate ligands—From simple dimers to 2D and 3D frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingjie; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Scales, Nicholas; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Price, Jason R.; Lu, Kim; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2014-11-15

    Four dysprosium (Dy) single carboxylates, a formate, a propionate, a butyrate and an oxalate have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The structure of Dy(HCO{sub 2}){sub 3} (1) contains nine-fold coordinated Dy polyhedra in perfect tricapped trigonal prisms. They are linked through trigonal O atoms forming 1D pillars which are further linked together through tricapped O atoms into a 3D pillared metal organic framework. The network structure is stable up to 360 °C. The structure of [Dy{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]·2.5H{sub 2}O (2) contains nine-fold coordinated Dy polyhedra linking together through μ{sub 2}-bridging oxalate anions into a 2D hexagonal layered structure. Both [Dy{sub 2}(Pr){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]·(HPr){sub 0.5} (3) [Pr=(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CO{sub 2}){sup −1}] and [Dy{sub 2}(Bu){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}] (4) [Bu=(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}CO{sub 2}){sup −1}] have similar di-nuclear structures. The Raman vibration modes of the complexes have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Four dysprosium (Dy) complexes with formate, propionate, butyrate and oxalate ligands have been synthesized and characterized. The Dy formato complex has a 3D pillared metal organic framework and the structure is stable up to 360 °C whilst the complexes with longer alkyl chained mono-carboxylates possess similar di-nuclear structures. The Dy oxalato complex has a 2D hexagonal (honeycomb-type) structure. Their Raman vibration modes have been investigated. - Highlights: • New Dysprosium complexes with formate, propionate, butyrate and oxalate ligands. • Crystal structures range from dimers to two and three dimensional frameworks. • Vibrational modes have been investigated and correlated to the structures. • The complexes are thermal robust and stable to over 300 °C.

  14. A 3-D velocity model for earthquake location from combined geological and geophysical data: a case study from the TABOO near fault observatory (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Diana; Lupattelli, Andrea; Mirabella, Francesco; Trippetta, Fabio; Valoroso, Luisa; Lomax, Anthony; Di Stefano, Raffaele; Collettini, Cristiano; Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2014-05-01

    Accurate hypocenter location at the crustal scale strongly depends on our knowledge of the 3D velocity structure. The integration of geological and geophysical data, when available, should contribute to a reliable seismic velocity model in order to guarantee high quality earthquake locations as well as their consistency with the geological structure. Here we present a 3D, P- and S-wave velocity model of the Upper Tiber valley region (Northern Apennines) retrieved by combining an extremely robust dataset of surface and sub-surface geological data (seismic reflection profiles and boreholes), in situ and laboratory velocity measurements, and earthquake data. The study area is a portion of the Apennine belt undergoing active extension where a set of high-angle normal faults is detached on the Altotiberina low-angle normal fault (ATF). From 2010, this area hosts a scientific infrastructure (the Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory, TABOO; http://taboo.rm.ingv.it/), consisting of a dense array of multi-sensor stations, devoted to studying the earthquakes preparatory phase and the deformation processes along the ATF fault system. The proposed 3D velocity model is a layered model in which irregular shaped surfaces limit the boundaries between main lithological units. The model has been constructed by interpolating depth converted seismic horizons interpreted along 40 seismic reflection profiles (down to 4s two way travel times) that have been calibrated with 6 deep boreholes (down to 5 km depth) and constrained by detailed geological maps and structural surveys data. The layers of the model are characterized by similar rock types and seismic velocity properties. The P- and S-waves velocities for each layer have been derived from velocity measurements coming from both boreholes (sonic logs) and laboratory, where measurements have been performed on analogue natural samples increasing confining pressure in order to simulate crustal conditions. In order to test the 3D velocity

  15. Clumped Isotope Thermometry of Geologic Methane (13CH3D) using Tunable Laser Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Zahniser, M. S.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Methane is both an alternative energy source as well as a significant greenhouse gas, and holds the potential for rapid release to the atmosphere, possibly triggering abrupt climate change in the past and in the future. The majority of methane on the Earth is biogenic, originating from microbial methanogenesis, or thermogenic sourced from previously formed biogenic organic materials. Methane can be also produced abiogenically during serpentinization and even mantle-sourced methane has been implicated. Carbon (13C/12C) and hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratios of methane and associated short chain hydrocarbons provide critical information about the abiogenic/biogenic origin of methane but data can be inconclusive. We have developed and tested a Tunable Infrared Laser Direct Absorption Spectroscopy (TILDAS) Instrument to be used for precise measurements of the abundance of doubly isotope-substituted methane (13CH3D). The TILDAS instrument measures direct absorption in the mid-infrared (~ 8 μm) region using continuous wave quantum cascade laser combined with a 76 m pathlength astigmatic absorption cell. Initial test result indicates the precision for 13CH4, 12CH3D and 13CH3D for 0.2 ‰ or better for comparison between two reference gases. Accuracy of the methods for δ13C and δD is evaluated by comparing measurements by conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Calibration of clumped isotope scale (δ13CH3D) is underway using methane produced at various temperatures. Following an isotope exchange reaction (13CH4 + 12CH3D ↔ 13CH3D + 12CH4), precise measurements of 13CH3D abundance is expected to provide new and critical information about the temperature at which methane was formed (or thermally equilibrated). Biogenic origin becomes highly unlikely, for example, if the estimated temperature is higher than 120°C, i.e., current high-temperature limit of microbial methanogenesis. Although significant questions remain regarding isotope exchange kinetics, and clumped

  16. Geological 3D modeling for excavation activity in an underground marble quarry in the Apuan Alps (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneschi, Claudio; Salvini, Riccardo; Massa, Giovanni; Riccucci, Silvia; Borsani, Angelo

    2014-08-01

    The three-dimensional laser scanning technique has recently become common in diverse working environments. Even in geology, where further development is needed, this technique is increasingly useful in tackling various problems such as stability investigations or geological and geotechnical monitoring. Three-dimensional laser scanning supplies detailed and complete geometrical information in short working times, as a result of the acquisition of a large number of data-points that accurately model the detected surfaces. Moreover, it is possible to combine these data with high quality photographic images so as to provide important information for geological applications, as follows. A working approach, that combines terrestrial laser scanning and traditional geological surveys, is presented. A three-dimensional model, that includes information about the geological structure in an underground quarry in the Apuan Alps, is realized. This procedure is adaptable to other geological contexts, and because of its operating speed and accuracy it is invaluable for optimal excavation, in which a proper planning of quarrying activity is vital for safety and commercial reasons.

  17. A new 3-D open-framework cadmium borovanadate with plane-shaped channels and high catalytic activity for the oxidation of cyclohexanol.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuquan; Qiu, Dongfang; Fan, Huitao; Li, Min; Huang, Qunzeng; Shi, Hengzhen

    2015-05-21

    A new 3-D open-framework cadmium borovanadate with 6-connected topology was hydrothermally obtained and structurally characterized. It not only features new cadmium(II) borovanadate which possesses an open-framework structure with unique plane-shaped channels, but also exhibits interesting absorption properties and high catalytic activities for the oxidation of cyclohexanol. PMID:25882921

  18. An unusual mono-substituted Keggin anion-chain based 3D framework with 24-membered macrocycles as linker units

    SciTech Connect

    Pang Haijun; Ma Huiyuan; Yu Yan; Yang Ming; Xun Ye; Liu Bo

    2012-02-15

    A new compound, [Cu{sup I}(H{sub 2}O)(Hbpp){sub 2}] Subset-Of {l_brace}[Cu{sup I}(bpp)]{sub 2}[PW{sub 11}Cu{sup II}O{sub 39}]{r_brace} (1) (bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane), has been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In compound 1, the unusual -A-B-A-B- array mono-substituted Keggin anion-chains and 24-membered (Cubpp){sub 2} cation-macrocycles are linked together to form a (2, 4) connected 3D framework with channels of ca. 9.784 Multiplication-Sign 7.771 A{sup 2} along two directions, in which the [Cu(H{sub 2}O)(Hbpp){sub 2}] coordination fragments as guest components are trapped. The photocatalytic experiments of compound 1 were performed, which show a good catalytic activity of compound 1 for photodegradation of RhB. Furthermore, the IR, TGA and electrochemical properties of compound 1 were investigated. - Graphical abstract: An unusual example of mono-substituted Keggin anion-chain based hybrid compound that possesses a 3D structure has been synthesized, which offers a feasible route for synthesis of such compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first example of -A-B-A-B- array mono-substituted Keggin chain is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An unusual three dimensional structure based mono-substituted Keggin anion-chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalysis and electrochemical properties of the title compound were studied.

  19. Dysprosium complexes with mono-/di-carboxylate ligands-From simple dimers to 2D and 3D frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Scales, Nicholas; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Price, Jason R.; Lu, Kim; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2014-11-01

    Four dysprosium (Dy) single carboxylates, a formate, a propionate, a butyrate and an oxalate have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The structure of Dy(HCO2)3 (1) contains nine-fold coordinated Dy polyhedra in perfect tricapped trigonal prisms. They are linked through trigonal O atoms forming 1D pillars which are further linked together through tricapped O atoms into a 3D pillared metal organic framework. The network structure is stable up to 360 °C. The structure of [Dy2(C2O4)3(H2O)6]·2.5H2O (2) contains nine-fold coordinated Dy polyhedra linking together through μ2-bridging oxalate anions into a 2D hexagonal layered structure. Both [Dy2(Pr)6(H2O)4]·(HPr)0.5 (3) [Pr=(C2H5CO2)-1] and [Dy2(Bu)6(H2O)4] (4) [Bu=(C3H7CO2)-1] have similar di-nuclear structures. The Raman vibration modes of the complexes have been investigated.

  20. Unravelling the Proton Conduction Mechanism from Room Temperature to 553 K in a 3D Inorganic Coordination Framework.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaxing; Tao, Zetian; Yin, Xuemiao; Shu, Jie; Chen, Lanhua; Sheng, Daopeng; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2015-10-19

    The preparation of proton-conducting materials that are functional and stable at intermediate temperatures (393-573 K) is a focal point of fuel cell development. The purely inorganic material, HNd(IO3)4, which possesses a dense 3D framework structure, can reach a maximum of 4.6 × 10(-4) S·cm(-1) at 353 K and 95% relative humidity and exhibit a high conductivity of 8.0 × 10(-5) S·cm(-1) from 373 to 553 K under the flow of wet N2. HNd(IO3)4 exhibits a variety of improvements including high thermal stability, low solubility in water, and resistance to reducing atmosphere. The proton conductivity in such a wide temperature range originates from the intrinsic liberated protons in the structure and the resulting 1D hydrogen-bonding network confirmed by bond valence sum calculation and solid-state NMR analysis. Moreover, two different activation energies are observed in different temperature regions (0.23 eV below 373 K and 0.026 eV from 373 to 553 K), indicating that two types of proton motion are responsible for proton diffusion, as further domenstrated by temperature-dependent open-circuit voltage hysteresis in a tested fuel cell assembly as well as variable-temperature and double quantum filtered solid-state NMR measurements. PMID:26444097

  1. a Uav Based 3-D Positioning Framework for Detecting Locations of Buried Persons in Collapsed Disaster Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, H.; Kim, C.; Lee, W.

    2016-06-01

    Regarding spatial location positioning, indoor location positioning theories based on wireless communication techniques such as Wi-Fi, beacon, UWB and Bluetooth has widely been developing across the world. These techniques are mainly focusing on spatial location detection of customers using fixed wireless APs and unique Tags in the indoor environment. Besides, since existing detection equipment and techniques using ultrasound or sound etc. to detect buried persons and identify survival status for them cause 2nd damages on the collapsed debris for rescuers. In addition, it might take time to check the buried persons. However, the collapsed disaster sites should consider both outdoor and indoor environments because empty spaces under collapsed debris exists. In order to detect buried persons from the empty spaces, we should collect wireless signals with Wi-Fi from their mobile phone. Basically, the Wi-Fi signal measure 2-D location. However, since the buried persons have Z value with burial depth, we also should collect barometer sensor data from their mobile phones in order to measure Z values according to weather conditions. Specially, for quick accessibility to the disaster area, a drone (UAV; Unmanned Arial Vehicle) system, which is equipped with a wireless detection module, was introduced. Using these framework, this study aims to provide the rescuers with effective rescue information by calculating 3-D location for buried persons based on the wireless and barometer sensor fusion.

  2. Positional isomerism-driven two 3D pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yayong; Zhao, Siwei; Ma, Haoran; Han, Yi; Liu, Kang; Wang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Two novel three-dimensional (3D) pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely [Zn2(μ2-OH)(boaba)(1,4-bmimb)]n (1) and {[Zn5K2(μ2-H2O)2(boaba)4(1,2-bmimb)2(H2O)2]·H2O}n (2), were prepared by hydrothermal reactions (H3boaba=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid; 1,4-bmimb=1,4-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene; 1,2-bmimb =1,2-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene). Notably, 1 exhibits a (3,5)-connected binodal (63)(69·8)-gra net with binuclear [Zn2(μ2-OH)(COO)]2+ clusters, while 2 shows a novel (4,4,5,9)-connected 4-nodal net constructed from the unique Zn(II)-K(I) heterometal rod-like substructures. The results indicate that the disposition of the 2-methylimidazolyl groups of bis(imidazole) ligands have a significant effect on structural diversity. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of 1 and 2 have been investigated.

  3. 3D Detection, Quantification and Correlation of Slope Failures with Geologic Structure in the Mont Blanc massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Mark; Dunning, Stuart; Lim, Michael; Woodward, John

    2016-04-01

    A thorough understanding of supply from landslides and knowledge of their spatial distribution is of fundamental importance to high-mountain sediment budgets. Advances in 3D data acquisition techniques are heralding new opportunities to create high-resolution topographic models to aid our understanding of landscape change through time. In this study, we use a Structure-from-Motion Multi-View Stereo (SfM-MVS) approach to detect and quantify slope failures at selected sites in the Mont Blanc massif. Past and present glaciations along with its topographical characteristics have resulted in a high rate of geomorphological activity within the range. Data for SfM-MVS processing were captured across variable temporal scales to examine short-term (daily), seasonal and annual change from terrestrial, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and helicopter perspectives. Variable spatial scales were also examined ranging from small focussed slopes (~0.01 km2) to large valley-scale surveys (~3 km2). Alignment and registration were conducted using a series of Ground Control Points (GCPs) across the surveyed slope at various heights and slope aspects. GCPs were also used to optimise data and reduce non-linear distortions. 3D differencing was performed using a multiscale model-to-model comparison algorithm (M3C2) which uses variable thresholding across each slope based on local surface roughness and model alignment quality. Detected change was correlated with local slope structure and 3D discontinuity analysis was undertaken using a plane-detection and clustering approach (DSE). Computation of joint spacing was performed using the classified data and normal distances. Structural analysis allowed us to assign a Slope Mass Rating (SMR) and assess the stability of each slope relative to the detected change and determine likely failure modes. We demonstrate an entirely 3D workflow which preserves the complexity of alpine slope topography to compute volumetric loss using a variable threshold. A

  4. High precision analysis of an embryonic extensional fault-related fold using 3D orthorectified virtual outcrops: The viewpoint importance in structural geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano; Corradetti, Amerigo; Billi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Image-based 3D modeling has recently opened the way to the use of virtual outcrop models in geology. An intriguing application of this method involves the production of orthorectified images of outcrops using almost any user-defined point of view, so that photorealistic cross-sections suitable for numerous geological purposes and measurements can be easily generated. These purposes include the accurate quantitative analysis of fault-fold relationships starting from imperfectly oriented and partly inaccessible real outcrops. We applied the method of image-based 3D modeling and orthorectification to a case study from the northern Apennines, Italy, where an incipient extensional fault affecting well-layered limestones is exposed on a 10-m-high barely accessible cliff. Through a few simple steps, we constructed a high-quality image-based 3D model of the outcrop. In the model, we made a series of measurements including fault and bedding attitudes, which allowed us to derive the bedding-fault intersection direction. We then used this direction as viewpoint to obtain a distortion-free photorealistic cross-section, on which we measured bed dips and thicknesses as well as fault stratigraphic separations. These measurements allowed us to identify a slight difference (i.e. only 0.5°) between the hangingwall and footwall cutoff angles. We show that the hangingwall strain required to compensate the upward-decreasing displacement of the fault was accommodated by this 0.5° rotation (i.e. folding) and coeval 0.8% thickening of strata in the hangingwall relatively to footwall strata. This evidence is consistent with trishear fault-propagation folding. Our results emphasize the viewpoint importance in structural geology and therefore the potential of using orthorectified virtual outcrops.

  5. Digital Geology from field to 3D modelling and Google Earth virtual environment: methods and goals from the Furlo Gorge (Northern Apennines - Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Donatis, Mauro; Susini, Sara

    2014-05-01

    A new map of the Furlo Gorge was surveyed and elaborated in a digital way. In every step of work we used digital tools as mobile GIS and 3D modelling software. Phase 1st Starting in the lab, planning the field project development, base cartography, forms and data base were designed in the way we thought was the best for collecting and store data in order of producing a digital n­-dimensional map. Bedding attitudes, outcrops sketches and description, stratigraphic logs, structural features and other informations were collected and organised in a structured database using rugged tablet PC, GPS receiver, digital cameras and later also an Android smartphone with some survey apps in-­house developed. A new mobile GIS (BeeGIS) was developed starting from an open source GIS (uDig): a number of tools like GPS connection, pen drawing annotations, geonotes, fieldbook, photo synchronization and geotagging were originally designed. Phase 2nd After some month of digital field work, all the informations were elaborated for drawing a geologic map in GIS environment. For that we use both commercial (ArcGIS) and open source (gvSig, QGIS, uDig) without big technical problems. Phase 3rd When we get to the step of building a 3D model (using 3DMove), passing trough the assisted drawing of cross-­sections (2DMove), we discovered a number of problems in the interpretation of geological structures (thrusts, normal faults) and more in the interpretation of stratigraphic thickness and boundaries and their relationships with topography. Phase 4th Before an "on­-armchair" redrawing of map, we decide to go back to the field and check directly what was wrong. Two main vantages came from this: (1) the mistakes we found could be reinterpreted and corrected directly in the field having all digital tools we need; (2) previous interpretations could be stored in GIS layers keeping memory of the previous work (also mistakes). Phase 5th A 3D model built with 3D Move is already almost self

  6. Geology and Petrophysical Characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D Simulation of a Fluvial-Deltaic Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Ann Mattson; Craig B. Forster; Paul B. Anderson; Steve H. Snelgrove; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1997-05-20

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone in the Ivie Creek case-study area: (1) regional stratigraphic interpretation, (2) case-study evaluation, (3) reservoir modeling, and (4) technology transfer.

  7. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser.

    PubMed

    Müller, R Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David T; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon E; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry.

  8. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser.

    PubMed

    Müller, R Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David T; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon E; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry. PMID:26960151

  9. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser

    PubMed Central

    Müller, R. Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David T.; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon E.; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of ‘big data’ and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth’s gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry. PMID:26960151

  10. Pushing the Limits of Geological Mapping Outside the Earth: 3D Modeling of Strike-Slip and Extensional Fault Systems in Meridiani Planum Region, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Royo, O.

    2014-12-01

    GIS and geological modeling software have radically changed the means by which geological mapping is produced, published and visualized. This type of software environment normally requires a spatially aware reference system to position data and interpretation, often referred as georeferenced data (i.e. geographic data referenced on the Earth). However, for this study we coin the term areoreferenced data (i.e. Mars-referenced "geographic" data). Thanks to the wealth of areoreferenced data made available by the NASA and the HiRise at University of Arizona it is now possible to carry out 3D areographic and areologic (i.e. related to the topography and geology of Mars, respectively) reconstructions in great detail. The present work benefits from the availability of software and areographic data, and presents the results of an areologic map and 3D model of the fault systems in the Meridiani Planum of Mars. The work has been carried out in Move™ (developed by Midland Valley Exploration), a geological modeling toolkit that allows for easy data loading in a wide range of formats as well as straightforward 2D/3D model building tools of geological bodies. Initial data consisted of Digital Terrain Model and orthoimages (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS). From these we have interpreted several structural domains: right-lateral strike-slip systems with associated releasing bends, which gave room to an extensional event causing a horizontal-axis rotation of the bedding. Bedding ranges from subhorizontal in the southern domain where strike-slip prevails to nearly 40º in the central and northern domains, where a more complex interaction between strike-slip and extensional faults is described. The stratigraphic sequence is mainly composed by moderately rounded well laminated basaltic sandstones (Squyres et al., 2004) in which a high component of sulfurs (e.g. sulfate anhydrate, hexahydrite, epsomite, gypsum) and salts (e.g. halite) has been described (Squyres et al., 2004

  11. Synergistic Effects of 3D ECM and Chemogradients on Neurite Outgrowth and Guidance: A Simple Modeling and Microfluidic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    2014-01-01

    During nervous system development, numerous cues within the extracellular matrix microenvironment (ECM) guide the growing neurites along specific pathways to reach their intended targets. Neurite motility is controlled by extracellular signal sensing through the growth cone at the neurite tip, including chemoattractive and repulsive cues. However, it is difficult to regenerate and restore neurite tracts, lost or degraded due to an injury or disease, in the adult central nervous system. Thus, it is important to evaluate the dynamic interplay between ECM and the concentration gradients of these cues, which would elicit robust neuritogenesis. Such information is critical in understanding the processes involved in developmental biology, and in developing high-fidelity neurite regenerative strategies post-injury, and in drug discovery and targeted therapeutics for neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we quantitatively investigated this relationship using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, and determined the synergistic role of guidance cues and ECM on neurite outgrowth and turning. Using a biomimetic microfluidic system, we have shown that cortical neurite outgrowth and turning under chemogradients (IGF-1 or BDNF) within 3D scaffolds is highly regulated by the source concentration of the guidance cue and the physical characteristics of the scaffold. A mechanistic-driven partial differential equation model of neurite outgrowth has been proposed, which could also be used prospectively as a predictive tool. The parameters for the chemotaxis term in the model are determined from the experimental data using our microfluidic assay. Resulting model simulations demonstrate how neurite outgrowth was critically influenced by the experimental variables, which was further supported by experimental data on cell-surface-receptor expressions. The model results are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. This integrated approach represents a

  12. A new approach of building 3D visualization framework for multimodal medical images display and computed assisted diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    As more and more CT/MR studies are scanning with larger volume of data sets, more and more radiologists and clinician would like using PACS WS to display and manipulate these larger data sets of images with 3D rendering features. In this paper, we proposed a design method and implantation strategy to develop 3D image display component not only with normal 3D display functions but also with multi-modal medical image fusion as well as compute-assisted diagnosis of coronary heart diseases. The 3D component has been integrated into the PACS display workstation of Shanghai Huadong Hospital, and the clinical practice showed that it is easy for radiologists and physicians to use these 3D functions such as multi-modalities' (e.g. CT, MRI, PET, SPECT) visualization, registration and fusion, and the lesion quantitative measurements. The users were satisfying with the rendering speeds and quality of 3D reconstruction. The advantages of the component include low requirements for computer hardware, easy integration, reliable performance and comfortable application experience. With this system, the radiologists and the clinicians can manipulate with 3D images easily, and use the advanced visualization tools to facilitate their work with a PACS display workstation at any time.

  13. A 3-D view of field-scale fault-zone cementation from geologically ground-truthed electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, H.; Spinelli, G. A.; Mozley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Fault-zones are an important control on fluid flow, affecting groundwater supply, hydrocarbon/contaminant migration, and waste/carbon storage. However, current models of fault seal are inadequate, primarily focusing on juxtaposition and entrainment effects, despite the recognition that fault-zone cementation is common and can dramatically reduce permeability. We map the 3D cementation patterns of the variably cemented Loma Blanca fault from the land surface to ~40 m depth, using electrical resistivity and induced polarization (IP). The carbonate-cemented fault zone is a region of anomalously low normalized chargeability, relative to the surrounding host material. Zones of low-normalized chargeability immediately under the exposed cement provide the first ground-truth that a cemented fault yields an observable IP anomaly. Low-normalized chargeability extends down from the surface exposure, surrounded by zones of high-normalized chargeability, at an orientation consistent with normal faults in the region; this likely indicates cementation of the fault zone at depth, which could be confirmed by drilling and coring. Our observations are consistent with: 1) the expectation that carbonate cement in a sandstone should lower normalized chargeability by reducing pore-surface area and bridging gaps in the pore space, and 2) laboratory experiments confirming that calcite precipitation within a column of glass beads decreases polarization magnitude. The ability to characterize spatial variations in the degree of fault-zone cementation with resistivity and IP has exciting implications for improving predictive models of the hydrogeologic impacts of cementation within faults.

  14. Massive sulfide exploration models of the Iberian Pyrite Belt Neves Corvo mine region, based in a 3D geological, geophysical and geochemical ProMine study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Mário Castelo-Branco, José; Granado, Isabel; Carvalho, João; João Baptista, Maria; Represas, Patrícia; Pereira, Zélia; Oliveira, Tomás; Araujo, Vitor

    2013-04-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) hosts one of the largest concentrations of massive sulfides in the Earth's crust. This highly productive VMS belt contains more than 85 massive sulfide deposits, totalling an estimate of 1600 Mt of massive ore and about 250 Mt of stockwork ore (Leistel et al., 1998; Oliveira et al., 2005; Tornos, 2006). Included in the South Portuguese Zone the IPB is represented by the Phyllite-Quartzite Group (PQG) composed of shales and quartzites of late Devonian age followed by the Volcanic-Sedimentary Complex (VSC) a submarine succession of sediments and felsic and basic volcanic rocks (late Famennian-late Viséan age). Above the IPB a turbidite sedimentary unit occurs being represented by the Baixo Alentejo Flysch Group (BAFG). The ore deposits are hosted by felsic volcanic rocks and sediments that are dominant in the lower part of the VSC succession. The Neves Corvo (ProMine, EU FP7) project area is focused on the Neves Corvo deposit, an active copper mine. The project area is located between the Messejana Fault and the Portuguese/Spanish border which has been selected for the 3D geological and geophysical modelling study, based on high exploration potential of the Neves Corvo area (Oliveira et al. 2006, Relvas et al. 2006, Pereira et al. 2008, Rosa et al. 2008, Matos et al. 2011, Oliveira et al. 2013). In this study existing LNEG and AGC geological, geophysical and geochemistry databases were considered. New surveys were done: i) - A physical volcanology and palynostratigraphic age data study and log of the Cotovio drill-hole core (1,888 m, drilled by AGC). ii) - Interpretation of 280 km of Squid TEM performed by AGC. Based on the TEM data, significant conductors have been identified related with: shallow conductive cover, graphitic shale, black shale and sulphide mineralizations. The most important TEM conductors are related with the Neves Corvo massive sulphides lenses (1-10 Ωm). iii) - Ground and residual gravimetry studies including

  15. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  16. 3D seismic geomorphology and geologic controls on gas hydrate accumulation mechanism in the Miyazaki-oki forearc basin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Fujii, T.

    2015-12-01

    The stratigraphy of the Miyazaki-oki forearc basin along the Southwest Japan Arc comprises the early Miocene to early Pleistocene Miyazaki Group and the Hyuganada Group. These groups comprise sediments (up to 5000 m) deposited in deep marine to shallow marine environments. Based on characteristics of well data outside seismic exploration area and stratigraphy of land areas, the Miyazaki Group was divided into four seismic units and the Hyuganada Group was divided into two seismic units. In this area, bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) have been widely observed and considered as representing lower boundaries of methane-hydrate-bearing deposits. However, the gas hydrate accumulation mechanism for this area is not yet well understood. We show the relation between sandy sediment distribution identified from the 3D seismic geomorphological analysis and methane hydrate occurrence to identify the accumulation mechanism. A submarine fan system was subdivided into four seismic facies: Submarine canyon complexes; Leveed channel complexes; Submarine fan complexes; Mass transport complexes (MTD). Depositional systems of target layers are characterized by a transition from submarine fan deposits (Miyazaki Group) to channel-levee deposits and MTD (Hyuganada Group). This transition of depositional environments is strongly influenced by global tectonics since early Miocene in the Southwest Japan Arc. A part of channel-fill located around structural wing and middle fan deposits above the BSR is inferred as sediments intercalated with sandy layers. We consider that these deposits contain methane hydrate because the sandy sediment distribution approximately coincides with a high-velocity zone as an indicator of gas hydrate. The comparison of the areal extent of the seismic facies and the mapped structural configuration, suggest that the gas hydrate accumulation represent combination structural-stratigraphic trap.

  17. Testing the hydrologic utility of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, B. B.; Halford, K. J.; Sweetkind, D. S.; Fenelon, J.

    2014-12-01

    The utility of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivities to length scales that are commensurate with hydraulic data has been assessed at the Nevada National Security Site in highly-faulted volcanic rocks. Observed drawdowns from eight, large-scale, aquifer tests on Pahute Mesa provided the necessary constraints to test assumed relations between hydraulic conductivity and interpretations of the geology. The investigated volume of rock encompassed about 40 cubic miles where drawdowns were detected more than 2 mi from pumping wells and traversed major fault structures. Five sets of hydraulic conductivities at about 500 pilot points were estimated by simultaneously interpreting all aquifer tests with a different geologic framework for each set. Each geologic framework was incorporated as prior information that assumed homogeneous hydraulic conductivities within each geologic unit. Complexity of the geologic frameworks ranged from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 unique geologic units. Analysis of the model calibrations showed that a maximum of four geologic units could be differentiated where each was hydraulically unique as defined by the mean and standard deviation of log-hydraulic conductivity. Consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation were evaluated qualitatively with maps of transmissivity. Distributions of transmissivity were similar within the investigated extents regardless of geologic framework except for a transmissive streak along a fault in the Fault-Structure framework. Extrapolation was affected by underlying geologic frameworks where the variability of transmissivity increased as the number of units increased.

  18. Geologic framework of thermal springs, Black Canyon, Nevada and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, L. Sue; Anderson, Zachary W.; Felger, Tracey J.; Seixas, Gustav B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal springs in Black Canyon of the Colorado River, downstream of Hoover Dam, are important recreational, ecological, and scenic features of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. This report presents the results from a U.S. Geological Survey study of the geologic framework of the springs. The study was conducted in cooperation with the National Park Service and funded by both the National Park Service and National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The report has two parts: A, a 1:48,000-scale geologic map created from existing geologic maps and augmented by new geologic mapping and geochronology; and B, an interpretive report that presents results based on a collection of fault kinematic data near springs within Black Canyon and construction of 1:100,000-scale geologic cross sections that extend across the western Lake Mead region. Exposures in Black Canyon are mostly of Miocene volcanic rocks, underlain by crystalline basement composed of Miocene plutonic rocks or Proterozoic metamorphic rocks. The rocks are variably tilted and highly faulted. Faults strike northwest to northeast and include normal and strike-slip faults. Spring discharge occurs along faults intruded by dacite dikes and plugs; weeping walls and seeps extend away from the faults in highly fractured rock or relatively porous volcanic breccias, or both. Results of kinematic analysis of fault data collected along tributaries to the Colorado River indicate two episodes of deformation, consistent with earlier studies. The earlier episode formed during east-northeast-directed extension, and the later during east-southeast-directed extension. At the northern end of the study area, pre-existing fault blocks that formed during the first episode were rotated counterclockwise along the left-lateral Lake Mead Fault System. The resulting fault pattern forms a complex arrangement that provides both barriers and pathways for groundwater movement within and around Black

  19. A workflow for handling heterogeneous 3D models with the TOUGH2 family of codes: Applications to numerical modeling of CO 2 geological storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audigane, Pascal; Chiaberge, Christophe; Mathurin, Frédéric; Lions, Julie; Picot-Colbeaux, Géraldine

    2011-04-01

    This paper is addressed to the TOUGH2 user community. It presents a new tool for handling simulations run with the TOUGH2 code with specific application to CO 2 geological storage. This tool is composed of separate FORTRAN subroutines (or modules) that can be run independently, using input and output files in ASCII format for TOUGH2. These modules have been developed specifically for modeling of carbon dioxide geological storage and their use with TOUGH2 and the Equation of State module ECO2N, dedicated to CO 2-water-salt mixture systems, with TOUGHREACT, which is an adaptation of TOUGH2 with ECO2N and geochemical fluid-rock interactions, and with TOUGH2 and the EOS7C module dedicated to CO 2-CH 4 gas mixture is described. The objective is to save time for the pre-processing, execution and visualization of complex geometry for geological system representation. The workflow is rapid and user-friendly and future implementation to other TOUGH2 EOS modules for other contexts (e.g. nuclear waste disposal, geothermal production) is straightforward. Three examples are shown for validation: (i) leakage of CO 2 up through an abandoned well; (ii) 3D reactive transport modeling of CO 2 in a sandy aquifer formation in the Sleipner gas Field, (North Sea, Norway); and (iii) an estimation of enhanced gas recovery technology using CO 2 as the injected and stored gas to produce methane in the K12B Gas Field (North Sea, Denmark).

  20. Submarine geology framework of the Strait of Gibralter

    SciTech Connect

    Mrah, M. )

    1991-03-01

    Three-dimensional, computer-generated bathymetric views and high-resolution sparker profiles are presented to illustrate the geologic framework of the Strait of Gibraltar. 'The Ridge,' an apparent structural feature, divides the Strait into a deeper, more narrow eastern portion and a shallower, wider and more irregular western portion. Sparker profiles show the Moroccan and Spanish shelves to be underlain by rocks whose deformation correlates with the structural deformation of the Betic and Rif Mountains. However, a portion of the center portion of the Strait is floored with approximately 700 m of horizontal sediments despite the adjacent structural deformation and the presence of strong bottom currents. The alternating sequence of well-layered and chaotic-layered sediments suggests periods of large-scale subaqueous landslides that post-date the structural deformation of the Strait. In other areas, the Strait appears to be free of unconsolidated sediments. Large bedrock horsts modify the topography of the floor and side walls.

  1. Interplate and Intraplate Decoupling: A 3D View from Surface Geology and Seismicity, Eastern Hellenic Forearc, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinspehn, K. L.; Russo, R. M.

    2003-12-01

    Shallow active seismicity and neotectonic structures reveal important changes in the degree of interplate and intraplate coupling along the convergent Hellenic plate boundary from Crete to Rhodes. The onshore/offshore Pliocene-Holocene surface geology of the Hellenic forearc records three different deformation states: 1) A western segment (western Crete) where incipient continent-continent collision produces shortening under strong interplate coupling; 2) a central segment (central-eastern Crete) partly coupled to Africa where oblique convergence is partitioned into sinistral strike slip and orthogonal shortening which is confined to the accretionary wedge; and 3) an eastern trantensional segment (Rhodes), mechanically decoupled from African oblique convergence, instead reflecting slab rollback and Aegea's southward motion relative to Anatolia. Such along-strike heterogeneity of neotectonic structures suggests each segment should also display distinct crustal-scale stress patterns. Abundant earthquake focal mechanisms provide a means to gauge stress regimes. Shallowly plunging P (compression) and T (tension) axes of crustal events differ systematically along the three forearc segments. Above the brittle-ductile transition (<13 km), the western segment records N-S P axes and E-W T axes. In the central Crete transition zone, P and T axes vary, whereas sparse P axes in the decoupled eastern forearc (Rhodes) parallel the NNE plate margin. Below the brittle-ductile transition (13 < h < 40 km), P axes beneath western Crete trend N-S normal to the subduction trace, signifying interplate coupling given their similarity to plate-convergence vectors. T axes trend WNW consistent with margin-parallel extension at depth due to Africa's northward convergence. Stress patterns reverse for the wrench-dominated transition zone: P axes trend WNW-ESE and T axes trend N-S, indicating that northward convergence is less important than slab roll back. In the transtensional forearc east of

  2. Retaining the 3D framework of zinc sponge anodes upon deep discharge in Zn-air cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joseph F; Nelson, Eric S; Wattendorf, Matthew D; Chervin, Christopher N; Long, Jeffrey W; Rolison, Debra R

    2014-11-26

    We fabricate three-dimensional zinc electrodes from emulsion-cast sponges of Zn powder that are thermally treated to produce rugged monoliths. This highly conductive, 3D-wired aperiodic scaffold achieves 740 mA h gZn(-1) when discharged in primary Zn-air cells (>90% of theoretical Zn capacity). We use scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction to monitor the microstructural evolution of a series of Zn sponges when oxidized in Zn-air cells to specific depths-of-discharge (20, 40, 60, 80% DOD) at a technologically relevant rate (C/40; 4-6 mA cm(-2)). The Zn sponges maintain their 3D-monolithic form factor at all DOD. The cell resistance remains low under all test conditions, indicating that an inner core of metallic Zn persists that 3D-electrically wires the electrode, even to deep DOD.

  3. Retaining the 3D framework of zinc sponge anodes upon deep discharge in Zn-air cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joseph F; Nelson, Eric S; Wattendorf, Matthew D; Chervin, Christopher N; Long, Jeffrey W; Rolison, Debra R

    2014-11-26

    We fabricate three-dimensional zinc electrodes from emulsion-cast sponges of Zn powder that are thermally treated to produce rugged monoliths. This highly conductive, 3D-wired aperiodic scaffold achieves 740 mA h gZn(-1) when discharged in primary Zn-air cells (>90% of theoretical Zn capacity). We use scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction to monitor the microstructural evolution of a series of Zn sponges when oxidized in Zn-air cells to specific depths-of-discharge (20, 40, 60, 80% DOD) at a technologically relevant rate (C/40; 4-6 mA cm(-2)). The Zn sponges maintain their 3D-monolithic form factor at all DOD. The cell resistance remains low under all test conditions, indicating that an inner core of metallic Zn persists that 3D-electrically wires the electrode, even to deep DOD. PMID:25350789

  4. Geologic framework of the offshore region adjacent to Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, R.N.; Roberts, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Several multichannel, common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection profiles concentrated in the area of the entrance to Delaware Bay provide a tie between the known onshore geology of the Coastal Plain of Delaware and the offshore geology of the Baltimore Canyon Trough. The data provide a basis for understanding the geologic framework and petroleum resource potential of the area immediately offshore Delaware. Our research has focused on buried early Mesozoic rift basins and their geologic history. Assuming that the buried basins are analogous to the exposed Newark Supergroup basins of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic age, the most likely possibility for occurrence of hydrocarbon source beds in the area of the landward margin of the Baltimore Canyon Trough is presumed to be lacustrine, organic-rich shales probably present in the basins. Although buried basins mapped offshore Delaware are within reach of drilling, no holes have been drilled to date; therefore, direct knowledge of source, reservoir, and sealing beds is absent. Buried rift basins offshore Delaware show axial trends ranging from NW-SE to NNE-SSW. Seismic reflection profiles are too widely spaced to delineate basin boundaries accurately. Isopleths of two-way travel time representing basin fill suggest that, structurally, the basins are grabens and half-grabens. As shown on seismic reflection profiles, bounding faults of the basins intersect or merge with low-angle fault surfaces that cut the pre-Mesozoic basement. The rift basins appear to have formed by Mesozoic extension that resulted in reverse motion on reactivated basement thrust faults that originated from compressional tectonics during the Paleozoic. Computer-plotted structure contour maps derived from analysis of seismic reflection profiles provide information on the burial history of the rift basins. The postrift unconformity bevels the rift basins and, in the offshore area mapped, ranges from 2000 to 12,000 m below present sea level. The oldest

  5. 3D modeling of the Buhi debris avalanche deposit of Iriga Volcano, Philippines by integrating shallow-seismic reflection and geological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minimo, Likha G.; Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar Francisco A.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical models for simulating volcanic debris avalanches commonly lack a critical initiation parameter, the source volume, which is difficult to estimate without data on the deposit thickness. This, in turn, limits how rheology can be characterized for simulating flow. Leapfrog Geo, a 3D geological modeling software, was used to integrate shallow-seismic reflection profiles with field and borehole data to determine the volume of the Buhi debris avalanche and the pre-collapse structure of Iriga Volcano. Volumes of the deposit calculated in this way are 34-71% larger than previous estimates. This technique may improve models of debris avalanches elsewhere in the world, and more precisely depict landslide runout and lateral extent, thus improving disaster prevention and mitigation for the many cities located near volcanoes.

  6. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1994-10-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a 3-D representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  7. In situ geomechanics of crystalline and sedimentary rocks; Part IV, continued field testing of the modified U.S. Geological Survey 3-D borehole stress probe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, Thomas C.

    1983-01-01

    Two modified and calibrated U.S. Geological Survey 3-D borehole probes were successfully tested in the field at a site on South Table Mountain, near Golden, Colo. The probes were installed in separate core holes at depths of 84 and 99 cm in the latite cap rock and subsequently stress relieved with overcoring techniques. The determined stresses from both probes are very low and contain both tensile and compressive components. Magnitudes range from 1196 KPa in tension to 832 KPa in compression. The principal stress orientations are in fair agreement whereas the horizontal secondary principal stress directions are in good agreement; the maximum horizontal compressive stress is oriented N. 76? W.-S. 76? E. for one probe and N. 63? W.-S. 63? E. for the second probe. The greatest determined Young's modulus of the rock is in the N. 89? E. direction, only 15? from the maximum horizontal compressive stress direction.

  8. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  9. 3D Simulation of terrestrial morphological analogues of hermean surface to evaluate SIMBIO-SYS STereo Camera rendering capacity for geological purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massironi, M.; Giacomini, L.; Cremonese, G.; Forlani, G.; Capria, M. T.; Pasquare, G.; da Deppo, V.; Naletto, G.; Flamini, E.

    BepiColombo is the next 5th ESA's cornerstone. It has been selected in the fall 2000 and it is planned for a launch in 2013. It will reach Mercury after a 6 years trip and will perform 1 year observation with two S/C (Mercury Planetary Orbiter and Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter). The SIMBIO-SYS (Spectrometers and Imagers for MPO BepiColombo Integrated Observatory SYStem) instrument is a system integrating a STereoscopic imaging Channel (STC), a High spatial Resolution Imaging Channel (HRIC) and a Visual and Infrared Hyper-spectral Imager channel (VIHI). SIMBIO-SYS has been selected by ESA in the payload of the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) of the BepiColombo mission. The main scientific objective is the global mapping of the entire surface of Mercury in 3D and colors with a maximum spatial resolution of 50 m per pixel. It will allow to generate the Digital Terrain Model of the entire surface improving the interpretation of morphological features at different scales and topographic relationships. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the STC 3D rendering for geological purpose the xy pixel ground size and the z error has been estimated at apoherm and periherm. These data were used for 3D simulation on Earth geological feautures likely representative of the hermean surface and small enough to be near the detection limit of the STC. In particular we have analyzed the Tenoumer (Mauritania) and Roter Kamm (Namibia) craters with dimension similar to the Hun Kal crater on Mercury, defining its 20° meridian . In addition a small lava volcano from the volcanic complex of Michoacan-Guanajuato 1 (Messico), an endogenic dome of the Meseta de Somuncara volcanic district (Argentina) and the long basaltic lava flows related the M. Payun volcano (Argentina) were considered. One of the main objective of the study of the hermean surface is the volcanic-vs-ejecta origin of the inter-crater and smooth plains and the detection of these volcanic features will be of paramount

  10. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  11. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  12. Web-based 3D digital pathology framework for large-mapping data scanned by FF-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, ChiaKai; Tsai, Chien-Chung; Chien, Meng-Ting; Li, Yu-I.; Shun, Chia-Tung; Huang, Sheng-Lung

    2015-03-01

    Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) is a high resolution instrument in 3 dimensional (3D) space, including lateral and longitudinal direction. With FF-OCT, we can perform 3D scanning for excised biopsy or cell culture sample to obtain cellular information. In this work, we have set up a high resolution FF-OCT scanning instrument that can perform cellular resolution tomography scanning of skin tissue for histopathology study. In a scan range of 1cm(x), 1cm(y), 106μm(z), for example, digital data occupies 253 GB capacity. Copying these materials is time consuming, not to mention efficient browsing and analyzing of these data. To solve the problem of information delivery, we have established a network service to browse and analyze the huge volume data.

  13. Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-15

    We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

  14. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.; Jordan, P.; Zhang, Y.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a simple and transparent approach for assessing CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk associated with CO{sub 2} injection at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. The approach, called the Certification Framework (CF), is based on the concept of effective trapping, which takes into account both the probability of leakage from the storage formation and impacts of leakage. The effective trapping concept acknowledges that GCS can be safe and effective even if some CO{sub 2} and brine were to escape from the storage formation provided the impact of such leakage is below agreed-upon limits. The CF uses deterministic process models to calculate expected well- and fault-related leakage fluxes and concentrations. These in turn quantify the impacts under a given leakage scenario to so-called 'compartments,' which comprise collections of vulnerable entities. The probabilistic part of the calculated risk comes from the likelihood of (1) the intersections of injected CO{sub 2} and related pressure perturbations with well or fault leakage pathways, and (2) intersections of leakage pathways with compartments. Two innovative approaches for predicting leakage likelihood, namely (1) fault statistics, and (2) fuzzy rules for fault and fracture intersection probability, are highlighted here.

  15. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Mirabela; Golden, Thea; Wang, Haibo; Gow, Andrew; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering ex vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors’ framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. Methods: The authors’ image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. Results: The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology—MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic

  16. A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand: Solvothermal synthesis, crystal structure, gas adsorption and magnetic property

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingfu Zhang, Haina; Geng, Aijing; Wang, Suna; Zhang, Chong

    2014-04-01

    A new cobalt(II)–organic framework, [Co{sub 2}(L)(py){sub 2}(DMSO)]{sub n}• 0.5nDMF• 2nDMSO (1) [H{sub 4}L=5,5'-((naphthalene-2,6-dicarbonyl)bis(azanediyl))diisophthalic acid, py=pyridine, DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide, DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide], has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, PXRD and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The structural analysis reveals that complex 1 is a 3D framework built from nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligands (L{sup 4−}) and dinuclear [Co{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 4}] secondary building units (SBUs), exhibiting a uninodal (4,4)-connected crb topology with the Schläfli symbol of (4• 6{sup 5}). The desolvated complex (1a) displays higher adsorption capability for CO{sub 2} than N{sub 2}, which may be due to the relatively strong binding affinity between the CO{sub 2} molecules and acylamide groups in the framework. The magnetic investigation shows that the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction is observed in complex 1. - Graphical abstract: A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand was solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized, its thermal stability, gas adsorption and magnetic property were studied. - Highlights: • A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized. • Complex 1 exhibits a uninodal (4,4)-connected crb topology. • The thermal stability, gas adsorption and magnetic property were studied.

  17. Three-dimensional (3-D) metal-organic frameworks with 3-pyridin-4-yl-benzoate defining new (3,6)-connected net topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Xiujuan; Du Miao; Sun Yan; Guo, Jian-Hua; Li, Jin-Shan

    2009-11-15

    Reactions of different metal salts with 3-pyridin-4-yl-benzoic acid (3,4-Hpybz) under ambient condition afford a series of 3-D metal-organic frameworks with two new types of (3,6)-connected net topologies. In the isomorphic complexes [M{sub 2}(mu-H{sub 2}O)(3,4-pybz){sub 4}]{sub n} (M{sup II}=Mn{sup II} for 1, Zn{sup II} for 2, or Cd{sup II} for 3), the octahedral metal nodes are extended by the 3-connected pybz tectons to constitute 3-D arrays with the Schlaefli symbol of (3.4.5)(3{sup 2}.4{sup 4}.5{sup 5}.6{sup 2}.7{sup 2}), whereas [Pb(3,4-pybz){sub 2}]{sub n} (4) shows a completely different 3-D (4{sup 2}.6){sub 2}(4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}.8{sup 9}) framework, which represents a subnet of the (4,8)-connected fluorite lattice. - Graphical abstract: This work presents a series of 3-D metal-organic frameworks with 3-pyridin-4-yl-benzoate, which display new (3,6)-connected net topologies of (3.4.5)(3{sup 2}.4{sup 4}.5{sup 5}.6{sup 2}.7{sup 2}) for Mn{sup II}/Zn{sup II}/Cd{sup II} and (4{sup 2}.6){sub 2}(4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}.8{sup 9}) for Pb{sup II} species.

  18. The PRoViDE framework for the quantitative geologic analysis of reconstructed Martian terrain and outcrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traxler, Christoph; Hesina, Gerd; Barnes, Robert; Gupta, Sanjeev; Paar, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    The EU-FP7 project PRoViDE (Planetary Robotics Vision Data Exploitation) assembled a major portion of the imaging data gathered so far from planetary surface missions into a unique 3D database, brought them into a spatial context and provides access to a complete set of 3D vision products. The processing chain (PRoViP) is able to generate novel 3D fusion products between HiRISE orbiter and multiple-station rover stereo imagery from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover - MER (Pancam, Navcam), and Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity - MSL (Mastcam). An important tool of the PRoViDE framework, using PRoViP multi-resolution 3D vision processing products, is called PRo3D. It is an interactive virtual environment for the scientific exploration and analysis of reconstructed Martian terrain and digital outcrop models. Data fusion is supported so that multiple models with different scales and geometric resolutions can be combined in one 3D scene. This allows studying both the large geological context, which usually is reconstructed from orbiter imagery, and small outcrop details originating from rover camera imagery. PRo3D allows the user to fluently move around and zoom to investigate features at different scales and perspectives, as well as providing various interactive analysis tools. Interpretations can be digitised directly onto the 3D surface, and simple measurements can be taken of the dimensions of the outcrop and sedimentary features. The 3D data allows for incorporation of the geometrical features of the sedimentary layers into the measurements to obtain the true dimensions of those features. Dip and strike is calculated within PRo3D from mapped bedding contacts and fracture traces, through which a best fit plane is created to derive the dip and strike vectors. Scientists can organize measurements and annotations according to their geological context in a hierarchical way. These tools have been tested on two case studies; Victoria Crater and Shaler. Victoria Crater, in the

  19. Electrospun carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network derived from metal-organic frameworks for capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Ma, Jiaqi; Lu, Ting; Pan, Likun

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network (e-CNF-PCP) was prepared through electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performance of the e-CNF-PCP were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and their electrosorption performance in NaCl solution was studied. The results show that the e-CNF-PCP exhibits a high electrosorption capacity of 16.98 mg g(-1) at 1.2 V in 500 mg l(-1) NaCl solution, which shows great improvement compared with those of electrospun carbon nanofibers and porous carbon polyhedra. The e-CNF-PCP should be a very promising candidate as electrode material for CDI applications. PMID:27608826

  20. Electrospun carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network derived from metal-organic frameworks for capacitive deionization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Ma, Jiaqi; Lu, Ting; Pan, Likun

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network (e-CNF-PCP) was prepared through electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performance of the e-CNF-PCP were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and their electrosorption performance in NaCl solution was studied. The results show that the e-CNF-PCP exhibits a high electrosorption capacity of 16.98 mg g−1 at 1.2 V in 500 mg l−1 NaCl solution, which shows great improvement compared with those of electrospun carbon nanofibers and porous carbon polyhedra. The e-CNF-PCP should be a very promising candidate as electrode material for CDI applications. PMID:27608826

  1. Electrospun carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network derived from metal-organic frameworks for capacitive deionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Ma, Jiaqi; Lu, Ting; Pan, Likun

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network (e-CNF-PCP) was prepared through electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performance of the e-CNF-PCP were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and their electrosorption performance in NaCl solution was studied. The results show that the e-CNF-PCP exhibits a high electrosorption capacity of 16.98 mg g‑1 at 1.2 V in 500 mg l‑1 NaCl solution, which shows great improvement compared with those of electrospun carbon nanofibers and porous carbon polyhedra. The e-CNF-PCP should be a very promising candidate as electrode material for CDI applications.

  2. Unusual Transformation from a Solvent-Stabilized 1D Coordination Polymer to a Metal-Organic Framework (MOF)-Like Cross-Linked 3D Coordination Polymer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Chul; Choi, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Beom; Kim, Sang-Wook; Kwon, O-Pil

    2015-10-26

    An unusual 1D-to-3D transformation of a coordination polymer based on organic linkers containing highly polar push-pull π-conjugated side chains is reported. The coordination polymers are synthesized from zinc nitrate and an organic linker, namely, 2,5-bis{4-[1-(4-nitrophenyl)pyrrolidin-2-yl]butoxy}terephthalic acid, which possesses highly polar (4-nitrophenyl)pyrrolidine groups, with high dipole moments of about 7 D. The coordination polymers exhibit an unusual transformation from a soluble, solvent-stabilized 1D coordination polymer into an insoluble, metal-organic framework (MOF)-like 3D coordination polymer. The coordination polymer exhibits good film-forming ability, and the MOF-like films are insoluble in conventional organic solvents.

  3. Determination of porosity and facies trends in a complex carbonate reservoir, by using 3-D seismic, borehole tools, and outcrop geology

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, T.G. Jr.; Comet, J.N.; Murillo, A.A.

    1996-08-01

    Mesozoic carbonate reservoirs are found in the Mediterranean Sea, off the east coast of Spain. A wide variation of porosities are found in the core samples and logs: vuggy, breccia, fractures, and cavern porosity. In addition, complex Tertiary carbonate geometries include olistostromes, breccia bodies, and reef buildups, which are found on top of Mesozoic carbonates. Predicting the porosity trends within these oil productive reservoirs requires an understanding of how primary porosity was further enhanced by secondary processes, including fractures, karstification, and dolomitization in burial conditions. Through an extensive investigation of field histories, outcrop geology, and seismic data, a series of basic reservoir styles have been identified and characterized by well log signature and seismic response. The distribution pattern of the different reservoirs styles is highly heterogeneous, but by integrating subsurface data and outcrop analogs, it is possible to distinguish field-scale and local patterns of both vertical and local variations in reservoir properties. Finally, it is important to quantify these reservoir properties through the study of seismic attributes, such as amplitude variations, and log responses at the reservoir interval. By incorporating 3-D seismic data, through the use of seismic inversion, it is possible to predict porosity trends. Further, the use of geostatistics can lead to the prediction of reservoir development within the carbonate facies.

  4. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Neelakkantan, Harini; Ruddy, Bari H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  5. Positional isomeric tunable two Co(II) 6-connected 3-D frameworks with pentanuclear to binuclear units: structures, ion-exchange and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Min-Le; Duan, Ya-Ping; Li, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2014-11-01

    Two new Co(II) based metal-organic frameworks, namely {[Co5(μ3-OH)2(m-pda)3(bix)4]·2ClO4}n (1) and {[Co2(p-pda)2(bix)2(H2O)]·H2O}n (2), were prepared by hydrothermal reactions of Co(II) salt with two isomeric dicarboxyl tectons 1,3-phenylenediacetic acid (m-pda) and 1,4-phenylenediacetic acid (p-pda), along with 1,3-bis(imidazol-L-ylmethyl)benzene (bix). Both complexes 1 and 2 have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). 1 shows a 6-connected 3-D pcu cationic framework with pentanuclear [Co5(μ3-OH)2(COO)6(bix)2](2+) units, while 2 exhibits a 6-connected 3-D msw net based on [Co2(μ2-H2O)(COO)2](2+) clusters. The results indicate that the different dispositions of the carboxylic groups of dicarboxylates have an important effect on the overall coordination frameworks. Perchlorate anions in 1 can be partly exchanged by thiocyanate and azide anions, however they are unavailable to nitrate anions. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that both 1 and 2 show weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the adjacent Co(II) ions. PMID:25190003

  6. Preliminary results of the 3D magnetotelluric characterization of the Research Laboratory on Geological Storage of CO2 in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, X.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.; Marcuello, A.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    The work presented here is a component of an on-going project in the framework of establishing a Technical Development Plant (PDT) for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in a deep saline aquifer. The Research Laboratory is located at the Spanish town of Hontomín, and the project is funded by Fundación Ciudad de la Energía-CIUDEN (http://www.ciuden.es) on behalf of the Spanish Government. In this setting, magnetotelluric (MT) data are providing a baseline model for estimating CO2 plume distribution after injection. The bulk electrical resistivity of rocks is expected to increase significantly due to the presence of CO2 inside the pores of the reservoir rock since the effective volume available for the ionic transport will be reduced. We present the preliminary results of the electromagnetic characterization of the Hontomín site. In total, 109 broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) soundings were acquired in the area covering an extent of 3 x 4 km2. The data are organized mainly along five north-south profiles, each of around 4 km in length, in the period range of 15 to 4096 Hz. The stations were deployed at approximately 200 m intervals, recording data during 24 to 48 hours, and the average distance between profiles was 500 m. The instrumentation consisted of Metronix ADU06, Metronix ADU07 and Phoenix V8. A remote reference station was permanently placed around 20 km away from the study area. Different robust processing codes using remote reference methods have been tested and used at all stations to derive optimal MT responses. The 3D electrical resistivity model of the subsurface is being computed using different 3D inversion codes: commercial 3D inversion of Winglink® (Mackie and Madden, 1993), WSINV3DMT (Siripunvaraporn et al., 2005) and modEM (Egbert and Kelbert, 2012). The model is discretized on 73 x 114 x 113-layer grid and the inversions were undertaken using the 4 elements of the impedance tensor (8 responses) and more than 16 periods in the range of 0.001 to 10

  7. A robust framework for soft tissue simulations with application to modeling brain tumor mass effect in 3D MR images.

    PubMed

    Hogea, Cosmina; Biros, George; Abraham, Feby; Davatzikos, Christos

    2007-12-01

    We present a framework for black-box and flexible simulation of soft tissue deformation for medical imaging and surgical planning applications. Our main motivation in the present work is to develop robust algorithms that allow batch processing for registration of brains with tumors to statistical atlases of normal brains and construction of brain tumor atlases. We describe a fully Eulerian formulation able to handle large deformations effortlessly, with a level-set-based approach for evolving fronts. We use a regular grid-fictitious domain method approach, in which we approximate coefficient discontinuities, distributed forces and boundary conditions. This approach circumvents the need for unstructured mesh generation, which is often a bottleneck in the modeling and simulation pipeline. Our framework employs penalty approaches to impose boundary conditions and uses a matrix-free implementation coupled with a multigrid-accelerated Krylov solver. The overall scheme results in a scalable method with minimal storage requirements and optimal algorithmic complexity. We illustrate the potential of our framework to simulate realistic brain tumor mass effects at reduced computational cost, for aiding the registration process towards the construction of brain tumor atlases. PMID:18029982

  8. A framework for quantification of regional cardiac fibrosis from serial sections using 3D whole slide imaging.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stephen H; Bernus, Olivier; White, Ed; Roberts, Nick; Treanor, Darren; Magee, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Pathological cardiac fibrosis is important in predisposing the heart to arrhythmia and mechanical failure. The regional distribution of fibrosis is often described qualitatively and quantitatively in histological studies of animal hearts after staining collagen with specific colored stains. Currently this description is often piecemeal, as it lacks rigorous spatial registration, matching and methodological standardization between animals and between study groups. We propose a strategy for the quantification of regional fibrosis using the American Heart Association (AHA) cardiac segmentation model. We quantify fibrosis after whole heart 3D histological reconstruction in one normal rat heart and in one rat heart in right heart failure induced by monocrotaline. We then assess the minimum spaced histological sampling which allows for accurate assessment of regional fibrosis. We show that using every section of a set of 5 μm serial sections quantifies regional right ventricular fibrosis, with highly significant (p <; 0.001) differences between heart failure and control hearts. We show that the absolute error of collagen quantification is low when sections are taken spaced by up to 100 μm (error 5.7±5.8%). Likewise, absolute error associated with sectioning starting position is low for sections spaced up to 100 μm (error 13.3±17.2%). Above 100 μm section spacing quantification error is large (tending to 50%) and error associated with sectioning starting position is large (tending to 60%).

  9. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  10. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  11. Building the 3-D jugsaw puzzle: Applications of sequence stratigraphy to 3-D reservoir characterization, Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, S.W.

    1996-04-01

    Reservoir characterization involves the quantification, integration, reduction, and analysis of geological, petrophysical, seismic, and engineering data. This is no small task. A principal goal of reservoir characterization is to derive a spatial understanding of interwell heterogeneity. Traditionally, geologic attempts to characterize interwell heterogeneity have been done using hand-drawn or computer-generated two-dimensional (2-D) maps and cross sections. Results can be improved dramatically using three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation and analysis techniques. Three-dimensional reservoir characterization requires the same input data used in 2-D approaches, and the cost is equal to, and commonly lower than, traditional 2-D methods. The product of 3-D reservoir characterization is a 3-D reservoir model. The language used to communicate the results of a 3-D reservoir model is visualization; i.e., visual images of numerical data. All of the available log and core data in a model area are incorporated in a 3-D model, but the data are depicted as colored cells rather than as log traces. The integrity of the 3-D reservoir model is largely a function of the stratigraphic framework. Interpreting the correct stratigraphic framework for a subsurface reservoir is the most difficult and creative part of the 3-D modeling process. Sequence and seismic stratigraphic interpretation provide the best stratigraphic framework for 3-D reservoir modeling. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the pro- cess of 3-D deterministic reservoir modeling and to illustrate the advantages of using a sequence stratigraphic framework in 3-D modeling. Mixed carbonate and siliciclastic sediment outcrop and subsurface examples from the Permian basin of west Texas and New Mexico will be used as examples, but the concepts and techniques can be applied to reservoirs of any age.

  12. Solvothermal synthesis and structure of 3D frameworks of Nd(III) and Y(III) with thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate and N,N‧-diethylformamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Swati; Yawer, Mohd; Kariem, Mukaddus; Sheikh, Haq Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Two new 3D MOFs [Nd2(TDA)3(DEF)2(H2O)]n (1) and [Y4(TDA)6(DEF)4]n (2) [Thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H2TDA) and N,N‧-diethylformamide (DEF)] were synthesized by solvothermal method. They were characterized by elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The two MOFs (1) and (2) belong to the monoclinic system with space group P21/n and C 2 respectively. Structural characterizations by single-crystal X-ray crystallography reveal that 1 and 2 adopt three-dimensional frameworks constructed by cross-linking of rod shaped infinite chain secondary building unit (SBU) by thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylates as linker. These frameworks feature rhomboidal channels, inside which coordinated DEF/H2O solvent molecules are located. DEF plays pivotal role in reaction and design of MOFs. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that both MOFs are thermally robust.

  13. Mapping the 3D Geometry of the San Leandro Block of the Hayward Fault Zone Using Geologic, Geophysical and Remote Sensing Data, California State University, East Bay Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvilly, A.; Abimbola, A.; Chan, J. H.; Strayer, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    California State University, East Bay (CSUEB), located in Hayward, California, lies atop the San Leandro block (SLB) in the Hayward fault zone. The SLB is a J-K aged lithotectonic assemblage dominated by gabbro and intercalated with minor volcanics and sediments. It is bound by the subparallel northwest-trending western Hayward and eastern Chabot (CF) faults and pervasively cut by anastomosing secondary faults. The block itself is ~30 km along strike and 2-3 km wide. Previous studies suggest the block dips steeply to the northeast and extends to a depth of at least 7 km. In May of 2015, as part of an ongoing collaborative effort led by the USGS to create a 3D velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area, researchers from CSUEB and the USGS conducted a seismic survey on the CSUEB campus. The primary goal of this pilot study was to locate the trace of the CF on the CSUEB campus and to determine bedrock depth. We deployed a 60-channel, 300m profile using 4.5Hz sensors spaced at 5m intervals. Active seismic sources were used at each geophone location. A 226kg accelerated weight-drop was used to generate P and Rayleigh waves for P-wave tomography and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), and a 3.5kg sledgehammer and block were used to generate S and Love waves for S-wave tomography and multichannel analysis of Love waves (MALW). Preliminary P-wave tomography, MASW, and MALW results from this pilot study suggest the location of an eastward-dipping CF as well as the presence of a high-velocity unit at about 20m depth, presumably an unmapped sliver of bedrock from the San Leandro block. Further studies planned for the fall of 2015 include additional seismic lines and surface mapping along the Chabot fault on and near the CSUEB campus. These new geophysical, GPS, and field geological data will be integrated with LiDAR imagery and existing geological, gravity and magnetic maps to create a 3-dimensional model of the portion of the SLB that contains the CSUEB campus.

  14. Geology and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Anderson, P.B.; Morris, T.H.; Dewey, J.A. Jr.; Mattson, A.; Foster, C.B.; Snelgrove, S.H.; Ryer, T.A.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone (Utah) project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic interwell and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a 3-D model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies. The primary objective of the regional stratigraphic analysis is to provide a more detailed interpretation of the stratigraphy and gross reservoir characteristics of the Ferron Sandstone as exposed in outcrop. The primary objective of the case-studies work is to develop a detailed geological and petrophysical characterization, at well-sweep scale or smaller, of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir. Work on tasks 3 and 4 consisted of developing two- and three-dimensional reservoir models at various scales. The bulk of the work on these tasks is being completed primarily during the last year of the project, and is incorporating the data and results of the regional stratigraphic analysis and case-studies tasks.

  15. Improving the moisture stability of a 3D zinc-organic framework by incorporating methyl groups into the auxiliary ligand: Synthesis, characterization, luminescence and catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, De-Yun; Li, Xiang; Wu, Xian-Ge; Chen, Xiao-Qiang; Xu, Zhen-Rui; Liu, Fu-Dan; Huang, Dong-Fu; Guo, Hai-Fu

    2015-03-01

    The solvothermal reaction of Zn(NO3)2·6H2O with 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic (1,4-H2ndc) and 3,3‧-dimethyl-4,4‧-bipyridine (dmbpy) generates a new twofold-interpenetrating 3D zinc-organic framework, [Zn2(1,4-ndc)2(dmbpy)]n, (1). Two adjacent ZnII atoms form a paddle-wheel Zn2(COO)4 secondary building unit (SBU), which is linked by 1,4-ndc linkers with bis(syn, syn-bridging bidentate) bonding modes within the layer to form a 2D net and is further pillared by dmbpy struts to give rise to a 3D framework with channels of 6.7 × 6.7 Å2. PXRD shows that complex 1 was stable in air after moisture exposure for 30 days. 1 emits the intense indigotin photoluminescence at room temperature. Moreover, 1 has a remarkable activity for degradation of methyl orange in a photo-assisted Fenton-like process.

  16. Discrete and polymeric cobalt organophosphates: isolation of a 3-D cobalt phosphate framework exhibiting selective CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep K; Kuppuswamy, Subramaniam; Walsh, James P S; McInnes, Eric J L; Murugavel, Ramaswamy

    2015-03-28

    Structurally diverse mononuclear, dinuclear, and tetranuclear cobalt organophosphates and a three-dimensional framework based on a D4R cobalt phosphate are reported. The role of auxiliary ligands in determining the nuclearity of the phosphate clusters has further been established. Reaction of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate with 2,6-di-iso-propylphenylphosphate (dippH2) in methanol or DMSO in the presence of ancillary N-donor ligands leads to the formation of mononuclear octahedral cobalt phosphate [Co(dippH)2(py)4] (1), dinuclear octahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(NN)(MeOH)2]2·2MeOH (NN = bpy 2; phen 3), tetrahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(L)2]2·2(MeOH) (L = imz 4; dmpz 5) and symmetric and asymmetric tetranuclear tetrahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(2-apy)]4 (6) and [Co4(dipp)4(2-apy)3(DMSO)]·(DMSO)·(H2O) (7), in nearly quantitative yields. The use of a linear N-donor ditopic linker, 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (dptz), as the ancillary ligand leads to the formation of a robust three dimensional, four-fold interpenetrated network based on the D4R platform, {[Co(dipp)(dptz)0.5]4}n (8), under ambient conditions. The new compounds have been characterized by analytical, thermo-analytical and spectroscopic techniques. Further, the molecular structures of compounds 1-8 have been established using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compound 1 is a mononuclear complex in which the dippH ligands occupy trans-positions around the octahedral cobalt ion. The core structure of compounds 2-5, a Co2P2O4 ring, resembles the S4R (single-4-ring) SBU of zeolites, whereas the Co4P4O12 inorganic core found in compounds 6 and 7 resembles the D4R (double-4-ring) SBU. Cobalt organophosphate framework 8 shows significant CO2 adsorption at 273 K (7.73 wt% at 1 bar and 18.21 wt% at 15.5 bar) with high selectivity to CO2 uptake over N2 and H2 at 273 K. Magnetic studies of these symmetric complexes indicate the presence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions

  17. Discrete and polymeric cobalt organophosphates: isolation of a 3-D cobalt phosphate framework exhibiting selective CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep K; Kuppuswamy, Subramaniam; Walsh, James P S; McInnes, Eric J L; Murugavel, Ramaswamy

    2015-03-28

    Structurally diverse mononuclear, dinuclear, and tetranuclear cobalt organophosphates and a three-dimensional framework based on a D4R cobalt phosphate are reported. The role of auxiliary ligands in determining the nuclearity of the phosphate clusters has further been established. Reaction of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate with 2,6-di-iso-propylphenylphosphate (dippH2) in methanol or DMSO in the presence of ancillary N-donor ligands leads to the formation of mononuclear octahedral cobalt phosphate [Co(dippH)2(py)4] (1), dinuclear octahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(NN)(MeOH)2]2·2MeOH (NN = bpy 2; phen 3), tetrahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(L)2]2·2(MeOH) (L = imz 4; dmpz 5) and symmetric and asymmetric tetranuclear tetrahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(2-apy)]4 (6) and [Co4(dipp)4(2-apy)3(DMSO)]·(DMSO)·(H2O) (7), in nearly quantitative yields. The use of a linear N-donor ditopic linker, 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (dptz), as the ancillary ligand leads to the formation of a robust three dimensional, four-fold interpenetrated network based on the D4R platform, {[Co(dipp)(dptz)0.5]4}n (8), under ambient conditions. The new compounds have been characterized by analytical, thermo-analytical and spectroscopic techniques. Further, the molecular structures of compounds 1-8 have been established using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compound 1 is a mononuclear complex in which the dippH ligands occupy trans-positions around the octahedral cobalt ion. The core structure of compounds 2-5, a Co2P2O4 ring, resembles the S4R (single-4-ring) SBU of zeolites, whereas the Co4P4O12 inorganic core found in compounds 6 and 7 resembles the D4R (double-4-ring) SBU. Cobalt organophosphate framework 8 shows significant CO2 adsorption at 273 K (7.73 wt% at 1 bar and 18.21 wt% at 15.5 bar) with high selectivity to CO2 uptake over N2 and H2 at 273 K. Magnetic studies of these symmetric complexes indicate the presence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions

  18. Synthesis, structure and electrochemical behavior of a 3D crystalline copper(II) metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hong-Ye; Fan, Wei-Qiang; Liu, Chun-Bo; Shi, Wei-Dong; Yan, Yong-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    Using an flexible amide-type tripodal ligand N,N‧,N″-tris(3-pyridyl)-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamide (L) and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (H2bdc), a three-dimensional copper(II) metal-organic framework (MOF) formulated as [Cu(bdc)(L)]n has been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by IR, elemental, X-ray single-crystal diffraction and thermal analysis. The complex crystallizes in the triclinic, space group P - 1, a = 8.891(2) Å, b = 11.760(2) Å, c = 15.348(3) Å, α = 96.73(3)°, β = 105.96(3)°, γ = 106.47(3)°, V = 1446.2(5) Å3, Mr = 666.10, Dc = 1.530 g/cm3, Z = 2, F(000) = 682, GOOF = 1.0560, μ(MoKα) = 0.817 mm-1, R = 0.0366 and wR = 0.0885. The structural analyses reveal that the title compound consists of one Cu(II) atom, two halves of bdc, and one L ligand. Each Cu(II) atom is linked by two bdc ligands and three L ligands to form a three-dimensional network. In addition, the electrochemical behavior of title compound has been studied. CCDC No. 990526.

  19. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith; Sweetkind, Don; Fenelon, Joe

    2016-08-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity ( K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  20. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    DOE PAGES

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2016-02-18

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks providemore » the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. As a result, testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.« less

  1. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  2. 3D Rare earth porous coordination frameworks with formamide generated in situ syntheses: Crystal structure and down- and up-conversion luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xue; Tian, Jing; Yang, Hong-Y.; Zhao, Kai; Li, Xia

    2013-05-01

    The reaction of RE(NO)₃·6H₂O and formamide yielded the coordination polymers, [RE(HCOO)₄]⁻[NH₂CHNH₂]⁺ (RE=Y 1, Eu 2, Gd 3, Tb 4, Dy 5, Er 6, and Yb 7). They possess 3D porous frameworks with the 1D rhombic channels occupied by [NH₂CHNH₂]⁺ cations. Complexes 2 and 4 display the characteristic down-conversion emissions corresponding to ⁵D₀→⁷FJ (J=1–4) transitions of Eu(III) ion and ⁵D₄→⁷FJ (J=6–3) transitions of Tb(III) ion, respectively. Longer lifetime values of 2.128±0.002 ms (⁵D₀) for 2 and 2.132±0.002 ms (⁵D₄) for 4 have been observed. The up-conversion spectra of the Y:Yb,Er and Gd:Yb,Er codoped complexes exhibit three emission bands around 410 (⁴H9/2→⁴I15/2, blue), 518–570 (⁴S3/2, ²H11/2→⁴I15/2, green), and 655 nm (⁴F9/2→⁴I15/2, red). - Graphical Abstract: The complexes [RE(HCOO)₄]⁻[NH₂CHNH₂]⁺ possess 3D porous frameworks. Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes show characteristic emission of Ln(III) ions. The up-conversion emission of the Y:Yb,Er and Gd:Yb,Er codoped complexes was observed. Highlights: •The reaction of RE(NO)₃·6H₂O and formamide produced complexes [RE(HCOO)₄]⁻[NH₂CHNH₂]⁺. • The complexes possess 3D frameworks with the 1D channels occupied by [NH₂CHNH₂]+ cations. • Eu(III)/Tb(III) complexes display the characteristic down-conversion emission of Ln(III) ions. • The Y:Yb,Er and Gd:Yb,Er doped complexes exhibit the up-conversion emission.

  3. Multi-Stencil Streamline Fast Marching: A General 3-D Framework to Determine Myocardial Thickness and Transmurality in Late Enhancement Images.

    PubMed

    Merino-Caviedes, Susana; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Revilla-Orodea, Ana; Sevilla-Ruiz, Teresa; Pérez, M Teresa; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    We propose a fully 3-D methodology for the computation of myocardial nonviable tissue transmurality in contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images. The outcome is a continuous map defined within the myocardium where not only current state-of-the-art measures of transmurality can be calculated, but also information on the location of nonviable tissue is preserved. The computation is done by means of a partial differential equation framework we have called multi-stencil streamline fast marching. Using it, the myocardial and scarred tissue thickness is simultaneously computed. Experimental results show that the proposed 3-D method allows for the computation of transmurality in myocardial regions where current 2-D methods are not able to as conceived, and it also provides more robust and accurate results in situations where the assumptions on which current 2-D methods are based-i.e., there is a visible endocardial contour and its corresponding epicardial points lie on the same slice-, are not met. PMID:24235299

  4. Solvothermal synthesis of uranium(VI) phases with aromatic carboxylate ligands: A dinuclear complex with 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and a 3D framework with terephthalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Tran, Toan Trong; Aharonovich, Igor; Fanna, Daniel J.; Shepherd, Nicholas D.; Lu, Kim; Li, Feng; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2016-02-01

    With the coordination of dimethylformamide (DMF), two new uranium(VI) complexes with either 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (H2phb) or terephthalic acid (H2tph) have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions and structurally characterized. [(UO2)2(Hphb)2(phb)(DMF)(H2O)3]·4H2O (1) has a dinuclear structure constructed with both pentagonal and hexagonal bipyramidal uranium polyhedra linked through a μ2-bridging ligand via both chelating carboxylate arm and alcohol oxygen bonding, first observation of such a coordination mode of 4-hydroxybenzoate for 5 f ions. [(UO2)(tph)(DMF)] (2) has a three-dimensional (3D) framework built with pentagonal bipyramidal uranium polyhedra linked with μ4-terephthalate ligands. The 3D channeled structure is facilitated by the unique carboxylate bonding with nearly linear C-O-U angles and the coordination of DMF molecules. The presence of phb ligands in different coordination modes, uranyl ions in diverse environments and DMF in complex 1, and tph ligand, DMF and uranyl ion in complex 2 has been confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. In addition, their thermal stability and photoluminescence properties have been investigated.

  5. Potassium 4,4'-Bis(dinitromethyl)-3,3'-azofurazanate: A Highly Energetic 3D Metal-Organic Framework as a Promising Primary Explosive.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongxing; He, Chunlin; Mitchell, Lauren A; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2016-04-25

    Environmentally acceptable alternatives to toxic lead-based primary explosives are becoming increasingly important for energetic materials. In this study, potassium 4,4'-bis(dinitromethyl)-3,3'-azofurazanate, comprising two dinitromethyl groups and an azofurazan moiety, was synthesized and isolated as a new energetic 3D metal-organic framework (MOF). Several attractive properties, including a density of 2.039 g cm(-3) , a decomposition temperature of 229 °C, a detonation velocity of 8138 m s(-1) , a detonation pressure of 30.1 GPa, an impact sensitivity of 2 J, and friction sensitivity of 20 N make 4 a good candidate as a green primary explosive. PMID:27008350

  6. Potassium 4,4'-Bis(dinitromethyl)-3,3'-azofurazanate: A Highly Energetic 3D Metal-Organic Framework as a Promising Primary Explosive.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongxing; He, Chunlin; Mitchell, Lauren A; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2016-04-25

    Environmentally acceptable alternatives to toxic lead-based primary explosives are becoming increasingly important for energetic materials. In this study, potassium 4,4'-bis(dinitromethyl)-3,3'-azofurazanate, comprising two dinitromethyl groups and an azofurazan moiety, was synthesized and isolated as a new energetic 3D metal-organic framework (MOF). Several attractive properties, including a density of 2.039 g cm(-3) , a decomposition temperature of 229 °C, a detonation velocity of 8138 m s(-1) , a detonation pressure of 30.1 GPa, an impact sensitivity of 2 J, and friction sensitivity of 20 N make 4 a good candidate as a green primary explosive.

  7. A super-resolution framework for 3-D high-resolution and high-contrast imaging using 2-D multislice MRI.

    PubMed

    Shilling, Richard Z; Robbie, Trevor Q; Bailloeul, Timothée; Mewes, Klaus; Mersereau, Russell M; Brummer, Marijn E

    2009-05-01

    A novel super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) framework in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is proposed. Its purpose is to produce images of both high resolution and high contrast desirable for image-guided minimally invasive brain surgery. The input data are multiple 2-D multislice inversion recovery MRI scans acquired at orientations with regular angular spacing rotated around a common frequency encoding axis. The output is a 3-D volume of isotropic high resolution. The inversion process resembles a localized projection reconstruction problem. Iterative algorithms for reconstruction are based on the projection onto convex sets (POCS) formalism. Results demonstrate resolution enhancement in simulated phantom studies, and ex vivo and in vivo human brain scans, carried out on clinical scanners. A comparison with previously published SRR methods shows favorable characteristics in the proposed approach.

  8. Two metal chalcogenides, Hg{sub 2}Te{sub 2} X {sub 2} (X =Br, I): 3-D framework constructed from novel left-handed helices

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wentong; Wang Mingsheng; Zhang Zhangjing; Xu Gang; Guo Guocong . E-mail: gcguo@ms.fjirsm.ac.cn; Huang Jinshun

    2006-11-15

    Two isostructural metal chalcogenides, Hg{sub 2}Te{sub 2}Br{sub 2} (1) and Hg{sub 2}Te{sub 2}I{sub 2} (2), were obtained by solid-state reactions and structurally characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 crystallize in the acentric space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 of the tetragonal system with eight formula units in a cell: a=10.2388(9), c=14.480(2) A, V=1518.0(3) A{sup 3}, R {sub 1}/wR {sub 2}=0.0670/0.1328 for 1 and a=10.711(3), c=15.025(8) A, V=1724(1) A{sup 3}, R {sub 1}/wR {sub 2}=0.0637/0.1233 for 2. Both compounds are characterized by a three-dimensional (3-D) framework structure, which is composed by interconnected left-handed helices formed by both tetrahedral and trigonal Hg atoms. Optical absorption spectra of 1 and 2 reveal the presence of sharp optical gaps of 2.06 and 1.85 eV, respectively, suggesting that both materials are semiconductors. TG-DTA measurements show that both compounds are thermally stable up to 200 deg. C. The composition of both compounds is well confirmed by the semiquantitative microscope analyses. - Graphical abstract: A new family of IIB {sub 2} Q {sub 2} X {sub 2} system, possessing an acentric nature that allows them to be a potential NLO material, has been synthesized via solid-state reactions. The crystal structures are characterized by a 3-D framework structure, comprising of interconnected left-handed helices. Optical absorption spectra show that both compounds are excellent candidate for potential photoelectric materials.

  9. Application of geologic-mathematical 3D modeling for complex structure deposits by the example of Lower- Cretaceous period depositions in Western Ust - Balykh oil field (Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous District)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevertailo, T.; Nedolivko, N.; Prisyazhnyuk, O.; Dolgaya, T.

    2015-11-01

    The complex structure of the Lower-Cretaceous formation by the example of the reservoir BC101 in Western Ust - Balykh Oil Field (Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous District) has been studied. Reservoir range relationships have been identified. 3D geologic- mathematical modeling technique considering the heterogeneity and variability of a natural reservoir structure has been suggested. To improve the deposit geological structure integrity methods of mathematical statistics were applied, which, in its turn, made it possible to obtain equal probability models with similar input data and to consider the formation conditions of reservoir rocks and cap rocks.

  10. GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY IN THE CASCADE RANGE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Quaternary volcanoes of the Cascade Range form a 1200-km-long belt from northern California to southwest British Columbia and lie above the subduction zone formed as the Juan de Fuca plate is consumed beneath North America. Volcanoes throughout this belt may have been active during Quaternary time, and many have erupted within Holocene time. Thermal springs are few and inconspicuous. Surface expression of hydrothermal systems possibly is masked by infiltration of abundant rainwater and snowmelt. Several geologic and geophysical features suggest that the Oregon and California parts of the Cascades are characterized by moderate east-west crustal extension, tectonic regime conducive to relatively widespread volcanism and to the formation of normal fault zones of potentially high permeability. Refs.

  11. Geological framework of the south polar region of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, B.C.; Soderblom, L.A.; Cutts, J.A.; Sharp, R.P.; Milton, D.J.; Leighton, R.B.

    1972-01-01

    The first 4 months of Mariner 9 photography of the south polar region are discussed. Three major geological units have been recognized, separated by erosional unconformities. From oldest to youngest they are: cratered terrain, pitted plains, and laminated terrain. The latter unit is unique in occurrence to the polar region, volatiles are probably involved in its origin, and may still be present within the laminated terrain as layered ice. The residual south polar cap has been observed to survive the disappearance of the thin annual CO2 frost deposit and to last virtually unchanged in outline through the southern summer. That exposed deposit is inferred to be composed of water-ice. The residual cap appears to lie at the apex of an unusual quasi-circular structure composed of laminated terrain; a similar structure also appears to exist near the north pole. ?? 1972.

  12. Development of Three-Dimensional Geologic Model as Spatial Framework for Study of the Ferrar Magmatic System, Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malolepszy, Z.; Morin, P.; Marsh, B. D.; Souter, B. J.; Peterson, D.

    2005-12-01

    Dolerite sills of the Ferrar magmatic system in the Dry Valleys, Antarctica, are very well exposed on the slopes of deep valleys, providing a large amount of data for detailed geological mapping in accessible areas as well as remote sensing observations in inaccessible places. Collection of those data obtained from archival geological maps and digital sources were used for the construction of a three-dimensional geologic model of the Basement, Peneplain, Asgard, and Mt. Fleming sills. This model constitutes a spatial framework for the continued detailed structural, petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of perhaps one of the best-exposed magmatic systems on Earth. For construction of the model the technique of building contiguous rock volumes was used. In the case of horizontal sills the most convenient method of creating volumes is the building top and bottom surfaces using thickness constraints. The resulting surfaces were later merged into the volumes. To construct component surfaces large amounts of data were obtained from multiple sources including maps from the New Zealand Geological Survey and the USGS Antarctica program. In the first stage, the lowermost sill, the Basement Sill, was modeled in its original sheet-like form. In the next stage its eroded parts were removed from the model by tracing the intersection of the original sill form with the present terrain surface without unconsolidated sediment cover. A digital elevation model (DEM) was generated from digitized contours at 50 m intervals using the USGS topographic maps (1970 survey) and from SRTM and Lidar data. Next, maps and cross-sections were scanned, geo-referenced using XYZ coordinates system, and registered in 3-D space. Scanned maps were then draped over the DEM. All of the above operations were done for interactive and intuitive digitizing of points in 3-D space. This process has allowed intricate field relations of single sills and between touching sills to be understood in

  13. Integrating Diverse Geophysical and Geological Data to Construct Multi-Dimensional Earth Models: The Open Earth Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Keller, R.; Wallet, B.; Crosby, C.; Moreland, J.; Nadeau, D.

    2008-12-01

    Currently, many large geoscientific efforts (e.g., EarthScope, Continental Dynamics, and GeoSwath) have emphasized that a crucial need in advancing our understanding of the structure and evolution of the continents is high-resolution, 3-D models of lithospheric structure. In addition, the geoscience community recognizes that our ultimate goal is the addition of the dimension of time to make the problem 4-D. Adding the dimension of time is a complex problem that is strongly dependent on the integration of a variety of geological data into our analyses (e.g., geochronology, paleontology, stratigraphy, pressure-time histories, structural geology, paleogeography, etc.). The geoscience community also recognizes that solutions to the scientific and societal questions that they seek to answer require innovative integration of many types of data so that many physical properties (x, y, z, P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, electrical conductivity, etc.) are measured and included in 3-D models. The problem is, therefore, truly multidimensional in nature. We are developing an Open Earth Framework (OEF) as an open data model for integration of such multidimensional Earth Sciences data. In our work and interactions with the community on building and visualizing complex earth models, several issues have emerged on which there is consensus. First of all, integration efforts should work from the surface down because we have the most data there (e.g., geologic maps, remote sensing data such as LIDAR and ASTER, digital elevation models, gravity and magnetic measurements, etc.) and because the complex conditions near surface always have a potential to mask deeper features. Secondly since we cannot expect uniform coverage of a variety of high-resolution data in anything but special circumstances, a data integration effort should first establish a regional context using lower resolution (and usually wide coverage) data and then proceed to modeling the data sets with the highest

  14. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  15. A 3D chiral metal-organic framework based on left-handed helices containing 3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Yang, Tian-Yi; Feng, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Zong-Hui; Xu, Ling

    2015-10-15

    A chiral metal-organic framework, [Cu(atr)(OH)]·0.5H{sub 2}O·0.5en (1) (Hatr=3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole, en=ethylenediamine), was constructed via diffusion reaction of the achiral Hatr ligand and CuSO{sub 4} as starting materials. Compound 1 crystallizes in the chiral space group P3{sub 2}21 and features a porous metal-organic framework with 44.1% solvent-accessible volume fabricated by left-handed helices with a pitch height of l{sub p}=10.442 Å. Six helices gather around in a cycle forming a large honeycomb channel with a 6.58 Å inner diameter. Cu(II) center and atr{sup ‒} ligand regarded as 3-connected nodes, compound 1 can be simplified to a 3-c uninodal (4.12{sup 2}) (qtz-h) topological network. A gradual decreasing in the magnetic moment depending on temperature decreasing indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction in 1. The powder XRD confirms the bulk sample is a single crystal pure phase, and the thermogravimetric analysis shows the thermal stability of 1 is up to ca. 240 °C. - Highlights: • The present 3D chiral MOF is built from achiral Hatr ligand. • Six left-handed helices gather into a honeycomb channel in chiral sp P3{sub 2}21. • Compound 1 shows a 3-c uninodal (4.12{sup 2}) or qtz-h topological network. • Compound 1 indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction.

  16. Conversion of uniform graphene oxide/polypyrrole composites into functionalized 3D carbon nanosheet frameworks with superior supercapacitive and sodium-ion storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanwen; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Wenping; Tan, Hui Teng; Franklin, Joseph B.; Guo, Yuanyuan; Fan, Haosen; Ulaganathan, Mani; Wu, Xing-Long; Luo, Zhong-Zhen; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Yan, Qingyu

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) graphene oxide/polypyrrole (GO/PPy) hybrid materials derived from in-situ polymerization are used as precursors for constructing functionalized three-dimensional (3D) porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet frameworks (FT-PNCNFs) through a one-step activation strategy. In the formation process of FT-PNCNFs, PPY is directly converted into hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped carbon layers, while GO is simultaneously reduced to become electrically conductive. The complementary functions of individual components endow the FT-PNCNFs with excellent properties for both supercapacitors (SCs) and sodium ion batteries (SIBs) applications. When tested in symmetrical SC, the FT-PNCNFs demonstrate superior energy storage behaviour. At an extremely high scan rate of 3000 mV s-1, the cyclic voltammetry (CV) curve retains an inspiring quasi-rectangle shape in KOH solution. Meanwhile, high capacitances (∼247 F g-1 at 10 mV s-1; ∼146 F g-1 at 3000 mV s-1) and good cycling stability (∼95% retention after 8000 cycles) are achieved. In addition, an attractive SIB anode performance could be achieved. The FT-PNCNFs electrode delivers a reversible capacity of 187 mAh g-1 during 160th cycle at 100 mA g-1. Its reversible capacity retains 144 mAh g-1 after extending the number of cycles to 500 at 500 mA g-1.

  17. Five 3D supramolecular frameworks assembled from classical directional hydrogen-bonds and Csbnd H⋯O associations between carboxylic acids and bis-imidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Guo, Ming; Wang, Daqi; Wei, Shuaishuai; Zhou, Yong; Zhou, Yingping; Cao, Xinchao; Yu, Zeyun

    2012-08-01

    Five crystalline organic acid-base adducts derived from bis(N-imidazolyl) and carboxylic acid (p-nitrobenzoic acid, m-nitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, sebacic acid, and fumaric acid) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the five compounds three are organic salts (1, 3, and 5) and the other two (2, and 4) are cocrystals. In salts 1, and 5, the L1 are diprotonated, while in 3 the L1 is only monoprotonated. All supramolecular architectures of the adducts 1-5 involve extensive intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯O, Osbnd H⋯O, and Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. All the complexes displayed 3D framework structure for the synergistic effect of the various noncovalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the N+sbnd H⋯O-, Osbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds between carboxylic acids and ditopic imidazoles are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary cocrystals or organic salts.

  18. Implant Restoration of Edentulous Jaws with 3D Software Planning, Guided Surgery, Immediate Loading, and CAD-CAM Full Arch Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    De Riu, Giacomo; Pisano, Milena; Campus, Guglielmo; Tullio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and radiographic outcomes of 23 edentulous jaws treated with 3D software planning, guided surgery, and immediate loading and restored with CAD-CAM full arch frameworks. Materials and Methods. This work was designed as a prospective case series clinical study. Twenty patients have been consecutively rehabilitated with an immediately loaded implant supported fixed full prosthesis. A total of 120 fixtures supporting 23 bridges were placed. 117 out of 120 implants were immediately loaded. Outcome measures were implants survival, radiographic marginal bone levels and remodeling, soft tissue parameters, and complications. Results. 114 of 117 implants reached a 30 months follow-up, and no patients dropped out from the study. The cumulative survival rate was 97.7%; after 30 months, mean marginal bone level was 1.25 ± 0.31 mm, mean marginal bone remodeling value was 1.08 ± 0.34, mean PPD value was 2.84 ± 0.55 mm, and mean BOP value was 4% ± 2.8%. Only minor prosthetic complications were recorded. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that computer-guided surgery and immediate loading seem to represent a viable option for the immediate rehabilitations of completely edentulous jaws with fixed implant supported restorations. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01866696. PMID:23983690

  19. Three novel organic-inorganic complexes based on decavanadate [V10O28]6- units: special water layers, open 3D frameworks and yellow/blue luminescences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Jiang, Feilong; Zhou, Youfu; Xiong, Kecai; Chen, Lian; Yang, Ming; Feng, Rui; Hong, Maochun

    2012-07-01

    Three unusual polyoxovanadate-based inorganic-organic hybrid complexes, [Zn(Im)(2)(DMF)(2)](2)[H(2)V(10)O(28)]·Im·DMF (1), [Zn(3)(Htrz)(6)(H(2)O)(6)][V(10)O(28)]·10H(2)O·Htrz (2) and {[Zn(3)(trz)(3)(H(2)O)(4)(DMF)](2)[V(10)O(28)]·4H(2)O}(n) (3) (Im = imidazole, Htrz = 1,2,4-triazole, DMF = N,N'-dimethylammonium) have been synthesized at room temperature via evaporative crystallization, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 shows the structure of a discrete [V(10)O(28)](6-) cluster grafted by two [Zn(Im)(2)(DMF)(2)](2+) fragments through two bridged oxygen atoms, representing a rarely observed coordination mode. Complex 2 consists of a linear trinuclear Zn(II) unit bridging six Htrz ligands and a [V(10)O(28)](6-) cluster as the counter anion, where the extensive hydrogen-bonding interactions lead to {Zn(3)-V(10)}(SMF) and a special water layer involving (H(2)O)(36) rings, and consequently forms a unique 3D metal-organic-water supramolecular network. Complex 3 can be described as a 3,4-connected fsc-type network, and is the first example of open coordination 3D framework based on [V(10)O(28)](6-) and the other two different secondary building units, involving mononuclear and binuclear Zn(II)-Htrz motifs. The optical properties of complexes 1-3 in the solid state are investigated at room temperature. The results show that complexes 1 and 3 emit intense blue luminescences attributed to the ligands, while complex 2 exhibits an infrequent fluorescent property, emitting both blue and yellow luminescences at 472 and 603 nm simultaneously. Furthermore, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analyses of 1-3 are also investigated, which demonstrate their high purities and thermal stabilities.

  20. Developing a geoscience knowledge framework for a national geological survey organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Andrew S.; Hatton, Bill; Reitsma, Femke; Lawrie, Ken I. G.

    2009-04-01

    Geological survey organisations (GSOs) are established by most nations to provide a geoscience knowledge base for effective decision-making on mitigating the impacts of natural hazards and global change, and on sustainable management of natural resources. The value of the knowledge base as a national asset is continually enhanced by the exchange of knowledge between GSOs as data and information providers and the stakeholder community as knowledge 'users and exploiters'. Geological maps and associated narrative texts typically form the core of national geoscience knowledge bases, but have some inherent limitations as methods of capturing and articulating knowledge. Much knowledge about the three-dimensional (3D) spatial interpretation and its derivation and uncertainty, and the wider contextual value of the knowledge, remains intangible in the minds of the mapping geologist in implicit and tacit form. To realise the value of these knowledge assets, the British Geological Survey (BGS) has established a workflow-based cyber-infrastructure to enhance its knowledge management and exchange capability. Future geoscience surveys in the BGS will contribute to a national, 3D digital knowledge base on UK geology, with the associated implicit and tacit information captured as metadata, qualitative assessments of uncertainty, and documented workflows and best practice. Knowledge-based decision-making at all levels of society requires both the accessibility and reliability of knowledge to be enhanced in the grid-based world. Establishment of collaborative cyber-infrastructures and ontologies for geoscience knowledge management and exchange will ensure that GSOs, as knowledge-based organisations, can make their contribution to this wider goal.

  1. Magnetism in a number of Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) with 1D and 3D characteristics: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, Youcef

    Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) exhibit many excellent physical properties including magnetic properties for potential applications in devices. More importantly for the subject of this thesis, MOFs are ideal for the realization of low dimensional magnetism because of the large selection of ligands connecting magnetic centers in making the framework. The materials studied in this thesis include ten magnetic MOFs of the form M(L1)(L2) [M = Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn; L1 = NDC, bpdc, BDC, BODC, N3; L2 = DMF, H2O, TED, bpy]. Polycrystalline powder samples as well as single crystal samples were synthesized. Their crystal structures were determined, and their magnetic and thermodynamic properties were measured and analyzed. Eight of these materials were characterized as 1D magnets and two as 3D magnets. In the 1D case it is found that above Tm [the temperature at which the magnetic susceptibility chi(T) has a peak] the magnetic behavior of MOFs (S ≥ 1) can be well described with the Classical Fisher Model (CFM). Near and below TC the spins take a more definite orientation than allowed for in the CFM and hence the Ising Model (IM) was used for fitting. Both CFM and IM yield fairly consistent intrachain couplings ( J) when applied in their appropriate temperature region. To estimate the interchain exchange (J'), the susceptibility for a magnetic chain in the mean field of neighboring chains is used. In all cases, as expected, the ratio of J to J' was less than 10%. The special case of Cu(N3)2bpy ( S = ½) was analyzed with the spin ½ IM. Although the specific heat data (Ctotal) for most of the 1D MOFs showed no clear phase transition, a low temperature fit to the electron-phonon specific heats yielded apparent heavy fermion-like gamma values on the order of several hundred mJ/mol K2. The lattice specific heat (Clattice) was estimated using a Debye-Einstein hybrid model. Subtracting Clattice from Ctotal, magnetic specific heat ( CM) with a broad peak characteristic of low

  2. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  3. 3d-4f Metal-Organic Framework with Dual Luminescent Centers That Efficiently Discriminates the Isomer and Homologues of Small Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guang; Xing, Shanghua; Wang, Xiuru; Yang, Yulin; Ma, Dingxuan; Liang, Hongwei; Gao, Lu; Hua, Jia; Li, Guanghua; Shi, Zhan; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-02-01

    A 3d-4f luminescent metal-organic framework (MOF), [Tb2(Cu8I8)(C12H8NO2)6(H2O)4]·5C4H8O2 (4), and three analogues {[La2(Cu8I8)(C12H8NO2)6(C4H8O2)2(H2O)2]·3C4H8O2·2H2O (1), [Ce2(Cu8I8)(C12H8NO2)6(H2O)4]·5C4H8O2 (2), and [Eu2(Cu8I8)(C12H8NO2)6(H2O)4]·5C4H8O2 (3)}, were self-assembled from copper(I) halide clusters and lanthanide metal ions with an organic linker [3-(pyridin-4-yl)benzoic acid] under solvothermal conditions. Compound 4 with high quantum yield (Φ = 68%) exhibits reversible luminescence behavior, accompanying the removal and recovery of guest molecules (1,4-dioxane). Because of the unique porous structure and dual luminescent centers of compound 4, it can efficiently differentiate benzene series with different sizes and provide readouts in corresponding optical signals. Furthermore, it also can unambiguously discriminate the isomers, homologues, and other small molecules with similar structural motifs from one another. The luminescent color of the MOF sensor in different guest solvents has obvious changes that can be clearly distinguished by the naked eye. This multicolor luminescence originates from emissions of the dual luminescent centers, and the emissions have shifted, enhanced, weakened, or quenched to different degrees.

  4. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  5. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  6. Geologic framework of the long bay inner shelf: implications for coastal evolution in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.; Denny, J.; Baldwin, W.; Schwab, W.; Morton, R.; Gayes, P.; Driscoll, N.

    2007-01-01

    The inner continental shelf off northern South Carolina is a sediment-limited environment characterized by extensive hardground areas, where coastal plain strata and ancient channel-fill deposits are exposed at the sea floor. Holocene sand is concentrated in large shoals associated with active tidal inlets, an isolated shore-detached sand body, and a widespread series of low-relief sand ridges. The regional geologic framework is a strong control on the production, movement and deposition of sediment. High-resolution geologic mapping of the sea floor supports conceptual models indicative of net southwestward sediment transport along the coast.

  7. 3D Stratigraphic Modeling of Central Aachen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, M.; Neukum, C.; Azzam, R.; Hu, H.

    2010-05-01

    ; no. 6; p. 667-682 2. Martin Ross, Michel Parent and René Lefebvre (2005) 3D geologic framework models for regional hydrogeology and land-use management: a case study from a Quaternary basin of southwestern Quebec, Canada. Hydrogeology Journal, 13:690-707 3. Martin Ross, Richard Martel, René Lefebvre, Michel Parent and Martine M. Savard (2004) Assessing rock aquifer vulnerability using downward advective times from a 3D model of surficial geology: A case study from the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Canada. Geofísica Internacional Vol. 43, Num. 4, pp. 591-602

  8. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the ferron sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, January 1 - March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial- deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Technical progress this quarter is divided into case-study evaluation, geostatistics, and technology transfer activities. The work focused on one parasequence set, referred to as the Kf-1, in the Willow Springs Wash and Ivie Creek case-study areas. In the Ivie Creek case-study area the Kf-1 represents a river-dominated delta deposit which changes from proximal to distal from east to west. In the Willow Springs Wash case-study area the Kf-1 contains parasequences which represent river-dominated and wave-modified environments of deposition. Interpretations of lithofacies, bounding surfaces, and other geologic information are being used to determine reservoir architecture. Graphical interpretations of important flow boundaries in the case-study areas, identified on photomosaics, are being used to construct cross sections, paleogeographic, maps, and reservoir models. Geostatistical analyses are being incorporated with the geological characterization to develop a three-dimensional model of the reservoirs for fluid-flow simulation.

  9. Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P.

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms in the context of the region’s geologic history. This chapter is based on the information in the geology data package for the SST waste management areas and SST RFI Appendix E, which builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  10. 2D and 3D modelling of the Linking Zone between the Iberian and the Catalan Coastal Ranges (NE Spain): Characterizing basement and cover deformation from geological and geophysical cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Ayala, Concepción; Rubio, Félix Manuel; Pueyo, Emilio; Casas, Antonio; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Rodríguez-Pintó, Adriana; Rey-Moral, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    New geological, geophysical and petrophysical information is presented in this work in order to improve the understanding of the Linking Zone, an E-W-trending fold and thrust system that connects the northeastern part of the Iberian Range (WNW-ESE-striking) and the Catalan Coastal Ranges (NNE-SSW-striking). It was formed during the Alpine Orogeny and it is characterized by (1) thick-skinned tectonics, partly controlled by reactivation of faults inherited from Mesozoic times and (2) thin-skinned tectonics, affecting the cover sequences above the regional detachment levels (Triassic gypsum and shales). The present study aims to obtain a 3D image of the structure of this area through the construction of balanced geological and geophysical cross sections. In the Linking Zone scarce subsurface information is available. Therefore, we have conducted data acquisition campaigns to improve this knowledge: A) about 3000 gravity stations distributed along 8 main profiles were measured, and these new stations were complemented with gravity data from IGME databases. These data were analyzed and processed to obtain a Bouguer anomaly map and a residual gravity map with reasonably good coverage; B) a petrophysical survey was also carried out; rock samples were acquired and analyzed obtaining density and susceptibility values of the main lithologies. The statistics of these physical properties is of key importance during the combined geophysical/geological modelling. Petrophysical data indicate a weak, progressive increase of density mean values from the top to the base of the stratigraphic pile with the exception of Triassic gypsum and shales, where the lowest density was obtained. The modelling has been made in three steps: First, a set of eight geological cross-sections based on surface geology and structural information were built, controlled and improved through gravity modelling and balanced to make them geometrically correct, consistent throughout the sections and closer to

  11. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone: (1) preparation of the project final report and (2) technology transfer.

  12. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone: (1) evaluation of the Ivie Creek and Willow Springs Wash case-study areas and (2) technology transfer.

  13. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-07-28

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Technical progress this quarter is divided into regional stratigraphy, case studies, stochastic modeling and fluid-flow simulation, and technology transfer activities. The regional stratigraphy of the Ferron Sandstone outcrop belt from Last Chance Creek to Ferron Creek is being described and interpreted. Photomosaics and a database of existing surface and subsurface data are being used to determine the extent and depositional environment of each parasequence, and the nature of the contacts with adjacent rocks or flow units. For the second field season, detailed geological and petrophysical characterization of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir, is continuing at selected case-study areas.

  14. Quaternary Geologic Framework of the St. Clair River between Michigan and Ontario, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, David S.; Denny, Jane F.

    2009-01-01

    Concern about the effect of geomorphic changes in the St. Clair River on water levels in the Upper Great Lakes resulted in the need for information on the geologic framework of the river. A geophysical survey of the Upper St. Clair River between Port Huron, MI, and Sarnia, Ontario, Canada, was conducted to determine the Quaternary geologic framework of the region. Previously available and new sediment samples and photographic and video data support the interpretation of the seismic stratigraphy and surficial geology. Three seismic stratigraphic units and two unconformities were identified. Glacial drift, consisting of interbedded till and glaciolacustrine deposits, overlies shale. Glaciofluvial and modern fluvial processes have eroded the glacial drift. Glaciofluvial, glaciolacustrine, fluvial, and lacustrine deposits overlie this unconformity. Seismic facies were interpreted to identify areas where these geologic facies exist; however, in the absence of distinct boundaries between facies, these deposits were mapped as one undifferentiated unit. This unit is thickest in the northernmost 3 kilometers of the river, where it consists of relatively coarse-grained fluvial, reworked glaciofluvial, and possibly glaciofluvial deposits. To the south, this coarse-grained unit thins or is absent. The undifferentiated unit comprises most of the surficial deposits in the northernmost river area. Some areas of glacial drift, predominantly till, are exposed at the lake and riverbed. The shale is not exposed anywhere in the region. Geophysical surveys at sites downriver, together with the results of previous studies, indicate that the geologic framework is similar to that in the northernmost river area except for the absence or reduced thickness of the coarse-grained fluvial deposits. Instead, glacial drift is exposed at the riverbed or is covered by a veneer of sediment. This information on the substrate is important for ongoing sediment transport studies.

  15. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-05-02

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  16. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, April 1, 1997--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve a reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  17. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah was collected. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1995-96, the third year of the project. Most work consisted of interpreting the large quantity of data collected over two field seasons. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies. The primary objective of the regional stratigraphic analysis is to provide a more detailed interpretation of the stratigraphy and gross reservoir characteristics of the Ferron Sandstone as exposed in outcrop. The primary objective of the case-studies work is to develop a detailed geological and petrophysical characterization, at well-sweep scale or smaller, of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir.

  18. MT3D-USGS version 1: A U.S. Geological Survey release of MT3DMS updated with new and expanded transport capabilities for use with MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Morway, Eric D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

    2016-09-30

    MT3D-USGS, a U.S. Geological Survey updated release of the groundwater solute transport code MT3DMS, includes new transport modeling capabilities to accommodate flow terms calculated by MODFLOW packages that were previously unsupported by MT3DMS and to provide greater flexibility in the simulation of solute transport and reactive solute transport. Unsaturated-zone transport and transport within streams and lakes, including solute exchange with connected groundwater, are among the new capabilities included in the MT3D-USGS code. MT3D-USGS also includes the capability to route a solute through dry cells that may occur in the Newton-Raphson formulation of MODFLOW (that is, MODFLOW-NWT). New chemical reaction Package options include the ability to simulate inter-species reactions and parent-daughter chain reactions. A new pump-and-treat recirculation package enables the simulation of dynamic recirculation with or without treatment for combinations of wells that are represented in the flow model, mimicking the above-ground treatment of extracted water. A reformulation of the treatment of transient mass storage improves conservation of mass and yields solutions for better agreement with analytical benchmarks. Several additional features of MT3D-USGS are (1) the separate specification of the partitioning coefficient (Kd) within mobile and immobile domains; (2) the capability to assign prescribed concentrations to the top-most active layer; (3) the change in mass storage owing to the change in water volume now appears as its own budget item in the global mass balance summary; (4) the ability to ignore cross-dispersion terms; (5) the definition of Hydrocarbon Spill-Source Package (HSS) mass loading zones using regular and irregular polygons, in addition to the currently supported circular zones; and (6) the ability to specify an absolute minimum thickness rather than the default percent minimum thickness in dry-cell circumstances.Benchmark problems that implement the new

  19. MT3D-USGS Version 1: A U.S. Geological Survey Release of MT3DMS Updated with New and Expanded Transport Capabilities for Use with MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Morway, Eric D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

    2016-09-30

    MT3D-USGS, a U.S. Geological Survey updated release of the groundwater solute transport code MT3DMS, includes new transport modeling capabilities to accommodate flow terms calculated by MODFLOW packages that were previously unsupported by MT3DMS and to provide greater flexibility in the simulation of solute transport and reactive solute transport. Unsaturated-zone transport and transport within streams and lakes, including solute exchange with connected groundwater, are among the new capabilities included in the MT3D-USGS code. MT3D-USGS also includes the capability to route a solute through dry cells that may occur in the Newton-Raphson formulation of MODFLOW (that is, MODFLOW-NWT). New chemical reaction Package options include the ability to simulate inter-species reactions and parent-daughter chain reactions. A new pump-and-treat recirculation package enables the simulation of dynamic recirculation with or without treatment for combinations of wells that are represented in the flow model, mimicking the above-ground treatment of extracted water. A reformulation of the treatment of transient mass storage improves conservation of mass and yields solutions for better agreement with analytical benchmarks. Several additional features of MT3D-USGS are (1) the separate specification of the partitioning coefficient (Kd) within mobile and immobile domains; (2) the capability to assign prescribed concentrations to the top-most active layer; (3) the change in mass storage owing to the change in water volume now appears as its own budget item in the global mass balance summary; (4) the ability to ignore cross-dispersion terms; (5) the definition of Hydrocarbon Spill-Source Package (HSS) mass loading zones using regular and irregular polygons, in addition to the currently supported circular zones; and (6) the ability to specify an absolute minimum thickness rather than the default percent minimum thickness in dry-cell circumstances.Benchmark problems that implement the new

  20. The deep crustal structure of the mafic-ultramafic Seiland Igneous Province of Norway from 3D gravity modelling and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Zeudia; Fichler, Christine; McEnroe, Suzanne A.

    2016-09-01

    The Seiland Igneous Province (SIP) is the largest complex of mafic and ultramafic intrusions in northern Fennoscandia intruded at ca. 580 - 560 Ma. The depth extent and the deep structure of the SIP are mainly unknown apart from three profiles modelled by gravity and refraction seismic data. Utilizing 3D gravity modelling, a complex model of the deep subsurface structure of the SIP has been developed. The structure is presented in a multi-profile model ranging from the surface to the Moho. The mafic/ultramafic rocks of the SIP are modelled with densities of 3100 and 3300 kg m-3, the surrounding rocks by densities of 2700 and 2900 kg m-3 for upper and lower crust, respectively. This density model explains the pronounced positive Bouguer gravity anomaly of up to 100 mGal above background. Its minimum volume is estimated from the subsurface model to 17000 km3 and as such we revise downwards the earlier estimations of 25000 km3. The new subsurface model suggests that most of the SIP has a thickness between 2 and 4 km. An area with roots in an annular pattern is found and two deep-reaching roots have been identified located below the islands of Seiland and Sørøy. The depth of these roots is estimated to approximatively 9 km. The SIP is presently interpreted to be in the Caledonian Kalak Nappe Complex and the roots depth constrains its minimum thickness which is larger than earlier estimated. Furthermore, the rather undisturbed shape of the annular root pattern indicates that the SIP has not been subjected to strong tectonic reworking during the Caledonian orogeny.

  1. 3D Geologic and Reservoir Modelling of a Distributive Fluvial System Derived from lidar: A Case Study of the Huesca Fluvial Fan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Brian; Hodgetts, David; Redfern, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Understanding stratigraphic and depositional architecture in a fluvially dominated system is fundamental when trying to model and characterise properties such as geometric relationships, heterogeneity, lithologic patterns or trends of the system as well as any associated petrophysical properties or behaviours. The Huesca fluvial fan, an Oligocene - Miocene age Distributive Fluvial System (DFS) in the northern extent of the Ebro Basin, is used extensively as an outcrop analogue for modelling fluvial hydrocarbon reservoirs, as well as a base for the DFS model. To further improve understanding of the system, mapping techniques using lidar integrated with Differential Global Navigation Satellite System (DGNSS) measurements were used to create sub-metre (spatially) accurate geologic models of the medial-distal portions of the DFS. In addition to the digital terrain data, traditional field sedimentary logs, structural and palaeocurrent measurements, and samples for petrophysical analysis were also collected near the town of Piracés in a series of amphitheatres and canal cuts that expose excellent two and three-dimensional views of the strata. The geologic models and subsequent analyses derived from the data will provide a quantitative tool to further understand the depositional architecture, geometric relationship and lithologic characteristics across the studied portion of the distributive fluvial system. Utilizing the inherent quantitative nature of the terrain data in combination with the traditional field and sample data collected, an outcrop based geocellular model of the studied section can be constructed by using several geostatistical modelling approaches to describe geo-body geometries (thickness and width ratio) for the associated fluvial architecture, as well as facies distribution and observed petrophysical characteristics. The resolution of the digital terrain data (<10cm) allowed for an accurate integration of the field observations (palaeoflow

  2. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, September 29, 1993--September 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be collected. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1993-94, the first year of the project. Most work consisted of developing field methods and collecting large quantities of existing and new data. We also developed preliminary regional and case-study area interpretations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) development of reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies.

  3. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Kumar, Navanit; Zhang, Yingqi; Jordan, Preston; Pan, Lehua; Granvold, Patrick; Chow, Fotini K.

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a framework for assessing the leakage risk of geologic carbon sequestration sites. This framework, known as the Certification Framework (CF), emphasizes wells and faults as the primary potential leakage conduits. Vulnerable resources are grouped into compartments, and impacts due to leakage are quantified by the leakage flux or concentrations that could potentially occur in compartments under various scenarios. The CF utilizes several model components to simulate leakage scenarios. One model component is a catalog of results of reservoir simulations that can be queried to estimate plume travel distances and times, rather than requiring CF users to run new reservoir simulations for each case. Other model components developed for the CF and described here include fault characterization using fault-population statistics; fault connection probability using fuzzy rules; well-flow modeling with a drift-flux model implemented in TOUGH2; and atmospheric dense-gas dispersion using a mesoscale weather prediction code.

  4. Detailed structure and geological background of Foldback Reflectors near Methane-hydrate BSRs inferred from 3D seismic in the eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, H.; Morita, S.; Kioka, A.; Ashi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding subsurface gas/fluid behavior is significant for revealing hydrocarbon pathways or for discussions on global carbon cycle. Conventional hydrocarbon indicators in seismic profiles are in practice useful for detection of gas hydrates or gas in shallow sedimentary sequences. We herein study uniquely distinct seismic reflectors imaged in 3D seismic data acquired in the eastern Nankai Trough. The reflectors termed here as Foldback reflectors (FBRs), which occur along the edge of BSR and have accordion shaped characteristics. The FBRs resemble but differ from vertically stacked stratigraphic traps, in terms of that all the reflectors cut the formational sequences. FBRs are distributed in thick, well-stratified and less deformed sediments of the north-western slope of the uplifted outer ridge. Two-dimensional thermal structure taking into account topographic effects on the seafloor in our model undoubtedly shows that FBRs are developed well below depths of the base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS), even with changing hydrocarbon proportion including methane and ethane. P-wave velocity strongly suggests that the FBRs serve as a boundary of gas distribution below the BGHS. The polarity reversed at the edge of each FBR is consistent with a velocity model. Relatively fast regional uplift possibly produces the trapped free gas in pore spaces that is related to dissociation of gas hydrates. Morphology of FBRs is controlled by lithology and structure of their surrounding formation. The edge of FBRs might be corresponded to the boundary of the sandy/muddy seismic unit that is inferred from an instantaneous amplitude attribute analysis. Previously reported distribution of gas hydrates in this region can be well-constrained by lithology which is consistent with the seismic unit defined in this study. FBRs strike almost in the same direction with hosting formation, and they are always developed in downdip of the formation below BSRs. It is thus inferred that the

  5. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  6. Geologic and Geophysical Framework of the Santa Rosa 7.5' Quadrangle, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Fleck, R.J.; McPhee, D.K.; Roberts, C.W.; McCabe, C.A.; Wan, Elmira

    2008-01-01

    The geologic and geophysical maps of Santa Rosa 7.5? quadrangle and accompanying structure sections portray the sedimentary and volcanic stratigraphy and crustal structure of the Santa Rosa 7.5? quadrangle and provide a context for interpreting the evolution of volcanism and active faulting in this region. The quadrangle is located in the California Coast Ranges north of San Francisco Bay and is traversed by the active Rodgers Creek, Healdsburg and Maacama Fault Zones. The geologic and geophysical data presented in this report, are substantial improvements over previous geologic and geophysical maps of the Santa Rosa area, allowing us to address important geologic issues. First, the geologic mapping is integrated with gravity and magnetic data, allowing us to depict the thicknesses of Cenozoic deposits, the depth and configuration of the Mesozoic basement surface, and the geometry of fault structures beneath this region to depths of several kilometers. This information has important implications for constraining the geometries of major active faults and for understanding and predicting the distribution and intensity of damage from ground shaking during earthquakes. Secondly, the geologic map and the accompanying description of the area describe in detail the distribution, geometry and complexity of faulting associated with the Rodgers Creek, Healdsburg and Bennett Valley Fault Zones and associated faults in the Santa Rosa quadrangle. The timing of fault movements is constrained by new 40Ar/39Ar ages and tephrochronologic correlations. These new data provide a better understanding of the stratigraphy of the extensive sedimentary and volcanic cover in the area and, in particular, clarify the formational affinities of Pliocene and Pleistocene nonmarine sedimentary units in the map area. Thirdly, the geophysics, particularly gravity data, indicate the locations of thick sections of sedimentary and volcanic fill within ground water basins of the Santa Rosa plain and

  7. Spatial variability in shoreline change along the Atlantic coast of Delaware: Influence of the geologic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, Maria Grace

    The oceanographic and sediment-transport processes governing shoreline change are rarely resolvable from the spatially and temporally limited datasets available. Until more comprehensive data become available, the complex interactions of the myriad processes controlling long-term shoreline change are assumed to be reflected in the migration of the high-water line or comparable shoreline feature. Given the limitations of this approach, other data that can provide context for interpreting historical changes or constraining erosion forecasts become critical. The antecedent geologic framework, including the land surface that is being inundated and eroded during transgression, can provide such a context. The geomorphology and spatial and temporal patterns of shoreline change are, to varying degrees, dependent upon antecedent topography and sediment variations across that surface. Comprehensive geophysical field-data collection and analysis were conducted along the Delaware Atlantic Coast to refine the geologic framework and explore the ways in which the framework influences modern geomorphology and the long-term retreat of the beach system. Ground-penetrating radar profiles collected on the uplands northwest of Bethany Beach revealed the internal structure of and the spatial relationships among the early Stage 5 paleoshorelines preserved on the emergent Coastal Plain. As documented in high-resolution, Chirp (2--10 kHz) seismic-reflection profiles collected in the nearshore zone, the Holocene sand sheet is generally only a 1--2 meter-thick veneer overlying Pleistocene units, which are the submerged, eastern portions of the Rehoboth and Bethany headlands. The locations of Pleistocene and Holocene fluvially and tidally incised valleys, some of which flank the headlands, were mapped in the shoreface and across the inner shelf. Spatial and temporal anomalies in historical shoreline-change data were observed coincident with the major sedimentologic and age discontinuities

  8. A Kagomé layer-based 3D Mn(II) framework showing coexistence of spin-canting, spin-frustration, field-induced metamagnetic and spin-flop transitions.

    PubMed

    Yang, En-Cui; Liu, Zhong-Yi; Li, Ya-Ling; Wang, Jing-Yi; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2011-09-14

    A novel 3D Mn(II) coordination framework with Kagomé sublattice, [Mn(3)(py)(2)(nip)(2)](n) (py(-) = 2-((1H-tetrazol-5-yl)methyl)pyridine and nip(2-) = 5-nitroisophathalate), was in situ solvothermally synthesized and shows the coexistence of spin-canting, spin-frustration as well as field-induced metamagnetic and spin-flop transitions at 2.9 K.

  9. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  10. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  11. Framework for the assessment of interaction between CO2 geological storage and other sedimentary basin resources.

    PubMed

    Michael, K; Whittaker, S; Varma, S; Bekele, E; Langhi, L; Hodgkinson, J; Harris, B

    2016-02-01

    Sedimentary basins around the world considered suitable for carbon storage usually contain other natural resources such as petroleum, coal, geothermal energy and groundwater. Storing carbon dioxide in geological formations in the basins adds to the competition for access to the subsurface and the use of pore space where other resource-based industries also operate. Managing potential impacts that industrial-scale injection of carbon dioxide may have on other resource development must be focused to prevent potential conflicts and enhance synergies where possible. Such a sustainable coexistence of various resource developments can be accomplished by implementing a Framework for Basin Resource Management strategy (FBRM). The FBRM strategy utilizes the concept of an Area of Review (AOR) for guiding development and regulation of CO2 geological storage projects and for assessing their potential impact on other resources. The AOR is determined by the expected physical distribution of the CO2 plume in the subsurface and the modelled extent of reservoir pressure increase resulting from the injection of the CO2. This information is used to define the region to be characterised and monitored for a CO2 injection project. The geological characterisation and risk- and performance-based monitoring will be most comprehensive within the region of the reservoir containing the carbon dioxide plume and should consider geological features and wells continuously above the plume through to its surface projection; this region defines where increases in reservoir pressure will be greatest and where potential for unplanned migration of carbon dioxide is highest. Beyond the expanse of the carbon dioxide plume, geological characterisation and monitoring should focus only on identified features that could be a potential migration conduit for either formation water or carbon dioxide.

  12. Framework for the assessment of interaction between CO2 geological storage and other sedimentary basin resources.

    PubMed

    Michael, K; Whittaker, S; Varma, S; Bekele, E; Langhi, L; Hodgkinson, J; Harris, B

    2016-02-01

    Sedimentary basins around the world considered suitable for carbon storage usually contain other natural resources such as petroleum, coal, geothermal energy and groundwater. Storing carbon dioxide in geological formations in the basins adds to the competition for access to the subsurface and the use of pore space where other resource-based industries also operate. Managing potential impacts that industrial-scale injection of carbon dioxide may have on other resource development must be focused to prevent potential conflicts and enhance synergies where possible. Such a sustainable coexistence of various resource developments can be accomplished by implementing a Framework for Basin Resource Management strategy (FBRM). The FBRM strategy utilizes the concept of an Area of Review (AOR) for guiding development and regulation of CO2 geological storage projects and for assessing their potential impact on other resources. The AOR is determined by the expected physical distribution of the CO2 plume in the subsurface and the modelled extent of reservoir pressure increase resulting from the injection of the CO2. This information is used to define the region to be characterised and monitored for a CO2 injection project. The geological characterisation and risk- and performance-based monitoring will be most comprehensive within the region of the reservoir containing the carbon dioxide plume and should consider geological features and wells continuously above the plume through to its surface projection; this region defines where increases in reservoir pressure will be greatest and where potential for unplanned migration of carbon dioxide is highest. Beyond the expanse of the carbon dioxide plume, geological characterisation and monitoring should focus only on identified features that could be a potential migration conduit for either formation water or carbon dioxide. PMID:26767550

  13. A model for the assessment of aquifer contamination potential based on regional geologic framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soller, D.R.; Berg, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    The texture and three-dimensional framework of geologic materials should be considered in assessments of groundwater's vulnerability to contamination because geology controls the movement of contaminants and groundwater and influences groundwater quality. Contaminants are introduced into, transmitted through, and stored by geologic materials. We present a model that identifies aquifers and ranks sequences of geologic materials by their relative potential for transmitting water and contaminants from land surface. With this basis, the model can be used to assess the potential for contamination of aquifers by surface activities such as landfitling of wastes or application of agricultural chemicals. A regional map of aquifer contamination potential can be generated from the model; it retains the geologic map information intact and available for reinterpretation or other uses. The model was developed using broad, regional map information and is intended to be a general tool for assessing the regional vulnerability of aquifers to contamination. It is not intended for local, site-specific use, but for prioritizing local areas where contamination potential and/or land-use history warrant more detailed assessment or monitoring. Because it provides a regional view of contamination potential, regional patterns or trends of map units should be evaluated, rather than using the map information literally to assess local areas. Methods of applying this model and contamination potential map to groundwater protection and management are currently being studied; research includes an attempt to statistically validate the model with water-quality data, and to identify natural groupings of the ranked contamination potential map units. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  14. 3D Vision on Mars: Stereo processing and visualizations for NASA and ESA rover missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Ben

    2016-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) vision processing is an essential component of planetary rover mission planning and scientific data analysis. Standard ground vision processing products are digital terrain maps, panoramas, and virtual views of the environment. Such processing is currently developed for the PanCam instrument of ESA's ExoMars Rover mission by the PanCam 3D Vision Team under JOANNEUM RESEARCH coordination. Camera calibration, quality estimation of the expected results and the interfaces to other mission elements such as operations planning, rover navigation system and global Mars mapping are a specific focus of the current work. The main goals of the 3D Vision team in this context are: instrument design support & calibration processing: Development of 3D vision functionality Visualization: development of a 3D visualization tool for scientific data analysis. 3D reconstructions from stereo image data during the mission Support for 3D scientific exploitation to characterize the overall landscape geomorphology, processes, and the nature of the geologic record using the reconstructed 3D models. The developed processing framework PRoViP establishes an extensible framework for 3D vision processing in planetary robotic missions. Examples of processing products and capabilities are: Digital Terrain Models, Ortho images, 3D meshes, occlusion, solar illumination-, slope-, roughness-, and hazard-maps. Another important processing capability is the fusion of rover and orbiter based images with the support of multiple missions and sensors (e.g. MSL Mastcam stereo processing). For 3D visualization a tool called PRo3D has been developed to analyze and directly interpret digital outcrop models. Stereo image products derived from Mars rover data can be rendered in PRo3D, enabling the user to zoom, rotate and translate the generated 3D outcrop models. Interpretations can be digitized directly onto the 3D surface, and simple measurements of the outcrop and sedimentary features

  15. Integrated characterization of the geologic framework of a contaminated site in West Trenton, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Burton, William C.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2012-01-01

    Fractured sedimentary bedrock and groundwater at the former Naval Air Warfare Center in West Trenton, New Jersey (United States of America) are contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Predicting contaminant migration or removing the contaminants requires an understanding of the geology. Consequently, the geologic framework near the site was characterized with four different methods having different spatial scales: geologic field mapping, analyses of bedrock drill core, analyses of soil and regolith, and S-wave refraction surveys. A fault zone is in the southeast corner of the site and separates two distinct sedimentary formations; the fault zone dips (steeply) southeasterly, strikes northeasterly, and extends at least 550 m along its strike direction. Drill core from the fault zone is extensively brecciated and includes evidence of tectonic contraction. Approximately 300 m east of this fault zone is another fault zone, which offsets the contact between the two sedimentary formations. The S-wave refraction surveys identified both fault zones beneath soil and regolith and thereby provided constraints on their lateral extent and location.

  16. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  17. The Development of a Performance Assessment Framework for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, H. S.; Stauffer, P. H.; Guthrie, G. D.; Pawar, R. J.; Kaszuba, J. P.; Carey, J. W.; Lichtner, P. C.; Ziock, H. J.; Dubey, M. K.; Olsen, S. C.; Chipera, S. J.; Fessenden-Rahn, J.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale implementation of geologic storage in the U.S. implies seals with a cumulative area amounting to hundreds of square kilometers per year and will require a large number of storage sites. These factors highlight the need for a robust and reliable method for evaluating the suitability of specific sites to ensure that they will perform to required goals. This method must address fundamental physics and chemistry over a large range in scale and must address uncertainties both in these phenomena and in the properties of the reservoir. In addition, the method must link these fundamental scientific inputs to decisions based on a required goal (e.g. <0.01% of CO2 released per year). The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is studying the injection of CO2 into geologic repositories. We have developed a coupled process-system model that is intended to evaluate critical pathways for CO2 transport in the system and MMV challenges/strategies associated with those pathways. In order for the systems model to be valid it must be supported by process level models that address the fundamental physics and chemistry at the appropriate scale. This study discusses upscaling and abstraction methods that link the process level models to the systems model CO2-PENS. Our approach has been to identify the key processes in each of the subsystems in geologic storage (reservoir to surface). In developing the framework, we are focusing in several specific subsystems: wellbore integrity, fracture/fault integrity, saturated zone interactions, terrestrial ecosystems and atmospheric processes. This talk will focus on the general framework and the abstraction process for incorporating process level information into the systems model for each of these subsystems. A poster by Stauffer et al. describes the CO2-PENS systems model in greater detail.

  18. Is barrier island geologic framework fractal? Evidence from Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernette, P. A.; Weymer, B. A.; Everett, M. E.; Houser, C.

    2015-12-01

    The surface morphology of coastlines has been observed to be fractal over different length-scales. Whether this phenomena extends into the subsurface has not been previously examined. Recent assessments of shoreline change suggest that the statistical behavior of shoreline change is self-affine, where the nonstationary time-series exhibits long-range dependence (LRD) that can be approximated by a power law. The scaling exponent determines the fractal dimension where high spectral power at low frequencies dominates shoreline position over large spatial scales (~ 101 to 102 km). Here, we explore the fractality of subsurface barrier island framework geology through the lens of a portable electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor. Responses of apparent conductivity σa measured by the EMI sensor at 3 kHz (~ 4 m depth) were collected along two alongshore surveys (100 and 10 km) in Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA. A 10 m step-size was used for the 100 km survey, whereas a 1 m step-size was used for the 10 km survey. Thus, each spatial data series consists of n ~ 10,000 data points enabling detailed tests for LRD using traditional wavelet analysis and unconventional forecasting FARIMA techniques. In general, high powers in the wavelets correspond to previously-identified Pleistocene paleo-channels suggesting that lower-frequencies dominate the signal and are geologically controlled. Higher frequencies are proposed to reflect small-scale variations in changing hydrology. Tests for LRD by the Hurst exponent and PSD plots suggest that autocorrelations are stronger in measurements that are closer together (i.e., 1 vs 10 m step-size) over the sensor footprint. Nonetheless, the scaling exponents for both surveys suggest that σa responses are fractal signals (over different spatial scales), reflecting a very rough distribution of varying barrier island framework geology.

  19. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et

  20. A universal surface complexation framework for modeling proton binding onto bacterial surfaces in geologic settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borrok, D.; Turner, B.F.; Fein, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption onto bacterial cell walls can significantly affect the speciation and mobility of aqueous metal cations in many geologic settings. However, a unified thermodynamic framework for describing bacterial adsorption reactions does not exist. This problem originates from the numerous approaches that have been chosen for modeling bacterial surface protonation reactions. In this study, we compile all currently available potentiometric titration datasets for individual bacterial species, bacterial consortia, and bacterial cell wall components. Using a consistent, four discrete site, non-electrostatic surface complexation model, we determine total functional group site densities for all suitable datasets, and present an averaged set of 'universal' thermodynamic proton binding and site density parameters for modeling bacterial adsorption reactions in geologic systems. Modeling results demonstrate that the total concentrations of proton-active functional group sites for the 36 bacterial species and consortia tested are remarkably similar, averaging 3.2 ?? 1.0 (1??) ?? 10-4 moles/wet gram. Examination of the uncertainties involved in the development of proton-binding modeling parameters suggests that ignoring factors such as bacterial species, ionic strength, temperature, and growth conditions introduces relatively small error compared to the unavoidable uncertainty associated with the determination of cell abundances in realistic geologic systems. Hence, we propose that reasonable estimates of the extent of bacterial cell wall deprotonation can be made using averaged thermodynamic modeling parameters from all of the experiments that are considered in this study, regardless of bacterial species used, ionic strength, temperature, or growth condition of the experiment. The average site densities for the four discrete sites are 1.1 ?? 0.7 ?? 10-4, 9.1 ?? 3.8 ?? 10-5, 5.3 ?? 2.1 ?? 10-5, and 6.6 ?? 3.0 ?? 10-5 moles/wet gram bacteria for the sites with pKa values of 3

  1. Geologic framework for the coal-bearing rocks of the Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesnut, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Coal production has been an important economic factor in the Central Appalachian Basin. However, regional stratigraphic and structural relationships of the coal-bearing rocks of the basin have been poorly understood due to numerous separate nomenclatural schemes employed by various states. In order to estimate coal resources and understand mechanisms controlling the distribution of coal within the basin, a reliable geologic framework is necessary. Seven detailed cross sections across the Central Appalachian Basin were constructed in order to examine the stratigraphic and structural framework of the coal-bearing rocks in the basin. The cross sections were based on more than 1000 oil and gas well logs, measured sections, and borehole information from Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The cross sections revealed three main points discussed here: southeast thickening of the Pennsylvanian strata, unconformable northwestward onlapping relationship of Lower Pennsylvanian strata over underlying Lower Pennsylvanian and Mississippian strata and regional continuity of beds. The cross sections, geologic mapping, coal-resource studies, extensive new highway exposures and the occurrence of tonstein beds indicate that many coal beds and marine strata are laterally extensive, albeit locally variable across the basin. Certain quartzose sandstone bodies are also extensive over large areas of the basin. Existing stratigraphic nomenclature schemes obscured the geologic framework of the basin, so a new unified nomenclature scheme was devised to better describe stratigraphic features of the basin. The new stratigraphic nomenclature, now only formalized for Kentucky, was based on key stratigraphic units that proved to be extensive across the basin. Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian rocks are now recognized as the Breathitt Group (the Breathitt Formation was elevated to group rank). The Breathitt Group was subdivided into eight coal-bearing formations by relatively thick

  2. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  3. Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. K.; Sabins, F. F., Jr.; Rowan, L. C.; Short, N. M.

    1975-01-01

    Papers from private industry reporting applications of remote sensing to oil and gas exploration were presented. Digitally processed LANDSAT images were successfully employed in several geologic interpretations. A growing interest in digital image processing among the geologic user community was shown. The papers covered a wide geographic range and a wide technical and application range. Topics included: (1) oil and gas exploration, by use of radar and multisensor studies as well as by use of LANDSAT imagery or LANDSAT digital data, (2) mineral exploration, by mapping from LANDSAT and Skylab imagery and by LANDSAT digital processing, (3) geothermal energy studies with Skylab imagery, (4) environmental and engineering geology, by use of radar or LANDSAT and Skylab imagery, (5) regional mapping and interpretation, and digital and spectral methods.

  4. Identifying the origin of differences between 3D numerical simulations of ground motion in sedimentary basins: lessons from stringent canonical test models in the E2VP framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, Emmanuel; Maufroy, Emeline; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Priolo, Enrico; Klin, Peter; De Martin, Florent; Zhang, Zenghuo; Hollender, Fabrice; Bard, Pierre-Yves

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulation is playing a role of increasing importance in the field of seismic hazard by providing quantitative estimates of earthquake ground motion, its variability, and its sensitivity to geometrical and mechanical properties of the medium. Continuous efforts to develop accurate and computationally efficient numerical methods, combined with increasing computational power have made it technically feasible to calculate seismograms in 3D realistic configurations and for frequencies of interest in seismic design applications. Now, in order to foster the use of numerical simulations in practical prediction of earthquake ground motion, it is important to evaluate the accuracy of current numerical methods when applied to realistic 3D sites. This process of verification is a necessary prerequisite to confrontation of numerical predictions and observations. Through the ongoing Euroseistest Verification and Validation Project (E2VP), which focuses on the Mygdonian basin (northern Greece), we investigated the capability of numerical methods to predict earthquake ground motion for frequencies up to 4 Hz. Numerical predictions obtained by several teams using a wide variety of methods were compared using quantitative goodness-of-fit criteria. In order to better understand the cause of misfits between different simulations, initially performed for the realistic geometry of the Mygdonian basin, we defined five stringent canonical configurations. The canonical models allow for identifying sources of misfits and quantify their importance. Detailed quantitative comparison of simulations in relation to dominant features of the models shows that even relatively simple heterogeneous models must be treated with maximum care in order to achieve sufficient level of accuracy. One important conclusion is that the numerical representation of models with strong variations (e.g. discontinuities) may considerably vary from one method to the other, and may become a dominant source of

  5. Description of the U.S. Geological Survey Geo Data Portal data integration framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, David L.; Booth, Nathaniel L.; Kunicki, Thomas C.; Walker, Jordan I.; Lucido, Jessica M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed an open-standard data integration framework for working efficiently and effectively with large collections of climate and other geoscience data. A web interface accesses catalog datasets to find data services. Data resources can then be rendered for mapping and dataset metadata are derived directly from these web services. Algorithm configuration and information needed to retrieve data for processing are passed to a server where all large-volume data access and manipulation takes place. The data integration strategy described here was implemented by leveraging existing free and open source software. Details of the software used are omitted; rather, emphasis is placed on how open-standard web services and data encodings can be used in an architecture that integrates common geographic and atmospheric data.

  6. Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

    2008-11-01

    We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying that the risks of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites are below agreed-upon thresholds. The CF is based on effective trapping of CO2, the proposed concept that takes into account both the probability and impact of CO2 leakage. The CF uses probability estimates of the intersection of conductive faults and wells with the CO2 plume along with modeled fluxes or concentrations of CO2 as proxies for impacts to compartments (such as potable groundwater) to calculate CO2 leakage risk. In order to test and refine the approach, we applied the CF to (1) a hypothetical large-scale GCS project in the Texas Gulf Coast, and (2) WESTCARB's Phase III GCS pilot in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California.

  7. A two-fold interpenetrating 3D metal-organic framework material constructed from helical chains linked via 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yiming; Zhao Zhenguo; Wu Xiaoyuan; Zhang Qisheng; Chen Lijuan; Wang Fei; Chen Shanci; Lu Canzhong

    2008-12-15

    A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound {l_brace}[Ag(L){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (1) has been synthesized by self-assembly of 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz (L=4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz=3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole) and Ag{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} under hydrothermal conditions. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/acd with a=21.406(4) A, b=21.406(4) A, c=36.298(8) A, Z=32. X-ray single-crystal diffraction reveals that 1 has a three-dimensional framework with an unprecedented alternate left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net. Photoluminescent investigation reveals that the title compound displays interesting emissions in a wide region, which shows that the title compound may be a good potential candidate as a photoelectric material. - Graphical abstract: A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound [Ag(4,4'-bpz){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}] shows unprecedented alternating left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net.

  8. Regional Jurassic geologic framework of Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent Federal waters area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    To date, numerous Jurassic hydrocarbon fields and pools have been discovered in the Cotton Valley Group, Haynesville Formation, Smackover Formation and Norphlet Formation in the tri-state area of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and in Alabama State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters area. Petroleum traps are basement highs, salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines and extensional faults associated with salt movement. Reservoirs include continental and marine sandstones, limestones and dolostones. Hydrocarbon types are oil, condensate and natural gas. The onshore stratigraphic and structural information can be used to establish a regional geologic framework for the Jurassic for the State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters areas. Evaluation of the geologic information along with the hydrocarbon data from the tri-state area indicates that at least three Jurassic hydrocarbon trends (oil, oil and gas condensate, and deep natural gas) can be identified onshore. These onshore hydrocarbon trends can be projected into the Mobile area in the Central Gulf of Mexico and into the Pensacola, Destin Dome and Apalachicola areas in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial reserves of natural gas are expected to be present in Alabama State waters and the northern portion of the Mobile area. Significant accumulations of oil and gas condensate may be encountered in the Pensacola, Destin Dome, and Apalachicola areas. ?? 1989.

  9. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR PROVIDES FRAMEWORK FOR SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC EXPLORATION IN EGYPT AND SUDAN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breed, Carol S.; McCauley, John F.; Schaber, Gerald G.

    1984-01-01

    Shuttle Imaging Radar provides a pictorial framework to guide exploration for mineral resources (potential placers), groundwater sources, and prehistoric archaeological sites in the Western Desert of Egypt and Sudan. Documented penetration by the SIR-A signal of dry surficial sediment to depths of a meter or more revealed bedrock geologic features and networks of former stream valleys otherwise concealed beneath windblown sand, alluvium, and colluvial deposits. 'Radar units' mapped on SIR-A images according to relative brightness and degree of mottling correspond to subsurface geologic and topographic features identified in more than 50 test pits. Petrologic examination of pit samples confirms that a variety of depositional environments existed in this now hyper-arid region before it was mantled by windblown sand sheets and dunes. Wet sand was discovered in two buried valleys shown on the radar images and located in the field with the aid of co-registered maps and Landsat images, and a satellite navigation device. Buried valleys whose streams once traversed mineralized zones are potential sites of placers (gold, tin).

  10. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic properties of the Seco Creek Watershed, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, D.S.; Mosier, John G.; Nalley, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    In 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, began a study to evaluate the effects of agricultural best-management practices on surface- and ground-water quantity and quality in the Seco Creek watershed. The USGS study is part of a larger study known as the Seco Creek Water-Quality Demonstration Project, which is intended to demonstrate to urban and rural land and water users the potential to reduce transport of agricultural chemicals and sediment, improve groundwater and downstream surface-water quality, and improve the quality and abundance of vegetative cover. The Seco Creek watershed is approximately 50 miles (mi) west of San Antonio (fig. 1) and has a drainage area of approximately 255 square miles (mi2). Agricultural activities account for more than 99 percent of the land use in the watershed (Steffens and Wright, 1996). The purpose of this fact sheet is to describe the geologic framework and hydrogeologic properties of the Seco Creek watershed.

  11. DYNA3D. Explicit 3-d Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Englemann, B.E. )

    1993-11-30

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, resultant plasticity, closed form update shell plasticity, and Frazer-Nash rubber model. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  12. Use Models like Maps in a 3D SDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gietzel, Jan; Gabriel, Paul; Schaeben, Helmut; Le, Hai Ha

    2013-04-01

    Digital geological applications have become 3D up to 4D modelling of the underground. The modellers are working very heterogeneously in terms of its applied software systems. On the other hand the 3D/4D modelling of the subsurface has become part of the geological surveys all around the world. This implies a wide spread group of users working in different institutions aiming to work together on one subsurface model. Established 3D/4D-modelling software systems mainly use a file based approach to store data, which is in a high contrast to the needs of a central administrated and network based data transfer approach. At the department of geophysics and geo information sciences at the Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, the GST system for managing 3D and 4D geosciences data in a databases system was developed and is now continued by the company GiGa infosystems. The GST-Framework includes a storage engine, a web service for sharing and a number of client software including a browser based client interface for visualising, accessing and manipulating geological CAD data. Including a check out system GST supports multi user editing on huge models, designed to manage seamless high resolution models of the subsurface. While working on complex projects various software is used for the creation of the model, the prediction of properties and final simulation. A problem rising from the use of several software is the interoperability of the models. Due to conversion errors different working groups use mainly different raw data. This results in different models, which have to be corrected with additional effort. One platform sharing the models is strongly demanded. One high potential solution is a centralized and software independent storage, which will be presented.

  13. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  14. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  15. Biomechanical comparison of implant retained fixed partial dentures with fiber reinforced composite versus conventional metal frameworks: a 3D FEA study.

    PubMed

    Erkmen, Erkan; Meriç, Gökçe; Kurt, Ahmet; Tunç, Yahya; Eser, Atılım

    2011-01-01

    Fiber reinforced composite (FRC) materials have been successfully used in a variety of commercial applications. These materials have also been widely used in dentistry. The use of fiber composite technology in implant prostheses has been previously presented, since they may solve many problems associated with metal alloy frameworks such as corrosion, complexity of fabrication and high cost. The hypothesis of this study was that an FRC framework with lower flexural modulus provides more even stress distribution throughout the implant retained fixed partial dentures (FPDs) than a metal framework does. A 3-dimensional finite element analysis was conducted to evaluate the stress distribution in bone, implant-abutment complex and prosthetic structures. Hence, two distinctly different models of implant retained 3-unit fixed partial dentures, composed of Cr-Co and porcelain (M-FPD model) or FRC and particulate composite (FRC-FPD model) were utilized. In separate load cases, 300 N vertical, 150 N oblique and 60 N horizontal forces were simulated. When the FRC-FPD and M-FPD models were compared, it was found that all investigated stress values in the M-FPD model were higher than the values in the FRC-FPD model except for the stress values in the implant-abutment complex. It can be concluded that the implant supported FRC-FPD could eliminate the excessive stresses in the bone-implant interface and maintain normal physiological loading of the surrounding bone, therefore minimizing the risk of peri-implant bone loss due to stress-shielding. PMID:21094484

  16. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources: Permian and Palo Duro Basins and Bend Arch-Fort Worth Basin: Chapter K in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merrill, Matthew D.; Slucher, Ernie R.; Roberts-Ashby, Tina L.; Warwick, Peter D.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, P.A.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Lohr, Celeste D.; Warwick, Peter D.; Corum, Margo D.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has completed an assessment of the potential geologic carbon dioxide storage resource in the onshore areas of the United States. To provide geological context and input data sources for the resources numbers, framework documents are being prepared for all areas that were investigated as part of the national assessment. This report is the geologic framework document for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins, the combined Bend arch-Fort Worth Basin area, and subbasins therein of Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. In addition to a summarization of the geology and petroleum resources of studied basins, the individual storage assessment units (SAUs) within the basins are described and explanations for their selection are presented. Though appendixes in the national assessment publications include the input values used to calculate the available storage resource, this framework document provides only the context and source of inputs selected by the assessment geologists. Spatial files of boundaries for the SAUs herein, as well as maps of the density of known well bores that penetrate the SAU seal, are available for download with the release of this report.

  17. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources—Southern Rocky Mountain Basins: Chapter M in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merrill, Matthew D.; Drake II, Ronald M.; Buursink, Marc L.; Craddock, William H.; East, Joseph A.; Slucher, Ernie R.; Warwick, Peter D.; Brennan, Sean T.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, Philip A.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Lohr, Celeste D.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has completed an assessment of the potential geologic carbon dioxide storage resources in the onshore areas of the United States. To provide geological context and input data sources for the resources numbers, framework documents are being prepared for all areas that were investigated as part of the national assessment. This report, chapter M, is the geologic framework document for the Uinta and Piceance, San Juan, Paradox, Raton, Eastern Great, and Black Mesa Basins, and subbasins therein of Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. In addition to a summary of the geology and petroleum resources of studied basins, the individual storage assessment units (SAUs) within the basins are described and explanations for their selection are presented. Although appendixes in the national assessment publications include the input values used to calculate the available storage resource, this framework document provides only the context and source of the input values selected by the assessment geologists. Spatial-data files of the boundaries for the SAUs, and the well-penetration density of known well bores that penetrate the SAU seal, are available for download with the release of this report.

  18. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources—Southern Rocky Mountain Basins: Chapter M in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merrill, Matthew D.; Drake, Ronald M.; Buursink, Marc L.; Craddock, William H.; East, Joseph A.; Slucher, Ernie R.; Warwick, Peter D.; Brennan, Sean T.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, Philip A.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Lohr, Celeste D.; Warwick, Peter D.; Corum, Margo D.

    2016-06-02

    The U.S. Geological Survey has completed an assessment of the potential geologic carbon dioxide storage resources in the onshore areas of the United States. To provide geological context and input data sources for the resources numbers, framework documents are being prepared for all areas that were investigated as part of the national assessment. This report, chapter M, is the geologic framework document for the Uinta and Piceance, San Juan, Paradox, Raton, Eastern Great, and Black Mesa Basins, and subbasins therein of Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. In addition to a summary of the geology and petroleum resources of studied basins, the individual storage assessment units (SAUs) within the basins are described and explanations for their selection are presented. Although appendixes in the national assessment publications include the input values used to calculate the available storage resource, this framework document provides only the context and source of the input values selected by the assessment geologists. Spatial-data files of the boundaries for the SAUs, and the well-penetration density of known well bores that penetrate the SAU seal, are available for download with the release of this report.

  19. A 3D chiral metal-organic framework based on left-handed helices containing 3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Yang, Tian-Yi; Feng, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Zong-Hui; Xu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    A chiral metal-organic framework, [Cu(atr)(OH)]·0.5H2O·0.5en (1) (Hatr=3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole, en=ethylenediamine), was constructed via diffusion reaction of the achiral Hatr ligand and CuSO4 as starting materials. Compound 1 crystallizes in the chiral space group P3221 and features a porous metal-organic framework with 44.1% solvent-accessible volume fabricated by left-handed helices with a pitch height of lp=10.442 Å. Six helices gather around in a cycle forming a large honeycomb channel with a 6.58 Å inner diameter. Cu(II) center and atr‒ ligand regarded as 3-connected nodes, compound 1 can be simplified to a 3-c uninodal {4.122} (qtz-h) topological network. A gradual decreasing in the magnetic moment depending on temperature decreasing indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction in 1. The powder XRD confirms the bulk sample is a single crystal pure phase, and the thermogravimetric analysis shows the thermal stability of 1 is up to ca. 240 °C.

  20. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): a 3-D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-12-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on amplitude-modulated (AM) - harmonic motion imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework to (1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and (2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6 and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69 and 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19 and 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28 and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm(2)) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm(2)). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo.

  1. Interpenetration of a 3D Icosahedral M@Ni12 (M=Al, Ga) Framework with Porphyrin-Reminiscent Boron Layers in MNi9 B8.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiang; Wagner, Frank R; Ormeci, Alim; Prots, Yurii; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Schmidt, Marcus; Schnelle, Walter; Grin, Yuri; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Two ternary borides MNi9 B8 (M=Al, Ga) were synthesized by thermal treatment of mixtures of the elements. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data reveal AlNi9 B8 and GaNi9 B8 crystallizing in a new type of structure within the space group Cmcm and the lattice parameters a=7.0896(3) Å, b=8.1181(3) Å, c=10.6497(4) Å and a=7.0897(5) Å, b=8.1579(4) Å, c=10.6648(7) Å, respectively. The boron atoms build up two-dimensional layers, which consist of puckered [B16 ] rings with two tailing B atoms, whereas the M atoms reside in distorted vertices-condensed [Ni12 ] icosahedra, which form a three-dimensional framework interpenetrated by boron porphyrin-reminiscent layers. An unusual local arrangement resembling a giant metallo-porphyrin entity is formed by the [B16 ] rings, which, due to their large annular size of approximately 8 Å, chelate four of the twelve icosahedral Ni atoms. An analysis of the chemical bonding by means of the electron localizability approach reveals strong covalent B-B interactions and weak Ni-Ni interactions. Multi-center dative B-Ni interaction occurs between the Al-Ni framework and the boron layers. In agreement with the chemical bonding analysis and band structure calculations, AlNi9 B8 is a Pauli-paramagnetic metal. PMID:26418894

  2. Geologic framework influences on the geomorphology of an anthropogenically modified barrier island: Assessment of dune/beach changes at Fire Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lentz, E.E.; Hapke, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Antecedent geology plays a crucial role in determining the inner-shelf, nearshore, and onshore geomorphology observed in coastal systems. However, the influence of the geologic framework on a system is difficult to extract when evaluating responses to changes due to storms and anthropogenic modifications, and few studies have quantified the potential for these influences in dune/beach environments. This study evaluates topographic change to the dune/beach system at Fire Island, New York over a ten year period (1998-2008) at two sites representing eastern and western reaches of the island where morphology has been shown to vary. The sites are situated along swaths of coast eroding differentially and where the inner shelf geologic framework differs substantially. Fewer large storms occurred in the first half of the study period, compared with the later part of the study period which includes several severe and prolonged extratropical storms. Additionally, a major beach replenishment project was conducted at one of the study sites. Topographic data from LiDAR and RTK GPS surveys are used to construct high-resolution 3D surfaces, which are used to determine volumetric change and to extract 2D alongshore features and profiles for analysis. The study sites help to further characterize morphologic differences between eastern and western reaches of the island. The western site displays higher sand volumes, lower dunes, and a lower gradient profile slope when compared with the eastern site. In addition to these fundamental morphologic differences, the two sites also differ significantly in their response to coastal storms and in the fact that their replenishment histories are different. The replenished areas show reduced vulnerability to storms through minimal volume loss and shoreline accretion that should be considered when evaluating the response of replenished areas to episodic events. We propose that site-specific differences evident throughout the study period can be

  3. The 3D Elevation Program and America's infrastructure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Carswell, Jr., William J.

    2016-11-07

    Infrastructure—the physical framework of transportation, energy, communications, water supply, and other systems—and construction management—the overall planning, coordination, and control of a project from beginning to end—are critical to the Nation’s prosperity. The American Society of Civil Engineers has warned that, despite the importance of the Nation’s infrastructure, it is in fair to poor condition and needs sizable and urgent investments to maintain and modernize it, and to ensure that it is sustainable and resilient. Three-dimensional (3D) light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data provide valuable productivity, safety, and cost-saving benefits to infrastructure improvement projects and associated construction management. By providing data to users, the 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) of the U.S. Geological Survey reduces users’ costs and risks and allows them to concentrate on their mission objectives. 3DEP includes (1) data acquisition partnerships that leverage funding, (2) contracts with experienced private mapping firms, (3) technical expertise, lidar data standards, and specifications, and (4) most important, public access to high-quality 3D elevation data. The size and breadth of improvements for the Nation’s infrastructure and construction management needs call for an efficient, systematic approach to acquiring foundational 3D elevation data. The 3DEP approach to national data coverage will yield large cost savings over individual project-by-project acquisitions and will ensure that data are accessible for other critical applications.

  4. Geologic framework of the Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation the Alabama coastal waters area

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A. ); Mink R.M.; Mann, S.D. ); Mancini, E.A.

    1993-09-01

    The Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a prolific hydrocarbon-producing geologic unit in the onshore Gulf of Mexico area, including southwest Alabama. However, no Smackover strata containing commercial accumulations of oil or gas have thus far been discovered in the Alabama state coastal waters area (ACW). This study of the regional geologic framework of the Smackover Formation was done to characterize the unit in the ACW and to compare strata in the ACW with productive Smackover intervals in the onshore area. In the study area, the Smackover Formation was deposited on a highly modified carbonate associated with pre-Smackover topographic features. In the onshore Alabama, north of the Wiggins arch complex, an inner ramp developed in the area of the Mississippi interior salt basin and the Manila and Conecuh embayments. South of the Wiggins arch complex in extreme southern onshore Alabama and in the ACW, an outer ramp formed that was characterized by a much thicker Smackover section. In the outer ramp setting, four lithofacies associations are recognized: lower, middle, and upper outer ramp lithofacies (ORL) and the coastal dolostone lithofacies. The coastal dolostone lithofacies accounts for most of the reservoir-grade porosity in the outer ramp setting. The lower, middle, and upper ORL, for the most part, are nonporous. Volumetrically, intercrystalline porosity is the most important pore type in the coastal dolostone lithofacies. Numerous data in the ACW area indicate that halokinesis has created structural conditions favorable for accumulation and entrapment of oil and gas in the outer ramp lithofacies of the Smackover. Prolific hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the ACW, as evidenced by the significant natural gas accumulations in the Norphlet Formation. To date, however, reservoir quality rocks of the coastal dolostone lithofacies coincident with favorable structural conditions have not been encountered in the ACW.

  5. A Framework to Estimate CO2 Leakage associated with Geological Storage in Mature Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celia, M. A.; Bachu, S.; Gasda, S.

    2002-12-01

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide requires careful risk analysis to avoid unintended consequences associated with the subsurface injection. Most negative consequences of subsurface injection are associated with leakage of the injected CO2 out of the geological formation into which it is injected. Such leakage may occur through natural geological features, including fractures and faults, or it may occur through human-created pathways such as existing wells. Possible leakage of CO2 through existing wells appears to be especially important in mature sedimentary basins that have been explored intensively and exploited for hydrocarbon production. In the Alberta Basin of western Canada, more than 300,000 oil and gas wells have been drilled, while in the state of Texas in the United States, more than 1,500,000 wells have been drilled. Many of these wells have been abandoned, and the information available to describe their current state is highly variable and sometimes nonexistent. Because these wells represent possible direct conduits from the injection zone to the land surface, a comprehensive assessment of leakage potential associated with these wells needs to be pursued. Analysis of leakage potential associated with existing wells must combine a data mining component with a multi-level modeling effort to assess leakage potential in a probabilistic framework. Information available for existing wells must be categorized and analyzed, and general leakage characteristics associated with wells of varying properties must be quantified. One example of a realistic target formation is the Viking Formation in Alberta, which is overlain by a thick shale layer and contains hydrocarbon in some locations. The existence of hydrocarbon in the formation indicates that the overlying shale layer is an effective barrier to flow, and therefore this is a good candidate formation for CO2 storage. However, the formation and its cap rock are punctured by approximately 180,000 wells, with

  6. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  7. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  8. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  9. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow

  10. Steeply dipping heaving bedrock, Colorado: Part 1 - Heave features and physical geological framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, D.C.; Higgins, J.D.; Olsen, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    Differentially heaving bedrock has caused severe damage near the Denver metropolitan area. This paper describes heave-feature morphologies, the underlying bedrock framework, and their inter-relationship. The heave features are linear to curvilinear and may attain heights of 0.7 m (2.4 ft), widths of 58 m (190 ft), and lengths of 1,067 m (3,500 ft). They are nearly symmetrical to highly asymmetrical in cross section, with width-to-height ratios of 45:1 to 400:1, and most are oriented parallel with the mountain front. The bedrock consists of Mesozoic sedimentary formations having dip angles of 30 degrees to vertical to overturned. Mixed claystone-siltstone bedding sequences up to 36-m (118-ft) thick are common in the heave-prone areas, and interbeds of bentonite, limestone, or sandstone may be present. Highly fractured zones of weathered to variably weathered claystone extend to depths of 19.5 to 22.3 m (64 to 73 ft). Fracture spacings are 0.1 to 0.2 m (0.3 to 0.7 ft) in the weathered and variably weathered bedrock and up to 0.75 m (2.5 ft) in the underlying, unweathered bedrock. Curvilinear shear planes in the weathered claystone show thrust or reverse offsets up to 1.2 m (3.9 ft). Three associations between heave-feature morphologies and the geological framework are recognized: (1) Linear, symmetrical to asymmetrical heaves are associated with primary bedding composition changes. (2) Linear, highly asymmetrical heaves are associated with shear planes along bedding. (3) Curvi-linear, highly asymmetrical heaves are associated with bedding-oblique shear planes.

  11. Cadomian tectonics in northern Brittany: a contribution of 3-D crustal-scale modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, J.-P.; Guennoc, P.; Truffert, C.; Vairon, J.; Armor Working Group Of The Geofrance 3-D Program

    2001-02-01

    Both available and newly acquired geological and geophysical data processed in the framework of the ARMOR project have been used to construct a 3-D geometric and geological model of the Cadomian domain of northern Brittany. The major results of the data processing are presented and discussed relative to a composite profile transecting the studied domain and constructed from the surface geology, reflection seismics, magnetotelluric soundings and gravimetric data. They are then extrapolated at regional scale through a series of cross-sections compiled from the surface geology and gravimetric data and calibrated onto the composite profile. The 3-D crustal-scale models were computed according to two procedures. The first, using a STRIM Matra Datavision modeler, defines various interfaces through correlation between adjacent cross-sections and is well adapted to the 3-D representation of geological structures. The second, based on Voronoı̈ diagrams, leads to a volumetric model of the geological units and is a powerful tool for calculating 3-D geophysical responses of the model when the physical properties of the rock units are known. The tectonic implications of the computed 3-D crustal-scale geometry of the Cadomian domain are then discussed in terms of volcanic-arc thrusting, with special emphasis being placed on the obliquity of the shortening direction by reference to the thrust fault trend. Finally, the data are used to demonstrate the reactivation of some Cadomian faults during the deposition of Ordovician sandstones and following the emplacement of the Paleozoic dolerite dyke swarm of northern Brittany.

  12. Geologic framework, evolutionary history, and distribution of hydrocarbon in Jizhong depression

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Q.

    1983-03-01

    North China basin is a large Mesozoic to Cenozoic sedimentary basin in eastern China. A result of strong block-faulting activities, the inner part of the basin reveals the characteristics of multiple uplifts and depressions. Each depression is generally an independent exploration unit. The practice of exploration in recent years has proved the following: taking each depression as an individual unit, the basic geologic framework and evolutionary history are quickly determined. This is very important in order to achieve the best effects in petroleum exploration. Jizhong depression is located at the western part of the North China basin. This area is about 25,000 km/sup 2/ (9650 mi/sup 2/). Extensive seismic surveys and several hundred exploration wells have been completed during the past few years, resulting in the discovery of Renqiu and other oil fields. Taking the Jizhong depression as an example, the writer has considered the four following problems: Pre-Tertiary fault blocks and their distributional form, Some characteristics of block-faulting activities; Block-faulting in relation to the controlling of Tertiary sediments and structures; and the types of oil and/or gas pools. In the future, the exploration of the buried-hill gas or oil pools will continue. This should expedite the exploration for the other two types of oil or gas pools. In addition, we should pay much attention to exploration for Tertiary stratigraphic-lithologic oil or gas pools.

  13. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  14. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  15. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  16. New coordination polymers from 1D chain, 2D layer to 3D framework constructed from 1,2-phenylenediacetic acid and 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane flexible ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Lingyun; Liu Guangzhen; Wang Liya

    2011-06-15

    The hydrothermal reactions of Cd, Zn, or Cu(II) acetate salts with H{sub 2}PHDA and BPP flexible ligands afford three new coordination polymers, including [Cd(PHDA)(BPP)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}(1), [Zn(PHDA)(BPP)]{sub n}(2), and [Cu{sub 2}(PHDA){sub 2}(BPP)]{sub n}(3) (H{sub 2}PHDA=1,2-phenylenediacetic acid, BPP=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane). The single-crystal X-ray diffractions reveal that all three complexes feature various metal carboxylate subunits extended further by the BPP ligands to form a diverse range of structures, displaying a remarked structural sensitivity to metal(II) cation. Complex 1 containing PHDA-bridged binuclear cadmium generates 1D double-stranded chain, complex 2 results in 2D{yields}2D interpenetrated (4,4) grids, and complex 3 displays a 3D self-penetrated framework with 4{sup 8}6{sup 6}8 rob topology. In addition, fluorescent analyses show that both 1 and 2 exhibit intense blue-violet photoluminescence in the solid state. - Graphical Abstract: We show diverse supramolecular frameworks based on the same ligands (PHDA and BPP) and different metal acetate salts including 1D double-stranded chain, 2D {yields} 2D twofold interpenetrated layer, and 3D self-penetration networks. Highlights: > Three metal(II = 2 /* ROMAN ) coordination polymers were synthesized using H{sub 2}PHDA and BPP. > The diversity of structures show a remarked sensitivity to metal(II) center. > Complexes show the enhancement of fluorescence compared to that of free ligand.

  17. Yb{sub 5}Ni{sub 4}Sn{sub 10} and Yb{sub 7}Ni{sub 4}Sn{sub 13}: New polar intermetallics with 3D framework structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Xiaowu; Sun Zhongming; Li Longhua; Zhong Guohua; Hu Chunli; Mao Jianggao

    2010-04-15

    The title compounds have been obtained by solid state reactions of the corresponding pure elements at high temperature, and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Yb{sub 5}Ni{sub 4}Sn{sub 10} adopts the Sc{sub 5}Co{sub 4}Si{sub 10} structure type and crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/mbm (No. 127) with cell parameters of a=13.785(4) A, c=4.492 (2) A, V=853.7(5) A{sup 3}, and Z=2. Yb{sub 7}Ni{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} is isostructural with Yb{sub 7}Co{sub 4}InGe{sub 12} and crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/m (No. 83) with cell parameters of a=11.1429(6) A, c=4.5318(4) A, V=562.69(7) A{sup 3}, and Z=1. Both structures feature three-dimensional (3D) frameworks based on three different types of one-dimensional (1D) channels, which are occupied by the Yb atoms. Electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) indicate that both compounds are metallic. These results are in agreement with those from temperature-dependent resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. - Graphical abstract: Two new ytterbium nickel stannides, namely, Yb{sub 5}Ni{sub 4}Sn{sub 10} and Yb{sub 7}Ni{sub 4}Sn{sub 13}, have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Both their structures feature three-dimensional (3D) frameworks based on three different types of one-dimensional (1D) channels, which are situated by all the Yb atoms. Electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) indicate that both compounds are metallic, which are in accordance with the results from temperature-dependent resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  18. Temperature dependent structural variation from 2D supramolecular network to 3D interpenetrated metal–organic framework: In situ cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Ugale, Bharat; Singh, Divyendu; Nagaraja, C.M.

    2015-03-15

    Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds, [Zn(muco)(dbds){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (1) and [Zn(muco)(dbs)] (2) (where, muco=trans, trans-muconate dianion, dbds=4,4′-dipyridyldisulfide and dbs=4,4′-dipyridylsulfide) have been synthesized from same precursors but at two different temperatures. Both the compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and photoluminescence studies. Compound 1 prepared at room temperature possesses a molecular structure extended to 2D supramolecular network through (H–O…H) hydrogen-bonding interactions. Compound 2, obtained at high temperature (100 °C) shows a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework constituted by an in situ generated dbs linker by the cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds of dbds linker. Thus, the influence of reaction temperature on the formation of two structural phases has been demonstrated. Both 1 and 2 exhibit ligand based luminescence emission owing to n→π⁎ and π→π⁎ transitions and also high thermal stabilities. - Graphical abstract: The influence of temperature on the formation of two structural phases, a 2D supramolecular network and a 3D 3-fold interpenetrating framework has been demonstrated and their luminescence emission is measured. - Highlights: • Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds were synthesized by tuning reaction temperatures. • Temperature induced in situ generation of dbs linker has been observed. • The compounds exhibit high thermal stability and luminescence emission properties. • The effect of temperature on structure, dimension and topology has been presented.

  19. Advancements in 3D Structural Analysis of Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett; McNamara, David

    2013-06-23

    . Analysis of fault intersection density indicates that the highest density of structurally controlled permeability within the field lies in a narrow (10-to-10s of m) zone plunging moderately (~35°) to the NNW beneath Pleistocene tufa deposits. This zone of increased fracture density, which we interpret as the primary upflow zone, is controlled by the intersection of N-to-NNW striking normal faults and a WNW striking dextral fault zone and represents the most promising target for future drilling. Construction of a 3D geologic model involves integration of a variety of data into an internally consistent framework. A robust model allows for spatial comparison between the various types of data (structural, stratigraphic, geophysical, temperature, etc.) that are commonly used independently to site geothermal wells. Furthermore, highly detailed 3D geologic models provide the basis for additional quantitative analysis, including 3D fault slip and dilation tendency analysis and the precise location of structurally controlled permeability pathways. These analyses provide detailed information relating to the internal dynamics of geothermal systems and can mitigate the costs and risks of geothermal exploration and development by contributing to better well targeting and more accurate evaluations of resource potential.

  20. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow

  1. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  2. Investigations in massive 3D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayeel-Neto, Jose; Morais, Jefferson; Turcati, Rodrigo; Scatena, Eslley

    2011-05-15

    Some interesting gravitational properties of the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend model (massive 3D gravity), such as the presence of a short-range gravitational force in the nonrelativistic limit and the existence of an impact-parameter-dependent gravitational deflection angle, are studied. Interestingly enough, these phenomena have no counterpart in the usual Einstein 3D gravity. In order to better understand the two aforementioned gravitational properties, they are also analyzed in the framework of 3D higher-derivative gravity with the Einstein-Hilbert term with the 'wrong sign'.

  3. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  4. Framework for a U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Climate-Response Program in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Lent, Robert M.; Dudley, Robert W.; Schalk, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a framework for a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic climate-response program designed to provide early warning of changes in the seasonal water cycle of Maine. Climate-related hydrologic changes on Maine's rivers and lakes in the winter and spring during the last century are well documented, and several river and lake variables have been shown to be sensitive to air-temperature changes. Monitoring of relevant hydrologic data would provide important baseline information against which future climate change can be measured. The framework of the hydrologic climate-response program presented here consists of four major parts: (1) identifying homogeneous climate-response regions; (2) identifying hydrologic components and key variables of those components that would be included in a hydrologic climate-response data network - as an example, streamflow has been identified as a primary component, with a key variable of streamflow being winter-spring streamflow timing; the data network would be created by maintaining existing USGS data-collection stations and establishing new ones to fill data gaps; (3) regularly updating historical trends of hydrologic data network variables; and (4) establishing basins for process-based studies. Components proposed for inclusion in the hydrologic climate-response data network have at least one key variable for which substantial historical data are available. The proposed components are streamflow, lake ice, river ice, snowpack, and groundwater. The proposed key variables of each component have extensive historical data at multiple sites and are expected to be responsive to climate change in the next few decades. These variables are also important for human water use and (or) ecosystem function. Maine would be divided into seven climate-response regions that follow major river-basin boundaries (basins subdivided to hydrologic units with 8-digit codes or larger) and have relatively homogeneous climates. Key

  5. Framework for a U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Climate-Response Program in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Lent, Robert M.; Dudley, Robert W.; Schalk, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    It is important to monitor hydrologic systems in the United States that could change dramatically over the short term as a result of climate change. Many ecological effects of climate change can be understood only if hydrologic data networks are in place. Because of its humid, temperate climate and its substantial annual snowpack, Maine's seasonal water cycle is sensitive to air temperature changes (Hodgkins and others, 2003). Monitoring of relevant hydrologic data would provide important baseline information against which future climate change can be measured. A series of recent investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has documented changes in several components of the water cycle, including earlier snowmelt runoff in Maine during the last 30 to 40 years (Hodgkins and others, 2003), earlier lake- and river-ice breakups (Hodgkins and others, 2002; Hodgkins and others, 2005), and a denser and thinner late-winter snowpack (Hodgkins and Dudley, 2006). Snowmelt runoff timing was measured as the date, each year, by which half of the total winter-spring streamflow passed a streamflow-gaging station. Historical snowmelt runoff timing for the Piscataquis River in central Maine is shown in figure 1 as an example. Results of climate projections input to hydrologic models indicate that hydrologic trends, such as earlier spring snowmelt runoff, are expected to continue into the future (Hayhoe and others, 2007). These trends could affect species at the southern edge of their range in Maine, such as Atlantic salmon and Canada lynx, and may also affect availability of water for human use. This fact sheet describes the framework of a hydrologic climate-response program that would improve understanding of the effects of future climate change in Maine.

  6. Geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    By using data that were compiled and collected for this study and previous studies, a revised map was constructed depicting the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. The map also shows the interpreted structural dip directions and interpreted location of a structural low (trough) in the area known as the Knippa Gap.

  7. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  8. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  9. CO2 Dissolution Trapping: Can Geologic Framework Models be used to Capture such Storage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtner, P. C.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    hand, fingering/dissolution is not apparent in the high-variance FHM because strong heterogeneity contributes to enhanced lateral flow, which leads to reduced dissolution fingering and less total aqueous CO2 storage. As a result of the reduced fingering, it takes longer for the supercritical CO2 phase to dissolve into the brine, or less dissolution is predicted by this model per unit time. Clearly, whether the geologic framework models, which are widely used for large- to regional-scale CO2 modeling, can accurately capture dissolution storage depends strongly on the reservoir permeability variability. To further screen for the factors which can exert significant influence on CO2 storage predictions over increasingly longer time scales, the computationally efficient design of experiments (DoE) sensitivity methodology is adopted. For the low ln(k) variance system, a set of preliminary DoE analysis suggests that at all time scales, brine salinity has the most important impact on the prediction of the dissolved CO2. Research is ongoing exploring the high variance system as well as in developing DoE-based proxy models to estimate uncertainties of different prediction outcomes. Reference: [1] PFLOTRAN, http://ees.lanl.gov/pflotran/

  10. Exploring the "what if?" in geology through a RESTful open-source framework for cloud-based simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, Jens; Robertson, Jess

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal extent of geological phenomena makes experiments in geology difficult to conduct, if not entirely impossible and collection of data is laborious and expensive - so expensive that most of the time we cannot test a hypothesis. The aim, in many cases, is to gather enough data to build a predictive geological model. Even in a mine, where data are abundant, a model remains incomplete because the information at the level of a blasting block is two orders of magnitude larger than the sample from a drill core, and we have to take measurement errors into account. So, what confidence can we have in a model based on sparse data, uncertainties and measurement error? Our framework consist of two layers: (a) a ground-truth layer that contains geological models, which can be statistically based on historical operations data, and (b) a network of RESTful synthetic sensor microservices which can query the ground-truth for underlying properties and produce a simulated measurement to a control layer, which could be a database or LIMS, a machine learner or a companies' existing data infrastructure. Ground truth data are generated by an implicit geological model which serves as a host for nested models of geological processes as smaller scales. Our two layers are implemented using Flask and Gunicorn, which are open source Python web application framework and server, the PyData stack (numpy, scipy etc) and Rabbit MQ (an open-source queuing library). Sensor data is encoded using a JSON-LD version of the SensorML and Observations and Measurements standards. Containerisation of the synthetic sensors using Docker and CoreOS allows rapid and scalable deployment of large numbers of sensors, as well as sensor discovery to form a self-organized dynamic network of sensors. Real-time simulation of data sources can be used to investigate crucial questions such as the potential information gain from future sensing capabilities, or from new sampling strategies, or the

  11. Deep time framework: A preliminary study of U.K. primary teachers' conceptions of geological time and perceptions of geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trend, Roger David

    2001-02-01

    As part of a continuing research program on the understanding of geological time (deep time) across society, a total of 51 in-service teachers of 7- to 11-year-old children was studied in relation to their orientations toward geoscience phenomena in general and deep time in particular. The first purpose of the research was to identify the nature of idiosyncratic conceptions of deep time: a cognitive deep time framework of pivotal geo-events. The second was to propose a curricular Deep Time Framework that may form the basis for constructivist approaches to in-service and pre-service teacher training which places deep time center stage. Three research questions were posed, addressing: (1) perceptions of geoscience phenomena and teachers' actual encounters with these in the classroom; (2) conceptions of deep time; and (3) approaches to teaching two curriculum areas (history and geology) which involve the interpretation of material evidence to reconstruct the past. Results enable the selection of 20 geoscience phenomena to be located in relation to teachers' interests and classroom encounters, those of high interest and high encounters being proposed as pivotal areas for further attention in teacher training. Results also reveal that in-service teachers conceive events in the geological past (geo-events) as having occurred in three distinct clusters: extremely ancient; moderately ancient; and less ancient. Within each category there is a strong lack of consensus on time-of-occurrence. Results suggest that primary teachers exhibit greater imagination in their teaching of history compared with geology and that aspects of deep time and past environments are not perceived as being of any great significance in the interpretation of geological specimens.

  12. 3D facial expression modeling for recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Jain, Anil K.; Dass, Sarat C.

    2005-03-01

    Current two-dimensional image based face recognition systems encounter difficulties with large variations in facial appearance due to the pose, illumination and expression changes. Utilizing 3D information of human faces is promising for handling the pose and lighting variations. While the 3D shape of a face does not change due to head pose (rigid) and lighting changes, it is not invariant to the non-rigid facial movement and evolution, such as expressions and aging effect. We propose a facial surface matching framework to match multiview facial scans to a 3D face model, where the (non-rigid) expression deformation is explicitly modeled for each subject, resulting in a person-specific deformation model. The thin plate spline (TPS) is applied to model the deformation based on the facial landmarks. The deformation is applied to the 3D neutral expression face model to synthesize the corresponding expression. Both the neutral and the synthesized 3D surface models are used to match a test scan. The surface registration and matching between a test scan and a 3D model are achieved by a modified Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the proposed expression modeling and recognition-by-synthesis schemes improve the 3D matching accuracy.

  13. Solvothermal synthesis of a new 3-D mixed-metal sulfide framework, (H1.33tren)[In2.67Sb1.33S8]·tren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampkin, John D.; Powell, Anthony V.; Chippindale, Ann M.

    2016-11-01

    A new indium(III) antimony(V) sulfide, (H1.33tren)[In2.67Sb1.33S8]·tren, has been prepared solvothermally at 433 K. The compound crystallises in the tetragonal space group I-42d (lattice parameters, a=12.6248(5) and c=19.4387(18) Å at 150 K) and contains adamantane-like T2 supertetrahedral units comprised of corner-sharing InS45- and SbS43- tetrahedra. The adamantane-like units are then linked through sulfur vertices to generate an open, 3-D framework structure containing large pores in which neutral, protonated tren (tris(2-aminoethylene)amine) molecules reside. The presence of the organic components was confirmed by solid-state 13C NMR (10 kHz), combustion and thermogravimetric analysis. The band gap, obtained from UV-vis diffuse reflectance measurements, is 2.7(2) eV. Stirring with either water or alkali-metal salt solution leads to removal of the neutral tren molecules and an ~9% reduction in unit-cell volume on formation of (H1.33tren)[In2.67Sb1.33S8]·(H2O)4.

  14. Screening and ranking framework (SRF) for geologic CO2 storagesite selection on the basis of HSE risk

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-11-27

    A screening and ranking framework (SRF) has been developedto evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites on thebasis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk arising from CO2leakage. The approach is based on the assumption that CO2 leakage risk isdependent on three basic characteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site:(1) the potential for primary containment by the target formation; (2)the potential for secondary containment if the primary formation leaks;and (3) the potential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 ifthe primary formation leaks and secondary containment fails. Theframework is implemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numericalscores representing expert opinions or published information along withestimates of uncertainty. Applications to three sites in Californiademonstrate the approach. Refinements and extensions are possible throughthe use of more detailed data or model results in place of propertyproxies.

  15. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  17. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. Airborne Geophysical Surveys Illuminate the Geologic and Hydrothermal Framework of the Pilgrim Springs Geothermal Area, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Bedrosian, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    An airborne magnetic and frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) survey of the Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located on the Seward Peninsula in west-central Alaska, delineates key structures controlling hydrothermal fluid flow. Hot springs, nearby thawed regions, and high lake temperatures are indicative of high heat flow in the region that is thought to be related to recent volcanism. By providing a region-wide geologic and geophysical framework, this work will provide informed decisions regarding drill-site planning and further our understanding of geothermal systems in active extensional basins. Helicopter magnetic and EM data were acquired using a Fugro RESOLVE system equipped with a high sensitivity cesium magnetometer and a multi-coil, multi-frequency EM system sensitive to the frequency range of 400-140,000 Hz. The survey was flown ~40 m above ground along flight lines spaced 0.2-0.4 km apart. Various derivative and filtering methods, including maximum horizontal gradient of the pseudogravity transformation of the magnetic data, are used to locate faults, contacts, and structural domains. A dominant northwest trending anomaly pattern characterizes the northeastern portion of the survey area between Pilgrim Springs and Hen and Chickens Mountain and may reflect basement structures. The area south of the springs, however, is dominantly characterized by east-west trending, range-front-parallel anomalies likely caused by late Cenozoic structures associated with the north-south extension that formed the basin. Regionally, the springs are characterized by a magnetic high punctuated by several east-west trending magnetic lows, the most prominent occurring directly over the springs. The lows may result from demagnetization of magnetic material along range-front parallel features that dissect the basin. We inverted in-phase and quadrature EM data along each profile using the laterally-constrained inversion of Auken et al. (2005). Data were inverted for 20-layer

  19. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments--a framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models.

    PubMed

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A; Christensen, Britt S B; Clausen, Thomas; Dalgaard, Esben; Effersø, Flemming; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Gertz, Flemming; Hansen, Anne Lausten; He, Xin; Jacobsen, Brian H; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt; Koch, Julian; Nilsson, Bertel; Petersen, Christian; De Schepper, Guillaume; Schamper, Cyril; Sørensen, Kurt I; Therrien, Rene; Thirup, Christian; Viezzoli, Andrea

    2014-01-15

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30-50 m and 2m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  20. 3D seismic imaging, example of 3D area in the middle of Banat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antic, S.

    2009-04-01

    3D seismic imaging was carried out in the 3D seismic volume situated in the middle of Banat region in Serbia. The 3D area is about 300 km square. The aim of 3D investigation was defining geology structures and techtonics especially in Mesozoik complex. The investigation objects are located in depth from 2000 to 3000 m. There are number of wells in this area but they are not enough deep to help in the interpretation. It was necessary to get better seismic image in deeper area. Acquisition parameters were satisfactory (good quality of input parameters, length of input data was 5 s, fold was up to 4000 %) and preprocessed data was satisfied. GeoDepth is an integrated system for 3D velocity model building and for 3D seismic imaging. Input data for 3D seismic imaging consist of preprocessing data sorted to CMP gathers and RMS stacking velocity functions. Other type of input data are geological information derived from well data, time migrated images and time migrated maps. Workflow for this job was: loading and quality control the input data (CMP gathers and velocity), creating initial RMS Velocity Volume, PSTM, updating the RMS Velocity Volume, PSTM, building the Initial Interval Velocity Model, PSDM, updating the Interval Velocity Model, PSDM. In the first stage the attempt is to derive initial velocity model as simple as possible as.The higher frequency velocity changes are obtained in the updating stage. The next step, after running PSTM, is the time to depth conversion. After the model is built, we generate a 3D interval velocity volume and run 3D pre-stack depth migration. The main method for updating velocities is 3D tomography. The criteria used in velocity model determination are based on the flatness of pre-stack migrated gathers or the quality of the stacked image. The standard processing ended with poststack 3D time migration. Prestack depth migration is one of the powerful tool available to the interpretator to develop an accurate velocity model and get

  1. Photochemistry in a 3D metal-organic framework (MOF): monitoring intermediates and reactivity of the fac-to-mer photoisomerization of Re(diimine)(CO)3Cl incorporated in a MOF.

    PubMed

    Easun, Timothy L; Jia, Junhua; Calladine, James A; Blackmore, Danielle L; Stapleton, Christopher S; Vuong, Khuong Q; Champness, Neil R; George, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism and intermediates in the UV-light-initiated ligand rearrangement of fac-Re(diimine)(CO)3Cl to form the mer isomer, when incorporated into a 3D metal-organic framework (MOF), have been investigated. The structure hosting the rhenium diimine complex is a 3D network with the formula {Mn(DMF)2[LRe(CO)3Cl]}∞ (ReMn; DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), where the diimine ligand L, 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylate, acts as a strut of the MOF. The incorporation of ReMn into a KBr disk allows spatial distribution of the mer-isomer photoproduct in the disk to be mapped and spectroscopically characterized by both Fourier transform infrared and Raman microscopy. Photoisomerization has been monitored by IR spectroscopy and proceeds via dissociation of a CO to form more than one dicarbonyl intermediate. The dicarbonyl species are stable in the solid state at 200 K. The photodissociated CO ligand appears to be trapped within the crystal lattice and, upon warming above 200 K, readily recombines with the dicarbonyl intermediates to form both the fac-Re(diimine)(CO)3Cl starting material and the mer-Re(diimine)(CO)3Cl photoproduct. Experiments over a range of temperatures (265-285 K) allow estimates of the activation enthalpy of recombination for each process of ca. 16 (±6) kJ mol(-1) (mer formation) and 23 (±4) kJ mol(-1) (fac formation) within the MOF. We have compared the photochemistry of the ReMn MOF with a related alkane-soluble Re(dnb)(CO)3Cl complex (dnb = 4,4'-dinonyl-2,2'-bipyridine). Time-resolved IR measurements clearly show that, in an alkane solution, the photoinduced dicarbonyl species again recombines with CO to both re-form the fac-isomer starting material and form the mer-isomer photoproduct. Density functional theory calculations of the possible dicarbonyl species aids the assignment of the experimental data in that the ν(CO) IR bands of the CO loss intermediate are, as expected, shifted to lower energy when the metal is bound to DMF rather than to an

  2. Cu-PDC-bpa solid coordination frameworks (PDC=2,5-pyrindinedicarboxylate; bpa=1,2-DI(4-pyridil)ethane)): 2D and 3D structural flexibility producing a 3-c herringbone array next to ideal

    SciTech Connect

    Llano-Tomé, Francisco; Bazán, Begoña; Urtiaga, Miren-Karmele; Barandika, Gotzone; Antonia Señarís-Rodríguez, M.; and others

    2015-10-15

    Combination of polycarboxylate anions and dipyridyl ligands is an effective strategy to produce solid coordination frameworks (SCF) which are crystalline materials based on connections between metal ions through organic ligands. In this context, this work is focused on two novel Cu{sup II}-based SCFs exhibiting PDC (2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate) and bpa (1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane), being the first structures reported in literature containing both ligands. Chemical formula are [Cu{sub 2}[(PDC){sub 2}(bpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O·DMF (1), and [Cu{sub 2}(PDC){sub 2}(bpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·7H{sub 2}O (2), where DMF is dimethylformamide. Compounds 1 and 2 have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and dielectric measurements. The crystallographic analysis revealed that compounds 1 and 2 can be described as herringbone-type layers formed by helicoidal Cu-PDC-Cu chains connected through bpa ligands. Solvent molecules are crystallized between the layers, providing the inter-layer connections through hydrogen bonds. Differences between both compounds are attributable to the flexibility of bpa (in 2D) as well as to the 3D packing of the layers which is solvent dependent. This fact results in the fact that compound 2 is the most regular 3-c herringbone array reported so far. The structural dynamism of these networks is responsible for the crystalline to-amorphous to-crystalline (CAC) transformation from compound 1 to compound 2. Crystallochemical features for both compounds have also been studied and compared to similar 3-connected herringbone-arrays. - Graphical abstract: Cu-PDC-bpa 3-c herringbone arrays. - Highlights: • The most ideal herringbone array reported so far is a Cu-PDC-bpa SCF. • Conformational freedom of bpa results in 2D and 3D flexibility of the SCFs. • The flexibility of the SCFs is related to a phase transformation. • Dielectric

  3. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

  4. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, Peter D.; Corum, Margo D.

    2012-01-01

    The 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (Public Law 110–140) directs the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2) and to consult with other Federal and State agencies to locate the pertinent geological data needed for the assessment. The geologic sequestration of CO2 is one possible way to mitigate its effects on climate change. The methodology used for the national CO2 assessment (Open-File Report 2010-1127; http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1127/) is based on previous USGS probabilistic oil and gas assessment methodologies. The methodology is non-economic and intended to be used at regional to subbasinal scales. The operational unit of the assessment is a storage assessment unit (SAU), composed of a porous storage formation with fluid flow and an overlying sealing unit with low permeability. Assessments are conducted at the SAU level and are aggregated to basinal and regional results. This report identifies and contains geologic descriptions of SAUs in separate packages of sedimentary rocks within the assessed basin and focuses on the particular characteristics, specified in the methodology, that influence the potential CO2 storage resource in those SAUs. Specific descriptions of the SAU boundaries as well as their sealing and reservoir units are included. Properties for each SAU such as depth to top, gross thickness, net porous thickness, porosity, permeability, groundwater quality, and structural reservoir traps are provided to illustrate geologic factors critical to the assessment. Although assessment results are not contained in this report, the geologic information included here will be employed, as specified in the methodology, to calculate a statistical Monte Carlo-based distribution of potential storage space in the various SAUs. Figures in this report show SAU boundaries and cell maps of well penetrations through the sealing unit into the top of the storage

  5. Using the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) Framework to Explore Teachers' Perceptions of the Role of Technology in the Implementation of mCLASSRTM: Reading 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Melody Tyler

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study considers the perceptions of teachers from one rural county in North Carolina who implemented the program implementation of mCLASSRTM: Reading 3D. Reading 3D is an electronic early literacy assessment that is designed to assist teachers in planning appropriate literacy instruction based on student needs by offering immediate…

  6. A Risk-Based System Analysis Framework for Geological Carbon Sequestration.

    SciTech Connect

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Klotz, Richard

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to characterize existing carbon capture and sequestration technologies at a high level, develop an analytical framework to help assess the technologies, and implement the framework in a system dynamics model. The first year of this project succeeded in characterizing existing technologies to help focus the analysis on power plants. The assessment also helped determine which technologies are largely accepted by the carbon capture research community as relatively proven technologies, discuss the salient performance metrics, and assess the associated economics. With this information, an analytical framework was developed to assess the technologies from a systems view perspective. With this framework, the Carbon Sequestration and Risk Model (CSR) was developed to assess performance and economic risk issues as they relate to global atmospheric CO2 concentration goals and single plant scale projects to characterize the economics of these systems.

  7. Cu-PDC-bpa solid coordination frameworks (PDC=2,5-pyrindinedicarboxylate; bpa=1,2-DI(4-pyridil)ethane)): 2D and 3D structural flexibility producing a 3-c herringbone array next to ideal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llano-Tomé, Francisco; Bazán, Begoña; Urtiaga, Miren-Karmele; Barandika, Gotzone; Antonia Señarís-Rodríguez, M.; Sánchez-Andújar, Manuel; Arriortua, María-Isabel

    2015-10-01

    Combination of polycarboxylate anions and dipyridyl ligands is an effective strategy to produce solid coordination frameworks (SCF) which are crystalline materials based on connections between metal ions through organic ligands. In this context, this work is focused on two novel CuII-based SCFs exhibiting PDC (2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate) and bpa (1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane), being the first structures reported in literature containing both ligands. Chemical formula are [Cu2[(PDC)2(bpa)(H2O)2]·3H2O·DMF (1), and [Cu2(PDC)2(bpa)(H2O)2]·7H2O (2), where DMF is dimethylformamide. Compounds 1 and 2 have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and dielectric measurements. The crystallographic analysis revealed that compounds 1 and 2 can be described as herringbone-type layers formed by helicoidal Cu-PDC-Cu chains connected through bpa ligands. Solvent molecules are crystallized between the layers, providing the inter-layer connections through hydrogen bonds. Differences between both compounds are attributable to the flexibility of bpa (in 2D) as well as to the 3D packing of the layers which is solvent dependent. This fact results in the fact that compound 2 is the most regular 3-c herringbone array reported so far. The structural dynamism of these networks is responsible for the crystalline to-amorphous to-crystalline (CAC) transformation from compound 1 to compound 2. Crystallochemical features for both compounds have also been studied and compared to similar 3-connected herringbone-arrays.

  8. Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Professional Paper 1708 is intended primarily for geoscientists in academia, industry, and government who are interested in Appalachian basin geology and its coal and petroleum resources. Other users, however, may find the topics, papers, and digital images valuable for land-use and policy planning. Among the anticipated benefits of the report are improvements in (1) resource assessment estimates and methodology, (2) exploration strategies, (3) basin models, and (4) energy use policies.

  9. Geologic framework of the regional ground-water flow system in the Upper Deschutes Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lite, Kenneth E.; Gannett, Marshall W.

    2002-12-10

    Geologic units in the Deschutes Basin were divided into several distinct hydrogeologic units. In some instances the units correspond to existing stratigraphic divisions. In other instances, hydrogeologic units correspond to different facies within a single stratigraphic unit or formation. The hydrogeologic units include Quaternary sediment, deposits of the Cascade Range and Newberry Volcano, four zones within the Deschutes Formation and age-equivalent rocks that roughly correspond with depositional environments, and pre-Deschutes-age strata.

  10. Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States - Climatic and Geologic Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Harrill, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water recharge in the arid and semiarid southwestern United States results from the complex interplay of climate, geology, and vegetation across widely ranging spatial and temporal scales. Present-day recharge tends to be narrowly focused in time and space. Widespread water-table declines accompanied agricultural development during the twentieth century, demonstrating that sustainable ground-water supplies are not guaranteed when part of the extracted resource represents paleorecharge. Climatic controls on ground-water recharge range from seasonal cycles of summer monsoonal and winter frontal storms to multimillennial cycles of glacial and interglacial periods. Precipitation patterns reflect global-scale interactions among the oceans, atmosphere, and continents. Large-scale climatic influences associated with El Ni?o and Pacific Decadal Oscillations strongly but irregularly control weather in the study area, so that year-to-year variations in precipitation and ground-water recharge are large and difficult to predict. Proxy data indicate geologically recent periods of multidecadal droughts unlike any in the modern instrumental record. Anthropogenically induced climate change likely will reduce ground-water recharge through diminished snowpack at higher elevations, and perhaps through increased drought. Future changes in El Ni?o and monsoonal patterns, both crucial to precipitation in the study area, are highly uncertain in current models. Land-use modifications influence ground-water recharge directly through vegetation, irrigation, and impermeable area, and indirectly through climate change. High ranges bounding the study area?the San Bernadino Mountains and Sierra Nevada to the west, and the Wasatch and southern Colorado Rocky Mountains to the east?provide external geologic controls on ground-water recharge. Internal geologic controls stem from tectonic processes that led to numerous, variably connected alluvial-filled basins, exposure of extensive

  11. Integrating visible light 3D scanning into the everyday world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    Visible light 3D scanning offers the potential to non-invasively and nearly non-perceptibly incorporate 3D imaging into the everyday world. This paper considers the various possible uses of visible light 3D scanning technology. It discusses multiple possible usage scenarios including in hospitals, security perimeter settings and retail environments. The paper presents a framework for assessing the efficacy of visible light 3D scanning for a given application (and compares this to other scanning approaches such as those using blue light or lasers). It also discusses ethical and legal considerations relevant to real-world use and concludes by presenting a decision making framework.

  12. Ice cover, landscape setting, and geological framework of Lake Vostok, East Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Studinger, M.; Bell, R.E.; Karner, G.D.; Tikku, A.A.; Holt, J.W.; Morse, D.L.; David, L.; Richter, T.G.; Kempf, S.D.; Peters, M.E.; Blankenship, D.D.; Sweeney, R.E.; Rystrom, V.L.

    2003-01-01

    Lake Vostok, located beneath more than 4 km of ice in the middle of East Antarctica, is a unique subglacial habitat and may contain microorganisms with distinct adaptations to such an extreme environment. Melting and freezing at the base of the ice sheet, which slowly flows across the lake, controls the flux of water, biota and sediment particles through the lake. The influx of thermal energy, however, is limited to contributions from below. Thus the geological origin of Lake Vostok is a critical boundary condition for the subglacial ecosystem. We present the first comprehensive maps of ice surface, ice thickness and subglacial topography around Lake Vostok. The ice flow across the lake and the landscape setting are closely linked to the geological origin of Lake Vostok. Our data show that Lake Vostok is located along a major geological boundary. Magnetic and gravity data are distinct east and west of the lake, as is the roughness of the subglacial topography. The physiographic setting of the lake has important consequences for the ice flow and thus the melting and freezing pattern and the lake's circulation. Lake Vostok is a tectonically controlled subglacial lake. The tectonic processes provided the space for a unique habitat and recent minor tectonic activity could have the potential to introduce small, but significant amounts of thermal energy into the lake. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recognition of the geologic framework of porphyry deposits on ERTS-1 imagery. [copper/molybdenum porphyrys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Three major tectonic provinces have been mapped by geologic photointerpretation of ERTS-1 imagery over the Ok Tedi test site. These areas can be characterized as follows: (1) A broad area of low relief and mature topography suggesting a history of relative tectonic stability. (2) A narrow belt of moderate to high relief, broad open folds and prominent linear features. The Mount Fubilan-type porphyry copper deposits and recent volcanic effusive centers occur in this province. (3) A heterogeneous zone of high relief and high drainage density suggestive of relative structural complexity.

  14. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the

  15. NoSQL Based 3D City Model Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, B.; Harrie, L.; Cao, J.; Wu, Z.; Shen, J.

    2014-04-01

    To manage increasingly complicated 3D city models, a framework based on NoSQL database is proposed in this paper. The framework supports import and export of 3D city model according to international standards such as CityGML, KML/COLLADA and X3D. We also suggest and implement 3D model analysis and visualization in the framework. For city model analysis, 3D geometry data and semantic information (such as name, height, area, price and so on) are stored and processed separately. We use a Map-Reduce method to deal with the 3D geometry data since it is more complex, while the semantic analysis is mainly based on database query operation. For visualization, a multiple 3D city representation structure CityTree is implemented within the framework to support dynamic LODs based on user viewpoint. Also, the proposed framework is easily extensible and supports geoindexes to speed up the querying. Our experimental results show that the proposed 3D city management system can efficiently fulfil the analysis and visualization requirements.

  16. 3D dynamic roadmapping for abdominal catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Frederik; Groher, Martin; Khamene, Ali; Wein, Wolfgang; Heibel, Tim Hauke; Navab, Nassir

    2008-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in interventional imaging, the navigation of a guide wire through abdominal vasculature remains, not only for novice radiologists, a difficult task. Since this navigation is mostly based on 2D fluoroscopic image sequences from one view, the process is slowed down significantly due to missing depth information and patient motion. We propose a novel approach for 3D dynamic roadmapping in deformable regions by predicting the location of the guide wire tip in a 3D vessel model from the tip's 2D location, respiratory motion analysis, and view geometry. In a first step, the method compensates for the apparent respiratory motion in 2D space before backprojecting the 2D guide wire tip into three dimensional space, using a given projection matrix. To countervail the error connected to the projection parameters and the motion compensation, as well as the ambiguity caused by vessel deformation, we establish a statistical framework, which computes a reliable estimate of the guide wire tip location within the 3D vessel model. With this 2D-to-3D transfer, the navigation can be performed from arbitrary viewing angles, disconnected from the static perspective view of the fluoroscopic sequence. Tests on a realistic breathing phantom and on synthetic data with a known ground truth clearly reveal the superiority of our approach compared to naive methods for 3D roadmapping. The concepts and information presented in this paper are based on research and are not commercially available. PMID:18982662

  17. A Life Cycle Cost Analysis Framework for Geologic Storage of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, Anna S.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Borns, David James

    2009-09-01

    Large scale geostorage options for fuels including natural gas and petroleum offer substantial buffer capacity to meet or hedge against supply disruptions. This same notion may be applied to large scale hydrogen storage to meet industrial or transportation sector needs. This study develops an assessment tool to calculate the potential ‘gate-to-gate’ life cycle costs for large scale hydrogen geostorage options in salt caverns, and continues to develop modules for depleted oil/gas reservoirs and aquifers. The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in these types of storage to assess the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for this type of hydrogen storage. Understanding, and looking to quantify, the value of large-scale storage in a larger hydrogen supply and demand infrastructure may prove extremely beneficial for larger infrastructure modeling efforts when looking to identify the most efficient means to fuel a hydrogen demand (e.g., industrial or transportation-centric demand). Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale storage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S., the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO2 in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

  18. Three-dimensional geologic framework modeling of faulted hydrostratigraphic units within the Edwards Aquifer, Northern Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pantea, Michael P.; Cole, James C.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a digital, three-dimensional faulted hydrostratigraphic model constructed to represent the geologic framework of the Edwards aquifer system in the area of San Antonio, northern Bexar County, Texas. The model is based on mapped geologic relationships that reflect the complex structures of the Balcones fault zone, detailed lithologic descriptions and interpretations of about 40 principal wells (and qualified data from numerous other wells), and a conceptual model of the gross geometry of the Edwards Group units derived from prior interpretations of depositional environments and paleogeography. The digital model depicts the complicated intersections of numerous major and minor faults in the subsurface, as well as their individual and collective impacts on the continuity of the aquifer-forming units of the Edwards Group and the Georgetown Formation. The model allows for detailed examination of the extent of fault dislocation from place to place, and thus the extent to which the effective cross-sectional area of the aquifer is reduced by faulting. The model also depicts the internal hydrostratigraphic subdivisions of the Edwards aquifer, consisting of three major and eight subsidiary hydrogeologic units. This geologic framework model is useful for visualizing the geologic structures within the Balcones fault zone and the interactions of en-echelon fault strands and flexed connecting fault-relay ramps. The model also aids in visualizing the lateral connections between hydrostratigraphic units of relatively high and low permeability across the fault strands. Introduction The Edwards aquifer is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, industrial, and military uses by nearly 1.5 million inhabitants of the greater San Antonio, Texas, region (Hovorka and others, 1996; Sharp and Banner, 1997). Discharges from the Edwards aquifer also support local recreation and tourism industries at Barton, Comal, and San Marcos Springs located

  19. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-09-30

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development.

  20. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-01-01

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development. PMID:24079529

  1. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  2. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  3. A 2D driven 3D vessel segmentation algorithm for 3D digital subtraction angiography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, M.; Redel, T.; Struffert, T.; Hornegger, J.; Doerfler, A.

    2011-10-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in western industrial nations. 3D rotational angiography delivers indispensable information on vessel morphology and pathology. Physicians make use of this to analyze vessel geometry in detail, i.e. vessel diameters, location and size of aneurysms, to come up with a clinical decision. 3D segmentation is a crucial step in this pipeline. Although a lot of different methods are available nowadays, all of them lack a method to validate the results for the individual patient. Therefore, we propose a novel 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-driven 3D vessel segmentation and validation framework. 2D DSA projections are clinically considered as gold standard when it comes to measurements of vessel diameter or the neck size of aneurysms. An ellipsoid vessel model is applied to deliver the initial 3D segmentation. To assess the accuracy of the 3D vessel segmentation, its forward projections are iteratively overlaid with the corresponding 2D DSA projections. Local vessel discrepancies are modeled by a global 2D/3D optimization function to adjust the 3D vessel segmentation toward the 2D vessel contours. Our framework has been evaluated on phantom data as well as on ten patient datasets. Three 2D DSA projections from varying viewing angles have been used for each dataset. The novel 2D driven 3D vessel segmentation approach shows superior results against state-of-the-art segmentations like region growing, i.e. an improvement of 7.2% points in precision and 5.8% points for the Dice coefficient. This method opens up future clinical applications requiring the greatest vessel accuracy, e.g. computational fluid dynamic modeling.

  4. 3D cartography of the Alpine Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vouillamoz, N.; Sue, C.; Champagnac, J. D.; Calcagno, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present a 3D cartography of the alpine arc, a highly non-cylindrical mountain belt, built using the 3D GeoModeller of the BRGM (French geological survey). The model allows to handle the large-scale 3D structure of seventeen major crustal units of the belt (from the lower crust to the sedimentary cover nappes), and two main discontinuities (the Insubric line and the Crustal Penninic Front). It provides a unique document to better understand their structural relationships and to produce new sections. The study area comprises the western alpine arc, from the Jura to the Northwest, up to the Bergell granite intrusion and the Lepontine Dome to the East, and is limited to the South by the Ligurian basin. The model is limited vertically 10 km above sea level at the top, and the moho interface at the bottom. We discarded the structural relationships between the Alps sensus stricto and the surrounding geodynamic systems such as the Rhine graben or the connection with the Apennines. The 3D-model is based on the global integration of various data such as the DEM of the Alps, the moho isobaths, the simplified geological and tectonic maps of the belt, the crustal cross-sections ECORS-CROP and NFP-20, and complementary cross-sections specifically built to precise local complexities. The database has first been integrated in a GIS-project to prepare their implementation in the GeoModeller, by homogenizing the different spatial referencing systems. The global model is finally interpolated from all these data, using the potential field method. The final document is a new tri-dimentional cartography that would be used as input for further alpine studies.

  5. Transient Electromagnetic Study of the Geologic Framework, Upper San Pedro Basin, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, M. W.; Gray, F.; Flemming, J. B.; Callegary, J.; Kleinkopf, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    The San Pedro River flows north from near Cananea, Mexico into the U.S. and ends at its confluence with the Gila River in Arizona. The river supports a riparian habitat that is important for its biological diversity and is the most significant flyway for migrating birds in southwest North America. Nearby communities in Arizona and Mexico are pumping groundwater from basin fill in the San Pedro valley and there is much concern about the effects of this pumping on the baseflow of the San Pedro River. Local, State, and National agencies have been studying this issue from a wide variety of perspectives. To help address the problem, the U.S. Geological Survey has undertaken an integrative research effort utilizing geologic mapping, multiple geophysical techniques, and multi-spectral imaging to better understand the geology, geometry, structure and basin fill sediments in the San Pedro basin in Mexico. An existing aeromagnetic survey coupled with a natural source audio frequency magnetotelluric study indicates that the basin is less than 1km deep in most places and contains at least two sub-basins. These sub-basins are separated by a subsurface bedrock high that is well below the present water table. Also, several vertical electrical soundings, acquired by Grupo Mexico in the region, indicate that the central portion of the basin may contain several, potentially thick, sequences of clay. The transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey was designed to provide more information on the nature of the basin fill sediments and to provide a better estimate of the depth of the bedrock structural high. The TEM data was acquired with a Zonge ZeroTEM instrument at 104 locations with 150m per side square loops using approximately 3.6 amps of current at a base frequency of 16 Hz. The locations of the TEM stations, generally spaced 0.5km apart, were designed to obtain a conductivity-depth profile along approximately 30km of the San Pedro River in Mexico and at three locations perpendicular

  6. Geologic framework and Cenozoic evolution of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.F. Jr.; Spengler, R.W.; Myers, W.B.

    1990-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has been proposed as the site of a high-level nuclear waste repository. The purpose of this paper is to outline aspects of the geology and tectonics of the area which bear on its suitability as a waste repository. The repository is to be excavated from a non-lithophysal zone within the lower part of the Paintbrush Tuff. Revised estimates of the thickness of this zone indicate that the lower, down-dip extremity of the planned repository could be raised by as much as 130 m, thus reducing the grade within the repository and increasing the distance to the water table below. We note that because of the closely spaced fracturing and low in-situ stresses within the repository block, lateral support of fractured rock is likely to be poor. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  7. New Insights on the Geologic Framework of Alaska and Potential Targets of Opportunity for Future Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, K.; Trop, J. M.; Finzel, E.; Brennan, P. R.; Gilbert, H. J.; Flesch, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Studies the past decade have fundamentally changed our perspective on the Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic configuration of Alaska. New concepts include: 1) A link exists between Mesozoic collisional zones, Cenozoic strike-slip fault systems, and active deformation that is related to lithospheric heterogeneities that remain over geologic timescales. The location of the active Denali fault and high topography, for example, is within a Mesozoic collisional zone. Rheological differences between juxtaposed crustal blocks and crustal thickening in this zone have had a significant influence on deformation and exhumation in south-central Alaska. In general, the original configuration of the collisional zone appears to set the boundary conditions for long-term and active deformation. 2) Subduction of a spreading ridge has significantly modified the convergent margin of southern Alaska. Paleocene-Eocene ridge subduction resulted in surface uplift, unconformity development and changes in deposystems in the forearc region, and magmatism that extended from the paleotrench to the retroarc region. 3) Oligocene to Recent shallow subduction of an oceanic plateau has markedly reconfigured the upper plate of the southern Alaska convergent margin. This ongoing process has prompted growth of some of the largest mountain ranges on Earth, exhumation of the forearc and backarc regions above the subducted slab, development of a regional gap in arc magmatism above the subducted slab as well as slab-edge magmatism, and displacement on the Denali fault system. In the light of these new tectonic concepts for Alaska, we will discuss targets of opportunity for future integrated geologic and geophysical studies. These targets include regional strike-slip fault systems, the newly recognized Bering plate, and the role of spreading ridge and oceanic plateau subduction on the location and pace of exhumation, sedimentary basin development, and magmatism in the upper plate.

  8. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  9. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  10. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  11. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  12. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  13. 3D microscopy - new powerful tools in geomaterials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauko Pranjić, Alenka; Mladenovič, Ana; Turk, Janez; Šajna, Aljoša; Čretnik, Janko

    2016-04-01

    Microtomography (microCT) is becoming more and more widely recognized in geological sciences as a powerful tool for the spatial characterization of rock and other geological materials. Together with 3D image analysis and other complementary techniques, it has the characteristics of an innovative and non-destructive 3D microscopical technique. On the other hand its main disadvantages are low availability (only a few geological laboratories are equipped with high resolution tomographs), the relatively high prices of testing connected with the use of an xray source, technical limitations connected to the resolution and imaging of certain materials, as well as timeconsuming and complex 3D image analysis, necessary for quantification of 3D tomographic data sets. In this work three examples are presented of optimal 3D microscopy analysis of geomaterials in construction such as porosity characterization of impregnated sandstone, aerated concrete and marble prone to bowing. Studies include processes of microCT imaging, 3D data analysis and fitting of data with complementary analysis, such as confocal microscopy, mercury porosimetry, gas sorption, optical/fluorescent microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Present work has been done in the frame of national research project 3D and 4D microscopy development of new powerful tools in geosciences (ARRS J1-7148) funded by Slovenian Research Agency.

  14. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  15. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  16. Hydrogeologic Framework of the Upper Santa Cruz Basin (Arizona and Sonora) using Well Logs, Geologic Mapping, Gravity, Magnetics, and Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegary, J. B.; Page, W. R.; Megdal, S.; Gray, F.; Scott, C. A.; Berry, M.; Rangel, M.; Oroz Ramos, L.; Menges, C. M.; Jones, A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Congress passed the U.S.-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Act which provides a framework for study of aquifers shared by the United States and Mexico. The aquifer of the Upper Santa Cruz Basin was chosen as one of four priority aquifers for several reasons, including water scarcity, a population greater than 300,000, groundwater as the sole source of water for human use, and a riparian corridor that is of regional significance for migratory birds and other animals. Several new mines are also being proposed for this area which may affect water quality and availability. To date, a number of studies have been carried out by a binational team composed of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Mexican National Water Commission, and the Universities of Arizona and Sonora. Construction of a cross-border hydrogeologic framework model of the basin between Amado, Arizona and its southern boundary in Sonora is currently a high priority. The relatively narrow Santa Cruz valley is a structural basin that did not experience the same degree of late Cenozoic lateral extension and consequent deepening as found in other basin-and-range alluvial basins, such as the Tucson basin, where basin depth exceeds 3000 meters. This implies that storage may be much less than that found in other basin-and-range aquifers. To investigate the geometry of the basin and facies changes within the alluvium, a database of over one thousand well logs has been developed, geologic mapping and transient electromagnetic (TEM) surveys have been carried out, and information from previous electromagnetic, magnetic, and gravity studies is being incorporated into the hydrogeologic framework. Initial geophysical surveys and analyses have focused on the portion of the basin west of Nogales, Arizona, because it supplies approximately 50% of that city's water. Previous gravity and magnetic modeling indicate that this area is a narrow, fault-controlled half graben. Preliminary modeling of airborne

  17. A review of the geologic framework of the Long Island Sound Basin, with some observations relating to postglacial sedimentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Ralph S.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Most of the papers in this thematic section present regional perspectives that build on more than 100 years of geologic investigation in Long Island Sound. When viewed collectively, a common theme emerges in these works. The major geologic components of the Long Island Sound basin (bedrock, buried coastal-plain strata, recessional moraines, glacial-lake deposits, and the remains of a large marine delta) interact with the water body to affect the way the modern sedimentary system functions. Previous work, along with our present knowledge of the geologic framework of the Long Island Sound basin, is comprehensively reviewed with this theme in mind. Aspects of the crystalline bedrock, and the deltaic deposits associated with glacial Lake Connecticut, are examined with respect to their influence on sedimentation along the Connecticut coast and in the northern and western Sound. We also discuss the influence of the glacial drift that mantles the coastal-plain remnant along the north shore of Long Island and in the southern Sound. A total of approximately 22.7 billion m3 of marine sediment has accumulated in the Long Island Sound basin. A significant portion (44%) of the fine-grained marine section in the central and western basins was redistributed there from the eastern Sound, as tidal scour removed slightly over 5 billion m3 (5.3 X 1012 kg) of fine material from glacial lake and early-marine deposits east of the Connecticut River. The remainder of the estimated 1.2 X 1013 kg of fine-grained marine sediment that now resides in the central and western Sound can be accounted for by riverine input over the past 13.5 ka.

  18. Quaternary geomorphology and modern coastal development in response to an inherent geologic framework: An example from Charleston, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, M.S.; Gayes, P.T.; Kindinger, J.L.; Flocks, J.G.; Krantz, D.E.; Donovan, P.

    2005-01-01

    Coastal landscapes evolve over wide-ranging spatial and temporal scales in response to physical and biological pro-cesses that interact with a wide range of variables. To develop better predictive models for these dynamic areas, we must understand the influence of these variables on coastal morphologies and ultimately how they influence coastal processes. This study defines the influence of geologic framework variability on a classic mixed-energy coastline, and establishes four categorical scales of spatial and temporal influence on the coastal system. The near-surface, geologic framework was delineated using high-resolution seismic profiles, shallow vibracores, detailed geomorphic maps, historical shorelines, aerial photographs, and existing studies, and compared to the long- and short-term development of two coastal compartments near Charleston, South Carolina. Although it is clear that the imprint of a mixed-energy tidal and wave signal (basin-scale) dictates formation of drumstick barriers and that immediate responses to wave climate are dramatic, island size, position, and longer-term dynamics are influenced by a series of inherent, complex near-surface stratigraphic geometries. Major near-surface Tertiary geometries influence inlet placement and drainage development (island-scale) through multiple interglacial cycles and overall channel morphology (local-scale). During the modern marine transgression, the halo of ebb-tidal deltas greatly influence inlet region dynamics, while truncated beach ridges and exposed, differentially erodable Cenozoic deposits in the active system influence historical shoreline dynamics and active shoreface morphologies (blockscale). This study concludes that the mixed-energy imprint of wave and tide theories dominates general coastal morphology, but that underlying stratigraphic influences on the coast provide site-specific, long-standing imprints on coastal evolution.

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  1. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  2. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  3. Recognition of the geologic framework of porphyry deposits on ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Camp, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Preliminary analysis of a mosaic composing 20 individual ERTS-1 frames that covers most of Nevada and western Utah reveals both new and old structural features. Three separate provinces, the Basin and Range, the southern extension of the Columbia River Plateau volcanics, and the western edge of the Colorado Plateau are easily distinguishable. A west-northwest cross or transverse structural trend, the Las Vegas Shear zone, is present in the region running from the Sierra Nevada to Lake Mead. The Sevier, Hurricane and Grand Wash faults that define the Wasateh-Jerome structural zone, can be traced further on the ERTS-1 imagery than on existing tectonic maps. By use of a stereo viewer on the side-lap coverage of ERTS-1 imagery, it is possible in some instances to determine the direction of sedimentary beds, enabling anticlines and synclines to be mapped. Other geologic features, faults, direction of throw on faults, recent basalt flow contacts with older rhyolitic tuffs, volcanic cones, and subsidences can also be mapped.

  4. The Verdesca landslide in the Agri Valley (Basilicata, southern Italy): a new geological and geomorphological framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueguen, E.; Bentivenga, M.; Colaiacovo, R.; Margiotta, S.; Summa, V.; Adurno, I.

    2015-11-01

    A landslide, to the west of Montemurro (a small village in southern Italy), has recently caused damage to buildings and other infrastructure in an urbanized area; as a result the development of new economic activities has been prohibited. The landslide phenomenon started in the last century and has been studied since the 1990s using classical geotechnical methods; however the sliding body continues to move. This paper presents the results of a study carried out using field surveys, geognostic investigations and TDR (time domain reflectometry) measurements in order to reconstruct the stratigraphy of the sediments involved and to further understand the geological and geomorphological context of the slope. This study is part of a larger multidisciplinary project, the results of which will also be presented in this paper. The landslide (rotational slide in the upper sector, developing into a translational slide in the lower part) affects Quaternary continental clastic deposits resting on a bedrock formed by Tertiary siliciclastic sediments of the Gorgoglione Flysch. TDR measurements did not show any significant movement during the period monitored (January 2013-January 2014). Slip zone geometries were hypothesized using inclinometric measurements taken from previous studies, stratigraphic data and geomorphological interpretations of topographic scarps. Feedback from monitoring will confirm this hypothesis.

  5. The Verdesca landslide in the Agri Valley (Basilicata, southern Italy): a new geological and geomorphological framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueguen, E.; Bentivenga, M.; Colaiacovo, R.; Margiotta, S.; Summa, V.; Adurno, I.

    2015-03-01

    A landslide, to the west of Montemurro (a small village in Southern Italy), has recently caused damage to buildings and other infrastructures in an urbanized area, as a result the development of new economic activities has been prohibited. The landslide was discovered in the last century and has been studied since the 1990's using classical geotechnical methods, but the sliding body continues to move. In this paper, we will present the results of a study carried out using field surveys, geognostic investigations and TDR (Time Domain Reflectometry) measurements in order to reconstruct the stratigraphy of the sediments involved and to further understand the geological and geomorphological context of the slope. This study is part of a larger multidisciplinary project of which the results will also be presented in this paper. The landslide (rotational slide in the upper sector, developing into a translational slide in the lower part) affects Quaternary continental clastic deposits resting on a bedrock formed by Tertiary siliciclastic sediments of the Gorgoglione Flysch. TDR measurements did not show any significant movement during the period monitored (January 2013-January 2014). Slip zone geometries were hypothesized using inclinometric measurements taken from previous studies, stratigraphic data and geomorphological interpretations of topographic scarps. Feedback from monitoring will confirm this hypothesis.

  6. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  7. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Deliverable 2.5.4, Ferron Sandstone lithologic strip logs, Emergy & Sevier Counties, Utah: Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-12-08

    Strip logs for 491 wells were produced from a digital subsurface database of lithologic descriptions of the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale. This subsurface database covers wells from the parts of Emery and Sevier Counties in central Utah that occur between Ferron Creek on the north and Last Chance Creek on the south. The lithologic descriptions were imported into a logging software application designed for the display of stratigraphic data. Strip logs were produced at a scale of one inch equals 20 feet. The strip logs were created as part of a study by the Utah Geological Survey to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and qualitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir using the Ferron Sandstone as a surface analogue. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Geoscience/Engineering Reservoir Characterization Program.

  8. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Deliverable 1.4.4: Ferron Sandstone lithofacies and case-study areas, Emery and Sevier Counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-01-04

    The types of dominantly sandstone lithofacies that characterize the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone reservoir types were tentatively identified before the project began. These reservoir types were defined and mapped at the regional scale and are the subject of the detailed, highly focused case studies. The purpose of conducting detailed case-study analysis is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of fluvial-deltaic reservoirs which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be used for improved oil-field development in actual reservoirs world-wide. The resulting benefits and value may: (1) increase recoverable reserves by identifying untapped compartments created by reservoir heterogeneity, (2) reduce development costs by more efficiently siting infill drilling locations, (3) increase deliverability by exploiting the reservoir along optimal fluid-flow paths, (4) enhance the application of new technologies, such as horizontal drilling, by identifying optimal drilling directions to maximize fluid-flow, and (5) identify reservoir trends for field extension drilling. Various geologic studies of the Ferron Sandstone were reviewed to compile a list of locations and types of lithofacies in the Ferron Sandstone to be examined in greater detail as part of the subsequent case studies. Preliminary regional interpretations were also used to help select the type and location of lithofacies for case studies. Potential case-study sites were delineated during several reconnaissance field trips by the geologic team. Two case-study sites were selected for the project: Ivie Creek and Willow Springs Wash, in the central and southern parts respectively of the project study area. Results are discussed.

  9. Use of GIS and 3D Modeling for Development and Conceptualization of a Performance Assessment Model for Decommissioning of a Complex Site

    SciTech Connect

    Esh, D. W.; Gross, A. J.; Thaggard, M.

    2006-07-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and 3D geo-spatial modeling were employed to facilitate development and conceptualization of a performance assessment (PA) model that will be used to evaluate the health impacts of residual radioactivity at a former nuclear materials processing facility site in New York. Previous operations have resulted in a number of different sources of radiological contamination that must be assessed during site decommissioning. A performance assessment model is being developed to estimate radiological dose to potential receptors through the simulation of the release and transport of radionuclides, and exposure to residual contamination for hundreds to thousands of years in the future. A variety of inputs are required to parameterize the performance assessment model, such as: distance from the waste to surface water bodies, thickness of geologic units for saturated transport, saturated thickness of the geologic units, and spatial and temporal average of percent of waste that is saturated. GIS and 3D modeling are used to analyze and abstract aleatory uncertainty associated with the dimensionality of the geologic system into epistemic uncertainty for one- and two-dimensional process models for flow and transport of radionuclides. Three-dimensional geo-spatial modeling was used to develop the geologic framework and the geometrical representation of the residual contamination within the geologic framework. GIS was used in the initial development and parameterization of the transport pathways, to provide spatial context to the PA model, and to link it to the 3D geologic framework and contamination geometry models. Both the GIS and 3-D modeling were used to interpret the results of runs of the PA model. (authors)

  10. New geological framework for Western Amazonia (Brazil) and implications for biogeography and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fátima Rossetti, Dilce; Mann de Toledo, Peter; Góes, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    Although many of the current hypotheses to explain the origin and distribution of the Amazon biodiversity has been based directly or indirectly on geological data, the reconstruction of the geological history of the Amazon region is still inadequate to analyze its relationship with the biodiversity. This work has the main goal to characterize the sedimentary successions formed in the Brazilian Amazon in the Neogene-Quaternary discussing the evolution of the depositional systems through time and analyzing their main controlling mechanisms in order to fill up this gap. Radar image interpretation, sedimentological studies, and radiocarbon dating allowed the mapping of Plio-Pleistocene to Holocene units along the Solimões-Amazonas River, Brazil. This integrated work led to the characterization of five sedimentary successions overlying Miocene deposits of the Solimões/Pebas Formation, which include the following: Içá Formation (Plio-Pleistocene), deposits Q1 (37,400-43,700 14C yr B.P.), deposits Q2 (27,200 14C yr B.P.), deposits Q3 (6730-2480 14C yr B.P.), and deposits Q4 (280-130 14C yr B.P.). These deposits occur mostly to the west of Manaus, forming NW-SE elongated belts that are progressively younger from SW to NE, indicating a subsiding basin with a depocenter that migrated to the NE. The reconstruction of the depositional history is consistent with significant changes in the landscapes. Hence, the closure of a large lake system at the end of the Miocene gave rise to the development of a Plio-Pleistocene fluvial system. This was yet very distinct from the modern drainage, with shallow, energetic, highly migrating, braided to anastomosed channels having an overall northeast outlet. This fluvial system formed probably under climatic conditions relatively drier than today's. During the early Pleistocene, there was pronounced erosion, followed by a renewed depositional phase ca. 40,000 14C yr B.P., with the development of prograding lobes and/or crevasse splays

  11. Automatic 2D-to-3D image conversion using 3D examples from the internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, J.; Brown, G.; Wang, M.; Ishwar, P.; Wu, C.; Mukherjee, D.

    2012-03-01

    repository. While far from perfect, the presented results demonstrate that on-line repositories of 3D content can be used for effective 2D-to-3D image conversion. With the continuously increasing amount of 3D data on-line and with the rapidly growing computing power in the cloud, the proposed framework seems a promising alternative to operator-assisted 2D-to-3D conversion.

  12. Collaborative annotation of 3D crystallographic models.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J; Henderson, M; Khan, I

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AnnoCryst system-a tool that was designed to enable authenticated collaborators to share online discussions about 3D crystallographic structures through the asynchronous attachment, storage, and retrieval of annotations. Annotations are personal comments, interpretations, questions, assessments, or references that can be attached to files, data, digital objects, or Web pages. The AnnoCryst system enables annotations to be attached to 3D crystallographic models retrieved from either private local repositories (e.g., Fedora) or public online databases (e.g., Protein Data Bank or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database) via a Web browser. The system uses the Jmol plugin for viewing and manipulating the 3D crystal structures but extends Jmol by providing an additional interface through which annotations can be created, attached, stored, searched, browsed, and retrieved. The annotations are stored on a standardized Web annotation server (Annotea), which has been extended to support 3D macromolecular structures. Finally, the system is embedded within a security framework that is capable of authenticating users and restricting access only to trusted colleagues.

  13. 3d model for site effect assessment at Nice (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, E.; Courrioux, G.; Bourgine, B.; Bour, M.; Guillen, A.; Mouroux, P.; Devaux, E.; Duval, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    Assessment of lithologic site effects is based on an accurate knowledge of properties and geometry of superficial geological formations, i.e. ideally a 3D-4G subsurface model (Geology, Geomorphology, Geophysics, Geotechnics). Such a model has been achieved using a 3D geomodeler ("Geological Editor" developed at BRGM) that allows building 3D volumes of geological formations starting from drill-holes data, sections, and geological maps. This software uses a pseudo-stratigraphic pile in order to reproduce geological history and structural relationships (erosion, deposit). The interpolation is achieved through a 3D potential field. A geostatistical formulation allows to consider data points of a geological limit as equipotential, and sructural dips as gradient inputs for the 3D field interpolation. Then isosurfaces corresponding to each limit are combined using formation relationships to provide volumic models of geological formations. The first task was to identify the relevant geological formations underlying in Nice area. In a first approach Mesozoic bedrock, Pliocene bedrock, and Quaternary alluvial deposits have been distinguished considering their seismic properties. Then alluvions have been subdivided into 9 groups according to their lithology and granulometry. Modelling has been performed considering 2 major erosion surfaces, post-Mesozoic and post-Pliocene. The succession of Quaternary alluviums have been considered as "onlap deposits". Given adjacent lithologies contained in maps and drill holes, these relations lead to logical identification of the roof of formations to be interpolated. The distribution of modeled geological formations can be visualised in 3 dimensions or in 2D sections. Besides the visual interest of 3D representations, the model is first used to build a series of earth columns over a 50m/50m 2D grid. A statistical analysis allowed to identify 73 existing configurations in the Nice district area. Among these, only 15 configurations

  14. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  15. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  16. 3D Viewer Platform of Cloud Clustering Management System: Google Map 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sung-Ja; Lee, Gang-Soo

    The new management system of framework for cloud envrionemnt is needed by the platfrom of convergence according to computing environments of changes. A ISV and small business model is hard to adapt management system of platform which is offered from super business. This article suggest the clustering management system of cloud computing envirionments for ISV and a man of enterprise in small business model. It applies the 3D viewer adapt from map3D & earth of google. It is called 3DV_CCMS as expand the CCMS[1].

  17. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  18. Influence of fluvial processes on the quaternary geologic framework of the continental shelf, North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boss, S.K.; Hoffman, C.W.; Cooper, B.

    2002-01-01

    Digital, single-channel, high-resolution seismic reflection profiles were acquired from the insular continental shelf of North Carolina, USA along a data grid extending from Oregon Inlet northward 48 km to Duck, North Carolina and from the nearshore zone seaward approximately 28 km (total surveyed area= 1334 km2). These data were processed and interpreted to delineate principal reflecting horizons and develop a three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic framework for the continental shelf that was compared to stratigraphic data from the shoreward back-barrier (estuarine) and barrier island system. Six principal reflecting horizons (designated R0 through R5) were present within the upper 60 m of the shelf stratigraphic succession. Three-dimensional mapping of reflector R1 demonstrated its origin from fluvial incision of the continental shelf during an episode (or episodes) of lowered sea-level. Fluvial processes during development of reflector R1 were responsible for extensive reworking and re-deposition of sediment throughout most of the northern half of the study area. Five seismic stratigraphic units (designated S1 through S5) were tentatively correlated with depositional sequences previously identified from the North Carolina back-barrier (estuarine) and barrier island system. These five stratigraphic units span the Quaternary Period (S1 = early Holocene; S2 = 51-78 ka; S3 = 330-530 ka; S4 = 1.1-1.8 Ma; S5 = earliest Pleistocene). Unit S1 is composed of fine-grained fluvial/estuarine sediment that back-filled incised streams during early Holocene sea-level rise. The four other stratigraphic units (S2-S5) display tabular depositional geometries, low total relief, and thicken toward the east-southeast as their basal reflectors dip gently between 0.41 m km-1 (0.02??) and 0.54 m km-1 (0.03??). Knowledge of the three-dimensional subsurface stratigraphic architecture of the continental shelf enhances understanding of the development of shelf depositional successions and

  19. The 2012 Emilia earthquake in northern Italy: coseismic geological effects within a compressive tectonic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montone, P.; Alessio, G.; Alfonsi, L.; Brunori, C.; Burrato, P.; Casula, G.; Cinti, F. R.; Civico, R.; Colini, L.; Cucci, L.; De Martini, P. M.; Falcucci, E.; Galadini, F.; Gaudiosi, G.; Gori, S.; Mariucci, M.; Moro, M.; Nappi, R.; Nardi, A.; Nave, R.; Pantosti, D.; Patera, A.; Pesci, A.; Pignone, M.; Pinzi, S.; Pucci, S.; Vannoli, P.; Venuti, A.; Villani, F.

    2012-12-01

    On May 20 2012 a Ml 5.9 seismic event hit the Emilia Po Plain area (northern Italy) triggering an intense earthquake activity along a broad area of the Plain. Nine days later, on May 29 a Ml 5.8 event occurred roughly 10 km to the SW of the first main shock; these events caused 26 victims and several injured and damages. The aftershock area extended for more than 50 km, in WNW-ESE direction, including five major aftershocks with 5.1≤Ml≤5.3 and more than two thousands of minor events. In general, the seismic sequence was confined in the upper 10 km of depth (ISIDe, http://iside.rm.ingv.it/). The focal mechanisms calculated for the main events and also for several M>4.5 aftershocks are almost all consistent with a compression (P-axes) N-S oriented due to thrust fault mechanisms. The two nodal planes, both E-W oriented, show a 40° southward and 60-70° northward dipping plane (QRCMT, Quick Regional Moment Tensors, http://autorcmt.bo.ingv.it/quicks.html), connected with the compressional regime of the area. From a tectonic point of view, the active Apennine thrust fronts, buried under the Po Plain Plio-Quaternary sediments, locally consist of three N-verging arcs. The most external structures, the active Ferrara and Mirandola thrusts and folds are responsible for the Emilia Romagna 2012 earthquake sequence. Just after the 20th May seismic event, the EMERGEO Working Group was active in surveying the epicentral area searching for coseismic geological effects. The survey lasted one month, involving about thirty researchers and technicians of the INGV in field and aerial investigations. Simultaneously, a laboratory-working group gathered, organized and interpreted the observations, processing them in the EMERGEO Information System (siE), on a GIS environment. The most common coseismic effects are: 1) liquefactions related to overpressure of aquifers hosted in buried and confined sand layers, occurring both as single cones or through several aligned vents forming

  20. 3D stochastic inversion of magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipour, Pejman; Chouteau, Michel; Marcotte, Denis

    2011-04-01

    A stochastic inversion method based on a geostatistical approach is presented to recover 3D susceptibility models from magnetic data. The aim of applying geostatistics is to provide quantitative descriptions of natural variables distributed in space or in time and space. Cokriging, the method which is used in this paper, is a method of estimation that minimizes the theoretical estimation error variance by using auto- and cross-correlations of several variables. The covariances for total field, susceptibility and total field-susceptibility are estimated using the observed data. Then, the susceptibility is cokriged or simulated as the primary variable. In order to avoid the natural tendency of the estimated structure to lay near the surface, depth weighting is included in the cokriging system. The algorithm assumes there is no remanent magnetization and the observation data represent only induced magnetization effects. The method is applied on different synthetic models to demonstrate its suitability for 3D inversion of magnetic data. A case study using ground measurements of total field at the Perseverance mine (Quebec, Canada) is presented. The recovered 3D susceptibility model provides beneficial information that can be used to analyze the geology of massive sulfide for the domain under study.

  1. Fast 3D Focusing Inversion of Gravity Data Using Reweighted Regularized Lanczos Bidiagonalization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaie, Mohammad; Moradzadeh, Ali; Kalate, Ali Nejati; Aghajani, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Inversion of gravity data is one of the important steps in the interpretation of practical data. One of the most interesting geological frameworks for gravity