Science.gov

Sample records for 3d graphics applications

  1. Spidergl: a Graphics Library for 3d Web Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, M.; Corsini, M.; Scopigno, R.

    2011-09-01

    The recent introduction of the WebGL API for leveraging the power of 3D graphics accelerators within Web browsers opens the possibility to develop advanced graphics applications without the need for an ad-hoc plug-in. There are several contexts in which this new technology can be exploited to enhance user experience and data fruition, like e-commerce applications, games and, in particular, Cultural Heritage. In fact, it is now possible to use the Web platform to present a virtual reconstruction hypothesis of ancient pasts, to show detailed 3D models of artefacts of interests to a wide public, and to create virtual museums. We introduce SpiderGL, a JavaScript library for developing 3D graphics Web applications. SpiderGL provides data structures and algorithms to ease the use of WebGL, to define and manipulate shapes, to import 3D models in various formats, and to handle asynchronous data loading. We show the potential of this novel library with a number of demo applications and give details about its future uses in the context of Cultural Heritage applications.

  2. Design Application Translates 2-D Graphics to 3-D Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Fabric Images Inc., specializing in the printing and manufacturing of fabric tension architecture for the retail, museum, and exhibit/tradeshow communities, designed software to translate 2-D graphics for 3-D surfaces prior to print production. Fabric Images' fabric-flattening design process models a 3-D surface based on computer-aided design (CAD) specifications. The surface geometry of the model is used to form a 2-D template, similar to a flattening process developed by NASA's Glenn Research Center. This template or pattern is then applied in the development of a 2-D graphic layout. Benefits of this process include 11.5 percent time savings per project, less material wasted, and the ability to improve upon graphic techniques and offer new design services. Partners include Exhibitgroup/Giltspur (end-user client: TAC Air, a division of Truman Arnold Companies Inc.), Jack Morton Worldwide (end-user client: Nickelodeon), as well as 3D Exhibits Inc., and MG Design Associates Corp.

  3. Internet-based hardware/software co-design framework for embedded 3D graphics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chi-Tsai; Wang, Chun-Hao; Huang, Ing-Jer; Wong, Weng-Fai

    2011-12-01

    Advances in technology are making it possible to run three-dimensional (3D) graphics applications on embedded and handheld devices. In this article, we propose a hardware/software co-design environment for 3D graphics application development that includes the 3D graphics software, OpenGL ES application programming interface (API), device driver, and 3D graphics hardware simulators. We developed a 3D graphics system-on-a-chip (SoC) accelerator using transaction-level modeling (TLM). This gives software designers early access to the hardware even before it is ready. On the other hand, hardware designers also stand to gain from the more complex test benches made available in the software for verification. A unique aspect of our framework is that it allows hardware and software designers from geographically dispersed areas to cooperate and work on the same framework. Designs can be entered and executed from anywhere in the world without full access to the entire framework, which may include proprietary components. This results in controlled and secure transparency and reproducibility, granting leveled access to users of various roles.

  4. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  5. Introduction to 3D Graphics through Excel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a method of explaining the principles of 3D graphics through making a revolvable and sizable orthographic parallel projection of cuboid in Excel. No programming is used. The method was tried in fourteen 90 minute lessons with 181 participants, which were Informatics teachers, undergraduates of Applied Informatics and gymnasium…

  6. A Dynamic 3D Graphical Representation for RNA Structure Analysis and Its Application in Non-Coding RNA Classification

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Fang, Yiliang; Wang, Kejing; Zhu, Lijuan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    With the development of new technologies in transcriptome and epigenetics, RNAs have been identified to play more and more important roles in life processes. Consequently, various methods have been proposed to assess the biological functions of RNAs and thus classify them functionally, among which comparative study of RNA structures is perhaps the most important one. To measure the structural similarity of RNAs and classify them, we propose a novel three dimensional (3D) graphical representation of RNA secondary structure, in which an RNA secondary structure is first transformed into a characteristic sequence based on chemical property of nucleic acids; a dynamic 3D graph is then constructed for the characteristic sequence; and lastly a numerical characterization of the 3D graph is used to represent the RNA secondary structure. We tested our algorithm on three datasets: (1) Dataset I consisting of nine RNA secondary structures of viruses, (2) Dataset II consisting of complex RNA secondary structures including pseudo-knots, and (3) Dataset III consisting of 18 non-coding RNA families. We also compare our method with other nine existing methods using Dataset II and III. The results demonstrate that our method is better than other methods in similarity measurement and classification of RNA secondary structures. PMID:27213271

  7. A Dynamic 3D Graphical Representation for RNA Structure Analysis and Its Application in Non-Coding RNA Classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Huang, Haiyun; Dong, Xiaoqing; Fang, Yiliang; Wang, Kejing; Zhu, Lijuan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Tao; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    With the development of new technologies in transcriptome and epigenetics, RNAs have been identified to play more and more important roles in life processes. Consequently, various methods have been proposed to assess the biological functions of RNAs and thus classify them functionally, among which comparative study of RNA structures is perhaps the most important one. To measure the structural similarity of RNAs and classify them, we propose a novel three dimensional (3D) graphical representation of RNA secondary structure, in which an RNA secondary structure is first transformed into a characteristic sequence based on chemical property of nucleic acids; a dynamic 3D graph is then constructed for the characteristic sequence; and lastly a numerical characterization of the 3D graph is used to represent the RNA secondary structure. We tested our algorithm on three datasets: (1) Dataset I consisting of nine RNA secondary structures of viruses, (2) Dataset II consisting of complex RNA secondary structures including pseudo-knots, and (3) Dataset III consisting of 18 non-coding RNA families. We also compare our method with other nine existing methods using Dataset II and III. The results demonstrate that our method is better than other methods in similarity measurement and classification of RNA secondary structures. PMID:27213271

  8. The Digital Space Shuttle, 3D Graphics, and Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Julian E.; Keller, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    The Digital Shuttle is a knowledge management project that seeks to define symbiotic relationships between 3D graphics and formal knowledge representations (ontologies). 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content, in 2D and 3D CAD forms, and the capability to display systems knowledge. Because the data is so heterogeneous, and the interrelated data structures are complex, 3D graphics combined with ontologies provides mechanisms for navigating the data and visualizing relationships.

  9. Distributed 3D Information Visualization - Towards Integration of the Dynamic 3D Graphics and Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucinic, Dean; Deen, Danny; Oanta, Emil; Batarilo, Zvonimir; Lacor, Chris

    This paper focuses on visualization and manipulation of graphical content in distributed network environments. The developed graphical middleware and 3D desktop prototypes were specialized for situational awareness. This research was done in the LArge Scale COllaborative decision support Technology (LASCOT) project, which explored and combined software technologies to support human-centred decision support system for crisis management (earthquake, tsunami, flooding, airplane or oil-tanker incidents, chemical, radio-active or other pollutants spreading, etc.). The performed state-of-the-art review did not identify any publicly available large scale distributed application of this kind. Existing proprietary solutions rely on the conventional technologies and 2D representations. Our challenge was to apply the "latest" available technologies, such Java3D, X3D and SOAP, compatible with average computer graphics hardware. The selected technologies are integrated and we demonstrate: the flow of data, which originates from heterogeneous data sources; interoperability across different operating systems and 3D visual representations to enhance the end-users interactions.

  10. 3D Graphics Through the Internet: A "Shoot-Out"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    3D graphics through the Internet needs to move beyond the current lowest common denominator of pre-computed movies, which consume bandwidth and are non-interactive. Panelists will demonstrate and compare 3D graphical tools for accessing, analyzing, and collaborating on information through the Internet and World-wide web. The "shoot-out" will illustrate which tools are likely to be the best for the various types of information, including dynamic scientific data, 3-D objects, and virtual environments. The goal of the panel is to encourage more effective use of the Internet by encouraging suppliers and users of information to adopt the next generation of graphical tools.

  11. DspaceOgre 3D Graphics Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Myin, Steven; Pomerantz, Marc I.

    2011-01-01

    This general-purpose 3D graphics visualization C++ tool is designed for visualization of simulation and analysis data for articulated mechanisms. Examples of such systems are vehicles, robotic arms, biomechanics models, and biomolecular structures. DspaceOgre builds upon the open-source Ogre3D graphics visualization library. It provides additional classes to support the management of complex scenes involving multiple viewpoints and different scene groups, and can be used as a remote graphics server. This software provides improved support for adding programs at the graphics processing unit (GPU) level for improved performance. It also improves upon the messaging interface it exposes for use as a visualization server.

  12. Evaluation of 3-D graphics software: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Chasen, S. H.; Garner, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient 3-D geometry graphics software package which is suitable for advanced design studies was developed. The advanced design system is called GRADE--Graphics for Advanced Design. Efficiency and ease of use are gained by sacrificing flexibility in surface representation. The immediate options were either to continue development of GRADE or to acquire a commercially available system which would replace or complement GRADE. Test cases which would reveal the ability of each system to satisfy the requirements were developed. A scoring method which adequately captured the relative capabilities of the three systems was presented. While more complex multi-attribute decision methods could be used, the selected method provides all the needed information without being so complex that it is difficult to understand. If the value factors are modestly perturbed, system Z is a clear winner based on its overall capabilities. System Z is superior in two vital areas: surfacing and ease of interface with application programs.

  13. Postprocessing of compressed 3D graphic data by using subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, Ka Man; Li, Jiankun; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    1998-10-01

    In this work, we present a postprocessing technique applied to a 3D graphic model of a lower resolution to obtain a visually more pleasant representation. Our method is an improved version of the Butterfly subdivision scheme developed by Zorin et al. Our main contribution is to exploit the flatness information of local areas of a 3D graphic model for adaptive refinement. Consequently, we can avoid unnecessary subdivision in regions which are relatively flat. The proposed new algorithm not only reduces the computational complexity but also saves the storage space. With the hierarchical mesh compression method developed by Li and Kuo as the baseline coding method, we show that the postprocessing technique can greatly improve the visual quality of the decoded 3D graphic model.

  14. Software-based geometry operations for 3D computer graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Mihai; Iancu, Daniel; Glossner, John; Schulte, Michael; Mamidi, Suman

    2006-02-01

    In order to support a broad dynamic range and a high degree of precision, many of 3D renderings fundamental algorithms have been traditionally performed in floating-point. However, fixed-point data representation is preferable over floating-point representation in graphics applications on embedded devices where performance is of paramount importance, while the dynamic range and precision requirements are limited due to the small display sizes (current PDA's are 640 × 480 (VGA), while cell-phones are even smaller). In this paper we analyze the efficiency of a CORDIC-augmented Sandbridge processor when implementing a vertex processor in software using fixed-point arithmetic. A CORDIC-based solution for vertex processing exhibits a number of advantages over classical Multiply-and-Acumulate solutions. First, since a single primitive is used to describe the computation, the code can easily be vectorized and multithreaded, and thus fits the major Sandbridge architectural features. Second, since a CORDIC iteration consists of only a shift operation followed by an addition, the computation may be deeply pipelined. Initially, we outline the Sandbridge architecture extension which encompasses a CORDIC functional unit and the associated instructions. Then, we consider rigid-body rotation, lighting, exponentiation, vector normalization, and perspective division (which are some of the most important data-intensive 3D graphics kernels) and propose a scheme to implement them on the CORDIC-augmented Sandbridge processor. Preliminary results indicate that the performance improvement within the extended instruction set ranges from 3× to 10× (with the exception of rigid body rotation).

  15. Creating Realistic 3D Graphics with Excel at High School--Vector Algebra in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of an experiment in which Excel applications that depict rotatable and sizable orthographic projection of simple 3D figures with face overlapping were developed with thirty gymnasium (high school) students of age 17-19 as an introduction to 3D computer graphics. A questionnaire survey was conducted to find out…

  16. 3D Simulation: Microgravity Environments and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Estes, Samantha; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most, if not all, 3-D and Virtual Reality (VR) software programs are designed for one-G gravity applications. Space environments simulations require gravity effects of one one-thousandth to one one-million of that of the Earth's surface (10(exp -3) - 10(exp -6) G), thus one must be able to generate simulations that replicate those microgravity effects upon simulated astronauts. Unfortunately, the software programs utilized by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration does not have the ability to readily neutralize the one-G gravity effect. This pre-programmed situation causes the engineer or analysis difficulty during micro-gravity simulations. Therefore, microgravity simulations require special techniques or additional code in order to apply the power of 3D graphic simulation to space related applications. This paper discusses the problem and possible solutions to allow microgravity 3-D/VR simulations to be completed successfully without program code modifications.

  17. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  18. Graphical postprocessing for 3-D mesh quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panthaki, M. J.; Abel, J. F.; Wawrzynek, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    An important objective of three-dimensional graphical finite-element postprocessing is to indicate to the engineer the accuracy of analysis results. The inclusion of mesh quality sensors permits a subjective evaluation of the adequacy of a single analysis being interpreted. For graphical approaches, both strain-energy-density gradients and discontinuities of unsmoothed responses and their gradients have proved to be effective sensors. Interactive graphical tools which can display discontinuity information effectively are described; these are essentially different from the ordinary methods used for the viewing of smoothed results.

  19. 3D object optonumerical acquisition methods for CAD/CAM and computer graphics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnik, Robert; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Pawlowski, Michal E.; Woznicki, Jerzy M.

    1999-08-01

    The creation of a virtual object for CAD/CAM and computer graphics on the base of data gathered by full-field optical measurement of 3D object is presented. The experimental co- ordinates are alternatively obtained by combined fringe projection/photogrammetry based system or fringe projection/virtual markers setup. The new and fully automatic procedure which process the cloud of measured points into triangular mesh accepted by CAD/CAM and computer graphics systems is presented. Its applicability for various classes of objects is tested including the error analysis of virtual objects generated. The usefulness of the method is proved by applying the virtual object in rapid prototyping system and in computer graphics environment.

  20. The three-dimensional Event-Driven Graphics Environment (3D-EDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Jeffrey; Hahn, Roger; Schwartz, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Stanford Telecom developed the Three-Dimensional Event-Driven Graphics Environment (3D-EDGE) for NASA GSFC's (GSFC) Communications Link Analysis and Simulation System (CLASS). 3D-EDGE consists of a library of object-oriented subroutines which allow engineers with little or no computer graphics experience to programmatically manipulate, render, animate, and access complex three-dimensional objects.

  1. Whole versus Part Presentations of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azmy, Nabil Gad; Ismaeel, Dina Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present an analysis of how the structure and design of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects can be effective and efficient in terms of Performance, Time on task, and Learning Efficiency. The study explored two treatments, namely whole versus Part Presentations of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects,…

  2. Tensor3D: A computer graphics program to simulate 3D real-time deformation and visualization of geometric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi Lavorante, Luca; Dirk Ebert, Hans

    2008-07-01

    Tensor3D is a geometric modeling program with the capacity to simulate and visualize in real-time the deformation, specified through a tensor matrix and applied to triangulated models representing geological bodies. 3D visualization allows the study of deformational processes that are traditionally conducted in 2D, such as simple and pure shears. Besides geometric objects that are immediately available in the program window, the program can read other models from disk, thus being able to import objects created with different open-source or proprietary programs. A strain ellipsoid and a bounding box are simultaneously shown and instantly deformed with the main object. The principal axes of strain are visualized as well to provide graphical information about the orientation of the tensor's normal components. The deformed models can also be saved, retrieved later and deformed again, in order to study different steps of progressive strain, or to make this data available to other programs. The shape of stress ellipsoids and the corresponding Mohr circles defined by any stress tensor can also be represented. The application was written using the Visualization ToolKit, a powerful scientific visualization library in the public domain. This development choice, allied to the use of the Tcl/Tk programming language, which is independent on the host computational platform, makes the program a useful tool for the study of geometric deformations directly in three dimensions in teaching as well as research activities.

  3. John C. Belland: A Pioneer in 3D Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Provides a profile of the career of John Belland and his work in instructional technology. Highlights include his educational background, teaching experience in higher education, work in learning with 3D computer-generated animation, alternative paradigms of instructional design, and ideas of postmodernism. (LRW)

  4. Standard Features and Their Impact on 3D Engineering Graphics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldenmeyer, K. M.; Hartman, N. W.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of feature-based 3D modeling in industry has necessitated the accumulation and maintenance of standard feature libraries. Currently, firms who use standard features to design parts are storing and utilizing these libraries through their existing product data management (PDM) systems. Standard features have enabled companies to…

  5. Mass data graphics requirements for symbol generators: example 2D airport navagation and 3D terrain function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefele, Jens; Bader, Joachim; Kastner, S.; Wiesemann, Thorsten; von Viebahn, Harro

    2002-07-01

    Next generation of cockpit display systems will display mass data. Mass data includes terrain, obstacle, and airport databases. Display formats will be two and eventually 3D. A prerequisite for the introduction of these new functions is the availability of certified graphics hardware. The paper describes functionality and required features of an aviation certified 2D/3D graphics board. This graphics board should be based on low-level and hi-level API calls. These graphic calls should be very similar to OpenGL. All software and the API must be aviation certified. As an example application, a 2D airport navigation function and a 3D terrain visualization is presented. The airport navigation format is based on highly precise airport database following EUROCAE ED-99/RTCA DO-272 specifications. Terrain resolution is based on EUROCAE ED-98/RTCA DO-276 requirements.

  6. Implementation Of True 3D Cursors In Computer Graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butts, David R.; McAllister, David F.

    1988-06-01

    The advances in stereoscopic image display techniques have shown an increased need for real-time interaction with the three-dimensional image. We have developed a prototype real-time stereoscopic cursor to investigate this interaction. The results have pointed out areas where hardware speeds are a limiting factor, as well as areas where various methodologies cause perceptual difficulties. This paper addresses the psychological and perceptual anomalies involved in stereo image techniques, cursor generation and motion, and the use of the device as a 3D drawing and depth measuring tool.

  7. Medical workstation design: enhancing graphical interface with 3D anatomical atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo Hoo, Kent; Wong, Stephen T.; Grant, Ellen

    1997-05-01

    The huge data archive of the UCSF Hospital Integrated Picture Archiving and Communication System gives healthcare providers access to diverse kinds of images and text for diagnosis and patient management. Given the mass of information accessible, however, conventional graphical user interface (GUI) approach overwhelms the user with forms, menus, fields, lists, and other widgets and causes 'information overloading.' This article describes a new approach that complements the conventional GUI with 3D anatomical atlases and presents the usefulness of this approach with a clinical neuroimaging application.

  8. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  9. Compressed sensing reconstruction for whole-heart imaging with 3D radial trajectories: a graphics processing unit implementation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seunghoon; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Basha, Tamer; Stehning, Christian; Manning, Warren J; Tarokh, Vahid; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    A disadvantage of three-dimensional (3D) isotropic acquisition in whole-heart coronary MRI is the prolonged data acquisition time. Isotropic 3D radial trajectories allow undersampling of k-space data in all three spatial dimensions, enabling accelerated acquisition of the volumetric data. Compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction can provide further acceleration in the acquisition by removing the incoherent artifacts due to undersampling and improving the image quality. However, the heavy computational overhead of the CS reconstruction has been a limiting factor for its application. In this article, a parallelized implementation of an iterative CS reconstruction method for 3D radial acquisitions using a commercial graphics processing unit is presented. The execution time of the graphics processing unit-implemented CS reconstruction was compared with that of the C++ implementation, and the efficacy of the undersampled 3D radial acquisition with CS reconstruction was investigated in both phantom and whole-heart coronary data sets. Subsequently, the efficacy of CS in suppressing streaking artifacts in 3D whole-heart coronary MRI with 3D radial imaging and its convergence properties were studied. The CS reconstruction provides improved image quality (in terms of vessel sharpness and suppression of noise-like artifacts) compared with the conventional 3D gridding algorithm, and the graphics processing unit implementation greatly reduces the execution time of CS reconstruction yielding 34-54 times speed-up compared with C++ implementation. PMID:22392604

  10. A graphic user interface for efficient 3D photo-reconstruction based on free software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; James, Michael; Gómez, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    Recently, different studies have stressed the applicability of 3D photo-reconstruction based on Structure from Motion algorithms in a wide range of geoscience applications. For the purpose of image photo-reconstruction, a number of commercial and freely available software packages have been developed (e.g. Agisoft Photoscan, VisualSFM). The workflow involves typically different stages such as image matching, sparse and dense photo-reconstruction, point cloud filtering and georeferencing. For approaches using open and free software, each of these stages usually require different applications. In this communication, we present an easy-to-use graphic user interface (GUI) developed in Matlab® code as a tool for efficient 3D photo-reconstruction making use of powerful existing software: VisualSFM (Wu, 2015) for photo-reconstruction and CloudCompare (Girardeau-Montaut, 2015) for point cloud processing. The GUI performs as a manager of configurations and algorithms, taking advantage of the command line modes of existing software, which allows an intuitive and automated processing workflow for the geoscience user. The GUI includes several additional features: a) a routine for significantly reducing the duration of the image matching operation, normally the most time consuming stage; b) graphical outputs for understanding the overall performance of the algorithm (e.g. camera connectivity, point cloud density); c) a number of useful options typically performed before and after the photo-reconstruction stage (e.g. removal of blurry images, image renaming, vegetation filtering); d) a manager of batch processing for the automated reconstruction of different image datasets. In this study we explore the advantages of this new tool by testing its performance using imagery collected in several soil erosion applications. References Girardeau-Montaut, D. 2015. CloudCompare documentation accessed at http://cloudcompare.org/ Wu, C. 2015. VisualSFM documentation access at http://ccwu.me/vsfm/doc.html#.

  11. Clinical applications of 3-D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    Both 3-D gels and radiochromic plastic dosimeters, in conjunction with dose image readout systems (MRI or optical-CT), have been employed to measure 3-D dose distributions in many clinical applications. The 3-D dose maps obtained from these systems can provide a useful tool for clinical dose verification for complex treatment techniques such as IMRT, SRS/SBRT, brachytherapy, and proton beam therapy. These complex treatments present high dose gradient regions in the boundaries between the target and surrounding critical organs. Dose accuracy in these areas can be critical, and may affect treatment outcome. In this review, applications of 3-D gels and PRESAGE dosimeter are reviewed and evaluated in terms of their performance in providing information on clinical dose verification as well as commissioning of various treatment modalities. Future interests and clinical needs on studies of 3-D dosimetry are also discussed.

  12. Using 3D Computer Graphics Multimedia to Motivate Preservice Teachers' Learning of Geometry and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson-Espy, Tracy; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Schram, Pamela; Quickenton, Art

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the genesis and purpose of our geometry methods course, focusing on a geometry-teaching technology we created using NVIDIA[R] Chameleon demonstration. This article presents examples from a sequence of lessons centered about a 3D computer graphics demonstration of the chameleon and its geometry. In addition, we present data…

  13. The design and implementation of stereoscopic 3D scalable vector graphics based on WebKit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongxin; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang

    2014-03-01

    Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), which is a language designed based on eXtensible Markup Language (XML), is used to describe basic shapes embedded in webpages, such as circles and rectangles. However, it can only depict 2D shapes. As a consequence, web pages using classical SVG can only display 2D shapes on a screen. With the increasing development of stereoscopic 3D (S3D) technology, binocular 3D devices have been widely used. Under this circumstance, we intend to extend the widely used web rendering engine WebKit to support the description and display of S3D webpages. Therefore, the extension of SVG is of necessity. In this paper, we will describe how to design and implement SVG shapes with stereoscopic 3D mode. Two attributes representing the depth and thickness are added to support S3D shapes. The elimination of hidden lines and hidden surfaces, which is an important process in this project, is described as well. The modification of WebKit is also discussed, which is made to support the generation of both left view and right view at the same time. As is shown in the result, in contrast to the 2D shapes generated by the Google Chrome web browser, the shapes got from our modified browser are in S3D mode. With the feeling of depth and thickness, the shapes seem to be real 3D objects away from the screen, rather than simple curves and lines as before.

  14. Acquisition and applications of 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterian, Paul; Mocanu, Elena

    2007-08-01

    The moiré fringes method and their analysis up to medical and entertainment applications are discussed in this paper. We describe the procedure of capturing 3D images with an Inspeck Camera that is a real-time 3D shape acquisition system based on structured light techniques. The method is a high-resolution one. After processing the images, using computer, we can use the data for creating laser fashionable objects by engraving them with a Q-switched Nd:YAG. In medical field we mention the plastic surgery and the replacement of X-Ray especially in pediatric use.

  15. 3D printed microfluidics for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chee Meng Benjamin; Ng, Sum Huan; Li, King Ho Holden; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The term "Lab-on-a-Chip," is synonymous with describing microfluidic devices with biomedical applications. Even though microfluidics have been developing rapidly over the past decade, the uptake rate in biological research has been slow. This could be due to the tedious process of fabricating a chip and the absence of a "killer application" that would outperform existing traditional methods. In recent years, three dimensional (3D) printing has been drawing much interest from the research community. It has the ability to make complex structures with high resolution. Moreover, the fast building time and ease of learning has simplified the fabrication process of microfluidic devices to a single step. This could possibly aid the field of microfluidics in finding its "killer application" that will lead to its acceptance by researchers, especially in the biomedical field. In this paper, a review is carried out of how 3D printing helps to improve the fabrication of microfluidic devices, the 3D printing technologies currently used for fabrication and the future of 3D printing in the field of microfluidics. PMID:26237523

  16. Virtual 3d City Modeling: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2013-08-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as Building, Tree, Vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. There are various terms used for 3D city models such as "Cybertown", "Cybercity", "Virtual City", or "Digital City". 3D city models are basically a computerized or digital model of a city contains the graphic representation of buildings and other objects in 2.5 or 3D. Generally three main Geomatics approach are using for Virtual 3-D City models generation, in first approach, researcher are using Conventional techniques such as Vector Map data, DEM, Aerial images, second approach are based on High resolution satellite images with LASER scanning, In third method, many researcher are using Terrestrial images by using Close Range Photogrammetry with DSM & Texture mapping. We start this paper from the introduction of various Geomatics techniques for 3D City modeling. These techniques divided in to two main categories: one is based on Automation (Automatic, Semi-automatic and Manual methods), and another is Based on Data input techniques (one is Photogrammetry, another is Laser Techniques). After details study of this, finally in short, we are trying to give the conclusions of this study. In the last, we are trying to give the conclusions of this research paper and also giving a short view for justification and analysis, and present trend for 3D City modeling. This paper gives an overview about the Techniques related with "Generation of Virtual 3-D City models using Geomatics Techniques" and the Applications of Virtual 3D City models. Photogrammetry, (Close range, Aerial, Satellite), Lasergrammetry, GPS, or combination of these modern Geomatics techniques play a major role to create a virtual 3-D City model. Each and every techniques and method has some advantages and some drawbacks. Point cloud model is a modern trend for virtual 3-D city model. Photo-realistic, Scalable, Geo-referenced virtual 3

  17. Learning from graphically integrated 2D and 3D representations improves retention of neuroanatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaz, Farah

    Visualizations in the form of computer-based learning environments are highly encouraged in science education, especially for teaching spatial material. Some spatial material, such as sectional neuroanatomy, is very challenging to learn. It involves learning the two dimensional (2D) representations that are sampled from the three dimensional (3D) object. In this study, a computer-based learning environment was used to explore the hypothesis that learning sectional neuroanatomy from a graphically integrated 2D and 3D representation will lead to better learning outcomes than learning from a sequential presentation. The integrated representation explicitly demonstrates the 2D-3D transformation and should lead to effective learning. This study was conducted using a computer graphical model of the human brain. There were two learning groups: Whole then Sections, and Integrated 2D3D. Both groups learned whole anatomy (3D neuroanatomy) before learning sectional anatomy (2D neuroanatomy). The Whole then Sections group then learned sectional anatomy using 2D representations only. The Integrated 2D3D group learned sectional anatomy from a graphically integrated 3D and 2D model. A set of tests for generalization of knowledge to interpreting biomedical images was conducted immediately after learning was completed. The order of presentation of the tests of generalization of knowledge was counterbalanced across participants to explore a secondary hypothesis of the study: preparation for future learning. If the computer-based instruction programs used in this study are effective tools for teaching anatomy, the participants should continue learning neuroanatomy with exposure to new representations. A test of long-term retention of sectional anatomy was conducted 4-8 weeks after learning was completed. The Integrated 2D3D group was better than the Whole then Sections

  18. Modified Anderson Method for Accelerating 3D-RISM Calculations Using Graphics Processing Unit.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Hirata, Fumio

    2012-09-11

    A fast algorithm is proposed to solve the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory on a graphics processing unit (GPU). 3D-RISM theory is a powerful tool for investigating biomolecular processes in solution; however, such calculations are often both memory-intensive and time-consuming. We sought to accelerate these calculations using GPUs, but to work around the problem of limited memory size in GPUs, we modified the less memory-intensive "Anderson method" to give faster convergence to 3D-RISM calculations. Using this method on a Tesla C2070 GPU, we reduced the total computational time by a factor of 8, 1.4 times by the modified Andersen method and 5.7 times by GPU, compared to calculations on an Intel Xeon machine (eight cores, 3.33 GHz) with the conventional method. PMID:26605714

  19. Development and New Directions for the RELAP5-3D Graphical Users Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee

    2001-09-01

    The direction of development for the RELAP5 Graphical User Interfaces (RGUI) has been extended. In addition to existing plans for displaying all aspects of RELAP5 calculations, the plan now includes plans to display the calculations of a variety of codes including SCDAP, RETRAN and FLUENT. Recent work has included such extensions along with the previously planned and user-requested improvements and extensions. Visualization of heat-structures has been added. Adaptations were made for another computer program, SCDAP-3D, including plant core views. An input model builder for generating RELAP5-3D input files was partially implemented. All these are reported. Plans for future work are also summarized. These include an input processor that transfers steady-state conditions into an input file.

  20. 3D animation of facial plastic surgery based on computer graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Zhao, Yan

    2013-12-01

    More and more people, especial women, are getting desired to be more beautiful than ever. To some extent, it becomes true because the plastic surgery of face was capable in the early 20th and even earlier as doctors just dealing with war injures of face. However, the effect of post-operation is not always satisfying since no animation could be seen by the patients beforehand. In this paper, by combining plastic surgery of face and computer graphics, a novel method of simulated appearance of post-operation will be given to demonstrate the modified face from different viewpoints. The 3D human face data are obtained by using 3D fringe pattern imaging systems and CT imaging systems and then converted into STL (STereo Lithography) file format. STL file is made up of small 3D triangular primitives. The triangular mesh can be reconstructed by using hash function. Top triangular meshes in depth out of numbers of triangles must be picked up by ray-casting technique. Mesh deformation is based on the front triangular mesh in the process of simulation, which deforms interest area instead of control points. Experiments on face model show that the proposed 3D animation facial plastic surgery can effectively demonstrate the simulated appearance of post-operation.

  1. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  2. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  3. Assessment of 3D Viewers for the Display of Interactive Documents in the Learning of Graphic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbero, Basilio Ramos; Pedrosa, Carlos Melgosa; Mate, Esteban Garcia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine which 3D viewers should be used for the display of interactive graphic engineering documents, so that the visualization and manipulation of 3D models provide useful support to students of industrial engineering (mechanical, organizational, electronic engineering, etc). The technical features of 26 3D…

  4. A 3D radiative transfer framework. VI. PHOENIX/3D example applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschildt, P. H.; Baron, E.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We demonstrate the application of our 3D radiative transfer framework in the model atmosphere code PHOENIX for a number of spectrum synthesis calculations for very different conditions. Methods: The 3DRT framework discussed in the previous papers of this series was added to our general-purpose model atmosphere code PHOENIX/1D and an extended 3D version PHOENIX/3D was created. The PHOENIX/3D code is parallelized via the MPI library using a hierarchical domain decomposition and displays very good strong scaling. Results: We present the results of several test cases for widely different atmosphere conditions and compare the 3D calculations with equivalent 1D models to assess the internal accuracy of the 3D modeling. In addition, we show the results for a number of parameterized 3D structures. Conclusions: With presently available computational resources it is possible to solve the full 3D radiative transfer (including scattering) problem with the same micro-physics as included in 1D modeling.

  5. Telidon Graphics and Library Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenne-Sens, Andrej

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the history of Telidon, the Canadian videotex system; describes Telidon's alphageometric method of graphic-information encoding; discusses some experimental applications of the Telidon system; and describes attempts at developing a North American standard for videotex systems. Five figures are included. (JL)

  6. A graphical user interface for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, J. C. L.; Leung, M. K. K.

    2008-02-01

    A software graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is developed using MATLAB. This GUI (DOSCTP) provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM CT-based dose calculation using EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. It offers numerous features not found in DOSXYZnrc, such as the ability to use multiple beams from different phase-space files, and has built-in dose analysis and visualization tools. DOSCTP is written completely in MATLAB, with integrated access to DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE. The program function may be divided into four subgroups, namely, beam placement, MC simulation with DOSXYZnrc, dose visualization, and export. Each is controlled by separate routines. The verification of DOSCTP was carried out by comparing plans with different beam arrangements (multi-beam/photon arc) on an inhomogeneous phantom as well as patient CT between the GUI and Pinnacle3. DOSCTP was developed and verified with the following features: (1) a built-in voxel editor to modify CT-based DOSXYZnrc phantoms for research purposes; (2) multi-beam placement is possible, which cannot be achieved using the current DOSXYZnrc code; (3) the treatment plan, including the dose distributions, contours and image set can be exported to a commercial treatment planning system such as Pinnacle3 or to CERR using RTOG format for plan evaluation and comparison; (4) a built-in RTOG-compatible dose reviewer for dose visualization and analysis such as finding the volume of hot/cold spots in the 3D dose distributions based on a user threshold. DOSCTP greatly simplifies the use of DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE, and offers numerous features that not found in the original user-code. Moreover, since phase-space beams can be defined and generated by the user, it is a particularly useful tool to carry out plans using specifically designed irradiators/accelerators that cannot be found in the Linac library of commercial treatment planning systems.

  7. 3D graphics, virtual reality, and motion-onset visual evoked potentials in neurogaming.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, R; Wilson, S; Coyle, D

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) offers movement-free control of a computer application and is achieved by reading and translating the cortical activity of the brain into semantic control signals. Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEP) are neural potentials employed in BCIs and occur when motion-related stimuli are attended visually. mVEP dynamics are correlated with the position and timing of the moving stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing the mVEP paradigm with video games of various graphical complexities including those of commercial quality, we conducted three studies over four separate sessions comparing the performance of classifying five mVEP responses with variations in graphical complexity and style, in-game distractions, and display parameters surrounding mVEP stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing contemporary presentation modalities in neurogaming, one of the studies compared mVEP classification performance when stimuli were presented using the oculus rift virtual reality headset. Results from 31 independent subjects were analyzed offline. The results show classification performances ranging up to 90% with variations in conditions in graphical complexity having limited effect on mVEP performance; thus, demonstrating the feasibility of using the mVEP paradigm within BCI-based neurogaming. PMID:27590974

  8. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  9. Towards a More Effective Use of 3D-Graphics in Mathematics Education--Utilisation of KETpic to Insert Figures into LATEX Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitahara, Kiyoshi; Abe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Masataka; Yamashita, Satoshi; Takato, Setsuo

    2010-01-01

    Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) are equipped with rich facilities to show graphics, so the use of CAS to show 3D-graphics on screen is a popular tool for mathematics education. However, showing 3D-graphics in mass printed materials is a different story, since the clarity and preciseness of figures tend to be lost. To fill this gap, we developed…

  10. Effectiveness of Applying 2D Static Depictions and 3D Animations to Orthographic Views Learning in Graphical Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chih-Fu; Chiang, Ming-Chin

    2013-01-01

    This study provides experiment results as an educational reference for instructors to help student obtain a better way to learn orthographic views in graphical course. A visual experiment was held to explore the comprehensive differences between 2D static and 3D animation object features; the goal was to reduce the possible misunderstanding…

  11. Brandenburg 3D - a comprehensive 3D Subsurface Model, Conception of an Infrastructure Node and a Web Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschke, Dorit; Schilling, Maik; Simon, Andreas; Wächter, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    The Energiewende and the increasing scarcity of raw materials will lead to an intensified utilization of the subsurface in Germany. Within this context, geological 3D modeling is a fundamental approach for integrated decision and planning processes. Initiated by the development of the European Geospatial Infrastructure INSPIRE, the German State Geological Offices started digitizing their predominantly analog archive inventory. Until now, a comprehensive 3D subsurface model of Brandenburg did not exist. Therefore the project B3D strived to develop a new 3D model as well as a subsequent infrastructure node to integrate all geological and spatial data within the Geodaten-Infrastruktur Brandenburg (Geospatial Infrastructure, GDI-BB) and provide it to the public through an interactive 2D/3D web application. The functionality of the web application is based on a client-server architecture. Server-sided, all available spatial data is published through GeoServer. GeoServer is designed for interoperability and acts as the reference implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Feature Service (WFS) standard that provides the interface that allows requests for geographical features. In addition, GeoServer implements, among others, the high performance certified compliant Web Map Service (WMS) that serves geo-referenced map images. For publishing 3D data, the OGC Web 3D Service (W3DS), a portrayal service for three-dimensional geo-data, is used. The W3DS displays elements representing the geometry, appearance, and behavior of geographic objects. On the client side, the web application is solely based on Free and Open Source Software and leans on the JavaScript API WebGL that allows the interactive rendering of 2D and 3D graphics by means of GPU accelerated usage of physics and image processing as part of the web page canvas without the use of plug-ins. WebGL is supported by most web browsers (e.g., Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, and Opera). The web

  12. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  13. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  14. DYNAMIC 3D QSAR TECHNIQUES: APPLICATIONS IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two dynamic techniques recently developed to account for conformational flexibility of chemicals in 3D QSARs are presented. In addition to the impact of conformational flexibility of chemicals in 3D QSAR models, the applicability of various molecular descriptors is discussed. The...

  15. CFL3D: Its History and Some Recent Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Thomas, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The history of the Computational Fluids Laboratory -3D (CFL3D) Navier-Stokes computer code is discussed and a comprehensive reference list is given. Three recent advanced applications are presented (1) Wing with partial-spanflap, (2) F/A-18 with forebody control strake, and (3) Noise predictions for an advanced ducted propeller turbomachinery flow.

  16. The Inorganic Illustrator: A 3-D Graphical Supplement for Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry Courses Distributed on CD-ROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Scott L.; Hagen, Karl S.

    1996-10-01

    files of solid state structures will not be limited to single unit cells that are common in textbooks, but will present multiple cells such that the extended lattice of the material is evident. Navigation through these resources is through a unique open hypertext-based interface using Authorware, which allows the user to create complex applications that support movies, animation, and other graphics seamlessly. Chem3D Viewer is a powerful program that allows not only multiple visualization modes, but also the detailed analysis of both bonded and nonbonded distances and angles. This is particularly useful for recognizing symmetry elements within molecules, as the student can precisely align atoms along the screen's Cartesian axes or within its planes and subsequently rotate the molecules about the axes at precise angles. We are developing stand-alone interactive tutorials to assign point groups to molecules and clusters. In addition, tutorials are being developed that show how the Chem3D Viewer software can be most effectively used in a classroom setting for lectures or for home or lab use by the students. The Inorganic Illustrator will be made available to the education community for the cost of materials plus shipping and handling. Acknowledgment We would like to thank the NSF for financial support through the Division of Undergraduate Education Course and Curriculum Program (DUE-CCD 9455567). Literature Cited 1. Illman, D. L. Chem. Eng. News 1994, 72(May 9), 34.

  17. 3D-printing technologies for electrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2016-05-21

    Since its conception during the 80s, 3D-printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has been receiving unprecedented levels of attention and interest from industry and research laboratories. This is in addition to end users, who have benefited from the pervasiveness of desktop-size and relatively cheap printing machines available. 3D-printing enables almost infinite possibilities for rapid prototyping. Therefore, it has been considered for applications in numerous research fields, ranging from mechanical engineering, medicine, and materials science to chemistry. Electrochemistry is another branch of science that can certainly benefit from 3D-printing technologies, paving the way for the design and fabrication of cheaper, higher performing, and ubiquitously available electrochemical devices. Here, we aim to provide a general overview of the most commonly available 3D-printing methods along with a review of recent electrochemistry related studies adopting 3D-printing as a possible rapid prototyping fabrication tool. PMID:27048921

  18. Development of 3-D fracture network visualization software based on graphical user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young-Hwan, Noh; Jeong-Gi, Um; Yosoon, Choi; Myong-Ho, Park; Jaeyoung, Choi

    2013-04-01

    A sound understanding of the structural characteristics of fractured rock masses is important in designing and maintaining earth structures because their strength, deformability, and hydraulic behavior depend mainly on the characteristics of discontinuity network structures. Despite considerable progress in understanding the structural characteristics of rock masses, the complexity of discontinuity patterns has prevented satisfactory analysis based on a 3-D rock mass visualization model. This research presents the results of studies performed to develop rock mass visualization in 3-D to analysis the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of fractured rock masses. General and particular solutions of non-linear equations of disk-shaped fractures have been derived to calculated lines of intersection and equivalent pipes. Also, program modules of DISK3D, FNTWK3D, BOUNDARY and BDM(borehole data management) have been developed to perform the visualization of fracture network and corresponding equivalent pipes for DFN based fluid flow model. The developed software for the 3-D fractured rock mass visualization model based on MS visual studio can be used to characterize rock mass geometry and network systems effectively. The results obtained in this study will be refined and then combined for use as a tool for assessing geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the 2011 Energy Efficiency and Resources Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant.

  19. Programming Language Software For Graphics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, Brian C.

    1993-01-01

    New approach reduces repetitive development of features common to different applications. High-level programming language and interactive environment with access to graphical hardware and software created by adding graphical commands and other constructs to standardized, general-purpose programming language, "Scheme". Designed for use in developing other software incorporating interactive computer-graphics capabilities into application programs. Provides alternative to programming entire applications in C or FORTRAN, specifically ameliorating design and implementation of complex control and data structures typifying applications with interactive graphics. Enables experimental programming and rapid development of prototype software, and yields high-level programs serving as executable versions of software-design documentation.

  20. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee; Galbraith, James Andrew

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three dimensional plants.

  1. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Mesina; J. Galbraith

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three-dimensional plants.

  2. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications.

    PubMed

    Kuş, Abdil

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering (RE) is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings) model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters. PMID:22573995

  3. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kuş, Abdil

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering (RE) is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings) model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters. PMID:22573995

  4. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  5. 3-D Imaging Systems for Agricultural Applications-A Review.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Arellano, Manuel; Griepentrog, Hans W; Reiser, David; Paraforos, Dimitris S

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency increase of resources through automation of agriculture requires more information about the production process, as well as process and machinery status. Sensors are necessary for monitoring the status and condition of production by recognizing the surrounding structures such as objects, field structures, natural or artificial markers, and obstacles. Currently, three dimensional (3-D) sensors are economically affordable and technologically advanced to a great extent, so a breakthrough is already possible if enough research projects are commercialized. The aim of this review paper is to investigate the state-of-the-art of 3-D vision systems in agriculture, and the role and value that only 3-D data can have to provide information about environmental structures based on the recent progress in optical 3-D sensors. The structure of this research consists of an overview of the different optical 3-D vision techniques, based on the basic principles. Afterwards, their application in agriculture are reviewed. The main focus lays on vehicle navigation, and crop and animal husbandry. The depth dimension brought by 3-D sensors provides key information that greatly facilitates the implementation of automation and robotics in agriculture. PMID:27136560

  6. Development and evaluation of a new 3-D digitization and computer graphic system to study the anatomic tissue and restoration surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dastane, A; Vaidyanathan, T K; Vaidyanathan, J; Mehra, R; Hesby, R

    1996-01-01

    It is necessary to visualize and reconstruct tissue anatomic surfaces accurately for a variety of oral rehabilitation applications such as surface wear characterization and automated fabrication of dental restorations, accuracy of reproduction of impression and die materials, etc. In this investigation, a 3-D digitization and computer-graphic system was developed for surface characterization. The hardware consists of a profiler assembly for digitization in an MTS biomechanical test system with an artificial mouth, an IBM PS/2 computer model 70 for data processing and a Hewlett-Packard laser printer for hardcopy outputs. The software used includes a commercially available Surfer 3-D graphics package, a public domain data-fitting alignment software and an inhouse Pascal program for intercommunication plus some other limited tasks. Surfaces were digitized before and after rotation by angular displacement, the digital data were interpolated by Surfer to provide a data grid and the surfaces were computer graphically reconstructed: Misaligned surfaces were aligned by the data-fitting alignment software under different choices of parameters. The effect of different interpolation parameters (e.g. grid size, method of interpolation) and extent of rotation on the alignment accuracy was determined. The results indicate that improved alignment accuracy results from optimization of interpolation parameters and minimization of the initial misorientation between the digitized surfaces. The method provides important advantages for surface reconstruction and visualization, such as overlay of sequentially generated surfaces and accurate alignment of pairs of surfaces with small misalignment. PMID:8850158

  7. Programmer's Guide for Subroutine PRNT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PRNT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of printed plot displays. The displays…

  8. User's Guide for Subroutine PLOT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PLOT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of three dimensional hidden…

  9. Programmer's Guide for Subroutine PLOT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PLOT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of three-dimensional hidden…

  10. User's Guide for Subroutine PRNT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PRNT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of printer plot displays. The displays…

  11. Polymer-Enriched 3D Graphene Foams for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun Kit; Xiong, Gordon Minru; Zhu, Minmin; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Castro Neto, Antonio Helio; Tan, Nguan Soon; Choong, Cleo

    2015-04-22

    Graphene foams (GFs) are versatile nanoplatforms for biomedical applications because of their excellent physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. However, the brittleness and inflexibility of pristine GF (pGF) are some of the important factors restricting their widespread application. Here, a chemical-vapor-deposition-assisted method was used to synthesize 3D GFs, which were subsequently spin-coated with polymer to produce polymer-enriched 3D GFs with high conductivity and flexibility. Compared to pGF, both poly(vinylidene fluoride)-enriched GF (PVDF/GF) and polycaprolactone-enriched GF (PCL/GF) scaffolds showed improved flexibility and handleability. Despite the presence of the polymers, the polymer-enriched 3D GF scaffolds retained high levels of electrical conductivity because of the presence of microcracks that allowed for the flow of electrons through the material. In addition, polymer enrichment of GF led to an enhancement in the formation of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) compounds when the scaffolds were exposed to simulated body fluid. Between the two polymers tested, PCL enrichment of GF resulted in a higher in vitro mineralization nucleation rate because the oxygen-containing functional group of PCL had a higher affinity for Ca-P deposition and formation compared to the polar carbon-fluorine (C-F) bond in PVDF. Taken together, our current findings are a stepping stone toward future applications of polymer-enriched 3D GFs in the treatment of bone defects as well as other biomedical applications. PMID:25822669

  12. X3D moving grid methods for semiconductor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.; Cartwright, D.; Gammel, J.T.; George, D.; Kendrick, B.; Kilcrease, D.; Trease, H.; Walker, R.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos 3D grid toolbox handles grid maintenance chores and provides access to a sophisticated set of optimization algorithms for unstructured grids. The application of these tools to semiconductor problems is illustrated in three examples: grain growth, topographic deposition and electrostatics. These examples demonstrate adaptive smoothing, front tracking, and automatic, adaptive refinement/derefinement.

  13. The use of 3D scanning for sporting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friel, Kevin; Ajjimaporn, Pann; Straub, Jeremy; Kerlin, Scott

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the process and research that went into creating a set of 3D models to characterize a golf swing. The purpose of this work is to illustrate how a 3D scanner could be used for assessing athlete performance in sporting applications. In this case, introductory work has been performed to show how the scanner could be used to show the errors a golfer made in a swing. Multiple factors must be taken into account when assessing golfers' swings including the position and movement of the golfer's hands, arms, and foot placement as well as the position of the club head and shaft of the golf club.

  14. Development of 3D in Vitro Technology for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, biomaterials technologies together with significant efforts on developing biology have revolutionized the process of engineered materials. Three dimensional (3D) in vitro technology aims to develop set of tools that are simple, inexpensive, portable and robust that could be commercialized and used in various fields of biomedical sciences such as drug discovery, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine. The proliferation of cells in the 3D scaffold needs an oxygen and nutrition supply. 3D scaffold materials should provide such an environment for cells living in close proximity. 3D scaffolds that are able to regenerate or restore tissue and/or organs have begun to revolutionize medicine and biomedical science. Scaffolds have been used to support and promote the regeneration of tissues. Different processing techniques have been developed to design and fabricate three dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering implants. Throughout the chapters we discuss in this review, we inform the reader about the potential applications of different 3D in vitro systems that can be applied for fabricating a wider range of novel biomaterials for use in tissue engineering. PMID:25299693

  15. Development of 3D in vitro technology for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, biomaterials technologies together with significant efforts on developing biology have revolutionized the process of engineered materials. Three dimensional (3D) in vitro technology aims to develop set of tools that are simple, inexpensive, portable and robust that could be commercialized and used in various fields of biomedical sciences such as drug discovery, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine. The proliferation of cells in the 3D scaffold needs an oxygen and nutrition supply. 3D scaffold materials should provide such an environment for cells living in close proximity. 3D scaffolds that are able to regenerate or restore tissue and/or organs have begun to revolutionize medicine and biomedical science. Scaffolds have been used to support and promote the regeneration of tissues. Different processing techniques have been developed to design and fabricate three dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering implants. Throughout the chapters we discuss in this review, we inform the reader about the potential applications of different 3D in vitro systems that can be applied for fabricating a wider range of novel biomaterials for use in tissue engineering. PMID:25299693

  16. Design of a VLSI scan conversion processor for high-performance 3-D graphics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.U.

    1988-01-01

    Scan-conversion processing is the bottleneck in the image generation process. To solve the problem of smooth shading and hidden surface elimination, a new processor architecture was invented which has been labeled as a scan-conversion processor architecture (SCP). The SCP is designed to perform hidden surface elimination and scan conversion for 64 pixels. The color intensities are dual-buffered so that when one buffer is being updated the other can be scanned out. Z-depth is used to perform the hidden surface elimination. The key operation performed by the SCP is the evaluation of linear functions of a form like F(X,Y) = A X + B Y + C. The computation is further simplified by using incremental addition. The z-depth buffer and the color buffers are incorporated onto the same chip. The SCP receives from its preprocessor the information for the definition of polygons and the computation of z-depth and RGB color intensities. Many copies of this processor will be used in a high-performance graphics system.

  17. AnimatLab: a 3D graphics environment for neuromechanical simulations.

    PubMed

    Cofer, David; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Reid, James; Zhu, Ying; Heitler, William J; Edwards, Donald H

    2010-03-30

    The nervous systems of animals evolved to exert dynamic control of behavior in response to the needs of the animal and changing signals from the environment. To understand the mechanisms of dynamic control requires a means of predicting how individual neural and body elements will interact to produce the performance of the entire system. AnimatLab is a software tool that provides an approach to this problem through computer simulation. AnimatLab enables a computational model of an animal's body to be constructed from simple building blocks, situated in a virtual 3D world subject to the laws of physics, and controlled by the activity of a multicellular, multicompartment neural circuit. Sensor receptors on the body surface and inside the body respond to external and internal signals and then excite central neurons, while motor neurons activate Hill muscle models that span the joints and generate movement. AnimatLab provides a common neuromechanical simulation environment in which to construct and test models of any skeletal animal, vertebrate or invertebrate. The use of AnimatLab is demonstrated in a neuromechanical simulation of human arm flexion and the myotactic and contact-withdrawal reflexes. PMID:20074588

  18. A Laboratory Application of Microcomputer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Kalle B.; Moore, John W.

    1983-01-01

    A PASCAL graphics and instrument interface program for a Z80/S-100 based microcomputer was developed. The computer interfaces to a stopped-flow spectrophotometer replacing a storage oscilloscope and polaroid camera. Applications of this system are discussed, indicating that graphics and analog-to-digital boards have transformed the computer into…

  19. Practical applications of 3D sonography in gynecologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Rochelle F; Fleischer, Arthur C

    2014-11-01

    Volume imaging in the pelvis has been well demonstrated to be an extremely useful technique, largely based on its ability to reconstruct the coronal plane of the uterus that usually cannot be visualized using traditional 2-dimensional (2D) imaging. As a result, this technique is now a part of the standard pelvic ultrasound protocol in many institutions. A variety of valuable applications of 3D sonography in the pelvis are discussed in this article. PMID:25444101

  20. 3D Winding Number: Theory and Application to Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Becciu, Alessandro; Fuster, Andrea; Pottek, Mark; van den Heuvel, Bart; ter Haar Romeny, Bart; van Assen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    We develop a new formulation, mathematically elegant, to detect critical points of 3D scalar images. It is based on a topological number, which is the generalization to three dimensions of the 2D winding number. We illustrate our method by considering three different biomedical applications, namely, detection and counting of ovarian follicles and neuronal cells and estimation of cardiac motion from tagged MR images. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation emphasizes the reliability of the results. PMID:21317978

  1. The Application of Ultrasound in 3D Bio-Printing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging and promising technology in tissue engineering to construct tissues and organs for implantation. Alignment of self-assembly cell spheroids that are used as bioink could be very accurate after droplet ejection from bioprinter. Complex and heterogeneous tissue structures could be built using rapid additive manufacture technology and multiple cell lines. Effective vascularization in the engineered tissue samples is critical in any clinical application. In this review paper, the current technologies and processing steps (such as printing, preparation of bioink, cross-linking, tissue fusion and maturation) in 3D bio-printing are introduced, and their specifications are compared with each other. In addition, the application of ultrasound in this novel field is also introduced. Cells experience acoustic radiation force in ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) and then accumulate at the pressure node at low acoustic pressure. Formation of cell spheroids by this method is within minutes with uniform size and homogeneous cell distribution. Neovessel formation from USWF-induced endothelial cell spheroids is significant. Low-intensity ultrasound could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Its use is at low cost and compatible with current bioreactor. In summary, ultrasound application in 3D bio-printing may solve some challenges and enhance the outcomes. PMID:27164066

  2. The Physics and Applications of a 3D Plasmonic Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, Brandon B.

    In this work, the dynamics of electromagnetic field interactions with free electrons in a 3D metallic nanostructure is evaluated theoretically. This dissertation starts by reviewing the relevant fundamentals of plasmonics and modern applications of plasmonic systems. Then, motivated by the need to have a simpler way of understanding the surface charge dynamics on complex plasmonic nanostructures, a new plasmon hybridization tree method is introduced. This method provides the plasmonicist with an intuitive way to determine the response of free electrons to incident light in complex nanostructures within the electrostatic regime. Next, a novel 3D plasmonic nanostructure utilizing reflective plasmonic coupling is designed to perform biosensing and plasmonic tweezing applications. By applying analytical and numerical methods, the effectiveness of this nanostructure at performing these applications is determined from the plasmonic response of the nanostructure to an excitation beam of coherent light. During this analysis, it was discovered that under certain conditions, this 3D nanostructure exhibits a plasmonic Fano resonance resulting from the interference of an in-plane dark mode and an out-of-plane bright mode. In evaluating this nanostructure for sensing changes in the local dielectric environment, a figure of merit of 68 is calculated, which is competitive with current localized surface plasmon resonance refractometric sensors. By evaluating the Maxwell stress tensor on a test particle in the vicinity of the nanostructure, it was found that under the right conditions, this plasmonic nanostructure design is capable of imparting forces greater than 10.5 nN on dielectric objects of nanoscale dimensions. The results obtained in these studies provides new routes to the design and engineering of 3D plasmonic nanostructures and Fano resonances in these systems. In addition, the nanostructure presented in this work and the design principles it utilizes have shown

  3. Interactive computer graphics applications for compressible aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Three computer applications have been developed to solve inviscid compressible fluids problems using interactive computer graphics. The first application is a compressible flow calculator which solves for isentropic flow, normal shocks, and oblique shocks or centered expansions produced by two dimensional ramps. The second application couples the solutions generated by the first application to a more graphical presentation of the results to produce a desk top simulator of three compressible flow problems: 1) flow past a single compression ramp; 2) flow past two ramps in series; and 3) flow past two opposed ramps. The third application extends the results of the second to produce a design tool which solves for the flow through supersonic external or mixed compression inlets. The applications were originally developed to run on SGI or IBM workstations running GL graphics. They are currently being extended to solve additional types of flow problems and modified to operate on any X-based workstation.

  4. High-definition 3D display for training applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Brian; Morris, James; Chenault, David; Tchon, Joe; Barnidge, Tracy

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a high definition stereoscopic liquid crystal display for use in training applications. The display technology provides full spatial and temporal resolution on a liquid crystal display panel consisting of 1920×1200 pixels at 60 frames per second. Display content can include mixed 2D and 3D data. Source data can be 3D video from cameras, computer generated imagery, or fused data from a variety of sensor modalities. Discussion of the use of this display technology in military and medical industries will be included. Examples of use in simulation and training for robot tele-operation, helicopter landing, surgical procedures, and vehicle repair, as well as for DoD mission rehearsal will be presented.

  5. NASA's 3D Flight Computer for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    2000-01-01

    The New Millennium Program (NMP) Integrated Product Development Team (IPDT) for Microelectronics Systems was planning to validate a newly developed 3D Flight Computer system on its first deep-space flight, DS1, launched in October 1998. This computer, developed in the 1995-97 time frame, contains many new computer technologies previously never used in deep-space systems. They include: advanced 3D packaging architecture for future low-mass and low-volume avionics systems; high-density 3D packaged chip-stacks for both volatile and non-volatile mass memory: 400 Mbytes of local DRAM memory, and 128 Mbytes of Flash memory; high-bandwidth Peripheral Component Interface (Per) local-bus with a bridge to VME; high-bandwidth (20 Mbps) fiber-optic serial bus; and other attributes, such as standard support for Design for Testability (DFT). Even though this computer system did not complete on time for delivery to the DS1 project, it was an important development along a technology roadmap towards highly integrated and highly miniaturized avionics systems for deep-space applications. This continued technology development is now being performed by NASA's Deep Space System Development Program (also known as X2000) and within JPL's Center for Integrated Space Microsystems (CISM).

  6. Performance evaluation and clinical applications of 3D plenoptic cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Ryan; Shademan, Azad; Opfermann, Justin; Leonard, Simon; Kim, Peter C. W.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-06-01

    The observation and 3D quantification of arbitrary scenes using optical imaging systems is challenging, but increasingly necessary in many fields. This paper provides a technical basis for the application of plenoptic cameras in medical and medical robotics applications, and rigorously evaluates camera integration and performance in the clinical setting. It discusses plenoptic camera calibration and setup, assesses plenoptic imaging in a clinically relevant context, and in the context of other quantitative imaging technologies. We report the methods used for camera calibration, precision and accuracy results in an ideal and simulated surgical setting. Afterwards, we report performance during a surgical task. Test results showed the average precision of the plenoptic camera to be 0.90mm, increasing to 1.37mm for tissue across the calibrated FOV. The ideal accuracy was 1.14mm. The camera showed submillimeter error during a simulated surgical task.

  7. Compact 3D flash lidar video cameras and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettner, Roger

    2010-04-01

    The theory and operation of Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc.'s (ASC) latest compact 3D Flash LIDAR Video Cameras (3D FLVCs) and a growing number of technical problems and solutions are discussed. The solutions range from space shuttle docking, planetary entry, decent and landing, surveillance, autonomous and manned ground vehicle navigation and 3D imaging through particle obscurants.

  8. 3D holographic polymer photonic crystal for superprism application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Sasa; Chen, Ray T.

    2007-02-01

    Photonic crystal based superprism offers a new way to design new optical components for beam steering and DWDM application. 3D photonic crystals are especially attractive as they could offer more control of the light beam based on the needs. A polygonal prism based holographic fabrication method has been demonstrated for a three-dimensional face-centered-cubic (FCC)-type submicron polymer photonic crystal using SU8 as the photo-sensitive material. Therefore antivibration equipment and complicated optical alignment system are not needed and the requirement for the coherence of the laser source is relaxed compared with the traditional holographic setup. By changing the top-cut prism structure, the polarization of the laser beam, the exposure and development conditions we can achieve different kinds of triclinic or orthorhombic photonic crystals on demand. Special fabrication treatments have been introduced to ensure the survivability of the fabricated large area (cm2) nano-structures. Scanning electron microscopy and diffraction results proved the good uniformity of the fabricated structures. With the proper design of the refraction prism we have achieved a partial bandgap for S+C band (1460-1565nm) in the [111] direction. The transmission and reflection spectra obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are in good agreement with simulated band structure. The superprism effects around 1550nm wavelength for the fabricated 3D polymer photonic crystal have been theoretically calculated and such effects can be used for beam steering purpose.

  9. 3D TEE registration with MR for cardiac interventional applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jonghye; Parthasarathy, Vijay; Sandeep, Dalal; Jain, Ameet

    2010-02-01

    Live three dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) provides real-time imaging of cardiac structure and function, and has been shown to be useful in interventional cardiac procedures. Its application in catheter based cardiac procedures is, however, limited by its limited field of view (FOV). In order to mitigate this limitation, we register pre-operative magnetic resonance (MR) images to live 3D TEE images. Conventional multimodal image registration techniques that use mutual information (MI) as the similarity measure use statistics from the entire image. In these cases, correct registration, however, may not coincide with the global maximum of MI metric. In order to address this problem, we present an automated registration algorithm that balances a combination global and local edge-based statistics. The weighted sum of global and local statistics is computed as the similarity measure, where the weights are decided based on the strength of the local statistics. Phantom validation experiments shows improved capture ranges when compared with conventional MI based methods. The proposed method provided robust results with accuracy better than 3 mm (5°) in the range of -10 to 12 mm (-6 to 3°), -14 to 12 mm (-6 to 6°) and -16 to 6 mm (-6 to 3°) in x-, y-, and z- axes respectively. We believe that the proposed registration method has the potential for real time intra-operative image fusion during percutaneous cardiac interventions.

  10. Study on 3D CFBG vibration sensor and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Qiuming; Li, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    A novel variety of three dimensional (3D) vibration sensor based on chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) is developed to measure 3D vibration in the mechanical equipment field. The sensor is composed of three independent vibration sensing units. Each unit uses double matched chirped gratings as sensing elements, and the sensing signal is processed by the edge filtering demodulation method. The structure and principle of the sensor are theoretically analyzed, and its performances are obtained from some experiments and the results are as follows: operating frequency range of the sensor is 10 Hz‒500 Hz; acceleration measurement range is 2 m·s-2‒30 m·s-2; sensitivity is about 70 mV/m·s-2; crosstalk coefficient is greater than 22 dB; self-compensation for temperature is available. Eventually the sensor is applied to monitor the vibration state of radiation pump. Seen from its experiments and applications, the sensor has good sensing performances, which can meet a certain requirement for some engineering measurement.

  11. Applications of Computer Graphics in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Various applications of interactive computer graphics to the following areas of science and engineering were described: design and analysis of structures, configuration geometry, animation, flutter analysis, design and manufacturing, aircraft design and integration, wind tunnel data analysis, architecture and construction, flight simulation, hydrodynamics, curve and surface fitting, gas turbine engine design, analysis, and manufacturing, packaging of printed circuit boards, spacecraft design.

  12. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mahmoud A; Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-12-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country. PMID:26807414

  13. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country. PMID:26807414

  14. 3-D transponder antennas for future SHF RFID applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichner, R.; Baumann, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    The radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is omnipresent since a few years. Some of the most popular fields of application are the use for security tasks, for logistics and for the consumer segment. For example, chip card or key ring sized RFID transponders can allow wireless access to secured rooms. The number of applications for wireless data transmission for the identification and tracking of objects increases every year. There is a large development need for highly functional and inexpensive RFID transponders due to the ever-increasing demand on improved reliability, higher data rates and read and write ranges of the RFID systems. Therefore, research was performed on new 3-D transponder antennas for the Super High Frequency Band around 5.8 GHz. Additionally, wave propagation effects and the influence of different dielectric environments were considered. Parallel to the design of the novel antenna structures, the printing process for inexpensive manufacturing was investigated. The gained results are the basis for prospective RFID applications.

  15. 3D-MID and process monitoring for microjoining applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, Andreas; Specker, Wilhelm; Stallmach, Matthias; Zeadan, Jeihad

    2003-07-01

    Nd:YAG solid-state lasers have been integrated in many seam welding applications. They provide a good ability of integration into existing manufacturing sequences and allow its easy automation. Appropriate process monitoring systems are needed to decrease necessary user intervention, to ensure a high machine availability and to realize a zero defect production. In the electronics industry, laser spot welding techniques using pulsed Nd:YAG-lasers have been established in mass production applications, for example in manufacturing of electron gun components for TV monitor tubes over the last 25 years. They require different strategies and methods for process monitoring systems. Apart from these integrated laser spot welding applications, there is a current demand for new technologies to join micro components onto 3-dimensional (3-D) circuit substrates and to connect electrical plugs. In recent years, laser spot joining techniques have emerged as a viable option for packaging electrical and mechanical microparts, such as surface mounted devices (SMDs) and casings. Under most conditions, laser spot welding provides more durability as well as thermal and mechanical stability compared to traditional packaging techniques, such as simultaneous soldering. Additionally, under less ideal conditions, the packaging quality can be inconsistent, resulting in the need for optimization and monitoring of the weld parameters under different conditions. In order to achieve a stable process during packaging of electrical components despite their weak absorption of laser radiation and different surface qualities, a process monitoring system should be needed.

  16. 3D Imaging with Structured Illumination for Advanced Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Kast, Brian A.; Smith, Collin S.

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information in a physical security system is a highly useful dis- criminator. The two-dimensional data from an imaging systems fails to provide target dis- tance and three-dimensional motion vector, which can be used to reduce nuisance alarm rates and increase system effectiveness. However, 3D imaging devices designed primarily for use in physical security systems are uncommon. This report discusses an architecture favorable to physical security systems; an inexpensive snapshot 3D imaging system utilizing a simple illumination system. The method of acquiring 3D data, tests to understand illumination de- sign, and software modifications possible to maximize information gathering capability are discussed.

  17. Vector spherical harmonics application to 3-D tomography problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, A. L.

    2007-04-01

    A method of series expansion with the aid of vector spherical harmonics intended for inverting line integrated data is proposed to investigate 3-D vector fields in the spherical plasmas. A set of numerical computations demonstrating the 3-D reconstruction of the model vector fields has been performed to assess the inversion method proposed.

  18. Ink Jet For Business Graphic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Dana H.

    1987-04-01

    This talk covers the use of Computer generated color output in the preparation of professional, memorable presentations. The focus is on this application and today's business graphic marketplace. To provide a background, on overview of the factors and trends influencing the market for color hard copy output is essential. The availability of lower cost computing technology, improved graphic software and user interfaces and the availability of color copiers is combining with the latest generation of color ink jet printers to cause a strong growth in the use of color hardcopy devices in the business graphics marketplace. The market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate in excess of 25% and reach a level of 5 Billion by 1990. Color lasography and ink jet technology based products are expected to increase share significantly primarily at the expense of pen plotters. Essential to the above mentioned growth is the latest generation of products. The Xerox 4020 Color Ink Jet Printer embodies the latest ink jet technology and is a good example of this new generation of products. The printer brings highly reliable color to a broad range of business users. The 4020 is driven by over 50 software packages allowing users compatibility and supporting a variety of applications. The 4020 is easy to operate and maintain and capable of producing excellent hardcopy and transparencies at an attractive price point. Several specific applications areas were discussed. Images were typically created on an IBM PC or compatible with a graphics application package and output to the Xerox 4020 Color Ink Jet Printer. Bar charts, line graphs, pie charts, integrated text and graphics, reports and maps were displayed with a brief description. Additionally, the use of color in brainscanning to discern and communicate information and in computer generated Art demonstrate the wide variety of potential applications. Images may be output to paper or to transparency for overhead

  19. 3D scanning modeling method application in ancient city reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Pu; Zhou, Mingquan; Du, Guoguang; Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Pengbo

    2015-07-01

    With the development of optical engineering technology, the precision of 3D scanning equipment becomes higher, and its role in 3D modeling is getting more distinctive. This paper proposed a 3D scanning modeling method that has been successfully applied in Chinese ancient city reconstruction. On one hand, for the existing architectures, an improved algorithm based on multiple scanning is adopted. Firstly, two pieces of scanning data were rough rigid registered using spherical displacers and vertex clustering method. Secondly, a global weighted ICP (iterative closest points) method is used to achieve a fine rigid registration. On the other hand, for the buildings which have already disappeared, an exemplar-driven algorithm for rapid modeling was proposed. Based on the 3D scanning technology and the historical data, a system approach was proposed for 3D modeling and virtual display of ancient city.

  20. Graphics Technology in Space Applications (GTSA 1989)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Sandy (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This document represents the proceedings of the Graphics Technology in Space Applications, which was held at NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center on April 12 to 14, 1989 in Houston, Texas. The papers included in these proceedings were published in general as received from the authors with minimum modifications and editing. Information contained in the individual papers is not to be construed as being officially endorsed by NASA.

  1. Micropatterning of 3D Microenvironments for Living Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, William F.; Doty, Nate J.; Zarembinski, Thomas I.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Toepke, Michael W.; Murphy, William L.; Atzet, Sarah K.; Clark, Ryan; Melendez, J. Andres; Cady, Nathaniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-scale printing and patterning of living cells has multiple applications including tissue engineering, cell signaling assays, and the fabrication of cell-based biosensors. In this work, a molecular printing instrument, the Bioforce Nano eNabler, was modified to enable micron-scale “quill-pen” based printing of mammalian cells in a 3D hyaluronan/gelatin based hydrogel. Specifically, photo-initiated “thiol-ene” click chemistry was used to couple the thiol groups of thiolated hyaluronan/thiolated gelatin to the alkene groups of 4-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG)-norbornene molecules. Rapid photopolymerization enabled direct printing and controlled curing of living cells within the hydrogel matrix. The resulting hydrogels were biocompatible with human adipose-derived stem cells, NIH-3T3 cells, and mouse embryonic stem cells. The utility of this printing approach was also explored for cell-based biosensors. Micro-printed cells expressing a redox sensitive variant of the green fluorescent protein (roGFP-R12) showed a measurable fluorescent response to addition of oxidizing and then reducing agents. This work represents a novel approach to micron-scale cell patterning, and its potential for living, cell-based biosensors. PMID:24791214

  2. Micropatterning of 3D Microenvironments for Living Biosensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Hynes, William F; Doty, Nate J; Zarembinski, Thomas I; Schwartz, Michael P; Toepke, Michael W; Murphy, William L; Atzet, Sarah K; Clark, Ryan; Melendez, J Andres; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2014-03-01

    Micro-scale printing and patterning of living cells has multiple applications including tissue engineering, cell signaling assays, and the fabrication of cell-based biosensors. In this work, a molecular printing instrument, the Bioforce Nano eNabler, was modified to enable micron-scale -quill-pen based printing of mammalian cells in a 3D hyaluronan/gelatin based hydrogel. Specifically, photo-initiated -thiol-ene click chemistry was used to couple the thiol groups of thiolated hyaluronan/thiolated gelatin to the alkene groups of 4-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG)-norbornene molecules. Rapid photopolymerization enabled direct printing and controlled curing of living cells within the hydrogel matrix. The resulting hydrogels were biocompatible with human adipose-derived stem cells, NIH-3T3 cells, and mouse embryonic stem cells. The utility of this printing approach was also explored for cell-based biosensors. Micro-printed cells expressing a redox sensitive variant of the green fluorescent protein (roGFP-R12) showed a measurable fluorescent response to addition of oxidizing and then reducing agents. This work represents a novel approach to micron-scale cell patterning, and its potential for living, cell-based biosensors. PMID:24791214

  3. Medical Applications for 3D Printing: Current and Projected Uses.

    PubMed

    Ventola, C Lee

    2014-10-01

    3D printing is expected to revolutionize health care through uses in tissue and organ fabrication; creation of customized prosthetics, implants, and anatomical models; and pharmaceutical research regarding drug dosage forms, delivery, and discovery. PMID:25336867

  4. The Use of 3D Graphic Modelling in Geoarchaeological Investigations (Bykowszczyzna Archaeological Site near Kock, E Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łojek, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to use the ArcView 3.2 application for spatial modelling of the exploration forms (pits) in the Bykowszczyzna 8 archaeological site. The 3D digital documentation at a specific scale makes possible easy archiving, presentation, and simple spatial analyses of the examined objects. The ArcView 3.2 programme and its extensions (Spatial Analyst and 3D Analyst), commonly used as analytical tools in geomorphology, were inventively used for inventory-making in the archaeological site. Traditional field sketches were only a base, which enables entering data into the programme, and don't documentation material in itself as it used to be. The method of data visual ization proposed by the author gives new possibilities for using the GIS platform software. W artykule zaprezentowano projekt wykorzystania aplikacji ArcView 3.2 w modelowaniu obrazu form eksploracyjnych na stanowisku archeologicznym Bykowszczyzna 8. Stanowisko zostało objęte programem ratowniczych badań archeologicznych w związku z budową obwodnicy miasta Kocka na trasie krajowej nr 19 relacji Siemiatycze-Lublin-Nisko. Zasadniczy etap prac archeologicznych na stanowisku Bykowszczyzna 8 obejmował pozyskanie oraz inwentaryzację materiału zabytkowego wypełniającego formy. W wyniku wybrania tego materiału, w obszarze stanowiska pozostają charakterystyczne jamy gospodarcze, które stanowią negatywowy obraz wypełnienia formy. Kształt jam jest dokumentowany w postaci szkiców oraz fotografii. Dokumentacja ta stanowi punkt wyjścia procesu digitalizacji (materiał źródłowy). Treścią artykułu jest sporządzenie cyfrowej dokumentacji zawierającej plany stanowiska w kilku poziomach szczegółowości (dla pasa, pola oraz pojedynczych form) oraz wygenerowanie modeli w standardzie 3D. Dokumentacja taka umożliwia łatwą archiwizację oraz czytelną prezentację wybranych obiektów. Możliwe jest również wykonanie analiz przestrzennych. Funkcje programu ArcView 3.2. oraz

  5. Graphics performance in rich Internet applications.

    PubMed

    Hoetzlein, Rama C

    2012-01-01

    Rendering performance for rich Internet applications (RIAs) has recently focused on the debate between using Flash and HTML5 for streaming video and gaming on mobile devices. A key area not widely explored, however, is the scalability of raw bitmap graphics performance for RIAs. Does Flash render animated sprites faster than HTML5? How much faster is WebGL than Flash? Answers to these questions are essential for developing large-scale data visualizations, online games, and truly dynamic websites. A new test methodology analyzes graphics performance across RIA frameworks and browsers, revealing specific performance outliers in existing frameworks. The results point toward a future in which all online experiences might be GPU accelerated. PMID:24806992

  6. Low-cost real-time 3D PC distributed-interactive-simulation (DIS) application for C4I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, David L.; Veron, Harry

    1998-04-01

    A 3D Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) application was developed and demonstrated in a PC environment. The application is capable of running in the stealth mode or as a player which includes battlefield simulations, such as ModSAF. PCs can be clustered together, but not necessarily collocated, to run a simulation or training exercise on their own. A 3D perspective view of the battlefield is displayed that includes terrain, trees, buildings and other objects supported by the DIS application. Screen update rates of 15 to 20 frames per second have been achieved with fully lit and textured scenes thus providing high quality and fast graphics. A complete PC system can be configured for under $2,500. The software runs under Windows95 and WindowsNT. It is written in C++ and uses a commercial API called RenderWare for 3D rendering. The software uses Microsoft Foundation classes and Microsoft DirectPlay for joystick input. The RenderWare libraries enhance the performance through optimization for MMX and the Pentium Pro processor. The RenderWare and the Righteous 3D graphics board from Orchid Technologies with an advertised rendering rate of up to 2 million texture mapped triangles per second. A low-cost PC DIS simulator that can partake in a real-time collaborative simulation with other platforms is thus achieved.

  7. Possible Applications of 3D Printing Technology on Textile Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korger, M.; Bergschneider, J.; Lutz, M.; Mahltig, B.; Finsterbusch, K.; Rabe, M.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing is a rapidly emerging additive manufacturing technology which can offer cost efficiency and flexibility in product development and production. In textile production 3D printing can also serve as an add-on process to apply 3D structures on textiles. In this study the low-cost fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique was applied using different thermoplastic printing materials available on the market with focus on flexible filaments such as thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) or Soft PLA. Since a good adhesion and stability of the 3D printed structures on textiles are essential, separation force and abrasion resistance tests were conducted with different kinds of printed woven fabrics demonstrating that a sufficient adhesion can be achieved. The main influencing factor can be attributed to the topography of the textile surface affected by the weave, roughness and hairiness offering formlocking connections followed by the wettability of the textile surface by the molten polymer, which depends on the textile surface energy and can be specifically controlled by washing (desizing), finishing or plasma treatment of the textile before the print. These basic adhesion mechanisms can also be considered crucial for 3D printing on knitwear.

  8. 3D reconstruction based on CT image and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxun; Zhang, Mingmin

    2004-03-01

    Reconstitute the 3-D model of the liver and its internal piping system and simulation of the liver surgical operation can increase the accurate and security of the liver surgical operation, attain a purpose for the biggest limit decrease surgical operation wound, shortening surgical operation time, increasing surgical operation succeeding rate, reducing medical treatment expenses and promoting patient recovering from illness. This text expatiated technology and method that the author constitutes 3-D the model of the liver and its internal piping system and simulation of the liver surgical operation according to the images of CT. The direct volume rendering method establishes 3D the model of the liver. Under the environment of OPENGL adopt method of space point rendering to display liver's internal piping system and simulation of the liver surgical operation. Finally, we adopt the wavelet transform method compressed the medical image data.

  9. Application of 3D printing technology in aerodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasek, K.; Wiklak, P.

    2014-08-01

    3D printing, as an additive process, offers much more than traditional machining techniques in terms of achievable complexity of a model shape. That fact was a motivation to adapt discussed technology as a method for creating objects purposed for aerodynamic testing. The following paper provides an overview of various 3D printing techniques. Four models of a standard NACA0018 aerofoil were manufactured in different materials and methods: MultiJet Modelling (MJM), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). Various parameters of the models have been included in the analysis: surface roughness, strength, details quality, surface imperfections and irregularities as well as thermal properties.

  10. Quantitative 3-D imaging topogrammetry for telemedicine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, Bruce R.

    1994-01-01

    The technology to reliably transmit high-resolution visual imagery over short to medium distances in real time has led to the serious considerations of the use of telemedicine, telepresence, and telerobotics in the delivery of health care. These concepts may involve, and evolve toward: consultation from remote expert teaching centers; diagnosis; triage; real-time remote advice to the surgeon; and real-time remote surgical instrument manipulation (telerobotics with virtual reality). Further extrapolation leads to teledesign and telereplication of spare surgical parts through quantitative teleimaging of 3-D surfaces tied to CAD/CAM devices and an artificially intelligent archival data base of 'normal' shapes. The ability to generate 'topogrames' or 3-D surface numerical tables of coordinate values capable of creating computer-generated virtual holographic-like displays, machine part replication, and statistical diagnostic shape assessment is critical to the progression of telemedicine. Any virtual reality simulation will remain in 'video-game' realm until realistic dimensional and spatial relational inputs from real measurements in vivo during surgeries are added to an ever-growing statistical data archive. The challenges of managing and interpreting this 3-D data base, which would include radiographic and surface quantitative data, are considerable. As technology drives toward dynamic and continuous 3-D surface measurements, presenting millions of X, Y, Z data points per second of flexing, stretching, moving human organs, the knowledge base and interpretive capabilities of 'brilliant robots' to work as a surgeon's tireless assistants becomes imaginable. The brilliant robot would 'see' what the surgeon sees--and more, for the robot could quantify its 3-D sensing and would 'see' in a wider spectral range than humans, and could zoom its 'eyes' from the macro world to long-distance microscopy. Unerring robot hands could rapidly perform machine-aided suturing with

  11. Demonstration of a 3D vision algorithm for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, Rui J. P. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports an extension of the MIAG algorithm for recognition and motion parameter determination of general 3-D polyhedral objects based on model matching techniques and using movement invariants as features of object representation. Results of tests conducted on the algorithm under conditions simulating space conditions are presented.

  12. Application of DYNA3D in large scale crashworthiness calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.; Hallquist, J.O.; Igarashi, M.; Shimomaki, K.; Mizuno, M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an example of an automobile crashworthiness calculation. Based on our experiences with the example calculation, we make recommendations to those interested in performing crashworthiness calculations. The example presented in this paper was supplied by Suzuki Motor Co., Ltd., and provided a significant shakedown for the new large deformation shell capability of the DYNA3D code. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Applications of 2D to 3D conversion for educational purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koido, Yoshihisa; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Saki; Takeuchi, Soya; Maruyama, Wataru; Nakagori, Toshio; Hirakata, Masataka; Shinkai, Hirohisa; Kawai, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    There are three main approaches creating stereoscopic S3D content: stereo filming using two cameras, stereo rendering of 3D computer graphics, and 2D to S3D conversion by adding binocular information to 2D material images. Although manual "off-line" conversion can control the amount of parallax flexibly, 2D material images are converted according to monocular information in most cases, and the flexibility of 2D to S3D conversion has not been exploited. If the depth is expressed flexibly, comprehensions and interests from converted S3D contents are anticipated to be differed from those from 2D. Therefore, in this study we created new S3D content for education by applying 2D to S3D conversion. For surgical education, we created S3D surgical operation content under a surgeon using a partial 2D to S3D conversion technique which was expected to concentrate viewers' attention on significant areas. And for art education, we converted Ukiyoe prints; traditional Japanese artworks made from a woodcut. The conversion of this content, which has little depth information, into S3D, is expected to produce different cognitive processes from those evoked by 2D content, e.g., the excitation of interest, and the understanding of spatial information. In addition, the effects of the representation of these contents were investigated.

  14. Shuttle Systems 3-D Applications: Application of 3-D Graphics in Engineering Training for Shuttle Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Gary S.

    2003-01-01

    This project illustrates an animation of the orbiter mate to the external tank, an animation of the OMS POD installation to the orbiter, and a simulation of the landing gear mechanism at the Kennedy Space Center. A detailed storyboard was created to reflect each animation or simulation. Solid models were collected and translated into Pro/Engineer's prt and asm formats. These solid models included computer files of the: orbiter, external tank, solid rocket booster, mobile launch platform, transporter, vehicle assembly building, OMS POD fixture, and landing gear. A depository of the above solid models was established. These solid models were translated into several formats. This depository contained the following files: stl for sterolithography, stp for neutral file work, shrinkwrap for compression, tiff for photoshop work, jpeg for Internet use, and prt and asm for Pro/Engineer use. Solid models were created of the material handling sling, bay 3 platforms, and orbiter contact points. Animations were developed using mechanisms to reflect each storyboard. Every effort was made to build all models technically correct for engineering use. The result was an animated routine that could be used by NASA for training material handlers and uncovering engineering safety issues.

  15. A 3-D measurement of biomagnetic field and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, Yoshinori; Kim, Bong-Soo; Kobayashi, Koichiro

    2006-09-01

    This review paper focuses in the usefulness of three-dimensional (3-D) biomagnetic field measurement for discriminating multiple sources closely located and overlapped in time. We have developed a 3-D second-order gradiometer connected to 39-channel SQUIDs for vector measurement of magnetoencephalogram (MEG), which can simultaneously detect magnetic field components perpendicular and tangential to the scalp. To assess discrimination and separation of multiple sources overlapping in time, we showed both simulation study and 3-D vector measurement of MEG as following; (a) mixed auditory evoked field (AEF) and somatosensory evoked field (SEF), (b) separating second somatosensory (SII) activity from primary somatosensory (SI) activity in SEF. The magnetic field distribution perpendicular to the scalp was not helpful for estimating the location and number of sources, owing to the lack of a dipole pattern, but the magnetic field distribution tangential to the scalp can provide information about new constraint conditions by visual inspection and singular value decomposition (SVD) method. We estimated multiple sources of mixed AEF and SEF from the MEG data of the magnetic field tangential to the scalp, and also estimated multiple sources of SI and SII activity. These results were confirmed by comparison with superimposed source locations in MRI of subject's head.

  16. MO-A-9A-01: Innovation in Medical Physics Practice: 3D Printing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, E; Perks, J; Rasmussen, K; Bakic, P

    2014-06-15

    3D printing, also called additive manufacturing, has great potential to advance the field of medicine. Many medical uses have been exhibited from facial reconstruction to the repair of pulmonary obstructions. The strength of 3D printing is to quickly convert a 3D computer model into a physical object. Medical use of 3D models is already ubiquitous with technologies such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Thus tailoring 3D printing technology to medical functions has the potential to impact patient care. This session will discuss applications to the field of Medical Physics. Topics discussed will include introduction to 3D printing methods as well as examples of real-world uses of 3D printing spanning clinical and research practice in diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy. The session will also compare 3D printing to other manufacturing processes and discuss a variety of uses of 3D printing technology outside the field of Medical Physics. Learning Objectives: Understand the technologies available for 3D Printing Understand methods to generate 3D models Identify the benefits and drawbacks to rapid prototyping / 3D Printing Understand the potential issues related to clinical use of 3D Printing.

  17. Quantitative 3D Optical Imaging: Applications in Dosimetry and Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Andrew Stephen

    Optical-CT has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the two very different spheres of biologists and radiation therapy physicists, but it has yet to live up to that potential. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical-CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters, but it is yet to be a clinically relevant tool as the technology is too slow to be considered practical. Biologists have used the technique for structural imaging, but have struggled with emission tomography as the reality of photon attenuation for both excitation and emission have made the images quantitatively irrelevant. Dosimetry. The DLOS (Duke Large field of view Optical-CT Scanner) was designed and constructed to make 3D dosimetry utilizing optical-CT a fast and practical tool while maintaining the accuracy of readout of the previous, slower readout technologies. Upon construction/optimization/implementation of several components including a diffuser, band pass filter, registration mount & fluid filtration system the dosimetry system provides high quality data comparable to or exceeding that of commercial products. In addition, a stray light correction algorithm was tested and implemented. The DLOS in combination with the 3D dosimeter it was designed for, PREAGETM, then underwent rigorous commissioning and benchmarking tests validating its performance against gold standard data including a set of 6 irradiations. DLOS commissioning tests resulted in sub-mm isotropic spatial resolution (MTF >0.5 for frequencies of 1.5lp/mm) and a dynamic range of ˜60dB. Flood field uniformity was 10% and stable after 45minutes. Stray light proved to be small, due to telecentricity, but even the residual can be removed through deconvolution. Benchmarking tests showed the mean 3D passing gamma rate (3%, 3mm, 5% dose threshold) over the 6 benchmark data sets was 97.3% +/- 0.6% (range 96%-98%) scans totaling ˜10 minutes, indicating excellent ability to perform 3D dosimetry while improving the speed of

  18. High-throughput three-dimensional (3D) lithographic microfabrication in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daekeun; So, Peter T. C.

    2010-02-01

    Two-photon excitation microfabrication has been shown to be useful in the field of photonics and biomedicine. It generates 3D microstructures and provides sub-diffraction fabrication resolution. Nevertheless, laser direct writing, the most popular two-photon fabrication technique, has slow fabrication speed, and its applications are limited to prototyping. In this proceeding, we propose high-throughput 3D lithographic microfabrication system based on depthresolved wide-field illumination and build several 3D microstructures with SU-8. Through these fabrications, 3D lithographic microfabrication has scalable function and high-throughput capability. It also has the potential for fabricating 3D microstructure in biomedical applications, such as intertwining channels in 3D microfluidic devices for biomedical analysis and 3D cell patterning in the tissue scaffolds.

  19. Adaptive step ODE algorithms for the 3D simulation of electric heart activity with graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Molla, V M; Liberos, A; Vidal, A; Guillem, M S; Millet, J; Gonzalez, A; Martinez-Zaldivar, F J; Climent, A M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we studied the implementation and performance of adaptive step methods for large systems of ordinary differential equations systems in graphics processing units, focusing on the simulation of three-dimensional electric cardiac activity. The Rush-Larsen method was applied in all the implemented solvers to improve efficiency. We compared the adaptive methods with the fixed step methods, and we found that the fixed step methods can be faster while the adaptive step methods are better in terms of accuracy and robustness. PMID:24377685

  20. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications

    PubMed Central

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2015-01-01

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting the high demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues that lead to immune rejection of the transplant. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, scientists working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired a growing interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity and precision, where fine details can be included at a micron level. In this review, we discuss the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering. A hybrid approach, employing both natural and synthetic materials, as well as multiple printing processes may be the key to yielding an ECM-like scaffold with high mechanical strength, porosity, interconnectivity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and high processability. Creating such biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation. PMID:26097108

  1. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications.

    PubMed

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-08-26

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair, and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues leading to immune rejection of the transplant. In order to overcome these drawbacks, scientists have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired an interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity, where fine details can be included at a micrometer level. In this Review, the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering are discussed. Creating biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation. PMID:26097108

  2. 3-D Adaptive Sparsity Based Image Compression With Applications to Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Fang, Leyuan; Li, Shutao; Kang, Xudong; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel general-purpose compression method for tomographic images, termed 3D adaptive sparse representation based compression (3D-ASRC). In this paper, we focus on applications of 3D-ASRC for the compression of ophthalmic 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. The 3D-ASRC algorithm exploits correlations among adjacent OCT images to improve compression performance, yet is sensitive to preserving their differences. Due to the inherent denoising mechanism of the sparsity based 3D-ASRC, the quality of the compressed images are often better than the raw images they are based on. Experiments on clinical-grade retinal OCT images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed 3D-ASRC over other well-known compression methods. PMID:25561591

  3. 3-D Adaptive Sparsity Based Image Compression with Applications to Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Leyuan; Li, Shutao; Kang, Xudong; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel general-purpose compression method for tomographic images, termed 3D adaptive sparse representation based compression (3D-ASRC). In this paper, we focus on applications of 3D-ASRC for the compression of ophthalmic 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. The 3D-ASRC algorithm exploits correlations among adjacent OCT images to improve compression performance, yet is sensitive to preserving their differences. Due to the inherent denoising mechanism of the sparsity based 3D-ASRC, the quality of the compressed images are often better than the raw images they are based on. Experiments on clinical-grade retinal OCT images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed 3D-ASRC over other well-known compression methods. PMID:25561591

  4. Building the 3-D jugsaw puzzle: Applications of sequence stratigraphy to 3-D reservoir characterization, Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, S.W.

    1996-04-01

    Reservoir characterization involves the quantification, integration, reduction, and analysis of geological, petrophysical, seismic, and engineering data. This is no small task. A principal goal of reservoir characterization is to derive a spatial understanding of interwell heterogeneity. Traditionally, geologic attempts to characterize interwell heterogeneity have been done using hand-drawn or computer-generated two-dimensional (2-D) maps and cross sections. Results can be improved dramatically using three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation and analysis techniques. Three-dimensional reservoir characterization requires the same input data used in 2-D approaches, and the cost is equal to, and commonly lower than, traditional 2-D methods. The product of 3-D reservoir characterization is a 3-D reservoir model. The language used to communicate the results of a 3-D reservoir model is visualization; i.e., visual images of numerical data. All of the available log and core data in a model area are incorporated in a 3-D model, but the data are depicted as colored cells rather than as log traces. The integrity of the 3-D reservoir model is largely a function of the stratigraphic framework. Interpreting the correct stratigraphic framework for a subsurface reservoir is the most difficult and creative part of the 3-D modeling process. Sequence and seismic stratigraphic interpretation provide the best stratigraphic framework for 3-D reservoir modeling. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the pro- cess of 3-D deterministic reservoir modeling and to illustrate the advantages of using a sequence stratigraphic framework in 3-D modeling. Mixed carbonate and siliciclastic sediment outcrop and subsurface examples from the Permian basin of west Texas and New Mexico will be used as examples, but the concepts and techniques can be applied to reservoirs of any age.

  5. Distributed microscopy: toward a 3D computer-graphic-based multiuser microscopic manipulation, imaging, and measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulzmann, Armin; Carlier, Jerome; Jacot, Jacques

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this project is to telecontrol the movements in 3D-space of a microscope in order to manipulate and measure microsystems or micro parts aided by multi-user virtual reality (VR) environments. Presently microsystems are gaining in interest. Microsystems are small, independent modules, incorporating various functions, such as electronic, micro mechanical, data processing, optical, chemical, medical and biological functions. Though improving the manufacturing technologies, the measurement of the small structures to insure the quality of the process is a key information for the development. So far to measure the micro structures strong microscopes are needed. The use of highly magnifying computerized microscopes is expensive. To insure high quality measurements and distribute the acquired information to multi-user our proposed system is divided into three parts: the virtual reality microscopic environment (VRME)-based user-interface on a SGI workstation to prepare the manipulations and measurements. Secondly the computerized light microscope with the vision system inspecting the scene and getting the images of the specimen. Newly developed vision algorithms are used to analyze micro structures in the scene corresponding to the known a priori model. This vision is extracting position and shape of the objects and then transmitted as feedback to the user of the VRME-system to update his virtual environment. The internet demon is the third part of the system and distributes the information about the position of the micro structures, their shape and the images to the connected users who themselves may interact with the microscope (turn and displace the specimen on the back of a moving platform, or adding their structures to the scene and compare). The key idea behind our project VRME is to use the intuitiveness and the 3D visualization of VR environments coupled with a vision system to perform measurements of micro structures at a high accuracy. The direct

  6. Interactive Graphics: Exemplified with Real Data Applications

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Ünlü, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Graphics are widely used in modern applied statistics because they are easy to create, convenient to use, and they can present information effectively. Static plots do not allow interacting with graphics. User interaction, on the other hand, is crucial in exploring data. It gives flexibility and control. One can experiment with the data and the displays. One can investigate the data from different perspectives to produce views that are easily interpretable and informative. In this paper, we try to explain interactive graphics and advocate their use as a practical tool. The benefits and strengths of interactive graphics for data exploration and data quality analyses are illustrated systematically with three complex real datasets. PMID:21713185

  7. Applications of computer graphics to aircraft synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, R. L.; Putnam, R.

    1975-01-01

    The history of the development of an aircraft configuration synthesis program using interactive computer graphics was described. A system based on time-sharing was compared to two different concepts based on distributed computing.

  8. Extracellular vesicles of calcifying turkey leg tendon characterized by immunocytochemistry and high voltage electron microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; McKee, M. D.; Nanci, A.; Song, M. J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Arena, J.; McEwen, B.

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the structure and possible function of extracellular vesicles in certain calcifying vertebrate tissues, normally mineralizing leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, have been studied in two separate investigations, one concerning the electron microscopic immunolocalization of the 66 kDa phosphoprotein, osteopontin, and the other detailing the organization and distribution of mineral crystals associated with the vesicles as determined by high voltage microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction. Immunolabeling shows that osteopontin is related to extracellular vesicles of the tendon in the sense that its initial presence appears coincident with the development of mineral associated with the vesicle loci. By high voltage electron microscopy and 3-D imaging techniques, mineral crystals are found to consist of small irregularly shaped particles somewhat randomly oriented throughout individual vesicles sites. Their appearance is different from that found for the mineral observed within calcifying tendon collagen, and their 3-D disposition is not regularly ordered. Possible spatial and temporal relationships of vesicles, osteopontin, mineral, and collagen are being examined further by these approaches.

  9. Graphics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Susan

    1975-01-01

    An art teacher described an elective course in graphics which was designed to enlarge a student's knowledge of value, color, shape within a shape, transparency, line and texture. This course utilized the technique of working a multi-colored print from a single block that was first introduced by Picasso. (Author/RK)

  10. Development and Applications of 3D Cartesian CFD Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Berger, Marsha J.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The urgent need for dramatic reductions in aircraft design cycle time is focusing scrutiny upon all aspects of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). These reductions will most likely come not from increased reliance upon user-interactive (and therefore time-expensive) methods, but instead from methods that can be fully automated and incorporated into 'black box' solutions. In comparison with tetrahedral methods, three-dimensional Cartesian grid approaches are in relative infancy, but initial experiences with automated Cartesian techniques are quite promising. Our research is targeted at furthering the development of Cartesian methods so that they can become key elements of a completely automatic grid generation/flow solution procedure applicable to the Euler analysis of complex aircraft geometries.

  11. Heuristic Techniques Application In A 3-D Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazouz, A. Kader

    1989-02-01

    This paper discusses the application of a heuristic technique to stack regular and irregular shapes objects on the same container or on the same pallet. The computer representation of any object is based on the recursive octree method where each unit volume element is a voxel. Then, the choice of the space taken by any shape object within the volume is made through the heuristic approach. The heuristic technique developed is an evaluation function that compares all the available spaces based on weighing factors and threshold levels. The parameters used are shape, space available, contents of the object, and dimensions. The goal is to choose the most feasible available space every time an object is ready to be stacked. The heuristic algorithm is implemented within a knowledge based system to control a flexible material handling cell. Generally the cell comprises a material handling robot, a conveyance system that brings the objects to the cell where objects are distributed randomly to the cell, a vision system to identify the objects and verify the stacking procedure, and a computer to control and initiate the decision making process to stack all shape objects on the same volume.

  12. 3D sensing for machine guidance in meat cutting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Wayne; Britton, Doug; Usher, Colin; Diao, Mamadou; Ruffin, Kevin

    2005-11-01

    Most cutting and deboning operations in meat processing require accurate cuts be made to obtain maximum yield and ensure food safety. This is a significant concern for purveyors of deboned product. This task is made more difficult by the variability that is present in most natural products. The specific application of interest in this paper is the production of deboned poultry breast. This is typically obtained from a cut of the broiler called a 'front half' that includes the breast and the wings. The deboning operation typically consists of a cut that starts at the shoulder joint and then continues along the scapula. Attentive humans with training do a very good job of making this cut. The breast meat is then removed by pulling on the wings. Inaccurate cuts lead to poor yield (amount of boneless meat obtained relative to the weight of the whole carcass) and increase the probability that bone fragments might end up in the product. As equipment designers seek to automate the deboning operation, the cutting task has been a significant obstacle to developing automation that maximizes yield without generating unacceptable levels of bone fragments. The current solution is to sort the bone-in product into different weight ranges and then to adjust the deboning machines to the average of these weight ranges. We propose an approach for obtaining key cut points by extrapolation from external reference points based on the anatomy of the bird. We show that this approach can be implemented using a stereo imaging system, and the accuracy in locating the cut points of interest is significantly improved. This should result in more accurate cuts and with this concomitantly improved yield while reducing the incidence of bones. We also believe the approach could be extended to the processing of other species.

  13. Application of statistical cancer atlas for 3D biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ramkrishnan; Shen, Dinggang; Davatzikos, Christos; Crawford, E. David; Barqawi, Albaha; Werahera, Priya; Kumar, Dinesh; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2008-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in males in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer death. While the exact cause is still under investigation, researchers agree on certain risk factors like age, family history, dietary habits, lifestyle and race. It is also widely accepted that cancer distribution within the prostate is inhomogeneous, i.e. certain regions have a higher likelihood of developing cancer. In this regard extensive work has been done to study the distribution of cancer in order to perform biopsy more effectively. Recently a statistical cancer atlas of the prostate was demonstrated along with an optimal biopsy scheme achieving a high detection rate. In this paper we discuss the complete construction and application of such an atlas that can be used in a clinical setting to effectively target high cancer zones during biopsy. The method consists of integrating intensity statistics in the form of cancer probabilities at every voxel in the image with shape statistics of the prostate in order to quickly warp the atlas onto a subject ultrasound image. While the atlas surface can be registered to a pre-segmented subject prostate surface or instead used to perform segmentation of the capsule via optimization of shape parameters to segment the subject image, the strength of our approach lies in the fast mapping of cancer statistics onto the subject using shape statistics. The shape model was trained from over 38 expert segmented prostate surfaces and the atlas registration accuracy was found to be high suggesting the use of this method to perform biopsy in near real time situations with some optimization.

  14. Human factors guidelines for applications of 3D perspectives: a literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Sharon; Fitzhugh, Elisabeth; Aleva, Denise

    2009-05-01

    Once considered too processing-intense for general utility, application of the third dimension to convey complex information is facilitated by the recent proliferation of technological advancements in computer processing, 3D displays, and 3D perspective (2.5D) renderings within a 2D medium. The profusion of complex and rapidly-changing dynamic information being conveyed in operational environments has elevated interest in possible military applications of 3D technologies. 3D can be a powerful mechanism for clearer information portrayal, facilitating rapid and accurate identification of key elements essential to mission performance and operator safety. However, implementation of 3D within legacy systems can be costly, making integration prohibitive. Therefore, identifying which tasks may benefit from 3D or 2.5D versus simple 2D visualizations is critical. Unfortunately, there is no "bible" of human factors guidelines for usability optimization of 2D, 2.5D, or 3D visualizations nor for determining which display best serves a particular application. Establishing such guidelines would provide an invaluable tool for designers and operators. Defining issues common to each will enhance design effectiveness. This paper presents the results of an extensive review of open source literature addressing 3D information displays, with particular emphasis on comparison of true 3D with 2D and 2.5D representations and their utility for military tasks. Seventy-five papers are summarized, highlighting militarily relevant applications of 3D visualizations and 2.5D perspective renderings. Based on these findings, human factors guidelines for when and how to use these visualizations, along with recommendations for further research are discussed.

  15. The application of digital medical 3D printing technology on tumor operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jimin; Jiang, Yijian; Li, Yangsheng

    2016-04-01

    Digital medical 3D printing technology is a new hi-tech which combines traditional medical and digital design, computer science, bio technology and 3D print technology. At the present time there are four levels application: The printed 3D model is the first and simple application. The surgery makes use of the model to plan the processing before operation. The second is customized operation tools such as implant guide. It helps doctor to operate with special tools rather than the normal medical tools. The third level application of 3D printing in medical area is to print artificial bones or teeth to implant into human body. The big challenge is the fourth level which is to print organs with 3D printing technology. In this paper we introduced an application of 3D printing technology in tumor operation. We use 3D printing to print guide for invasion operation. Puncture needles were guided by printed guide in face tumors operation. It is concluded that this new type guide is dominantly advantageous.

  16. 3D Globe Support for Arctic Science through the Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, J.; Johnson, G. W.; Gaylord, A. G.; Cody, R.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Franko, J. C.; Dover, M.; Garcia-Lavigne, D.; Manley, W.; Score, R.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual Globes or 3D Geobrowsers play a crucial role in the visualization of spatial data for scientific research. While many applications provide the ability to visualize data, they lack the necessary GIS functionality to query the information. In addition, many users want to overlay their own tabular, vector and raster data on a virtual globe. The 3D Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP 3D) provides a free 3D geobrowser that includes query functionality and support for many data formats and map services. ARMAP 3D was developed on top of a free software application from the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) called ArcGIS Explorer (AGX). Several custom tasks as well as a customizable interface have been developed for ARMAP 3D with AGX's own software development kit (SDK) using .NET framework. ARMAP 3D includes high resolution imagery and information from the Arctic Research Logistics Support Service (ARLSS) database which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). ARLSS includes information about NSF research locations plus locations from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) locations. With special emphasis on the International Polar Year (IPY), ARMAP has targeted science planners, scientists, educators, and the general public. In sum, ARMAP goes beyond a simple map display to enable analysis, synthesis, and coordination of Arctic research. Information on the ARMAP suite of applications and services may be accessed via the gateway web site at http://www.armap.org.

  17. Conformal geometry and its applications on 3D shape matching, recognition, and stitching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Yang; Jin, Miao; Gu, Xianfeng David; Samaras, Dimitris

    2007-07-01

    Three-dimensional shape matching is a fundamental issue in computer vision with many applications such as shape registration, 3D object recognition, and classification. However, shape matching with noise, occlusion, and clutter is a challenging problem. In this paper, we analyze a family of quasi-conformal maps including harmonic maps, conformal maps, and least-squares conformal maps with regards to 3D shape matching. As a result, we propose a novel and computationally efficient shape matching framework by using least-squares conformal maps. According to conformal geometry theory, each 3D surface with disk topology can be mapped to a 2D domain through a global optimization and the resulting map is a diffeomorphism, i.e., one-to-one and onto. This allows us to simplify the 3D shape-matching problem to a 2D image-matching problem, by comparing the resulting 2D parametric maps, which are stable, insensitive to resolution changes and robust to occlusion, and noise. Therefore, highly accurate and efficient 3D shape matching algorithms can be achieved by using the above three parametric maps. Finally, the robustness of least-squares conformal maps is evaluated and analyzed comprehensively in 3D shape matching with occlusion, noise, and resolution variation. In order to further demonstrate the performance of our proposed method, we also conduct a series of experiments on two computer vision applications, i.e., 3D face recognition and 3D nonrigid surface alignment and stitching. PMID:17496378

  18. 3D graphene-based hybrid materials: synthesis and applications in energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiurong; Cha, Younghwan; Song, Yang; Lee, Jung-In; Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, Xiaoyu; Song, Min-Kyu; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-08-25

    Porous 3D graphene-based hybrid materials (3D GBHMs) are currently attractive nanomaterials employed in the field of energy. Heteroatom-doped 3D graphene and metal, metal oxide, and polymer-decorated 3D graphene with modified electronic and atomic structures provide promising performance as electrode materials in energy storage and conversion. Numerous synthesis methods such as self-assembly, templating, electrochemical deposition, and supercritical CO2, pave the way to mass production of 3D GBHMs in the commercialization of energy devices. This review summarizes recent advances in the fabrication of 3D GBHMs with well-defined architectures such as finely controlled pore sizes, heteroatom doping types and levels. Moreover, current progress toward applications in fuel cells, supercapacitors and batteries employing 3D GBHMs is also highlighted, along with the detailed mechanisms of the enhanced electrochemical performance. Furthermore, current critical issues, challenges and future prospects with respect to applications of 3D GBHMs in practical devices are discussed at the end of this review. PMID:27531643

  19. Applications of three-dimensional (3D) printing for microswimmers and bio-hybrid robotics.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Trichet-Paredes, C; Sánchez, S

    2015-04-01

    This article will focus on recent reports that have applied three-dimensional (3D) printing for designing millimeter to micrometer architecture for robotic motility. The utilization of 3D printing has rapidly grown in applications for medical prosthetics and scaffolds for organs and tissue, but more recently has been implemented for designing mobile robotics. With an increase in the demand for devices to perform in fragile and confined biological environments, it is crucial to develop new miniaturized, biocompatible 3D systems. Fabrication of materials at different scales with different properties makes 3D printing an ideal system for creating frameworks for small-scale robotics. 3D printing has been applied for the design of externally powered, artificial microswimmers and studying their locomotive capabilities in different fluids. Printed materials have also been incorporated with motile cells for bio-hybrid robots capable of functioning by cell contraction and swimming. These 3D devices offer new methods of robotic motility for biomedical applications requiring miniature structures. Traditional 3D printing methods, where a structure is fabricated in an additive process from a digital design, and non-traditional 3D printing methods, such as lithography and molding, will be discussed. PMID:25632887

  20. Application of ggplot2 to Pharmacometric Graphics

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Murphy, D

    2013-01-01

    Visualization is a powerful mechanism for extracting information from data. ggplot2 is a contributed visualization package in the R programming language, which creates publication-quality statistical graphics in an efficient, elegant, and systematic manner. This article summarizes key features of the package with examples from pharmacometrics and pointers to available resources for learning ggplot2. PMID:24132163

  1. Computer graphics application in the engineering design integration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Abel, R. W.; Hirsch, G. N.; Alford, G. E.; Colquitt, W. N.; Stewart, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The computer graphics aspect of the Engineering Design Integration (EDIN) system and its application to design problems were discussed. Three basic types of computer graphics may be used with the EDIN system for the evaluation of aerospace vehicles preliminary designs: offline graphics systems using vellum-inking or photographic processes, online graphics systems characterized by direct coupled low cost storage tube terminals with limited interactive capabilities, and a minicomputer based refresh terminal offering highly interactive capabilities. The offline line systems are characterized by high quality (resolution better than 0.254 mm) and slow turnaround (one to four days). The online systems are characterized by low cost, instant visualization of the computer results, slow line speed (300 BAUD), poor hard copy, and the early limitations on vector graphic input capabilities. The recent acquisition of the Adage 330 Graphic Display system has greatly enhanced the potential for interactive computer aided design.

  2. The application of iterative closest point (ICP) registration to improve 3D terrain mapping estimates using the flash 3D ladar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Jack; Armstrong, Ernest E.; Armbruster, Walter; Richmond, Richard

    2010-04-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to develop an effective means of creating a 3D terrain map image (point-cloud) in GPS denied regions from a sequence of co-bore sighted visible and 3D LIDAR images. Both the visible and 3D LADAR cameras were hard mounted to a vehicle. The vehicle was then driven around the streets of an abandoned village used as a training facility by the German Army and imagery was collected. The visible and 3D LADAR images were then fused and 3D registration performed using a variation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The ICP algorithm is widely used for various spatial and geometric alignment of 3D imagery producing a set of rotation and translation transformations between two 3D images. ICP rotation and translation information obtain from registering the fused visible and 3D LADAR imagery was then used to calculate the x-y plane, range and intensity (xyzi) coordinates of various structures (building, vehicles, trees etc.) along the driven path. The xyzi coordinates information was then combined to create a 3D terrain map (point-cloud). In this paper, we describe the development and application of 3D imaging techniques (most specifically the ICP algorithm) used to improve spatial, range and intensity estimates of imagery collected during urban terrain mapping using a co-bore sighted, commercially available digital video camera with focal plan of 640×480 pixels and a 3D FLASH LADAR. Various representations of the reconstructed point-clouds for the drive through data will also be presented.

  3. Performance assessment of 3D surface imaging technique for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Recent development in optical 3D surface imaging technologies provide better ways to digitalize the 3D surface and its motion in real-time. The non-invasive 3D surface imaging approach has great potential for many medical imaging applications, such as motion monitoring of radiotherapy, pre/post evaluation of plastic surgery and dermatology, to name a few. Various commercial 3D surface imaging systems have appeared on the market with different dimension, speed and accuracy. For clinical applications, the accuracy, reproducibility and robustness across the widely heterogeneous skin color, tone, texture, shape properties, and ambient lighting is very crucial. Till now, a systematic approach for evaluating the performance of different 3D surface imaging systems still yet exist. In this paper, we present a systematic performance assessment approach to 3D surface imaging system assessment for medical applications. We use this assessment approach to exam a new real-time surface imaging system we developed, dubbed "Neo3D Camera", for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The assessments include accuracy, field of view, coverage, repeatability, speed and sensitivity to environment, texture and color.

  4. Sub aquatic 3D visualization and temporal analysis utilizing ArcGIS online and 3D applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used 3D Visualization tools to illustrate some complex water quality data we’ve been collecting in the Great Lakes. These data include continuous tow data collected from our research vessel the Lake Explorer II, and continuous water quality data collected from an autono...

  5. 3D radiative transfer in colliding wind binaries: Application of the SimpleX algorithm to 3D SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael; Icke, Vincent; Gull, Theodore

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in a massive binary system. We accomplish this by applying the SIMPLEX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the colliding winds in the binary system η Carinae. We use SIMPLEX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We show how the SIMPLEX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in η Car's extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SIMPLEX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the η Car system, such as the primary's mass-loss rate and the companion's temperature and luminosity. While we initially focus specifically on the η Car binary, the numerical methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR140, WR137, WR19) and dusty 'pinwheel' (WR104, WR98a) binary systems. One of the biggest remaining mysteries is how dust can form and survive in such systems that contain a hot, luminous O star. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SIMPLEX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  6. Computer graphics applications to crew displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyzkoski, J.

    1983-01-01

    Astronauts are provided much data and information via the monochrome CRT displays on the orbiter. For this project two areas were investigated for the possible introduction of computer graphics to enhance and extend the utility of these displays. One involved reviewing the current orbiter displays and identifying those which could be improved via computer graphics. As an example, the tabular data on electrical power distribution and control was enhanced by the addition of color and bar charts. The other dealt with the development of an aid to berthing a payload with the Remote Manipulator System (RMS). This aid consists of a graphics display of the top, front and side views of the payload and cargo bay and point of resolution (POR) position and attitude data for the current location of the payload. The initial implementation was on an IBM PC clone. The demonstration software installed in the Johnson Space Center Manipulator Development Facility (MD) was reviewed. Due to current hardware limitations, the MDF verision is slow, i.e., about a 40+ seond update rate and, hence, not real-time. Despite this fact, the evaluation of this additional visual cue as an RMS operator aid indicates that this display, with modifications for speed, etc., can assist the crew. Further development is appropriate.

  7. Study on the Construction and Application of 3D Geographic Information Services for the Smart City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W.-Q.

    2014-04-01

    Smart City, whose main characteristics are intelligence and interconnection capability, has become an important goal of some cities' development. This paper, based on urban three-dimensional geographic information characteristics, analyses 3D geographic information requirements in the Smart City construction and development process, proposes construction and management methods for 3D geographic information. Furthermore, this paper takes Shanghai Geographic Information Public Service Platform as an example, discusses 3D geographic information application in multiple fields, and proves that it is an effective ways to promote Intelligent City construction.

  8. Clinical application of 3D imaging for assessment of treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H.C.; Oliveira, Ana Emilia Figueiredo; Grauer, Dan; Styner, Martin; Proffit, William R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the clinical application of CBCT for assessment of treatment outcomes, and discusses current work to superimpose digital dental models and 3D photographs. Superimposition of CBCTs on stable structures of reference now allow assessment of 3D dental, skeletal and soft tissue changes for both growing and non-growing patients. Additionally, we describe clinical findings from CBCT superimpositions in assessment of surgery and skeletal anchorage treatment. PMID:21516170

  9. Development and application of a 3D Cartesian grid Euler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Wong, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes recent progress in the development and application of 3D Cartesian grid generation and Euler flow solution techniques. Improvements to flow field grid generation algorithms, geometry representations, and geometry refinement criteria are presented, including details of a procedure for correctly identifying and resolving extremely thin surface features. An initial implementation of automatic flow field refinement is also presented. Results for several 3D multi-component configurations are provided and discussed.

  10. 3D Laser Scanning Modeling and Application on Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, M.; Zhang, X.; Wu, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva Statue is located at Baoding Mountain in Chongqing. It has the reputation as "the Gem of World's Rock Carving Art". At present,the Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva Statue is basically well conserved, while the local damage is already very serious. However, the Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva Statue is a three-dimensional caved statue, the present plane surveying and mapping device cannot reflect the preservation situation completely. Therefore, the documentation of the Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva Statue using terrestrial laser scanning is of great significance. This paper will introduce a new method for superfine 3D modeling of Thousand-hand Bodhisattva based on the high-resolution 3D cloud points. By analyzing these 3D cloud points and 3D models, some useful information, such as several 3D statistics, 3D thematic map and 3D shape restoration suggestion of Thousand-hand Bodhisattva will be revealed, which are beneficial to restoration work and some other application.

  11. Application of 3D photo-reconstruction in soil erosion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; James, Michael; Pérez, Rafael; Gómez, Jose Alfonso

    2014-05-01

    3D photo-reconstruction (3D-PR) has been applied successfully to obtain elevation models using uncalibrated and nonmetric cameras for a range of geoscience applications (e.g. James and Robson, 2012), including gully erosion assessment (Castillo et al., 2012). However, its application in soil erosion studies is currently at the outset. The aim of this work is to compare 3D-PR with conventional techniques that have been employed traditionally for different purposes in soil erosion studies. In this preliminary work, we tested three applications that involve volume calculations: estimation of soil bulk density (BD), quantification of soil erosion at road banks (RB) and sedimentation rates behind check dams (CD). For each analysis, a PR field survey was carried out simultaneously with a conventional method (volume of water was used for BD, and total station surveys for RB and CD). For the 3D-PR technique, the accuracy as a function of the number of pictures taken was evaluated. In this study we explore the difference in the volume estimates between 3D-PR and conventional techniques as well as the time requirements for each method in order to compare their performance and optimal field of application.

  12. Graphical neuroimaging informatics: application to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H; Greer, Vaughan

    2014-06-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer's Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer's Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN's ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  13. Performance of the Cray T3D and emerging architectures on canopy QCD applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, M.; Uchima, M.

    1995-11-01

    The Cray T3D, an MIMD system with NUMA shared memory capabilities and in principle very low communications latency, can support the Canopy framework for grid-oriented applications. CANOPY has been ported to the T3D, with the intent of making it available to a spectrum of users. The performance of the T3D running Canopy has been benchmarked on five QCD applications extensively run on ACPMAPS at Fermilab, requiring a variety of data access patterns. The net performance and scaling behavior reveals an efficiency relative to peak Gflops almost identical to that achieved on ACPMAPS. Detailed studies of the major factors impacting performance are presented. Generalizations applying this analysis to the newly emerging crop of commercial systems reveal where their limitations will lie. On these applications, efficiencies of above 25% are not to be expected; eliminating overheads due to Canopy will improve matters, but by less than a factor of two.

  14. Applications of Panoramic Images: from 720° Panorama to Interior 3d Models of Augmented Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.-C.; Tsai, F.

    2015-05-01

    A series of panoramic images are usually used to generate a 720° panorama image. Although panoramic images are typically used for establishing tour guiding systems, in this research, we demonstrate the potential of using panoramic images acquired from multiple sites to create not only 720° panorama, but also three-dimensional (3D) point clouds and 3D indoor models. Since 3D modeling is one of the goals of this research, the location of the panoramic sites needed to be carefully planned in order to maintain a robust result for close-range photogrammetry. After the images are acquired, panoramic images are processed into 720° panoramas, and these panoramas which can be used directly as panorama guiding systems or other applications. In addition to these straightforward applications, interior orientation parameters can also be estimated while generating 720° panorama. These parameters are focal length, principle point, and lens radial distortion. The panoramic images can then be processed with closerange photogrammetry procedures to extract the exterior orientation parameters and generate 3D point clouds. In this research, VisaulSFM, a structure from motion software is used to estimate the exterior orientation, and CMVS toolkit is used to generate 3D point clouds. Next, the 3D point clouds are used as references to create building interior models. In this research, Trimble Sketchup was used to build the model, and the 3D point cloud was added to the determining of locations of building objects using plane finding procedure. In the texturing process, the panorama images are used as the data source for creating model textures. This 3D indoor model was used as an Augmented Reality model replacing a guide map or a floor plan commonly used in an on-line touring guide system. The 3D indoor model generating procedure has been utilized in two research projects: a cultural heritage site at Kinmen, and Taipei Main Station pedestrian zone guidance and navigation system. The

  15. 3D ultrasound volume stitching using phase symmetry and harris corner detection for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Rupin; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2010-03-01

    Stitching of volumes obtained from three dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) scanners improves visualization of anatomy in many clinical applications. Fast but accurate volume registration remains the key challenge in this area.We propose a volume stitching method based on efficient registration of 3D US volumes obtained from a tracked US probe. Since the volumes, after adjusting for probe motion, are coarsely registered, we obtain salient correspondence points in the central slices of these volumes. This is done by first removing artifacts in the US slices using intensity invariant local phase image processing and then applying the Harris Corner detection algorithm. Fast sub-volume registration on a small neighborhood around the points then gives fast, accurate 3D registration parameters. The method has been tested on 3D US scans of phantom and real human radius and pelvis bones and a phantom human fetus. The method has also been compared to volumetric registration, as well as feature based registration using 3D-SIFT. Quantitative results show average post-registration error of 0.33mm which is comparable to volumetric registration accuracy (0.31mm) and much better than 3D-SIFT based registration which failed to register the volumes. The proposed method was also much faster than volumetric registration (~4.5 seconds versus 83 seconds).

  16. 3-D System-on-System (SoS) Biomedical-Imaging Architecture for Health-Care Applications.

    PubMed

    Sang-Jin Lee; Kavehei, O; Yoon-Ki Hong; Tae Won Cho; Younggap You; Kyoungrok Cho; Eshraghian, K

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the implementation of a 3-D architecture for a biomedical-imaging system based on a multilayered system-on-system structure. The architecture consists of a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor image sensor layer, memory, 3-D discrete wavelet transform (3D-DWT), 3-D Advanced Encryption Standard (3D-AES), and an RF transmitter as an add-on layer. Multilayer silicon (Si) stacking permits fabrication and optimization of individual layers by different processing technology to achieve optimal performance. Utilization of through silicon via scheme can address required low-power operation as well as high-speed performance. Potential benefits of 3-D vertical integration include an improved form factor as well as a reduction in the total wiring length, multifunctionality, power efficiency, and flexible heterogeneous integration. The proposed imaging architecture was simulated by using Cadence Spectre and Synopsys HSPICE while implementation was carried out by Cadence Virtuoso and Mentor Graphic Calibre. PMID:23853380

  17. Microfluidic 3D cell culture: potential application for tissue-based bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Li, XiuJun (James); Valadez, Alejandra V.; Zuo, Peng; Nie, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    Current fundamental investigations of human biology and the development of therapeutic drugs, commonly rely on two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture systems. However, 2D cell culture systems do not accurately recapitulate the structure, function, physiology of living tissues, as well as highly complex and dynamic three-dimensional (3D) environments in vivo. The microfluidic technology can provide micro-scale complex structures and well-controlled parameters to mimic the in vivo environment of cells. The combination of microfluidic technology with 3D cell culture offers great potential for in vivo-like tissue-based applications, such as the emerging organ-on-a-chip system. This article will review recent advances in microfluidic technology for 3D cell culture and their biological applications. PMID:22793034

  18. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  19. Radiology's Emerging Role in 3-D Printing Applications in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Trace, Anthony P; Ortiz, Daniel; Deal, Adam; Retrouvey, Michele; Elzie, Carrie; Goodmurphy, Craig; Morey, Jose; Hawkins, C Matthew

    2016-07-01

    From its inception as a tool for prototype development in the early 1980s, three-dimensional (3-D) printing has made inroads into almost every sector of industry, including health care. Medical applications range from extra- and intracorporeal orthopedic devices to complex, temporal reconstructions of patient-specific anatomy that allow operative planning and education. In the contemporary climate of personalized medicine, the utility of tangible 3-D models extrapolated directly from patient imaging data seems boundless. The purpose of this review is to briefly outline the development of 3-D printing, discuss its applications across the many medical and surgical specialties, and attempt to address obstacles and opportunities facing radiology as this technology continues to be integrated into patient care. PMID:27236288

  20. 3D exploitation system for operational applications of Earth observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonavenia, Roberto; Colaiacomo, Lucio; Dooley, Colin; Menu, Eric; Palumbo, Gianluca; Prisco, Giulio; Valero, Juan L.; Villemaud, Olivier

    1999-07-01

    The operational applicability of Earth Observation data to facilitate decision making is demonstrated with examples taken from the work of the Western European Union Satellite Center in Madrid. Analysis and reporting techniques based on 3D representations of the surface of the Earth and Virtual Reality are described.

  1. Invited review--Applications for 3D printers in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Hespel, Adrien-Maxence; Wilhite, Ray; Hudson, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in 3D printing have resulted in increased use of this technology in human medicine, and decreasing cost is making it more affordable for veterinary use. Rapid prototyping is at its early stage in veterinary medicine but clinical, educational, and experimental possibilities exist. Techniques and applications, both current and future, are explored and illustrated in this article. PMID:24889058

  2. Application of 3D Photo-reconstruction techniques in Geomorphology: Examples through different landforms and scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro; Susanne, Schnabel; Conoscenti, Christian; Caraballo-Arias, Nathalie A.; Ferro, Vito; di Stefano, Constanza; Juan de Sanjosé, José; Berenguer-Sempere, Fernando; de Matías, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments made in tri-dimensional photo-reconstruction techniques (3D-PR), such as the use of Structure from Motion (SfM) and MultiView Stereo (MVS) techniques together, have allowed obtaining high resolution 3D point clouds. In order to achieve final point clouds with these techniques, only oblique images from consumer un-calibrated and non-metric cameras are needed. Here, these techniques are used in order to measure, monitor and quantify geomorphological features and processes. Three different applications through a range of scales and landforms are presented here. Firstly, five small gully headcuts located in a small catchment in SW Spain were monitored with the aim of estimating headcut retreat rates. During this field work, 3D models obtained by means of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) were captured and used as benchmarks to analyze 3D-PR method accuracy. Results of this analysis showed centimeter-level accuracies with average distances between the 3D-PR model and the TLS model ranging from 0.009 to 0.025 m. Estimated soil loss ranged from -0.246 m3 to 0.114 m3 for a wet period (289 mm) of 54 days in 2013. Secondly, a calanchi type badland in Sicily (Italy) was photo-reconstructed and the quality of the 3D-PR model was analyzed using a Digital Elevation Model produced by classic digital photogrammetry with photos captured by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). In this case, sub-meter calculated accuracies (0.30) showed that it is possible to describe badland morphology using 3D-PR models but it is not feasible to use these models to quantify annual rates of soil erosion in badlands (10 mm eroded per year). Finally, a high-resolution model of the Veleta rock glacier (in SE Spain) was elaborated with 3D-PR techniques and compared with a 3D model obtained by means of a TLS. Results indicated that 3D-PR method can be applied to the micro-scale study of glacier morphologies and processes with average distances to the TLS point cloud of 0.21 m.

  3. a Comparison Between Active and Passive Techniques for Underwater 3d Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, G.; Gallo, A.; Bruno, F.; Muzzupappa, M.

    2011-09-01

    In the field of 3D scanning, there is an increasing need for more accurate technologies to acquire 3D models of close range objects. Underwater exploration, for example, is very hard to perform due to the hostile conditions and the bad visibility of the environment. Some application fields, like underwater archaeology, require to recover tridimensional data of objects that cannot be moved from their site or touched in order to avoid possible damages. Photogrammetry is widely used for underwater 3D acquisition, because it requires just one or two digital still or video cameras to acquire a sequence of images taken from different viewpoints. Stereo systems composed by a pair of cameras are often employed on underwater robots (i.e. ROVs, Remotely Operated Vehicles) and used by scuba divers, in order to survey archaeological sites, reconstruct complex 3D structures in aquatic environment, estimate in situ the length of marine organisms, etc. The stereo 3D reconstruction is based on the triangulation of corresponding points on the two views. This requires to find in both images common points and to match them (correspondence problem), determining a plane that contains the 3D point on the object. Another 3D technique, frequently used in air acquisition, solves this point-matching problem by projecting structured lighting patterns to codify the acquired scene. The corresponding points are identified associating a binary code in both images. In this work we have tested and compared two whole-field 3D imaging techniques (active and passive) based on stereo vision, in underwater environment. A 3D system has been designed, composed by a digital projector and two still cameras mounted in waterproof housing, so that it can perform the various acquisitions without changing the configuration of optical devices. The tests were conducted in a water tank in different turbidity conditions, on objects with different surface properties. In order to simulate a typical seafloor, we used

  4. Functional Equivalence Acceptance Testing of FUN3D for Entry Descent and Landing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Glass, Christopher E.; Padilla, Jose F.; Hammond, Dana P.; White, Jeffery A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional equivalence of the unstructured grid code FUN3D to the the structured grid code LAURA (Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm) is documented for applications of interest to the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) community. Examples from an existing suite of regression tests are used to demonstrate the functional equivalence, encompassing various thermochemical models and vehicle configurations. Algorithm modifications required for the node-based unstructured grid code (FUN3D) to reproduce functionality of the cell-centered structured code (LAURA) are also documented. Challenges associated with computation on tetrahedral grids versus computation on structured-grid derived hexahedral systems are discussed.

  5. An approach to 3D model fusion in GIS systems and its application in a future ECDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhao, Depeng; Pan, Mingyang

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics technology is widely used in various areas and causes profound changes. As an information carrier, 3D models are becoming increasingly important. The use of 3D models greatly helps to improve the cartographic expression and design. 3D models are more visually efficient, quicker and easier to understand and they can express more detailed geographical information. However, it is hard to efficiently and precisely fuse 3D models in local systems. The purpose of this study is to propose an automatic and precise approach to fuse 3D models in geographic information systems (GIS). It is the basic premise for subsequent uses of 3D models in local systems, such as attribute searching, spatial analysis, and so on. The basic steps of our research are: (1) pose adjustment by principal component analysis (PCA); (2) silhouette extraction by simple mesh silhouette extraction and silhouette merger; (3) size adjustment; (4) position matching. Finally, we implement the above methods in our system Automotive Intelligent Chart (AIC) 3D Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS). The fusion approach we propose is a common method and each calculation step is carefully designed. This approach solves the problem of cross-platform model fusion. 3D models can be from any source. They may be stored in the local cache or retrieved from Internet, or may be manually created by different tools or automatically generated by different programs. The system can be any kind of 3D GIS system.

  6. Modeling Images of Natural 3D Surfaces: Overview and Potential Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalobeanu, Andre; Kuehnel, Frank; Stutz, John

    2004-01-01

    Generative models of natural images have long been used in computer vision. However, since they only describe the of 2D scenes, they fail to capture all the properties of the underlying 3D world. Even though such models are sufficient for many vision tasks a 3D scene model is when it comes to inferring a 3D object or its characteristics. In this paper, we present such a generative model, incorporating both a multiscale surface prior model for surface geometry and reflectance, and an image formation process model based on realistic rendering, the computation of the posterior model parameter densities, and on the critical aspects of the rendering. We also how to efficiently invert the model within a Bayesian framework. We present a few potential applications, such as asteroid modeling and Planetary topography recovery, illustrated by promising results on real images.

  7. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    PubMed Central

    Asa'ad, Farah; Giannì, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration. PMID:27366149

  8. Application of the ASP3D Computer Program to Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2006-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation - 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The paper presents unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic applications of ASP3D to assess the time dependent capability and demonstrate various features of the code.

  9. Self-Assembled 3D Flower-Like Nickel Hydroxide Nanostructures and Their Supercapacitor Applications.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Nazish; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures have attracted considerable attention because of their high surface areas and unique properties which gives outstanding performance in catalysis and energy storage applications. This paper proposes the growth mechanism of 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 constructed through a two dimensional sheet framework using a one-step oleylamine-assisted solvothermal approach, where oleylamine acts as the surfactant, co-solvent, stabilizer, and reducing agent. A detailed examination of the product morphology after various reaction times suggested that the self-assembly of flower occurs through a mechanism involving nucleation, Ostwald ripening, and recrystallization. The associated characterization revealed it to be pure β-Ni(OH)2 without any sign of contamination. The effect of the morphology (sheet to 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2) on the electrochemical supercapacitive behavior was assessed by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The results showed that 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 exhibited better specific capacitance of ~1567 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) and retained ~25% capacitance at a high current density of 10 A g(-1) compared to the other reference materials. The superior electrochemical properties of the 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 originate from their large specific surface area and unique structure. PMID:27251067

  10. 3D kinematics using dual quaternions: theory and applications in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Guillaume; Lefèvre, Philippe; Blohm, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    In behavioral neuroscience, many experiments are developed in 1 or 2 spatial dimensions, but when scientists tackle problems in 3-dimensions (3D), they often face problems or new challenges. Results obtained for lower dimensions are not always extendable in 3D. In motor planning of eye, gaze or arm movements, or sensorimotor transformation problems, the 3D kinematics of external (stimuli) or internal (body parts) must often be considered: how to describe the 3D position and orientation of these objects and link them together? We describe how dual quaternions provide a convenient way to describe the 3D kinematics for position only (point transformation) or for combined position and orientation (through line transformation), easily modeling rotations, translations or screw motions or combinations of these. We also derive expressions for the velocities of points and lines as well as the transformation velocities. Then, we apply these tools to a motor planning task for manual tracking and to the modeling of forward and inverse kinematics of a seven-dof three-link arm to show the interest of dual quaternions as a tool to build models for these kinds of applications. PMID:23443667

  11. Self-Assembled 3D Flower-Like Nickel Hydroxide Nanostructures and Their Supercapacitor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Nazish; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures have attracted considerable attention because of their high surface areas and unique properties which gives outstanding performance in catalysis and energy storage applications. This paper proposes the growth mechanism of 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 constructed through a two dimensional sheet framework using a one-step oleylamine-assisted solvothermal approach, where oleylamine acts as the surfactant, co-solvent, stabilizer, and reducing agent. A detailed examination of the product morphology after various reaction times suggested that the self-assembly of flower occurs through a mechanism involving nucleation, Ostwald ripening, and recrystallization. The associated characterization revealed it to be pure β-Ni(OH)2 without any sign of contamination. The effect of the morphology (sheet to 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2) on the electrochemical supercapacitive behavior was assessed by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The results showed that 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 exhibited better specific capacitance of ~1567 F g−1 at a current density of 1 A g−1 and retained ~25% capacitance at a high current density of 10 A g−1 compared to the other reference materials. The superior electrochemical properties of the 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 originate from their large specific surface area and unique structure. PMID:27251067

  12. Self-Assembled 3D Flower-Like Nickel Hydroxide Nanostructures and Their Supercapacitor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parveen, Nazish; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures have attracted considerable attention because of their high surface areas and unique properties which gives outstanding performance in catalysis and energy storage applications. This paper proposes the growth mechanism of 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 constructed through a two dimensional sheet framework using a one-step oleylamine-assisted solvothermal approach, where oleylamine acts as the surfactant, co-solvent, stabilizer, and reducing agent. A detailed examination of the product morphology after various reaction times suggested that the self-assembly of flower occurs through a mechanism involving nucleation, Ostwald ripening, and recrystallization. The associated characterization revealed it to be pure β-Ni(OH)2 without any sign of contamination. The effect of the morphology (sheet to 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2) on the electrochemical supercapacitive behavior was assessed by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The results showed that 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 exhibited better specific capacitance of ~1567 F g‑1 at a current density of 1 A g‑1 and retained ~25% capacitance at a high current density of 10 A g‑1 compared to the other reference materials. The superior electrochemical properties of the 3D flower-like β-Ni(OH)2 originate from their large specific surface area and unique structure.

  13. Facile 3D Metal Electrode Fabrication for Energy Applications via Inkjet Printing and Shape Memory Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R. C.; Wu, J.; Hau, N. Y.; Chang, Y. H.; Feng, S. P.; Li, D. C.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on a simple 3D metal electrode fabrication technique via inkjet printing onto a thermally contracting shape memory polymer (SMP) substrate. Inkjet printing allows for the direct patterning of structures from metal nanoparticle bearing liquid inks. After deposition, these inks require thermal curing steps to render a stable conductive film. By printing onto a SMP substrate, the metal nanoparticle ink can be cured and substrate shrunk simultaneously to create 3D metal microstructures, forming a large surface area topology well suited for energy applications. Polystyrene SMP shrinkage was characterized in a laboratory oven from 150-240°C, resulting in a size reduction of 1.97-2.58. Silver nanoparticle ink was patterned into electrodes, shrunk, and the topology characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Zinc-Silver Oxide microbatteries were fabricated to demonstrate the 3D electrodes compared to planar references. Characterization was performed using 10M potassium hydroxide electrolyte solution doped with zinc oxide (57g/L). After a 300s oxidation at 3Vdc, the 3D electrode battery demonstrated a 125% increased capacity over the reference cell. Reference cells degraded with longer oxidations, but the 3D electrodes were fully oxidized for 4 hours, and exhibited a capacity of 5.5mA-hr/cm2 with stable metal performance.

  14. Design, Implementation and Applications of 3d Web-Services in DB4GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, M.; Kuper, P. V.; Dittrich, A.; Wild, P.; Butwilowski, E.; Al-Doori, M.

    2013-09-01

    The object-oriented database architecture DB4GeO was originally designed to support sub-surface applications in the geo-sciences. This is reflected in DB4GeO's geometric data model as well as in its import and export functions. Initially, these functions were designed for communication with 3D geological modeling and visualization tools such as GOCAD or MeshLab. However, it soon became clear that DB4GeO was suitable for a much wider range of applications. Therefore it is natural to move away from a standalone solution and to open the access to DB4GeO data by standardized OGC web-services. Though REST and OGC services seem incompatible at first sight, the implementation in DB4GeO shows that OGC-based implementation of web-services may use parts of the DB4GeO-REST implementation. Starting with initial solutions in the history of DB4GeO, this paper will introduce the design, adaptation (i.e. model transformation), and first steps in the implementation of OGC Web Feature (WFS) and Web Processing Services (WPS), as new interfaces to DB4GeO data and operations. Among its capabilities, DB4GeO can provide data in different data formats like GML, GOCAD, or DB3D XML through a WFS, as well as its ability to run operations like a 3D-to-2D service, or mesh-simplification (Progressive Meshes) through a WPS. We then demonstrate, an Android-based mobile 3D augmented reality viewer for DB4GeO that uses the Web Feature Service to visualize 3D geo-database query results. Finally, we explore future research work considering DB4GeO in the framework of the research group "Computer-Aided Collaborative Subway Track Planning in Multi-Scale 3D City and Building Models".

  15. Real-time graphic simulation for space telerobotics applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, E. W.

    1987-01-01

    Designing space-based telerobotic systems presents many problems unique to telerobotics and the space environment, but it also shares many common hardware and software design problems with Earth-based industrial robot applications. Such problems include manipulator design and placement, grapple-fixture design, and of course the development of effective and reliable control algorithms. Since first being applied to industrial robotics just a few years ago, interactive graphic simulation has proven to be a powerful tool for anticipating and solving problems in the design of Earth-based robotic systems and processes. Where similar problems are encountered in the design of space-based robotic mechanisms, the same graphic simulation tools may also be of assistance. The capabilities of PLACE, a commercially available interactive graphic system for the design and simulation of robotic systems and processes is described. A space-telerobotics application of the system is presented and discussed. Potential future enhancements are described.

  16. Applications of Selected Computer Graphics in Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alan D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of computer graphics techniques in a study of attrition at the University of Akron is outlined to illustrate potential applications. The techniques produce information that is more readily interpreted than the usual data tables. Specific software information and illustrations are included. (MSE)

  17. Preparation for a 3D Electromagnetic inversion-Application to GREATEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd allah, S.; Mogi, T.; Kim, H.; Fomenko, E.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies conducted by the Grounded Electrical-Source Airborne Transient Electromagnetic (GREATEM) have shown that, this system is a promising method for modelling 3D resistivity structures in coastal areas. To expand the application of the GREATEM system in the future for studying hazardous wastes, sea water incursion and hydrocarbon exploration, a 3D-resistivity modelling that considers large lateral resistivity variations is required in case of large resistivity contrasts between land and sea in surveys of coastal areas where 1D resistivity model that assumes a horizontally layered structure might be inaccurate. In this abstract we present the preparation for developing a consistent three dimensional electromagnetic inversion algorithm to calculate the EM response over arbitrary 3D conductivity structure using GREATEM system. In forward modelling the second order partial differential equations for scalar and vector potential are discretized on a staggered-grid using the finite difference method (Fomenko and Mogi, 2002, Mogi et al., 2011). In the inversion method the 3D model discretized into a large number of rectangular cells of constant conductivity and the final solution is obtained by minimizing a global objective function composed of the model objective function and data misfit. To deal with a huge number of grids and wide range of frequencies in air borne data sets, a method for approximating sensitivities is introduced for the efficient 3-D inversion. Approximate sensitivities are derived by replacing adjoint secondary electric fields with those computed in the previous iteration. These sensitivities can reduce the computation time, without significant loss of accuracy when constructing a full sensitivity matrix for 3-D inversion, based on the Gauss-Newton method (N. Han et al., 2008). Now, we tested the algorithm in the frequency domain electromagnetic response of synthetic model considering a 3D conductor. Frequency-domain computation is executed

  18. The application of camera calibration in range-gated 3D imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-quan; Wang, Xian-wei; Zhou, Yan

    2013-09-01

    selected. One-to-one correspondence between visual filed and focal length of system is obtained and offers effective visual field information for the matching of imaging filed and illumination filed in range-gated 3-D imaging technology. On the basis of the experimental results, combined with the depth of field theory, the application of camera calibration in range-gated 3-D imaging technology is futher studied.

  19. 3D chiral nanoplasmonics: fabrication, chiroptic engineering, mechanism, and application in enantioselection (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhifeng

    2015-09-01

    Chirality does naturally exist, and the building blocks of life (e.g. DNA, proteins, peptides and sugars) are usually chiral. Chirality inherently imposes chemical/biological selectivity on functional molecules; hence the discrimination in molecular chirality from an enantiomer to the other mirror image (i.e. enantioselection) has fundamental and application significance. Enantiomers interact with left and right handed circularly polarized light in a different manner with respect to optical extinction; hence, electronic circular dichroism (ECD) has been widely used for enantioselection. However, enantiomers usually have remarkably low ECD intensity, mainly owing to the small electric transition dipole moment induced by molecular sizes compared to the ECD-active wavelength in the UV-visible-near IR region. To enhance ECD magnitude, recently it has being developed 3D chiral nanoplasmonic structures having a helical path, and the dimensions are comparable to the ECD wavelength. However, it is still ambiguous the origin of 3D chiroplasmonics, and there is a lack of studying the interaction of 3D chiroplasmoncs with enantiomers for the application of enantioselection. Herein, we will present a one-step fabrication of 3D silver nanospirals (AgNSs) via low-substrate-temperature glancing angle deposition. AgNSs can be deposited on a wide range of substrates (including transparent and flexible substrates), in an area on the order of cm2. A set of spiral dimensions (such as spiral pitches, number of turns and handedness) have been easily engineered to tune the chiroptic properties, leading to studying the chiroplasmonic principles together with finite element simulation and the LC model. At the end, it will be demonstrated that 3D chiroplasmonics can differentiate molecular chirality of enantiomers with dramatic enhancement in the anisotropy g factor. This study opens a door to sensitively discriminate enantiomer chirality.

  20. Workflow strategies and application to large-scale 3-D full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemenz, A.; Igel, H.

    2012-04-01

    We present results of 3-D full-waveform inversion (FWI) utilizing a Python-driven workflow which incorporates the SPECFEM3D solver, a time-domain spectral element method, and the Obpsy software, a toolbox for computational seismology. We examine source encoding strategies, where multiple seismic sources are simultaneously excited, reducing in the number of required simulations per FWI iteration. Applications to synthetic case studies are presented which demonstrate a sensitivity of source encoding to source-receiver offset and number of encoded supershots. We detail workflow methodologies suitable for large-scale (i.e. many sources and receivers) FWI applications, as encountered in exploration geophysics problems in the marine environment.

  1. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  2. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-21

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  3. A 3-D active shape model driven by fuzzy inference: application to cardiac CT and MR.

    PubMed

    van Assen, Hans C; Danilouchkine, Mikhail G; Dirksen, Martijn S; Reiber, Johan H C; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F

    2008-09-01

    Manual quantitative analysis of cardiac left ventricular function using Multislice CT and MR is arduous because of the large data volume. In this paper, we present a 3-D active shape model (ASM) for semiautomatic segmentation of cardiac CT and MR volumes, without the requirement of retraining the underlying statistical shape model. A fuzzy c-means based fuzzy inference system was incorporated into the model. Thus, relative gray-level differences instead of absolute gray values were used for classification of 3-D regions of interest (ROIs), removing the necessity of training different models for different modalities/acquisition protocols. The 3-D ASM was evaluated using 25 CT and 15 MR datasets. Automatically generated contours were compared to expert contours in 100 locations. For CT, 82.4% of epicardial contours and 74.1% of endocardial contours had a maximum error of 5 mm along 95% of the contour arc length. For MR, those numbers were 93.2% (epicardium) and 91.4% (endocardium). Volume regression analysis revealed good linear correlations between manual and semiautomatic volumes, r(2) >/= 0.98. This study shows that the fuzzy inference 3-D ASM is a robust promising instrument for semiautomatic cardiac left ventricle segmentation. Without retraining its statistical shape component, it is applicable to routinely acquired CT and MR studies. PMID:18779074

  4. Bioactive polymeric-ceramic hybrid 3D scaffold for application in bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Torres, A L; Gaspar, V M; Serra, I R; Diogo, G S; Fradique, R; Silva, A P; Correia, I J

    2013-10-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains a challenging scenario from a therapeutic point of view. In fact, the currently available bone substitutes are often limited by poor tissue integration and severe host inflammatory responses, which eventually lead to surgical removal. In an attempt to address these issues, herein we evaluated the importance of alginate incorporation in the production of improved and tunable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds to be used as temporary templates for bone regeneration. Different bioceramic combinations were tested in order to investigate optimal scaffold architectures. Additionally, 3D β-TCP/HA vacuum-coated with alginate, presented improved compressive strength, fracture toughness and Young's modulus, to values similar to those of native bone. The hybrid 3D polymeric-bioceramic scaffolds also supported osteoblast adhesion, maturation and proliferation, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that a 3D scaffold produced with this combination of biomaterials is described. Altogether, our results emphasize that this hybrid scaffold presents promising characteristics for its future application in bone regeneration. PMID:23910366

  5. Application of graphically oriented programming to imaging of structure deterioration of historic glass by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Kwiatkowska, Ewa A.; Karaszkiewicz, Pawel; Iwanicka, Magdalena; Targowski, Piotr

    2009-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an interferometric method utilising light of low temporal coherence for noninvasive structural imaging of objects weakly absorbing and scattering light. In this contribution, using various examples of images of objects made of glass affected by the atmospheric corrosion and/or by crizzling, we demonstrate a software developed in our laboratory specifically for 3D OCT imaging of samples with a fine structure. For this task we employed the OpenGL platform (Open Graphics Library), an Application Programming Interface (API) for writing applications dedicated to interactive 3D computer graphics. In our application we have utilized texture rendering with a modulation of transparency and a colour as a function of elevation.

  6. Evaluating the performance of close-range 3D active vision systems for industrial design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Gaiani, Marco

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, active three-dimensional (3D) active vision systems or range cameras for short have come out of research laboratories to find niche markets in application fields as diverse as industrial design, automotive manufacturing, geomatics, space exploration and cultural heritage to name a few. Many publications address different issues link to 3D sensing and processing but currently these technologies pose a number of challenges to many recent users, i.e., "what are they, how good are they and how do they compare?". The need to understand, test and integrate those range cameras with other technologies, e.g. photogrammetry, CAD, etc. is driven by the quest for optimal resolution, accuracy, speed and cost. Before investing, users want to be certain that a given range camera satisfy their operational requirements. The understanding of the basic theory and best practices associated with those cameras are in fact fundamental to fulfilling the requirements listed above in an optimal way. This paper addresses the evaluation of active 3D range cameras as part of a study to better understand and select one or a number of them to fulfill the needs of industrial design applications. In particular, object material and surface features effect, calibration and performance evaluation are discussed. Results are given for six different range cameras for close range applications.

  7. Evaluating the performance of close-range 3D active vision systems for industrial design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Gaiani, Marco

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, active three-dimensional (3D) active vision systems or range cameras for short have come out of research laboratories to find niche markets in application fields as diverse as industrial design, automotive manufacturing, geomatics, space exploration and cultural heritage to name a few. Many publications address different issues link to 3D sensing and processing but currently these technologies pose a number of challenges to many recent users, i.e., "what are they, how good are they and how do they compare?". The need to understand, test and integrate those range cameras with other technologies, e.g. photogrammetry, CAD, etc. is driven by the quest for optimal resolution, accuracy, speed and cost. Before investing, users want to be certain that a given range camera satisfy their operational requirements. The understanding of the basic theory and best practices associated with those cameras are in fact fundamental to fulfilling the requirements listed above in an optimal way. This paper addresses the evaluation of active 3D range cameras as part of a study to better understand and select one or a number of them to fulfill the needs of industrial design applications. In particular, object material and surface features effect, calibration and performance evaluation are discussed. Results are given for six different range cameras for close range applications.

  8. 3D scaffold alters cellular response to graphene in a polymer composite for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Azam, Dilkash; Raj, Shammy; Kolanthai, Elayaraja; Vasu, K S; Sood, A K; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-05-01

    Graphene-based polymer nanocomposites are being studied for biomedical applications. Polymer nanocomposites can be processed differently to generate planar two-dimensional (2D) substrates and porous three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. The objective of this work was to investigate potential differences in biological response to graphene in polymer composites in the form of 2D substrates and 3D scaffolds. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating 1% of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). GO increased modulus and strength of PCL by 44 and 22% respectively, whereas RGO increased modulus and strength by 22 and 16%, respectively. RGO increased the water contact angle of PCL from 81° to 87° whereas GO decreased it to 77°. In 2D, osteoblast proliferated 15% more on GO composites than on PCL whereas RGO composite showed 17% decrease in cell proliferation, which may be attributed to differences in water wettability. In 3D, initial cell proliferation was markedly retarded in both GO (36% lower) and RGO (55% lower) composites owing to increased roughness due to the presence of the protruding nanoparticles. Cells organized into aggregates in 3D in contrast to spread and randomly distributed cells on 2D discs due to the macro-porous architecture of the scaffolds. Increased cell-cell contact and altered cellular morphology led to significantly higher mineralization in 3D. This study demonstrates that the cellular response to nanoparticles in composites can change markedly by varying the processing route and has implications for designing orthopedic implants such as resorbable fracture fixation devices and tissue scaffolds using such nanocomposites. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 732-749, 2016. PMID:26482196

  9. Local Metric Learning in 2D/3D Deformable Registration With Application in the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Mageras, Gig; Pizer, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of disease sites subject to respiratory motion, soft tissue deformations can affect localization accuracy. We describe the application of a method of 2D/3D deformable registration to soft tissue localization in abdomen. The method, called registration efficiency and accuracy through learning a metric on shape (REALMS), is designed to support real-time IGRT. In a previously developed version of REALMS, the method interpolated 3D deformation parameters for any credible deformation in a deformation space using a single globally-trained Riemannian metric for each parameter. We propose a refinement of the method in which the metric is trained over a particular region of the deformation space, such that interpolation accuracy within that region is improved. We report on the application of the proposed algorithm to IGRT in abdominal disease sites, which is more challenging than in lung because of low intensity contrast and nonrespiratory deformation. We introduce a rigid translation vector to compensate for nonrespiratory deformation, and design a special region-of-interest around fiducial markers implanted near the tumor to produce a more reliable registration. Both synthetic data and actual data tests on abdominal datasets show that the localized approach achieves more accurate 2D/3D deformable registration than the global approach. PMID:24771575

  10. Scalable, High-performance 3D Imaging Software Platform: System Architecture and Application to Virtual Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Wu, Yin; Cai, Wenli; Brett, Bevin

    2013-01-01

    One of the key challenges in three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is to enable the fast turn-around time, which is often required for interactive or real-time response. This inevitably requires not only high computational power but also high memory bandwidth due to the massive amount of data that need to be processed. In this work, we have developed a software platform that is designed to support high-performance 3D medical image processing for a wide range of applications using increasingly available and affordable commodity computing systems: multi-core, clusters, and cloud computing systems. To achieve scalable, high-performance computing, our platform (1) employs size-adaptive, distributable block volumes as a core data structure for efficient parallelization of a wide range of 3D image processing algorithms; (2) supports task scheduling for efficient load distribution and balancing; and (3) consists of a layered parallel software libraries that allow a wide range of medical applications to share the same functionalities. We evaluated the performance of our platform by applying it to an electronic cleansing system in virtual colonoscopy, with initial experimental results showing a 10 times performance improvement on an 8-core workstation over the original sequential implementation of the system. PMID:23366803

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of a Multichannel 3D Thermopile for Chip Calorimeter Applications

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Tho Phuoc; Zhang, Yilei; Yehuda, Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Thermal sensors based on thermopiles are some of the most robust and popular temperature sensing technologies across industries and research disciplines. A chip calorimeter with a 3D thermopile layout with a large sensing area and multichannel capacity has been developed, which is highly desired for many applications requiring large reaction chambers or high throughputs, such as biofilm research, drug screening, etc. The performance of the device, including temperature sensitivity and heat power sensitivity, was evaluated. The capability to split the chip calorimeter to multiple channels was also demonstrated, which makes the chip calorimeter very flexible and powerful in many applications. PMID:25654716

  12. [Tissue printing; the potential application of 3D printing in medicine].

    PubMed

    Visser, Jetze; Melchels, Ferry P W; Dhert, Wouter J A; Malda, Jos

    2013-01-01

    Complex structures based on a digital blueprint can be created using a 3D printer. As this blueprint can be created using patient imaging data, there are many potential patient-specific applications of 3D printing in medicine. Individually printed metal implants and synthetic devices are currently being used on a limited scale in clinical practice. Researchers in the field of regenerative medicine are now going a step further by printing a combination of cells, growth factors and biomaterials. This process is known as 'bioprinting'. It can be used to copy the complex organization of natural tissue required to repair or replace damaged tissues or organs. The technique needs to be optimized, however, and more knowledge is required regarding the development of printed living constructs into functional tissues before 'tissue from the printer' can be clinically applied. PMID:24382049

  13. An Application of the Method of Arbitrary Lines to 3D Elastic Stress Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminishi, Ken; Ando, Ryuma

    The MAL (Method of Arbitrary Lines) is a technique of reducing a partial differential equation to a system of ordinary differential equations. It is known that relevant use of this procedure yields high accuracy in some problems of two-dimensional elasticity and elastoplasticity. Since the basic concept of MAL is simple and based on generality, it is expected that many problems in other fields will be effectively solvable by this method. In this study, we consider the application of MAL to 3D (three-dimensional) elasticity analysis. We first give a MAL formulation of 3D elasticity problems, and demonstrate its effectiveness and accuracy for a typical problem. The reported numerical results are compared with the exact solution or that of the finite element method (FEM).

  14. Elastic registration using 3D ChainMail: application to virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Pareja, Carlos R.; Daly, Barry; Shekhar, Raj

    2006-03-01

    We present an elastic registration algorithm based on local deformations modeled using cubic B-splines and controlled using 3D ChainMail. Our algorithm eliminates the appearance of folding artifacts and allows local rigidity and compressibility control independent of the image similarity metric being used. 3D ChainMail propagates large internal deformations between neighboring B-Spline control points, thereby preserving the topology of the transformed image without requiring the addition of penalty terms based on rigidity of the transformation field to the equation used to maximize image similarity. A novel application to virtual colonoscopy is presented where the algorithm is used to significantly improve cross-localization between colon locations in prone and supine CT images.

  15. Automatic 2D to 3D conversion implemented for real-time applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr; Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo; Gonzalez Huitron, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Different hardware implementations of designed automatic 2D to 3D video color conversion employing 2D video sequence are presented. The analyzed framework includes together processing of neighboring frames using the following blocks: CIELa*b* color space conversion, wavelet transform, edge detection using HF wavelet sub-bands (HF, LH and HH), color segmentation via k-means on a*b* color plane, up-sampling, disparity map (DM) estimation, adaptive postfiltering, and finally, the anaglyph 3D scene generation. During edge detection, the Donoho threshold is computed, then each sub-band is binarized according to a threshold chosen and finally the thresholding image is formed. DM estimation is performed in the following matter: in left stereo image (or frame), a window with varying sizes is used according to the information obtained from binarized sub-band image, distinguishing different texture areas into LL sub-band image. The stereo matching is performed between two (left and right) LL sub-band images using processing with different window sizes. Upsampling procedure is employed in order to obtain the enhanced DM. Adaptive post-processing procedure is based on median filter and k-means segmentation in a*b* color plane. The SSIM and QBP criteria are applied in order to compare the performance of the proposed framework against other disparity map computation techniques. The designed technique has been implemented on DSP TMS320DM648, Matlab's Simulink module over a PC with Windows 7 and using graphic card (NVIDIA Quadro K2000) demonstrating that the proposed approach can be applied in real-time processing mode.

  16. Delft3D-FLOW on PRACE infrastructures for real life hydrodynamic applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donners, John; Genseberger, Menno; Jagers, Bert; de Goede, Erik; Mourits, Adri

    2013-04-01

    PRACE, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, offers access to the largest high-performance computing systems in Europe. PRACE invites and helps industry to increase their innovative potential through the use of the PRACE infrastructure. This poster describes different efforts to assist Deltares with porting the open-source simulation software Delft3D-FLOW to PRACE infrastructures. Analysis of the performance on these infrastructures has been done for real life flow applications. Delft3D-FLOW is a 2D and 3D shallow water solver which calculates non-steady flow and transport phenomena resulting from tidal and meteorological forcing on a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid in Cartesian or spherical coordinates. It also includes a module which sediment transport (both suspended and bed total load) and morphological changes for an arbitrary number of cohesive and non-cohesive fractions. As Delft3D-FLOW has been developed over several decades, with a variety of functionality and over 350k lines of source code, porting to PRACE infrastructures needs some effort. At the moment Delft3D-FLOW uses MPI with domain decomposition in one direction as its parallellisation approach. Because it is hard to identify scaling issues if one immediately starts with a complex case with many features enabled, different cases with increasing complexity have been used to investigate scaling of this parallellisation approach on several PRACE platforms. As a base reference case we started with a schematic high-resolution 2D hydrodynamic model of the river Waal that turned out to be surprisingly well-suited to the highly-parallel PRACE machines. Although Delft3D-FLOW employs a sophisticated build system, several modifications were required to port it to most PRACE systems due to the use of specific, highly-tuned compilers and MPI-libraries. After this we moved to a 3D hydrodynamic model of Rotterdam harbour that includes sections of the rivers Rhine and Meuse and a part of the North

  17. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment.  PMID:25679174

  18. [The application of graphic (visual) databases in neurology and neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, W; Milewska, D; Swiderski, W; Dymecki, J

    1994-01-01

    The possibilities and principles of creation in Windows environment of visual databases are described which could be used for elaboration of multimedial encyclopedia of selected nosological entities. Such databases are particularly important in education making possible finding of data and their relative comparison. The method of organization of "files" using standard programmes of Windows packs and the method of application of the technique of image coding for forms of symbolic icons are presented. Examples of graphic bases of neurological and neuropathological data evolved in Windows environment using professional application programmes (framing and retouching of images in graphic editors, coding of icons of macroinstruction of reading of information introduced into the relating visual database of the analysed cases. PMID:8065541

  19. Application of 3D electrical capacitance tomography in probing anomalous blocks in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Aimin; Zhou, Qiyou; Zhang, Yun

    2015-06-01

    Water usually acts as a high-permittivity dielectric in many fields such as geophysics, hydrology, hydrogeology, aquaculture, etc. Thus, it may be of significance to adapt ECT to the fields with a high permittivity in which the conventional ECT is scarcely involved. To achieve this objective, a simplified 3D-ECT system was constructed with a high-precision inductance capacitance resistance meter and programmable logic controllers. In the aspect of sensing unit of the system, two geometries (i.e. cylinder and cube) of 3D sensors were constructed to probe anomalous blocks in water. Numerical simulations and physical experiments for both the sensors were performed to test the effectiveness of the constructed system to probe anomalous blocks in water. Furthermore, to justify the availability of this system in some possible fields, two experiments associated with applications of the 3D-ECT system were performed to measure the distribution of a plant root system in water, and to monitor the infiltration of water in soil in field. The experimental results demonstrate that the ECT system is capable of probing the location and rough size of anomalous blocks in water with both the sensors, determining the distribution of a plant root system in water, and monitoring the infiltration process of water in soil.

  20. Random porous media flow on large 3-D grids: Numerics, performance, and application to homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Ababou, R.

    1996-12-31

    Subsurface flow processes are inherently three-dimensional and heterogeneous over many scales. Taking this into account, for instance assuming random heterogeneity in 3-D space, puts heavy constraints on numerical models. An efficient numerical code has been developed for solving the porous media flow equations, appropriately generalized to account for 3-D, random-like heterogeneity. The code is based on implicit finite differences (or finite volumes), and uses specialized versions of pre-conditioned iterative solvers that take advantage of sparseness. With Diagonally Scaled Conjugate Gradients, in particular, large systems on the order of several million equations, with randomly variable coefficients, have been solved efficiently on Cray-2 and Cray-Y/MP8 machines, in serial mode as well as parallel mode (autotasking). The present work addresses, first, the numerical aspects and computational issues associated with detailed 3-D flow simulations, and secondly, presents a specific application related to the conductivity homogenization problem (identifying a macroscale conduction law, and an equivalent or effective conductivity). Analytical expressions of effective conductivities are compared with empirical values obtained from several large scale simulations conducted for single realizations of random porous media.

  1. Characterization of 3D Joint Space Morphology Using an Electrostatic Model (with Application to Osteoarthritis)

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qian; Thawait, Gaurav; Gang, Grace J.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reigel, Thomas; Brown, Tyler; Corner, Brian; Demehri, Shadpour; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Joint space morphology can be indicative of the risk, presence, progression, and/or treatment response of disease or trauma. We describe a novel methodology of characterizing joint space morphology in high-resolution 3D images [e.g., cone-beam CT (CBCT)] using a model based on elementary electrostatics that overcomes a variety of basic limitations of existing 2D and 3D methods. The method models each surface of a joint as a conductor at fixed electrostatic potential and characterizes the intra-articular space in terms of the electric field lines resulting from the solution of Gauss’ Law and the Laplace equation. As a test case, the method was applied to discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic subjects (N = 39) in 3D images of the knee acquired on an extremity CBCT system. The method demonstrated improved diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC > 0.98) compared to simpler methods of quantitative measurement and qualitative image-based assessment by three expert musculoskeletal radiologists (AUC = 0.87, p-value = 0.007). The method is applicable to simple (e.g., the knee or elbow) or multi-axial joints (e.g., the wrist or ankle) and may provide a useful means of quantitatively assessing a variety of joint pathologies. PMID:25575100

  2. Topographical surveys: Classical method versus 3D laser scanning. Case study - An application in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoraş, I.-R.; Covăsnianu, A.; Pleşu, G.; Benedict, B.

    2009-04-01

    The paper describes an experiment which took place in Iasi town, Romania, consisted in two different topographical survey techniques applied for one and the same objective placed in a block within the city (western part) - a thermal power station. The purpose was to compare those methods and to determine which one is proper to be used in this domain in terms of fastness, optimization and speed of data processing. First technique applied for our survey was the classical one, with a total station. Using the CAD technique, we obtained a final product (a dwg file) and a list of coordinates (a text file). The second method, which we focused our attention more, was the measurement with a very precise 3D laser scanstation, also very suitable in archeology. The data obtained were processed with special software. Result was a 3D model of the thermal power plant composed of measurable cloud point data. Finally, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of each method, we came to the conclusion that the 3D laser scanning which we used matches well the application, in this case civil engineering, but the future of accepting and implementing this technique is in the hands of Romanian authorities.

  3. Characterization of 3D joint space morphology using an electrostatic model (with application to osteoarthritis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Thawait, Gaurav; Gang, Grace J.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reigel, Thomas; Brown, Tyler; Corner, Brian; Demehri, Shadpour; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-02-01

    Joint space morphology can be indicative of the risk, presence, progression, and/or treatment response of disease or trauma. We describe a novel methodology of characterizing joint space morphology in high-resolution 3D images (e.g. cone-beam CT (CBCT)) using a model based on elementary electrostatics that overcomes a variety of basic limitations of existing 2D and 3D methods. The method models each surface of a joint as a conductor at fixed electrostatic potential and characterizes the intra-articular space in terms of the electric field lines resulting from the solution of Gauss’ Law and the Laplace equation. As a test case, the method was applied to discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic subjects (N = 39) in 3D images of the knee acquired on an extremity CBCT system. The method demonstrated improved diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC > 0.98) compared to simpler methods of quantitative measurement and qualitative image-based assessment by three expert musculoskeletal radiologists (AUC = 0.87, p-value = 0.007). The method is applicable to simple (e.g. the knee or elbow) or multi-axial joints (e.g. the wrist or ankle) and may provide a useful means of quantitatively assessing a variety of joint pathologies.

  4. Application of 3-D Urbanization Index to Assess Impact of Urbanization on Air Temperature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Da; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2016-01-01

    The lack of appropriate methodologies and indicators to quantify three-dimensional (3-D) building constructions poses challenges to authorities and urban planners when formulating polices to reduce health risks due to heat stress. This study evaluated the applicability of an innovative three-dimensional Urbanization Index (3DUI), based on remote sensing database, with a 5 m spatial resolution of 3-D man-made constructions to representing intra-urban variability of air temperature by assessing correlation of 3DUI with air temperature from a 3-D perspective. The results showed robust high correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.83 to 0.85, obtained within the 1,000 m circular buffer around weather stations regardless of season, year, or spatial location. Our findings demonstrated not only the strength of 3DUI in representing intra-urban air-temperature variability, but also its great potential for heat stress assessment within cities. In view of the maximum correlation between building volumes within the 1,000 m circular buffer and ambient air temperature, urban planning should consider setting ceilings for man-made construction volume in each 2 × 2 km(2) residential community for thermal environment regulation, especially in Asian metropolis with high population density in city centers. PMID:27079537

  5. Laser-Micro/Nanofabricated 3D Polymers for Tissue Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevičius, P.; Žukauskas, A.; Bičkauskaitė, G.; Purlys, V.; Rutkauskas, M.; Gertus, T.; Paipulas, D.; Matukaitė, J.; Baltriukienė, D.; Malinauskas, M.

    2011-01-01

    A multi-photon polymerization system has been designed based on a pulsed irradiation light source (diode-pumped solid state femtosecond laser Yb:KGW, 300 fs, 1030 nm, 1-200 kHz) in combination with large working area and high precision linear motor driven stages (100×100×50 mm3). The system is intended for high resolution and throughput 3D micro- and nanofabrication and enables manufacturing the polymeric templates up to 1 cm2 areas with sub-micrometer resolution. These can be used for producing 3D artificial polymeric scaffolds to be applied for growing cells, specifically, in the tissue engineering. The bio-compatibility of different acrylate, hybrid organic-inorganic and biodegradable polymeric materials is evaluated experimentally in vitro. Variously sized and shaped polymeric scaffolds of biocompatible photopolymers with intricate 3D geometry were successfully fabricated. Proliferation tests for adult rabbit myogenic stem cells have shown the applicability of artificial scaffolds in biomedicine practice.

  6. Application of 3-D Urbanization Index to Assess Impact of Urbanization on Air Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Da; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2016-01-01

    The lack of appropriate methodologies and indicators to quantify three-dimensional (3-D) building constructions poses challenges to authorities and urban planners when formulating polices to reduce health risks due to heat stress. This study evaluated the applicability of an innovative three-dimensional Urbanization Index (3DUI), based on remote sensing database, with a 5 m spatial resolution of 3-D man-made constructions to representing intra-urban variability of air temperature by assessing correlation of 3DUI with air temperature from a 3-D perspective. The results showed robust high correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.83 to 0.85, obtained within the 1,000 m circular buffer around weather stations regardless of season, year, or spatial location. Our findings demonstrated not only the strength of 3DUI in representing intra-urban air-temperature variability, but also its great potential for heat stress assessment within cities. In view of the maximum correlation between building volumes within the 1,000 m circular buffer and ambient air temperature, urban planning should consider setting ceilings for man-made construction volume in each 2 × 2 km2 residential community for thermal environment regulation, especially in Asian metropolis with high population density in city centers. PMID:27079537

  7. New solutions and applications of 3D computer tomography image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberger, Ira; Kroll, Julia; Verl, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    As nowadays the industry aims at fast and high quality product development and manufacturing processes a modern and efficient quality inspection is essential. Compared to conventional measurement technologies, industrial computer tomography (CT) is a non-destructive technology for 3D-image data acquisition which helps to overcome their disadvantages by offering the possibility to scan complex parts with all outer and inner geometric features. In this paper new and optimized methods for 3D image processing, including innovative ways of surface reconstruction and automatic geometric feature detection of complex components, are presented, especially our work of developing smart online data processing and data handling methods, with an integrated intelligent online mesh reduction. Hereby the processing of huge and high resolution data sets is guaranteed. Besides, new approaches for surface reconstruction and segmentation based on statistical methods are demonstrated. On the extracted 3D point cloud or surface triangulation automated and precise algorithms for geometric inspection are deployed. All algorithms are applied to different real data sets generated by computer tomography in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new tools. Since CT is an emerging technology for non-destructive testing and inspection more and more industrial application fields will use and profit from this new technology.

  8. Application of 3-D Urbanization Index to Assess Impact of Urbanization on Air Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chih-Da; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2016-04-01

    The lack of appropriate methodologies and indicators to quantify three-dimensional (3-D) building constructions poses challenges to authorities and urban planners when formulating polices to reduce health risks due to heat stress. This study evaluated the applicability of an innovative three-dimensional Urbanization Index (3DUI), based on remote sensing database, with a 5 m spatial resolution of 3-D man-made constructions to representing intra-urban variability of air temperature by assessing correlation of 3DUI with air temperature from a 3-D perspective. The results showed robust high correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.83 to 0.85, obtained within the 1,000 m circular buffer around weather stations regardless of season, year, or spatial location. Our findings demonstrated not only the strength of 3DUI in representing intra-urban air-temperature variability, but also its great potential for heat stress assessment within cities. In view of the maximum correlation between building volumes within the 1,000 m circular buffer and ambient air temperature, urban planning should consider setting ceilings for man-made construction volume in each 2 × 2 km2 residential community for thermal environment regulation, especially in Asian metropolis with high population density in city centers.

  9. Quantitative validation of the 3D SAR profile of hyperthermia applicators using the gamma method.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, Maarten; Samaras, Theodoros; Chavannes, Nicolas; van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2007-06-01

    For quality assurance of hyperthermia treatment planning systems, quantitative validation of the electromagnetic model of an applicator is essential. The objective of this study was to validate a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model implementation of the Lucite cone applicator (LCA) for superficial hyperthermia. The validation involved (i) the assessment of the match between the predicted and measured 3D specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution, and (ii) the assessment of the ratio between model power and real-world power. The 3D SAR distribution of seven LCAs was scanned in a phantom bath using the DASY4 dosimetric measurement system. The same set-up was modelled in SEMCAD X. The match between the predicted and the measured SAR distribution was quantified with the gamma method, which combines distance-to-agreement and dose difference criteria. Good quantitative agreement was observed: more than 95% of the measurement points met the acceptance criteria 2 mm/2% for all applicators. The ratio between measured and predicted power absorption ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 (mean 0.85). This study shows that quantitative validation of hyperthermia applicator models is feasible and is worth considering as a part of hyperthermia quality assurance procedures. PMID:17505090

  10. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  11. Application of digital interferogram evaluation techniques to the measurement of 3-D flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Friedhelm; Yu, Yung H.

    1987-01-01

    A system for digitally evaluating interferograms, based on an image processing system connected to a host computer, was implemented. The system supports one- and two-dimensional interferogram evaluations. Interferograms are digitized, enhanced, and then segmented. The fringe coordinates are extracted, and the fringes are represented as polygonal data structures. Fringe numbering and fringe interpolation modules are implemented. The system supports editing and interactive features, as well as graphic visualization. An application of the system to the evaluation of double exposure interferograms from the transonic flow field around a helicopter blade and the reconstruction of the three dimensional flow field is given.

  12. MEVA - An Interactive Visualization Application for Validation of Multifaceted Meteorological Data with Multiple 3D Devices

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Carolin; Bilke, Lars; Bauer, Hans-Stefan; Böttinger, Michael; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Background To achieve more realistic simulations, meteorologists develop and use models with increasing spatial and temporal resolution. The analyzing, comparing, and visualizing of resulting simulations becomes more and more challenging due to the growing amounts and multifaceted character of the data. Various data sources, numerous variables and multiple simulations lead to a complex database. Although a variety of software exists suited for the visualization of meteorological data, none of them fulfills all of the typical domain-specific requirements: support for quasi-standard data formats and different grid types, standard visualization techniques for scalar and vector data, visualization of the context (e.g., topography) and other static data, support for multiple presentation devices used in modern sciences (e.g., virtual reality), a user-friendly interface, and suitability for cooperative work. Methods and Results Instead of attempting to develop yet another new visualization system to fulfill all possible needs in this application domain, our approach is to provide a flexible workflow that combines different existing state-of-the-art visualization software components in order to hide the complexity of 3D data visualization tools from the end user. To complete the workflow and to enable the domain scientists to interactively visualize their data without advanced skills in 3D visualization systems, we developed a lightweight custom visualization application (MEVA - multifaceted environmental data visualization application) that supports the most relevant visualization and interaction techniques and can be easily deployed. Specifically, our workflow combines a variety of different data abstraction methods provided by a state-of-the-art 3D visualization application with the interaction and presentation features of a computer-games engine. Our customized application includes solutions for the analysis of multirun data, specifically with respect to data

  13. Design and application of 3D-printed stepless beam modulators in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, C; Kumlin, J; Martinez, D M; Jirasek, A; Hoehr, C

    2016-06-01

    A new method for the design of stepless beam modulators for proton therapy is described and verified. Simulations of the classic designs are compared against the stepless method for various modulation widths which are clinically applicable in proton eye therapy. Three modulator wheels were printed using a Stratasys Objet30 3D printer. The resulting depth dose distributions showed improved uniformity over the classic stepped designs. Simulated results imply a possible improvement in distal penumbra width; however, more accurate measurements are needed to fully verify this effect. Lastly, simulations were done to model bio-equivalence to Co-60 cell kill. A wheel was successfully designed to flatten this metric. PMID:27182839

  14. Efficient 3D movement-based kernel density estimator and application to wildlife ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracey-PR, Jeff; Sheppard, James K.; Lockwood, Glenn K.; Chourasia, Amit; Tatineni, Mahidhar; Fisher, Robert N.; Sinkovits, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe an efficient implementation of a 3D movement-based kernel density estimator for determining animal space use from discrete GPS measurements. This new method provides more accurate results, particularly for species that make large excursions in the vertical dimension. The downside of this approach is that it is much more computationally expensive than simpler, lower-dimensional models. Through a combination of code restructuring, parallelization and performance optimization, we were able to reduce the time to solution by up to a factor of 1000x, thereby greatly improving the applicability of the method.

  15. Study of hybrid driven micromirrors for 3-D variable optical attenuator applications.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kah How; Soon, Bo Woon; Tsai, Julius Minglin; Danner, Aaron J; Lee, Chengkuo

    2012-09-10

    Aluminium-coated micromirrors driven by electrothermal and electromagnetic actuations have been demonstrated for 3-D variable optical attenuation applications. Three types of attenuation schemes based on electrothermal, electromagnetic and hybrid, i.e. combination of electrothermal and electromagnetic, actuations have been developed. In addition, two different designs have been fabricated and characterized to investigate the effects of the variations made to both the actuators on the optical attenuation performances of the micromirror. Our unique design of using both ET and EM actuators simultaneously to achieve attenuation is the first demonstration of such hybrid driven CMOS compatible MEMS VOA device. PMID:23037278

  16. Design and application of 3D-printed stepless beam modulators in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C.; Kumlin, J.; Martinez, D. M.; Jirasek, A.; Hoehr, C.

    2016-06-01

    A new method for the design of stepless beam modulators for proton therapy is described and verified. Simulations of the classic designs are compared against the stepless method for various modulation widths which are clinically applicable in proton eye therapy. Three modulator wheels were printed using a Stratasys Objet30 3D printer. The resulting depth dose distributions showed improved uniformity over the classic stepped designs. Simulated results imply a possible improvement in distal penumbra width; however, more accurate measurements are needed to fully verify this effect. Lastly, simulations were done to model bio-equivalence to Co-60 cell kill. A wheel was successfully designed to flatten this metric.

  17. 3D Globe Support for Arctic Science through the Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, J. J.; Gaylord, A. G.; Johnson, G.; Cody, R. P.; Dover, M.; Garcia-Lavigne, D.; Manley, W.; Score, R.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) is a suite of online services to provide support of Arctic science. These services include: a text based online search utility, 2D Internet Map Server (IMS); 3D globes and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Services (WMS). With special emphasis on the International Polar Year (IPY), ARMAP has a target audience of science planners, scientists, educators, and the general public. The Arctic Research Logistics Support Service (ARLSS) database is the foundation of ARMAP and includes information on US research funded by the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the United States Geological Survey. Avoiding a duplication of effort has been a primary objective of the ARMAP project, which incorporates best practices (e.g. Spatial Data Infrastructure and OGC standard web services and metadata) and off the shelf technologies where appropriate. ARMAP services may be accessed via the gateway web site at http://www.armap.org. ARMAP's 3D globe services includes a layer users can download into Google Earth and a prototype ArcGIS Explorer (ESRI) application. A comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the two virtual globe applications will be presented.

  18. Design and fabrication of a foldable 3D silicon based package for solid state lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskij, R.; Liu, P.; van Zeijl, H. W.; Mimoun, B.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2015-05-01

    Miniaturization of solid state lighting (SSL) luminaires as well as reduction of packaging and assembly costs are of prime interest for the SSL lighting industry. A novel silicon based LED package for lighting applications is presented in this paper. The proposed design consists of 5 rigid Si tiles connected by flexible polyimide hinges with embedded interconnects (ICs). Electrical, optical and thermal characteristics were taken into consideration during design. The fabrication process involved polyimide (PI) application and patterning, aluminium interconnect integration in the flexible hinge, LED reflector cavity formation and metalization followed by through wafer DRIE etching for chip formation and release. A method to connect chip front to backside without TSVs was also integrated into the process. Post-fabrication wafer level assembly included LED mounting and wirebond, phosphor-based colour conversion and silicone encapsulation. The package formation was finalized by vacuum assisted wrapping around an assembly structure to form a 3D geometry, which is beneficial for omnidirectional lighting. Bending tests were performed on the flexible ICs and optical performance at different temperatures was evaluated. It is suggested that 3D packages can be expanded to platforms for miniaturized luminaire applications by combining monolithic silicon integration and system-in-package (SiP) technologies.

  19. Fabrication of 3D polymer photonic crystals for near-IR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Peng; Qiu, Liang; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J.; Prather, Dennis W.; Sharkawy, Ahmed; Kelmelis, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Photonic crystals[1, 2] have stirred enormous research interest and became a growing enterprise in the last 15 years. Generally, PhCs consist of periodic structures that possess periodicity comparable with the wavelength that the PhCs are designed to modulate. If material and periodic pattern are properly selected, PhCs can be applied to many applications based on their unique properties, including photonic band gaps (PBG)[3], self-collimation[4], super prism[5], etc. Strictly speaking, PhCs need to possess periodicity in three dimensions to maximize their advantageous capabilities. However, many current research is based on scaled two-dimensional PhCs, mainly due to the difficulty of fabrication such three-dimensional PhCs. Many approaches have been explored for the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, including layer-by-layer surface micromachining[6], glancing angle deposition[7], 3D micro-sculpture method[8], self-assembly[9] and lithographical methods[10-12]. Among them, lithographic methods became increasingly accepted due to low costs and precise control over the photonic crystal structure. There are three mostly developed lithographical methods, namely X-ray lithography[10], holographic lithography[11] and two-photon polymerization[12]. Although significant progress has been made in developing these lithography-based technologies, these approaches still suffer from significant disadvantages. X-ray lithography relies on an expensive radiation source. Holographic lithography lacks the flexibility to create engineered defects, and multi-photon polymerization is not suitable for parallel fabrication. In our previous work, we developed a multi-layer photolithography processes[13, 14] that is based on multiple resist application and enhanced absorption upon exposure. Using a negative lift-off resist (LOR) and 254nm DUV source, we have demonstrated fabrication of 3D arbitrary structures with feature size of several microns. However, severe intermixing problem

  20. Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP): 2D Maps and 3D Globes Support Arctic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G.; Gaylord, A. G.; Brady, J. J.; Cody, R. P.; Aguilar, J. A.; Dover, M.; Garcia-Lavigne, D.; Manley, W.; Score, R.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) is a suite of online services to provide support of Arctic science. These services include: a text based online search utility, 2D Internet Map Server (IMS); 3D globes and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Services (WMS). With ARMAP's 2D maps and 3D globes, users can navigate to areas of interest, view a variety of map layers, and explore U.S. Federally funded research projects. Projects can be queried by location, year, funding program, discipline, and keyword. Links take you to specific information and other web sites associated with a particular research project. The Arctic Research Logistics Support Service (ARLSS) database is the foundation of ARMAP including US research funded by the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the United States Geological Survey. Avoiding a duplication of effort has been a primary objective of the ARMAP project which incorporates best practices (e.g. Spatial Data Infrastructure and OGC standard web services and metadata) and off the shelf technologies where appropriate. The ARMAP suite provides tools for users of various levels of technical ability to interact with the data by importing the web services directly into their own GIS applications and virtual globes; performing advanced GIS queries; simply printing maps from a set of predefined images in the map gallery; browsing the layers in an IMS; or by choosing to "fly to" sites using a 3D globe. With special emphasis on the International Polar Year (IPY), ARMAP has targeted science planners, scientists, educators, and the general public. In sum, ARMAP goes beyond a simple map display to enable analysis, synthesis, and coordination of Arctic research. ARMAP may be accessed via the gateway web site at http://www.armap.org.

  1. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  2. Coupled 1D-3D hydrodynamic modelling, with application to the Pearl River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twigt, Daniel J.; de Goede, Erik D.; Zijl, Firmijn; Schwanenberg, Dirk; Chiu, Alex Y. W.

    2009-12-01

    Within the hydrodynamic modelling community, it is common practice to apply different modelling systems for coastal waters and river systems. Whereas for coastal waters 3D finite difference or finite element grids are commonly used, river systems are generally modelled using 1D networks. Each of these systems is tailored towards specific applications. Three-dimensional coastal water models are designed to model the horizontal and vertical variability in coastal waters and are less well suited for representing the complex geometry and cross-sectional areas of river networks. On the other hand, 1D river network models are designed to accurately represent complex river network geometries and complex structures like weirs, barrages and dams. A disadvantage, however, is that they are unable to resolve complex spatial flow variability. In real life, however, coastal oceans and rivers interact. In deltaic estuaries, both tidal intrusion of seawater into the upstream river network and river discharge into open waters play a role. This is frequently approached by modelling the systems independently, with off-line coupling of the lateral boundary forcing. This implies that the river and the coastal model run sequentially, providing lateral discharge (1D) and water level (3D) forcing to each other without the possibility of direct feedback or interaction between these processes. An additional disadvantage is that due to the time aggregation usually applied to exchanged quantities, mass conservation is difficult to ensure. In this paper, we propose an approach that couples a 3D hydrodynamic modelling system for coastal waters (Delft3D) with a 1D modelling system for river hydraulics (SOBEK) online. This implies that contrary to off-line coupling, the hydrodynamic quantities are exchanged between the 1D and 3D domains during runtime to resolve the real-time exchange and interaction between the coastal waters and river network. This allows for accurate and mass conserving

  3. PSF Rotation with Changing Defocus and Applications to 3D Imaging for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S.; Kumar, R.

    2013-09-01

    different focal depths have shown remarkable robustness of our rotating-PSF approach to achieve good transverse and longitudinal resolution even for moderate SNR. Additionally, the work seeks to clarify an important theoretical issue about 3D imaging, namely the detailed nature of the interplay between transverse and longitudinal resolutions, including 3D generalizations of the space-bandwidth product (SBP) and its dependence on image noise. An underlying transport equation, which we shall derive and analyze, describes the trade-off between the transverse and longitudinal blur processes in a manner analogous to the diffractive spreading of a light beam that is transversely confined. This work has immediate applications for space-based surveillance, particularly for 3D mapping and tracking of space debris flying in the vicinity of important AF space assets. Working with a well corrected conventional imager, our 3D computational imager can acquire with high sensitivity and speed an extended focal volume in which individual objects of interest can be subsequently probed and imaged with high resolution over smaller 2D field segments. [1] S. Prasad, Rotating Point Spread Function by Pupil Phase Engineering, Opt. Lett., vol. 38, pp. 585-587 (2013)

  4. Preparation of 3D fibrin scaffolds for stem cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Kathleen; Willerth, Stephanie M

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are found in naturally occurring 3D microenvironments in vivo, which are often referred to as the stem cell niche. Culturing stem cells inside of 3D biomaterial scaffolds provides a way to accurately mimic these microenvironments, providing an advantage over traditional 2D culture methods using polystyrene as well as a method for engineering replacement tissues. While 2D tissue culture polystrene has been used for the majority of cell culture experiments, 3D biomaterial scaffolds can more closely replicate the microenvironments found in vivo by enabling more accurate establishment of cell polarity in the environment and possessing biochemical and mechanical properties similar to soft tissue. A variety of naturally derived and synthetic biomaterial scaffolds have been investigated as 3D environments for supporting stem cell growth. While synthetic scaffolds can be synthesized to have a greater range of mechanical and chemical properties and often have greater reproducibility, natural biomaterials are often composed of proteins and polysaccharides found in the extracelluar matrix and as a result contain binding sites for cell adhesion and readily support cell culture. Fibrin scaffolds, produced by polymerizing the protein fibrinogen obtained from plasma, have been widely investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications both in vitro and in vivo. Such scaffolds can be modified using a variety of methods to incorporate controlled release systems for delivering therapeutic factors. Previous work has shown that such scaffolds can be used to successfully culture embryonic stem cells and this scaffold-based culture system can be used to screen the effects of various growth factors on the differentiation of the stem cells seeded inside. This protocol details the process of polymerizing fibrin scaffolds from fibrinogen solutions using the enzymatic activity of thrombin. The process takes 2 days to complete, including an overnight dialysis step for the

  5. Preparation of 3D Fibrin Scaffolds for Stem Cell Culture Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kolehmainen, Kathleen; Willerth, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are found in naturally occurring 3D microenvironments in vivo, which are often referred to as the stem cell niche 1. Culturing stem cells inside of 3D biomaterial scaffolds provides a way to accurately mimic these microenvironments, providing an advantage over traditional 2D culture methods using polystyrene as well as a method for engineering replacement tissues 2. While 2D tissue culture polystrene has been used for the majority of cell culture experiments, 3D biomaterial scaffolds can more closely replicate the microenvironments found in vivo by enabling more accurate establishment of cell polarity in the environment and possessing biochemical and mechanical properties similar to soft tissue.3 A variety of naturally derived and synthetic biomaterial scaffolds have been investigated as 3D environments for supporting stem cell growth. While synthetic scaffolds can be synthesized to have a greater range of mechanical and chemical properties and often have greater reproducibility, natural biomaterials are often composed of proteins and polysaccharides found in the extracelluar matrix and as a result contain binding sites for cell adhesion and readily support cell culture. Fibrin scaffolds, produced by polymerizing the protein fibrinogen obtained from plasma, have been widely investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications both in vitro and in vivo4. Such scaffolds can be modified using a variety of methods to incorporate controlled release systems for delivering therapeutic factors 5. Previous work has shown that such scaffolds can be used to successfully culture embryonic stem cells and this scaffold-based culture system can be used to screen the effects of various growth factors on the differentiation of the stem cells seeded inside 6,7. This protocol details the process of polymerizing fibrin scaffolds from fibrinogen solutions using the enzymatic activity of thrombin. The process takes 2 days to complete, including an overnight dialysis

  6. Multiple platform application of 3D CAD PIC simulations in pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Peratt, A.L.; Mostrom, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    With the availability of 80--125 MHz microprocessors, the methodology developed for the simulation of problems in pulsed power and plasma physics on modern day supercomputers is now amenable to application on a wide range of platforms including laptops and workstations. While execution speeds with these processors do not match those of large scale computing machines, resources such as computer-aided-design (CAD) and graphical analysis codes are available to automate simulation setup and process data. This paper reports on the adaptation of IVORY, a three-dimensional, fully-electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulation code, to this platform independent CAD environment. The primary purpose of this talk is to demonstrate how rapidly a pulsed power/plasma problem can be scoped out by an experimenter on a dedicated workstation. Demonstrations include a magnetically insulated transmission line, power flow in a graded insulator stack, a relativistic klystron oscillator, and the dynamics of a coaxial thruster for space applications.

  7. Real-time 3D vectorcardiography: an application for didactic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, G.; Lissa, G.; Medina Redondo, D.; Vásquez, L.; Zapata, D.

    2007-11-01

    The traditional approach to teach the physiological basis of electrocardiography, based only on textbooks, turns out to be insufficient or confusing for students of biomedical sciences. The addition of laboratory practice to the curriculum enables students to approach theoretical aspects from a hands-on experience, resulting in a more efficient and deeper knowledge of the phenomena of interest. Here, we present the development of a PC-based application meant to facilitate the understanding of cardiac bioelectrical phenomena by visualizing in real time the instantaneous 3D cardiac vector. The system uses 8 standard leads from a 12-channel electrocardiograph. The application interface has pedagogic objectives, and facilitates the observation of cardiac depolarization and repolarization and its temporal relationship with the ECG, making it simpler to interpret.

  8. 3D printed polymers toxicity profiling: a caution for biodevice applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Skommer, Joanna; Friedrich, Timo; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-01

    A recent revolution in additive manufacturing technologies and access to 3D Computer Assisted Design (CAD) software has spurred an explosive growth of new technologies in biomedical engineering. This includes biomodels for diagnosis, surgical training, hard and soft tissue replacement, biodevices and tissue engineering. Moreover, recent developments in high-definition additive manufacturing systems such as Multi-Jet Modelling (MJM) and Stereolithography (SLA), capable of reproducing feature sizes close to 100 μm, promise brand new capabilities in fabrication of optical-grade biomicrofluidic Lab-on-a-Chip and MEMS devices. Compared with other rapid prototyping technologies such as soft lithography and infrared laser micromachining in PMMA, SLA and MJM systems can enable user-friendly production of prototypes, superior feature reproduction quality and comparable levels of optical transparency. Prospectively they can revolutionize fabrication of microfluidic devices with complex geometric features and eliminate the need to use clean room environment and conventional microfabrication techniques. In this work we demonstrate preliminary data on toxicity profiling of a panel of common polymers used in 3D printing applications. The main motivation of our work was to evaluate toxicity profiles of most commonly used polymers using standardized biotests according to OECD guidelines for testing of chemic risk assessment. Our work for the first time provides a multispecies view of potential dangers and limitation for building biocompatible devices using FDM, SLA and MJM additive manufacturing systems. Our work shows that additive manufacturing holds significant promise for fabricating LOC and MEMS but requires caution when selecting systems and polymers due to toxicity exhibited by some 3D printing polymers.

  9. Centroid Moment Tensor Inversion in a 3D heterogeneous Earth: Application to the Australasian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejrani, B.; Tkalcic, H.; Fichtner, A.

    2015-12-01

    radially anisotropic structure: new insights into present and past states of the Australasian upper mantle. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 290, 270-280. Hingee, M., Tkalčić, H., Fichtner A., Sambridge, M., 2011. Moment tensor inversion using a 3-D structural model: Applications for the Australian region, Geophys. J. Int., 184(2), 949-964.

  10. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: application to an enhanced geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Carbajal, M.; Linde, N.; Peacock, J.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, T.; Thiel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved. We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  11. Interactive Visualization of 3-D Mantle Convection Extended Through AJAX Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, J. C.; Czech, W.; Yuen, D.; Greensky, J.; Knox, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have designed a new software system for real-time interactive visualization of results taken directly from large-scale simulations of 3-D mantle convection and other large-scale simulations. This approach allows for intense visualization sessions for a couple of hours as opposed to storing massive amounts of data in a storage system. Our data sets consist of 3-D data for volume rendering with over 10 million unknowns at each timestep. Large scale visualization on a display wall holding around 13 million pixels has already been accomplished with extension to hand-held devices, such as the OQO and Nokia N800 and recently the iPHONE. We are developing web-based software in Java to extend the use of this system across long distances. The software is aimed at creating an interactive and functional application capable of running on multiple browsers by taking advantage of two AJAX-enabled web frameworks: Echo2 and Google Web Toolkit. The software runs in two modes allowing for a user to control an interactive session or observe a session controlled by another user. Modular build of the system allows for components to be swapped out for new components so that other forms of visualization could be accommodated such as Molecular Dynamics in mineral physics or 2-D data sets from lithospheric regional models.

  12. A dual 3D DIC-system application for DSL strain and displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raurova, I.; Berggreen, C.; Eriksen, R.

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a dual 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system application for DLS strain and displacement measurements, where two 3D DIC-systems are used in parallel. The bonded specimens were tested to failure under monotonic loading in a uni-axial tensile testing machine at ambient temperature. Both surface inplane strain and full-field displacement values were recorded using two DIC systems: high speed (HS) and high resolution (HR). The HS system was used in a parallel setup with the HR system in order to detect the initial failure location and crack propagation rate during the brittle failure mechanism, where an interface crack is propagating between the straps and the inner adherent. Using two inherently different DIC systems involve a number of problems. This involves synchronization of the HS and HR systems, a common illumination level and speckle pattern. This paper therefore describes guidelines for a mutual system setup, applied in an experimental study of steel/epoxy DLS joints under pure tension.

  13. A Parallelized 3D Particle-In-Cell Method With Magnetostatic Field Solver And Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Kuo-Hsien; Chen, Yen-Sen; Wu, Men-Zan Bill; Wu, Jong-Shinn

    2008-10-01

    A parallelized 3D self-consistent electrostatic particle-in-cell finite element (PIC-FEM) code using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh was developed. For simulating some applications with external permanent magnet set, the distribution of the magnetostatic field usually also need to be considered and determined accurately. In this paper, we will firstly present the development of a 3D magnetostatic field solver with an unstructured mesh for the flexibility of modeling objects with complex geometry. The vector Poisson equation for magnetostatic field is formulated using the Galerkin nodal finite element method and the resulting matrix is solved by parallel conjugate gradient method. A parallel adaptive mesh refinement module is coupled to this solver for better resolution. Completed solver is then verified by simulating a permanent magnet array with results comparable to previous experimental observations and simulations. By taking the advantage of the same unstructured grid format of this solver, the developed PIC-FEM code could directly and easily read the magnetostatic field for particle simulation. In the upcoming conference, magnetron is simulated and presented for demonstrating the capability of this code.

  14. Image-based reconstruction of 3D myocardial infarct geometry for patient specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Rajchl, Martin; White, James; Pashakhanloo, Farhad; Herzka, Daniel A.; McVeigh, Elliot; Lardo, Albert C.; Trayanova, Natalia; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy

    2015-03-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) geometry of a myocardial infarct from two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice image sequences has important applications in the clinical evaluation and treatment of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, this reconstruction is challenging because the resolution of common clinical scans used to acquire infarct structure, such as short-axis, late-gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) images, is low, especially in the out-of-plane direction. In this study, we propose a novel technique to reconstruct the 3D infarct geometry from low resolution clinical images. Our methodology is based on a function called logarithm of odds (LogOdds), which allows the broader class of linear combinations in the LogOdds vector space as opposed to being limited to only a convex combination in the binary label space. To assess the efficacy of the method, we used high-resolution LGE-CMR images of 36 human hearts in vivo, and 3 canine hearts ex vivo. The infarct was manually segmented in each slice of the acquired images, and the manually segmented data were downsampled to clinical resolution. The developed method was then applied to the downsampled image slices, and the resulting reconstructions were compared with the manually segmented data. Several existing reconstruction techniques were also implemented, and compared with the proposed method. The results show that the LogOdds method significantly outperforms all the other tested methods in terms of region overlap.

  15. Application of a 3d Smart Flexible Phased-Array to Piping Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toullelan, G.; Casula, O.; Abittan, E.; Dumas, P.

    2008-02-01

    The piping inspection in nuclear power plants is mainly performed in contact with ultrasonic wedge transducers. During the scanning, the fixed shape of the wedges cannot conform to the irregular surfaces and complex geometries of the components (butt weld, nozzle, elbow). The surface irregularities lead to thickness variations of the coupling medium that result in beam distortions and losses of sensitivity. A 3-D ultrasonic flexible phased-array is presented here and applied to the ultrasonic inspection of a welded pipe. This example of a complex geometry inspection is typical of the field of application for such sensor. The phased-array probe is flexible to conform to a complex profile and to minimize the thickness of the coupling layer. The independent piezoelectric elements composing the radiating surface are mechanically assembled to build an articulated structure. A profilometer, embedded in the transducer, measures the local surface distortion allowing to compute in real-time the optimized delay laws and to compensate the distortions of the 2D or 3D profiles. Those delay laws transferred to the UT-acquisition system are applied in real-time to the piezoelectric elements. The experiments presented here aim to determine the detection abilities of this technique using multi-shot configurations (e.g. angular scanning, several points focusing).

  16. Laser 3D micro/nanofabrication of polymers for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevičius, P.; Rekštytė, S.; Balčiūnas, E.; Kraniauskas, A.; Širmenis, R.; Baltriukienė, D.; Bukelskienė, V.; Gadonas, R.; Sirvydis, V.; Piskarskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we applied a constructed multi-photon polymerization system based on diode-pumped solid state femtosecond Yb:KGW laser used as pulsed irradiation light source (300 fs, 1030 nm, 200 kHz) in combination with large area high sample translation velocity (up to 300 mm/s) linear motor-driven stages (100×100×50 mm3) designed for high resolution and throughput 3D micro/nanofabrication. It enables rapid prototyping out of most polymers up to cm in scale with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. This can be used for production of three-dimensional artificial polymeric scaffolds applied for cell growth and expansion experiments as well as tissue engineering. Biocompatibilities of different acrylate, hybrid organic-inorganic and biodegradable polymeric materials were evaluated experimentally in vitro. Various in size and form scaffolds of biocompatible photopolymers were successfully fabricated having intricate 3D geometry, thus demonstrating the potential of the applied method. Adult rabbit myogenic stem cell proliferation tests show artificial scaffolds to be applicable for biomedical practice. Additionally, a micromolding technique was used for a rapid multiplication of adequate laser manufactured structures.

  17. The application of 3D image processing to studies of the musculoskeletal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Bruce Elliot; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Siegler, Sorin; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2009-10-01

    Three dimensional renditions of anatomical structures are commonly used to improve visualization, surgical planning, and patient education. However, such 3D images also contain information which is not readily apparent, and which can be mined to elucidate, for example, such parameters as joint kinematics, spacial relationships, and distortions of those relationships with movement. Here we describe two series of experiments which demonstrate the functional application of 3D imaging. The first concerns the joints of the ankle complex, where the usual description of motions in the talocrural joint is shown to be incomplete, and where the roles of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments are clarified in ankle sprains. Also, the biomechanical effects of two common surgical procedures for repairing torn ligaments were examined. The second series of experiments explores changes in the anatomical relationships between nerve elements and the cervical vertebrae with changes in neck position. They provide preliminary evidence that morphological differences may exist between asymptomatic subjects and patients with radiculopathy in certain positions, even when conventional imaging shows no difference.

  18. A harmonic polynomial cell (HPC) method for 3D Laplace equation with application in marine hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yan-Lin Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new efficient and accurate numerical method based on harmonic polynomials to solve boundary value problems governed by 3D Laplace equation. The computational domain is discretized by overlapping cells. Within each cell, the velocity potential is represented by the linear superposition of a complete set of harmonic polynomials, which are the elementary solutions of Laplace equation. By its definition, the method is named as Harmonic Polynomial Cell (HPC) method. The characteristics of the accuracy and efficiency of the HPC method are demonstrated by studying analytical cases. Comparisons will be made with some other existing boundary element based methods, e.g. Quadratic Boundary Element Method (QBEM) and the Fast Multipole Accelerated QBEM (FMA-QBEM) and a fourth order Finite Difference Method (FDM). To demonstrate the applications of the method, it is applied to some studies relevant for marine hydrodynamics. Sloshing in 3D rectangular tanks, a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank, fully-nonlinear wave focusing on a semi-circular shoal, and the nonlinear wave diffraction of a bottom-mounted cylinder in regular waves are studied. The comparisons with the experimental results and other numerical results are all in satisfactory agreement, indicating that the present HPC method is a promising method in solving potential-flow problems. The underlying procedure of the HPC method could also be useful in other fields than marine hydrodynamics involved with solving Laplace equation.

  19. 3D Equilibrium Effects Due to RMP Application on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, S.; Lazarus, E.; Hudson, S.; Pablant, N.; Gates, D.

    2012-06-20

    The mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) through application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamak plasmas is a well documented phenomenon. Vacuum calculations suggest the formation of edge islands and stochastic regions when RMPs are applied to the axisymmetric equilibria. Self-consistent calculations of the plasma equilibrium with the VMEC and SPEC codes have been performed for an up-down symmetric shot in DIII-D. In these codes, a self-consistent calculation of the plasma response due to the RMP coils is calculated. The VMEC code globally enforces the constraints of ideal MHD; consequently, a continuously nested family of flux surfaces is enforced throughout the plasma domain. This approach necessarily precludes the observation of islands or field-line chaos. The SPEC code relaxes the constraints of ideal MHD locally, and allows for islands and field line chaos at or near the rational surfaces. Equilibria with finite pressure gradients are approximated by a set of discrete "ideal-interfaces" at the most irrational flux surfaces and where the strongest pressure gradients are observed. Both the VMEC and SPEC calculations are initialized from EFIT reconstructions of the plasma that are consistent with the experimental pressure and current profiles. A 3D reconstruction using the STELLOPT code, which fits VMEC equilibria to experimental measurements, has also been performed. Comparisons between the equilibria generated by the 3D codes and between STELLOPT and EFIT are presented.

  20. 3D Equilibrium Effects Due to RMP Application on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lazerson, E. Lazarus, S. Hudson, N. Pablant and D. Gates

    2012-06-20

    The mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) through application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamak plasmas is a well documented phenomenon [1]. Vacuum calculations suggest the formation of edge islands and stochastic regions when RMPs are applied to the axisymmetric equilibria. Self-consistent calculations of the plasma equilibrium with the VMEC [2] and SPEC [3] codes have been performed for an up-down symmetric shot (142603) in DIII-D. In these codes, a self-consistent calculation of the plasma response due to the RMP coils is calculated. The VMEC code globally enforces the constraints of ideal MHD; consequently, a continuously nested family of flux surfaces is enforced throughout the plasma domain. This approach necessarily precludes the observation of islands or field-line chaos. The SPEC code relaxes the constraints of ideal MHD locally, and allows for islands and field line chaos at or near the rational surfaces. Equilibria with finite pressure gradients are approximated by a set of discrete "ideal-interfaces" at the most irrational flux surfaces and where the strongest pressure gradients are observed. Both the VMEC and SPEC calculations are initialized from EFIT reconstructions of the plasma that are consistent with the experimental pressure and current profiles. A 3D reconstruction using the STELLOPT code, which fits VMEC equilibria to experimental measurements, has also been performed. Comparisons between the equilibria generated by the 3D codes and between STELLOPT and EFIT are presented.

  1. Neutron transport with the method of characteristics for 3-D full core boiling water reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Justin W.

    2006-12-01

    The Numerical Nuclear Reactor (NNR) is a code suite that is being developed to provide high-fidelity multi-physics capability for the analysis of light water nuclear reactors. The focus of the work here is to extend the capability of the NNR by incorporation of the neutronics module, DeCART, for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) applications. The DeCART code has been coupled to the NNR fluid mechanics and heat transfer module STAR-CD for light water reactor applications. The coupling has been accomplished via an interface program, which is responsible for mapping the STAR-CD and DeCART meshes, managing communication, and monitoring convergence. DeCART obtains the solution of the 3-D Boltzmann transport equation by performing a series of 2-D modular ray tracing-based method of characteristics problems that are coupled within the framework of 3-D coarse-mesh finite difference. The relatively complex geometry and increased axial heterogeneity found in BWRs are beyond the modeling capability of the original version of DeCART. In this work, DeCART is extended in three primary areas. First, the geometric capability is generalized by extending the modular ray tracing scheme and permitting an unstructured mesh in the global finite difference kernel. Second, numerical instabilities, which arose as a result of the severe axial heterogeneity found in BWR cores, have been resolved. Third, an advanced nodal method has been implemented to improve the accuracy of the axial flux distribution. In this semi-analytic nodal method, the analytic solution to the transverse-integrated neutron diffusion equation is obtained, where the nonhomogeneous neutron source was first approximated by a quartic polynomial. The successful completion of these three tasks has allowed the application of the coupled DeCART/STAR-CD code to practical BWR problems.

  2. Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP): 2D Maps and 3D Globes Support Arctic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweedie, C. E.; Cody, R. P.; Kassin, A.; Gaylord, A.; Manley, W. F.; Dover, M.; Score, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) is a suite of online applications and data services that support Arctic science by providing project tracking information (who's doing what, when and where in the region) for United States Government funded projects. With ARMAP's 2D mapping application, 3D globes, and data services (http://armap.org), users can search for research projects by location, year, funding program, keyword, investigator, and discipline, among other variables. Key information about each project is displayed within the application with links to web pages that provide additional information. The ARMAP 2D mapping application has been significantly enhanced to include support for multiple projections, improved base maps, additional reference data layers, and optimization for better performance. The additional functionality of this tool will increase awareness of projects funded by numerous entities in the Arctic, enhance coordination for logistics support, help identify geographic gaps in research efforts and potentially foster more collaboration amongst researchers working in the region. Additionally, ARMAP can be used to demonstrate the effects of the International Polar Year (IPY) on funding of different research disciplines by the U.S. Government.

  3. Research on urban rapid 3D modeling and application based on CGA rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-wen; Jiang, Jian-wu; Zhou, Song; Yin, Shou-qiang

    2015-12-01

    Use CityEngine as the 3D modeling platform, research on urban rapid 3D modeling technology based on the CGA(Computer Generated Architectur) rule , solved the problem of the rapid creation of urban 3D model in large scenes , and research on building texture processing and 3D model optimization techniques based on CGA rule , using component modeling method , solved the problem of texture distortion and model redundancy in the traditional fast modeling 3D model , and development of a three-dimensional view and analysis system based on ArcGIS Engine , realization of 3D model query , distance measurement , specific path flight , 3D marking , Scene export,etc.

  4. Application of a Hybrid 3D-2D Laser Scanning System to the Characterization of Slate Slabs

    PubMed Central

    López, Marcos; Martínez, Javier; Matías, José María; Vilán, José Antonio; Taboada, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Dimensional control based on 3D laser scanning techniques is widely used in practice. We describe the application of a hybrid 3D-2D laser scanning system to the characterization of slate slabs with structural defects that are difficult for the human eye to characterize objectively. Our study is based on automating the process using a 3D laser scanner and a 2D camera. Our results demonstrate that the application of this hybrid system optimally characterizes slate slabs in terms of the defects described by the Spanish UNE-EN 12326-1 standard. PMID:22219696

  5. The effects of X window HEP graphics applications on ESnet

    SciTech Connect

    Abar, F.A. |; Lidinsky, W.P. |

    1994-12-31

    Wide area networking is the next evolutionary step toward distributed computing. Many applications that were found useful in local area networks are beginning to show their presence in wide area networks (WANs). A question is: Given today`s typical WAN infrastructure, what are the effects of the presence of distributed applications in the WANs and what can be done to facilitate full deployment of such services across wide area network? A simulation model for X window distributed graphical applications in high energy physics communities interacting across the DOE Energy Science wide area networks (ESnet) was created to examine X service resource requirements and ESnet resource limitations. Through simulation analysis the effects of the incremental introduction of X traffic to ESnet was determined as was the load level at which ESnet became unstable. Proposals for improving ESnet performance by upgrading to T3 links and also by introducing a service-based packet priority scheme at the network layer were also examined.

  6. Wrapping-free phase retrieval with applications to interferometry, 3D-shape profiling, and deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Perciante, César D; Strojnik, Marija; Paez, Gonzalo; Di Martino, J Matias; Ayubi, Gastón A; Flores, Jorge L; Ferrari, José A

    2015-04-01

    Phase unwrapping is probably the most challenging step in the phase retrieval process in phase-shifting and spatial-carrier interferometry. Likewise, phase unwrapping is required in 3D-shape profiling and deflectometry. In this paper, we present a novel phase retrieval method that completely sidesteps the phase unwrapping process, significantly eliminating the guessing in phase reconstruction and thus decreasing the time data processing. The proposed wrapping-free method is based on the direct integration of the spatial derivatives of the interference patterns under the single assumption that the phase is continuous. This assumption is valid in most physical applications. Validation experiments are presented confirming the robustness of the proposed method. PMID:25967217

  7. Fusion of 3D laser scanner and depth images for obstacle recognition in mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzan, Sebastian; Kasprzyk, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The problem of obstacle detection and recognition or, generally, scene mapping is one of the most investigated problems in computer vision, especially in mobile applications. In this paper a fused optical system using depth information with color images gathered from the Microsoft Kinect sensor and 3D laser range scanner data is proposed for obstacle detection and ground estimation in real-time mobile systems. The algorithm consists of feature extraction in the laser range images, processing of the depth information from the Kinect sensor, fusion of the sensor information, and classification of the data into two separate categories: road and obstacle. Exemplary results are presented and it is shown that fusion of information gathered from different sources increases the effectiveness of the obstacle detection in different scenarios, and it can be used successfully for road surface mapping.

  8. 3D scintigraphic imaging and navigation in radioguided surgery: freehand SPECT technology and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Christina; Matthies, Philipp; Herrmann, Ken; Povoski, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Freehand SPECT (fhSPECT) is a technology platform for providing 3-dimensional (3D) navigation for radioguided surgical procedures, such as sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy (SLNB). In addition to the information provided by conventional handheld gamma detection probes, fhSPECT allows for direct visualization of the distribution of radioactivity in any given region of interest, allowing for improved navigation to radioactive target lesions and providing accurate lesion depth measurements. Herein, we will review the currently available clinical data on the use of fhSPECT: (i) for SLNB of various malignancies, including difficult-to-detect SLNs, and (ii) for radioguided localization of solid tumors. Moreover, the combination of fhSPECT with other technologies (e.g., small field-of-view gamma cameras, and diagnostic ultrasound) is discussed. These technical advances have the potential to greatly expand the clinical application of radioguided surgery in the future. PMID:26878667

  9. CraMs: Craniometric Analysis Application Using 3D Skull Models.

    PubMed

    Dias, Paulo; Neves, Luis; Santos, Daniel; Coelho, Catarina; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Santos, Helder; Silva, Samuel; Santos, Beatriz Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Craniometric analysis plays an important role in anthropology studies and forensics. This paper presents CraMs, an application using a new craniometric approach based on 3D models of the skull. The main objective is to obtain, through a process supervised by anthropologists, the main points of interest used to compute craniometric measurements. The application aids this process by analyzing the skull geometry and automatically providing points of interest. The application also allows for semiautomatic point detection, where the user provides an initial guess that might be refined based on the curvature of the skull, as well as the manual selection of any other points of interest. Moreover, results comparing measurements obtained with CraMs and traditional craniometry methods on eight skulls suggest that the application provides comparable craniometric measurements and lower inter-observer variability. This approach offers advantages such as an easier access to skulls with no risk of bone damage and the possibility of defining new measurements based on morphology or other skull characteristics, which are not possible using traditional methods. PMID:26594956

  10. Can 3D ultrasound identify trochlea dysplasia in newborns? Evaluation and applicability of a technique.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Heidt, Christoph; Bähler, Alexandrine; Kohl, Sandro; Gravius, Sascha; Friedrich, Max J; Ziebarth, Kai; Stranzinger, Enno

    2015-06-01

    Femoro-patellar dysplasia is considered as a significant risk factor of patellar instability. Different studies suggest that the shape of the trochlea is already developed in early childhood. Therefore early identification of a dysplastic configuration might be relevant information for the treating physician. An easy applicable routine screening of the trochlea is yet not available. The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate a screening method for femoro-patellar dysplasia using 3D ultrasound. From 2012 to 2013 we prospectively imaged 160 consecutive femoro-patellar joints in 80 newborns from the 36th to 61st gestational week that underwent a routine hip sonography (Graf). All ultrasounds were performed by a pediatric radiologist with only minimal additional time to the routine hip ultrasound. In 30° flexion of the knee, axial, coronal, and sagittal reformats were used to standardize a reconstructed axial plane through the femoral condyle and the mid-patella. The sulcus angle, the lateral-to-medial facet ratio of the trochlea and the shape of the patella (Wiberg Classification) were evaluated. In all examinations reconstruction of the standardized axial plane was achieved, the mean trochlea angle was 149.1° (SD 4.9°), the lateral-to-medial facet ratio of the trochlea ratio was 1.3 (SD 0.22), and a Wiberg type I patella was found in 95% of the newborn. No statistical difference was detected between boys and girls. Using standardized reconstructions of the axial plane allows measurements to be made with lower operator dependency and higher accuracy in a short time. Therefore 3D ultrasound is an easy applicable and powerful tool to identify trochlea dysplasia in newborns and might be used for screening for trochlea dysplasia. PMID:25843417

  11. PC graphics generation and management tool for real-time applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.

    1992-01-01

    A graphics tool was designed and developed for easy generation and management of personal computer graphics. It also provides methods and 'run-time' software for many common artificial intelligence (AI) or expert system (ES) applications.

  12. GICUDA: A parallel program for 3D correlation imaging of large scale gravity and gravity gradiometry data on graphics processing units with CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoxi; Meng, Xiaohong; Guo, Lianghui; Liu, Guofeng

    2012-09-01

    The 3D correlation imaging for gravity and gravity gradiometry data provides a rapid approach to the equivalent estimation of objective bodies with different density contrasts in the subsurface. The subsurface is divided into a 3D regular grid, and then a cross correlation between the observed data and the theoretical gravity anomaly due to a point mass source is calculated at each grid node. The resultant correlation coefficients are adopted to describe the equivalent mass distribution in a quantitate probability sense. However, when the size of the survey data is large, it is still computationally expensive. With the advent of the CUDA, GPUs lead to a new path for parallel computing, which have been widely applied in seismic processing, astronomy, molecular dynamics simulation, fluid mechanics and some other fields. We transfer the main time-consuming program of 3D correlation imaging into GPU device, where the program can be executed in a parallel way. The synthetic and real tests have been performed to validate the correctness of our code on NVIDIA GTX 550. The precision evaluation and performance speedup comparison of the CPU and GPU implementations are illustrated with different sizes of gravity data. When the size of grid nodes and observed data sets is 1024×1024×1 and 1024×1024, the speed up can reach to 81.5 for gravity data and 90.7 for gravity vertical gradient data respectively, thus providing the basis for the rapid interpretation of gravity and gravity gradiometry data.

  13. uPy: a ubiquitous computer graphics Python API with Biological Modeling Applications

    PubMed Central

    Autin, L.; Johnson, G.; Hake, J.; Olson, A.; Sanner, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe uPy, an extension module for the Python programming language that provides a uniform abstraction of the APIs of several 3D computer graphics programs called hosts, including: Blender, Maya, Cinema4D, and DejaVu. A plugin written with uPy is a unique piece of code that will run in all uPy-supported hosts. We demonstrate the creation of complex plug-ins for molecular/cellular modeling and visualization and discuss how uPy can more generally simplify programming for many types of projects (not solely science applications) intended for multi-host distribution. uPy is available at http://upy.scripps.edu PMID:24806987

  14. MPEG-2 multiview profile and its application in 3D TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuemin; Luthra, Ajay

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in the technology of digital video compression, transmission and displays have made the multiple viewpoint digital video viable for many applications, e.g. stereoscopic view for 3D TV and arbitrary angle scene compositing for virtual camera, etc. To facilitate these applications the Motion Pictures Experts Group (MPEG) of the International Standards Organization (ISO), that successfully created the MPEG-1 & 2 standards, has been working on amending the MPEG-2 standard to create a new MPEG-2 profile, called the Multi-View Profile (MVP). MVP features a two-layer -- base layer and enhancement layer -- video coding scheme. The base layer video is coded as MPEG-2 main profile (MP) bitstream. The enhancement layer video is coded with temporal scalability tools and exploits the correlation between the two viewing angles to improve the compression efficiency. This type of two layer approach guarantees backward and forward compatibility with main profile receivers and encoders; i.e. an MVP decoder will be able to decode any main profile bit stream at the same level and a main profile receiver will be able to decode the base layer of an MVP stream to generate and display mono view scenes of the same program. In stereoscopic video applications the base layer is assigned to the left eye view and the enhancement layer to the right eye view. This paper provides an overview of the MPEG-2 MVP and focuses in detail on the stereoscopic video compression algorithms.

  15. 3-D Reconstruction From 2-D Radiographic Images and Its Application to Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Motoyoshi

    3D imaging technique is very important and indispensable in diagnosis. The main stream of the technique is one in which 3D image is reconstructed from a set of slice images, such as X-ray CT and MRI. However, these systems require large space and high costs. On the other hand, a low cost and small size 3D imaging system is needed in clinical veterinary medicine, for example, in the case of diagnosis in X-ray car or pasture area. We propose a novel 3D imaging technique using 2-D X-ray radiographic images. This system can be realized by cheaper system than X-ray CT and enables to get 3D image in X-ray car or portable X-ray equipment. In this paper, a 3D visualization technique from 2-D radiographic images is proposed and several reconstructions are shown. These reconstructions are evaluated by veterinarians.

  16. Real-time graphic display utility for nuclear safety applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Huang, X.; Taylor, J.; Stevens, J.; Gerardis, T.; Hsu, A.; McCreary, T.

    2006-07-01

    With the increasing interests in the nuclear energy, new nuclear power plants will be constructed and licensed, and older generation ones will be upgraded for assuring continuing operation. The tendency of adopting the latest proven technology and the fact of older parts becoming obsolete have made the upgrades imperative. One of the areas for upgrades is the older CRT display being replaced by the latest graphics displays running under modern real time operating system (RTOS) with safety graded modern computer. HFC has developed a graphic display utility (GDU) under the QNX RTOS. A standard off-the-shelf software with a long history of performance in industrial applications, QNX RTOS used for safety applications has been examined via a commercial dedication process that is consistent with the regulatory guidelines. Through a commercial survey, a design life cycle and an operating history evaluation, and necessary tests dictated by the dedication plan, it is reasonably confirmed that the QNX RTOS was essentially equivalent to what would be expected in the nuclear industry. The developed GDU operates and communicates with the existing equipment through a dedicated serial channel of a flat panel controller (FPC) module. The FPC module drives a flat panel display (FPD) monitor. A touch screen mounted on the FPD serves as the normal operator interface with the FPC/FPD monitor system. The GDU can be used not only for replacing older CRTs but also in new applications. The replacement of the older CRT does not disturb the function of the existing equipment. It not only provides modern proven technology upgrade but also improves human ergonomics. The FPC, which can be used as a standalone controller running with the GDU, is an integrated hardware and software module. It operates as a single board computer within a control system, and applies primarily to the graphics display, targeting, keyboard and mouse. During normal system operation, the GDU has two sources of data

  17. Review on applications of 3D inverse design method for pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Junlian; Wang, Dezhong

    2014-05-01

    The 3D inverse design method, which methodology is far superior to the conventional design method that based on geometrical description, is gradually applied in pump blade design. However, no complete description about the method is outlined. Also, there are no general rules available to set the two important input parameters, blade loading distribution and stacking condition. In this sense, the basic theory and the mechanism why the design method can suppress the formation of secondary flow are summarized. And also, several typical pump design cases with different specific speeds ranging from centrifugal pump to axial pump are surveyed. The results indicates that, for centrifugal pump and mixed pump or turbine, the ratio of blade loading on the hub to that on the shroud is more than unit in the fore part of the blade, whereas in the aft part, the ratio is decreased to satisfy the same wrap angle for hub and shroud. And the choice of blade loading type depends on the balancing of efficiency and cavitation. If the cavitation is more weighted, the better choice is aft-loaded, otherwise, the fore-loaded or mid-loaded is preferable to improve the efficiency. The stacking condition, which is an auxiliary to suppress the secondary flow, can have great effect on the jet-wake outflow and the operation range for pump. Ultimately, how to link the design method to modern optimization techniques is illustrated. With the know-how design methodology and the know-how systematic optimization approach, the application of optimization design is promising for engineering. This paper summarizes the 3D inverse design method systematically.

  18. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: Application to an enhanced geothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Linde, Nicolas; Peacock, Jared R.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Thiel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved.We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  19. Processing 3D flash LADAR point-clouds in real-time for flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, R.; Gravseth, I.; Earhart, R. P.; Bladt, J.; Barnhill, S.; Ruppert, L.; Centamore, C.

    2007-04-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. has demonstrated real-time processing of 3D imaging LADAR point-cloud data to produce the industry's first time-of-flight (TOF) 3D video capability. This capability is uniquely suited to the rigorous demands of space and airborne flight applications and holds great promise in the area of autonomous navigation. It will provide long-range, three dimensional video information to autonomous flight software or pilots for immediate use in rendezvous and docking, proximity operations, landing, surface vision systems, and automatic target recognition and tracking. This is enabled by our new generation of FPGA based "pixel-tube" processors, coprocessors and their associated algorithms which have led to a number of advancements in high-speed wavefront processing along with additional advances in dynamic camera control, and space laser designs based on Ball's CALIPSO LIDAR. This evolution in LADAR is made possible by moving the mechanical complexity required for a scanning system into the electronics, where production, integration, testing and life-cycle costs can be significantly reduced. This technique requires a state of the art TOF read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) attached to a sensor array to collect high resolution temporal data, which is then processed through FPGAs. The number of calculations required to process the data is greatly reduced thanks to the fact that all points are captured at the same time and thus correlated. This correlation allows extremely efficient FPGA processing. This capability has been demonstrated in prototype form at both Marshal Space Flight Center and Langley Research Center on targets that represent docking and landing scenarios. This report outlines many aspects of this work as well as aspects of our recent testing at Marshall's Flight Robotics Laboratory.

  20. Image synchronization for 3D application using the NanEye sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Ricardo M.; Wäny, Martin; Santos, Pedro; Dias, Morgado

    2015-03-01

    Based on Awaiba's NanEye CMOS image sensor family and a FPGA platform with USB3 interface, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate a novel technique to perfectly synchronize up to 8 individual self-timed cameras. Minimal form factor self-timed camera modules of 1 mm x 1 mm or smaller do not generally allow external synchronization. However, for stereo vision or 3D reconstruction with multiple cameras as well as for applications requiring pulsed illumination it is required to synchronize multiple cameras. In this work, the challenge to synchronize multiple self-timed cameras with only 4 wire interface has been solved by adaptively regulating the power supply for each of the cameras to synchronize their frame rate and frame phase. To that effect, a control core was created to constantly monitor the operating frequency of each camera by measuring the line period in each frame based on a well-defined sampling signal. The frequency is adjusted by varying the voltage level applied to the sensor based on the error between the measured line period and the desired line period. To ensure phase synchronization between frames of multiple cameras, a Master-Slave interface was implemented. A single camera is defined as the Master entity, with its operating frequency being controlled directly through a PC based interface. The remaining cameras are setup in Slave mode and are interfaced directly with the Master camera control module. This enables the remaining cameras to monitor its line and frame period and adjust their own to achieve phase and frequency synchronization. The result of this work will allow the realization of smaller than 3mm diameter 3D stereo vision equipment in medical endoscopic context, such as endoscopic surgical robotic or micro invasive surgery.

  1. Characteristics of capacitance-micro-displacement for model of complex interior surface of the 3D Taiji ball and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruo-Gu; Jiang, Kun; Qing, Zhao-Bo; Liu, Yue-Hui; Yan, Jun

    2006-11-01

    Taiji image originated from ancient China. It is not only the Taoism emblem but also the ancient graphic presentation sign to everything origin. It either has a too far-reaching impact on traditional culture of China, or is influencing the development of current natural science. On the basis of analyzing the classical philosophic theory of two-dimensional (2-D) Taiji image, we developed it into the model of complex interior surface-three-dimensional (3-D) Taiji ball, and explored its possible applications. Combining modern mathematics and physics knowledge, we have studied on the physical meaning of 3-D Taiji ball, thus the plane change of original Taiji image is developed into space change which is more close to the real world. The change layers are obvious increased notably, and the amount of information included in this model increases correspondingly. We also realized a special paper 3-D Taiji ball whose surface is coved with metal foil by means of laser manufacture. A new experiment set-up for measuring micro displace has been designed and constituted thus the relation between capacitance and micro displacement for the 3-D Taiji ball has performed. Experimental and theoretical analyses are also finished. This models of 3-D Taiji ball for physical characteristics are the first time set up. Experimental data and fitting curves between capacitance and micro displacement for the special paper Taiji ball coved with metal foil are suggested. It is shown that the special Taiji ball has less leakage capacitance or more strengthen electric field than an ordinary half ball capacitance. Finally their potential applied values are explored.

  2. State-of-The-Art and Applications of 3D Imaging Sensors in Industry, Cultural Heritage, Medicine, and Criminal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Docchio, Franco

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging sensors for the acquisition of three dimensional (3D) shapes have created, in recent years, a considerable degree of interest for a number of applications. The miniaturization and integration of the optical and electronic components used to build them have played a crucial role in the achievement of compactness, robustness and flexibility of the sensors. Today, several 3D sensors are available on the market, even in combination with other sensors in a “sensor fusion” approach. An importance equal to that of physical miniaturization has the portability of the measurements, via suitable interfaces, into software environments designed for their elaboration, e.g., CAD-CAM systems, virtual renders, and rapid prototyping tools. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of 3D imaging sensors, a number of significant examples of their use are presented, with particular reference to industry, heritage, medicine, and criminal investigation applications. PMID:22389618

  3. State-of-The-Art and Applications of 3D Imaging Sensors in Industry, Cultural Heritage, Medicine, and Criminal Investigation.

    PubMed

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Docchio, Franco

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging sensors for the acquisition of three dimensional (3D) shapes have created, in recent years, a considerable degree of interest for a number of applications. The miniaturization and integration of the optical and electronic components used to build them have played a crucial role in the achievement of compactness, robustness and flexibility of the sensors. Today, several 3D sensors are available on the market, even in combination with other sensors in a "sensor fusion" approach. An importance equal to that of physical miniaturization has the portability of the measurements, via suitable interfaces, into software environments designed for their elaboration, e.g., CAD-CAM systems, virtual renders, and rapid prototyping tools. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of 3D imaging sensors, a number of significant examples of their use are presented, with particular reference to industry, heritage, medicine, and criminal investigation applications. PMID:22389618

  4. The 3D visualization technology research of submarine pipeline based Horde3D GameEngine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guanghui; Ma, Xiushui; Chen, Genlang; Ye, Lingjian

    2013-10-01

    With the development of 3D display and virtual reality technology, its application gets more and more widespread. This paper applies 3D display technology to the monitoring of submarine pipeline. We reconstruct the submarine pipeline and its surrounding submarine terrain in computer using Horde3D graphics rendering engine on the foundation database "submarine pipeline and relative landforms landscape synthesis database" so as to display the virtual scene of submarine pipeline based virtual reality and show the relevant data collected from the monitoring of submarine pipeline.

  5. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises. PMID:27445707

  6. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises. PMID:27445707

  7. 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Markstedt, Kajsa; Mantas, Athanasios; Tournier, Ivan; Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-05-11

    The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs. PMID:25806996

  8. A Computer Graphics Human Figure Application Of Biostereometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, William A.

    1980-07-01

    A study of improved computer graphic representation of the human figure is being conducted under a National Science Foundation grant. Special emphasis is given biostereometrics as a primary data base from which applications requiring a variety of levels of detail may be prepared. For example, a human figure represented by a single point can be very useful in overview plots of a population. A crude ten point figure can be adequate for queuing theory studies and simulated movement of groups. A one hundred point figure can usefully be animated to achieve different overall body activities including male and female figures. A one thousand point figure si-milarly animated, begins to be useful in anthropometrics and kinesiology gross body movements. Extrapolations of this order-of-magnitude approach ultimately should achieve very complex data bases and a program which automatically selects the correct level of detail for the task at hand. See Summary Figure 1.

  9. Synthesis and 3D printing of biodegradable polyurethane elastomer by a water-based process for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kun-Che; Tseng, Ching-Shiow; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable materials that can undergo degradation in vivo are commonly employed to manufacture tissue engineering scaffolds, by techniques including the customized 3D printing. Traditional 3D printing methods involve the use of heat, toxic organic solvents, or toxic photoinitiators for fabrication of synthetic scaffolds. So far, there is no investigation on water-based 3D printing for synthetic materials. In this study, the water dispersion of elastic and biodegradable polyurethane (PU) nanoparticles is synthesized, which is further employed to fabricate scaffolds by 3D printing using polyethylene oxide (PEO) as a viscosity enhancer. The surface morphology, degradation rate, and mechanical properties of the water-based 3D-printed PU scaffolds are evaluated and compared with those of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds made from the solution in organic solvent. These scaffolds are seeded with chondrocytes for evaluation of their potential as cartilage scaffolds. Chondrocytes in 3D-printed PU scaffolds have excellent seeding efficiency, proliferation, and matrix production. Since PU is a category of versatile materials, the aqueous 3D printing process developed in this study is a platform technology that can be used to fabricate devices for biomedical applications. PMID:24729580

  10. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application

    PubMed Central

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy. PMID:27215466

  11. Parallel graph search: application to intraretinal layer segmentation of 3D macular OCT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2012-02-01

    Image segmentation is of paramount importance for quantitative analysis of medical image data. Recently, a 3-D graph search method which can detect globally optimal interacting surfaces with respect to the cost function of volumetric images has been introduced, and its utility demonstrated in several application areas. Although the method provides excellent segmentation accuracy, its limitation is a slow processing speed when many surfaces are simultaneously segmented in large volumetric datasets. Here, we propose a novel method of parallel graph search, which overcomes the limitation and allows the quick detection of multiple surfaces. To demonstrate the obtained performance with respect to segmentation accuracy and processing speedup, the new approach was applied to retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) image data and compared with the performance of the former non-parallel method. Our parallel graph search methods for single and double surface detection are approximately 267 and 181 times faster than the original graph search approach in 5 macular OCT volumes (200 x 5 x 1024 voxels) acquired from the right eyes of 5 normal subjects. The resulting segmentation differences were small as demonstrated by the mean unsigned differences between the non-parallel and parallel methods of 0.0 +/- 0.0 voxels (0.0 +/- 0.0 μm) and 0.27 +/- 0.34 voxels (0.53 +/- 0.66 μm) for the single- and dual-surface approaches, respectively.

  12. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application.

    PubMed

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy. PMID:27215466

  13. General application of rapid 3-D digitizing and tool path generation for complex shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.; Loucks, C.S.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-09-01

    A system for automatic tool path generation was developed at Sandia National Laboratories for finish machining operations. The system consists of a commercially available 5-axis milling machine controlled by Sandia developed software. This system was used to remove overspray on cast turbine blades. A laser-based, structured-light sensor, mounted on a tool holder, is used to collect 3D data points around the surface of the turbine blade. Using the digitized model of the blade, a tool path is generated which will drive a 0.375 inch grinding pin around the tip of the blade. A fuzzified digital filter was developed to properly eliminate false sensor readings caused by burrs, holes and overspray. The digital filter was found to successfully generate the correct tool path for a blade with intentionally scanned holes and defects. The fuzzified filter improved the computation efficiency by a factor of 25. For application to general parts, an adaptive scanning algorithm was developed and presented with simulation and experimental results. A right pyramid and an ellipsoid were scanned successfully with the adaptive algorithm in simulation studies. In actual experiments, a nose cone and a turbine blade were successfully scanned. A complex shaped turbine blade was successfully scanned and finished machined using these algorithms.

  14. 3D Bioprinting of Carboxymethylated-Periodate Oxidized Nanocellulose Constructs for Wound Dressing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gethin, David T.; Syverud, Kristin; Hill, Katja E.; Thomas, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Nanocellulose has a variety of advantages, which make the material most suitable for use in biomedical devices such as wound dressings. The material is strong, allows for production of transparent films, provides a moist wound healing environment, and can form elastic gels with bioresponsive characteristics. In this study, we explore the application of nanocellulose as a bioink for modifying film surfaces by a bioprinting process. Two different nanocelluloses were used, prepared with TEMPO mediated oxidation and a combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation. The combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation produced a homogeneous material with short nanofibrils, having widths <20 nm and lengths <200 nm. The small dimensions of the nanofibrils reduced the viscosity of the nanocellulose, thus yielding a material with good rheological properties for use as a bioink. The nanocellulose bioink was thus used for printing 3D porous structures, which is exemplified in this study. We also demonstrated that both nanocelluloses did not support bacterial growth, which is an interesting property of these novel materials. PMID:26090461

  15. 3D Bioprinting of Carboxymethylated-Periodate Oxidized Nanocellulose Constructs for Wound Dressing Applications.

    PubMed

    Rees, Adam; Powell, Lydia C; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Gethin, David T; Syverud, Kristin; Hill, Katja E; Thomas, David W

    2015-01-01

    Nanocellulose has a variety of advantages, which make the material most suitable for use in biomedical devices such as wound dressings. The material is strong, allows for production of transparent films, provides a moist wound healing environment, and can form elastic gels with bioresponsive characteristics. In this study, we explore the application of nanocellulose as a bioink for modifying film surfaces by a bioprinting process. Two different nanocelluloses were used, prepared with TEMPO mediated oxidation and a combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation. The combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation produced a homogeneous material with short nanofibrils, having widths <20 nm and lengths <200 nm. The small dimensions of the nanofibrils reduced the viscosity of the nanocellulose, thus yielding a material with good rheological properties for use as a bioink. The nanocellulose bioink was thus used for printing 3D porous structures, which is exemplified in this study. We also demonstrated that both nanocelluloses did not support bacterial growth, which is an interesting property of these novel materials. PMID:26090461

  16. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-05-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy.

  17. Application Protocol, Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES), Layered Electrical Product

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connell, L.J.

    1994-12-01

    An application protocol is an information systems engineering view of a specific product The view represents an agreement on the generic activities needed to design and fabricate the product the agreement on the information needed to support those activities, and the specific constructs of a product data standard for use in transferring some or all of the information required. This application protocol describes the data for electrical and electronic products in terms of a product description standard called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). More specifically, the Layered Electrical Product IGES Application Protocol (AP) specifies the mechanisms for defining and exchanging computer-models and their associated data for those products which have been designed in two dimensional geometry so as to be produced as a series of layers in IGES format The AP defines the appropriateness of the data items for describing the geometry of the various parts of a product (shape and location), the connectivity, and the processing and material characteristics. Excluded is the behavioral requirements which the product was intended to satisfy, except as those requirements have been recorded as design rules or product testing requirements.

  18. DLP technology application: 3D head tracking and motion correction in medical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Oline V.; Wilm, Jakob; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Højgaard, Liselotte; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensing system, robust Near-infrared Structured Light Scanning (NIRSL) for three-dimensional human model scanning application. Human model scanning due to its nature of various hair and dress appearance and body motion has long been a challenging task. Previous structured light scanning methods typically emitted visible coded light patterns onto static and opaque objects to establish correspondence between a projector and a camera for triangulation. In the success of these methods rely on scanning objects with proper reflective surface for visible light, such as plaster, light colored cloth. Whereas for human model scanning application, conventional methods suffer from low signal to noise ratio caused by low contrast of visible light over the human body. The proposed robust NIRSL, as implemented with the near infrared light, is capable of recovering those dark surfaces, such as hair, dark jeans and black shoes under visible illumination. Moreover, successful structured light scan relies on the assumption that the subject is static during scanning. Due to the nature of body motion, it is very time sensitive to keep this assumption in the case of human model scan. The proposed sensing system, by utilizing the new near-infrared capable high speed LightCrafter DLP projector, is robust to motion, provides accurate and high resolution three-dimensional point cloud, making our system more efficient and robust for human model reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that our system is effective and efficient to scan real human models with various dark hair, jeans and shoes, robust to human body motion and produces accurate and high resolution 3D point cloud.

  19. Latest applications of 3D ToF-SIMS bio-imaging.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John S

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a rapidly developing technique for the characterization of a wide range of materials. Recently, advances in instrumentation and sample preparation approaches have provided the ability to perform 3D molecular imaging experiments. Polyatomic ion beams, such as C60, and gas cluster ion beams, often Arn (n = 500-4000), substantially reduce the subsurface damage accumulation associated with continued bombardment of organic samples with atomic beams. In this review, the capabilities of the technique are discussed and examples of the 3D imaging approach for the analysis of model membrane systems, plant single cell, and tissue samples are presented. Ongoing challenges for 3D ToF-SIMS imaging are also discussed along with recent developments that might offer improved 3D imaging prospects in the near future. PMID:25708631

  20. Development of a 3D GIS and its application to karst areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Xu, Hua; Zhou, Wanfang

    2008-05-01

    There is a growing interest in modeling and analyzing karst phenomena in three dimensions. This paper integrates geology, groundwater hydrology, geographic information system (GIS), database management system (DBMS), visualization and data mining to study karst features in Huaibei, China. The 3D geo-objects retrieved from the karst area are analyzed and mapped into different abstract levels. The spatial relationships among the objects are constructed by a dual-linker. The shapes of the 3D objects and the topological models with attributes are stored and maintained in the DBMS. Spatial analysis was then used to integrate the data in the DBMS and the 3D model to form a virtual reality (VR) to provide analytical functions such as distribution analysis, correlation query, and probability assessment. The research successfully implements 3D modeling and analyses in the karst area, and meanwhile provides an efficient tool for government policy-makers to set out restrictions on water resource development in the area.

  1. Combinatorial clustering and Its Application to 3D Polygonal Traffic Sign Reconstruction From Multiple Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, B.; Soheilian, B.; Brédif, M.

    2014-08-01

    The 3D reconstruction of similar 3D objects detected in 2D faces a major issue when it comes to grouping the 2D detections into clusters to be used to reconstruct the individual 3D objects. Simple clustering heuristics fail as soon as similar objects are close. This paper formulates a framework to use the geometric quality of the reconstruction as a hint to do a proper clustering. We present a methodology to solve the resulting combinatorial optimization problem with some simplifications and approximations in order to make it tractable. The proposed method is applied to the reconstruction of 3D traffic signs from their 2D detections to demonstrate its capacity to solve ambiguities.

  2. Application to monitoring of tailings dam based on 3D laser scanning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fang; Zhang, Aiwu

    2011-06-01

    This paper presented a new method of monitoring of tailing dam based on 3D laser scanning technology and gave the method flow of acquiring and processing the tailing dam data. Taking the measured data for example, the author analyzed the dam deformation by generating the TIN, DEM and the curvature graph, and proved that it's feasible to global monitor the tailing dam using 3D laser scanning technology from the theory and method.

  3. Application of 3-D printing (rapid prototyping) for creating physical models of pediatric orthopedic disorders.

    PubMed

    Starosolski, Zbigniew A; Kan, J Herman; Rosenfeld, Scott D; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Annapragada, Ananth

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional printing called rapid prototyping, a technology that is used to create physical models based on a 3-D computer representation, is now commercially available and can be created from CT or MRI datasets. This technical innovation paper reviews the specific requirements and steps necessary to apply biomedical 3-D printing of pediatric musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss its role for the radiologist, orthopedist and patient. PMID:24202430

  4. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SILICON GRAPHICS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  5. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, I; Lasso, A; Rankin, A; Fichtinger, G; Joshi, C P; Falkson, C; Schreiner, L John

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  6. Fundamental Study on Applicability of Powder-Based 3D Printer for Physical Modeling in Rock Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereshtenejad, Sayedalireza; Song, Jae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Applications of 3D printing technology become more widespread in many research fields because of its rapid development and valuable capabilities. In rock mechanics and mining engineering, this technology has the potential to become a useful tool that might help implement a number of research studies previously considered impractical. Most commercial 3D printers cannot print prototypes with mechanical properties that match precisely those of natural rock samples. Therefore, some additional enhancements are required for 3D printers to be effectively utilized for rock mechanics applications. In this study, we printed and studied specimens using a powder-based commercial ZPrinter® 450 with ZP® 150 powder and Zb® 63 binder used as raw materials. The specimens printed by this 3D printer exhibited relatively low strength and ductile behavior, implying that it needs further improvements. Hence, we focused on several ways to determine the best combination of printing options and post-processing including the effects of the printing direction, printing layer thickness, binder saturation level, and heating process on the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and stress-strain behavior of the printed samples. The suggested procedures have demonstrated their effectiveness by obtaining the printed samples that behave similarly to the natural rocks with low UCS. Although our optimization methods were particularly successful, further improvements are required to expand 3D printer application in the area of rock mechanics.

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  9. Application of a 3D model Mixfor-3D for description of solar radiation regime in a tropical monsoon forest in the Cat Tien National Park in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, A.; Kurbatova, J.; Radler, K.; Khanh, Pham Huu; Khoi, Vu Xuan; Kuznetsov, A.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation regime of lowland lagerstroemia tropical monsoon forests in the Cat Tien National Park in Vietnam was described using a 3D process-based model Mixfor-3D (Olchev et al. 2009). The Cat Tien National Park is situated in the south of Vietnam, approximately 150 km north of Ho Chi Minh City. It is unique area that protects one of the largest areas of lowland tropical rainforests left in Vietnam. The main concept of the used Mixfor-3D model is a combined description of the physical and biological processes on the different spatial levels of a plant ecosystem, i.e. from individual leaf and plant (tree) to the entire ecosystem. The model effectively integrates a very high (3D) spatial resolution of ecosystem structure with 3D algorithms sophistically describing the processes of radiation, turbulent exchange of sensible heat and water vapour, water and heat transfer in plant canopy and soil. The Mixfor-3D model consists of several closely coupled 3D sub-models describing: structure of a forest stand; radiative transfer in a forest canopy; turbulent transfer of sensible heat and water vapour between ground surface, trees and the atmospheric surface layer; heat and moisture transfer in soil. Reasonable computing time and a number of input parameters are important factors that were taken into account during development of the model. Mixfor-3D has a horizontal resolution of 2 m x 2 m, a vertical canopy resolution of 1 m, a vertical soil resolution of 0.1 m and a primary time step of 1 hour. These spatial and temporal resolutions allow us to take into account small scale heterogeneity of the canopy and soil structure and to reproduce the 3D flux distribution and canopy microclimate. For modeling experiments three different forest plots have been selected. They are characterized by very heterogeneous and diverse structure. Tree density of the forest plots is up to 660 trees per hectare, and number of tree species is ranged between 19 and 23. Upper canopy layer of the

  10. Programmable real-time applications with the 3D-Flow for input data rate systems of hundreds of MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, D.

    1996-02-01

    The applicability of the 3D-Flow system to different experimental setups for real-time applications in the range of hundreds of nanoseconds is described. The results of the simulation of several real-time applications using the 3D-Flow demonstrate the advantages of a simple architecture that carries out operations in a balanced manner using regular connections and exceptionally few replicated components compared to conventional microprocessors. Diverse applications can be found that will benefit from this approach: High Energy Physics (HEP), which typically requires discerning patterns from thousands of accelerator particle collision signals up to 40 Mhz input data rate; Medical Imaging, that requires interactive tools for studying fast occurring biological processes; processing output from high-rate CCD cameras in commercial applications, such as quality control in manufacturing; data compression; speech and character recognition; automatic automobile guidance, and other applications. The 3D-Flow system was conceived for experiments at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). It was adopted by the Gamma Electron and Muon (GEM) experiment that was to be used for particle identification. The target of the 3D-Flow system was real-time pattern recognition at 100 million frames/sec.

  11. A novel 3D micron-scale DPTV (Defocused Particle Tracking Velocimetry) and its applications in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John

    2005-11-01

    The rapid advancements in micro/nano biotechnology demand quantitative tools for characterizing microfluidic flows in lab-on-a-chip applications, validation of computational results for fully 3D flows in complex micro-devices, and efficient observation of cellular dynamics in 3D. We present a novel 3D micron-scale DPTV (defocused particle tracking velocimetry) that is capable of mapping out 3D Lagrangian, as well as 3D Eulerian velocity flow fields at sub-micron resolution and with one camera. The main part of the imaging system is an epi-fluorescent microscope (Olympus IX 51), and the seeding particles are fluorescent particles with diameter range 300nm - 10um. A software package has been developed for identifying (x,y,z,t) coordinates of the particles using the defocused images. Using the imaging system, we successfully mapped the pressure driven flow fields in microfluidic channels. In particular, we measured the Laglangian flow fields in a microfluidic channel with a herring bone pattern at the bottom, the later is used to enhance fluid mixing in lateral directions. The 3D particle tracks revealed the flow structure that has only been seen in numerical computation. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (CTS - 0514443), the Nanobiotechnology Center at Cornell, and The New York State Center for Life Science Enterprise.

  12. 3-D inversion of magnetotelluric data using unstructured tetrahedral elements: applicability to data affected by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Yoshiya

    2015-08-01

    A 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inversion code using unstructured tetrahedral elements has been developed in order to correct the topographic effect by directly incorporating it into computational grids. The electromagnetic field and response functions get distorted at the observation sites of MT surveys because of the undulating surface topography, and without correcting this distortion, the subsurface structure can be misinterpreted. Of the two methods proposed to correct the topographic effect, the method incorporating topography explicitly in the inversion is applicable to a wider range of surveys. For forward problems, it has been shown that the finite element method using unstructured tetrahedral elements is useful for the incorporation of topography. Therefore, this paper shows the applicability of unstructured tetrahedral elements in MT inversion using the newly developed code. The inversion code is capable of using the impedance tensor, the vertical magnetic transfer function (VMTF), and the phase tensor as observational data, and it estimates the subsurface resistivity values and the distortion tensor of each observation site. The forward part of the code was verified using two test models, one incorporating topographic effect and one without, and the verifications showed that the results were almost the same as those of previous works. The developed inversion code was then applied to synthetic data from a MT survey, and was verified as being able to recover the resistivity structure as well as other inversion codes. Finally, to confirm its applicability to the data affected by topography, inversion was performed using the synthetic data of the model that included two overlapping mountains. In each of the cases using the impedance tensor, the VMTF and the phase tensor, by including the topography in the mesh, the subsurface resistivity was determined more proficiently than in the case using the flat-surface mesh. Although the locations of the anomalies were

  13. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in Eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in Eta Car. We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form. We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for Eta Car.

  14. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C.J.H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in eta Car.We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form.We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for eta Car.

  15. Real-Depth imaging: a new (no glasses) 3D imaging technology with video/data projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgoff, Eugene

    1997-05-01

    Floating Images, Inc. has developed the software and hardware for anew, patent pending, 'floating 3D, off-the- screen-experience' display technology. This technology has the potential to become the next standard for home and arcade video games, computers, corporate presentations, Internet/Intranet viewing, and television. Current '3D Graphics' technologies are actually flat on screen. Floating Images technology actually produce images at different depths from any display, such as CRT and LCD, for television, computer, projection, and other formats. In addition, unlike stereoscopic 3D imaging, no glasses, headgear, or other viewing aids are used. And, unlike current autostereoscopic imaging technologies, there is virtually no restriction on where viewers can sit to view the images, with no 'bad' or 'dead' zones, flipping, or pseudoscopy. In addition to providing traditional depth cues such as perspective and background image occlusion, the new technology also provides both horizontal and vertical binocular parallax and accommodation which coincides with convergence. Since accommodation coincides with convergence, viewing these images doesn't produce headaches, fatigue, or eye-strain, regardless of how long they are viewed. The imagery must either be formatted for the Floating Images platform when written, or existing software can be reformatted without much difficult. The optical hardware system can be made to accommodate virtually any projection system to produce Floating Images for the Boardroom, video arcade, stage shows, or the classroom.

  16. Pilot Application of 3d Underwater Imaging Techniques for Mapping Posidonia Oceanica (L.) Delile Meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rende, F. S.; Irving, A. D.; Lagudi, A.; Bruno, F.; Scalise, S.; Cappa, P.; Montefalcone, M.; Bacci, T.; Penna, M.; Trabucco, B.; Di Mento, R.; Cicero, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    Seagrass communities are considered one of the most productive and complex marine ecosystems. Seagrasses belong to a small group of 66 species that can form extensive meadows in all coastal areas of our planet. Posidonia oceanica beds are the most characteristic ecosystem of the Mediterranean Sea, and should be constantly monitored, preserved and maintained, as specified by EU Habitats Directive for priority habitats. Underwater 3D imaging by means of still or video cameras can allow a detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of these meadows, but also of the seafloor morphology and integrity. Video-photographic devices and open source software for acquiring and managing 3D optical data rapidly became more and more effective and economically viable, making underwater 3D mapping an easier task to carry out. 3D reconstruction of the underwater scene can be obtained with photogrammetric techniques that require just one or more digital cameras, also in stereo configuration. In this work we present the preliminary results of a pilot 3D mapping project applied to the P. oceanica meadow in the Marine Protected Area of Capo Rizzuto (KR, Calabria Region - Italy).

  17. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SILICON GRAPHICS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  18. Application and Evaluation of Interactive 3D PDF for Presenting and Sharing Planning Results for Liver Surgery in Clinical Routine

    PubMed Central

    Newe, Axel; Becker, Linda; Schenk, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objectives The Portable Document Format (PDF) is the de-facto standard for the exchange of electronic documents. It is platform-independent, suitable for the exchange of medical data, and allows for the embedding of three-dimensional (3D) surface mesh models. In this article, we present the first clinical routine application of interactive 3D surface mesh models which have been integrated into PDF files for the presentation and the exchange of Computer Assisted Surgery Planning (CASP) results in liver surgery. We aimed to prove the feasibility of applying 3D PDF in medical reporting and investigated the user experience with this new technology. Methods We developed an interactive 3D PDF report document format and implemented a software tool to create these reports automatically. After more than 1000 liver CASP cases that have been reported in clinical routine using our 3D PDF report, an international user survey was carried out online to evaluate the user experience. Results Our solution enables the user to interactively explore the anatomical configuration and to have different analyses and various resection proposals displayed within a 3D PDF document covering only a single page that acts more like a software application than like a typical PDF file (“PDF App”). The new 3D PDF report offers many advantages over the previous solutions. According to the results of the online survey, the users have assessed the pragmatic quality (functionality, usability, perspicuity, efficiency) as well as the hedonic quality (attractiveness, novelty) very positively. Conclusion The usage of 3D PDF for reporting and sharing CASP results is feasible and well accepted by the target audience. Using interactive PDF with embedded 3D models is an enabler for presenting and exchanging complex medical information in an easy and platform-independent way. Medical staff as well as patients can benefit from the possibilities provided by 3D PDF. Our results open the door for a

  19. The program FANS-3D (finite analytic numerical simulation 3-dimensional) and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravo, Ramiro H.; Chen, Ching-Jen

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the program named FANS-3D (Finite Analytic Numerical Simulation-3 Dimensional) is presented. FANS-3D was designed to solve problems of incompressible fluid flow and combined modes of heat transfer. It solves problems with conduction and convection modes of heat transfer in laminar flow, with provisions for radiation and turbulent flows. It can solve singular or conjugate modes of heat transfer. It also solves problems in natural convection, using the Boussinesq approximation. FANS-3D was designed to solve heat transfer problems inside one, two and three dimensional geometries that can be represented by orthogonal planes in a Cartesian coordinate system. It can solve internal and external flows using appropriate boundary conditions such as symmetric, periodic and user specified.

  20. Aspects of Biodeterioration of Lapideous Submerged Artefacts: 3d Methodologies Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, S.; Antonelli, F.; Sacco Perasso, C.

    2015-04-01

    Submerged stone archaeological artefacts are bioeroded by endolithic microbiota (cyanobacteria, algae and fungi) and macroborers (Porifera, Bivalvia and Sipuncula). Optical microscope and SEM observations permit to analyse the bioerosion traces and to identify bioeroders. Data obtained with these techniques cannot be used to estimate volumes of material bioeroded. This aspect require the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from artefact. In this work we illustrate two 3D imaging techniques used to study bioerosion phenomena of underwater Cultural Heritage. In particular Digital Video Microscope permit the elaboration of 3D images, which are widely employed for close-range acquisitions. Underwater Laser Scanner documents the in situ degradation of submerged artefacts. This research aims to sensitize specialist figures in the study 3D offering a starting point for future collaborations that could lead to interesting results.

  1. Lightweight compact 2D/3D autostereoscopic LCD backlight for games, monitor, and notebook applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenlaub, Jesse B.

    1998-04-01

    At the 1997 conference DTI first reported on a low cost, thin, lightweight backlight for LCDs that generates a special illumination pattern to create autostereoscopic 3D images and can switch to conventional diffuse illumination for 2D images. The backlight is thin and efficient enough for use in portable computer and hand held games, as well as thin desktop displays. The system has been embodied in 5' (13 cm) diagonal backlights for gambling machines, and in the 12.1' (31 cm) diagonal DTI Virtual Window(TM) desktop product. During the past year, DTI has improved the technology considerably, reducing crosstalk, increasing efficiency, improving components for mass production, and developing prototypes that move the 3D viewing zones in response to the observer's head position. The paper will describe the 2D/3D backlights, improvements that have been made to their function, and their embodiments within the latest display products and prototypes.

  2. HDTV single camera 3D system and its application in microsurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Ryo; Kobayashi, Shigeaki

    1994-04-01

    A 3D high-definition television (HDTV) system suitable for attachment to a stereoscopic operating microscope allowing 3D medical documentation using a single HDTV camera and monitor is described. The system provides 3D HDTV microneurosurgical recorded images suitable for viewing on a screen or monitor, or for printing. Visual documentation using a television and video system is very important in modern medical practice, especially for the eduction of medical students, the training of residents, and the display of records in medical conferences. For the documentation of microsurgery and endoscopic surgery, the video system is essential. The printed images taken from the recording by the HDTV system of the illustrative case clearly demonstrate the high quality and definition achieved, which are comparable to that of the 35 mm movie film. As the system only requires a single camera and recorder, the cost performance and size make it very suitable for microsurgical and endoscopic documentation.

  3. 3D intrathoracic region definition and its application to PET-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Recently developed integrated PET-CT scanners give co-registered multimodal data sets that offer complementary three-dimensional (3D) digital images of the chest. PET (positron emission tomography) imaging gives highly specific functional information of suspect cancer sites, while CT (X-ray computed tomography) gives associated anatomical detail. Because the 3D CT and PET scans generally span the body from the eyes to the knees, accurate definition of the intrathoracic region is vital for focusing attention to the central-chest region. In this way, diagnostically important regions of interest (ROIs), such as central-chest lymph nodes and cancer nodules, can be more efficiently isolated. We propose a method for automatic segmentation of the intrathoracic region from a given co-registered 3D PET-CT study. Using the 3D CT scan as input, the method begins by finding an initial intrathoracic region boundary for a given 2D CT section. Next, active contour analysis, driven by a cost function depending on local image gradient, gradient-direction, and contour shape features, iteratively estimates the contours spanning the intrathoracic region on neighboring 2D CT sections. This process continues until the complete region is defined. We next present an interactive system that employs the segmentation method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis. A validation study over a series of PET-CT studies reveals that the segmentation method gives a Dice index accuracy of less than 98%. In addition, further results demonstrate the utility of the method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis, ROI definition, and visualization.

  4. Fast extraction of minimal paths in 3D images and applications to virtual endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, T; Cohen, L D

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this article is to build trajectories for virtual endoscopy inside 3D medical images, using the most automatic way. Usually the construction of this trajectory is left to the clinician who must define some points on the path manually using three orthogonal views. But for a complex structure such as the colon, those views give little information on the shape of the object of interest. The path construction in 3D images becomes a very tedious task and precise a priori knowledge of the structure is needed to determine a suitable trajectory. We propose a more automatic path tracking method to overcome those drawbacks: we are able to build a path, given only one or two end points and the 3D image as inputs. This work is based on previous work by Cohen and Kimmel [Int. J. Comp. Vis. 24 (1) (1997) 57] for extracting paths in 2D images using Fast Marching algorithm. Our original contribution is twofold. On the first hand, we present a general technical contribution which extends minimal paths to 3D images and gives new improvements of the approach that are relevant in 2D as well as in 3D to extract linear structures in images. It includes techniques to make the path extraction scheme faster and easier, by reducing the user interaction. We also develop a new method to extract a centered path in tubular structures. Synthetic and real medical images are used to illustrate each contribution. On the other hand, we show that our method can be efficiently applied to the problem of finding a centered path in tubular anatomical structures with minimum interactivity, and that this path can be used for virtual endoscopy. Results are shown in various anatomical regions (colon, brain vessels, arteries) with different 3D imaging protocols (CT, MR). PMID:11731307

  5. Application of Plenoptic PIV for 3D Velocity Measurements Over Roughness Elements in a Refractive Index Matched Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Johnson, Kyle; Kim, Taehoon; Blois, Gianluca; Best, Jim; Christensen, Ken

    2014-11-01

    The application of Plenoptic PIV in a Refractive Index Matched (RIM) facility housed at Illinois is presented. Plenoptic PIV is an emerging 3D diagnostic that exploits the light-field imaging capabilities of a plenoptic camera. Plenoptic cameras utilize a microlens array to measure the position and angle of light rays captured by the camera. 3D/3C velocity fields are determined through application of the MART algorithm for volume reconstruction and a conventional 3D cross-correlation PIV algorithm. The RIM facility is a recirculating tunnel with a 62.5% aqueous solution of sodium iodide used as the working fluid. Its resulting index of 1.49 is equal to that of acrylic. Plenoptic PIV was used to measure the 3D velocity field of a turbulent boundary layer flow over a smooth wall, a single wall-mounted hemisphere and a full array of hemispheres (i.e. a rough wall) with a k/ δ ~ 4.6. Preliminary time averaged and instantaneous 3D velocity fields will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1235726.

  6. First application of the 3D-MHB on dynamic compressive behavior of UHPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Riganti, Gianmario; Albertini, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the dynamic behaviour of material in confined conditions a new machine was conceived and called 3D-Modified Hopkinson Bar (3D-MHB). It is a Modified Hopkinson Bar apparatus designed to apply dynamic loading in materials having a tri-axial stress state. It consists of a pulse generator system (with pre-tensioned bar and brittle joint), 1 input bar, and 5 output bars. The first results obtained on Ultra High Performance Concrete in compression with three different mono-axial compression states are presented. The results show how the pre-stress states minimize the boundary condition and a more uniform response is obtained.

  7. Freestanding nanocellulose-composite fibre reinforced 3D polypyrrole electrodes for energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Tammela, Petter; Zhang, Peng; Huo, Jinxing; Ericson, Fredric; Strømme, Maria; Nyholm, Leif

    2014-10-01

    It is demonstrated that 3D nanostructured polypyrrole (3D PPy) nanocomposites can be reinforced with PPy covered nanocellulose (PPy@nanocellulose) fibres to yield freestanding, mechanically strong and porosity optimised electrodes with large surface areas. Such PPy@nanocellulose reinforced 3D PPy materials can be employed as free-standing paper-like electrodes in symmetric energy storage devices exhibiting cell capacitances of 46 F g-1, corresponding to specific electrode capacitances of up to ~185 F g-1 based on the weight of the electrode, and 5.5 F cm-2 at a current density of 2 mA cm-2. After 3000 charge/discharge cycles at 30 mA cm-2, the reinforced 3D PPy electrode material also showed a cell capacitance corresponding to 92% of that initially obtained. The present findings open up new possibilities for the fabrication of high performance, low-cost and environmentally friendly energy-storage devices based on nanostructured paper-like materials.It is demonstrated that 3D nanostructured polypyrrole (3D PPy) nanocomposites can be reinforced with PPy covered nanocellulose (PPy@nanocellulose) fibres to yield freestanding, mechanically strong and porosity optimised electrodes with large surface areas. Such PPy@nanocellulose reinforced 3D PPy materials can be employed as free-standing paper-like electrodes in symmetric energy storage devices exhibiting cell capacitances of 46 F g-1, corresponding to specific electrode capacitances of up to ~185 F g-1 based on the weight of the electrode, and 5.5 F cm-2 at a current density of 2 mA cm-2. After 3000 charge/discharge cycles at 30 mA cm-2, the reinforced 3D PPy electrode material also showed a cell capacitance corresponding to 92% of that initially obtained. The present findings open up new possibilities for the fabrication of high performance, low-cost and environmentally friendly energy-storage devices based on nanostructured paper-like materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c

  8. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  9. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  10. Compilation of 3D global conductivity model of the Earth for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Dmitry; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Palshin, Nikolay

    2015-07-01

    We have compiled a global three-dimensional (3D) conductivity model of the Earth with an ultimate goal to be used for realistic simulation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC), posing a potential threat to man-made electric systems. Bearing in mind the intrinsic frequency range of the most intense disturbances (magnetospheric substorms) with typical periods ranging from a few minutes to a few hours, the compiled 3D model represents the structure in depth range of 0-100 km, including seawater, sediments, earth crust, and partly the lithosphere/asthenosphere. More explicitly, the model consists of a series of spherical layers, whose vertical and lateral boundaries are established based on available data. To compile a model, global maps of bathymetry, sediment thickness, and upper and lower crust thicknesses as well as lithosphere thickness are utilized. All maps are re-interpolated on a common grid of 0.25×0.25 degree lateral spacing. Once the geometry of different structures is specified, each element of the structure is assigned either a certain conductivity value or conductivity versus depth distribution, according to available laboratory data and conversion laws. A numerical formalism developed for compilation of the model, allows for its further refinement by incorporation of regional 3D conductivity distributions inferred from the real electromagnetic data. So far we included into our model four regional conductivity models, available from recent publications, namely, surface conductance model of Russia, and 3D conductivity models of Fennoscandia, Australia, and northwest of the United States.

  11. 3D flexible NiTi-braided elastomer composites for smart structure applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, L.; Vokoun, D.; Šittner, P.; Finckh, H.

    2012-04-01

    While outstanding functional properties of thin NiTi wires are nowadays well recognized and beneficially utilized in medical NiTi devices, development of 2D/3D wire structures made out of these NiTi wires remains challenging and mostly unexplored. The research is driven by the idea of creating novel 2D/3D smart structures which inherit the functional properties of NiTi wires and actively utilize geometrical deformations within the structure to create new/improved functional properties. Generally, textile technology provides attractive processing methods for manufacturing 2D/3D smart structures made out of NiTi wires. Such structures may be beneficially combined with soft elastomers to create smart deformable composites. Following this route, we carried out experimental work focused on development of 3D flexible NiTi-braided elastomer composites involving their design, laboratory manufacture and thermomechanical testing. We describe the manufacturing technology and structural properties of these composites; and perform thermomechanical tests on the composites, focusing particularly on quasistatic tensile properties, energy absorption, damping and actuation under tensile loading. Functional thermomechanical properties of the composites are discussed with regard to the mechanical properties of the components and architecture of the composites. It is found that the composites indeed inherit all important features of the thermomechanical behavior of NiTi wires but, due to their internal architecture, outperform single NiTi wires in some features such as the magnitude of recoverable strain, superelastic damping capacity and thermally induced actuation strain.

  12. Thermoforming techniques for manufacturing porous scaffolds for application in 3D cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Justyna; Hampl, Jörg; Gebinoga, Michael; Elsarnagawy, Tarek; Elnakady, Yasser A; Fouad, Hassan; Almajhadi, Fahd; Fernekorn, Uta; Weise, Frank; Singh, Sukhdeep; Elsarnagawy, Dief; Schober, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Within the scientific community, there is an increasing demand to apply advanced cell cultivation substrates with increased physiological functionalities for studying spatially defined cellular interactions. Porous polymeric scaffolds are utilized for mimicking an organ-like structure or engineering complex tissues and have become a key element for three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation in the meantime. As a consequence, efficient 3D scaffold fabrication methods play an important role in modern biotechnology. Here, we present a novel thermoforming procedure for manufacturing porous 3D scaffolds from permeable materials. We address the issue of precise thermoforming of porous polymer foils by using multilayer polymer thermoforming technology. This technology offers a new method for structuring porous polymer foils that are otherwise available for non-porous polymers only. We successfully manufactured 3D scaffolds from solvent casted and phase separated polylactic acid (PLA) foils and investigated their biocompatibility and basic cellular performance. The HepG2 cell culture in PLA scaffold has shown enhanced albumin secretion rate in comparison to a previously reported polycarbonate based scaffold with similar geometry. PMID:25686978

  13. Construction and application of 3D model sequence to illustrate the development of the human embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Shinobu; Kakusho, Koh; Minekura, Yutaka; Minoh, Michihiko; Nakatsu, Tomoko; Shiota, Kohei

    2002-05-01

    Embryology is one of the basic subjects in medical education, to learn the process of human development especially from fertilization to birth. The shape deformation in the development of human embryo is one of the most important points to be comprehended, but it is difficult to illustrate the deformation by texts, 2D drawings, photographs and so on, because it is extremely complicated. The purpose of our research is to construct a 3D model sequence to illustrate the deformation of human embryo, and to make the model sequence into the teaching materials for medical education. Firstly, 3D images of the specimens of human embryo were acquired using MR microscopy. Next, an initial 3D model sequence was manually modified by comparing with the features of the acquired images under the supervision of medical doctors, because the images were influenced not only by the noise or limitation of resolution in MR image acquisition, but also by the variation of shape depending on the difference of subject. Using the constructed 3D model sequence, CG animations and an interactive VRML system were composed as the teaching materials for embryology. These materials were quite helpful to understand the shape deformation compared with the conventional materials.

  14. Mackay campus of environmental education and digital cultural construction: the application of 3D virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Shao-Chi; Chung, Yu-Wei; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Jun-Yi; Chang, Jhih-Ting; He, Cai-Ying; Cheng, Yi-Wen

    2012-04-01

    This study uses 3D virtual reality technology to create the "Mackay campus of the environmental education and digital cultural 3D navigation system" for local historical sites in the Tamsui (Hoba) area, in hopes of providing tourism information and navigation through historical sites using a 3D navigation system. We used Auto CAD, Sketch Up, and SpaceEyes 3D software to construct the virtual reality scenes and create the school's historical sites, such as the House of Reverends, the House of Maidens, the Residence of Mackay, and the Education Hall. We used this technology to complete the environmental education and digital cultural Mackay campus . The platform we established can indeed achieve the desired function of providing tourism information and historical site navigation. The interactive multimedia style and the presentation of the information will allow users to obtain a direct information response. In addition to showing the external appearances of buildings, the navigation platform can also allow users to enter the buildings to view lifelike scenes and textual information related to the historical sites. The historical sites are designed according to their actual size, which gives users a more realistic feel. In terms of the navigation route, the navigation system does not force users along a fixed route, but instead allows users to freely control the route they would like to take to view the historical sites on the platform.

  15. New 3D thermal evolution model for icy bodies application to trans-Neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, A.; Lasue, J.; Federico, C.; Coradini, A.; Orosei, R.; Rosenberg, E. D.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Thermal evolution models have been developed over the years to investigate the evolution of thermal properties based on the transfer of heat fluxes or transport of gas through a porous matrix, among others. Applications of such models to trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs has shown that these bodies could be strongly differentiated from the point of view of chemistry (i.e. loss of most volatile ices), as well as from physics (e.g. melting of water ice), resulting in stratified internal structures with differentiated cores and potential pristine material close to the surface. In this context, some observational results, such as the detection of crystalline water ice or volatiles, remain puzzling. Aims: In this paper, we would like to present a new fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. With this model, we aim to improve determination of the temperature distribution inside icy bodies such as TNOs by accounting for lateral heat fluxes, which have been proven to be important for accurate simulations. We also would like to be able to account for heterogeneous boundary conditions at the surface through various albedo properties, for example, that might induce different local temperature distributions. Methods: In a departure from published modeling approaches, the heat diffusion problem and its boundary conditions are represented in terms of real spherical harmonics, increasing the numerical efficiency by roughly an order of magnitude. We then compare this new model and another 3D model recently published to illustrate the advantages and limits of the new model. We try to put some constraints on the presence of crystalline water ice at the surface of TNOs. Results: The results obtained with this new model are in excellent agreement with results obtained by different groups with various models. Small TNOs could remain primitive unless they are formed quickly (less than 2 Myr) or are debris from the disruption of larger bodies. We find that, for

  16. Graphic engine resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautin, Mikhail; Dwarakinath, Ashok; Chiueh, Tzi-cker

    2008-01-01

    Modern consumer-grade 3D graphic cards boast a computation/memory resource that can easily rival or even exceed that of standard desktop PCs. Although these cards are mainly designed for 3D gaming applications, their enormous computational power has attracted developers to port an increasing number of scientific computation programs to these cards, including matrix computation, collision detection, cryptography, database sorting, etc. As more and more applications run on 3D graphic cards, there is a need to allocate the computation/memory resource on these cards among the sharing applications more fairly and efficiently. In this paper, we describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) scheduler based on Deficit Round Robin scheduling that successfully allocates to every process an equal share of the GPU time regardless of their demand. This scheduler, called GERM, estimates the execution time of each GPU command group based on dynamically collected statistics, and controls each process's GPU command production rate through its CPU scheduling priority. Measurements on the first GERM prototype show that this approach can keep the maximal GPU time consumption difference among concurrent GPU processes consistently below 5% for a variety of application mixes.

  17. An application of interactive graphics to neutron spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binney, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of interactive graphics is presented as an attractive method for performing multi-parameter data analysis of proton recoil distributions to determine neutron spectra. Interactive graphics allows the user to view results on-line as the program is running and to maintain maximum control over the path along which the calculation will proceed. Other advantages include less time to obtain results and freedom from handling paper tapes and IBM cards.

  18. An SML Driven Graphical User Interface and Application Management Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    White, Greg R

    2002-01-18

    In the past, the features of a user interface were limited by those available in the existing graphical widgets it used. Now, improvements in processor speed have fostered the emergence of interpreted languages, in which the appropriate method to render a given data object can be loaded at runtime. XML can be used to precisely describe the association of data types with their graphical handling (beans), and Java provides an especially rich environment for programming the graphics. We present a graphical user interface builder based on Java Beans and XML, in which the graphical screens are described textually (in files or a database) in terms of their screen components. Each component may be a simple text read back, or a complex plot. The programming model provides for dynamic data pertaining to a component to be forwarded synchronously or asynchronously, to the appropriate handler, which may be a built-in method, or a complex applet. This work was initially motivated by the need to move the legacy VMS display interface of the SLAC Control Program to another platform while preserving all of its existing functionality. However the model allows us a powerful and generic system for adding new kinds of graphics, such as Matlab, data sources, such as EPICS, middleware, such as AIDA[1], and transport, such as XML and SOAP. The system will also include a management console, which will be able to report on the present usage of the system, for instance who is running it where and connected to which channels.

  19. An XML Driven Graphical User Interface and Application Management Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    White, Greg R

    2002-01-18

    In the past, the features of a user interface were limited by those available in the existing graphical widgets it used. Now, improvements in processor speed have fostered the emergence of interpreted languages, in which the appropriate method to render a given data object can be loaded at runtime. XML can be used to precisely describe the association of data types with their graphical handling (beans), and Java provides an especially rich environment for programming the graphics. We present a graphical user interface builder based on Java Beans and XML, in which the graphical screens are described textually (in files or a database) in terms of their screen components. Each component may be a simple text read back, or a complex plot. The programming model provides for dynamic data pertaining to a component to be forwarded synchronously or asynchronously, to the appropriate handler, which may be a built-in method, or a complex applet. This work was initially motivated by the need to move the legacy VMS display interface of the SLAC Control Program to another platform while preserving all of its existing functionality. However the model allows us a powerful and generic system for adding new kinds of graphics, such as Matlab, data sources, such as EPICS, middleware, such as AIDA[1], and transport, such as XML and SOAP. The system will also include a management console, which will be able to report on the present usage of the system, for instance who is running it where and connected to which channels.

  20. Development and application of a 3-D geometry/mass model for LDEF satellite ionizing radiation assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colborn, B. L.; Armstrong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    A computer model of the three dimensional geometry and material distributions for the LDEF spacecraft, experiment trays, and, for selected trays, the components of experiments within a tray was developed for use in ionizing radiation assessments. The model is being applied to provide 3-D shielding distributions around radiation dosimeters to aid in data interpretation, particularly in assessing the directional properties of the radiation exposure. Also, the model has been interfaced with radiation transport codes for 3-D dosimetry response predictions and for calculations related to determining the accuracy of trapped proton and cosmic ray environment models. The methodology is described used in developing the 3-D LDEF model and the level of detail incorporated. Currently, the trays modeled in detail are F2, F8, and H12 and H3. Applications of the model which are discussed include the 3-D shielding distributions around various dosimeters, the influence of shielding on dosimetry responses, and comparisons of dose predictions based on the present 3-D model vs those from 1-D geometry model approximations used in initial estimates.

  1. Reactor Dosimetry Applications Using RAPTOR-M3G:. a New Parallel 3-D Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoni, Gianluca; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2009-08-01

    The numerical solution of the Linearized Boltzmann Equation (LBE) via the Discrete Ordinates method (SN) requires extensive computational resources for large 3-D neutron and gamma transport applications due to the concurrent discretization of the angular, spatial, and energy domains. This paper will discuss the development RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation - Multiple 3D Geometries), a new 3-D parallel radiation transport code, and its application to the calculation of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry responses in the cavity of a commercial 2-loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). RAPTOR-M3G is based domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architectures. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor, yielding an efficient solution methodology for large 3-D problems. Measured neutron dosimetry responses in the reactor cavity air gap will be compared to the RAPTOR-M3G predictions. This paper is organized as follows: Section 1 discusses the RAPTOR-M3G methodology; Section 2 describes the 2-loop PWR model and the numerical results obtained. Section 3 addresses the parallel performance of the code, and Section 4 concludes this paper with final remarks and future work.

  2. Robust Detection of Round Shaped Pits Lying on 3D Meshes: Application to Impact Crater Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Martin-Pierre; Muscato, Jennifer; Viseur, Sophie; Jorda, Laurent; Bouley, Sylvain; Mari, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    Most celestial bodies display impacts of collisions with asteroids and meteoroids. These traces are called craters. The possibility of observing and identifying these craters and their characteristics (radius, depth and morphology) is the only method available to measure the age of different units at the surface of the body, which in turn allows to constrain its conditions of formation. Interplanetary space probes always carry at least one imaging instrument on board. The visible images of the target are used to reconstruct high-resolution 3D models of its surface as a cloud of points in the case of multi-image dense stereo, or as a triangular mesh in the case of stereo and shape-from-shading. The goal of this work is to develop a methodology to automatically detect the craters lying on these 3D models. The robust extraction of feature areas on surface objects embedded in 3D, like circular pits, is a challenging problem. Classical approaches generally rely on image processing and template matching on a 2D flat projection of the 3D object (i.e.: a high-resolution photograph). In this work, we propose a full-3D method that mainly relies on curvature analysis. Mean and Gaussian curvatures are estimated on the surface. They are used to label vertices that belong to concave parts corresponding to specific pits on the surface. The surface is thus transformed into binary map distinguishing potential crater features to other types of features. Centers are located in the targeted surface regions, corresponding to potential crater features. Concentric rings are then built around the found centers. They consist in circular closed lines exclusively composed of edges of the initial mesh. The first built ring represents the nearest vertex neighborhood of the found center. The ring is then optimally expanded using a circularity constrain and the curvature values of the ring vertices. This method has been tested on a 3D model of the asteroid Lutetia observed by the ROSETTA (ESA

  3. Application of edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs in 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element absorbing boundary condition (FE-ABC) solution of the scattering by arbitrary 3-D structures is considered. The computational domain is discretized using edge-based tetrahedral elements. In contrast to the node-based elements, edge elements can treat geometries with sharp edges, are divergence-less, and easily satisfy the field continuity condition across dielectric interfaces. They do, however, lead to a higher unknown count but this is balanced by the greater sparsity of the resulting finite element matrix. Thus, the computation time required to solve such a system iteratively with a given degree of accuracy is less than the traditional node-based approach. The purpose is to examine the derivation and performance of the ABC's when applied to 2-D and 3-D problems and to discuss the specifics of our FE-ABC implementation.

  4. Application of FUN3D Solver for Aeroacoustics Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a nose landing gear configuration corresponding to the experimental tests conducted in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A widely used unstructured grid code, FUN3D, is examined for solving the unsteady flow field associated with this configuration. A series of successively finer unstructured grids has been generated to assess the effect of grid refinement. Solutions have been obtained on purely tetrahedral grids as well as mixed element grids using hybrid RANS/LES turbulence models. The agreement of FUN3D solutions with experimental data on the same size mesh is better on mixed element grids compared to pure tetrahedral grids, and in general improves with grid refinement.

  5. Design and application of a virtual reality 3D engine based on rapid indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Mai, Jin

    2007-06-01

    This article proposes a data structure of a 3D engine based on rapid indices. Taking a model for a construction unit, this data structure can construct a coordinate array with 3D vertex rapidly and arrange those vertices in a sequence of triangle strips or triangle fans, which can be rendered rapidly by OpenGL. This data structure is easy to extend. It can hold texture coordinates, normal coordinates of vertices and a model matrix. Other models can be added to it, deleted from it, or transformed by model matrix, so it is flexible. This data structure also improves the render speed of OpenGL when it holds a large amount of data.

  6. Nonrigid point registration for 2D curves and 3D surfaces and its various applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hesheng; Fei, Baowei

    2013-06-01

    A nonrigid B-spline-based point-matching (BPM) method is proposed to match dense surface points. The method solves both the point correspondence and nonrigid transformation without features extraction. The registration method integrates a motion model, which combines a global transformation and a B-spline-based local deformation, into a robust point-matching framework. The point correspondence and deformable transformation are estimated simultaneously by fuzzy correspondence and by a deterministic annealing technique. Prior information about global translation, rotation and scaling is incorporated into the optimization. A local B-spline motion model decreases the degrees of freedom for optimization and thus enables the registration of a larger number of feature points. The performance of the BPM method has been demonstrated and validated using synthesized 2D and 3D data, mouse MRI and micro-CT images. The proposed BPM method can be used to register feature point sets, 2D curves, 3D surfaces and various image data.

  7. 3D Digital Surveying and Modelling of Cave Geometry: Application to Paleolithic Rock Art

    PubMed Central

    González-Aguilera, Diego; Muñoz-Nieto, Angel; Gómez-Lahoz, Javier; Herrero-Pascual, Jesus; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    3D digital surveying and modelling of cave geometry represents a relevant approach for research, management and preservation of our cultural and geological legacy. In this paper, a multi-sensor approach based on a terrestrial laser scanner, a high-resolution digital camera and a total station is presented. Two emblematic caves of Paleolithic human occupation and situated in northern Spain, “Las Caldas” and “Peña de Candamo”, have been chosen to put in practise this approach. As a result, an integral and multi-scalable 3D model is generated which may allow other scientists, pre-historians, geologists…, to work on two different levels, integrating different Paleolithic Art datasets: (1) a basic level based on the accurate and metric support provided by the laser scanner; and (2) a advanced level using the range and image-based modelling. PMID:22399958

  8. Optoranger: A 3D pattern matching method for bin picking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Bellandi, Paolo; Leoni, Fabio; Docchio, Franco

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new method, based on 3D vision, for the recognition of free-form objects in the presence of clutters and occlusions, ideal for robotic bin picking tasks. The method can be considered as a compromise between complexity and effectiveness. A 3D point cloud representing the scene is generated by a triangulation-based scanning system, where a fast camera acquires a blade projected by a laser source. Image segmentation is based on 2D images, and on the estimation of the distances between point pairs, to search for empty areas. Object recognition is performed using commercial software libraries integrated with custom-developed segmentation algorithms, and a database of model clouds created by means of the same scanning system.

  9. Reconstruction of 3D ion beam micro-tomography data for applications in Cell Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habchi, C.; Nguyen, D. T.; Barberet, Ph.; Incerti, S.; Moretto, Ph.; Sakellariou, A.; Seznec, H.

    2009-06-01

    The DISRA (Discrete Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm) reconstruction code, created by A. Sakellariou, was conceived for the ideal case of complete three-dimensional (3D) PIXET (Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography) data. This implies two major difficulties for biological samples: first, the long duration of such experiments and second, the subsequent damage that occurs on such fragile specimens. For this reason, the DISRA code was extended at CENBG in order to probe isolated PIXET slices, taking into account the sample structure and mass density provided by 3D STIMT (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography) in the volume of interest. This modified version was tested on a phantom sample and first results on human cancer cells are also presented.

  10. Computed Tomography and its Application for the 3D Characterization of Coarse Grained Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. P.; Carpenter, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    With judicious selection of parameters, computed tomography can provide high precision density data. Such data can lead to a non-destructive determination of the phases and phase distribution within large solid objects. Of particular interest is the structure of the Mundrabilla meteorite, which has 25 volumes, percent of a sulfide within a metallic meteorite. 3D digital imaging has enabled a quantitative evaluation of the distribution and contiguity of the phases to be determined.

  11. Characterization and application of 3D-printed phantoms for biophotonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianting; Coburn, James; Liang, Chia-Pin; Woolsey, Nicholas; Le, Du; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Chen, Yu; Pfefer, Joshua

    2013-05-01

    The emerging technique of three-dimensional (3D) printing provides a simple, fast, and flexible way to fabricate structures with arbitrary spatial features and may prove useful in the development of standardized, phantom-based performance test methods for biophotonic imaging. Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) is commonly used in the printing process, given its low cost and strength. In this study, we evaluate 3D printing as an approach for fabricating biologically-relevant optical phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging (HRI). The initial phase of this work involved characterization of absorption and scattering coefficients using spectrophotometry. The morphology of phantoms incorporating vessel-like channels with diameters on the order of hundreds of microns was examined by microscopy and OCT. A near-infrared absorbing dye was injected into channels located at a range of depths within the phantom and imaged with a near-infrared HRI system (650-1100 nm). ABS was found to have scattering coefficients comparable to biological tissue and low absorption throughout much of the visible and infrared range. Channels with dimensions on the order of the resolution limit of the 3D printer (~0.2 mm) exhibited pixelation effects as well as a degree of distortion along their edges. Furthermore, phantom porosity sometimes resulted in leakage from channel regions. Contrast-enhanced channel visualization with HRI was possible to a depth of nearly 1 mm - a level similar to that seen previously in biological tissue. Overall, our ABS phantoms demonstrated a high level of optical similarity to biological tissue. While limitations in printer resolution, matrix homogeneity and optical property tunability remain challenging, 3D printed phantoms have significant promise as samples for objective, quantitative evaluation of performance for biophotonic imaging modalities such as HRI.

  12. Application of CART3D to Complex Propulsion-Airframe Integration with Vehicle Sketch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) is an easy-to-use modeler used to generate aircraft geometries for use in conceptual design and analysis. It has been used in the past to generate metageometries for aerodynamic analyses ranging from handbook methods to Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD). As desirable as it is to bring high order analyses, such as CFD, into the conceptual design process, this has been difficult and time consuming in practice due to the manual nature of both surface and volume grid generation. Over the last couple of years, VSP has had a major upgrade of its surface triangulation and export capability. This has enhanced its ability to work with Cart3D, an inviscid, three dimensional fluid flow toolset. The combination of VSP and Cart3D allows performing inviscid CFD on complex geometries with relatively high productivity. This paper will illustrate the use of VSP with Cart3D through an example case of a complex propulsion-airframe integration (PAI) of an over-wing nacelle (OWN) airliner configuration.

  13. Application of 3D biomimetic models in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yufan; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine holds much promise in assisting patients to recover from injured or lost tissues and organs through organism reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic models via various approaches can be used by pharmaceutical industry for controlled drug delivery. With proper biomaterials and engineering technologies, drugs can be released in a rate-manipulated manner towards targeted regions with spatial and temporal effects. Much of the success is a result of a combination of growth factors, stem cells, biomaterials, nanotechnologies, electrospinning and 3D printing techniques mimicking in vivo angiogenesis, histogenesis and tumorigenesis processes. This interdisciplinary field on biomimetic drug delivery and regenerative medicine has already opened up a new avenue for medical progress and reformation. This article presents a comprehensive review of the 3D biomimetic models in the pertinent fields of tissue and organ manufacturing, cell-material mutual interactions, bioactive agent carrier systems and anti-cancer drug delivery methods. Particularly, the potential trends and challenges of tissue and organ manufacturing are discussed from different perspectives. PMID:25594404

  14. Development and application of 3-D foot-shape measurement system under different loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guozhong; Wang, Boxiong; Shi, Hui; Luo, Xiuzhi

    2008-03-01

    The 3-D foot-shape measurement system under different loads based on laser-line-scanning principle was designed and the model of the measurement system was developed. 3-D foot-shape measurements without blind areas under different loads and the automatic extraction of foot-parameter are achieved with the system. A global calibration method for CCD cameras using a one-axis motion unit in the measurement system and the specialized calibration kits is presented. Errors caused by the nonlinearity of CCD cameras and other devices and caused by the installation of the one axis motion platform, the laser plane and the toughened glass plane can be eliminated by using the nonlinear coordinate mapping function and the Powell optimized method in calibration. Foot measurements under different loads for 170 participants were conducted and the statistic foot parameter measurement results for male and female participants under non-weight condition and changes of foot parameters under half-body-weight condition, full-body-weight condition and over-body-weight condition compared with non-weight condition are presented. 3-D foot-shape measurement under different loads makes it possible to realize custom-made shoe-making and shows great prosperity in shoe design, foot orthopaedic treatment, shoe size standardization, and establishment of a feet database for consumers and athletes.

  15. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sophie C; Thornby, John A; Gibbons, Gregory J; Williams, Mark A; Mallick, Kajal K

    2015-02-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). PMID:25492194

  16. Evaluation of an improved algorithm for producing realistic 3D breast software phantoms: Application for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Bliznakova, K.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Karellas, A.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents an improved algorithm for the generation of 3D breast software phantoms and its evaluation for mammography. Methods: The improved methodology has evolved from a previously presented 3D noncompressed breast modeling method used for the creation of breast models of different size, shape, and composition. The breast phantom is composed of breast surface, duct system and terminal ductal lobular units, Cooper's ligaments, lymphatic and blood vessel systems, pectoral muscle, skin, 3D mammographic background texture, and breast abnormalities. The key improvement is the development of a new algorithm for 3D mammographic texture generation. Simulated images of the enhanced 3D breast model without lesions were produced by simulating mammographic image acquisition and were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively. For evaluation purposes, a database with regions of interest taken from simulated and real mammograms was created. Four experienced radiologists participated in a visual subjective evaluation trial, as they judged the quality of the simulated mammograms, using the new algorithm compared to mammograms, obtained with the old modeling approach. In addition, extensive quantitative evaluation included power spectral analysis and calculation of fractal dimension, skewness, and kurtosis of simulated and real mammograms from the database. Results: The results from the subjective evaluation strongly suggest that the new methodology for mammographic breast texture creates improved breast models compared to the old approach. Calculated parameters on simulated images such as {beta} exponent deducted from the power law spectral analysis and fractal dimension are similar to those calculated on real mammograms. The results for the kurtosis and skewness are also in good coincidence with those calculated from clinical images. Comparison with similar calculations published in the literature showed good agreement in the majority of cases. Conclusions: The

  17. Fusion of Terrestrial and Airborne Laser Data for 3D modeling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Hani Mahmoud

    This thesis deals with the 3D modeling phase of the as-built large BIM projects. Among several means of BIM data capturing, such as photogrammetric or range tools, laser scanners have been one of the most efficient and practical tool for a long time. They can generate point clouds with high resolution for 3D models that meet nowadays' market demands. The current 3D modeling projects of as-built BIMs are mainly focused on using one type of laser scanner data, such as Airborne or Terrestrial. According to the literatures, no significant (few) efforts were made towards the fusion of heterogeneous laser scanner data despite its importance. The importance of the fusion of heterogeneous data arises from the fact that no single type of laser data can provide all the information about BIM, especially for large BIM projects that are existing on a large area, such as university buildings, or Heritage places. Terrestrial laser scanners are able to map facades of buildings and other terrestrial objects. However, they lack the ability to map roofs or higher parts in the BIM project. Airborne laser scanner on the other hand, can map roofs of the buildings efficiently and can map only small part of the facades. Short range laser scanners can map the interiors of the BIM projects, while long range scanners are used for mapping wide exterior areas in BIM projects. In this thesis the long range laser scanner data obtained in the Stop-and-Go mapping mode, the short range laser scanner data, obtained in a fully static mapping mode, and the airborne laser data are all fused together to bring a complete effective solution for a large BIM project. Working towards the 3D modeling of BIM projects, the thesis framework starts with the registration of the data, where a new fast automatic registration algorithm were developed. The next step is to recognize the different objects in the BIM project (classification), and obtain 3D models for the buildings. The last step is the development of an

  18. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    PubMed Central

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications. PMID:26883390

  19. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications.

  20. TIGER: A graphically interactive grid system for turbomachinery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat K.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical grid generation algorithm associated with the flow field about turbomachinery geometries is presented. Graphical user interface is developed with FORMS Library to create an interactive, user-friendly working environment. This customized algorithm reduces the man-hours required to generate a grid associated with turbomachinery geometry, as compared to the use of general-purpose grid generation softwares. Bezier curves are utilized both interactively and automatically to accomplish grid line smoothness and orthogonality. Graphical User Interactions are provided in the algorithm, allowing the user to design and manipulate the grid lines with a mouse.

  1. TIGER: A graphically interactive grid system for turbomachinery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat K.

    Numerical grid generation algorithm associated with the flow field about turbomachinery geometries is presented. Graphical user interface is developed with FORMS Library to create an interactive, user-friendly working environment. This customized algorithm reduces the man-hours required to generate a grid associated with turbomachinery geometry, as compared to the use of general-purpose grid generation softwares. Bezier curves are utilized both interactively and automatically to accomplish grid line smoothness and orthogonality. Graphical User Interactions are provided in the algorithm, allowing the user to design and manipulate the grid lines with a mouse.

  2. PLOT3D Export Tool for Tecplot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The PLOT3D export tool for Tecplot solves the problem of modified data being impossible to output for use by another computational science solver. The PLOT3D Exporter add-on enables the use of the most commonly available visualization tools to engineers for output of a standard format. The exportation of PLOT3D data from Tecplot has far reaching effects because it allows for grid and solution manipulation within a graphical user interface (GUI) that is easily customized with macro language-based and user-developed GUIs. The add-on also enables the use of Tecplot as an interpolation tool for solution conversion between different grids of different types. This one add-on enhances the functionality of Tecplot so significantly, it offers the ability to incorporate Tecplot into a general suite of tools for computational science applications as a 3D graphics engine for visualization of all data. Within the PLOT3D Export Add-on are several functions that enhance the operations and effectiveness of the add-on. Unlike Tecplot output functions, the PLOT3D Export Add-on enables the use of the zone selection dialog in Tecplot to choose which zones are to be written by offering three distinct options - output of active, inactive, or all zones (grid blocks). As the user modifies the zones to output with the zone selection dialog, the zones to be written are similarly updated. This enables the use of Tecplot to create multiple configurations of a geometry being analyzed. For example, if an aircraft is loaded with multiple deflections of flaps, by activating and deactivating different zones for a specific flap setting, new specific configurations of that aircraft can be easily generated by only writing out specific zones. Thus, if ten flap settings are loaded into Tecplot, the PLOT3D Export software can output ten different configurations, one for each flap setting.

  3. Methods For Electronic 3-D Moving Pictures Without Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collender, Robert B.

    1987-06-01

    This paper describes implementation approaches in image acquisition and playback for 3-D computer graphics, 3-D television and 3-D theatre movies without special glasses. Projection lamps, spatial light modulators, CRT's and dynamic scanning are all eliminated by the application of an active image array, all static components and a semi-specular screen. The resulting picture shows horizontal parallax with a wide horizontal view field (up to 360 de-grees) giving a holographic appearance in full color with smooth continuous viewing without speckle. Static component systems are compared with dynamic component systems using both linear and circular arrays. Implementation of computer graphic systems are shown that allow complex shaded color images to extend from the viewer's eyes to infinity. Large screen systems visible by hundreds of people are feasible by the use of low f-stops and high gain screens in projection. Screen geometries and special screen properties are shown. Viewing characteristics offer no restrictions in view-position over the entire view-field and have a "look-around" feature for all the categories of computer graphics, television and movies. Standard video cassettes and optical discs can also interface the system to generate a 3-D window viewable without glasses. A prognosis is given for technology application to 3-D pictures without glasses that replicate the daily viewing experience. Super-position of computer graphics on real-world pictures is shown feasible.

  4. Representing geometric structures in 3D tomography soil images: Application to pore-space modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Olivier; Ndeye Ngom, Fatou; François Delerue, Jean

    2007-09-01

    Only in the last decade have geoscientists started to use 3D computed tomography (CT) images of soil for better understanding and modeling of soil properties. In this paper, we propose one of the first approaches to allow the definition and computation of stable (intrinsic) geometric representations of structures in 3D CT soil images. This addresses the open problem set by the description of volume shapes from discrete traces without any a priori information. The basic concept involves representing the volume shape by a piecewise approximation using simple volume primitives (bowls, cylinders, cones, etc.). This typical representation is assumed to optimize a criterion ensuring its stability. This criterion includes the representation scale, which characterizes the trade-off between the fitting error and the number of patches. We also take into account the preservation of topological properties of the initial shape: the number of connected components, adjacency relationships, etc. We propose an efficient computation method for this piecewise approximation using cylinders or bowls. For cylinders, we use optimal region growing in a valuated adjacency graph that represents the primitives and their adjacency relationships. For bowls, we compute a minimal set of Delaunay spheres recovering the skeleton. Our method is applied to modeling of a coarse pore space extracted from 3D CT soil images. The piecewise bowls approximation gives a geometric formalism corresponding to the intuitive notion of pores and also an efficient way to compute it. This geometric and topological representation of coarse pore space can be used, for instance, to simulate biological activity in soil.

  5. Detecting falls with 3D range camera in ambient assisted living applications: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Leone, Alessandro; Diraco, Giovanni; Siciliano, Pietro

    2011-07-01

    In recent years several world-wide ambient assisted living (AAL) programs have been activated in order to improve the quality of life of older people, and to strengthen the industrial base through the use of information and communication technologies. An important issue is extending the time that older people can live in their home environment, by increasing their autonomy and helping them to carry out activities of daily living (ADLs). Research in the automatic detection of falls has received a lot of attention, with the object of enhancing safety, emergency response and independence of the elderly, at the same time comparing the social and economic costs related to fall accidents. In this work, an algorithmic framework to detect falls by using a 3D time-of-flight vision technology is presented. The proposed system presented complementary working requirements with respect to traditional worn and non-worn fall-detection devices. The vision system used a state-of-the-art 3D range camera for elderly movement measurement and detection of critical events, such as falls. The depth images provided by the active sensor allowed reliable segmentation and tracking of elderly movements, by using well-established imaging methods. Moreover, the range camera provided 3D metric information in all illumination conditions (even night vision), allowing the overcoming of some typical limitations of passive vision (shadows, camouflage, occlusions, brightness fluctuations, perspective ambiguity). A self-calibration algorithm guarantees different setup mountings of the range camera by non-technical users. A large dataset of simulated fall events and ADLs in real dwellings was collected and the proposed fall-detection system demonstrated high performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity. PMID:21382737

  6. 3D-printed surface mould applicator for high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Mark; Lasso, Andras; Cumming, Ian; Rankin, Adam; Falkson, Conrad B.; Schreiner, L. John; Joshi, Chandra; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    In contemporary high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of superficial tumors, catheters are placed in a wax mould. The creation of current wax models is a difficult and time consuming proces.The irradiation plan can only be computed post-construction and requires a second CT scan. In case no satisfactory dose plan can be created, the mould is discarded and the process is repeated. The objective of this work was to develop an automated method to replace suboptimal wax moulding. We developed a method to design and manufacture moulds that guarantee to yield satisfactory dosimetry. A 3D-printed mould with channels for the catheters designed from the patient's CT and mounted on a patient-specific thermoplastic mesh mask. The mould planner was implemented as an open-source module in the 3D Slicer platform. Series of test moulds were created to accommodate standard brachytherapy catheters of 1.70mm diameter. A calibration object was used to conclude that tunnels with a diameter of 2.25mm, minimum 12mm radius of curvature, and 1.0mm open channel gave the best fit for this printer/catheter combination. Moulds were created from the CT scan of thermoplastic mesh masks of actual patients. The patient-specific moulds have been visually verified to fit on the thermoplastic meshes. The masks were visually shown to fit onto the thermoplastic meshes, next the resulting dosimetry will have to be compared with treatment plans and dosimetry achieved with conventional wax moulds in order to validate our 3D printed moulds.

  7. Application of high resolution 2D/3D spectral induced polarization (SIP) in metalliferous ore exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Zhao, X.; Yao, H.; He, X.; Zeng, P.; Chang, F.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Xi, X.; He, L.

    2015-12-01

    Induced polarization (IP) is a powerful tool in metalliferous ore exploration. However, there are many sources, such as clay and graphite, which can generate IP anomaly. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measures IP response on a wide frequency range. This method provides a way to discriminate IP response generated by metalliferous ore or other objects. The best way to explore metalliferous ore is 3D SIP exploration. However, if we consider the exploration cost and efficiency, we can use SIP profiling to find an anomaly, and then use 2D/3D SIP sounding to characterize the anomaly. Based on above idea, we used a large-scale distributed SIP measurement system which can realize 800 sounding sites in one direction at the same time. This system can be used for SIP profiling, 2D/3D SIP sounding with high efficiency, high resolution, and large depth of investigation (> 1000 m). Qiushuwan copper - molybdenum deposit is located in Nanyang city, Henan province, China. It is only a middle-size deposit although over 100 holes were drilled and over 40 years of exploration were spent because of very complex geological setting. We made SIP measurement over 100 rock and ore samples to discriminate IP responses of ore and rock containing graphite. Then we carried out 7 lines of 2D SIP exploration with the depth of investigation great than 1000 m. The minimum electode spacing for potential difference is only 20 m. And we increase the spacing of current electodes at linear scale. This acquisition setting ensures high density data acquired and high quality data acquisition. Modeling and inversion result proves that we can get underground information with high resolution by our method. Our result shows that there exists a strong SIP response related to ore body in depth > 300 m. Pseudo-3D inversion of five 2D SIP sounding lines shows the location and size of IP anomaly. The new drillings based our result found a big copper-molybdenum ore body in new position with depth > 300 m and

  8. Application of 3D reconstruction for surgical treatment of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Biao; Bai, Lei; Aji, Tuerganaili; Jiang, Yi; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Jin-Hui; Shao, Ying-Mei; Liu, Wen-Ya; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the reliability and accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction for liver resection in patients with hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE). METHODS: One-hundred and six consecutive patients with HAE underwent hepatectomy at our hospital between May 2011 and January 2015. Fifty-nine patients underwent preoperative 3D reconstruction and “virtual” 3D liver resection before surgery (Group A). Another 47 patients used conventional imaging methods for preoperative assessment (Group B). Outcomes of hepatectomy were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in preoperative data between the two groups. Compared with patients in Group B, those in Group A had a significantly shorter operation time (227.1 ± 51.4 vs 304.6 ± 88.1 min; P < 0.05), less intraoperative blood loss (308.1 ± 135.4 vs 458.1 ± 175.4 mL; P < 0.05), and lower requirement for intraoperative blood transfusion (186.4 ± 169.6 vs 289.4 ± 199.2 mL; P < 0.05). Estimated resection liver volumes in both groups had good correlation with actual graft weight (Group A: r = 0.978; Group B: r = 0.960). There was a significant higher serum level of albumin in Group A (26.3 ± 5.9 vs 22.6 ± 4.3 g/L, P < 0.05). Other postoperative laboratory parameters (serum levels of aminotransferase and bilirubin; prothrombin time) and duration of postoperative hospital stay were similar. Sixteen complications occurred in Group A and 19 in Group B. All patients were followed for 3-46 (mean, 17.3) mo. There was no recurrence of lesions in Group A, but two recurrences in Group B. There were three deaths: two from cerebrovascular accident, and one from car accident. CONCLUSION: 3D reconstruction provides comprehensive and precise anatomical information for the liver. It also improves the chance of success and reduces the risk of hepatectomy in HAE. PMID:26401085

  9. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  10. Spherical cavity-expansion forcing function in PRONTO 3D for application to penetration problems

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, T.L.; Tabbara, M.R.

    1997-05-01

    In certain penetration events the primary mode of deformation of the target can be approximated by known analytical expressions. In the context of an analysis code, this approximation eliminates the need for modeling the target as well as the need for a contact algorithm. This technique substantially reduces execution time. In this spirit, a forcing function which is derived from a spherical-cavity expansion analysis has been implemented in PRONTO 3D. This implementation is capable of computing the structural and component responses of a projectile due to three dimensional penetration events. Sample problems demonstrate good agreement with experimental and analytical results.

  11. ProVac3D and Application to the Neutral Beam Injection System of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X.; Dremel, M.; Day, Ch.

    2008-12-31

    In order to heat the confined plasma up to 100 million degrees Celsius and initiate a sustained fusion reaction, ITER will use several heating mechanisms at the same time, of which Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) systems play an important role. The NBI includes several internal gas sources and has to be operated under vacuum conditions. We have developed ProVac3D, a Monte Carlo simulation code, to calculate gas dynamics and the density profiles in volumes of interest inside NBI. This enables us to elaborate our in-situ and state-of-the-art cryogenic pump design and estimate the corresponding pumping speed.

  12. 3D reconstruction with single image pairs and structured light projection for short-term ultra-high-speed applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heist, Stefan; Dietrich, Patrick; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-05-01

    A new approach for a 3D reconstruction algorithm using a single pair of a stereo-camera setup and a structured light projection based on spatial correlation is introduced. In comparison to existing methods using sequences of temporally consecutive images, sufficient 3D-reconstruction quality is achieved, even in the case of ultra-high-speed cameras. This is obtained by iterative application of correspondence finding and filtering operators. The calculation effort of the evaluation, filling, filtering, and outlier removing operators is relative high and may prevent a permanent application of the algorithm to high-resolution long-term recordings. The favored application scenario of the new method is the rough 3D reconstruction and motion tracking of quickly moving objects in short-term processes (few seconds), e.g. in the analysis of crash-test situations. Here, the complete recorded image sequence can be analyzed off-line which allows an afterwards optimization of the parameters. An advantage of the new technique regarding high-speed applications is that fixed single patterns instead of pattern sequences can be used for moving objects and hence no synchronization between projection and cameras is necessary.

  13. Accelerating a 3D finite-difference wave propagation code by a factor of 50 and a spectral-element code by a factor of 25 using a cluster of GPU graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Michéa, David; Erlebacher, Gordon; Göddeke, Dominik

    2010-05-01

    We first accelerate a three-dimensional finite-difference in the time domain (FDTD) wave propagation code by a factor of about 50 using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computing on a cheap NVIDIA graphics card with the CUDA programming language. We implement the code in CUDA in the case of the fully heterogeneous elastic wave equation. We also implement Convolution Perfectly Matched Layers (CPMLs) on the graphics card to efficiently absorb outgoing waves on the fictitious edges of the grid. We show that the code that runs on the graphics card gives the expected results by comparing our results to those obtained by running the same simulation on a classical processor core. The methodology that we present can be used for Maxwell's equations as well because their form is similar to that of the seismic wave equation written in velocity vector and stress tensor. We then implement a high-order finite-element (spectral-element) application, which performs the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation resulting for instance from earthquakes at the scale of a continent or from active seismic acquisition experiments in the oil industry, on a cluster of NVIDIA Tesla graphics cards using the CUDA programming language and non blocking message passing based on MPI. We compare it to the implementation in C language and MPI on a classical cluster of CPU nodes. We use mesh coloring to efficiently handle summation operations over degrees of freedom on an unstructured mesh, and we exchange information between nodes using non blocking MPI messages. Using non-blocking communications allows us to overlap the communications across the network and the data transfer between the GPU card and the CPU node on which it is installed with calculations on that GPU card. We perform a number of numerical tests to validate the single-precision CUDA and MPI implementation and assess its accuracy. We then analyze performance measurements and in average we obtain a speedup of 20x to 25x.

  14. A roadmap to global illumination in 3D scenes: solutions for GPU object recognition applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picos, Kenia; Díaz-Ramírez, Victor H.; Tapia, Juan J.

    2014-09-01

    Light interactions with matter is of remarkable complexity. An adequate modeling of global illumination is a vastly studied topic since the beginning of computer graphics, and still is an unsolved problem. The rendering equation for global illumination is based of refraction and reflection of light in interaction with matter within an environment. This physical process possesses a high computational complexity when implemented in a digital computer. The appearance of an object depends on light interactions with the surface of the material, such as emission, scattering, and absorption. Several image-synthesis methods have been used to realistically render the appearance of light incidence on an object. Recent global illumination algorithms employ mathematical models and computational strategies that improve the efficiency of the simulation solution. This work presents a review the state of the art of global illumination algorithms and focuses on the efficiency of the solution in a computational implementation in a graphics processing unit. A reliable system is developed to simulate realistics scenes in the context of real-time object recognition under different lighting conditions. Computer simulations results are presented and discussed in terms of discrimination capability, and robustness to additive noise, when considering several lighting model reflections and multiple light sources.

  15. Fabrication of chitosan-silver nanoparticle hybrid 3D porous structure as a SERS substrate for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Gyeong-Bok; Kim, Ji-Hye; Burm, Jin Sik; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-05-01

    We propose a simple, low-cost, large-area, and functional surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for biomedical applications. The SERS substrate with chitosan-silver nanoparticles (chitosan-Ag NPs) hybrid 3D porous structure was fabricated simply by a one-step method. The chitosan was used as a template for the Ag NPs deposition. SERS enhancement by the chitosan-Ag NPs substrate was experimentally verified using rhodamine B as an analyte. Thiolated single stranded DNA was also measured for atopic dermatitis genetic markers (chemokines CCL17) at a low concentration of 5 pM. We successfully designed a novel SERS substrate with silver nanoparticle hybridized 3D porous chitosan that has the potential to become a highly sensitive and selective tool for biomedical applications.

  16. Evaluation and application of 3D lung warping and registration model using HRCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Chen, Chang W.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2001-05-01

    Image-based study of structure-function relationships is a challenging problem in that the structure or region of interest may vary in position and shape on images captured over time. Such variation may be caused by the change in body posture or the motion of breathing and heart beating. Therefore, the structure or region of interest should be registered before any further regional study can be carried out. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to study the structure-function relationship of ventilation using a previously developed 3D lung warping and registration model. First, we evaluate the effectiveness of the lung warping and registration model using a set of criteria, including apparent lung motion patterns and ground truths. Then, we study the ventilation by integrating the warping model with air content calibration. The warping model is applied to three CT lung data sets, obtained under volume control of FRC, 40% and 75% vital capacity (VC). Dense displacement fields are obtained to represent deformation between different lung volume steps. For any specific region of interest, we first register it between images over time using the dense displacement, and then estimate the corresponding regional inspired air content. Assessments include change of regional volume during inspiration, change of regional air content, and the distribution of regional ventilation. This is the first time that 3D warping of lung images is applied to assess clinically significant pulmonary functions.

  17. 3D X-rays application for precision measurement of the cell structure of extruded polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. Y.; Kim, K. Y.; Shin, H. S.; Yeom, S.; Lee, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    While the thermal performance of existing insulation materials have been determined by blister gases, the thermal performance of future insulation materials will be dependent on the cell size and independent foam content as we use eco-friendly blister gases with a higher thermal conductivity. However, with the current technology we are only able to guess the whole cell size and independent foam content through SEM applied 2D fragmentary scanning but are still far from the level of accurate cell structure data extraction. Under this situation, we utilized X-ray CT scanned 3D images to identify and shape the cell structure and proposed a method of inferring the whole distribution and independent foam content as accurately as possible. According to X-ray CT scanning images and SEM images, the shape was similar but according to tracer applied CT scanning images, the cell size distribution was 380∼400 pm within the range of the general insulation diameter distribution which had the highest reliability. As for extrusion foaming polystyrene, we need additional image processing to identify the independent foam content as its density is too low. So, it is recommended to raise the 3D cell structure completeness of XPS by improving the scanning accuracy.

  18. A novel graphene based nanocomposite for application in 3D flexible micro-supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasso, S. L.; Rivolo, P.; Giardi, R.; Mombello, D.; Gigot, A.; Serrapede, M.; Benetto, S.; Enrico, A.; Cocuzza, M.; Tresso, E.; Pirri, C. F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work a hybrid graphene-based flexible micro-supercapacitor (MSC) exploiting a novel composite material was fabricated and extensively characterized. The MSC electrodes have been obtained from a synthesized composite aerogel of reduced graphene oxide and polycrystalline nanoparticles of molybdenum (IV) oxide (MoO2) and then dispersed in a solution containing poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). Usually in MSCs the electrons have to percolate through the nanostructured Three-dimensional (3D) matrix in order to reach the collectors, made by metal thin films that provide electrical contacts only on the surface of active material. In the attempt to enable a more efficient charge transfer and to allow direct electrical contact without metal deposition, in this study a highly doped PEDOT acting both as current collector and as binder for the nanocomposite material has been employed. 3D MSCs were fabricated through a Lithographie, Galvanoformung, Abformung (LIGA)-like process to obtain high aspect ratio microstructures in polydimethylsiloxane replicas. Capacitance values of 94 F g‑1 for the nanocomposite and of 14 mF cm‑2 for the device were achieved. Moreover, bending test has demonstrated good performance preservation in a U shape conformation of the device.

  19. Intraclass retrieval of nonrigid 3D objects: application to face recognition.

    PubMed

    Passalis, Georgios; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A; Theoharis, Theoharis

    2007-02-01

    As the size of the available collections of 3D objects grows, database transactions become essential for their management with the key operation being retrieval (query). Large collections are also precategorized into classes so that a single class contains objects of the same type (e.g., human faces, cars, four-legged animals). It is shown that general object retrieval methods are inadequate for intraclass retrieval tasks. We advocate that such intraclass problems require a specialized method that can exploit the basic class characteristics in order to achieve higher accuracy. A novel 3D object retrieval method is presented which uses a parameterized annotated model of the shape of the class objects, incorporating its main characteristics. The annotated subdivision-based model is fitted onto objects of the class using a deformable model framework, converted to a geometry image and transformed into the wavelet domain. Object retrieval takes place in the wavelet domain. The method does not require user interaction, achieves high accuracy, is efficient for use with large databases, and is suitable for nonrigid object classes. We apply our method to the face recognition domain, one of the most challenging intraclass retrieval tasks. We used the Face Recognition Grand Challenge v2 database, yielding an average verification rate of 95.2 percent at 10-3 false accept rate. The latest results of our work can be found at http://www.cbl.uh.edu/UR8D/. PMID:17170476

  20. Application for 3d Scene Understanding in Detecting Discharge of Domesticwaste Along Complex Urban Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninsalam, Y.; Qin, R.; Rekittke, J.

    2016-06-01

    In our study we use 3D scene understanding to detect the discharge of domestic solid waste along an urban river. Solid waste found along the Ciliwung River in the neighbourhoods of Bukit Duri and Kampung Melayu may be attributed to households. This is in part due to inadequate municipal waste infrastructure and services which has caused those living along the river to rely upon it for waste disposal. However, there has been little research to understand the prevalence of household waste along the river. Our aim is to develop a methodology that deploys a low cost sensor to identify point source discharge of solid waste using image classification methods. To demonstrate this we describe the following five-step method: 1) a strip of GoPro images are captured photogrammetrically and processed for dense point cloud generation; 2) depth for each image is generated through a backward projection of the point clouds; 3) a supervised image classification method based on Random Forest classifier is applied on the view dependent red, green, blue and depth (RGB-D) data; 4) point discharge locations of solid waste can then be mapped by projecting the classified images to the 3D point clouds; 5) then the landscape elements are classified into five types, such as vegetation, human settlement, soil, water and solid waste. While this work is still ongoing, the initial results have demonstrated that it is possible to perform quantitative studies that may help reveal and estimate the amount of waste present along the river bank.

  1. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  2. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging. PMID:26412926

  3. 3-D crustal velocity model for Lithuania and its application to local event studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budraitis, M.; Kozlovskaya, E.; Janutyte, I.; Motuza, G.

    2009-12-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 project (PASsive Seismic Experiment in TESZ) aimed at studying the lithosphere-asthenosphere system around the TransEuropean Suture Zone (TESZ)- the transition between old Proterozoic platform of north and east Europe and younger Phanerozoic platform in central and western Europe. The experiment was a seismic array research aiming to retrieve the structure of the crust and Earth's mantle down to the mantle transition zone, including mapping of upper mantle seismic velocity variations and discontinuities (Moho, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, mantle transition zone) using all available techniques. During the experiment 26 seismic stations (including four broadband stations) were installed in Lithuania and operated since June, 2006 till January, 2008. One of the main reasons of PASSEQ deployment in Lithuania is identification and characterisation of the local seismic activity. During the data acquisition period a number of local seismic events was identified and preliminary event location was made using LocSat and VELEST algorithms and 1-D velocity models. These standard procedures is not enough precise for Lithuania, however, because the thickness of the crust varies significantly in the region (from 45 to 55 km). Another problem was low quality of S-wave arrivals due to thick (up to 2 km) sediments in most part of Lithuania. In order to improve event location, we compiled a 3-D seismic velocity model of the crust down to a depth of 60 km. The model, consisting of four major layers (sediments, upper crust, middle crust, lower crust and uppermost mantle) was interpolated from 2-D velocity models along previous wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles into a regular grid. The quality of the approximation was analysed using comparison of travel times of P-waves recorded by controlled source experiments and calculated travel times through the 3-D velocity model. The model was converted into a density model using a special procedure, in which

  4. Extracting 3-D information from SEM and TEM images: Approaches and applications in the physical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    L`Esperance, G.; Dionne, M.; Tremblay, S.

    1996-12-31

    Techniques for extracting 3-D information from TEM samples in life sciences have considerably progressed in recent years. One approach has been the use of serial prepared by ultramicrotomy from which the volume of the sample and of various constituents can be reconstructed. In the case of engineering materials, however, ultramicrotomy generally induces severe deformation resulting in a large density of structural defects (dislocations, stacking faults etc.). This leads to significant diffraction contrast effects which mask microstructural features such as second phase particles, precipitates etc. Recently, a series of TEM bright field images taken at different tilts have been used in combination with image analysis to determine the volume fraction (V{sub f}) of second phase particles in thin foils of aluminum alloys. Although the technique was successful to remove most of the diffraction contrast effects and to make the particles visible, the need to acquire and process a large number of images makes the technique laborious and can lead to artefacts.

  5. Inflow/Outflow Boundary Conditions with Application to FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2011-01-01

    Several boundary conditions that allow subsonic and supersonic flow into and out of the computational domain are discussed. These boundary conditions are demonstrated in the FUN3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code which solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured computational meshes. The boundary conditions are enforced through determination of the flux contribution at the boundary to the solution residual. The boundary conditions are implemented in an implicit form where the Jacobian contribution of the boundary condition is included and is exact. All of the flows are governed by the calorically perfect gas thermodynamic equations. Three problems are used to assess these boundary conditions. Solution residual convergence to machine zero precision occurred for all cases. The converged solution boundary state is compared with the requested boundary state for several levels of mesh densities. The boundary values converged to the requested boundary condition with approximately second-order accuracy for all of the cases.

  6. Newly-Developed 3D GRMHD Code and its Application to Jet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code by using a conservative, high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. The numerical fluxes are calculated using the HLL approximate Riemann solver scheme. The flux-interpolated constrained transport scheme is used to maintain a divergence-free magnetic field. We have performed various 1-dimensional test problems in both special and general relativity by using several reconstruction methods and found that the new 3D GRMHD code shows substantial improvements over our previous model. The . preliminary results show the jet formations from a geometrically thin accretion disk near a non-rotating and a rotating black hole. We will discuss the jet properties depended on the rotation of a black hole and the magnetic field strength.

  7. Distributed network of integrated 3D sensors for transportation security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejmadi, Vic; Garcia, Fred

    2009-05-01

    The US Port Security Agency has strongly emphasized the needs for tighter control at transportation hubs. Distributed arrays of miniature CMOS cameras are providing some solutions today. However, due to the high bandwidth required and the low valued content of such cameras (simple video feed), large computing power and analysis algorithms as well as control software are needed, which makes such an architecture cumbersome, heavy, slow and expensive. We present a novel technique by integrating cheap and mass replicable stealth 3D sensing micro-devices in a distributed network. These micro-sensors are based on conventional structures illumination via successive fringe patterns on the object to be sensed. The communication bandwidth between each sensor remains very small, but is of very high valued content. Key technologies to integrate such a sensor are digital optics and structured laser illumination.

  8. High linearity SPAD and TDC array for TCSPC and 3D ranging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Federica; Lussana, Rudi; Bronzi, Danilo; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2015-01-01

    An array of 32x32 Single-Photon Avalanche-Diodes (SPADs) and Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs) has been fabricated in a 0.35 μm automotive-certified CMOS technology. The overall dimension of the chip is 9x9 mm2. Each pixel is able to detect photons in the 300 nm - 900 nm wavelength range with a fill-factor of 3.14% and either to count them or to time stamp their arrival time. In photon-counting mode an in-pixel 6-bit counter provides photon-numberresolved intensity movies at 100 kfps, whereas in photon-timing mode the 10-bit in-pixel TDC provides time-resolved maps (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting measurements) or 3D depth-resolved (through direct time-of-flight technique) images and movies, with 312 ps resolution. The photodetector is a 30 μm diameter SPAD with low Dark Count Rate (120 cps at room temperature, 3% hot-pixels) and 55% peak Photon Detection Efficiency (PDE) at 450 nm. The TDC has a 6-bit counter and a 4-bit fine interpolator, based on a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) line, which makes the TDC insensitive to process, voltage, and temperature drifts. The implemented sliding-scale technique improves linearity, giving 2% LSB DNL and 10% LSB INL. The single-shot precision is 260 ps rms, comprising SPAD, TDC and driving board jitter. Both optical and electrical crosstalk among SPADs and TDCs are negligible. 2D fast movies and 3D reconstructions with centimeter resolution are reported.

  9. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  10. Challenge for 3D culture technology: Application in carcinogenesis studies with human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emura, M; Aufderheide, M

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is still one of the major intractable diseases and we urgently need more efficient preventive and curative measures. Recent molecular studies have provided strong evidence that allows us to believe that classically well-known early airway lesions such as hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma in situ are really precancerous lesions progressing toward cancer but not necessarily transient and reversible alteration. This suggests that adequate early control of the precancerous lesions may lead to improved prevention of lung cancer. This knowledge is encouraging in view of the imminent necessity for additional experimental systems to investigate the causal mechanisms of cancers directly in human cells and tissues. There are many questions with regard to various precancerous lesions of the airways. For example, should cells, before reaching a stage of invasive carcinoma, undergo all precancerous stages such as hyperplasia or metaplasia and dysplasia, or is there any shortcut to bypass one or more of the precancerous stages? For the study of such questions, the emerging 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture technology appears to provide an effective and valuable tool. Though a great challenge, it is expected that this in vitro technology will be rapidly and reliably improved to enable the cultures to be maintained in an in vivo-mimicking state of differentiation for much longer than a period of at best a few months, as is currently the case. With the help of a "causes recombination-Lox" (Cre-lox) technology, it has been possible to trace cells giving rise to specific lung tumor types. In this short review we have attempted to assess the future role of 3D technology in the study of lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26951634

  11. The Merging Of Computer Graphics And Image Processing Technologies And Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, Robert F.; Stephenson, Thomas P.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, computer graphics and image processing technologies and applications have been distinct, both in their research communities and in their hardware and software product suppliers. Computer graphics deals with synthesized visual depictions of outputs from computer models*, whereas image processing (and analysis) deals with computational operations on input data from "imaging sensors"**. Furthermore, the fundamental storage and computational aspects of these two fields are different from one another. For example, many computer graphics applications store data using vector formats whereas image processing applications generally use raster formats. Computer graphics applications may involve polygonal representations, floating point operations, and mathematical models of physical phenomena such as lighting conditions, surface reflecting properties, etc. Image processing applications may involve pixel operations, fixed point representations, global operations (e.g. image rotations), and nonlinear signal processing algorithms.

  12. Arctic Research Mapping Application 3D Geobrowser: Accessing and Displaying Arctic Information From the Desktop to the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. W.; Gonzalez, J.; Brady, J. J.; Gaylord, A.; Manley, W. F.; Cody, R.; Dover, M.; Score, R.; Garcia-Lavigne, D.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    ARMAP 3D allows users to dynamically interact with information about U.S. federally funded research projects in the Arctic. This virtual globe allows users to explore data maintained in the Arctic Research & Logistics Support System (ARLSS) database providing a very valuable visual tool for science management and logistical planning, ascertaining who is doing what type of research and where. Users can “fly to” study sites, view receding glaciers in 3D and access linked reports about specific projects. Custom “Search” tasks have been developed to query by researcher name, discipline, funding program, place names and year and display results on the globe with links to detailed reports. ARMAP 3D was created with ESRI’s free ArcGIS Explorer (AGX) new build 900 providing an updated application from build 500. AGX applications provide users the ability to integrate their own spatial data on various data layers provided by ArcOnline (http://resources.esri.com/arcgisonlineservices). Users can add many types of data including OGC web services without any special data translators or costly software. ARMAP 3D is part of the ARMAP suite (http://armap.org), a collection of applications that support Arctic science tools for users of various levels of technical ability to explore information about field-based research in the Arctic. ARMAP is funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs Arctic Sciences Division and is a collaborative development effort between the Systems Ecology Lab at the University of Texas at El Paso, Nuna Technologies, the INSTAAR QGIS Laboratory, and CH2M HILL Polar Services.

  13. Packaging printed circuit boards: A production application of interactive graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrill, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The structure and use of an Interactive Graphics Packaging Program (IGPP), conceived to apply computer graphics to the design of packaging electronic circuits onto printed circuit boards (PCB), were described. The intent was to combine the data storage and manipulative power of the computer with the imaginative, intuitive power of a human designer. The hardware includes a CDC 6400 computer and two CDC 777 terminals with CRT screens, light pens, and keyboards. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 extended with the exception of a few functions coded in COMPASS (assembly language). The IGPP performs four major functions for the designer: (1) data input and display, (2) component placement (automatic or manual), (3) conductor path routing (automatic or manual), and (4) data output. The most complex PCB packaged to date measured 16.5 cm by 19 cm and contained 380 components, two layers of ground planes and four layers of conductors mixed with ground planes.

  14. S3D: An interactive surface grid generation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luh, Raymond Ching-Chung; Pierce, Lawrence E.; Yip, David

    1992-01-01

    S3D, an interactive software tool for surface grid generation, is described. S3D provides the means with which a geometry definition based either on a discretized curve set or a rectangular set can be quickly processed towards the generation of a surface grid for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. This is made possible as a result of implementing commonly encountered surface gridding tasks in an environment with a highly efficient and user friendly graphical interface. Some of the more advanced features of S3D include surface-surface intersections, optimized surface domain decomposition and recomposition, and automated propagation of edge distributions to surrounding grids.

  15. Applications of graphics to support a testbed for autonomous space vehicle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeckpeper, K. R.; Aldridge, J. P.; Benson, S.; Horner, S.; Kullman, A.; Mulder, T.; Parrott, W.; Roman, D.; Watts, G.; Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1989-01-01

    Researchers describe their experience using graphics tools and utilities while building an application, AUTOPS, that uses a graphical Machintosh (TM)-like interface for the input and display of data, and animation graphics to enhance the presentation of results of autonomous space vehicle operations simulations. AUTOPS is a test bed for evaluating decisions for intelligent control systems for autonomous vehicles. Decisions made by an intelligent control system, e.g., a revised mission plan, might be displayed to the user in textual format or he can witness the effects of those decisions via out of window graphics animations. Although a textual description conveys essentials, a graphics animation conveys the replanning results in a more convincing way. Similarily, iconic and menu-driven screen interfaces provide the user with more meaningful options and displays. Presented here are experiences with the SunView and TAE Plus graphics tools used for interface design, and the Johnson Space Center Interactive Graphics Laboratory animation graphics tools used for generating out out of the window graphics.

  16. Verification Test Suite (VERTS) For Rail Gun Applications using ALE3D: 2-D Hydrodynamics & Thermal Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, F M; Solberg, J; White, D

    2008-04-17

    A verification test suite has been assessed with primary focus on low reynolds number flow of liquid metals. This is representative of the interface between the armature and rail in gun applications. The computational multiphysics framework, ALE3D, is used. The main objective of the current study is to provide guidance and gain confidence in the results obtained with ALE3D. A verification test suite based on 2-D cases is proposed and includes the lid-driven cavity and the Couette flow are investigated. The hydro and thermal fields are assumed to be steady and laminar in nature. Results are compared with analytical solutions and previously published data. Mesh resolution studies are performed along with various models for the equation of state.

  17. Application of the Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analysis of Skin-Stiffener Debond Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; O'Brien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2002-01-01

    The application of a shell/3D modeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond in a specimen subjected to three-point bending is demonstrated. The global structure was modeled with shell elements. A local three-dimensional model, extending to about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front was used to capture the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from shell/13D simulations were in good agreement with results obtained from full solid models. The good correlations of the results demonstrated the effectiveness of the shell/3D modeling technique for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents.

  18. ALPINE3D: a detailed model of mountain surface processes and its application to snow hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehning, Michael; Völksch, Ingo; Gustafsson, David; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Stähli, Manfred; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2006-06-01

    Current models of snow cover distribution, soil moisture, surface runoff and river discharge typically have very simple parameterizations of surface processes, such as degree-day factors or single-layer snow cover representation. For the purpose of reproducing catchment runoff, simple snowmelt routines have proven to be accurate, provided that they are carefully calibrated specifically for the catchment they are applied to. The use of more detailed models is, however, useful to understand and quantify the role of individual surface processes for catchment hydrology, snow cover status and soil moisture distribution.We introduce ALPINE3D, a model for the high-resolution simulation of alpine surface processes, in particular snow processes. The model can be driven by measurements from automatic weather stations or by meteorological model outputs. As a preprocessing alternative, specific high-resolution meteorological fields can be created by running a meteorological model. The core three-dimensional ALPINE3D modules consist of a radiation balance model (which uses a view-factor approach and includes shortwave scattering and longwave emission from terrain and tall vegetation) and a drifting snow model solving a diffusion equation for suspended snow and a saltation transport equation. The processes in the atmosphere are thus treated in three dimensions and are coupled to a distributed (in the hydrological sense of having a spatial representation of the catchment properties) one-dimensional model of vegetation, snow and soil (SNOWPACK) using the assumption that lateral exchange is small in these media. The model is completed by a conceptual runoff module. The model can be run with a choice of modules, thus generating more or less detailed surface forcing data as input for runoff generation simulations. The model modules can be run in a parallel (distributed) mode using a GRID infrastructure to allow computationally demanding tasks. In a case study from the Dischma Valley

  19. 3-D crustal velocity model for Lithuania and its application to local event studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, Elena; Budraitis, Mantas; Janutyte, Ilma; Motuza, Gediminas; Lazauskiene, Jurga; Passeq-Working Group

    2010-05-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 project (PASsive Seismic Experiment in TESZ) aimed at studying the lithosphere-asthenosphere system around the TransEuropean Suture Zone (TESZ)- the transition between old Proterozoic platform of north and east Europe and younger Phanerozoic platform in central and western Europe. The experiment was a seismic array research aiming to retrieve the structure of the crust and Earth's mantle down to the mantle transition zone, including mapping of upper mantle seismic velocity variations and discontinuities (Moho, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, mantle transition zone) using all available techniques. During the experiment 26 seismic stations (including four broadband stations) were installed in Lithuania. One of the main targets of PASSEQ deployment in Lithuania was identification and characterization of the local seismic activity. The PASSEQ stations in Lithuania were in operation since June, 2006 till January, 2008. During this period a number of local seismic events was recorded and preliminary event location was made using the LocSat algorithm and 1-D velocity model. This standard procedure is not enough precise for Lithuania, however, because the thickness of the crust varies significantly in the region (from 45 to 55 km). In order to improve event location, we separated the events into several groups and located each group separately using a VELEST algorithms and own 1-D velocity model for each group. We also compiled a 3-D seismic velocity of the crust down to a depth of 60 km. The model, consisting of four major layers (sediments, upper crust, middle crust, lower crust and uppermost mantle) was interpolated from 2-D velocity models along previous wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles into a regular grid. The quality of the approximation was analysed using comparison of travel times of P-waves recorded along previous controlled source profiles and synthetic travel times calculated using the 3-D velocity model. The model was converted

  20. An Application for Cultural Heritage in Erasmus Placement. Surveys and 3d Cataloging Archaeological Finds in MÉRIDA (spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, S.; Fiorillo, F.; Ortiz Coder, P.; D'Auria, S.; De Feo, E.

    2011-09-01

    Man has always had the need to live with his past, with its places and its artefacts. The reconstructions, the economical changes, the urbanization and its speculations have devastated whole cities, changed the faces of their historical centers, changed the relationship between the new and the old. Also the millenarian 'rest' of the archaeological findings, and therefore the respect towards those ancient civilizations, has been troubled. Our continent is rich in masterpieces that the modern man are not able to protect and pass on to the future, it is commonplace to observe that the modern `civilization' has cemented and suffocated the ancient city of Pompeii, or even worse, failed to protected it. Walking in the archaeological area of Paestum it can be noticed how just sixty years ago, no one had the slightest concern of fencing the amphitheatre and the Roman forum, or entire houses and shops, to lay a carpet of tar or simple to build constructions completely inferior compared to those majestic Greek temples. The engineers and the architects should be held responsible for this as based on their scientific and humanistic sensibility; they should bring together the man with his surroundings in the complete respects of the historical heritage. The interest in ancient began to change nearly three decades ago since it was realized that the "Cultural Heritage" is a major tourist attraction and, if properly managed and used, it can be an economical cornerstone. Today, thanks to survey and the 3D graphics, which provide powerful new tools, we are witnessing a new and real need for the conservation, cataloguing and enhancement as a way to revive our archaeological sites. As part of a major laboratory project, artefacts from the Roman period (I and II century b.C.), found in the Spanish city of Mérida, declared World Heritage by UNESCO in 1993, were acquired with a 3D laser scanner VIVID 910, and then catalogued. Based on these brief comments we wanted to direct the work

  1. Real-time Graphics Processing Unit Based Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Surgical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kang

    2011-12-01

    In this dissertation, real-time Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) capable of multi-dimensional micrometer-resolution imaging targeted specifically for microsurgical intervention applications was developed and studied. As a part of this work several ultra-high speed real-time FD-OCT imaging and sensing systems were proposed and developed. A real-time 4D (3D+time) OCT system platform using the graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate OCT signal processing, the imaging reconstruction, visualization, and volume rendering was developed. Several GPU based algorithms such as non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT), numerical dispersion compensation, and multi-GPU implementation were developed to improve the impulse response, SNR roll-off and stability of the system. Full-range complex-conjugate-free FD-OCT was also implemented on the GPU architecture to achieve doubled image range and improved SNR. These technologies overcome the imaging reconstruction and visualization bottlenecks widely exist in current ultra-high speed FD-OCT systems and open the way to interventional OCT imaging for applications in guided microsurgery. A hand-held common-path optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) distance-sensor based microsurgical tool was developed and validated. Through real-time signal processing, edge detection and feed-back control, the tool was shown to be capable of track target surface and compensate motion. The micro-incision test using a phantom was performed using a CP-OCT-sensor integrated hand-held tool, which showed an incision error less than +/-5 microns, comparing to >100 microns error by free-hand incision. The CP-OCT distance sensor has also been utilized to enhance the accuracy and safety of optical nerve stimulation. Finally, several experiments were conducted to validate the system for surgical applications. One of them involved 4D OCT guided micro-manipulation using a phantom. Multiple volume renderings of one 3D data set were

  2. The 3-D description of vertical current sheets with application to solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Davis, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Following a brief review of the processes which have been suggested for explaining the occurrence of solar flares we suggest a new scenario which builds on the achievements of the previous suggestion that the current sheets, which develop naturally in 3-D cases with gravity from impacting independent magnetic structures (i.e., approaching current systems), do not consist of horizontal currents but are instead predominantly vertical current systems. This suggestion is based on the fact that as the subphotospheric sources of the magnetic field displace the upper photosphere and lower chromosphere regions, where plasma beta is near unity, will experience predominantly horizontal mass motions which will lead to a distorted 3-D configurations of the magnetic field having stored free energy. In our scenario, a vertically flowing current sheet separates the plasma regions associated with either of the subphotospheric sources. This reflects the balanced tension of the two stressed fields which twist around each other. This leads naturally to a metastable or unstable situation as the twisted field emerges into a low beta region where vertical motions are not inhibited by gravity. In our flare scenario the impulsive energy release occurs, initially, not by reconnection but mainly by the rapid change of the magnetic field which has become unstable. During the impulsive phase the field lines contort in such way as to realign the electric current sheet into a minimum energy horizontal flow. This contortion produces very large electric fields which will accelerate particles. As the current evolves to a horizontal configuration the magnetic field expands vertically, which can be accompanied by eruptions of material. The instability of a horizontal current is well known and causes the magnetic field to undergo a rapid outward expansion. In our scenario, fast reconnection is not necessary to trigger the flare, however, slow reconnection would occur continuously in the current layer

  3. 3-D Particle Tracking Velocimetry: Development and Applications in Small Scale Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Wei-Hsin

    The thesis contains two parts of studies. In part I, a novel volumetric velocimetry technique is developed to measure the 3-D flow field of small-scale flows. The technique utilizes a color-coded pinhole plate with multiple light sources aligned to each pinhole to achieve high particle image density and large measurable depth on a single lens microscope system. A color separation algorithm and an improved particle identification algorithm are developed to identify individual particle images from each pinhole view. Furthermore, a calibration-based technique based on epi-polar line search method is developed to reconstruct the spatial coordinates of the particle, and a new two-frame tracking particle-tracking algorithm is developed to calculate the velocity field. The system was setup to achieve a magnification of 2.69, resulting in an imaging volume of 3.35 x 2.5 x 1.5 mm3 and showed satisfactory measurement accuracy. The technique was then further miniaturized to achieve a magnification of 10, resulting in a imaging volume of 600 x 600 x 600 microm3. The system was applied to a backward-facing step flow to test its ability to reconstruct the unsteady flow field with two-frame tracking. Finally, this technique was applied to a steady streaming flow field in a microfluidic device used to trap particles. The results revealed the three-dimensional flow structure that has not been observed in previous studies, and provided insights to the design of a more efficient trapping device. In part II, an in-vitro study was carried out to investigate the flow around a prosthetic venous valve. Using 2-D PIV, the dynamics of the valve motion was captured and the velocity fields were measured to investigate the effect of the sinus pocket and the coupling effect of a pair of valves. The PIV and hemodynamic results showed that the sinus pocket around the valve functioned as a flow regulator to smooth the entrained velocity profile and suppress the jet width. For current prosthetic

  4. Constructing complex graphics applications with CLIPS and the X window system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faul, Ben M.

    1990-01-01

    This article will demonstrate how the artificial intelligence concepts in CLIPS used to solve problems encountered in the design and implementation of graphics applications within the UNIX-X Window System environment. The design of an extended version of CLIPS, called XCLIPS, is presented to show how the X Windows System graphics can be incorporated without losing DOS compatibility. Using XCLIPS, a sample scientific application is built that applies solving capabilities of both two and three dimensional graphics presentations in conjunction with the standard CLIPS features.

  5. 3D heterogeneous sensor system on a chip for defense and security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhansali, Shekhar; Chapman, Glenn H.; Friedman, Eby G.; Ismail, Yehea; Mukund, P. R.; Tebbe, Dennis; Jain, Vijay K.

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes a new concept for ultra-small, ultra-compact, unattended multi-phenomenological sensor systems for rapid deployment, with integrated classification-and-decision-information extraction capability from a sensed environment. We discuss a unique approach, namely a 3-D Heterogeneous System on a Chip (HSoC) in order to achieve a minimum 10X reduction in weight, volume, and power and a 10X or greater increase in capability and reliability -- over the alternative planar approaches. These gains will accrue from (a) the avoidance of long on-chip interconnects and chip-to-chip bonding wires, and (b) the cohabitation of sensors, preprocessing analog circuitry, digital logic and signal processing, and RF devices in the same compact volume. A specific scenario is discussed in detail wherein a set of four types of sensors, namely an array of acoustic and seismic sensors, an active pixel sensor array, and an uncooled IR imaging array are placed on a common sensor plane. The other planes include an analog plane consisting of transductors and A/D converters. The digital processing planes provide the necessary processing and intelligence capability. The remaining planes provide for wireless communications/networking capability. When appropriate, this processing and decision-making will be accomplished on a collaborative basis among the distributed sensor nodes through a wireless network.

  6. 3-D resistivity imaging of buried concrete infrastructure with application to unknown bridge foundation depth determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, M. E.; Arjwech, R.; Briaud, J.; Hurlebaus, S.; Medina-Cetina, Z.; Tucker, S.; Yousefpour, N.

    2010-12-01

    Bridges are always vulnerable to scour and those mainly older ones with unknown foundations constitute a significant risk to public safety. Geophysical testing of bridge foundations using 3-D resistivity imaging is a promising non-destructive technology but its execution and reliable interpretation remains a challenging task. A major difficulty to diagnosing foundation depth is that a single linear electrode profile generally does not provide adequate 3—D illumination to provide a useful image of the bottom of the foundation. To further explore the capabilities of resistivity tomography, we conducted a 3—D resistivity survey at a geotechnical test area which includes groups of buried, steel—reinforced concrete structures, such as slabs and piles, with cylindrical and square cross—sections that serve as proxies for bridge foundations. By constructing a number of 3—D tomograms using selected data subsets and comparing the resulting images, we have identified efficient combinations of data acquired in the vicinity of a given foundation which enable the most cost-effective and reliable depth determination. The numerous issues that are involved in adapting this methodology to actual bridge sites is discussed.

  7. A New Methodology for 3D Target Detection in Automotive Radar Applications.

    PubMed

    Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Lukin, Sergyi; Matuozzo, Gianfranco; Pascazio, Vito; Schirinzi, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Today there is a growing interest in automotive sensor monitoring systems. One of the main challenges is to make them an effective and valuable aid in dangerous situations, improving transportation safety. The main limitation of visual aid systems is that they do not produce accurate results in critical visibility conditions, such as in presence of rain, fog or smoke. Radar systems can greatly help in overcoming such limitations. In particular, imaging radar is gaining interest in the framework of Driver Assistance Systems (DAS). In this manuscript, a new methodology able to reconstruct the 3D imaged scene and to detect the presence of multiple targets within each line of sight is proposed. The technique is based on the use of Compressive Sensing (CS) theory and produces the estimation of multiple targets for each line of sight, their range distance and their reflectivities. Moreover, a fast approach for 2D focus based on the FFT algorithm is proposed. After the description of the proposed methodology, different simulated case studies are reported in order to evaluate the performances of the proposed approach. PMID:27136558

  8. Depth-based representations: Which coding format for 3D video broadcast applications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbiriou, Paul; Boisson, Guillaume; Sidibé, Korian; Huynh-Thu, Quan

    2011-03-01

    3D Video (3DV) delivery standardization is currently ongoing in MPEG. Now time is to choose 3DV data representation format. What is at stake is the final quality for end-users, i.e. synthesized views' visual quality. We focus on two major rival depth-based formats, namely Multiview Video plus Depth (MVD) and Layered Depth Video (LDV). MVD can be considered as the basic depth-based 3DV format, generated by disparity estimation from multiview sequences. LDV is more sophisticated, with the compaction of multiview data into color- and depth-occlusions layers. We compare final views quality using MVD2 and LDV (both containing two color channels plus two depth components) coded with MVC at various compression ratios. Depending on the format, the appropriate synthesis process is performed to generate final stereoscopic pairs. Comparisons are provided in terms of SSIM and PSNR with respect to original views and to synthesized references (obtained without compression). Eventually, LDV outperforms significantly MVD when using state-of-the-art reference synthesis algorithms. Occlusions management before encoding is advantageous in comparison with handling redundant signals at decoder side. Besides, we observe that depth quantization does not induce much loss on the final view quality until a significant degradation level. Improvements in disparity estimation and view synthesis algorithms are therefore still expected during the remaining standardization steps.

  9. 3D representations of amino acids—applications to protein sequence comparison and classification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Koehl, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protein is the key to understanding its structure and ultimately its function in the cell. This paper addresses the fundamental issue of encoding amino acids in ways that the representation of such a protein sequence facilitates the decoding of its information content. We show that a feature-based representation in a three-dimensional (3D) space derived from amino acid substitution matrices provides an adequate representation that can be used for direct comparison of protein sequences based on geometry. We measure the performance of such a representation in the context of the protein structural fold prediction problem. We compare the results of classifying different sets of proteins belonging to distinct structural folds against classifications of the same proteins obtained from sequence alone or directly from structural information. We find that sequence alone performs poorly as a structure classifier. We show in contrast that the use of the three dimensional representation of the sequences significantly improves the classification accuracy. We conclude with a discussion of the current limitations of such a representation and with a description of potential improvements. PMID:25379143

  10. 3D Shortwave Radiative Transfer in Mountains: Application to the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.-L.; Liou, K. N.

    2009-04-01

    Surface fluxes over complex terrain are strongly affected by variation in elevation, slope, and albedo. However, these factors are generally neglected in most of the existing radiative transfer schemes which assume that the lower boundary is flat and homogeneous. We developed a new 3D Monte Carlo photon tracing program for radiative transfer in inhomogeneous and irregular terrain coupled with the correlated k-distribution method for gaseous absorption in the atmosphere for the calculation of broadband shortwave fluxes at mountain surfaces. The atmosphere is discretized by using finite cubic cells characterized by the spectral optical properties of molecules and background aerosols (extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and scattering phase function). To avoid leaks of photons, each land surface pixel consists of eight triangles based on terrain configuration (elevation, slope, and orientation) to create a seamless surface. We selected an area of 100×100 km2 in the Tibetan Plateau near Lhasa city with a horizontal resolution of 1 km2 and used the albedo available from MODIS/Terra dataset for this study. The results show that subgrid variability of the net surface solar fluxes are generally on the order of 10 to 30 W/m2.

  11. Direct electrospinning of 3D auricle-shaped scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Walser, Jochen; Stok, Kathryn S; Caversaccio, Marco D; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-two poly(ε)caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds have been produced by electrospinning directly into an auricle-shaped mould and seeded with articular chondrocytes harvested from bovine ankle joints. After seeding, the auricle shaped constructs were cultured in vitro and analysed at days 1, 7, 14 and 21 for regional differences in total DNA, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen (COL) content as well as the expression of aggrecan (AGG), collagen type I and type II (COL1/2) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 and 13 (MMP3/13). Stress-relaxation indentation testing was performed to investigate regional mechanical properties of the electrospun constructs. Electrospinning into a conductive mould yielded stable 3D constructs both initially and for the whole in vitro culture period, with an equilibrium modulus in the MPa range. Rapid cell proliferation and COL accumulation was observed until week 3. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed an initial increase in AGG, no change in COL2, a persistent increase in COL1, and only a slight decrease initially for MMP3. Electrospinning of fibrous scaffolds directly into an auricle-shape represents a promising option for auricular tissue engineering, as it can reduce the steps needed to achieve an implantable structure. PMID:27171651

  12. Regional application of multi-layer artificial neural networks in 3-D ionosphere tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Razin, Mir Reza; Voosoghi, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Tomography is a very cost-effective method to study physical properties of the ionosphere. In this paper, residual minimization training neural network (RMTNN) is used in voxel-based tomography to reconstruct of 3-D ionosphere electron density with high spatial resolution. For numerical experiments, observations collected at 37 GPS stations from Iranian permanent GPS network (IPGN) are used. A smoothed TEC approach was used for absolute STEC recovery. To improve the vertical resolution, empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) obtained from international reference ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012) used as object function in training neural network. Ionosonde observations is used for validate reliability of the proposed method. Minimum relative error for RMTNN is 1.64% and maximum relative error is 15.61%. Also root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.17 × 1011 (electrons/m3) is computed for RMTNN which is less than RMSE of IRI2012. The results show that RMTNN has higher accuracy and compiles speed than other ionosphere reconstruction methods.

  13. Validation of a Parametric Approach for 3d Fortification Modelling: Application to Scale Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, K.; Chevrier, C.; Halin, G.

    2013-02-01

    Parametric modelling approach applied to cultural heritage virtual representation is a field of research explored for years since it can address many limitations of digitising tools. For example, essential historical sources for fortification virtual reconstructions like plans-reliefs have several shortcomings when they are scanned. To overcome those problems, knowledge based-modelling can be used: knowledge models based on the analysis of theoretical literature of a specific domain such as bastioned fortification treatises can be the cornerstone of the creation of a parametric library of fortification components. Implemented in Grasshopper, these components are manually adjusted on the data available (i.e. 3D surveys of plans-reliefs or scanned maps). Most of the fortification area is now modelled and the question of accuracy assessment is raised. A specific method is used to evaluate the accuracy of the parametric components. The results of the assessment process will allow us to validate the parametric approach. The automation of the adjustment process can finally be planned. The virtual model of fortification is part of a larger project aimed at valorising and diffusing a very unique cultural heritage item: the collection of plans-reliefs. As such, knowledge models are precious assets when automation and semantic enhancements will be considered.

  14. Magnetic field penetration into a 3D ordered Josephson medium and applicability of the bean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelikman, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    The results of calculation of penetration of an external magnetic field into a 3D ordered Josephson medium, based on analysis of modification of the configuration in the direction of the decrease in its Gibbs potential, are reported. When the external field slightly exceeds the stability threshold, the Meissner configuration is transformed into a periodic sequence of linear vortices, which are parallel to the boundary of the medium and are located at a certain distance from it. There exists a critical value I C separating two possible regimes of penetration of the external magnetic field into the medium. For I > I C, for any value of the external field, a finite-length boundary current configuration appears, which completely compensates the external field in the bulk of the sample. At the sample boundary, the field decreases with increasing depth almost linearly. The values of the slope of the magnetic field dependence are rational fractions, which remain constant in finite intervals of I. When the value of I exceeds the upper boundary of such an interval, the slope increases and assumes the value of another rational fraction. If, however, I < I C, such a situation takes place only up to a certain value of external field H max. For higher values, the field penetrates into the medium to an infinite depth. These results lead to the conclusion that the Bean assumptions are violated and that Bean's model is inapplicable for analyzing the processes considered here.

  15. Creation and use of adjustable 3D phantoms: application for the lung monitoring of female workers.

    PubMed

    Farah, Jad; Broggio, David; Franck, Didier

    2010-11-01

    In vivo counting measurements, used for the monitoring of workers with internal contamination risks, are based on the use of calibration physical phantoms. However, such phantoms do not exist for female subjects. Computational calibration using numerical representations, Mesh and non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) geometries, was thus considered. The study presented here is focused on the creation of different female thoracic phantoms with various breast sizes and chest girths. These 3D models are used to estimate the radiation attenuation with morphology and the resulting variation of the calibration coefficient of a typical 4-germanium in vivo counting system. A basic Mesh female thoracic phantom was created from the International Commission on Radiological Protection Adult Female Reference Computational Phantom. Using this basic phantom, different chest girths (85, 90, 100, 110, and 120) and cup sizes (A to F) were created representing the most common thoracic female morphologies, as recommended by the available and relevant literature. Variation of breast tissue composition and internal organ volumes with morphology were also considered. As a result, 34 thoracic female phantoms were created combining different cup sizes and chest girths. For the 85 chest girth, at very low energies (15 keV), a relative counting efficiency variation of about 85% was observed between the A and E cups. As a result of this study, breast size dependent calibration coefficients, between 15 keV and 1.4 MeV, were obtained and tabulated for a typical lung counting germanium system. PMID:20938235

  16. A New Methodology for 3D Target Detection in Automotive Radar Applications

    PubMed Central

    Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Lukin, Sergyi; Matuozzo, Gianfranco; Pascazio, Vito; Schirinzi, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Today there is a growing interest in automotive sensor monitoring systems. One of the main challenges is to make them an effective and valuable aid in dangerous situations, improving transportation safety. The main limitation of visual aid systems is that they do not produce accurate results in critical visibility conditions, such as in presence of rain, fog or smoke. Radar systems can greatly help in overcoming such limitations. In particular, imaging radar is gaining interest in the framework of Driver Assistance Systems (DAS). In this manuscript, a new methodology able to reconstruct the 3D imaged scene and to detect the presence of multiple targets within each line of sight is proposed. The technique is based on the use of Compressive Sensing (CS) theory and produces the estimation of multiple targets for each line of sight, their range distance and their reflectivities. Moreover, a fast approach for 2D focus based on the FFT algorithm is proposed. After the description of the proposed methodology, different simulated case studies are reported in order to evaluate the performances of the proposed approach. PMID:27136558

  17. 3-D localization of gamma ray sources with coded apertures for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaissas, I.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Several small gamma cameras for radioguided surgery using CdTe or CdZnTe have parallel or pinhole collimators. Coded aperture imaging is a well-known method for gamma ray source directional identification, applied in astrophysics mainly. The increase in efficiency due to the substitution of the collimators by the coded masks renders the method attractive for gamma probes used in radioguided surgery. We have constructed and operationally verified a setup consisting of two CdTe gamma cameras with Modified Uniform Redundant Array (MURA) coded aperture masks of rank 7 and 19 and a video camera. The 3-D position of point-like radioactive sources is estimated via triangulation using decoded images acquired by the gamma cameras. We have also developed code for both fast and detailed simulations and we have verified the agreement between experimental results and simulations. In this paper we present a simulation study for the spatial localization of two point sources using coded aperture masks with rank 7 and 19.

  18. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  19. Application of the Graphic Correlation method to Pliocene marine sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Biostratigraphy - the use of paleontological evidence to establish relative chronologies, forms the cornerstone of many sedimentary geological investigations. Several different approaches to biochronology are available. Traditional interval zones, defined on lowest and/or highest occurrences of selected taxa, are used to place bodies of rock in a relative chronological framework. Fossil datum levels, which are more numerous than zones, are often used as chronohorizons for correlation purposs. The Graphic Correlation method, like interval zonations, synthesizes information from a number of different taxa but does not assume synchrony of any one taxon. A magnetobiostratigraphic model for deep-sea Pliocene sequences has been constructed by graphic correlation of Deep Sea Drilling project cores from the North Atlantic (606), Caribbean Sea (502), South Atlantic (516), Tasman Sea (590), Equatorial Pacific (573) and North Pacific (577). All cores are hydraulic piston cores which contain abundant planktonic foraminifers, calcareous nannofossils and which record many of the magnetic reversals expected in the Pliocene. The model is based on internally consistent paleontologic data gathered by the author. This study demonstrates the advantages of graphic correlation over conventional biostratigraphic procedures. Accurate inter-regional correlations can be made between core sites without resorting to multiple microfossil zonations and without invoking synchrony of fossil events. Important results of this study are: (1) many Pliocene planktonic foraminifer and calcareous nannofossil events are diachronous by more than 0.20 m.y., (2) Globorotalia truncatulinoides first occurs in the Southwest Pacific Ocean, approximately 0.50 m.y. earlier than previously reported, (3) a previously undetected hiatus of short duration (0.38 m.y.) exists just above the Cochiti subchron at DSDP 577A. ?? 1989.

  20. 2D Maps, 3D Globes, and OGC Web Services Supporting Arctic Science through the Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. W.; Gaylord, A. G.; Brady, J.; Cody, R.; Ramirez, G.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Rubio, C.; Dover, M.; Garcia-Lavigne, D.; Manley, W.; Score, R.; Tweedie, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) is a suite of online services designed to provide support for Arctic science. These services include: a text based online search utility, 2D Internet Map Server (IMS), 3D globe applications (Google Earth and ArcGIS Explorer), Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) and Keyhole Markup Language (KML) Service , and a prototype 2D ArcGIS Server Web Mapping Application (WMA). Avoiding a duplication of effort has been a primary objective of the ARMAP project which incorporates best practices (e.g. OGC standard web services and metadata) and off the shelf technologies. The Arctic Research Logistics Support Service (ARLSS) database is the foundation of all the ARMAP services and includes US research funded by the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. With ARMAP's 2D maps and 3D globes, users can navigate to areas of interest, view a variety of map layers, and explore U.S. federally funded research projects. Projects can be queried by location, year, funding program, discipline, and keyword. Links to specific information and other web sites associated with particular research projects are included. . The ARMAP suite provides tools for users of various levels of technical ability to interact with data by running text based queries, browsing in 2D or 3D, or importing the KML and OGC web services directly into their own GIS applications and virtual globes. With special emphasis on the International Polar Year (IPY), ARMAP has targeted science planners, scientists, educators, and the general public. In sum, ARMAP goes beyond a simple map display to enable analysis, synthesis, and coordination of Arctic research. ARMAP may be accessed via the gateway web site at http://www.armap.org.

  1. Application of 2D and 3D Digital Image Correlation on CO2-like altered carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zinsmeister, Louis; Dautriat, Jérémie; Dimanov, Alexandre; Raphanel, Jean; Bornert, Michel

    2013-04-01

    In order to provide mechanical constitutive laws for reservoir monitoring during CO2 long term storage, we studied the mechanical properties of Lavoux limestone before and after a homogeneous alteration following the protocol of acid treatments defined by Egermann et al, (2006). The mechanical data have been analysed at the light of systematic microstructural investigations. Firstly, the alteration impact on the evolution of flow properties related to microstructural changes was studied at successive levels of alteration by classical petrophysical measurements of porosity and permeability (including NMR, mercury porosimetry and laser diffraction) and by observations of microstructures on thin sections and by SEM. Secondly, the mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by classical (macroscopic) triaxial and uniaxial tests and are discussed in terms of the structural modifications. The macroscopic tests indicate that the alteration weakens the material, according to the observed decrease of elastic moduli and Uniaxial Compressive Strengths, from 29MPa to 19MPa after 6 cycles of acid treatments. The study is further complemented by 2D full (mechanical) field measurements, thanks to Digital Image Correlation (DIC) performed on images acquired during the uniaxial tests. This technique allows for continuous quantitative micro-mechanical monitoring in terms of deformation history and localisation processes during compression. This technique was applied on both intact and altered materials and at different scales of observation: (i) cm-sized samples were compressed in a classical load frame and optically imaged, (ii) mm-sized samples were loaded with a miniaturized compression rig implemented within a Scanning Electron Microscope. At last, 3D full field measurements were performed by 3D-DIC on mm-sized samples, which were compressed "in-situ" an X-ray microtomograph thanks to a miniaturized triaxial cell allowing for confining pressures of up to 15 MPa. At

  2. An impedance method for spatial sensing of 3D cell constructs--towards applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Canali, C; Mazzoni, C; Larsen, L B; Heiskanen, A; Martinsen, Ø G; Wolff, A; Dufva, M; Emnéus, J

    2015-09-01

    We present the characterisation and validation of multiplexed 4-terminal (4T) impedance measurements as a method for sensing the spatial location of cell aggregates within large three-dimensional (3D) gelatin scaffolds. The measurements were performed using an array of four rectangular chambers, each having eight platinum needle electrodes for parallel analysis. The electrode positions for current injection and voltage measurements were optimised by means of finite element simulations to maximise the sensitivity field distribution and spatial resolution. Eight different 4T combinations were experimentally tested in terms of the spatial sensitivity. The simulated sensitivity fields were validated using objects (phantoms) with different conductivity and size placed in different positions inside the chamber. This provided the detection limit (volume sensitivity) of 16.5%, i.e. the smallest detectable volume with respect to the size of the measurement chamber. Furthermore, the possibility for quick single frequency analysis was demonstrated by finding a common frequency of 250 kHz for all the presented electrode combinations. As final proof of concept, a high density of human hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells were encapsulated in gelatin to form artificial 3D cell constructs and detected when placed in different positions inside large gelatin scaffolds. Taken together, these results open new perspectives for impedance-based sensing technologies for non-invasive monitoring in tissue engineering applications providing spatial information of constructs within biologically relevant 3D environments. PMID:26198701

  3. Facile and rapid generation of 3D chemical gradients within hydrogels for high-throughput drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Obregón, Raquel; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-09-15

    We propose a novel application of dielectrophoresis (DEP) to make three-dimensional (3D) methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels with gradients of micro- and nanoparticles. DEP forces were able to manipulate micro- and nanoparticles of different sizes and materials (i.e., C2C12 myoblasts, polystyrene beads, gold microparticles, and carbon nanotubes) within GelMA hydrogels in a rapid and facile way and create 3D gradients of these particles in a microchamber. Immobilization of drugs, such as fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), on gold microparticles allowed us to investigate the high-throughput release of these drugs from GelMA-gold microparticle gradient systems. The latter gradient constructs were incubated with C2C12 myoblasts for 24h to examine the cell viability through the release of 6-OHDA. The drug was released from the microparticles in a gradient manner, inducing a cell viability gradient. This novel approach to create 3D chemical gradients within hydrogels is scalable to any arbitrary length scale. It is useful for making anisotropic biomimetic materials and high-throughput platforms to investigate cell-microenvironment interactions in a rapid, simple, cost-effective, and reproducible manner. PMID:24727602

  4. 3D Graphene-Infused Polyimide with Enhanced Electrothermal Performance for Long-Term Flexible Space Applications.

    PubMed

    Loeblein, Manuela; Bolker, Asaf; Tsang, Siu Hon; Atar, Nurit; Uzan-Saguy, Cecile; Verker, Ronen; Gouzman, Irina; Grossman, Eitan; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-12-22

    Polyimides (PIs) have been praised for their high thermal stability, high modulus of elasticity and tensile strength, ease of fabrication, and moldability. They are currently the standard choice for both substrates for flexible electronics and space shielding, as they render high temperature and UV stability and toughness. However, their poor thermal conductivity and completely electrically insulating characteristics have caused other limitations, such as thermal management challenges for flexible high-power electronics and spacecraft electrostatic charging. In order to target these issues, a hybrid of PI with 3D-graphene (3D-C), 3D-C/PI, is developed here. This composite renders extraordinary enhancements of thermal conductivity (one order of magnitude) and electrical conductivity (10 orders of magnitude). It withstands and keeps a stable performance throughout various bending and thermal cycles, as well as the oxidative and aggressive environment of ground-based, simulated space environments. This makes this new hybrid film a suitable material for flexible space applications. PMID:26479496

  5. Electrochemically formed 3D hierarchical thin films of cobalt-manganese (Co-Mn) hexacyanoferrate hybrids for electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam Venugopal, Narendra Kumar; Joseph, James

    2016-02-01

    Here we report the feasibility of forming 3D nanostructured hexacyanoferates of Cobalt and Manganese (Co-MnHCF) on GC surface by a facile electrochemical method. This 3D architecture on glassy carbon electrode characterised systematically by voltammetry and other physical characterisation techniques like Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) etc,. Electrochemical Quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) studies helped out to calculate the total mass change during Co-MnHCF formation. Electrochemical studies reveal that the formal redox potentials of both Co and MnHCF films remained close to that of newly formed Co-MnHCF hybrid films. These 3D modified films were successfully applied for two different electrochemical applications i) For pseudocapacitor studies in KNO3 medium ii) Investigated the electrocatalytic behaviour of redox film towards water oxidation reaction in alkaline medium. Electrochemical performances of newly formed Co-MnHCF are compared with their individual transition metal (Co, Mn) hexacyanoferrates. The resulting material shows a specific capacitance of 350 F g-1 through its fast reversible redox reaction of electrochemically formed Co-MnHCF modified film. Interestingly we showed the overpotential of 450 mV (from its thermodynamic voltage 1.2 V) to attain its optimum current density of 10 mA cm-2 for O2 evolution in alkaline medium.

  6. A 3D numerical investigation of reservoir monitoring with borehole radar and its application in smart well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Miorali, M.; Slob, E. C.; Arts, R.

    2011-12-01

    Smart wells, a new generation of wells used in oil production, combine down-hole monitoring and control of the reservoir flow. Smart technology allows the implementation of proactive strategies that can mitigate potential problems, such as the approach of undesired fluids, before they impact production from the well. The effectiveness of the proactive strategies depends on the ability of monitoring the near-well region. We propose that borehole radar is a promising technology for this purpose. We couple 3D reservoir flow modeling with 3D radar modeling. The time-lapse analysis of the electromagnetic simulations confirms that radar can map the movement of the oil-water contact in a range of 1-10 m from the well. The comparison of the 3D reflected signals with the 2D show a good correlation, which allows cheaper simulation for a large-scale reservoir model. We use the radar results to implement a proactive control strategy in a realistic reservoir scenario. The NPV(Net Present Value) has improved by controlling the production according to the modeled radar measurements. We suggest borehole radar as a promising application in oil production optimization if an effective smart well control strategy is combined.

  7. Application of artificial neural network in 3D imaging with lanthanum bromide calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostojic, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Kiener, J.; Hamadache, C.; Karkour, N.; Linget, D.; Grave, X.; Gibelin, L.; Travers, B.; Blin, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range from 0.1 up to 100 MeV holds many understudied questions connected with e.g. stellar nucleosynthesis, the active Sun, neutron stars and black holes. To access the physics behind, a significant improvement in detection sensitivity is needed compared to previous missions, e.g. CGRO and INTEGRAL. One of the promising concepts for a future gamma-ray mission is an Advanced Compton Telescope. Under the project of creating a prototype of such instrument, we study the perspectives of using a novel inorganic scintillator as a calorimeter part. Modern inorganic crystal or ceramics scintillators are constantly improving on qualities such as energy resolution and radiation hardness, and this makes them a smart choice for a new space-borne telescope. At CSNSM Orsay, we have assembled a detection module from a 5 × 5cm2 area and 1 cm thick, cerium-doped lanthanum (III) bromide (LaBr3:Ce) inorganic scintillator coupled to a 64 channel multi-anode photomultiplier. The readout of the PMT signals is carried out with the ASIC MAROC, used previously for the luminometer of the ATLAS detector (CERN). Characterization, thorough measurements with various radioactive sources, as well as, single photoelectron detection have been done. Furthermore, we made a comparison of measurements with a detailed GEANT4-based simulation which includes tracking of the optical photons. Finally, we have studied the 3D reconstruction of the first interaction point of incident gamma rays, utilizing a neural network algorithm. This spatial position resolution plays a crucial part in the future implementations and, together with the other measured properties, it makes our detector module very interesting for the next generation of space telescopes operating in the MeV range.

  8. Straightforward reconstruction of 3D surfaces and topography with a camera: Accuracy and geoscience application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.

    2012-09-01

    Topographic measurements for detailed studies of processes such as erosion or mass movement are usually acquired by expensive laser scanners or rigorous photogrammetry. Here, we test and use an alternative technique based on freely available computer vision software which allows general geoscientists to easily create accurate 3D models from field photographs taken with a consumer-grade camera. The approach integrates structure-from-motion (SfM) and multiview-stereo (MVS) algorithms and, in contrast to traditional photogrammetry techniques, it requires little expertise and few control measurements, and processing is automated. To assess the precision of the results, we compare SfM-MVS models spanning spatial scales of centimeters (a hand sample) to kilometers (the summit craters of Piton de la Fournaise volcano) with data acquired from laser scanning and formal close-range photogrammetry. The relative precision ratio achieved by SfM-MVS (measurement precision: observation distance) is limited by the straightforward camera calibration model used in the software, but generally exceeds 1:1000 (i.e., centimeter-level precision over measurement distances of 10 s of meters). We apply SfM-MVS at an intermediate scale, to determine erosion rates along a ˜50-m-long coastal cliff. Seven surveys carried out over a year indicate an average retreat rate of 0.70 ± 0.05 m a-1. Sequential erosion maps (at ˜0.05 m grid resolution) highlight the spatiotemporal variability in the retreat, with semivariogram analysis indicating a correlation between volume loss and length scale. Compared with a laser scanner survey of the same site, SfM-MVS produced comparable data and reduced data collection time by ˜80%.

  9. Ionized Outflows in 3-D Insights from Herbig-Haro Objects and Applications to Nearby AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    HST shows that the gas distributions of these objects are complex and clump at the limit of resolution. HST spectra have lumpy emission-line profiles, indicating unresolved sub-structure. The advantages of 3D over slits on gas so distributed are: robust flux estimates of various dynamical systems projected along lines of sight, sensitivity to fainter spectral lines that are physical diagnostics (reddening-gas density, T, excitation mechanisms, abundances), and improved prospects for recovery of unobserved dimensions of phase-space. These advantages al- low more confident modeling for more profound inquiry into underlying dynamics. The main complication is the effort required to link multi- frequency datasets that optimally track the energy flow through various phases of the ISM. This tedium has limited the number of objects that have been thoroughly analyzed to the a priori most spectacular systems. For HHO'S, proper-motions constrain the ambient B-field, shock velocity, gas abundances, mass-loss rates, source duty-cycle, and tie-ins with molecular flows. If the shock speed, hence ionization fraction, is indeed small then the ionized gas is a significant part of the flow energetics. For AGN'S, nuclear beaming is a source of ionization ambiguity. Establishing the energetics of the outflow is critical to determining how the accretion disk loses its energy. CXO will provide new constraints (especially spectral) on AGN outflows, and STIS UV-spectroscopy is also constraining cloud properties (although limited by extinction). HHO's show some of the things that we will find around AGN'S. I illustrate these points with results from ground-based and HST programs being pursued with collaborators.

  10. Commissioning a CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Justus; Newton, Joseph; Yang, Yun; Steffey, Beverly; Cai, Jing; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark; Chino, Junzo; Craciunescu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the geometric and dose attenuation characteristics of a new commercially available CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid (T&O) applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry. Methods: For geometric characterization, we quantified physical dimensions and investigated a systematic difference found to exist between nominal ovoid angle and the angle at which the afterloading buckets fall within the ovoid. For dosimetric characterization, we determined source attenuation through asymmetric gold shielding in the buckets using Monte Carlo simulations and 3D dosimetry. Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to simulate 1.5 × 109 photon histories from a 137Cs source placed in the bucket to achieve statistical uncertainty of 1% at a 6 cm distance. For 3D dosimetry, the distribution about an unshielded source was first measured to evaluate the system for 137Cs, after which the distribution was measured about sources placed in each bucket. Cylindrical PRESAGE® dosimeters (9.5 cm diameter, 9.2 cm height) with a central channel bored for source placement were supplied by Heuris Inc. The dosimeters were scanned with the Duke Large field of view Optical CT-Scanner before and after delivering a nominal dose at 1 cm of 5–8 Gy. During irradiation the dosimeter was placed in a water phantom to provide backscatter. Optical CT scan time lasted 15 min during which 720 projections were acquired at 0.5° increments, and a 3D distribution was reconstructed with a (0.05 cm)3 isotropic voxel size. The distributions about the buckets were used to calculate a 3D distribution of transmission rate through the bucket, which was applied to a clinical CT-based T&O implant plan. Results: The systematic difference in bucket angle relative to the nominal ovoid angle (105°) was 3.1°–4.7°. A systematic difference in bucket angle of 1°, 5°, and 10° caused a 1% ± 0.1%, 1.7% ± 0.4%, and 2.6% ± 0.7% increase in rectal dose, respectively, with smaller effect to dose to

  11. Commissioning a CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Justus; Newton, Joseph; Yang Yun; Steffey, Beverly; Cai, Jing; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark; Chino, Junzo; Craciunescu, Oana

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the geometric and dose attenuation characteristics of a new commercially available CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid (T and O) applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry. Methods: For geometric characterization, we quantified physical dimensions and investigated a systematic difference found to exist between nominal ovoid angle and the angle at which the afterloading buckets fall within the ovoid. For dosimetric characterization, we determined source attenuation through asymmetric gold shielding in the buckets using Monte Carlo simulations and 3D dosimetry. Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to simulate 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} photon histories from a {sup 137}Cs source placed in the bucket to achieve statistical uncertainty of 1% at a 6 cm distance. For 3D dosimetry, the distribution about an unshielded source was first measured to evaluate the system for {sup 137}Cs, after which the distribution was measured about sources placed in each bucket. Cylindrical PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} dosimeters (9.5 cm diameter, 9.2 cm height) with a central channel bored for source placement were supplied by Heuris Inc. The dosimeters were scanned with the Duke Large field of view Optical CT-Scanner before and after delivering a nominal dose at 1 cm of 5-8 Gy. During irradiation the dosimeter was placed in a water phantom to provide backscatter. Optical CT scan time lasted 15 min during which 720 projections were acquired at 0.5 Degree-Sign increments, and a 3D distribution was reconstructed with a (0.05 cm){sup 3} isotropic voxel size. The distributions about the buckets were used to calculate a 3D distribution of transmission rate through the bucket, which was applied to a clinical CT-based T and O implant plan. Results: The systematic difference in bucket angle relative to the nominal ovoid angle (105 Degree-Sign ) was 3.1 Degree-Sign -4.7 Degree-Sign . A systematic difference in bucket angle of 1 Degree-Sign , 5 Degree-Sign , and

  12. Computer graphics and the graphic artist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, N. L.; Fedors, E. G.; Pinelli, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    A centralized computer graphics system is being developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. This system was required to satisfy multiuser needs, ranging from presentation quality graphics prepared by a graphic artist to 16-mm movie simulations generated by engineers and scientists. While the major thrust of the central graphics system was directed toward engineering and scientific applications, hardware and software capabilities to support the graphic artists were integrated into the design. This paper briefly discusses the importance of computer graphics in research; the central graphics system in terms of systems, software, and hardware requirements; the application of computer graphics to graphic arts, discussed in terms of the requirements for a graphic arts workstation; and the problems encountered in applying computer graphics to the graphic arts. The paper concludes by presenting the status of the central graphics system.

  13. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  14. A 3-D Coupled CFD-DSMC Solution Method With Application to the Mars Sample Return Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    A method to obtain coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (CFD-DSMC), 3-D flow field solutions for highly blunt bodies at low incidence is presented and applied to one concept of the Mars Sample Return Orbiter vehicle as a demonstration of the technique. CFD is used to solve the high-density blunt forebody flow defining an inflow boundary condition for a DSMC solution of the afterbody wake flow. By combining the two techniques in flow regions where most applicable, the entire mixed flow field is modeled in an appropriate manner.

  15. 3D point cloud classification of complex natural scenes using a multi-scale dimensionality criterion: applications in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodu, N.; Lague, D.

    2012-04-01

    3D point clouds derived from Terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) and photogrammetry are now frequently used in geomorphology to achieve greater precision and completeness in surveying natural environments than what was feasible a few years ago. Yet, scientific exploitation of these large and complex 3D data sets remains difficult and would benefit from automated classification procedures that could pre-process the raw point cloud data. Typical examples of applications are the separation of vegetation from ground or cliff outcrops, the distinction between fresh rock surfaces and rockfall, the classification of flat or rippled bed, and more generally the classification of 3D surfaces according to their morphology directly in the native point cloud data organization rather than after a sometime cumbersome meshing or gridding phase. Yet developing such classification procedures remains difficult because of the 3D nature of the data generated from ground based systems (as opposed to the 2.5D nature of aerial lidar data) and the heterogeneity and complexity of natural surfaces. We present a new software suite (CANUPO) that can classify raw point clouds in 3D based on a new geometrical measure: the multi-scale dimensionality. This method exploits the multi-resolution characteristics high-resolution datasets covering scales ranging from a few centimeters to hundred of meters. The dimensionality characterizes the local 3D organization of the point cloud within spheres centered on the measured points and varies from being 1D (points set along a line), 2D (points forming a plane) to the full 3D volume. By varying the diameter of the sphere, we track how the local cloud geometry behaves across scales (typically ranging from 5 cm to 1 m). We present the technique and illustrate its efficiency on two examples : separating riparian vegetation from ground, and classifying a steep mountain stream as vegetation, rock, gravel or water surface. In these two cases, separating the

  16. Application of micro- and nanoprobes to the analysis of small-sized 3D materials, nanosystems, and nanoobjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Ponomarev, A. G.; Shpak, Anatolii P.; Kunitskii, Yu A.

    2012-03-01

    The basic physics behind the interaction of ions with solid-state matter is discussed, with an emphasis on the formation of interaction products between the ions and target atoms. Processes covering modification of high-resistance materials for use in small-sized 3D structure technology are described. Current trends in and problems facing the development of the scanning nuclear microprobe (SNMP) are reviewed. The application of slow positrons to diagnosing materials is examined and the techniques of positron microscopy and microprobing are presented. The potential of near-field microwave microscopy for diagnosing superconducting ceramics and of microwave microscopy for nanotechnology applications are assessed. The examples given include the use of micro- and nanoprobes to analyze nanoobjects (such as green algae cells with 3D-distributed microelements, etc.), to develop the topological aspects of integrated microcircuits in nanoelectronics, and some other applications. The role of iron in pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is highlighted, the latter being the subject of research in neurochemistry.

  17. T-HEMP3D user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.

    1983-08-01

    The T-HEMP3D (Transportable HEMP3D) computer program is a derivative of the STEALTH three-dimensional thermodynamics code developed by Science Applications, Inc., under the direction of Ron Hofmann. STEALTH, in turn, is based entirely on the original HEMP3D code written at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary advantage STEALTH has over its predecessors is that it was designed using modern structured design techniques, with rigorous programming standards enforced. This yields two benefits. First, the code is easily changeable; this is a necessity for a physics code used for research. The second benefit is that the code is easily transportable between different types of computers. The STEALTH program was transferred to LLNL under a cooperative development agreement. Changes were made primarily in three areas: material specification, coordinate generation, and the addition of sliding surface boundary conditions. The code was renamed T-HEMP3D to avoid confusion with other versions of STEALTH. This document summarizes the input to T-HEMP3D, as used at LLNL. It does not describe the physics simulated by the program, nor the numerical techniques employed. Furthermore, it does not describe the separate job steps of coordinate generation and post-processing, including graphical display of results. (WHK)

  18. Solar physics applications of computer graphics and image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Computer graphics devices coupled with computers and carefully developed software provide new opportunities to achieve insight into the geometry and time evolution of scalar, vector, and tensor fields and to extract more information quickly and cheaply from the same image data. Two or more different fields which overlay in space can be calculated from the data (and the physics), then displayed from any perspective, and compared visually. The maximum regions of one field can be compared with the gradients of another. Time changing fields can also be compared. Images can be added, subtracted, transformed, noise filtered, frequency filtered, contrast enhanced, color coded, enlarged, compressed, parameterized, and histogrammed, in whole or section by section. Today it is possible to process multiple digital images to reveal spatial and temporal correlations and cross correlations. Data from different observatories taken at different times can be processed, interpolated, and transformed to a common coordinate system.

  19. Impact of 3D Rotational Angiography on Liver Embolization Procedures: Review of Technique and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucatelli, Pierleone Corona, Mario Argirò, Renato Anzidei, Michele; Vallati, Giulio; Fanelli, Fabrizio Bezzi, Mario Catalano, Carlo

    2015-06-15

    In the last years, the interest into interventional applications of C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) progressively raised, widening its clinical application from the original field of interventional neuroradiology to the field of peripheral procedures. Liver embolization procedures, due to their complexity and potential treatment-related life-threatening complications, represent one of the main clinical applications of this novel angiographic technique. CBCT has been demonstrated to render procedures safer and technically easier, and to predict outcome as well as to avoid major complications in different treatment scenarios (trans-arterial embolization, trans-arterial chemoembolization, selective internal radiation therapy, percutaneous portal vein embolization). This review summarizes all technical, dosimetric and procedural aspects of CBCT techniques, underlying all its potential clinical advantages in the field of liver embolization procedures. Moreover, the paper provides all the instructions to obtain the best diagnostic performance out of this novel angiographic technique.

  20. Graphical Neuroimaging Informatics: Application to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Greer, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer’s Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN’s ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  1. Software Graphics Processing Unit (sGPU) for Deep Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCabe, Mary; Salazar, George; Steele, Glen

    2015-01-01

    A graphics processing capability will be required for deep space missions and must include a range of applications, from safety-critical vehicle health status to telemedicine for crew health. However, preliminary radiation testing of commercial graphics processing cards suggest they cannot operate in the deep space radiation environment. Investigation into an Software Graphics Processing Unit (sGPU)comprised of commercial-equivalent radiation hardened/tolerant single board computers, field programmable gate arrays, and safety-critical display software shows promising results. Preliminary performance of approximately 30 frames per second (FPS) has been achieved. Use of multi-core processors may provide a significant increase in performance.

  2. Design and implementation of a prototype graphical environment for (IMS/VS) hierarchical data-base application development (HIDAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, T.

    1987-01-01

    In order to alleviate the existing software crisis, data-base application developers require a revolutionary approach for developing their applications. A graphical environment is suggested for this purpose. This dissertation describes and demonstrates a design and implementation of a prototype graphical environment for hierarchy data-base application development (HIDAD). The HIDAD graphical environment is composed of a graphic tool box, a graphic language, a graphic editor, a macro generator, and an application organizer. The graphic tool box contains a set of tools for generating the vocabulary of HIDAD graphic language. The graphic language is designed for representing data base applications. The microcomputer-based graphic editor is used to input and maintain the graphical representation of the system. This can generate intermediate code from graphical specifications. The macro generator uses the intermediate code in the mainframe computer and produces macros in COBOL, IMS, JCL and WYLBUR from primitive templates. The application organizer organizes the above macros from the respective libraries into an executable application program.

  3. Example Applications of A Physically-Based 3D Surface-Subsurface Hydrologic Model Over Multiple Spatial and Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudicky, E. A.; Park, Y. J.; Hwang, H. T.; Berg, S.; Frey, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is now generally accepted within the scientific community that the climate is changing, and that future climate change may have significant impact on water resources in both quantity and quality. Alterations of base flow to rivers due to changing subsurface flow patterns, fluctuations in soil moisture and in the depth of the groundwater table, water levels in lakes and wetlands, and altered groundwater recharge/discharge patterns are examples of possible consequences of future climate change. In this presentation, our physically-based model, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), is first briefly described. It is a physically-based 3D control-volume finite element model representing 2D surface water flow and transport on the land surface together with 3D variably-saturated flow and transport in the subsurface. A globally implicit scheme used to solve the nonlinear surface and subsurface flow and transport equations simultaneously. The model can explicitly account for the hydrologic, solute and thermal interactions between surface and subsurface flow regimes as well as the atmospheric inputs in terms of air temperature, solar radiation and sensible/latent heat fluxes. A parallel computational framework has been implemented to facilitate model applications in high performance computing environments. The applicability of the model is demonstrated for a variety of problems, covering the hill slope scale to improve the understanding of the physical and chemical processes in the water cycle, to the assessment of the impact of climate change on water resources over the Canadian landmass in three dimensions. The climate-driven 3D basin-scale examples range from that of a highly characterized watershed in Southern Ontario having an area of about 7000 km2 to a large basin in Western Canada that covers an area of about 120,000 km2. The continental scale simulations explore the impacts of global climate change on Canada's surface and groundwater resources.

  4. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus: A NASA tool for building and managing graphical user interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1991-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus, developed at GSFC, is an advanced portable user interface development environment which simplifies the process of creating and managing complex application graphical user interfaces (GUI's), supports prototyping, allows applications to be ported easily between different platforms and encourages appropriate levels of user interface consistency between applications. The following topics are discussed: the capabilities of the TAE Plus tool; how the implementation has utilized state-of-the-art technologies within graphic workstations; and how it has been used both within and outside of NASA.

  5. Global 3D-Grids Based on Great Circle Arc QTM Sphere Octree and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Li, Y. H.; Zheng, Y. S.; Liu, J. N.

    2013-10-01

    With the development of computers, network communications, scientific computing, mapping remote sensing and geographic information technologies, Discrete Global Grids (DGGs) and Earth System Spatial Grid(ESSG)have become the integrated spatial data model facing the large-scale and global-scale problems and the complex geo-computation. This paper discusses the property and character of the global spatial data at first. Then it introduces the grid division system based on large arc QTM octree and compares this scheme with degradation octree scheme. At last, it introduces the application of the scheme in land surface, underground and aerial geographic entity modeling. The study suggests that: the grid division system based on large arc QTM octree has the potential to integrate the whole spatial data of different layers of the geospatial. And it will have a broad application prospect in complex large-scale geographic computing.

  6. Automatic "pipeline" analysis of 3-D MRI data for clinical trials: application to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zijdenbos, Alex P; Forghani, Reza; Evans, Alan C

    2002-10-01

    The quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has become increasingly important in both research and clinical studies aiming at human brain development, function, and pathology. Inevitably, the role of quantitative image analysis in the evaluation of drug therapy will increase, driven in part by requirements imposed by regulatory agencies. However, the prohibitive length of time involved and the significant intraand inter-rater variability of the measurements obtained from manual analysis of large MRI databases represent major obstacles to the wider application of quantitative MRI analysis. We have developed a fully automatic "pipeline" image analysis framework and have successfully applied it to a number of large-scale, multicenter studies (more than 1,000 MRI scans). This pipeline system is based on robust image processing algorithms, executed in a parallel, distributed fashion. This paper describes the application of this system to the automatic quantification of multiple sclerosis lesion load in MRI, in the context of a phase III clinical trial. The pipeline results were evaluated through an extensive validation study, revealing that the obtained lesion measurements are statistically indistinguishable from those obtained by trained human observers. Given that intra- and inter-rater measurement variability is eliminated by automatic analysis, this system enhances the ability to detect small treatment effects not readily detectable through conventional analysis techniques. While useful for clinical trial analysis in multiple sclerosis, this system holds widespread potential for applications in other neurological disorders, as well as for the study of neurobiology in general. PMID:12585710

  7. Application of Lidar Data and 3D-City Models in Visual Impact Simulations of Tall Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czynska, K.

    2015-04-01

    The paper examines possibilities and limitations of application of Lidar data and digital 3D-city models to provide specialist urban analyses of tall buildings. The location and height of tall buildings is a subject of discussions, conflicts and controversies in many cities. The most important aspect is the visual influence of tall buildings to the city landscape, significant panoramas and other strategic city views. It is an actual issue in contemporary town planning worldwide. Over 50% of high-rise buildings on Earth were built in last 15 years. Tall buildings may be a threat especially for historically developed cities - typical for Europe. Contemporary Earth observation, more and more available Lidar scanning and 3D city models are a new tool for more accurate urban analysis of the tall buildings impact. The article presents appropriate simulation techniques, general assumption of geometric and computational algorithms - available methodologies and individual methods develop by author. The goal is to develop the geometric computation methods for GIS representation of the visual impact of a selected tall building to the structure of large city. In reference to this, the article introduce a Visual Impact Size method (VIS). Presented analyses were developed by application of airborne Lidar / DSM model and more processed models (like CityGML), containing the geometry and it's semantics. Included simulations were carried out on an example of the agglomeration of Berlin.

  8. Application of liquid crystal polymer films for photolithographic fabrication of 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Anna E.; Fontecchio, Adam K.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a silicon etching application of a holographically formed polymer dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) photomask. H-PDLC is a periodically nanostructured material consisting of stratified layers of polymer and liquid crystal. Due to the natural random alignment of the liquid crystal axes with respect to the polymer layers, an index of refraction mismatch exists and a reflection occurs. Application of bias across the film aligns the liquid crystals and eliminates the index mismatch causing the film to become transparent. H-PDLC films have been shown to sufficiently attenuate the UV exposure dose in the photolithographic process when in the unbiased state, and can be electrically controlled to modulate the amount of UV transmission when electric field is applied. We show etch depth profiles of patterns masked on a silicon substrate using the H-PDLC photomask device compared with etch profiles of similar structures patterned with more conventional ink jet printed photomasks and chrome on quartz glass photomasks. We investigate reactive ion etching technique and potassium hydroxide wet etch technique.

  9. Response of microscale cell/matrix constructs to successive force application in a 3D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical dilation of arteries by pulsatile blood flow is directly opposed by coordinated contraction of a band of smooth muscle tissue that envelops the vessels. This mechanical adaptation of smooth muscle cells to external loading is a critical feature of normal blood vessel function. While most previous studies on biomechanical systems have focused on single cells or large excised tissue, we utilize a device to apply forces to engineered smooth muscle microtissues. This device consists of arrayed pairs of elastomeric micro-cantilevers capable of magnetic actuation. Tissues are formed through self-assembly following the introduction of cell-infused collagen gel to the array. With this system, we are able to dynamically stretch and relax these sub-millimeter sized tissues. The timing and magnitude of the force application can be precisely controlled and thus can be used to mimic a wide range of physiological behavior. In particular, we will discuss results that show that the interval between successive force applications mediates the both the subsequent mechanical and active dynamics of the cell/matrix composite system. Understanding this process will lead to better understanding of the interplay between cell and extracellular matrix responses to mechanical stimulus at a novel length scale.

  10. 3D Polarized Radiative Transfer for Solar System Applications Using the public-domain HYPERION Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Robitaille, T.; Whitney, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a public-domain radiative transfer tool that will allow researchers to examine a wide-range of interesting solar system applications. Hyperion is a new three-dimensional continuum Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is designed to be as general as possible, allowing radiative transfer to be computed through a variety of three-dimensional grids (Robitaille, 2011, Astronomy & Astrophysics 536 A79). The main part of the code is problem-independent, and only requires the user to define the three-dimensional density structure, and the opacity and the illumination properties (as well as a few parameters that control execution and output of the code). Hyperion is written in Fortran 90 and parallelized using the MPI-2 standard. It is bundled with Python libraries that enable very flexible pre- and post-processing options (arbitrary shapes, multiple aerosol components, etc.). These routines are very amenable to user-extensibility. The package is currently distributed at www.hyperion-rt.org. Our presentation will feature 1) a brief overview of the code, including a description of the solar system-specific modifications that we have made beyond the capabilities in the original release; 2) Several solar system applications (i.e., Deep Impact Plume, Martian atmosphere, etc.); 3) discussion of availability and distribution of code components via www.hyperion-rt.org.

  11. Representation of protein 3D structures in spherical (ρ, ϕ, θ) coordinates and two of its potential applications.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Vicente M

    2011-09-01

    Three-dimensional objects can be represented using cartesian, spherical or cylindrical coordinate systems, among many others. Currently all protein 3D structures in the PDB are in cartesian coordinates. We wanted to explore the possibility that protein 3D structures, especially the globular type (spheroproteins), when represented in spherical coordinates might find useful novel applications. A Fortran program was written to transform protein 3D structure files in cartesian coordinates (x,y,z) to spherical coordinates (ρ, ϕ, θ), with the centroid of the protein molecule as origin. We present here two applications, namely, (1) separation of the protein outer layer (OL) from the inner core (IC); and (2) identifying protrusions and invaginations on the protein surface. In the first application, ϕ and θ were partitioned into suitable intervals and the point with maximum ρ in each such 'ϕ-θ bin' was determined. A suitable cutoff value for ρ is adopted, and for each ϕ-θ bin, all points with ρ values less than the cutoff are considered part of the IC, and those with ρ values equal to or greater than the cutoff are considered part of the OL. We show that this separation procedure is successful as it gives rise to an OL that is significantly more enriched in hydrophilic amino acid residues, and an IC that is significantly more enriched in hydrophobic amino acid residues, as expected. In the second application, the point with maximum ρ in each ϕ-θ bin are sequestered and their frequency distribution constructed (i.e., maximum ρ's sorted from lowest to highest, collected into 1.50Å-intervals, and the frequency in each interval plotted). We show in such plots that invaginations on the protein surface give rise to subpeaks or shoulders on the lagging side of the main peak, while protrusions give rise to similar subpeaks or shoulders, but on the leading side of the main peak. We used the dataset of Laskowski et al. (1996) to demonstrate both applications. PMID

  12. Collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum based porous 3D scaffolds immobilized with growth factor for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ragothaman, Murali; Palanisamy, Thanikaivelan; Kalirajan, Cheirmadurai

    2014-12-19

    Here we report the preparation of collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum based hybrid functionalized scaffolds covalently immobilized with platelet derived growth factor - BB for tissue engineering applications. Poly(dialdehyde) guar gum was synthesized from selective oxidation of guar gum using sodium periodate. The synthesized poly(dialdehyde) guar gum not only promotes crosslinking of collagen but also immobilizes the platelet derived growth factor through imine bonds. The covalent crosslinking formed in collagen improves thermal, swelling and biodegradation properties of the hybrid scaffolds. The prepared hybrid scaffolds show 3D interconnected honeycomb porous structure when viewed under a microscope. The release of immobilized platelet derived growth factor was seen up to 13th day of incubation thereby proving its sustained delivery. The developed hybrid scaffold leads to a quantum increase in NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell density and proliferation thereby demonstrating its potential for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25263907

  13. 3D extension of Tensorial Polar Decomposition. Application to (photo-)elasticity tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmorat, Rodrigue; Desmorat, Boris

    2016-06-01

    The orthogonalized harmonic decomposition of symmetric fourth-order tensors (i.e. having major and minor indicial symmetries, such as elasticity tensors) is completed by a representation of harmonic fourth-order tensors H by means of two second-order harmonic (symmetric deviatoric) tensors only. A similar decomposition is obtained for non-symmetric tensors (i.e. having minor indicial symmetry only, such as photo-elasticity tensors or elasto-plasticity tangent operators) introducing a fourth-order major antisymmetric traceless tensor Z. The tensor Z is represented by means of one harmonic second-order tensor and one antisymmetric second-order tensor only. Representations of totally symmetric (rari-constant), symmetric and major antisymmetric fourth-order tensors are simple particular cases of the proposed general representation. Closed-form expressions for tensor decomposition are given in the monoclinic case. Practical applications to elasticity and photo-elasticity monoclinic tensors are finally presented. xml:lang="fr"

  14. Recent Enhancements To The FUN3D Flow Solver For Moving-Mesh Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T,; Thomas, James L.

    2009-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids has been extended to handle general mesh movement involving rigid, deforming, and overset meshes. Mesh deformation is achieved through analogy to elastic media by solving the linear elasticity equations. A general method for specifying the motion of moving bodies within the mesh has been implemented that allows for inherited motion through parent-child relationships, enabling simulations involving multiple moving bodies. Several example calculations are shown to illustrate the range of potential applications. For problems in which an isolated body is rotating with a fixed rate, a noninertial reference-frame formulation is available. An example calculation for a tilt-wing rotor is used to demonstrate that the time-dependent moving grid and noninertial formulations produce the same results in the limit of zero time-step size.

  15. 3D Polymer Weld Seam Characterization Based on Optical Coherence Tomography for Laser Transmission Welding Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Robert; Mallmann, Guilherme; Devrient, Martin; Schmidt, Michael

    Laser transmission welding is an established single-stage plastic joining process, which enables hermetically sealed joints under the workpiece surface. The process requires joining partners with proper degrees of transmission and absorption to the processing wavelength. For reaching a stable process an in-process quality assurance is very valuable. Current monitoring systems have a limited usage, as no quantitative information of the weld itself is obtained without its destruction. In medical and pharmaceutical applications a weld with leakage is e.g. unacceptable. The main objective of this paper is the presentation of the optical coherence tomography as a tool for the quality assurance in laser transmission welding. This approach enables the measurement of any residual gap, weld geometry, internal pores and leaks. The presented results show that this technique allows even the characterization of welds using joining partners with thicknesses of 2 mm or with glass fiber reinforcement levels of 30% per weight.

  16. Biomimetic interconnected porous keratin-fibrin-gelatin 3D sponge for tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Singaravelu, Sivakumar; Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Raja, M D; Nagiah, Naveen; Padmapriya, P; Kaveri, Krishnasamy; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli

    2016-05-01

    The medicated wound dressing material with highly interconnected pores, mimicking the function of the extracellular matrix was fabricated for the promotion of cell growth. In this study, keratin (K), fibrin (F) and gelatin (G) composite scaffold (KFG-SPG) was fabricated by freeze drying technique and the mupirocin (D) drug was successfully incorporated with KFG-SPG (KFG-SPG-D) intended for tissue engineering applications. The fabrication of scaffold was performed without the use of any strong chemical solvents, and the solid sponge scaffold was obtained with well interconnected pores. The porous morphology of the scaffold was confirmed by SEM analysis and exhibited competent mechanical properties. KFG-SPG and KFG-SPG-D possess high level of biocompatibility, cell proliferation and cell adhesion of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cell lines thereby indicating the scaffolds potential as a suitable medicated dressing for wound healing. PMID:26875534

  17. Applicability of 3D Monte Carlo simulations for local values calculations in a PWR core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Franck; Cochet, Bertrand; Jinaphanh, Alexis; Jacquet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    As technical support of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN has been developing the MORET Monte Carlo code for many years in the framework of criticality safety assessment and is now working to extend its application to reactor physics. For that purpose, beside the validation for criticality safety (more than 2000 benchmarks from the ICSBEP Handbook have been modeled and analyzed), a complementary validation phase for reactor physics has been started, with benchmarks from IRPHEP Handbook and others. In particular, to evaluate the applicability of MORET and other Monte Carlo codes for local flux or power density calculations in large power reactors, it has been decided to contribute to the "Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark" (hosted by OECD/NEA). The aim of this benchmark is to monitor, in forthcoming decades, the performance progress of detailed Monte Carlo full core calculations. More precisely, it measures their advancement towards achieving high statistical accuracy in reasonable computation time for local power at fuel pellet level. A full PWR reactor core is modeled to compute local power densities for more than 6 million fuel regions. This paper presents results obtained at IRSN for this benchmark with MORET and comparisons with MCNP. The number of fuel elements is so large that source convergence as well as statistical convergence issues could cause large errors in local tallies, especially in peripheral zones. Various sampling or tracking methods have been implemented in MORET, and their operational effects on such a complex case have been studied. Beyond convergence issues, to compute local values in so many fuel regions could cause prohibitive slowing down of neutron tracking. To avoid this, energy grid unification and tallies preparation before tracking have been implemented, tested and proved to be successful. In this particular case, IRSN obtained promising results with MORET compared to MCNP, in terms of local power densities, standard

  18. Voxelization algorithms for geospatial applications: Computational methods for voxelating spatial datasets of 3D city models containing 3D surface, curve and point data models.

    PubMed

    Nourian, Pirouz; Gonçalves, Romulo; Zlatanova, Sisi; Ohori, Ken Arroyo; Vu Vo, Anh

    2016-01-01

    Voxel representations have been used for years in scientific computation and medical imaging. The main focus of our research is to provide easy access to methods for making large-scale voxel models of built environment for environmental modelling studies while ensuring they are spatially correct, meaning they correctly represent topological and semantic relations among objects. In this article, we present algorithms that generate voxels (volumetric pixels) out of point cloud, curve, or surface objects. The algorithms for voxelization of surfaces and curves are a customization of the topological voxelization approach [1]; we additionally provide an extension of this method for voxelization of point clouds. The developed software has the following advantages:•It provides easy management of connectivity levels in the resulting voxels.•It is not dependant on any external library except for primitive types and constructs; therefore, it is easy to integrate them in any application.•One of the algorithms is implemented in C++ and C for platform independence and efficiency. PMID:27408832

  19. Fabrication of continuous flow microfluidics device with 3D electrode structures for high throughput DEP applications using mechanical machining.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Soheila; Çetin, Barbaros; Oliaei, Samad Nadimi Bavil; Karpat, Yiğit

    2015-07-01

    Microfluidics is the combination of micro/nano fabrication techniques with fluid flow at microscale to pursue powerful techniques in controlling and manipulating chemical and biological processes. Sorting and separation of bio-particles are highly considered in diagnostics and biological analyses. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has offered unique advantages for microfluidic devices. In DEP devices, asymmetric pair of planar electrodes could be employed to generate non-uniform electric fields. In DEP applications, facing 3D sidewall electrodes is considered to be one of the key solutions to increase device throughput due to the generated homogeneous electric fields along the height of microchannels. Despite the advantages, fabrication of 3D vertical electrodes requires a considerable challenge. In this study, two alternative fabrication techniques have been proposed for the fabrication of a microfluidic device with 3D sidewall electrodes. In the first method, both the mold and the electrodes are fabricated using high precision machining. In the second method, the mold with tilted sidewalls is fabricated using high precision machining and the electrodes are deposited on the sidewall using sputtering together with a shadow mask fabricated by electric discharge machining. Both fabrication processes are assessed as highly repeatable and robust. Moreover, the two methods are found to be complementary with respect to the channel height. Only the manipulation of particles with negative-DEP is demonstrated in the experiments, and the throughput values up to 105 particles / min is reached in a continuous flow. The experimental results are compared with the simulation results and the limitations on the fabrication techniques are also discussed. PMID:25808433

  20. A Computationally-Efficient Kinetic Approach for Gas/Particle Mass Transfer Treatments: Development, Testing, and 3-D Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast/Chemistry Model (WRF/Chem) that simulates chemistry simultaneously with meteorology has recently been developed for real-time forecasting by the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). As one of the six air quality models, WRF/Chem with a modal aerosol module has been applied for ozone and PM2.5 ensemble forecasts over eastern North America as part of the 2004 New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS) program (NEAQS-2004). Significant differences exist in the partitioning of volatile species (e.g., ammonium and nitrate) simulated by the six models. Model biases are partially attributed to the equilibrium assumption used in the gas/particles mass transfer approach in some models. Development of a more accurate, yet computationally- efficient gas/particle mass transfer approach for three-dimensional (3-D) applications, in particular, real-time forecasting, is therefore warranted. Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution (MADRID) has been implemented into WRF/Chem (referred to as WRF/Chem-MADRID). WRF/Chem-MADRID offers three gas/particle partitioning treatments: equilibrium, kinetic, and hybrid approaches. The equilibrium approach is computationally-efficient and commonly used in 3-D air quality models but less accurate under certain conditions (e.g., in the presence of coarse, reactive particles such as PM containing sea-salts in the coastal areas). The kinetic approach is accurate but computationally-expensive, limiting its 3-D applications. The hybrid approach attempts to provide a compromise between merits and drawbacks of the two approaches by treating fine PM (typically < ~ 1 μm) with the equilibrium approach and coarse PM with the kinetic approach. A computationally-efficient kinetic gas/particle mass transfer approach in MADRID has recently been developed for 3-D applications based on an Analytical Predictor of Condensation (referred

  1. 3D-CANVENT: An interactive mine ventilation simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hardcastle, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    3D-CANVENT is a software package that integrates advanced computer aided design (ACAD) true 3D graphics with a mine ventilation simulator. The package runs as a Windows{trademark} application to access its printer drivers environment and does not need third party CAD software. It is composed of two primary modules: DMVENT and MINEDESIGNER. DMVENT is a traditional Fortran coded Hardy-Cross iterative ventilation network solver written in 1980 with thermodynamic capabilities. This module is relatively unchanged with the traditional data input options for branch type, specified or calculated resistances, fixed flows, and fixed or variable pressure fans. MINEDESIGNER is the graphics engine that optimizes the ventilation design process. It performs the front-end transformation of input data entered in the graphical interface into the correct format for the solver. At the back-end it reconverts the historically standard tabular data output from the solver into an easily viewed graphical format. ACAD features of MINEDESIGNER are used to generate a 3D wire-frame node and branch network of the mine`s ventilation system. The network can be displayed in up to 4 views orientated to XYZ planes or a 3D view. AU the views have zoom, pan, slice and rotate options. The graphical interface efficiently permits data entry and editing via a mouse with pick-and-point item selection. Branches can be found or added with {open_quotes}search{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}join{close_quotes} options. Visual interpretation is enhanced by the 16 colour options for branches and numerous graphical attributes. Network locations are readily identified by alpha-numeric names for branches, junctions and fans, and also the logical numbering of junctions. The program is also readily expandable for pollutant simulation and control/monitoring applications.

  2. Large-scale fabrication, 3D tomography, and lithium-ion battery application of porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Ge, Mingyuan; Lu, Yunhao; Ercius, Peter; Rong, Jiepeng; Fang, Xin; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-01-01

    Recently, silicon-based lithium-ion battery anodes have shown encouraging results, as they can offer high capacities and long cyclic lifetimes. The applications of this technology are largely impeded by the complicated and expensive approaches in producing Si with desired nanostructures. We report a cost-efficient method to produce nanoporous Si particles from metallurgical Si through ball-milling and inexpensive stain-etching. The porosity of porous Si is derived from particle's three-dimensional reconstructions by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography, which shows the particles' highly porous structure when etched under proper conditions. Nanoporous Si anodes with a reversible capacity of 2900 mAh/g was attained at a charging rate of 400 mA/g, and a stable capacity above 1100 mAh/g was retained for extended 600 cycles tested at 2000 mA/g. The synthetic route is low-cost and scalable for mass production, promising Si as a potential anode material for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries with enhanced capacity and energy density. PMID:24279924

  3. A statistical measure of tissue heterogeneity with application to 3D PET sarcoma data.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Roy, Supratik; Eary, Janet

    2003-07-01

    In vivo measurement of local tissue characteristics by modern bioimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) provides the opportunity to analyze quantitatively the role that tissue heterogeneity may play in understanding biological function. This paper develops a statistical measure of the heterogeneity of a tissue characteristic that is based on the deviation of the distribution of the tissue characteristic from a unimodal elliptically contoured spatial pattern. An efficient algorithm is developed for computation of the measure based on volumetric region of interest data. The technique is illustrated by application to data from PET imaging studies of fluorodeoxyglucose utilization in human sarcomas. A set of 74 sarcoma patients (with five-year follow-up survival information) were evaluated for heterogeneity as well as a number of other potential prognostic indicators of survival. A Cox proportional hazards analysis of these data shows that the degree of heterogeneity of the sarcoma is the major risk factor associated with patient death. Some theory is developed to analyze the asymptotic statistical behavior of the heterogeneity estimator. In the context of data arising from Poisson deconvolution (PET being the prime example), the heterogeneity estimator, which is a non-linear functional of the PET image data, is consistent and converges at a rate that is parametric in the injected dose. PMID:12925510

  4. Illustrative visualization of 3D city models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doellner, Juergen; Buchholz, Henrik; Nienhaus, Marc; Kirsch, Florian

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents an illustrative visualization technique that provides expressive representations of large-scale 3D city models, inspired by the tradition of artistic and cartographic visualizations typically found in bird"s-eye view and panoramic maps. We define a collection of city model components and a real-time multi-pass rendering algorithm that achieves comprehensible, abstract 3D city model depictions based on edge enhancement, color-based and shadow-based depth cues, and procedural facade texturing. Illustrative visualization provides an effective visual interface to urban spatial information and associated thematic information complementing visual interfaces based on the Virtual Reality paradigm, offering a huge potential for graphics design. Primary application areas include city and landscape planning, cartoon worlds in computer games, and tourist information systems.

  5. TAE Plus: Transportable Applications Environment Plus tools for building graphic-oriented applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1989-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Environment Plus (TAE Plus), developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is a portable User Interface Management System (UIMS), which provides an intuitive WYSIWYG WorkBench for prototyping and designing an application's user interface, integrated with tools for efficiently implementing the designed user interface and effective management of the user interface during an application's active domain. During the development of TAE Plus, many design and implementation decisions were based on the state-of-the-art within graphics workstations, windowing system and object-oriented programming languages. Some of the problems and issues experienced during implementation are discussed. A description of the next development steps planned for TAE Plus is also given.

  6. X based interactive computer graphics applications for aerodynamic design and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Higgs, C. Fred, III

    1995-01-01

    Six computer applications packages have been developed to solve a variety of aerodynamic problems in an interactive environment on a single workstation. The packages perform classical one dimensional analysis under the control of a graphical user interface and can be used for preliminary design or educational purposes. The programs were originally developed on a Silicon Graphics workstation and used the GL version of the FORMS library as the graphical user interface. These programs have recently been converted to the XFORMS library of X based graphics widgets and have been tested on SGI, IBM, Sun, HP and PC-Lunix computers. The paper will show results from the new VU-DUCT program as a prime example. VU-DUCT has been developed as an educational package for the study of subsonic open and closed loop wind tunnels.

  7. 3D Visualization Types in Multimedia Applications for Science Learning: A Case Study for 8th Grade Students in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korakakis, G.; Pavlatou, E. A.; Palyvos, J. A.; Spyrellis, N.

    2009-01-01

    This research aims to determine whether the use of specific types of visualization (3D illustration, 3D animation, and interactive 3D animation) combined with narration and text, contributes to the learning process of 13- and 14- years-old students in science courses. The study was carried out with 212 8th grade students in Greece. This…

  8. Innovative three-dimensional (3D) eco-TiO2 photocatalysts for practical environmental and bio-medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Lee, Young-Chul; Son, Byoungchul; Park, So Young; Lee, Jae Won; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Yooseok; Choi, Saehae; Lee, Young-Seak; Lee, Jouhahn

    2014-10-01

    It is known that water purified by conventional TiO2 photocatalysts may not be safe enough for drinking, due to the toxicity by tiny existence of TiO2 nanoparticles after water treatment. We herein demonstrate a facile design of a three-dimensional (3D) TiO2 photocatalyst structure with which both the efficiency of purification and the safety level of the final purified water can be improved and ensured, respectively. The structure, consisting of 3D sulfur-doped TiO2 microtubes in nanotubes (eco-TiO2), is suitable for both environmental and bio-medical applications. Investigation of its formation mechanism reveals that anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), owing to a spatial constraint, causes a simple, nanoparticles-to-nanotubes structural rearrangement as a template for nanotube growth. It is found that eco-TiO2 can be activated under visible-light irradiation by non-metal (sulfur; S) doping, after which it shows visible-light photocatalytic activities over a range of solar energy. Importantly, an in vitro cytotoxicity test of well-purified water by eco-TiO2 confirms that eco-TiO2 satisfies the key human safety conditions.

  9. Tri-color composite volume H-PDLC grating and its application to 3D color autostereoscopic display.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangni; Zheng, Jihong; Gao, Hui; Lu, Feiyue; Sun, Lijia; Yin, Stuart; Zhuang, Songlin

    2015-11-30

    A tri-color composite volume holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) grating and its application to 3-dimensional (3D) color autostereoscopic display are reported in this paper. The composite volume H-PDLC grating consists of three different period volume H-PDLC sub-gratings. The longer period diffracts red light, the medium period diffracts the green light, and the shorter period diffracts the blue light. To record three different period gratings simultaneously, two photoinitiators are employed. The first initiator consists of methylene blue and p-toluenesulfonic acid and the second initiator is composed of Rose Bengal and N-phenyglycine. In this case, the holographic recording medium is sensitive to entire visible wavelengths, including red, green, and blue so that the tri-color composite grating can be written simultaneously by harnessing three different color laser beams. In the experiment, the red beam comes from a He-Ne laser with an output wavelength of 632.8 nm, the green beam comes from a Verdi solid state laser with an output wavelength of 532 nm, and the blue beam comes from a He-Cd laser with an output wavelength of 441.6 nm. The experimental results show that diffraction efficiencies corresponding to red, green, and blue colors are 57%, 75% and 33%, respectively. Although this diffraction efficiency is not perfect, it is high enough to demonstrate the effect of 3D color autostereoscopic display. PMID:26698768

  10. A thermo-responsive and photo-polymerizable chondroitin sulfate-based hydrogel for 3D printing applications.

    PubMed

    Abbadessa, A; Blokzijl, M M; Mouser, V H M; Marica, P; Malda, J; Hennink, W E; Vermonden, T

    2016-09-20

    The aim of this study was to design a hydrogel system based on methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA) and a thermo-sensitive poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide-mono/dilactate)-polyethylene glycol triblock copolymer (M15P10) as a suitable material for additive manufacturing of scaffolds. CSMA was synthesized by reaction of chondroitin sulfate with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) in dimethylsulfoxide at 50°C and its degree of methacrylation was tunable up to 48.5%, by changing reaction time and GMA feed. Unlike polymer solutions composed of CSMA alone (20% w/w), mixtures based on 2% w/w of CSMA and 18% of M15P10 showed strain-softening, thermo-sensitive and shear-thinning properties more pronounced than those found for polymer solutions based on M15P10 alone. Additionally, they displayed a yield stress of 19.2±7.0Pa. The 3D printing of this hydrogel resulted in the generation of constructs with tailorable porosity and good handling properties. Finally, embedded chondrogenic cells remained viable and proliferating over a culture period of 6days. The hydrogel described herein represents a promising biomaterial for cartilage 3D printing applications. PMID:27261741

  11. Innovative three-dimensional (3D) eco-TiO2 photocatalysts for practical environmental and bio-medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Lee, Young-Chul; Son, Byoungchul; Park, So Young; Lee, Jae Won; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Yooseok; Choi, Saehae; Lee, Young-Seak; Lee, Jouhahn

    2014-01-01

    It is known that water purified by conventional TiO2 photocatalysts may not be safe enough for drinking, due to the toxicity by tiny existence of TiO2 nanoparticles after water treatment. We herein demonstrate a facile design of a three-dimensional (3D) TiO2 photocatalyst structure with which both the efficiency of purification and the safety level of the final purified water can be improved and ensured, respectively. The structure, consisting of 3D sulfur-doped TiO2 microtubes in nanotubes (eco-TiO2), is suitable for both environmental and bio-medical applications. Investigation of its formation mechanism reveals that anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), owing to a spatial constraint, causes a simple, nanoparticles-to-nanotubes structural rearrangement as a template for nanotube growth. It is found that eco-TiO2 can be activated under visible-light irradiation by non-metal (sulfur; S) doping, after which it shows visible-light photocatalytic activities over a range of solar energy. Importantly, an in vitro cytotoxicity test of well-purified water by eco-TiO2 confirms that eco-TiO2 satisfies the key human safety conditions. PMID:25338845

  12. Innovative three-dimensional (3D) eco-TiO₂ photocatalysts for practical environmental and bio-medical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Lee, Young-Chul; Son, Byoungchul; Park, So Young; Lee, Jae Won; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Yooseok; Choi, Saehae; Lee, Young-Seak; Lee, Jouhahn

    2014-01-01

    It is known that water purified by conventional TiO2 photocatalysts may not be safe enough for drinking, due to the toxicity by tiny existence of TiO2 nanoparticles after water treatment. We herein demonstrate a facile design of a three-dimensional (3D) TiO2 photocatalyst structure with which both the efficiency of purification and the safety level of the final purified water can be improved and ensured, respectively. The structure, consisting of 3D sulfur-doped TiO2 microtubes in nanotubes (eco-TiO2), is suitable for both environmental and bio-medical applications. Investigation of its formation mechanism reveals that anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), owing to a spatial constraint, causes a simple, nanoparticles-to-nanotubes structural rearrangement as a template for nanotube growth. It is found that eco-TiO2 can be activated under visible-light irradiation by non-metal (sulfur; S) doping, after which it shows visible-light photocatalytic activities over a range of solar energy. Importantly, an in vitro cytotoxicity test of well-purified water by eco-TiO2 confirms that eco-TiO2 satisfies the key human safety conditions. PMID:25338845

  13. Development of patterned carbon nanotubes on a 3D polymer substrate for the flexible tactile sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chih-Fan; Su, Wang-Shen; Fang, Weileun

    2011-11-01

    This study reports an improved approach to implement a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based flexible tactile sensor, which is integrated with a flexible print circuit (FPC) connector and is capable of detecting normal and shear forces. The merits of the presented tactile sensor by the integration process are as follows: (1) 3D polymer tactile bump structures are naturally formed by the use of an anisotropically etched silicon mold; (2) planar and 3D distributed CNTs are adopted as piezoresistive sensing elements to enable the detection of shear and normal forces; (3) the processes of patterning CNTs and metal routing can be easily batch fabricated on rigid silicon instead of flexible polymer; (4) robust electrical routing is realized using parylene encapsulation to avoid delamination; (5) patterned CNTs, electrical routing and FPC connector are integrated and transferred to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate by a molding process. In application, the CNT-based flexible tactile sensor and its integration with the FPC connector are implemented. Preliminary tests show the feasibility of detecting both normal and shear forces using the presented flexible sensor.

  14. 3D surface measurement for medical application--technical comparison of two established industrial surface scanning systems.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K; Haberstok, J; Kovacs, L; Boerner, B I; Schwenzer, N; Juergens, P; Zeihofer, H F; Holberg, C

    2008-02-01

    In 3D mapping of flexible surfaces (e.g. human faces) measurement errors due to movement or positioning occur. Aggravated by equipment- or researcher-caused mistakes considerable deviations can result. Therefore first the appliances' precision handling and reliability in clinical environment must be established. Aim of this study was to investigate accuracy and precision of two contact-free 3D measurement systems (white light vs. laser). Standard specimens of known diameter for sphere deviation, touch deviation and plane deviation were tested. Both systems are appropriate for medical application acquiring solid data (

  15. Met.3D - a new open-source tool for interactive 3D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Kern, Michael; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    We introduce Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output -- 3D visualisation, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3D context. It implements methods that address the issue of spatial perception in the 3D view as well as approaches to using the ensemble in order to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to the Met.3D approach. The tool uses modern graphics hardware technology to achieve interactive visualization of present-day numerical weather prediction datasets on standard consumer hardware. Met.3D supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and operates directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the software --illustrated with short video examples--, and give information on its availability.

  16. 3-D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts - Part 1: The visualization tool Met.3D (version 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Kern, M.; Schäfler, A.; Westermann, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3-D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output - 3-D visualization, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2-D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3-D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3-D context. We address the issue of spatial perception in the 3-D view and present approaches to using the ensemble to allow the user to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to our approach. Met.3D uses modern graphics technology to achieve interactive visualization on standard consumer hardware. The tool supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and can operate directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. We describe the employed visualization algorithms, and analyse the impact of the ECMWF grid topology on computing 3-D ensemble statistical quantitites. Our techniques are demonstrated with examples from the T-NAWDEX-Falcon 2012 campaign.

  17. Some research advances in computer graphics that will enhance applications to engineering design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, J. J., III

    1975-01-01

    Research in man/machine interactions and graphics hardware/software that will enhance applications to engineering design was described. Research aspects of executive systems, command languages, and networking used in the computer applications laboratory are mentioned. Finally, a few areas where little or no research is being done were identified.

  18. Design and application of real-time visual attention model for the exploration of 3D virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Sébastien; Lécuyer, Anatole; Regia-Corte, Tony; Cozot, Rémi; Royan, Jérôme; Breton, Gaspard

    2012-03-01

    This paper studies the design and application of a novel visual attention model designed to compute user's gaze position automatically, i.e., without using a gaze-tracking system. The model we propose is specifically designed for real-time first-person exploration of 3D virtual environments. It is the first model adapted to this context which can compute in real time a continuous gaze point position instead of a set of 3D objects potentially observed by the user. To do so, contrary to previous models which use a mesh-based representation of visual objects, we introduce a representation based on surface-elements. Our model also simulates visual reflexes and the cognitive processes which take place in the brain such as the gaze behavior associated to first-person navigation in the virtual environment. Our visual attention model combines both bottom-up and top-down components to compute a continuous gaze point position on screen that hopefully matches the user's one. We conducted an experiment to study and compare the performance of our method with a state-of-the-art approach. Our results are found significantly better with sometimes more than 100 percent of accuracy gained. This suggests that computing a gaze point in a 3D virtual environment in real time is possible and is a valid approach, compared to object-based approaches. Finally, we expose different applications of our model when exploring virtual environments. We present different algorithms which can improve or adapt the visual feedback of virtual environments based on gaze information. We first propose a level-of-detail approach that heavily relies on multiple-texture sampling. We show that it is possible to use the gaze information of our visual attention model to increase visual quality where the user is looking, while maintaining a high-refresh rate. Second, we introduce the use of the visual attention model in three visual effects inspired by the human visual system namely: depth-of-field blur, camera

  19. Nonlinear rheology in ASPECT: benchmarking and an application to 3D subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Fraters, Menno; Spakman, Wim

    2014-05-01

    ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion) is a promising new code designed for modelling thermal convection in the mantle (Kronbichler et al. 2012). The massively parallel code uses state-of-the-art numerical methods, such as high performance solvers and adaptive mesh refinement. It builds on tried-and-well-tested libraries and works with plug-ins allowing easy extension to fine-tune it to the user's specific needs. We extended the code by implementing a frictional plasticity criterion that can be combined with a viscous creep rheology, allowing for thermo-mechanically coupled visco-plastic flow. This way we can accommodate for the nonlinear behavior of the Earth's materials and incorporate for instance the localization of deformation through plastic yielding. This has been shown to be of great importance for modelling lithosphere deformation. Three well-known benchmarks are used to test and validate our implementation of plasticity: the punch benchmark (e.g. Thieulot et al. 2008), which considers the indentation of a perfectly plastic material and allows for comparison with an analytical solution; the brick benchmark (Kaus 2010), performed in both a compressional and tensional regime with shear band angles bounded by results of other codes and theory; and the sandbox experiment by Buiter et al. (2006) modelling the time evolution of the extension of viscous and plastic layers in the presence of a free surface. We further showcase ASPECT's capabilities with a more geodynamical application: the subduction of an oceanic plate in a three-dimensional thermo-mechanically coupled system. We compare the use of nonlinear rheologies versus that of constant mantle and plate viscosities with an adaptation of the subducting/overriding plate setup of Schellart and Moresi (2013). These models also demonstrate how the adaptive mesh refinement allows for high resolutions locally while the code remains computationally efficient even in the presence of large

  20. A new method of constructing a grid in the space of 3D rotations and its applications to texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşca, D.; Morawiec, A.; De Graef, M.

    2014-10-01

    In computational work, data sets must often be represented on the surface of a sphere or inside a ball, requiring uniform grids. We construct a new volume-preserving projection between a cube and the set of unit quaternions. The projection consists of two steps: an equal-volume mapping from the cube to the unit ball, followed by an inverse generalized Lambert projection to either of the two unit quaternion hemispheres. The new projection provides a one-to-one mapping between a grid in the cube and elements of the special orthogonal group SO(3), i.e., 3D rotations. We provide connections to other rotation representation schemes, including the Rodrigues-Frank vector and the homochoric parameterizations, and illustrate the new mapping through example applications relevant to texture analysis.

  1. Self-imaging effect in photonic quasicrystal waveguides: Application to 3 dB power splitter for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feixiang; Zou, Qiushun; Zhou, Quancheng; Wang, Tongbiao; Yu, Tianbao; Liu, Nianhua

    2016-05-01

    We report that self-imaging effect still can be achieved in photonic quasicrystal waveguides (PtQCWs) just as it does in photonic crystal waveguides. As a possible application of the results, a new kind of compact 3 dB PtQCWs-based power splitters based on this effect for terahertz waves with symmetric interference is presented and analyzed. The finite element method is used to calculate the distributions of stable-state electric field and evaluate transmission efficiency of these structures. The calculated results show that the proposed device provides a new compact model for exporting efficiently THz wave with a broad bandwidth to two channels averagely and can be extended to new designs of PtQCW devices.

  2. Heat- and pH-induced BSA conformational changes, hydrogel formation and application as 3D cell scaffold.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Giovanna; Peres, Chiara; Contardi, Marco; Picone, Pasquale; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Di Carlo, Marta; Giacomazza, Daniela; Militello, Valeria

    2016-09-15

    Aggregation and gelation of globular proteins can be an advantage to generate new forms of nanoscale biomaterials based on the fibrillar architecture. Here, we report results obtained by exploiting the proteins' natural tendency to self-organize in 3D network, for the production of new material based on BSA for medical application. In particular, at five different pH values the conformational and structural changes of the BSA during all the steps of the thermal aggregation and gelation have been analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. The macroscopic mechanical properties of these hydrogels have been obtained by rheological measurements. The microscopic structure of the gels have been studied by AFM and SEM images to have a picture of their different spatial arrangement. Finally, the use of the BSA hydrogels as scaffold has been tested in two different cell cultures. PMID:27480606

  3. 3D optical see-through head-mounted display based augmented reality system and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenliang; Weng, Dongdong; Liu, Yue; Xiang, Li

    2015-07-01

    The combination of health and entertainment becomes possible due to the development of wearable augmented reality equipment and corresponding application software. In this paper, we implemented a fast calibration extended from SPAAM for an optical see-through head-mounted display (OSTHMD) which was made in our lab. During the calibration, the tracking and recognition techniques upon natural targets were used, and the spatial corresponding points had been set in dispersed and well-distributed positions. We evaluated the precision of this calibration, in which the view angle ranged from 0 degree to 70 degrees. Relying on the results above, we calculated the position of human eyes relative to the world coordinate system and rendered 3D objects in real time with arbitrary complexity on OSTHMD, which accurately matched the real world. Finally, we gave the degree of satisfaction about our device in the combination of entertainment and prevention of cervical vertebra diseases through user feedbacks.

  4. Applications of Non-destructive methods (GPR and 3D Laser Scanner) in Historic Masonry Arch Bridge Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alani, Amir; Banks, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    There exist approximately 70,000 masonry arch bridge spans (brick and stone) in the UK with tens of thousands more throughout Europe. A significant number of these bridges are still in operation and form part of the road and rail network systems in many countries. A great majority of these bridges are in desperate need of repair and maintenance. Applications of non-destructive testing methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR), 3D laser scanning, accelerometer sensors and vibration detecting sensors amongst many others have been used to assess and monitor such structures in the past few years. This presentation provides results of the applications of a 2GHz GPR antenna system and a 3D laser scanner on a historic masonry arch bridge (the Old Bridge, Aylesford) located in Kent, in the south east of England. The older part of the bridge (the mid-span) is 860 years old. The bridge was the subject of a major alteration in 1811. This presentation forms part of a larger ongoing study which is using the two above mentioned non-destructive methods for long-term monitoring of the bridge. The adopted survey planning strategy and technique, data acquisition and processing as well as challenges encountered during actual survey and fieldworks have been discussed in this presentation. As a result of this study the position of different layers of the deck structure has been established with the identification of the original stone base of the bridge. This information in addition to the location of a number of structural ties (anchors - remedial work carried out previously) in the absence of reliable and accurate design details proved to be extremely useful for the modelling of the bridge using the finite element method. Results of the 3D laser scanning of the bridge have also been presented which have provided invaluable data essential for the accurate modelling of the bridge as well as the long term monitoring of the bridge. 2014 EGU-GA GI3.1 Session, organised by COST Action

  5. Evaluating Mobile Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for Real-Time Resource Constrained Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meredith, J; Conger, J; Liu, Y; Johnson, J

    2005-11-11

    Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) can provide tremendous performance boosts for some applications beyond what a single CPU can accomplish, and their performance is growing at a rate faster than CPUs as well. Mobile GPUs available for laptops have the small form factor and low power requirements suitable for use in embedded processing. We evaluated several desktop and mobile GPUs and CPUs on traditional and non-traditional graphics tasks, as well as on the most time consuming pieces of a full hyperspectral imaging application. Accuracy remained high despite small differences in arithmetic operations like rounding. Performance improvements are summarized here relative to a desktop Pentium 4 CPU.

  6. Dosimetry in radiotherapy using a-Si EPIDs: Systems, methods, and applications focusing on 3D patient dose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2013-06-01

    An overview is provided of the use of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetric purposes in radiation therapy, focusing on 3D patient dose estimation. EPIDs were originally developed to provide on-treatment radiological imaging to assist with patient setup, but there has also been a natural interest in using them as dosimeters since they use the megavoltage therapy beam to form images. The current generation of clinically available EPID technology, amorphous-silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers, possess many characteristics that make them much better suited to dosimetric applications than earlier EPID technologies. Features such as linearity with dose/dose rate, high spatial resolution, realtime capability, minimal optical glare, and digital operation combine with the convenience of a compact, retractable detector system directly mounted on the linear accelerator to provide a system that is well-suited to dosimetric applications. This review will discuss clinically available a-Si EPID systems, highlighting dosimetric characteristics and remaining limitations. Methods for using EPIDs in dosimetry applications will be discussed. Dosimetric applications using a-Si EPIDs to estimate three-dimensional dose in the patient during treatment will be overviewed. Clinics throughout the world are implementing increasingly complex treatments such as dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, as well as specialized treatment techniques using large doses per fraction and short treatment courses (ie. hypofractionation and stereotactic radiosurgery). These factors drive the continued strong interest in using EPIDs as dosimeters for patient treatment verification.

  7. Embedded memory compression for video and graphics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Andy; Gokce, Dane; Aleksic, Mickey; Reznik, Yuriy A.

    2010-08-01

    We describe design of a low-complexity lossless and near-lossless image compression system with random access, suitable for embedded memory compression applications. This system employs a block-based DPCM coder using variable-length encoding for the residual. As part of this design, we propose to use non-prefix (one-to-one) codes for coding of residuals, and show that they offer improvements in compression performance compared to conventional techniques, such as Golomb-Rice and Huffman codes.

  8. The Application of GIS 3D Modeling and Analysis Technology in Real Estate Mass Appraisal - Taking landscape and sunlight factors as the example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Li, Y.; Liu, B.; Liu, C.

    2014-04-01

    Based on procedural modeling approach and buildings 2D GIS data of Shenzhen, 3D external models of buildings are generated by CityEngine in a quick and batch mode. And 3D internal model is generated by vectorization of houses distribution within the target building. Following that, the landscape analysis and the sunlight analysis based on GIS visibility analysis method are applied on 3D model of the target building to get the concrete quantization indexes, such as landscape visual range and sunshine duration which could significantly influence real estate value. Finally, the drawing with 3D visualization effect for landscape information and sunshine information is produced. Compared with traditional manual modeling method, the results showed that rule-based 3D modeling method in CityEngine platform could take full advantage of existing GIS data. It could improve the efficiency of 3D modeling by rapidly and automatically generate refined building 3D models in batch mode. Meanwhile, compared with man-made subjective judgment, the building landscape and sunlight analysis model built by visibility analysis could quantify landscape and sunshine indexes more accurately. Furthermore, the application in real estate mass appraisal model for calculation and analysis will reduce the index errors caused by man-made subjective judgment. In addition, precise 3D visualization effect can provide appraisers with more intuitive and efficient view for real estate expression. It greatly improves the efficiency and accuracy in real estate appraisal.

  9. Application of combined EBSD and 3D-SEM technique on crystallographic facet analysis of steel at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, P; Solberg, J K; Karlsen, M; Akselsen, O M; Ostby, E

    2013-07-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction has been increasingly used to identify the crystallographic planes and orientation of cleavage facets with respect to the rolling direction in fracture surfaces. The crystallographic indices of cleavage planes can be determined either directly from the fracture surface or indirectly from metallographic sections perpendicular to the plane of the fracture surface. A combination of electron backscatter diffraction and 3D scanning electron microscopy imaging technique has been modified to determine crystallographic facet orientations. The main purpose of this work has been to identify the macroscopic crystallographic orientations of cleavage facets in the fracture surfaces of weld heat affected zones in a well-known steel fractured at low temperatures. The material used for the work was an American Petroleum Institute (API) X80 grade steel developed for applications at low temperatures, and typical heat affected zone microstructures were obtained by carrying out weld thermal simulation. The fracture toughness was measured at different temperatures (0°C, -30°C, -60°C and -90°C) by using Crack Tip Opening Displacement testing. Fracture surfaces and changes in microstructure were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. Crystallographic orientations were identified by electron backscatter diffraction, indirectly from a polished section perpendicular to the major fracture surface of the samples. Computer assisted 3D imaging was used to measure the angles between the cleavage facets and the adjacent polished surface, and then these angles were combined with electron backscatter diffraction measurements to determine the macroscopic crystallographic planes of the facets. The crystallographic indices of the macroscopic cleavage facet planes were identified to be {100}, {110}, {211} and {310} at all temperatures. PMID:23692572

  10. LiveView3D: Real Time Data Visualization for the Aerospace Testing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses LiveView3D, a software package and associated data visualization system for use in the aerospace testing environment. The LiveView3D system allows researchers to graphically view data from numerous wind tunnel instruments in real time in an interactive virtual environment. The graphical nature of the LiveView3D display provides researchers with an intuitive view of the measurement data, making it easier to interpret the aerodynamic phenomenon under investigation. LiveView3D has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center and has been applied in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). This paper discusses the capabilities of the LiveView3D system, provides example results from its application in the UPWT, and outlines features planned for future implementation.

  11. A 3D Geostatistical Mapping Tool

    1999-02-09

    This software provides accurate 3D reservoir modeling tools and high quality 3D graphics for PC platforms enabling engineers and geologists to better comprehend reservoirs and consequently improve their decisions. The mapping algorithms are fractals, kriging, sequential guassian simulation, and three nearest neighbor methods.

  12. APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTER GRAPHICS TO INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS OF ENERGY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the first two years of research designed to demonstrate applications of computer graphics to environmental analyses associated with the evaluation of impacts from development of conventional energy systems. The work emphasizes the use of storage-tube comput...

  13. A graphical method to size submersible pumps for variable speed application

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.C.; Autrey, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    A graphical method is presented to size submersible pumps for variable speed motor controller application. This will optimize the selection of a pump of broad operating range for a given well inflow performance. The method was used to successfully design a number of submersible pump installations in the Gulf Coast Region. Two field examples are presented.

  14. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  15. Analysis of the energy distribution of interface traps related to tunnel oxide degradation using charge pumping techniques for 3D NAND flash applications

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The degradation tendency extracted by CP technique was almost the same in both the bulk-type and TFT-type cells. - Highlights: • D{sub it} is directly investigated from bulk-type and TFT-type CTF memory. • Charge pumping technique was employed to analyze the D{sub it} information. • To apply the CP technique to monitor the reliability of the 3D NAND flash. - Abstract: The energy distribution and density of interface traps (D{sub it}) are directly investigated from bulk-type and thin-film transistor (TFT)-type charge trap flash memory cells with tunnel oxide degradation, under program/erase (P/E) cycling using a charge pumping (CP) technique, in view of application in a 3-demension stackable NAND flash memory cell. After P/E cycling in bulk-type devices, the interface trap density gradually increased from 1.55 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} to 3.66 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} due to tunnel oxide damage, which was consistent with the subthreshold swing and transconductance degradation after P/E cycling. Its distribution moved toward shallow energy levels with increasing cycling numbers, which coincided with the decay rate degradation with short-term retention time. The tendency extracted with the CP technique for D{sub it} of the TFT-type cells was similar to those of bulk-type cells.

  16. Adjoint Monte Carlo method for prostate external photon beam treatment planning: an application to 3D patient anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Brian; Goldstein, Moshe; Xu, X. George; Sahoo, Narayan

    2005-03-01

    Recently, the theoretical framework of the adjoint Monte Carlo (AMC) method has been developed using a simplified patient geometry. In this study, we extended our previous work by applying the AMC framework to a 3D anatomical model called VIP-Man constructed from the Visible Human images. First, the adjoint fluxes for the prostate (PTV) and rectum and bladder (organs at risk (OARs)) were calculated on a spherical surface of 1 m radius, centred at the centre of gravity of PTV. An importance ratio, defined as the PTV dose divided by the weighted OAR doses, was calculated for each of the available beamlets to select the beam angles. Finally, the detailed doses in PTV and OAR were calculated using a forward Monte Carlo simulation to include the electron transport. The dose information was then used to generate dose volume histograms (DVHs). The Pinnacle treatment planning system was also used to generate DVHs for the 3D plans with beam angles obtained from the AMC (3D-AMC) and a standard six-field conformal radiation therapy plan (3D-CRT). Results show that the DVHs for prostate from 3D-AMC and the standard 3D-CRT are very similar, showing that both methods can deliver prescribed dose to the PTV. A substantial improvement in the DVHs for bladder and rectum was found for the 3D-AMC method in comparison to those obtained from 3D-CRT. However, the 3D-AMC plan is less conformal than the 3D-CRT plan because only bladder, rectum and PTV are considered for calculating the importance ratios. Nevertheless, this study clearly demonstrated the feasibility of the AMC in selecting the beam directions as a part of a treatment planning based on the anatomical information in a 3D and realistic patient anatomy.

  17. High-κ Al2O3 material in low temperature wafer-level bonding for 3D integration application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Tu, L. C.; Tan, C. S.

    2014-03-01

    This work systematically investigated a high-κ Al2O3 material for low temperature wafer-level bonding for potential applications in 3D microsystems. A clean Si wafer with an Al2O3 layer thickness of 50 nm was applied as our experimental approach. Bonding was initiated in a clean room ambient after surface activation, followed by annealing under inert ambient conditions at 300 °C for 3 h. The investigation consisted of three parts: a mechanical support study using the four-point bending method, hermeticity measurements using the helium bomb test, and thermal conductivity analysis for potential heterogeneous bonding. Compared with samples bonded using a conventional oxide bonding material (SiO2), a higher interfacial adhesion energy (˜11.93 J/m2) and a lower helium leak rate (˜6.84 × 10-10 atm.cm3/sec) were detected for samples bonded using Al2O3. More importantly, due to the excellent thermal conductivity performance of Al2O3, this technology can be used in heterogeneous direct bonding, which has potential applications for enhancing the performance of Si photonic integrated devices.

  18. Spatio-temporal control of LbL films for biomedical applications: from 2D to 3D

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Claire; Almodóvar, Jorge; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Introduced in the 90’s by Prof Moehwald, Lvov and Decher, the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polyelectrolytes has become a popular technique to engineer various types of objects such as films, capsules and free standing membranes, with an unprecedented control at the nanometer and micrometer scales. The LbL technique allows to engineer biofunctional surface coatings, which may be dedicated to biomedical applications in vivo but also to fundamental studies and diagnosis in vitro. Initially mostly developed as 2D coatings and hollow capsules, the range of complex objects created by the LbL technique has greatly expanded in the past 10 years. In this review, our aim was to highlight the recent progress in the field of LbL films for biomedical applications and discuss the various ways to control spatially and temporally the biochemical and mechanical properties of multilayers. In particular, we will discuss three major developments of LbL films: 1) the new methods and templates to engineer LbL films and control cellular processes from adhesion to differentiation, 2) the major ways to achieve temporal control by chemical, biological and physical triggers and, 3) the combinations of LbL technique, cells and scaffolds for repairing 3D tissues, including cardio-vascular devices, bone implants and neuro-prosthetic devices. PMID:25627563

  19. IMAGE information monitoring and applied graphics software environment. Volume 4. Applications description

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, J.W.; Ng, K.B.; Upham, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    The EPRI Information Monitoring and Applied Graphics Environment (IMAGE) system is designed for 'fast proto-typing' of advanced concepts for computer-aided plant operations tools. It is a flexible software system which can be used for rapidly creating, dynamically driving and evaluating advanced operator aid displays. The software is written to be both host computer and graphic device independent. This four volume report includes an Executive Overview of the IMAGE package (Volume 1), followed by Software Description (Volume II), User's Guide (Volume III), and Description of Example Applications (Volume IV).

  20. The Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes (I3RC): Showcasing Mathematical and Computational Physics in a Critical Atmospheric Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.; Cahalan, R. F.

    2001-05-01

    The Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes (I3RC) is an on-going initiative involving an international group of over 30 researchers engaged in the numerical modeling of three-dimensional radiative transfer as applied to clouds. Because of their strong variability and extreme opacity, clouds are indeed a major source of uncertainty in the Earth's local radiation budget (at GCM grid scales). Also 3D effects (at satellite pixel scales) invalidate the standard plane-parallel assumption made in the routine of cloud-property remote sensing at NASA and NOAA. Accordingly, the test-cases used in I3RC are based on inputs and outputs which relate to cloud effects in atmospheric heating rates and in real-world remote sensing geometries. The main objectives of I3RC are to (1) enable participants to improve their models, (2) publish results as a community, (3) archive source code, and (4) educate. We will survey the status of I3RC and its plans for the near future with a special emphasis on the mathematical models and computational approaches. We will also describe some of the prime applications of I3RC's efforts in climate models, cloud-resolving models, and remote-sensing observations of clouds, or that of the surface in their presence. In all these application areas, computational efficiency is the main concern and not accuracy. One of I3RC's main goals is to document the performance of as wide a variety as possible of three-dimensional radiative transfer models for a small but representative number of ``cases.'' However, it is dominated by modelers working at the level of linear transport theory (i.e., they solve the radiative transfer equation) and an overwhelming majority of these participants use slow-but-robust Monte Carlo techniques. This means that only a small portion of the efficiency vs. accuracy vs. flexibility domain is currently populated by I3RC participants. To balance this natural clustering the present authors have organized a systematic outreach towards

  1. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    This is the first book written on using Blender for scientific visualization. It is a practical and interesting introduction to Blender for understanding key parts of 3D rendering and animation that pertain to the sciences via step-by-step guided tutorials. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender takes you through an understanding of 3D graphics and modelling for different visualization scenarios in the physical sciences.

  2. Application of 3D Printing in the Surgical Planning of Trimalleolar Fracture and Doctor-Patient Communication

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Long; Shang, Xian-Wen; Fan, Jian-Nan; He, Zhi-Xu; Wang, Jian-Ji; Liu, Miao; Zhuang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3D printing in treating trimalleolar fractures and its roles in physician-patient communication, thirty patients with trimalleolar fractures were randomly divided into the 3D printing assisted-design operation group (Group A) and the no-3D printing assisted-design group (Group B). In Group A, 3D printing was used by the surgeons to produce a prototype of the actual fracture to guide the surgical treatment. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation. A questionnaire was designed for doctors and patients to verify the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototype. Meanwhile, the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss were compared between the two groups. The fracture prototypes were accurately printed, and the average overall score of the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototypes was relatively high. Both the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss in Group A were less than those in Group B (P < 0.05). Patient satisfaction using the 3D-printed prototype and the communication score were 9.3 ± 0.6 points. A 3D-printed prototype can faithfully reflect the anatomy of the fracture site; it can effectively help the doctors plan the operation and represent an effective tool for physician-patient communication. PMID:27446944

  3. Application of 3D Printing in the Surgical Planning of Trimalleolar Fracture and Doctor-Patient Communication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long; Shang, Xian-Wen; Fan, Jian-Nan; He, Zhi-Xu; Wang, Jian-Ji; Liu, Miao; Zhuang, Yong; Ye, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3D printing in treating trimalleolar fractures and its roles in physician-patient communication, thirty patients with trimalleolar fractures were randomly divided into the 3D printing assisted-design operation group (Group A) and the no-3D printing assisted-design group (Group B). In Group A, 3D printing was used by the surgeons to produce a prototype of the actual fracture to guide the surgical treatment. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation. A questionnaire was designed for doctors and patients to verify the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototype. Meanwhile, the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss were compared between the two groups. The fracture prototypes were accurately printed, and the average overall score of the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototypes was relatively high. Both the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss in Group A were less than those in Group B (P < 0.05). Patient satisfaction using the 3D-printed prototype and the communication score were 9.3 ± 0.6 points. A 3D-printed prototype can faithfully reflect the anatomy of the fracture site; it can effectively help the doctors plan the operation and represent an effective tool for physician-patient communication. PMID:27446944

  4. Using Computer Graphics to Demonstrate the Origin and Applications of the "Reacting Bond Rules"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, David R.; Herrick, David R.

    2002-11-01

    The reacting bond rules, also known as Thornton's rules, describe how the structure and energy of a transition state vary as a function of changes in the energies of selected reaction parameters. The rules have many applications in the interpretation of reactivity. The derivation of the "reacting bond rules" is demonstrated using the graphics plotting routines available on programs such as Mathematica. Using these same graphics plotting programs, the relationship between three-dimensional energy plots, two-dimensional More O'Ferrall Jencks diagrams, and reaction coordinate diagrams is shown for the case of SN1 and SN2 substitution reactions. The graphical methods discussed herein are not restricted to substitution reactions but are easily extended to other types of reactions.

  5. Development of visual 3D virtual environment for control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Michitaka; Myoi, Takeshi; Amari, Haruo; Inamura, Kohei; Stark, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments for software visualization may enable complex programs to be created and maintained. A typical application might be for control of regional electric power systems. As these encompass broader computer networks than ever, construction of such systems becomes very difficult. Conventional text-oriented environments are useful in programming individual processors. However, they are obviously insufficient to program a large and complicated system, that includes large numbers of computers connected to each other; such programming is called 'programming in the large.' As a solution for this problem, the authors are developing a graphic programming environment wherein one can visualize complicated software in virtual 3D world. One of the major features of the environment is the 3D representation of concurrent process. 3D representation is used to supply both network-wide interprocess programming capability (capability for 'programming in the large') and real-time programming capability. The authors' idea is to fuse both the block diagram (which is useful to check relationship among large number of processes or processors) and the time chart (which is useful to check precise timing for synchronization) into a single 3D space. The 3D representation gives us a capability for direct and intuitive planning or understanding of complicated relationship among many concurrent processes. To realize the 3D representation, a technology to enable easy handling of virtual 3D object is a definite necessity. Using a stereo display system and a gesture input device (VPL DataGlove), our prototype of the virtual workstation has been implemented. The workstation can supply the 'sensation' of the virtual 3D space to a programmer. Software for the 3D programming environment is implemented on the workstation. According to preliminary assessments, a 50 percent reduction of programming effort is achieved by using the virtual 3D environment. The authors expect that the 3D

  6. FELIX: a volumetric 3D laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Detlef; Langhans, Knut; Gerken, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, an innovative approach of a true 3D image presentation in a space filling, volumetric laser display will be described. The introduced prototype system is based on a moving target screen that sweeps the display volume. Net result is the optical equivalent of a 3D array of image points illuminated to form a model of the object which occupies a physical space. Wireframe graphics are presented within the display volume which a group of people can walk around and examine simultaneously from nearly any orientation and without any visual aids. Further to the detailed vector scanning mode, a raster scanned system and a combination of both techniques are under development. The volumetric 3D laser display technology for true reproduction of spatial images can tremendously improve the viewers ability to interpret data and to reliably determine distance, shape and orientation. Possible applications for this development range from air traffic control, where moving blips of light represent individual aircrafts in a true to scale projected airspace of an airport, to various medical applications (e.g. electrocardiography, computer-tomography), to entertainment and education visualization as well as imaging in the field of engineering and Computer Aided Design.

  7. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus: A NASA tool for building and managing graphical user interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1993-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus, developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is an advanced portable user interface development which simplifies the process of creating and managing complex application graphical user interfaces (GUI's). TAE Plus supports the rapid prototyping of GUI's and allows applications to be ported easily between different platforms. This paper will discuss the capabilities of the TAE Plus tool, and how it makes the job of designing and developing GUI's easier for application developers. TAE Plus is being applied to many types of