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Sample records for 3d histological section

  1. 3D prostate histology image reconstruction: Quantifying the impact of tissue deformation and histology section location

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gómez, José A.; Moussa, Madeleine; Pautler, Stephen; Chin, Joseph L.; Crukley, Cathie; Bauman, Glenn S.; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Guidelines for localizing prostate cancer on imaging are ideally informed by registered post-prostatectomy histology. 3D histology reconstruction methods can support this by reintroducing 3D spatial information lost during histology processing. The need to register small, high-grade foci drives a need for high accuracy. Accurate 3D reconstruction method design is impacted by the answers to the following central questions of this work. (1) How does prostate tissue deform during histology processing? (2) What spatial misalignment of the tissue sections is induced by microtome cutting? (3) How does the choice of reconstruction model affect histology reconstruction accuracy? Materials and Methods: Histology, paraffin block face and magnetic resonance images were acquired for 18 whole mid-gland tissue slices from six prostates. 7-15 homologous landmarks were identified on each image. Tissue deformation due to histology processing was characterized using the target registration error (TRE) after landmark-based registration under four deformation models (rigid, similarity, affine and thin-plate-spline [TPS]). The misalignment of histology sections from the front faces of tissue slices was quantified using manually identified landmarks. The impact of reconstruction models on the TRE after landmark-based reconstruction was measured under eight reconstruction models comprising one of four deformation models with and without constraining histology images to the tissue slice front faces. Results: Isotropic scaling improved the mean TRE by 0.8-1.0 mm (all results reported as 95% confidence intervals), while skew or TPS deformation improved the mean TRE by <0.1 mm. The mean misalignment was 1.1-1.9° (angle) and 0.9-1.3 mm (depth). Using isotropic scaling, the front face constraint raised the mean TRE by 0.6-0.8 mm. Conclusions: For sub-millimeter accuracy, 3D reconstruction models should not constrain histology images to the tissue slice front faces and should be

  2. 3D reconstruction of digitized histological sections for vasculature quantification in the mouse hind limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Nong, Zengxuan; Gibson, Eli; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    In contrast to imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and micro computed tomography, digital histology reveals multiple stained tissue features at high resolution (0.25μm/pixel). However, the two-dimensional (2D) nature of histology challenges three-dimensional (3D) quantification and visualization of the different tissue components, cellular structures, and subcellular elements. This limitation is particularly relevant to the vasculature, which has a complex and variable structure within tissues. The objective of this study was to perform a fully automated 3D reconstruction of histology tissue in the mouse hind limb preserving the accurate systemic orientation of the tissues, stained with hematoxylin and immunostained for smooth muscle α actin. We performed a 3D reconstruction using pairwise rigid registrations of 5μm thick, paraffin-embedded serial sections, digitized at 0.25μm/pixel. Each registration was performed using the iterative closest points algorithm on blood vessel landmarks. Landmarks were vessel centroids, determined according to a signed distance map of each pixel to a decision boundary in hue-saturation-value color space; this decision boundary was determined based on manual annotation of a separate training set. Cell nuclei were then automatically extracted and corresponded to refine the vessel landmark registration. Homologous nucleus landmark pairs appearing on not more than two adjacent slides were chosen to avoid registrations which force curved or non-sectionorthogonal structures to be straight and section-orthogonal. The median accumulated target registration errors ± interquartile ranges for the vessel landmark registration, and the nucleus landmark refinement were 43.4+/-42.8μm and 2.9+/-1.7μm, respectively (p<0.0001). Fully automatic and accurate 3D rigid reconstruction of mouse hind limb histology imaging is feasible based on extracted vasculature and nuclei.

  3. Digital 3D reconstructions using histological serial sections of lung tissue including the alveolar capillary network.

    PubMed

    Grothausmann, Roman; Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Grothausmann R, Knudsen L, Ochs M, Mühlfeld C. Digital 3D reconstructions using histological serial sections of lung tissue including the alveolar capillary network. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 312: L243-L257, 2017. First published December 2, 2016; doi:10.1152/ajplung.00326.2016-The alveolar capillary network (ACN) provides an enormously large surface area that is necessary for pulmonary gas exchange. Changes of the ACN during normal or pathological development or in pulmonary diseases are of great functional impact and warrant further analysis. Due to the complexity of the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the ACN, 2D approaches are limited in providing a comprehensive impression of the characteristics of the normal ACN or the nature of its alterations. Stereological methods offer a quantitative way to assess the ACN in 3D in terms of capillary volume, surface area, or number but lack a 3D visualization to interpret the data. Hence, the necessity to visualize the ACN in 3D and to correlate this with data from the same set of data arises. Such an approach requires a large sample volume combined with a high resolution. Here, we present a technically simple and cost-efficient approach to create 3D representations of lung tissue ranging from bronchioles over alveolar ducts and alveoli up to the ACN from more than 1 mm sample extent to a resolution of less than 1 μm. The method is based on automated image acquisition of serially sectioned epoxy resin-embedded lung tissue fixed by vascular perfusion and subsequent automated digital reconstruction and analysis of the 3D data. This efficient method may help to better understand mechanisms of vascular development and pathology of the lung.

  4. Utilizing 3D Printing Technology to Merge MRI with Histology: A Protocol for Brain Sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Nicholas J; Sati, Pascal; Nair, Govind; Guy, Joseph R; Ha, Seung-Kwon; Absinta, Martina; Chiang, Wen-Yang; Leibovitch, Emily C; Jacobson, Steven; Silva, Afonso C; Reich, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for the delineation between normal and abnormal tissue on a macroscopic scale, sampling an entire tissue volume three-dimensionally. While MRI is an extremely sensitive tool for detecting tissue abnormalities, association of signal changes with an underlying pathological process is usually not straightforward. In the central nervous system, for example, inflammation, demyelination, axonal damage, gliosis, and neuronal death may all induce similar findings on MRI. As such, interpretation of MRI scans depends on the context, and radiological-histopathological correlation is therefore of the utmost importance. Unfortunately, traditional pathological sectioning of brain tissue is often imprecise and inconsistent, thus complicating the comparison between histology sections and MRI. This article presents novel methodology for accurately sectioning primate brain tissues and thus allowing precise matching between histology and MRI. The detailed protocol described in this article will assist investigators in applying this method, which relies on the creation of 3D printed brain slicers. Slightly modified, it can be easily implemented for brains of other species, including humans. PMID:28060281

  5. Utilizing 3D Printing Technology to Merge MRI with Histology: A Protocol for Brain Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Nicholas J; Sati, Pascal; Nair, Govind; Guy, Joseph R; Ha, Seung-Kwon; Absinta, Martina; Chiang, Wen-Yang; Leibovitch, Emily C; Jacobson, Steven; Silva, Afonso C; Reich, Daniel S

    2016-12-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for the delineation between normal and abnormal tissue on a macroscopic scale, sampling an entire tissue volume three-dimensionally. While MRI is an extremely sensitive tool for detecting tissue abnormalities, association of signal changes with an underlying pathological process is usually not straightforward. In the central nervous system, for example, inflammation, demyelination, axonal damage, gliosis, and neuronal death may all induce similar findings on MRI. As such, interpretation of MRI scans depends on the context, and radiological-histopathological correlation is therefore of the utmost importance. Unfortunately, traditional pathological sectioning of brain tissue is often imprecise and inconsistent, thus complicating the comparison between histology sections and MRI. This article presents novel methodology for accurately sectioning primate brain tissues and thus allowing precise matching between histology and MRI. The detailed protocol described in this article will assist investigators in applying this method, which relies on the creation of 3D printed brain slicers. Slightly modified, it can be easily implemented for brains of other species, including humans.

  6. Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping Registration of Reconstructed 3D Histological Section Images and in vivo MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Ceritoglu, Can; Wang, Lei; Selemon, Lynn D.; Csernansky, John G.; Miller, Michael I.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak

    2009-01-01

    Our current understanding of neuroanatomical abnormalities in neuropsychiatric diseases is based largely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and post mortem histological analyses of the brain. Further advances in elucidating altered brain structure in these human conditions might emerge from combining MRI and histological methods. We propose a multistage method for registering 3D volumes reconstructed from histological sections to corresponding in vivo MRI volumes from the same subjects: (1) manual segmentation of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments in histological sections, (2) alignment of consecutive histological sections using 2D rigid transformation to construct a 3D histological image volume from the aligned sections, (3) registration of reconstructed 3D histological volumes to the corresponding 3D MRI volumes using 3D affine transformation, (4) intensity normalization of images via histogram matching, and (5) registration of the volumes via intensity based large deformation diffeomorphic metric (LDDMM) image matching algorithm. Here we demonstrate the utility of our method in the transfer of cytoarchitectonic information from histological sections to identify regions of interest in MRI scans of nine adult macaque brains for morphometric analyses. LDDMM improved the accuracy of the registration via decreased distances between GM/CSF surfaces after LDDMM (0.39 ± 0.13 mm) compared to distances after affine registration (0.76 ± 0.41 mm). Similarly, WM/GM distances decreased to 0.28 ± 0.16 mm after LDDMM compared to 0.54 ± 0.39 mm after affine registration. The multistage registration method may find broad application for mapping histologically based information, for example, receptor distributions, gene expression, onto MRI volumes. PMID:20577633

  7. 3D volume reconstruction of a mouse brain histological sections using warp filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Tao; Warren, Joe; Carson, James P.; Bello, Musodiq; Kakadiaris, Ioannis; Chiu, Wah; Thaller, Christina; Eichele, Gregor

    2006-09-30

    Sectioning tissues for optical microscopy often introduces upon the resulting sections distortions that make 3D reconstruction difficult. Here we present an automatic method for producing a smooth 3D volume from distorted 2D sections in the absence of any undistorted references. The method is based on pairwise elastic image warps between successive tissue sections, which can be computed by 2D image registration. Using a Gaussian filter, an average warp is computed for each section from the pairwise warps in a group of its neighboring sections. The average warps deform each section to match its neighboring sections, thus creating a smooth volume where corresponding features on successive sections lie close to each other. The proposed method can be used with any existing 2D image registration method for 3D reconstruction. In particular, we present a novel image warping algorithm based on dynamic programming that extends Dynamic Time Warping in 1D speech recognition to compute pairwise warps between high-resolution 2D images. The warping algorithm efficiently computes a restricted class of 2D local deformations that are characteristic between successive tissue sections. Finally, a validation framework is proposed and applied to evaluate the quality of reconstruction using both real sections and a synthetic volume.

  8. 3D volume reconstruction of a mouse brain from histological sections using warp filtering.

    PubMed

    Ju, Tao; Warren, Joe; Carson, James; Bello, Musodiq; Kakadiaris, Ioannis; Chiu, Wah; Thaller, Christina; Eichele, Gregor

    2006-09-30

    Sectioning tissues for optical microscopy often introduces upon the resulting sections distortions that make 3D reconstruction difficult. Here we present an automatic method for producing a smooth 3D volume from distorted 2D sections in the absence of any undistorted references. The method is based on pairwise elastic image warps between successive tissue sections, which can be computed by 2D image registration. Using a Gaussian filter, an average warp is computed for each section from the pairwise warps in a group of its neighboring sections. The average warps deform each section to match its neighboring sections, thus creating a smooth volume where corresponding features on successive sections lie close to each other. The proposed method can be used with any existing 2D image registration method for 3D reconstruction. In particular, we present a novel image warping algorithm based on dynamic programming that extends Dynamic Time Warping in 1D speech recognition to compute pairwise warps between high-resolution 2D images. The warping algorithm efficiently computes a restricted class of 2D local deformations that are characteristic between successive tissue sections. Finally, a validation framework is proposed and applied to evaluate the quality of reconstruction using both real sections and a synthetic volume.

  9. The Development of a Virtual 3D Model of the Renal Corpuscle from Serial Histological Sections for E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Jeremy A.; Wilson, Timothy D.; Sandig, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Histology is a core subject in the anatomical sciences where learners are challenged to interpret two-dimensional (2D) information (gained from histological sections) to extrapolate and understand the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of cells, tissues, and organs. In gross anatomical education 3D models and learning tools have been associated…

  10. The Development of a Virtual 3D Model of the Renal Corpuscle from Serial Histological Sections for E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Jeremy A.; Wilson, Timothy D.; Sandig, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Histology is a core subject in the anatomical sciences where learners are challenged to interpret two-dimensional (2D) information (gained from histological sections) to extrapolate and understand the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of cells, tissues, and organs. In gross anatomical education 3D models and learning tools have been associated…

  11. Automatic 3D acoustic tissue models from histologic tissue sections and application to ex vivo tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2005-04-01

    Three-dimensional acoustic tissue models (3DATMs) can be used as computational tools for ultrasonic imaging algorithm development and analysis. 3DATMs are automatically constructed from digitized light microscope images of consecutive H&E-stained histologic tissue sections. Construction necessitated contrast equalization, registration, and interpolation of missing sections. The registered (with interpolated) sections yield a 3D histologic volume (3DHV). Acoustic properties are then assigned to each tissue constituent of the 3DHV to obtain the 3DATM. A tissue characterization technique was developed to obtain scatterer parameter estimates (size and acoustic concentration) from a 3D impedance map (3DZM) deduced from a 3DHV by assigning acoustic impedance values. 3DZMs were constructed for a rat fibroadenoma (FA), a mouse mammary tumor (MMT) and a mouse sarcoma (EHS). From these 3 3DZMs estimates, effective scatterer diameters of 91 μm, 31.5 μm, and 34.5 μm, respectively, were determined. Independent ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 μm, 30 μm, and 33 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the ultrasonic measurements. 3DATMs may therefore be a useful tool for quantifying ultrasonic tissue properties. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  12. Analysis of cardiac development in the turtle Emys orbicularis (Testudines: Emidydae) using 3-D computer modeling from histological sections.

    PubMed

    Bertens, Laura M F; Richardson, M K; Verbeek, F J

    2010-07-01

    In this article we present a 3-D modeling study of cardiac development in the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis (of the reptilian order Testudines). The study is aimed at elucidating the embryonic development of the horizontal septum in the ventricle and underscoring the importance of 3-D reconstructions in studying morphogenesis. Turtles possess one common ventricle, partly divided into three cava by a vertical and a horizontal septum, of which the embryonic origins have so far not been described. We used serial sectioning and computerized high-resolution 3-D reconstructions of different developmental stages to create a chronological overview of cardiogenesis, in order to study this process. This has yielded a new understanding of the development of the horizontal septum and (directly related) the looping of the heart tube. This looping is found to be markedly different from that in the human heart, with the turtle having two clear bends in the part of the heart tube leaving the primitive ventricle, as opposed to one in humans. It is this particular looping that is responsible for the formation of the horizontal septum. In addition to our findings on the ventricular septation this study has also yielded new insights into the developmental origins of the pulmonary vein. The 3-D reconstructions were built using our platform TDR-3-D base and enabled us to study the developmental processes in specific parts of the turtle heart separately and in three dimensions, over time. The complete 3-D reconstructions have been made available to the reader via internet using our 3-D model browser application, which allows interactive viewing of the models. The browser application can be found on bio-imaging.liacs.nl/galleries/emysorbicularis/TurtleGallery.html, along with additional images of both models and histological sections and animation sequences of the models. By allowing the reader to view the material in such an interactive way, we hope to make optimal use of the

  13. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2004-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  14. The development of a virtual 3D model of the renal corpuscle from serial histological sections for E-learning environments.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jeremy A; Wilson, Timothy D; Sandig, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Histology is a core subject in the anatomical sciences where learners are challenged to interpret two-dimensional (2D) information (gained from histological sections) to extrapolate and understand the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of cells, tissues, and organs. In gross anatomical education 3D models and learning tools have been associated with improved learning outcomes, but similar tools have not been created for histology education to visualize complex cellular structure-function relationships. This study outlines steps in creating a virtual 3D model of the renal corpuscle from serial, semi-thin, histological sections obtained from epoxy resin-embedded kidney tissue. The virtual renal corpuscle model was generated by digital segmentation to identify: Bowman's capsule, nuclei of epithelial cells in the parietal capsule, afferent arteriole, efferent arteriole, proximal convoluted tubule, distal convoluted tubule, glomerular capillaries, podocyte nuclei, nuclei of extraglomerular mesangial cells, nuclei of epithelial cells of the macula densa in the distal convoluted tubule. In addition to the imported images of the original sections the software generates, and allows for visualization of, images of virtual sections generated in any desired orientation, thus serving as a "virtual microtome". These sections can be viewed separately or with the 3D model in transparency. This approach allows for the development of interactive e-learning tools designed to enhance histology education of microscopic structures with complex cellular interrelationships. Future studies will focus on testing the efficacy of interactive virtual 3D models for histology education.

  15. Postmortem examination of patient H.M.'s brain based on histological sectioning and digital 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Annese, Jacopo; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M; Bartsch, Hauke; Maechler, Paul; Sheh, Colleen; Thomas, Natasha; Kayano, Junya; Ghatan, Alexander; Bresler, Noah; Frosch, Matthew P; Klaming, Ruth; Corkin, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Modern scientific knowledge of how memory functions are organized in the human brain originated from the case of Henry G. Molaison (H.M.), an epileptic patient whose amnesia ensued unexpectedly following a bilateral surgical ablation of medial temporal lobe structures, including the hippocampus. The neuroanatomical extent of the 1953 operation could not be assessed definitively during H.M.'s life. Here we describe the results of a procedure designed to reconstruct a microscopic anatomical model of the whole brain and conduct detailed 3D measurements in the medial temporal lobe region. This approach, combined with cellular-level imaging of stained histological slices, demonstrates a significant amount of residual hippocampal tissue with distinctive cytoarchitecture. Our study also reveals diffuse pathology in the deep white matter and a small, circumscribed lesion in the left orbitofrontal cortex. The findings constitute new evidence that may help elucidate the consequences of H.M.'s operation in the context of the brain's overall pathology.

  16. Quantitative estimation of 3-D fiber course in gross histological sections of the human brain using polarized light.

    PubMed

    Axer, H; Axer, M; Krings, T; Keyserlingk, D G

    2001-02-15

    Series of polarized light images can be used to achieve quantitative estimates of the angles of inclination (z-direction) and direction (in xy-plane) of central nervous fibers in histological sections of the human brain. (1) The corpus callosum of a formalin-fixed human brain was sectioned at different angles of inclination of nerve fibers and at different thicknesses of the samples. The minimum, and maximum intensities, and their differences revealed a linear relationship to the angle of inclination of fibers. It was demonstrated that sections with a thickness of 80--120 microm are best suited for estimating the angle of inclination. (2) Afterwards the optic tracts of eight formalin-fixed human brains were sliced at different angles of fiber inclination at 100 microm. Measurements of intensity in 30 pixels in each section were used to calculate a linear function of calibration. The maximum intensities and the differences between maximum and minimum values measured with two polars only were best suited for estimation of fiber inclination. (3) Gross histological brain slices of formalin-fixed human brains were digitized under azimuths from 0 to 80 degrees using two polars only. These sequences were used to estimate the inclination of fibers (in z-direction). The same slices were digitized under azimuths from 0 to 160 degrees in steps of 20 degrees using a quarter wave plate additionally. These sequences were used to estimate the direction of the fibers in xy-direction. The method can be used to produce maps of fiber orientation in gross histological sections of the human brain similar to the fiber orientation maps derived by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Postmortem examination of patient H.M.’s brain based on histological sectioning and digital 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annese, Jacopo; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Maechler, Paul; Sheh, Colleen; Thomas, Natasha; Kayano, Junya; Ghatan, Alexander; Bresler, Noah; Frosch, Matthew P.; Klaming, Ruth; Corkin, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Modern scientific knowledge of how memory functions are organized in the human brain originated from the case of Henry G. Molaison (H.M.), an epileptic patient whose amnesia ensued unexpectedly following a bilateral surgical ablation of medial temporal lobe structures, including the hippocampus. The neuroanatomical extent of the 1953 operation could not be assessed definitively during H.M.’s life. Here we describe the results of a procedure designed to reconstruct a microscopic anatomical model of the whole brain and conduct detailed 3D measurements in the medial temporal lobe region. This approach, combined with cellular-level imaging of stained histological slices, demonstrates a significant amount of residual hippocampal tissue with distinctive cytoarchitecture. Our study also reveals diffuse pathology in the deep white matter and a small, circumscribed lesion in the left orbitofrontal cortex. The findings constitute new evidence that may help elucidate the consequences of H.M.’s operation in the context of the brain’s overall pathology.

  18. Postmortem examination of patient H.M.’s brain based on histological sectioning and digital 3D reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Annese, Jacopo; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Maechler, Paul; Sheh, Colleen; Thomas, Natasha; Kayano, Junya; Ghatan, Alexander; Bresler, Noah; Frosch, Matthew P.; Klaming, Ruth; Corkin, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Modern scientific knowledge of how memory functions are organized in the human brain originated from the case of Henry G. Molaison (H.M.), an epileptic patient whose amnesia ensued unexpectedly following a bilateral surgical ablation of medial temporal lobe structures, including the hippocampus. The neuroanatomical extent of the 1953 operation could not be assessed definitively during H.M.’s life. Here we describe the results of a procedure designed to reconstruct a microscopic anatomical model of the whole brain and conduct detailed 3D measurements in the medial temporal lobe region. This approach, combined with cellular-level imaging of stained histological slices, demonstrates a significant amount of residual hippocampal tissue with distinctive cytoarchitecture. Our study also reveals diffuse pathology in the deep white matter and a small, circumscribed lesion in the left orbitofrontal cortex. The findings constitute new evidence that may help elucidate the consequences of H.M.’s operation in the context of the brain’s overall pathology. PMID:24473151

  19. 3D morphological measurement of whole slide histological vasculature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J. G.; Nong, Zengxuan; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-03-01

    Properties of the microvasculature that contribute to tissue perfusion can be assessed using immunohistochemistry on 2D histology sections. However, the vasculature is inherently 3D and the ability to measure and visualize the vessel wall components in 3D will aid in detecting focal pathologies. Our objectives were (1) to develop a method for 3D measurement and visualization of microvasculature in 3D, (2) to compare the normal and regenerated post-ischemia mouse hind limb microvasculature, and (3) to compare the 2D and 3D vessel morphology measures. Vessels were stained for smooth muscle using 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) immunostain for both normal (n = 6 mice) and regenerated vasculature (n = 5 mice). 2D vessel segmentations were reconstructed into 3D using landmark based registration. No substantial bias was found in the 2D measurements relative to 3D, but larger differences were observed for individual vessels oriented non-orthogonally to the plane of sectioning. A larger value of area, perimeter, and vessel wall thickness was found in the normal vasculature as compared to the regenerated vasculature, for both the 2D and 3D measurements (p < 0.01). Aggregated 2D measurements are sufficient for identifying morphological differences between groups of mice; however, one must interpret individual 2D measurements with caution if the vessel centerline direction is unknown. Visualization of 3D measurements permits the detection of localized vessel morphology aberrations that are not revealed by 2D measurements. With vascular measure visualization methodologies in 3D, we are now capable of locating focal pathologies on a whole slide level.

  20. Automated 3D-2D registration of X-ray microcomputed tomography with histological sections for dental implants in bone using chamfer matching and simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kathrin; Stauber, Martin; Schwarz, Frank; Beißbarth, Tim

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel 3D-2D registration approach for micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histology (HI), constructed for dental implant biopsies, that finds the position and normal vector of the oblique slice from μCT that corresponds to HI. During image pre-processing, the implants and the bone tissue are segmented using a combination of thresholding, morphological filters and component labeling. After this, chamfer matching is employed to register the implant edges and fine registration of the bone tissues is achieved using simulated annealing. The method was tested on n=10 biopsies, obtained at 20 weeks after non-submerged healing in the canine mandible. The specimens were scanned with μCT 100 and processed for hard tissue sectioning. After registration, we assessed the agreement of bone to implant contact (BIC) using automated and manual measurements. Statistical analysis was conducted to test the agreement of the BIC measurements in the registered samples. Registration was successful for all specimens and agreement of the respective binary images was high (median: 0.90, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.89-0.91). Direct comparison of BIC yielded that automated (median 0.82, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.75-0.85) and manual (median 0.61, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.52-0.67) measures from μCT were significant positively correlated with HI (median 0.65, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.59-0.72) between μCT and HI groups (manual: R(2)=0.87, automated: R(2)=0.75, p<0.001). The results show that this method yields promising results and that μCT may become a valid alternative to assess osseointegration in three dimensions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated Serial Sectioning for 3D Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkemper, Jen; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2003-01-01

    Some aspects of an apparatus and method for automated serial sectioning of a specimen of a solder, aluminum, or other relatively soft opaque material are discussed. The apparatus includes a small milling machine (micromiller) that takes precise, shallow cuts (increments of depth as small as 1 micron) to expose successive sections. A microscope equipped with an electronic camera, mounted in a fixed position on the micromiller, takes pictures of the newly exposed specimen surface at each increment of depth. The images are digitized, and the resulting data are subsequently processed to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) features of the specimen.

  2. Custom fit 3D-printed brain holders for comparison of histology with MRI in marmosets.

    PubMed

    Guy, Joseph R; Sati, Pascal; Leibovitch, Emily; Jacobson, Steven; Silva, Afonso C; Reich, Daniel S

    2016-01-15

    MRI has the advantage of sampling large areas of tissue and locating areas of interest in 3D space in both living and ex vivo systems, whereas histology has the ability to examine thin slices of ex vivo tissue with high detail and specificity. Although both are valuable tools, it is currently difficult to make high-precision comparisons between MRI and histology due to large differences inherent to the techniques. A method combining the advantages would be an asset to understanding the pathological correlates of MRI. 3D-printed brain holders were used to maintain marmoset brains in the same orientation during acquisition of ex vivo MRI and pathologic cutting of the tissue. The results of maintaining this same orientation show that sub-millimeter, discrete neuropathological features in marmoset brain consistently share size, shape, and location between histology and ex vivo MRI, which facilitates comparison with serial imaging acquired in vivo. Existing methods use computational approaches sensitive to data input in order to warp histologic images to match large-scale features on MRI, but the new method requires no warping of images, due to a preregistration accomplished in the technique, and is insensitive to data formatting and artifacts in both MRI and histology. The simple method of using 3D-printed brain holders to match brain orientation during pathologic sectioning and MRI acquisition enables rapid and precise comparison of small features seen on MRI to their underlying histology. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Custom Fit 3D-Printed Brain Holders for Comparison of Histology with MRI in Marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Joseph R.; Sati, Pascal; Leibovitch, Emily; Jacobson, Steven; Silva, Afonso C.; Reich, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background MRI has the advantage of sampling large areas of tissue and locating areas of interest in 3D space in both living and ex vivo systems, whereas histology has the ability to examine thin slices of ex vivo tissue with high detail and specificity. Although both are valuable tools, it is currently difficult to make high-precision comparisons between MRI and histology due to large differences inherent to the techniques. A method combining the advantages would be an asset to understanding the pathological correlates of MRI. New Method 3D-printed brain holders were used to maintain marmoset brains in the same orientation during acquisition of ex vivo MRI and pathologic cutting of the tissue. Results The results of maintaining this same orientation show that sub-millimeter, discrete neuropathological features in marmoset brain consistently share size, shape, and location between histology and ex vivo MRI, which facilitates comparison with serial imaging acquired in vivo. Comparison with Existing Methods Existing methods use computational approaches sensitive to data input in order to warp histologic images to match large-scale features on MRI, but the new method requires no warping of images, due to a preregistration accomplished in the technique, and is insensitive to data formatting and artifacts in both MRI and histology. Conclusions The simple method of using 3D-printed brain holders to match brain orientation during pathologic sectioning and MRI acquisition enables rapid and precise comparison of small features seen on MRI to their underlying histology. PMID:26365332

  4. EVA-enhanced embedding medium for histological analysis of 3D porous scaffold material.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jin Ik; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-10-01

    When sectioning a 3D porous scaffold made of a soft elastomeric material embedded in paraffin medium, it is not easy to obtain a section because of the different mechanical properties of the paraffin and tissue/scaffold. We describe a new embedding material for histological analysis of various biomaterials that is composed of paraffin and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) resin (0, 3, 7, and 13 wt.%). 3D porous poly(L-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL) and chitosan scaffolds were fabricated to test the sectioning efficiency of the paraffin/EVA embedding material. The new embedding material was characterized by rheological analysis and solvent solubility testing in xylene and n-hexane. The hydrophilicity of the new material was assessed by contact angle measurement and its surface roughness was measured using AFM analysis. The staining efficiency of sections embedded in a paraffin/EVA mixture was determined by eosin staining of the chitosan scaffold and chitosan/collagen hybrid scaffold using a fluorescently labeled collagen. Section roughness decreased with increasing EVA content. The softening temperature of the paraffin/EVA mixture was similar to that of paraffin (50-60 degrees C by rheometer). The paraffin/EVA mixture dissolved completely in xylene after 30min at 50 degrees C, and after 30min in n-hexane at 60 degrees C. Therefore, the new embedding medium can be used for histological analysis of various biomaterials and natural tissues.

  5. Quantification of tumor morphology via 3D histology: application to oral cavity cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Scott; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Tomaszewski, John

    2016-03-01

    Traditional histopathology quantifies disease through the study of glass slides, i.e. two-dimensional samples that are representative of the overall process. We hypothesize that 3D reconstruction can enhance our understanding of histopathologic interpretations. To test this hypothesis, we perform a pilot study of the risk model for oral cavity cancer (OCC), which stratifies patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk for locoregional disease-free survival. Classification is based on study of hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained tissues sampled from the resection specimens. In this model, the Worst Pattern of Invasion (WPOI) is assessed, representing specific architectural features at the interface between cancer and non-cancer tissue. Currently, assessment of WPOI is based on 2D sections of tissue, representing complex 3D structures of tumor growth. We believe that by reconstructing a 3D model of tumor growth and quantifying the tumor-host interface, we can obtain important diagnostic information that is difficult to assess in 2D. Therefore, we introduce a pilot study framework for visualizing tissue architecture and morphology in 3D from serial sections of histopathology. This framework can be used to enhance predictive models for diseases where severity is determined by 3D biological structure. In this work we utilize serial H and E-stained OCC resections obtained from 7 patients exhibiting WPOI-3 (low risk of recurrence) through WPOI-5 (high risk of recurrence). A supervised classifier automatically generates a map of tumor regions on each slide, which are then co-registered using an elastic deformation algorithm. A smooth 3D model of the tumor region is generated from the registered maps, which is suitable for quantitative tumor interface morphology feature extraction. We report our preliminary models created with this system and suggest further enhancements to traditional histology scoring mechanisms that take spatial architecture into consideration.

  6. Dentatorubrothalamic tract localization with postmortem MR diffusion tractography compared to histological 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mollink, J; van Baarsen, K M; Dederen, P J W C; Foxley, S; Miller, K L; Jbabdi, S; Slump, C H; Grotenhuis, J A; Kleinnijenhuis, M; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography is a technique with great potential to characterize the in vivo anatomical position and integrity of white matter tracts. Tractography, however, remains an estimation of white matter tracts, and false-positive and false-negative rates are not available. The goal of the present study was to compare postmortem tractography of the dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRTT) by its 3D histological reconstruction, to estimate the reliability of the tractography algorithm in this specific tract. Recent studies have shown that the cerebellum is involved in cognitive, language and emotional functions besides its role in motor control. However, the exact working mechanism of the cerebellum is still to be elucidated. As the DRTT is the main output tract it is of special interest for the neuroscience and clinical community. A postmortem human brain specimen was scanned on a 7T MRI scanner using a diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession sequence. Tractography was performed with PROBTRACKX. The specimen was subsequently serially sectioned and stained for myelin using a modified Heidenhain-Woelke staining. Image registration permitted the 3D reconstruction of the histological sections and comparison with MRI. The spatial concordance between the two modalities was evaluated using ROC analysis and a similarity index (SI). ROC curves showed a high sensitivity and specificity in general. Highest measures were observed in the superior cerebellar peduncle with an SI of 0.72. Less overlap was found in the decussation of the DRTT at the level of the mesencephalon. The study demonstrates high spatial accuracy of postmortem probabilistic tractography of the DRTT when compared to a 3D histological reconstruction. This gives hopeful prospect for studying structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders using tractography of the DRTT.

  7. Anterior and posterior compartment 3D endovaginal ultrasound anatomy based on direct histologic comparison.

    PubMed

    Shobeiri, S Abbas; White, Dena; Quiroz, Lieschen H; Nihira, Mikio A

    2012-08-01

    We used direct histologic comparison to validate the use of 3D endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) as a novel and emerging technology for evaluating the structures found in the anterior and posterior pelvic floor compartments. A young nulliparous female pelvis specimen was dissected and histologic slides were prepared by making 8-Micron-thick sagittal cuts. The slides were stained with Mallory trichrome and arranged to form large sections encompassing each anterior and posterior sagittal plane. Healthy nulliparous women underwent 3D EVUS to obtain 3D cubes of the anterior and posterior compartments. Two investigators independently evaluated the anterior and posterior midsagittal structures. The investigators mutually viewed the images and calculated urethral and anal sphincter measurements. Thirty-one nulliparous women underwent 3D EVUS; 77% of the participants were Caucasian, with mean age 31.8 [standard deviation (SD) 5.8] and mean body mass index (BMI) of 28.5 (SD 7.9). The following mean (SD) measurements were obtained: urethral length 36 mm (± 5); striated urogenital sphincter area 0.6 cm(2) (± 0.16); longitudinal and circular smooth muscle area 1.1 cm(2) (± 0.4); urethral complex width 14 mm (± 2); urethral complex area 1.3 cm(2) (± 0.4); internal anal sphincter length 26 mm (± 4); internal anal sphincter thickness 3.2 mm (± 0.8); and rectovaginal septum length 31 mm (± 5). The agreement for visualization of structures was as follows: vesical trigone 96% (κ = 0.65), trigonal ring 94% (κ = 0.8), trigonal plate 84% (κ = 0.6); longitudinal and circular smooth muscle 100%; compressor urethra 97% (κ = 0.85); striated urogenital sphincter 97% (κ = 0.85); rectovaginal septum 100%; internal anal sphincter 100%; external anal sphincter subdivisions 100%. Three-dimensional EVUS can be used to visualize structures of the anterior and posterior compartments in nullipara.

  8. Zooming in: high resolution 3D reconstruction of differently stained histological whole slide images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Johannes; Berger, Judith; Müller, Benedikt; Breuhahn, Kai; Grabe, Niels; Heldmann, Stefan; Homeyer, André; Lahrmann, Bernd; Laue, Hendrik; Olesch, Janine; Schwier, Michael; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Warth, Arne

    2014-03-01

    Much insight into metabolic interactions, tissue growth, and tissue organization can be gained by analyzing differently stained histological serial sections. One opportunity unavailable to classic histology is three-dimensional (3D) examination and computer aided analysis of tissue samples. In this case, registration is needed to reestablish spatial correspondence between adjacent slides that is lost during the sectioning process. Furthermore, the sectioning introduces various distortions like cuts, folding, tearing, and local deformations to the tissue, which need to be corrected in order to exploit the additional information arising from the analysis of neighboring slide images. In this paper we present a novel image registration based method for reconstructing a 3D tissue block implementing a zooming strategy around a user-defined point of interest. We efficiently align consecutive slides at increasingly fine resolution up to cell level. We use a two-step approach, where after a macroscopic, coarse alignment of the slides as preprocessing, a nonlinear, elastic registration is performed to correct local, non-uniform deformations. Being driven by the optimization of the normalized gradient field (NGF) distance measure, our method is suitable for differently stained and thus multi-modal slides. We applied our method to ultra thin serial sections (2 μm) of a human lung tumor. In total 170 slides, stained alternately with four different stains, have been registered. Thorough visual inspection of virtual cuts through the reconstructed block perpendicular to the cutting plane shows accurate alignment of vessels and other tissue structures. This observation is confirmed by a quantitative analysis. Using nonlinear image registration, our method is able to correct locally varying deformations in tissue structures and exceeds the limitations of globally linear transformations.

  9. Does 3D orientation account for variation in osteon morphology assessed by 2D histology?

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Cheryl; Thomas, C David L; Clement, John G; Cooper, David M L

    2015-01-01

    The primary microstructural unit of cortical bone, the secondary osteon or Haversian system, is widely assumed to have a cylindrical shape. It is generally accepted that osteons are roughly circular in cross-section and deviations from circularity have been attributed to deviations from longitudinal orientation. To our knowledge this idealized geometric relationship, which assumes osteons are perfect cylinders, has not been rigorously explored. As such, we sought to explore two research questions: (i) Does the orientation of osteons in 3D explain variation in shapes visualized in 2D? (ii) Can differences in osteon 3D orientation explain previously reported age-related differences observed in their 2D cross-sectional shape (e.g. more circular shape and decreased area with age)? To address these questions we utilized a combination of 2D histology to identify osteon shape and superimposed micro-computed tomography data to assess osteon orientation in 3D based upon the osteonal canal. Shape was assessed by the inverse of Aspect Ratio (On.AspR−1, based on a fitted ellipse) – which ranged from 0 (infinitely elongated shape) to 1 (perfectly circular). A sample (n = 27) of human female anterior femoral cortical bone samples from across the human lifespan (20–87 years) were included in the analysis, which involved 1418 osteons. The overall mean measure of On.AspR−1 was 0.703 (1.42 Aspect Ratio). Mean osteon orientation was 79.1° (90° being longitudinal). While we anticipated a positive relation between orientation and On.AspR−1, we found the opposite – a weak negative correlation (with more oblique 3D osteon alignment, the 2D shape became more circular as reflected by increased On.AspR−1). When analysis of covariance was performed with age and orientation as covariates, the negative relation with orientation was replaced by a significant relation with age alone. This relation with age accounted for 41% of the variation of On.AspR−1. The results

  10. Fast assembling of neuron fragments in serial 3D sections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanbo; Iascone, Daniel Maxim; da Costa, Nuno Maçarico; Lein, Ed S; Liu, Tianming; Peng, Hanchuan

    2017-04-01

    Reconstructing neurons from 3D image-stacks of serial sections of thick brain tissue is very time-consuming and often becomes a bottleneck in high-throughput brain mapping projects. We developed NeuronStitcher, a software suite for stitching non-overlapping neuron fragments reconstructed in serial 3D image sections. With its efficient algorithm and user-friendly interface, NeuronStitcher has been used successfully to reconstruct very large and complex human and mouse neurons.

  11. Imaging articular cartilage defects with 3D fat-suppressed echo planar imaging: comparison with conventional 3D fat-suppressed gradient echo sequence and correlation with histology.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, S; Huber, M; Breitenseher, M J; Trnka, H J; Rand, T; Kaider, A; Helbich, T; Imhof, H; Resnick, D

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to shorten examination time in articular cartilage imaging by use of a recently developed 3D multishot echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence with fat suppression (FS). We performed comparisons with 3D FS GE sequence using histology as the standard of reference. Twenty patients with severe gonarthrosis who were scheduled for total knee replacement underwent MRI prior to surgery. Hyaline cartilage was imaged with a 3D FS EPI and a 3D FS GE sequence. Signal intensities of articular structures were measured, and contrast-to-noise (C/N) ratios were calculated. Each knee was subdivided into 10 cartilage surfaces. From a total of 188 (3D EPI sequence) and 198 (3D GE sequence) cartilage surfaces, 73 and 79 histologic specimens could be obtained and analyzed. MR grading of cartilage lesions on both sequences was based on a five grade classification scheme and compared with histologic grading. The 3D FS EPI sequence provided a high C/N ratio between cartilage and subchondral bone similar to that of the 3D FS GE sequence. The C/N ratio between cartilage and effusion was significantly lower on the 3D EPI sequence due to higher signal intensity of fluid. MR grading of cartilage abnormalities using 3D FS EPI and 3D GE sequence correlated well with histologic grading. 3D FS EPI sequence agreed within one grade in 69 of 73 (94.5%) histologically proven cartilage lesions and 3D FS GE sequence agreed within one grade in 76 of 79 (96.2%) lesions. The gradings were identical in 38 of 73 (52.1%) and in 46 of 79 (58.3%) cases, respectively. The difference between the sensitivities was statistically not significant. The 3D FS EPI sequence is comparable with the 3D FS GE sequence in the noninvasive evaluation of advanced cartilage abnormalities but reduces scan time by a factor of 4.

  12. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  13. Does 2D-Histologic identification of villous types of human placentas at birth enable sensitive and reliable interpretation of 3D structure?

    PubMed

    Haeussner, Eva; Aschauer, Beate; Burton, Graham J; Huppertz, Berthold; Edler von Koch, Franz; Müller-Starck, Jens; Salafia, Carolyn; Schmitz, Christoph; Frank, Hans-Georg

    2015-12-01

    The villous tree of human placentas is a complex three-dimensional (3D) structure which enables fetomaternal exchange. Current concepts of microscopic analyses are based on the analysis of two-dimensional (2D) histologic sections. For this approach, the assessment of the stromal core of sectioned villi is of key importance. The classification of stromal properties of sectioned villi allows allocation of villous sections to villous types which are named by their expected position in villous trees (terminal, intermediate, and stem villi). The present study takes these current concepts of placental histology as hypothesis and validates them against predetermined 3D positions of branches of villous trees. The 3D positions were determined prior to histologic sectioning using a recently introduced 3D-microscopic approach. Individual histologic sections of villi were classified by their stromal structures and inter rater variability of these histologic assessments were determined. Inter rater variability was high and indicates substantial observer influence on the outcome of histologic assessments. Cross-match of villous types with the predetermined positions of villous branches of villous trees revealed substantial mismatch between the outcome of stromal classification and 3D-position of the sectioned villi in the placental villous trees. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. A Gauss-Seidel Iteration Scheme for Reference-Free 3-D Histological Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Daum, Volker; Steidl, Stefan; Maier, Andreas; Köstler, Harald; Hornegger, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of histological slice sequences offers great benefits in the investigation of different morphologies. It features very high-resolution which is still unmatched by in-vivo 3-D imaging modalities, and tissue staining further enhances visibility and contrast. One important step during reconstruction is the reversal of slice deformations introduced during histological slice preparation, a process also called image unwarping. Most methods use an external reference, or rely on conservative stopping criteria during the unwarping optimization to prevent straightening of naturally curved morphology. Our approach shows that the problem of unwarping is based on the superposition of low-frequency anatomy and high-frequency errors. We present an iterative scheme that transfers the ideas of the Gauss-Seidel method to image stacks to separate the anatomy from the deformation. In particular, the scheme is universally applicable without restriction to a specific unwarping method, and uses no external reference. The deformation artifacts are effectively reduced in the resulting histology volumes, while the natural curvature of the anatomy is preserved. The validity of our method is shown on synthetic data, simulated histology data using a CT data set and real histology data. In the case of the simulated histology where the ground truth was known, the mean Target Registration Error (TRE) between the unwarped and original volume could be reduced to less than 1 pixel on average after 6 iterations of our proposed method. PMID:25312918

  15. A Gauss-Seidel iteration scheme for reference-free 3-D histological image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gaffling, Simone; Daum, Volker; Steidl, Stefan; Maier, Andreas; Kostler, Harald; Hornegger, Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of histological slice sequences offers great benefits in the investigation of different morphologies. It features very high-resolution which is still unmatched by in vivo 3-D imaging modalities, and tissue staining further enhances visibility and contrast. One important step during reconstruction is the reversal of slice deformations introduced during histological slice preparation, a process also called image unwarping. Most methods use an external reference, or rely on conservative stopping criteria during the unwarping optimization to prevent straightening of naturally curved morphology. Our approach shows that the problem of unwarping is based on the superposition of low-frequency anatomy and high-frequency errors. We present an iterative scheme that transfers the ideas of the Gauss-Seidel method to image stacks to separate the anatomy from the deformation. In particular, the scheme is universally applicable without restriction to a specific unwarping method, and uses no external reference. The deformation artifacts are effectively reduced in the resulting histology volumes, while the natural curvature of the anatomy is preserved. The validity of our method is shown on synthetic data, simulated histology data using a CT data set and real histology data. In the case of the simulated histology where the ground truth was known, the mean Target Registration Error (TRE) between the unwarped and original volume could be reduced to less than 1 pixel on average after six iterations of our proposed method.

  16. Serial sectioning methods for 3D investigations in materials science.

    PubMed

    Zankel, Armin; Wagner, Julian; Poelt, Peter

    2014-07-01

    A variety of methods for the investigation and 3D representation of the inner structure of materials has been developed. In this paper, techniques based on slice and view using scanning microscopy for imaging are presented and compared. Three different methods of serial sectioning combined with either scanning electron or scanning ion microscopy or atomic force microscopy (AFM) were placed under scrutiny: serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, which facilitates an ultramicrotome built into the chamber of a variable pressure scanning electron microscope; three-dimensional (3D) AFM, which combines an (cryo-) ultramicrotome with an atomic force microscope, and 3D FIB, which delivers results by slicing with a focused ion beam. These three methods complement one another in many respects, e.g., in the type of materials that can be investigated, the resolution that can be obtained and the information that can be extracted from 3D reconstructions. A detailed review is given about preparation, the slice and view process itself, and the limitations of the methods and possible artifacts. Applications for each technique are also provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. μCT of ex-vivo stained mouse hearts and embryos enables a precise match between 3D virtual histology, classical histology and immunochemistry.

    PubMed

    Dullin, Christian; Ufartes, Roser; Larsson, Emanuel; Martin, Sabine; Lazzarini, Marcio; Tromba, Giuliana; Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine; Pinkert-Leetsch, Diana; Katschinski, Dörthe M; Alves, Frauke

    2017-01-01

    The small size of the adult and developing mouse heart poses a great challenge for imaging in preclinical research. The aim of the study was to establish a phosphotungstic acid (PTA) ex-vivo staining approach that efficiently enhances the x-ray attenuation of soft-tissue to allow high resolution 3D visualization of mouse hearts by synchrotron radiation based μCT (SRμCT) and classical μCT. We demonstrate that SRμCT of PTA stained mouse hearts ex-vivo allows imaging of the cardiac atrium, ventricles, myocardium especially its fibre structure and vessel walls in great detail and furthermore enables the depiction of growth and anatomical changes during distinct developmental stages of hearts in mouse embryos. Our x-ray based virtual histology approach is not limited to SRμCT as it does not require monochromatic and/or coherent x-ray sources and even more importantly can be combined with conventional histological procedures. Furthermore, it permits volumetric measurements as we show for the assessment of the plaque volumes in the aortic valve region of mice from an ApoE-/- mouse model. Subsequent, Masson-Goldner trichrome staining of paraffin sections of PTA stained samples revealed intact collagen and muscle fibres and positive staining of CD31 on endothelial cells by immunohistochemistry illustrates that our approach does not prevent immunochemistry analysis. The feasibility to scan hearts already embedded in paraffin ensured a 100% correlation between virtual cut sections of the CT data sets and histological heart sections of the same sample and may allow in future guiding the cutting process to specific regions of interest. In summary, since our CT based virtual histology approach is a powerful tool for the 3D depiction of morphological alterations in hearts and embryos in high resolution and can be combined with classical histological analysis it may be used in preclinical research to unravel structural alterations of various heart diseases.

  18. μCT of ex-vivo stained mouse hearts and embryos enables a precise match between 3D virtual histology, classical histology and immunochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Emanuel; Martin, Sabine; Lazzarini, Marcio; Tromba, Giuliana; Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine; Pinkert-Leetsch, Diana; Katschinski, Dörthe M.; Alves, Frauke

    2017-01-01

    The small size of the adult and developing mouse heart poses a great challenge for imaging in preclinical research. The aim of the study was to establish a phosphotungstic acid (PTA) ex-vivo staining approach that efficiently enhances the x-ray attenuation of soft-tissue to allow high resolution 3D visualization of mouse hearts by synchrotron radiation based μCT (SRμCT) and classical μCT. We demonstrate that SRμCT of PTA stained mouse hearts ex-vivo allows imaging of the cardiac atrium, ventricles, myocardium especially its fibre structure and vessel walls in great detail and furthermore enables the depiction of growth and anatomical changes during distinct developmental stages of hearts in mouse embryos. Our x-ray based virtual histology approach is not limited to SRμCT as it does not require monochromatic and/or coherent x-ray sources and even more importantly can be combined with conventional histological procedures. Furthermore, it permits volumetric measurements as we show for the assessment of the plaque volumes in the aortic valve region of mice from an ApoE-/- mouse model. Subsequent, Masson-Goldner trichrome staining of paraffin sections of PTA stained samples revealed intact collagen and muscle fibres and positive staining of CD31 on endothelial cells by immunohistochemistry illustrates that our approach does not prevent immunochemistry analysis. The feasibility to scan hearts already embedded in paraffin ensured a 100% correlation between virtual cut sections of the CT data sets and histological heart sections of the same sample and may allow in future guiding the cutting process to specific regions of interest. In summary, since our CT based virtual histology approach is a powerful tool for the 3D depiction of morphological alterations in hearts and embryos in high resolution and can be combined with classical histological analysis it may be used in preclinical research to unravel structural alterations of various heart diseases. PMID:28178293

  19. Development of a 2D Image Reconstruction and Viewing System for Histological Images from Multiple Tissue Blocks: Towards High-Resolution Whole-Organ 3D Histological Images.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Noriaki; Bautista, Pinky A; Haneishi, Hideaki; Snuderl, Matija; Yagi, Yukako

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution 3D histology image reconstruction of the whole brain organ starts from reconstructing the high-resolution 2D histology images of a brain slice. In this paper, we introduced a method to automatically align the histology images of thin tissue sections cut from the multiple paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of a brain slice. For this method, we employed template matching and incorporated an optimization technique to further improve the accuracy of the 2D reconstructed image. In the template matching, we used the gross image of the brain slice as a reference to the reconstructed 2D histology image of the slice, while in the optimization procedure, we utilized the Jaccard index as the metric of the reconstruction accuracy. The results of our experiment on the initial 3 different whole-brain tissue slices showed that while the method works, it is also constrained by tissue deformations introduced during the tissue processing and slicing. The size of the reconstructed high-resolution 2D histology image of a brain slice is huge, and designing an image viewer that makes particularly efficient use of the computing power of a standard computer used in our laboratories is of interest. We also present the initial implementation of our 2D image viewer system in this paper. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. 3D cryo-section/imaging of blood vessel lesions for validation of MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvado, Olivier; Roy, Debashish; Heinzel, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot; Wilson, David

    2006-03-01

    Vascular disease is a leading cause of death and disability in the western world. Diagnosis and staging of atherosclerosis is a challenge, especially with regards to the identification of plaque vulnerability. We are developing imaging methods based upon MRI and intravascular microcoils. In order to rigorously validate our MRI imaging methods and algorithms, we have developed a new cryo-imaging system that allows one to alternately section and image the block face of tissue. We obtain 3D pathology of vessel segments excised from cadaver and we characterize the tissues of atheroma using episcopic autofluorescence and bright field microscopy images. After embedding the vessel, the block is frozen, and block face microscopic images are taken every 200μm with an image resolution of 30μm×30μm. The series of images is then corrected for uneven illumination, serially registered to one another, and the 3D vessel segment is reconstructed. Some sections are recovered and processed with histological staining for validation. Seven tissue types can be readily identified from the cryo-images: necrotic core, calcification, lipid pool, media, adventitia, fibrosis, thrombus, and normal intima. Since the whole vessel segment is available, we could register 3D data to images from MR, or other modalities, for validation. In addition, visualization tools such as multi-planar reformatting 3D rendering can be used to study 3D plaque morphology, in microscopic detail.

  1. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Mcknight, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an analytical tool capable of economically evaluating the cyclic time dependent plasticity which occurs in hot section engine components in areas of strain concentration resulting from the combination of both mechanical and thermal stresses. The techniques developed must be capable of accommodating large excursions in temperatures with the associated variations in material properties including plasticity and creep. The overall objective of this proposed program is to develop advanced 3-D inelastic structural/stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and yet more cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes. The approach will be to develop four different theories, one linear and three higher order with increasing complexities including embedded singularities.

  2. Tracking tissue section surfaces for automated 3D confocal cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustin, Ramses; Price, Jeffrey H.

    2002-05-01

    Three-dimensional cytometry, whereby large volumes of tissue would be measured automatically, requires a computerized method for detecting the upper and lower tissue boundaries. In conventional confocal microscopy, the user interactively sets limits for axial scanning for each field-of-view. Biological specimens vary in section thickness, thereby driving the requirement for setting vertical scan limits. Limits could be set arbitrarily large to ensure the entire tissue is scanned, but automatic surface identification would eliminate storing undue numbers of empty optical sections and forms the basis for incorporating lateral microscope stage motion to collect unlimited numbers of stacks. This walk-away automation of 3D confocal scanning for biological imaging is the first sep towards practical, computerized statistical sampling from arbitrarily large tissue volumes. Preliminary results for automatic tissue surface tracking were obtained for phase-contrast microscopy by measuring focus sharpness (previously used for high-speed autofocus by our group). Measurements were taken from 5X5 fields-of-view from hamster liver sections, varying from five to twenty microns in thickness, then smoothed to lessen variations of in-focus information at each axial position. Because image sharpness (as the power of high spatial frequency components) drops across the axial boundaries of a tissue section, mathematical quantities including the full-width at half-maximum, extrema in the first derivative, and second derivative were used to locate the proximal and distal surfaces of a tissue. Results from these tests were evaluated against manual (i.e., visual) determination of section boundaries.

  3. Laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography enables 3D virtual histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Quade, Felix; Salditt, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Due to the large penetration depth and small wavelength hard x-rays offer a unique potential for 3D biomedical and biological imaging, combining capabilities of high resolution and large sample volume. However, in classical absorption-based computed tomography, soft tissue only shows a weak contrast, limiting the actual resolution. With the advent of phase-contrast methods, the much stronger phase shift induced by the sample can now be exploited. For high resolution, free space propagation behind the sample is particularly well suited to make the phase shift visible. Contrast formation is based on the self-interference of the transmitted beam, resulting in object-induced intensity modulations in the detector plane. As this method requires a sufficiently high degree of spatial coherence, it was since long perceived as a synchrotron-based imaging technique. In this contribution we show that by combination of high brightness liquid-metal jet microfocus sources and suitable sample preparation techniques, as well as optimized geometry, detection and phase retrieval, excellent three-dimensional image quality can be obtained, revealing the anatomy of a cobweb spider in high detail. This opens up new opportunities for 3D virtual histology of small organisms. Importantly, the image quality is finally augmented to a level accessible to automatic 3D segmentation.

  4. Plaque characterization in ex vivo MRI evaluated by dense 3D correspondence with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, Arna; de Bruijne, Marleen; Klein, Stefan; Verhagen, Hence; Groen, Harald; Wentzel, Jolanda; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro

    2011-03-01

    Automatic quantification of carotid artery plaque composition is important in the development of methods that distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques. MRI has shown to be capable of imaging different components noninvasively. We present a new plaque classification method which uses 3D registration of histology data with ex vivo MRI data, using non-rigid registration, both for training and evaluation. This is more objective than previously presented methods, as it eliminates selection bias that is introduced when 2D MRI slices are manually matched to histological slices before evaluation. Histological slices of human atherosclerotic plaques were manually segmented into necrotic core, fibrous tissue and calcification. Classification of these three components was voxelwise evaluated. As features the intensity, gradient magnitude and Laplacian in four MRI sequences after different degrees of Gaussian smoothing, and the distances to the lumen and the outer vessel wall, were used. Performance of linear and quadratic discriminant classifiers for different combinations of features was evaluated. Best accuracy (72.5 +/- 7.7%) was reached with the linear classifier when all features were used. Although this was only a minor improvement to the accuracy of a classifier that only included the intensities and distance features (71.6 +/- 7.9%), the difference was statistically significant (paired t-test, p<0.05). Good sensitivity and specificity for calcification was reached (83% and 95% respectively), however, differentiation between fibrous (sensitivity 85%, specificity 60%) and necrotic tissue (sensitivity 49%, specificity 89%) was more difficult.

  5. Ultra wide band 3-D cross section (RCS) holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, H. D.; Hall, T. E.

    1992-07-01

    Ultra wide band impulse holography is an exciting new concept for predictive radar cross section (RCS) evaluation employing near-field measurements. Reconstruction of the near-field hologram data maps the target's scattering areas, and uniquely identifies the 'hot spot' locations on the target. In addition, the target and calibration sphere's plane wave angular spectrums are computed (via digital algorithm) and used to generate the target's far-field RCS values in three dimensions for each frequency component in the impulse. Thin and thick targets are defined in terms of their near-field amplitude variations in range. Range gating and computer holographic techniques are applied to correct these variations. Preliminary experimental results on various targets verify the concept of RCS holography. The unique 3-D presentation (i.e., typically containing 524,288 RCS values for a 1024 (times) 512 sampled aperture for every frequency component) illustrates the efficacy of target recognition in terms of its far-field plane wave angular spectrum image. RCS images can then be viewed at different angles for target recognition, etc.

  6. Ultra wide band 3-D cross section (RCS) holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-07-01

    Ultra wide band impulse holography is an exciting new concept for predictive radar cross section (RCS) evaluation employing near-field measurements. Reconstruction of the near-field hologram data maps the target's scattering areas, and uniquely identifies the hot spot'' locations on the target. In addition, the target and calibration sphere's plane wave angular spectrums are computed (via digital algorithm) and used to generate the target's far-field RCS values in three dimensions for each frequency component in the impulse. Thin and thick targets are defined in terms of their near-field amplitude variations in range. Range gating and computer holographic techniques are applied to correct these variations. Preliminary experimental results on various targets verify the concept of RCS holography. The unique 3-D presentation (i.e., typically containing 524,288 RCS values for a 1024 {times} 512 sampled aperture for every frequency component) illustrates the efficacy of target recognition in terms of its far-field plane wave angular spectrum image. RCS images can then be viewed at different angles for target recognition, etc.

  7. Ultra wide band 3-D cross section (RCS) holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-07-01

    Ultra wide band impulse holography is an exciting new concept for predictive radar cross section (RCS) evaluation employing near-field measurements. Reconstruction of the near-field hologram data maps the target`s scattering areas, and uniquely identifies the ``hot spot`` locations on the target. In addition, the target and calibration sphere`s plane wave angular spectrums are computed (via digital algorithm) and used to generate the target`s far-field RCS values in three dimensions for each frequency component in the impulse. Thin and thick targets are defined in terms of their near-field amplitude variations in range. Range gating and computer holographic techniques are applied to correct these variations. Preliminary experimental results on various targets verify the concept of RCS holography. The unique 3-D presentation (i.e., typically containing 524,288 RCS values for a 1024 {times} 512 sampled aperture for every frequency component) illustrates the efficacy of target recognition in terms of its far-field plane wave angular spectrum image. RCS images can then be viewed at different angles for target recognition, etc.

  8. 3D analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient histograms in hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation with histological grade.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Tomohisa; Saito, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Yu; Harada, Taiyo L; Araki, Yoichi; Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2017-01-05

    To evaluate the usefulness of differentiation of histological grade in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using three-dimensional (3D) analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histograms retrospectively. The subjects consisted of 53 patients with 56 HCCs. The subjects included 12 well-differentiated, 35 moderately differentiated, and nine poorly differentiated HCCs. Diffusion-weighted imaging (b-values of 100 and 800 s/mm(2)) were obtained within 3 months before surgery. Regions of interest (ROIs) covered the entire tumor. The data acquired from each slice were summated to derive voxel-by-voxel ADCs for the entire tumor. The following parameters were derived from the ADC histogram: mean, standard deviation, minimum, maximum, mode, percentiles (5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th), skew, and kurtosis. These parameters were analyzed according to histological grade. After eliminating steatosis lesions, these parameters were re-analyzed. A weak correlation was observed in minimum ADC and 5th percentile for each histological grade (r = -0.340 and r = -0.268, respectively). The minimum ADCs of well, moderately, and poorly differentiated HCC were 585 ± 388, 411 ± 278, and 235 ± 102 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s, respectively. Minimum ADC showed significant differences among tumor histological grades (P = 0.009). The minimum ADC of poorly differentiated HCC and that of combined well and moderately differentiated HCC were 236 ± 102 and 437 ± 299 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s. The minimum ADC of poorly differentiated HCC was significantly lower than that of combined well and moderately differentiated HCC (P = 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity, when a minimum ADC of 400 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s or lower was considered to be poorly differentiated HCC, were 100 and 54%, respectively. After exclusion of the effect of steatosis, the sensitivity and specificity did not change, although the statistical differences became strong (P < 0

  9. Data-driven sampling method for building 3D anatomical models from serial histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salunke, Snehal Ulhas; Ablove, Tova; Danforth, Theresa; Tomaszewski, John; Doyle, Scott

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of slice sampling on 3D models of tissue architecture using serial histopathology. We present a method for using a single fully-sectioned tissue block as pilot data, whereby we build a fully-realized 3D model and then determine the optimal set of slices needed to reconstruct the salient features of the model objects under biological investigation. In our work, we are interested in the 3D reconstruction of microvessel architecture in the trigone region between the vagina and the bladder. This region serves as a potential avenue for drug delivery to treat bladder infection. We collect and co-register 23 serial sections of CD31-stained tissue images (6 μm thick sections), from which four microvessels are selected for analysis. To build each model, we perform semi-automatic segmentation of the microvessels. Subsampled meshes are then created by removing slices from the stack, interpolating the missing data, and re-constructing the mesh. We calculate the Hausdorff distance between the full and subsampled meshes to determine the optimal sampling rate for the modeled structures. In our application, we found that a sampling rate of 50% (corresponding to just 12 slices) was sufficient to recreate the structure of the microvessels without significant deviation from the fullyrendered mesh. This pipeline effectively minimizes the number of histopathology slides required for 3D model reconstruction, and can be utilized to either (1) reduce the overall costs of a project, or (2) enable additional analysis on the intermediate slides.

  10. Microcomputer-aided reconstruction: a system designed for the study of 3-D microstructure in histology and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Yaegashi, H; Takahashi, T; Kawasaki, M

    1987-04-01

    We have designed a microcomputer system to reproduce 3-D tissue structures graphically from serial microscopic sections. The system, based on a Hewlett-Packard model 310 desktop computer, comprises a floppy disc drive, a hard-disc that extends the available user memory by adding 40 Mbytes, a colour memory-mapped graphics display, a graphics tablet and a graphics printer. A set of serial 2-D images, manually extracted from serial sections using a microprojector, are digitized on the tablet by tracing the contours of the structure of interest; up to ten different structures can be inputted and reproduced using a 'hidden line' effect. The software, written mainly in HP-BASIC 4.0, produces 3-D pictures of a tissue structure either as a 'stack of slices' with or without being 'tiled' with triangular patches, or in 'wire framing'. Any angle of rotation around the x, y and z axes is assigned for the image to be reconstructed, allowing the operator to obtain the best perspective. The system also discloses the internal connectivity of an object by reducing the structure to a network diagram; this is especially useful in analysing the topological properties of tissue structure. It is shown how, in some examples, the system contributes to a better understanding of tissue microstructures and their morbid changes and how, as an effective tool in morphology, it will aid future studies of histology and histopathology.

  11. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Mcknight, R. L.; Dame, L. T.; Chen, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced 3-D inelastic structural/stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and yet more cost-effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes are being developed. The approach is to develop four different theories, one linear and three higher order with increasing complexities including embedded singularities. Progress in each area is reported.

  12. Bone apposition to laminin-1 coated implants: histologic and 3D evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bougas, K; Jimbo, R; Vandeweghe, S; Hayashi, M; Bryington, M; Kozai, Y; Schwartz-Filho, H O; Tovar, N; Adolfsson, E; Ono, D; Coelho, P G; Wennerberg, A

    2013-05-01

    Laminin-1 has been reported as one of the factors responsible for the nucleation of calcium phosphates and, in vitro, has been reported to selectively recruit osteoprogenitors. This article focused on its in vivo effects, and evaluated the effect of laminin-1 local application on osseointegration. Polished cylindrical hydroxyapatite implants were coated with laminin-1 (test) and the bone responses in the rabbit tibiae after 2 and 4 weeks were evaluated and compared to the non-coated implants (control). Before the samples were processed for histological sectioning, they were three-dimensionally analysed with micro computed tomography (μCT). Both evaluation methods were analysed with regards to bone area around the implant and bone to implant contact. From the histologic observation, new bone formation around the laminin-1 coated implant at 2 weeks seemed to have increased the amount of supporting bone around the implant, however, at 4 weeks, the two groups presented no notable differences. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional morphometric evaluation revealed that both histologic and three-dimensional analysis showed some tendency in favour of the test group implants, however there was no statistical significance between the test and control group results. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-feature-based plaque characterization in ex vivo MRI trained by registration to 3D histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, Arna; Niessen, Wiro J.; Klein, Stefan; Groen, Harald C.; Verhagen, Hence JM; Wentzel, Jolanda J.; van der Lugt, Aad; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for automated characterization of atherosclerotic plaque composition in ex vivo MRI. It uses MRI intensities as well as four other types of features: smoothed, gradient magnitude and Laplacian images at several scales, and the distances to the lumen and outer vessel wall. The ground truth for fibrous, necrotic and calcified tissue was provided by histology and μCT in 12 carotid plaque specimens. Semi-automatic registration of a 3D stack of histological slices and μCT images to MRI allowed for 3D rotations and in-plane deformations of histology. By basing voxelwise classification on different combinations of features, we evaluated their relative importance. To establish whether training by 3D registration yields different results than training by 2D registration, we determined plaque composition using (1) a 2D slice-based registration approach for three manually selected MRI and histology slices per specimen, and (2) an approach that uses only the three corresponding MRI slices from the 3D-registered volumes. Voxelwise classification accuracy was best when all features were used (73.3 ± 6.3%) and was significantly better than when only original intensities and distance features were used (Friedman, p < 0.05). Although 2D registration or selection of three slices from the 3D set slightly decreased accuracy, these differences were non-significant.

  14. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    A two-year program to develop advanced 3D inelastic structural stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes is described. The approach was to develop a matrix of formulation elements and constitutive models. Three constitutive models were developed in conjunction with optimized iterating techniques, accelerators, and convergence criteria within a framework of dynamic time incrementing. Three formulation models were developed: an eight-noded midsurface shell element; a nine-noded midsurface shell element; and a twenty-noded isoparametric solid element. A separate computer program has been developed for each combination of constitutive model-formulation model. Each program provides a functional stand alone capability for performing cyclic nonlinear structural analysis. In addition, the analysis capabilities incorporated into each program can be abstracted in subroutine form for incorporation into other codes or to form new combinations.

  15. On 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Holt, R. V.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.; Gellin, S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the 2-year program, to develop advanced 3-D inelastic structural stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades and vanes. The approach was to develop a matrix of formulation elements and constitutive models. Three constitutive models were developed in conjunction with optimized iterating techniques, accelerators, and convergence criteria within a framework of dynamic time incrementing. Three formulations models were developed; an eight-noded mid-surface shell element, a nine-noded mid-surface shell element and a twenty-noded isoparametric solid element. A separate computer program was developed for each combination of constitutive model-formulation model. Each program provides a functional stand alone capability for performing cyclic nonlinear structural analysis. In addition, the analysis capabilities incorporated into each program can be abstracted in subroutine form for incorporation into other codes or to form new combinations.

  16. Cross-sectional imaging combined with 3D-MR angiography (3D-MRA): diagnostic tool for preoperative vascular assessment of head and neck tumors.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Maliha; Sadick, Haneen; Hörmann, Karl; Düber, Christoph; Diehl, Steffen J

    2005-10-01

    Head and neck cancer accounts for 5% of all malignancies worldwide. The presence of lymph node metastases and vascular infiltration influence patient outcome. This prospective study describes the preoperative morphologic assessment of the vascular status of patients with head and neck tumors by means of high spatial resolution and extended coverage of the arterial and venous system reaching from the supra-aortic region to the skull base. Cross-sectional imaging combined with contrast-enhanced 3D-maximum intensity projection MR angiography (3D-MRA) was applied using a dedicated head and neck coil with a 4-channel panorama array system interface to assess vascular involvement in patients with suspected head and neck cancer. 32 patients underwent preoperative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results were then correlated with surgical and histological findings. 3 of the 32 patients (9%) demonstrated involvement of the arterial system. In 2 of these 3 cases, MRA correctly predicted the arterial status, while in 1 case it gave a false negative result. 11 of the 32 patients (34%) presented with involvement of the venous system. 10 cases showed complete concordance between the findings of the MR venography and the intraoperative status, while in 1 case a false negative result was produced. In patients with suspected head and neck tumors, 3D-MRA in combination with cross sectional imaging is a valuable diagnostic tool for the detection of vascular involvement.

  17. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis of combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. Each code embodies a progression of mathematical models for increasingly comprehensive representation of the geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of nonlinear material response that distinguish these three groups of hot section components.

  18. 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Chen, P. C.; Hartle, M. S.; Huang, H. T.

    1985-01-01

    The objective is to develop analytical tools capable of economically evaluating the cyclic time dependent plasticity which occurs in hot section engine components in areas of strain concentration resulting from the combination of both mechanical and thermal stresses. Three models were developed. A simple model performs time dependent inelastic analysis using the power law creep equation. The second model is the classical model of Professors Walter Haisler and David Allen of Texas A and M University. The third model is the unified model of Bodner, Partom, et al. All models were customized for linear variation of loads and temperatures with all material properties and constitutive models being temperature dependent.

  19. Superfast elastic registration of histologic images of a whole rat brain for 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Stefan; Fischer, Bernd; Modersitzki, Jan; Schmitt, Oliver

    2004-05-01

    We present a super-fast and parameter-free algorithm for non-rigid elastic registration of images of a serially sectioned whole rat brain. The purpose is to produce a three-dimensional high-resolution reconstruction. The registration is modelled as a minimization problem of a functional consisting of a distance measure and a regularizer based on the elastic potential of the displacement field. The minimization of the functional leads to a system of non-linear partial differential equations, the so-called Navier-Lame equations (NLE). Discretization of the NLE and a fixed point type iteration method lead to a linear system of equations, which has to be solved at each iteration step. We not only present a super-fast solution technique for this system, but also come up with sound strategies for accelerating the outer iteration. This does include a multi-scale approach based on a Gaussian pyramid as well as a clever estimation of the material constants for the elastic potential. The results of the registration process were controlled by an expert who was able to recognize histological details like laminations which was not possible before. Therefore, it is essential to apply elastic registration to this kind of imaging problem. Finally, the visually pleasing results were quantified by a distance measure leading to an improvement of about 79% after just 35 iteration steps.

  20. Automatic morphometry of nerve histological sections.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Cuisenaire, O; Denef, J F; Delbeke, J; Macq, B; Veraart, C

    2000-04-15

    A method for the automatic segmentation, recognition and measurement of neuronal myelinated fibers in nerve histological sections is presented. In this method, the fiber parameters i.e. perimeter, area, position of the fiber and myelin sheath thickness are automatically computed. Obliquity of the sections may be taken into account. First, the image is thresholded to provide a coarse classification between myelin and non-myelin pixels. Next, the resulting binary image is further simplified using connected morphological operators. By applying semantic rules to the zonal graph axon candidates are identified. Those are either isolated or still connected. Then, separation of connected fibers is performed by evaluating myelin sheath thickness around each candidate area with an Euclidean distance transformation. Finally, properties of each detected fiber are computed and false positives are removed. The accuracy of the method is assessed by evaluating missed detection, false positive ratio and comparing the results to the manual procedure with sampling. In the evaluated nerve surface, a 0.9% of false positives was found, along with 6.36% of missed detections. The resulting histograms show strong correlation with those obtained by manual measure. The noise introduced by this method is significantly lower than the intrinsic sampling variability. This automatic method constitutes an original tool for morphometrical analysis.

  1. 28 CFR 5.304 - Exemptions under sections 3(d) and (e) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (e) of the Act. (a) As used in section 3(d), the term trade or commerce shall include the exchange... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemptions under sections 3(d) and (e) of... Act, in furtherance of the bona fide trade or commerce of such foreign principal, shall be...

  2. Software for browsing sectioned images of a dog body and generating a 3D model.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seo; Jung, Yong Wook

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to provide accessible and instructive browsing software for sectioned images and a portable document format (PDF) file that includes three-dimensional (3D) models of an entire dog body and (2) to develop techniques for segmentation and 3D modeling that would enable an investigator to perform these tasks without the aid of a computer engineer. To achieve these goals, relatively important or large structures in the sectioned images were outlined to generate segmented images. The sectioned and segmented images were then packaged into browsing software. In this software, structures in the sectioned images are shown in detail and in real color. After 3D models were made from the segmented images, the 3D models were exported into a PDF file. In this format, the 3D models could be manipulated freely. The browsing software and PDF file are available for study by students, for lecture for teachers, and for training for clinicians. These files will be helpful for anatomical study by and clinical training of veterinary students and clinicians. Furthermore, these techniques will be useful for researchers who study two-dimensional images and 3D models.

  3. Cervical vertebrae maturation index estimates on cone beam CT: 3D reconstructions vs sagittal sections

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Marco A E; Costa, André L F; Ximenez, Michel E L; Cotrim-Ferreira, Flávio A; Ferreira-Santos, Rívea I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of CBCT three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and sagittal sections for estimates of cervical vertebrae maturation index (CVMI). Methods: The sample consisted of 72 CBCT examinations from patients aged 8–16 years (45 females and 27 males) selected from the archives of two private clinics. Two calibrated observers (kappa scores: ≥0.901) interpreted the CBCT settings twice. Intra- and interobserver agreement for both imaging exhibition modes was analyzed by kappa statistics, which was also used to analyze the agreement between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections. Correlations between cervical vertebrae maturation estimates and chronological age, as well as between the assessments by 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections, were analyzed using gamma Goodman–Kruskal coefficients (α = 0.05). Results: The kappa scores evidenced almost perfect agreement between the first and second assessments of the cervical vertebrae by 3D reconstructions (0.933–0.983) and sagittal sections (0.983–1.000). Similarly, the agreement between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections was almost perfect (kappa index: 0.983). In most divergent cases, the difference between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections was one stage of CVMI. Strongly positive correlations (>0.8, p < 0.001) were found not only between chronological age and CVMI but also between the estimates by 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Although CBCT imaging must not be used exclusively for this purpose, it may be suitable for skeletal maturity assessments. PMID:26509559

  4. Introduction to the special section on 3D representation, compression, and rendering.

    PubMed

    Vetro, Anthony; Frossard, Pascal; Lee, Sanghoon; Mueller, Karsten; Ohm, Jens-Rainer; Sullivan, Gary

    2013-09-01

    A new set of three-dimensional (3D) data formats and associated compression technologies are emerging with the aim to achieve more flexible representation and higher compression of 3D and multiview video content. These new tools will facilitate the generation of multiview output (e.g., as needed for multiview auto-stereoscopic displays), provide richer immersive multimedia experiences, and allow new interactive applications. This special section includes a timely set of papers covering the most recent technical developments in this area with papers covering topics in the different aspects of 3D systems, from representation and compression algorithms to rendering techniques and quality assessment. This special section includes a good balance on topics that are of interest to academic, industrial, and standardization communities. We believe that this collection of papers represent the most recent advances in representation, compression, rendering, and quality assessment of 3D scenes.

  5. A low cost computer aided design (CAD) system for 3D-reconstruction from serial sections.

    PubMed

    Keri, C; Ahnelt, P K

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes an approach to computer-assisted 3D-reconstruction of neuronal specimens based on a low cost yet powerful software package for a personal computer (Atari ST). It provides an easy to handle (mouse driven) object editor to create 3D models of medium complexity (15,000 vertices) from sections or from scratch. The models may be displayed in various modes including stereo viewing and complex animation sequences.

  6. Alignment, segmentation and 3-D reconstruction of serial sections based on automated algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Weiguo; Tang, Shaojie; Xu, Qiong; Lian, Qin; Wang, Jin; Li, Dichen

    2012-12-01

    A well-defined three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of bone-cartilage transitional structures is crucial for the osteochondral restoration. This paper presents an accurate, computationally efficient and fully-automated algorithm for the alignment and segmentation of two-dimensional (2-D) serial to construct the 3-D model of bone-cartilage transitional structures. Entire system includes the following five components: (1) image harvest, (2) image registration, (3) image segmentation, (4) 3-D reconstruction and visualization, and (5) evaluation. A computer program was developed in the environment of Matlab for the automatic alignment and segmentation of serial sections. Automatic alignment algorithm based on the position's cross-correlation of the anatomical characteristic feature points of two sequential sections. A method combining an automatic segmentation and an image threshold processing was applied to capture the regions and structures of interest. SEM micrograph and 3-D model reconstructed directly in digital microscope were used to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of this strategy. The morphology of 3-D model constructed by serial sections is consistent with the results of SEM micrograph and 3-D model of digital microscope.

  7. Fourier Domain Iterative Approach to Optical Sectioning of 3d Translucent Objects for Ophthalmology Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razguli, A. V.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, A. V.; Romanenko, T. E.; Goncharov, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we deal with the problem of optical sectioning. This is a post processing step while investigating of 3D translucent medical objects based on rapid refocusing of the imaging system by the adaptive optics technique. Each image, captured in focal plane, can be represented as the sum of in-focus true section and out-of-focus images of the neighboring sections of the depth that are undesirable in the subsequent reconstruction of 3D object. The problem of optical sectioning under consideration is to elaborate a robust approach capable of obtaining a stack of cross section images purified from such distortions. For a typical sectioning statement arising in ophthalmology we propose a local iterative method in Fourier spectral plane. Compared to the non-local constant parameter selection for the whole spectral domain, the method demonstrates both improved sectioning results and a good level of scalability when implemented on multi-core CPUs.

  8. [Use of polyvinyl alcohol for preparing frozen histological sections].

    PubMed

    Serga, V A; Bykov, L A; Kasatonov, V G

    1982-01-01

    The authors developed a new method for preparation of frozen histological sections. It consists in the use of glycerin-plastified polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, and distilled water for impregnation of tissue pieces and subsequent freezing of them in the same medium. This produces histological sections of high quality. The frozen sections are sufficiently thin (3--5 micrometers). The method excludes cell structure destruction by ice crystals and overfreezing of blocks; the sections do not crumble. Losses of free cell elements, extraction of substances and other artifacts are minimized. The frozen histological sections are firmly glued to the glass without using protein with glycerin. The method saves time and reagents for the preparation of the sections and allows their wide use in morphological and histochemical studies.

  9. WELLTON GOVERNMENT CAMP, TEMPORARY RESIDENCE TYPE 3D. PLAN, SECTION, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WELLTON GOVERNMENT CAMP, TEMPORARY RESIDENCE TYPE 3D. PLAN, SECTION, AND ELEVATIONS. Drawing 50-308-4565, dated July 20, 1949. U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Yuma, Arizona - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Building No. 8 A-B (Duplex), 30671 & 30673 Wellton-Mohawk Drive, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  10. Correlating 2D histological slice with 3D MRI image volume using smart phone as an interactive tool for muscle study.

    PubMed

    Eresen, Aydin; Li, Peng; Ji, Jim Xiuquan

    2014-01-01

    In muscle dystrophy studies, registration of histological image with MRI image volume enables cross validation of MRI biomarkers using pathological result. However, correlation of 2D histology slice with 3D MRI volume is technically challenging due to the potentially non-orthogonal slice plane and incomplete or distorted histological slice. This paper presents an efficient method to directly perform the 2D-3D registration. The method is unique in that it uses smart phone as a navigation tool for initial alignment followed by an overlap invariant mutual information-based refinement. Experimental results using animal muscle samples images from a 3T MRI and HE stained histological images show that the proposed method is capable of aligning the histological slice with an oblique slice in MR volume.

  11. Average Cross-Sectional Area of DebriSat Fragments Using Volumetrically Constructed 3D Representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scruggs, T.; Moraguez, M.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.

    2016-01-01

    Debris fragments from the hypervelocity impact testing of DebriSat are being collected and characterized for use in updating existing satellite breakup models. One of the key parameters utilized in these models is the ballistic coefficient of the fragment which is directly related to its area-to-mass ratio. However, since the attitude of fragments varies during their orbital lifetime, it is customary to use the average cross-sectional area in the calculation of the area-to-mass ratio. The average cross-sectional area is defined as the average of the projected surface areas perpendicular to the direction of motion and has been shown to be equal to one-fourth of the total surface area of a convex object. Unfortunately, numerous fragments obtained from the DebriSat experiment show significant concavity (i.e., shadowing) and thus we have explored alternate methods for computing the average cross-sectional area of the fragments. An imaging system based on the volumetric reconstruction of a 3D object from multiple 2D photographs of the object was developed for use in determining the size characteristic (i.e., characteristics length) of the DebriSat fragments. For each fragment, the imaging system generates N number of images from varied azimuth and elevation angles and processes them using a space-carving algorithm to construct a 3D point cloud of the fragment. This paper describes two approaches for calculating the average cross-sectional area of debris fragments based on the 3D imager. Approach A utilizes the constructed 3D object to generate equally distributed cross-sectional area projections and then averages them to determine the average cross-sectional area. Approach B utilizes a weighted average of the area of the 2D photographs to directly compute the average cross-sectional area. A comparison of the accuracy and computational needs of each approach is described as well as preliminary results of an analysis to determine the "optimal" number of images needed for

  12. Innovative 3D Model of the Human Middle Ear in High Resolution with a Histological Microgrinding Method: A Feasibility Study and Comparison with μCT

    PubMed Central

    Bradel, Susanne; Doniga-Crivat, Laura; Besdo, Silke; Lexow, Franziska; Fehr, Michael; Lenarz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion. The development of a histological 3D model of the tympanic cavity visualizes the exact microanatomy of the sound conduction organ and is therefore essential for finite elements simulations and surgical training. Objectives. So far, no accurate histological 3D model of the sound conduction system existed in literature. For 3D reconstruction of the very fine structures inside and outside the auditory ossicles, a method based on histological slices allows a more differential analysis of both hard and soft tissues and could thus be superior to μCT. Method. A complete temporal bone was embedded in epoxy resin and microground in distances of about 34 μm. After photodocumentation of every plane, a 3D reconstruction was performed by using the Computer Aided Design (CAD) program Rhinoceros 5®. For comparison, a μCT of the same specimen resulted in a 3D model of the calcified structures in the middle ear. Results. The histological 3D model gives an excellent overview to all anatomical soft and bony tissues of the human auditory ossicles. Specifically the fine blood vessel system and the exact dimension of cartilage areas inside the ossicles can be illustrated much more precisely than with μCT data. The present technique also allows the evaluation of the fine connecting ligaments inside the tympanic cavity. PMID:28553355

  13. Innovative 3D Model of the Human Middle Ear in High Resolution with a Histological Microgrinding Method: A Feasibility Study and Comparison with μCT.

    PubMed

    Bradel, Susanne; Doniga-Crivat, Laura; Besdo, Silke; Lexow, Franziska; Fehr, Michael; Lenarz, Thomas; Prenzler, Nils; Brandes, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion. The development of a histological 3D model of the tympanic cavity visualizes the exact microanatomy of the sound conduction organ and is therefore essential for finite elements simulations and surgical training. Objectives. So far, no accurate histological 3D model of the sound conduction system existed in literature. For 3D reconstruction of the very fine structures inside and outside the auditory ossicles, a method based on histological slices allows a more differential analysis of both hard and soft tissues and could thus be superior to μCT. Method. A complete temporal bone was embedded in epoxy resin and microground in distances of about 34 μm. After photodocumentation of every plane, a 3D reconstruction was performed by using the Computer Aided Design (CAD) program Rhinoceros 5®. For comparison, a μCT of the same specimen resulted in a 3D model of the calcified structures in the middle ear. Results. The histological 3D model gives an excellent overview to all anatomical soft and bony tissues of the human auditory ossicles. Specifically the fine blood vessel system and the exact dimension of cartilage areas inside the ossicles can be illustrated much more precisely than with μCT data. The present technique also allows the evaluation of the fine connecting ligaments inside the tympanic cavity.

  14. A Method for Sectioning and Immunohistochemical Analysis of Stem Cell-Derived 3-D Organoids.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Luke A; Beebe, David C; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-05-12

    This unit describes a protocol for embedding, sectioning, and immunocytochemical analysis of pluripotent stem cell-derived 3-D organoids. Specifically, we describe a method to embed iPSC-derived retinal cups in low-melt agarose, acquire thick sections using a vibratome tissue slicer, and perform immunohistochemical analysis. This method includes an approach for antibody labeling that minimizes the amount of antibody needed for individual experiments and that utilizes large-volume washing to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, allowing for clean, high-resolution imaging of developing cell types. The universal methods described can be employed regardless of the type of pluripotent stem cell used and 3-D organoid generated. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    This annual status report presents the results of work performed during the fourth year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes permitting more accurate and efficient 3-D analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of math models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. Volume 1 of this report discusses the special finite element models developed during the fourth year of the contract.

  16. Understanding surface oxidation in stainless steels through 3D FIB sequential sectioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Kruska, Karen; Iyengar, Ilya; Terachi, Takumi; Yamada, Takuyo

    2012-07-01

    Focused Ion Beam (FIB) 3D sequential sectioning has been used to reconstruct the morphology of surface oxides in 304 stainless steels in nuclear reactors in order to characterize environmental degradation. Several coupon specimens with prior cold work and oxidized under applied stress have been studied in detail. A novel statistical approach based on more than 250k individual measurements will be presented as an alternative to conventional methods.

  17. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: Advanced special functions models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Sections Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analyses of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components.

  18. 3D elemental mapping with nanometer scale depth resolution via electron optical sectioning

    DOE PAGES

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Yang, Hao; Jones, Lewys; ...

    2016-12-05

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope has long been used to perform elemental mapping but has not previously exhibited depth sensitivity. The key to depth resolution with optical sectioning is the transfer of sufficiently high lateral spatial frequencies. By performing spectrum imaging with atomic resolution we achieve in this paper nanometer scale depth resolution, enabling us to optically section an oxide heterostructure spectroscopically. Finally, such 3D elemental mapping is sensitive to atomic scale changes in structure and composition and is more interpretable than Z-contrast imaging alone.

  19. Fast multi-core based multimodal registration of 2D cross-sections and 3D datasets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Solving bioinformatics tasks often requires extensive computational power. Recent trends in processor architecture combine multiple cores into a single chip to improve overall performance. The Cell Broadband Engine (CBE), a heterogeneous multi-core processor, provides power-efficient and cost-effective high-performance computing. One application area is image analysis and visualisation, in particular registration of 2D cross-sections into 3D image datasets. Such techniques can be used to put different image modalities into spatial correspondence, for example, 2D images of histological cuts into morphological 3D frameworks. Results We evaluate the CBE-driven PlayStation 3 as a high performance, cost-effective computing platform by adapting a multimodal alignment procedure to several characteristic hardware properties. The optimisations are based on partitioning, vectorisation, branch reducing and loop unrolling techniques with special attention to 32-bit multiplies and limited local storage on the computing units. We show how a typical image analysis and visualisation problem, the multimodal registration of 2D cross-sections and 3D datasets, benefits from the multi-core based implementation of the alignment algorithm. We discuss several CBE-based optimisation methods and compare our results to standard solutions. More information and the source code are available from http://cbe.ipk-gatersleben.de. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the CBE processor in a PlayStation 3 accelerates computational intensive multimodal registration, which is of great importance in biological/medical image processing. The PlayStation 3 as a low cost CBE-based platform offers an efficient option to conventional hardware to solve computational problems in image processing and bioinformatics. PMID:20064262

  20. Semi-automated 3D segmentation of major tracts in the rat brain: comparing DTI with standard histological methods.

    PubMed

    Gyengesi, Erika; Calabrese, Evan; Sherrier, Matthew C; Johnson, G Allan; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Researchers working with rodent models of neurological disease often require an accurate map of the anatomical organization of the white matter of the rodent brain. With the increasing popularity of small animal MRI techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), there is considerable interest in rapid segmentation methods of neurological structures for quantitative comparisons. DTI-derived tractography allows simple and rapid segmentation of major white matter tracts, but the anatomic accuracy of these computer-generated fibers is open to question and has not been rigorously evaluated in the rat brain. In this study, we examine the anatomic accuracy of tractography-based segmentation in the adult rat brain. We analysed 12 major white matter pathways using semi-automated tractography-based segmentation alongside manual segmentation of Gallyas silver-stained histology sections. We applied four fiber-tracking algorithms to the DTI data-two integration methods and two deflection methods. In many cases, tractography-based segmentation closely matched histology-based segmentation; however different tractography algorithms produced dramatically different results. Results suggest that certain white matter pathways are more amenable to tractography-based segmentation than others. We believe that these data will help researchers decide whether it is appropriate to use tractography-based segmentation of white matter structures for quantitative DTI-based analysis of neurologic disease models.

  1. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mirabela; Golden, Thea; Wang, Haibo; Gow, Andrew; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering ex vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors' framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. The authors' image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology-MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic inflammation in a mouse model. The authors

  2. 3D optical sectioning with a new hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging system.

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, Linda T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2007-02-01

    A novel hyperspectral fluorescence microscope for high-resolution 3D optical sectioning of cells and other structures has been designed, constructed, and used to investigate a number of different problems. We have significantly extended new multivariate curve resolution (MCR) data analysis methods to deconvolve the hyperspectral image data and to rapidly extract quantitative 3D concentration distribution maps of all emitting species. The imaging system has many advantages over current confocal imaging systems including simultaneous monitoring of numerous highly overlapped fluorophores, immunity to autofluorescence or impurity fluorescence, enhanced sensitivity, and dramatically improved accuracy, reliability, and dynamic range. Efficient data compression in the spectral dimension has allowed personal computers to perform quantitative analysis of hyperspectral images of large size without loss of image quality. We have also developed and tested software to perform analysis of time resolved hyperspectral images using trilinear multivariate analysis methods. The new imaging system is an enabling technology for numerous applications including (1) 3D composition mapping analysis of multicomponent processes occurring during host-pathogen interactions, (2) monitoring microfluidic processes, (3) imaging of molecular motors and (4) understanding photosynthetic processes in wild type and mutant Synechocystis cyanobacteria.

  3. Strain determination in bone sections with simultaneous 3D digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Araceli Sánchez; De la Torre Ibarra, Manuel H.; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza; Anaya, Tonatiuh-Saucedo

    2014-06-01

    A 3D digital holographic interferometer was used to measure the surface strain components in two different bovine's bone sections. The applied force on the sample was induced by a precisely controlled lateral micro compression. The simultaneous acquisition capability of the system helps to record a fast sequence of images, each one containing three independent holograms that result in three orthogonal displacement components u, v and w from which the surface strain components ɛx, ɛy and γxy over the bone's field of view were calculated. This research study was carried out in two different bone sections: the cortical bone and the medullary cavity/yellow marrow section. The resulting strain concentrators are of great importance to better understand the mechanical response of complex biological structures such as this bovine femoral bone.

  4. On correction of translational misalignments between section planes in 3D EBSD.

    PubMed

    Šedivý, O; Jäger, A

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction allows obtaining the 3D image of a material from the stack of 2D sections. This is achieved by repeated application of two different beams; electron beam for electron backscatter diffraction mapping of the surface and focused ion beam for removing a thin layer of material from the surface. In most of these systems with two beams, the experiment requires stage movements for correct positioning of the sample to the respective beams. However, imperfections in this positioning are difficult to avoid, which yield small translational misalignments between the sections in the output data. In this work, we deal with an important task of correcting these misalignments between the sections such that the 3D image is recovered properly. On a simple example, we demonstrate that commonly used methods fail in case there is a structural anisotropy in the material under consideration. We propose an improved alignment algorithm which can neglect this behaviour with the use of external support information on a systematic trend in the translational misalignments. Efficiency of the algorithm is proven on a number of simulated data with different kinds of anisotropy. Application to a real data sample of a fine grained aluminium alloy is also given. The algorithm is available in an open-source library. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Pico-projector-based optical sectioning microscopy for 3D chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of mesophyll cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Yu John; Yeh, Chia-Hua; Chen, S.-Wei; Chung, Chien-Han

    2015-03-01

    A pico-projector-based optical sectioning microscope (POSM) was constructed using a pico-projector to generate structured illumination patterns. A net rate of 5.8 × 106 pixel/s and sub-micron spatial resolution in three-dimensions (3D) were achieved. Based on the pico-projector’s flexibility in pattern generation, the characteristics of POSM with different modulation periods and at different imaging depths were measured and discussed. With the application of different modulation periods, 3D chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of mesophyll cells was carried out in freshly plucked leaves of four species without sectioning or staining. For each leaf, an average penetration depth of 120 μm was achieved. Increasing the modulation period along with the increment of imaging depth, optical sectioning images can be obtained with a compromise between the axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. After ∼30 min imaging on the same area, photodamage was hardly observed. Taking the advantages of high speed and low damages of POSM, the investigation of the dynamic fluorescence responses to temperature changes was performed under three different treatment temperatures. The three embedded blue, green and red light-emitting diode light sources were applied to observe the responses of the leaves with different wavelength excitation.

  6. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-D Inelastic Analysis Method program is described. This program consists of a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain)and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. Three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (Marc-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described in this report.

  7. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2004-02-17

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

  8. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Mirabela; Golden, Thea; Wang, Haibo; Gow, Andrew; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering ex vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors’ framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. Methods: The authors’ image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. Results: The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology—MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic

  9. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Rusu, Mirabela Wang, Haibo; Madabhushi, Anant; Golden, Thea; Gow, Andrew

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering ex vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors’ framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. Methods: The authors’ image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. Results: The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology—MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic

  10. Stacked Predictive Sparse Decomposition for Classification of Histology Sections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hang; Zhou, Yin; Borowsky, Alexander; Barner, Kenneth; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2015-05-01

    Image-based classification of histology sections, in terms of distinct components (e.g., tumor, stroma, normal), provides a series of indices for histology composition (e.g., the percentage of each distinct components in histology sections), and enables the study of nuclear properties within each component. Furthermore, the study of these indices, constructed from each whole slide image in a large cohort, has the potential to provide predictive models of clinical outcome. For example, correlations can be established between the constructed indices and the patients' survival information at cohort level, which is a fundamental step towards personalized medicine. However, performance of the existing techniques is hindered as a result of large technical variations (e.g., variations of color/textures in tissue images due to non-standard experimental protocols) and biological heterogeneities (e.g., cell type, cell state) that are always present in a large cohort. We propose a system that automatically learns a series of dictionary elements for representing the underlying spatial distribution using stacked predictive sparse decomposition. The learned representation is then fed into the spatial pyramid matching framework with a linear support vector machine classifier. The system has been evaluated for classification of distinct histological components for two cohorts of tumor types. Throughput has been increased by using of graphical processing unit (GPU), and evaluation indicates a superior performance results, compared with previous research.

  11. Stacked Predictive Sparse Decomposition for Classification of Histology Sections

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yin; Borowsky, Alexander; Barner, Kenneth; Spellman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Image-based classification of histology sections, in terms of distinct components (e.g., tumor, stroma, normal), provides a series of indices for histology composition (e.g., the percentage of each distinct components in histology sections), and enables the study of nuclear properties within each component. Furthermore, the study of these indices, constructed from each whole slide image in a large cohort, has the potential to provide predictive models of clinical outcome. For example, correlations can be established between the constructed indices and the patients’ survival information at cohort level, which is a fundamental step towards personalized medicine. However, performance of the existing techniques is hindered as a result of large technical variations (e.g., variations of color/textures in tissue images due to non-standard experimental protocols) and biological heterogeneities (e.g., cell type, cell state) that are always present in a large cohort. We propose a system that automatically learns a series of dictionary elements for representing the underlying spatial distribution using stacked predictive sparse decomposition. The learned representation is then fed into the spatial pyramid matching framework with a linear support vector machine classifier. The system has been evaluated for classification of distinct histological components for two cohorts of tumor types. Throughput has been increased by using of graphical processing unit (GPU), and evaluation indicates a superior performance results, compared with previous research. PMID:27721567

  12. Analysis of large displacements/small strains of enhanced 3D beam with section changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Sasa; Liang, Biao; Vidal-Salle, Emmanuelle

    2016-10-01

    Modeling fabric process at the mesoscopic (i.e. the yarn) scale can be able to give realistic fabric shape predictions. For that, we proposed a new 3D beam element with section changes while breaking from classical beam hypothesis, which can describe the compression and shape change of the yarn. However, the results presented previously are only the first step of a more ambitious work. Indeed, the final goal is to use those elements to model yarns in a textile composite preform. For that purpose, the present paper aims to carry out validation for large displacements and small strains. A nonlinear theory of deformation is based on the updated Lagrangian method. The work employs small strain theory on each element like the co-rotational technique, and only the unit vectors of the cross-sections are employed instead of the full three-dimensional rotational vectors or angles. Finally, a set of numerical examples show that the enhanced 3D element provides an excellent numerical performance under large displacements/ small strains.

  13. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 describes effort performed under Task 4B, Special Finite Element Special Function Models, while Volume 2 concentrates on Task 4C, Advanced Special Functions Models.

  14. 3D Topography of the Young Adult Anal Sphincter Complex Reconstructed from Undeformed Serial Anatomical Sections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Hagoort, Jaco; Shan, Jin-Lu; Tan, Li-Wen; Fang, Bin-Ji; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pelvic-floor anatomy is usually studied by artifact-prone dissection or imaging, which requires prior anatomical knowledge. We used the serial-section approach to settle contentious issues and an interactive 3D-pdf to make the results widely accessible. Method 3D reconstructions of undeformed thin serial anatomical sections of 4 females and 2 males (21–35y) of the Chinese Visible Human database. Findings Based on tendinous septa and muscle-fiber orientation as segmentation guides, the anal-sphincter complex (ASC) comprised the subcutaneous external anal sphincter (EAS) and the U-shaped puborectal muscle, a part of the levator ani muscle (LAM). The anococcygeal ligament fixed the EAS to the coccygeal bone. The puborectal-muscle loops, which define the levator hiatus, passed around the anorectal junction and inserted anteriorly on the perineal body and pubic bone. The LAM had a common anterior attachment to the pubic bone, but separated posteriorly into puborectal and “pubovisceral” muscles. This pubovisceral muscle was bilayered: its internal layer attached to the conjoint longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the rectococcygeal fascia, while its outer, patchy layer reinforced the inner layer. ASC contraction makes the ano-rectal bend more acute and lifts the pelvic floor. Extensions of the rectal longitudinal smooth muscle to the coccygeal bone (rectococcygeal muscle), perineal body (rectoperineal muscle), and endopelvic fascia (conjoint longitudinal and pubovisceral muscles) formed a “diaphragm” at the inferior boundary of the mesorectum that suspended the anorectal junction. Its contraction should straighten the anorectal bend. Conclusion The serial-section approach settled contentious topographic issues of the pelvic floor. We propose that the ASC is involved in continence and the rectal diaphragm in defecation. PMID:26305117

  15. 3D Topography of the Young Adult Anal Sphincter Complex Reconstructed from Undeformed Serial Anatomical Sections.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F; Hagoort, Jaco; Shan, Jin-Lu; Tan, Li-Wen; Fang, Bin-Ji; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Lamers, Wouter H

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic-floor anatomy is usually studied by artifact-prone dissection or imaging, which requires prior anatomical knowledge. We used the serial-section approach to settle contentious issues and an interactive 3D-pdf to make the results widely accessible. 3D reconstructions of undeformed thin serial anatomical sections of 4 females and 2 males (21-35y) of the Chinese Visible Human database. Based on tendinous septa and muscle-fiber orientation as segmentation guides, the anal-sphincter complex (ASC) comprised the subcutaneous external anal sphincter (EAS) and the U-shaped puborectal muscle, a part of the levator ani muscle (LAM). The anococcygeal ligament fixed the EAS to the coccygeal bone. The puborectal-muscle loops, which define the levator hiatus, passed around the anorectal junction and inserted anteriorly on the perineal body and pubic bone. The LAM had a common anterior attachment to the pubic bone, but separated posteriorly into puborectal and "pubovisceral" muscles. This pubovisceral muscle was bilayered: its internal layer attached to the conjoint longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the rectococcygeal fascia, while its outer, patchy layer reinforced the inner layer. ASC contraction makes the ano-rectal bend more acute and lifts the pelvic floor. Extensions of the rectal longitudinal smooth muscle to the coccygeal bone (rectococcygeal muscle), perineal body (rectoperineal muscle), and endopelvic fascia (conjoint longitudinal and pubovisceral muscles) formed a "diaphragm" at the inferior boundary of the mesorectum that suspended the anorectal junction. Its contraction should straighten the anorectal bend. The serial-section approach settled contentious topographic issues of the pelvic floor. We propose that the ASC is involved in continence and the rectal diaphragm in defecation.

  16. Multimodal-3D imaging based on μMRI and μCT techniques bridges the gap with histology in visualization of the bone regeneration process.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, R; Conti, A; Sinjari, B; Spadone, S; Pecci, R; Palombo, M; Komlev, V S; Ortore, M G; Tromba, G; Capuani, S; De Luca, F; Caputi, S; Traini, T; Della Penna, S

    2017-06-07

    Bone repair/regeneration is usually investigated through x-ray computed microtomography (μCT) supported by histology of extracted samples, to analyze biomaterial structure and new bone formation processes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (μMRI) shows a richer tissue contrast than μCT, despite at lower resolution, and could be combined with μCT in the perspective of conducting non-destructive 3D investigations of bone. A pipeline designed to combine μMRI and μCT images of bone samples is here described and applied on samples of extracted human jawbone core following bone graft. We optimized the co-registration procedure between μCT and μMRI images to avoid bias due to the different resolutions and contrasts. Furthermore, we used an Adaptive Multivariate Clustering, grouping homologous voxels in the co-registered images, to visualize different tissue types within a fused 3D metastructure. The tissue grouping matched the 2D histology applied only on one slice, thus extending the histology labelling in 3D. Specifically, in all samples we could separate and map two types of regenerated bone, calcified tissue, soft tissues and/or fat and marrow space. Remarkably, μMRI and μCT alone were not able to separate the two types of regenerated bone. Finally, we computed volumes of each tissue in the 3D metastructures, which might be exploited by quantitative simulation. The 3D metastructure obtained through our pipeline represents a first step to bridge the gap between the quality of information obtained from 2D optical microscopy and the 3D mapping of the bone tissue heterogeneity, and could allow researchers and clinicians to non-destructively characterize and follow-up bone regeneration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Special Section: New Ways to Detect Colon Cancer 3-D virtual screening now being used

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3-D image generated by the virtual colonoscopy software he invented with a team of computer scientists ... and his colleagues had patented a pioneering computer software system and techniques for 3-D virtual colonoscopy ...

  18. Detecting Distance between Injected Microspheres and Target Tumor via 3D Reconstruction of Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Colby, Sean M.; Davis, Cassi A.; Basciano, Christopher; Greene, Kevin; Feo, John T.; Kennedy, Andrew

    2012-08-28

    One treatment increasing in use for solid tumors in the liver is radioembolization via the delivery of 90Y microspheres to the vascular bed within or near the location of the tumor. It is desirable as part of the treatment for the microspheres to embed preferentially in or near the tumor. This work details an approach for analyzing the deposition of microspheres with respect to the location of the tumor. The approach used is based upon thin-slice serial sectioning of the tissue sample, followed by high resolution imaging, microsphere detection, and 3-D reconstruction of the tumor surface. Distance from the microspheres to the tumor was calculated using a fast deterministic point inclusion method.

  19. Robust registration of sparsely sectioned histology to ex-vivo MRI of temporal lobe resections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubran, Maged; Khan, Ali R.; Crukley, Cathie; Buchanan, Susan; Santyr, Brendan; deRibaupierre, Sandrine; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Surgical resection of epileptic foci is a typical treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy, however, accurate preoperative localization is challenging and often requires invasive sub-dural or intra-cranial electrode placement. The presence of cellular abnormalities in the resected tissue can be used to validate the effectiveness of multispectralMagnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in pre-operative foci localization and surgical planning. If successful, these techniques can lead to improved surgical outcomes and less invasive procedures. Towards this goal, a novel pipeline is presented here for post-operative imaging of temporal lobe specimens involving MRI and digital histology, and present and evaluate methods for bringing these images into spatial correspondence. The sparsely-sectioned histology images of resected tissue represents a challenge for 3D reconstruction which we address with a combined 3D and 2D rigid registration algorithm that alternates between slice-based and volume-based registration with the ex-vivo MRI. We also evaluate four methods for non-rigid within-plane registration using both images and fiducials, with the top performing method resulting in a target registration error of 0.87 mm. This work allows for the spatially-local comparison of histology with post-operative MRI and paves the way for eventual registration with pre-operative MRI images.

  20. 3D Measurement of Anatomical Cross-sections of Foot while Walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Makoto; Mochimaru, Masaaki; Kanade, Takeo

    Recently, techniques for measuring and modeling of human body are taking attention, because human models are useful for ergonomic design in manufacturing. We aim to measure accurate shape of human foot that will be useful for the design of shoes. For such purpose, shape measurement of foot in motion is obviously important, because foot shape in the shoe is deformed while walking or running. In this paper, we propose a method to measure anatomical cross-sections of foot while walking. No one had ever measured dynamic shape of anatomical cross-sections, though they are very basic and popular in the field of biomechanics. Our proposed method is based on multi-view stereo method. The target cross-sections are painted in individual colors (red, green, yellow and blue), and the proposed method utilizes the characteristic of target shape in the camera captured images. Several nonlinear conditions are introduced in the process to find the consistent correspondence in all images. Our desired accuracy is less than 1mm error, which is similar to the existing 3D scanners for static foot measurement. In our experiments, the proposed method achieved the desired accuracy.

  1. Microscopic and histological examination of the mouse hindpaw digit and flexor tendon arrangement with 3D reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason; Bennett, William; Ferguson, Mark W J; McGrouther, Duncan A

    2006-01-01

    Mice are currently the species of choice for the in vivo study of injury, but few detailed anatomical descriptions have been made of rodent digits, limiting their use for the investigation of intrasynovial tendon healing. In this study a detailed microscopic and histological investigation was performed using C57/BL6 and Tie2 LacZ reporter gene transgenic mice. Serial-sectioned mouse hindpaw digits were characterized using haematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome (collagen), Alcian blue (fibrocartilage), Miller's stain (elastin) and TRITC-phalloidin (cellular cytoskeleton) staining. Digital vasculature was demonstrated using FITC-labelled dextran perfusion studies supplemented with LacZ expression in Tie2 LacZ transgenic mice digits. Imaging of the digit used a combination of brightfield and confocal microscopy with three-dimensional reconstruction. Our findings demonstrated that the mouse hindpaw possesses deep and superficial flexor tendons within a synovial sheath comparable with that found in other mammalian species. The intrasynovial tendons were avascular and had regions of fibrocartilaginous specialization relating to areas of compression. Corresponding vascular networks were demonstrated around the sheath using Tie2 LacZ mice and FITC-perfused hindpaws. Furthermore, there is an area of digit where both deep and superficial tendons reside between two pulleys, similar to zone 2 in the human hand where it would be possible to study intrasynovial tendon injury and adhesion formation. In conclusion, although the dimensions of the mouse digit pose technical challenges for surgical intervention, we have identified a model for the study of flexor tendon injury that will permit future genetic manipulation studies. PMID:17005025

  2. [A method of preparing sections for express histological diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zubkova, T V; Tarnopol'skaia, O V; Makarov, V L; Nemykin, V I; Marmarova, T Iu

    2000-01-01

    The method of improving quality of histological slides for intrasurgical diagnosis is proposed. The method consists in preliminary microwave processing of the slice of surgical material before putting in into cryostat for freezing and sections preparation. A slice of surgical material was first immersed in 10 ml of physiological solution (pH = 7.2). Then it was exposed to microwave radiation (2.45 GHz, 1 W/cm2) for 1.5 min. After that the slice was put into cryostat and frozen. Microwave processing is done in a home microwave oven or working chamber of microwave histoprocessor. Essential advantage in quality of slides is obtained.

  3. Three-dimensional direct measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Jonathan Guy; De Matteo, Robert; Harding, Richard; Black, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of myocardial development and disease requires accurate measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity (nuclei per cell), and ploidy (genome copies per cell). Current methods require enzymatically isolating cells, which excludes the use of archived tissue, or serial sectioning. We describe a method of analysis that permits the direct simultaneous measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, heart tissue was obtained from four species (rat, mouse, rabbit, sheep) at up to three life stages: prenatal, weaning and adulthood. Thick (40 μm) paraffin sections were stained with Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 to visualise cell membranes, and DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) to visualise nuclei and measure ploidy. Previous methods have been restricted to thin sections (2–10 μm) and offer an incomplete picture of cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis software (Imaris Version 8.2, Bitplane AG, Switzerland), cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy were measured. This method of staining and analysis of cardiomyocytes enables accurate morphometric measurements in thick histological sections, thus unlocking the potential of archived tissue. Our novel time-efficient method permits the entire cardiomyocyte to be visualised directly in 3D, eliminating the need for precise alignment of serial sections. PMID:27048757

  4. Three-dimensional direct measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensley, Jonathan Guy; de Matteo, Robert; Harding, Richard; Black, Mary Jane

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of myocardial development and disease requires accurate measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity (nuclei per cell), and ploidy (genome copies per cell). Current methods require enzymatically isolating cells, which excludes the use of archived tissue, or serial sectioning. We describe a method of analysis that permits the direct simultaneous measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, heart tissue was obtained from four species (rat, mouse, rabbit, sheep) at up to three life stages: prenatal, weaning and adulthood. Thick (40 μm) paraffin sections were stained with Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 to visualise cell membranes, and DAPI (4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) to visualise nuclei and measure ploidy. Previous methods have been restricted to thin sections (2–10 μm) and offer an incomplete picture of cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis software (Imaris Version 8.2, Bitplane AG, Switzerland), cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy were measured. This method of staining and analysis of cardiomyocytes enables accurate morphometric measurements in thick histological sections, thus unlocking the potential of archived tissue. Our novel time-efficient method permits the entire cardiomyocyte to be visualised directly in 3D, eliminating the need for precise alignment of serial sections.

  5. A detailed description of the development of the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii using SEM, TEM, Histology and 3D-reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, the origin of the third germ layer and its special formation of coelomic cavities by enterocoely is regarded to be an informative character in phylogenetic analyses. In early deuterostomes such as sea urchins, the mesoderm forms through a single evagination pinching off from the apical end of the archenteron which then gives off mesocoela and metacoela on each side. This echinoid-type coelom formation has conventionally been assumed to be ancestral for Deuterostomia. However, recent phylogenetic analyses show that Echinodermata hold a more derived position within Deuterostomia. In this regard a subgroup of Hemichordata, namely enteropneusts, seem to host promising candidates, because they are supposed to have retained many ancestral deuterostome features on the one hand, and furthermore share some characteristics with chordates on the other hand. In enteropneusts a wide range of different modes of coelom formation has been reported and in many cases authors of the original observations carefully detailed the limitations of their descriptions, while these doubts disappeared in subsequent reviews. In the present study, we investigated the development of all tissues in an enteropneust, Saccoglossus kowalevskii by using modern morphological techniques such as complete serial sectioning for LM and TEM, and 3D-reconstructions, in order to contribute new data to the elucidation of deuterostome evolution. Results Our data show that in the enteropneust S. kowalevskii all main coelomic cavities (single protocoel, paired mesocoela and metacoela) derive from the endoderm via enterocoely as separate evaginations, in contrast to the aforementioned echinoid-type. The anlagen of the first pair of gill slits emerge at the late kink stage (~96 h pf). From that time onwards, we documented a temporal left-first development of the gill slits and skeletal gill rods in S. kowalevskii until the 2 gill slit juvenile stage. Conclusions The condition of coelom

  6. The spine in 3D. Computed tomographic reformation from 2D axial sections.

    PubMed

    Virapongse, C; Gmitro, A; Sarwar, M

    1986-01-01

    A new program (3D83, General Electric) was used to reformat three-dimensional (3D) images from two-dimensional (2D) computed tomographic axial scans in 18 patients who had routine scans of the spine. The 3D spine images were extremely true to life and could be rotated around all three principle axes (constituting a movie), so that an illusion of head-motion parallax was created. The benefit of 3D reformation with this program is primarily for preoperative planning. It appears that 3D can also effectively determine the patency of foraminal stenosis by reformatting in hemisections. Currently this program is subject to several drawbacks that require user interaction and long reconstruction time. With further improvement, 3D reformation will find increasing clinical applicability.

  7. Acetylcholinesterase and Nissl staining in the same histological section.

    PubMed

    Shipley, M T; Ennis, M; Behbehani, M M

    1989-12-18

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme histochemistry and Nissl staining are commonly utilized in neural architectonic studies. However, the opaque reaction deposit produced by the most commonly used AChE histochemical methods is not compatible with satisfactory Nissl staining. As a result, precise correlation of AChE and Nissl staining necessitates time-consuming comparisons of adjacent sections which may have differential shrinkage. Here, we have modified the Koelle-Friedenwald histochemical reaction for AChE by omitting the final intensification steps. The modified reaction yields a non-opaque reaction product that is selectively visualized by darkfield illumination. This non-intensified darkfield AChE (NIDA) reaction allows clear visualization of Nissl staining in the same histological section. This combined AChE-Nissl method greatly facilitates detailed correlation of enzyme and cytoarchitectonic organization.

  8. Reconstruction of 3d grain boundaries from rock thin sections, using polarised light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus Hammes, Daniel; Peternell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Grain boundaries affect the physical and chemical properties of polycrystalline materials significantly by initiating reactions and collecting impurities (Birchenall, 1959), and play an essential role in recrystallization (Doherty et al. 1997). In particular, the shape and crystallographic orientation of grain boundaries reveal the deformation and annealing history of rocks (Kruhl and Peternell 2002, Kuntcheva et al. 2006). However, there is a lack of non-destructive and easy-to-use computer supported methods to determine grain boundary geometries in 3D. The only available instrument using optical light to measure grain boundary angles is still the polarising microscope with attached universal stage; operated manually and time-consuming in use. Here we present a new approach to determine 3d grain boundary orientations from 2D rock thin sections. The data is recorded by using an automatic fabric analyser microscope (Peternell et al., 2010). Due to its unique arrangement of 9 light directions the highest birefringence colour due to each light direction and crystal orientation (retardation) can be determined at each pixel in the field of view. Retardation profiles across grain boundaries enable the calculation of grain boundary angle and direction. The data for all positions separating the grains are combined and further processed. In combination with the lateral position of the grain boundary, acquired using the FAME software (Hammes and Peternell, in review), the data is used to reconstruct a 3d grain boundary model. The processing of data is almost fully automatic by using MATLAB®. Only minor manual input is required. The applicability was demonstrated on quartzite samples, but the method is not solely restricted on quartz grains and other birefringent polycrystalline materials could be used instead. References: Birchenall, C.E., 1959: Physical Metallurgy. McGraw-Hill, New York. Doherty, R.D., Hughes, D.A., Humphreys, F.J., Jonas, J.J., Juul Jensen, D., Kassner, M

  9. Three-dimensional reconstruction from serial sections in PC-Windows platform by using 3D_Viewer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Hua; Lahvis, Garet; Edwards, Harlene; Pitot, Henry C

    2004-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction from serial sections allows identification of objects of interest in 3D and clarifies the relationship among these objects. 3D_Viewer, developed in our laboratory for this purpose, has four major functions: image alignment, movie frame production, movie viewing, and shift-overlay image generation. Color images captured from serial sections were aligned; then the contours of objects of interest were highlighted in a semi-automatic manner. These 2D images were then automatically stacked at different viewing angles, and their composite images on a projected plane were recorded by an image transform-shift-overlay technique. These composition images are used in the object-rotation movie show. The design considerations of the program and the procedures used for 3D reconstruction from serial sections are described. This program, with a digital image-capture system, a semi-automatic contours highlight method, and an automatic image transform-shift-overlay technique, greatly speeds up the reconstruction process. Since images generated by 3D_Viewer are in a general graphic format, data sharing with others is easy. 3D_Viewer is written in MS Visual Basic 6, obtainable from our laboratory on request.

  10. Visualizing 3D Objects from 2D Cross Sectional Images Displayed "In-Situ" versus "Ex-Situ"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Stetten, George

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people's ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images in order to…

  11. Visualizing 3D Objects from 2D Cross Sectional Images Displayed "In-Situ" versus "Ex-Situ"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Stetten, George

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people's ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images in order to…

  12. Complementary X-ray tomography techniques for histology-validated 3D imaging of soft and hard tissues using plaque-containing blood vessels as examples.

    PubMed

    Holme, Margaret N; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Lobrinus, Johannes A; Rikhtegar, Farhad; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Zanette, Irene; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2014-01-01

    A key problem in X-ray computed tomography is choosing photon energies for postmortem specimens containing both soft and hard tissues. Increasing X-ray energy reduces image artifacts from highly absorbing hard tissues including plaque, but it simultaneously decreases contrast in soft tissues including the endothelium. Therefore, identifying the lumen within plaque-containing vessels is challenging. Destructive histology, the gold standard for tissue evaluation, reaches submicron resolution in two dimensions, whereas slice thickness limits spatial resolution in the third. We present a protocol to systematically analyze heterogeneous tissues containing weakly and highly absorbing components in the original wet state, postmortem. Taking the example of atherosclerotic human coronary arteries, the successively acquired 3D data of benchtop and synchrotron radiation-based tomography are validated by histology. The entire protocol requires ∼20 working days, enables differentiation between plaque, muscle and fat tissues without using contrast agents and permits blood flow simulations in vessels with plaque-induced constrictions.

  13. Atomic force microscopy imaging and 3-D reconstructions of serial thin sections of a single cell and its interior structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Cai, Jiye; Zhao, Tao; Wang, Chenxi; Dong, Shuo; Luo, Shuqian; Chen, Zheng W

    2005-06-01

    The thin sectioning has been widely applied in electron microscopy (EM), and successfully used for an in situ observation of inner ultrastructure of cells. This powerful technique has recently been extended to the research field of atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, there have been no reports describing AFM imaging of serial thin sections and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of cells and their inner structures. In the present study, we used AFM to scan serial thin sections approximately 60 nm thick of a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell, and to observe the in situ inner ultrastructure including cell membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus membrane, and linear chromatin. The high-magnification AFM imaging of single mitochondria clearly demonstrated the outer membrane, inner boundary membrane and cristal membrane of mitochondria in the cellular compartment. Importantly, AFM imaging on six serial thin sections of a single mouse ES cell showed that mitochondria underwent sequential changes in the number, morphology and distribution. These nanoscale images allowed us to perform 3-D surface reconstruction of interested interior structures in cells. Based on the serial in situ images, 3-D models of morphological characteristics, numbers and distributions of interior structures of the single ES cells were validated and reconstructed. Our results suggest that the combined AFM and serial-thin-section technique is useful for the nanoscale imaging and 3-D reconstruction of single cells and their inner structures. This technique may facilitate studies of proliferating and differentiating stages of stem cells or somatic cells at a nanoscale.

  14. Localization of Metal Electrodes in the Intact Rat Brain Using Registration of 3D Microcomputed Tomography Images to a Magnetic Resonance Histology Atlas1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Jana Schaich; Vu, Mai-Anh; Badea, Cristian; Badea, Alexandra; Johnson, G. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Simultaneous neural recordings taken from multiple areas of the rodent brain are garnering growing interest because of the insight they can provide about spatially distributed neural circuitry. The promise of such recordings has inspired great progress in methods for surgically implanting large numbers of metal electrodes into intact rodent brains. However, methods for localizing the precise location of these electrodes have remained severely lacking. Traditional histological techniques that require slicing and staining of physical brain tissue are cumbersome and become increasingly impractical as the number of implanted electrodes increases. Here we solve these problems by describing a method that registers 3D computed tomography (CT) images of intact rat brains implanted with metal electrode bundles to a magnetic resonance imaging histology (MRH) atlas. Our method allows accurate visualization of each electrode bundle’s trajectory and location without removing the electrodes from the brain or surgically implanting external markers. In addition, unlike physical brain slices, once the 3D images of the electrode bundles and the MRH atlas are registered, it is possible to verify electrode placements from many angles by “reslicing” the images along different planes of view. Furthermore, our method can be fully automated and easily scaled to applications with large numbers of specimens. Our digital imaging approach to efficiently localizing metal electrodes offers a substantial addition to currently available methods, which, in turn, may help accelerate the rate at which insights are gleaned from rodent network neuroscience. PMID:26322331

  15. 3D Modeling of the Lateral Ventricles and Histological Characterization of Periventricular Tissue in Humans and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Acabchuk, Rebecca L.; Sun, Ye; Wolferz,, Richard; Eastman, Matthew B.; Lennington, Jessica B.; Shook, Brett A.; Wu, Qian; Conover, Joanne C.

    2015-01-01

    The ventricular system carries and circulates cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and facilitates clearance of solutes and toxins from the brain. The functional units of the ventricles are ciliated epithelial cells termed ependymal cells, which line the ventricles and through ciliary action are capable of generating laminar flow of CSF at the ventricle surface. This monolayer of ependymal cells also provides barrier and filtration functions that promote exchange between brain interstitial fluids (ISF) and circulating CSF. Biochemical changes in the brain are thereby reflected in the composition of the CSF and destruction of the ependyma can disrupt the delicate balance of CSF and ISF exchange. In humans there is a strong correlation between lateral ventricle expansion and aging. Age-associated ventriculomegaly can occur even in the absence of dementia or obstruction of CSF flow. The exact cause and progression of ventriculomegaly is often unknown; however, enlarged ventricles can show regional and, often, extensive loss of ependymal cell coverage with ventricle surface astrogliosis and associated periventricular edema replacing the functional ependymal cell monolayer. Using MRI scans together with postmortem human brain tissue, we describe how to prepare, image and compile 3D renderings of lateral ventricle volumes, calculate lateral ventricle volumes, and characterize periventricular tissue through immunohistochemical analysis of en face lateral ventricle wall tissue preparations. Corresponding analyses of mouse brain tissue are also presented supporting the use of mouse models as a means to evaluate changes to the lateral ventricles and periventricular tissue found in human aging and disease. Together, these protocols allow investigations into the cause and effect of ventriculomegaly and highlight techniques to study ventricular system health and its important barrier and filtration functions within the brain. PMID:26068121

  16. Classification of Histology Sections via Multispectral Convolutional Sparse Coding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yin; Chang, Hang; Barner, Kenneth; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    Image-based classification of histology sections plays an important role in predicting clinical outcomes. However this task is very challenging due to the presence of large technical variations (e.g., fixation, staining) and biological heterogeneities (e.g., cell type, cell state). In the field of biomedical imaging, for the purposes of visualization and/or quantification, different stains are typically used for different targets of interest (e.g., cellular/subcellular events), which generates multi-spectrum data (images) through various types of microscopes and, as a result, provides the possibility of learning biological-component-specific features by exploiting multispectral information. We propose a multispectral feature learning model that automatically learns a set of convolution filter banks from separate spectra to efficiently discover the intrinsic tissue morphometric signatures, based on convolutional sparse coding (CSC). The learned feature representations are then aggregated through the spatial pyramid matching framework (SPM) and finally classified using a linear SVM. The proposed system has been evaluated using two large-scale tumor cohorts, collected from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Experimental results show that the proposed model 1) outperforms systems utilizing sparse coding for unsupervised feature learning (e.g., PSD-SPM [5]); 2) is competitive with systems built upon features with biological prior knowledge (e.g., SMLSPM [4]).

  17. Pathologic Intimal Thickening Plaque Phenotype: Not as Innocent as Previously Thought. A Serial 3D Intravascular Ultrasound Virtual Histology Study.

    PubMed

    Kovarnik, Tomas; Chen, Zhi; Wahle, Andreas; Zhang, Ling; Skalicka, Hana; Kral, Ales; Lopez, John J; Horak, Jan; Sonka, Milan; Linhart, Ales

    2017-01-01

    Pathologic intimal thickening (PIT) has been considered a benign plaque phenotype. We report plaque phenotypic changes in a baseline/follow-up intravascular ultrasound-based virtual histology study. A total of 61 patients with stable coronary artery disease were analyzed from the HEAVEN trial (89 patients randomized between routine statin therapy vs atorvastatin 80mg and ezetimibe 10mg) with serial intravascular ultrasound imaging of nonculprit vessels. We compared changes in 693 baseline and follow-up 5-mm long segments in a novel risk score, Liverpool Active Plaque Score (LAPS), plaque parameters, and plaque composition. The PIT showed the highest increase of risk score and, with fibrous plaque, also the LAPS. Necrotic core (NC) abutting to the lumen increased in PIT (22 ± 51.7; P = .0001) and in fibrous plaque (17.9 ± 42.6; P = .004) but decreased in thin cap fibroatheroma (TCFA) (⿿15.14 ± 52.2; P = .001). The PIT was the most likely of all nonthin cap fibroatheroma plaque types to transform into TCFA at follow-up (11% of all TCFA found during follow-up and 35.9% of newly-developed TCFA), but showed (together with fibrous plaque) the lowest stability during lipid-lowering therapy (24.7% of PIT remained PIT and 24.5% of fibrous plaque remained fibrous plaque). Over the 1-year follow-up, PIT was the most dynamic of the plaque phenotypes and was associated with an increase of risk score and LAPS (together with fibrous plaque), NC percentage (together with fibrous plaque) and NC abutting to the lumen, despite a small reduction of plaque volume during lipid-lowering therapy. The PIT was the main source for new TCFA segments. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. 26 CFR 1.852-9 - Special procedural requirements applicable to designation under section 852(b)(3)(D).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section 852(b)(3)(D). (a) Regulated investment company—(1) Notice to shareholders. (i) A designation of... notice on Form 2439 mailed by the regulated investment company to each person who is a shareholder of... shareholder; the amount designated by the company for inclusion by the shareholder in computing his long-term...

  19. 26 CFR 1.852-9 - Special procedural requirements applicable to designation under section 852(b)(3)(D).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... designation under section 852(b)(3)(D). (a) Regulated investment company—(1) Notice to shareholders. (i) A... shareholder of record of the company at the close of the company's taxable year. The notice on Form 2439 shall... of the shareholder; the amount designated by the company for inclusion by the shareholder in...

  20. At the limits of a successful body plan – 3D microanatomy, histology and evolution of Helminthope (Mollusca: Heterobranchia: Rhodopemorpha), the most worm-like gastropod

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastropods are among the most diverse animal clades, and have successfully colonized special habitats such as the marine sand interstitial. Specialized meiofaunal snails and slugs are tiny and worm-shaped. They combine regressive features – argued to be due to progenetic tendencies – with convergent adaptations. Microscopic size and concerted convergences make morphological examination non-trivial and hamper phylogenetic reconstructions. The enigmatic turbellarian-like Rhodopemorpha are a small group that has puzzled systematists for over a century. A preliminary molecular framework places the group far closer to the root of Heterobranchia – one of the major gastropod groups – than previously suggested. The poorly known meiofaunal Helminthope psammobionta Salvini-Plawen, 1991 from Bermuda is the most worm-shaped free-living gastropod and shows apparently aberrant aspects of anatomy. Its study may give important clues to understand the evolution of rhodopemorphs among basal heterobranchs versus their previously thought origin among ‘higher’ euthyneuran taxa. Results We describe the 3D-microanatomy of H. psammobionta using three-dimensional digital reconstruction based on serial semithin histological sections. The new dataset expands upon the original description and corrects several aspects. Helminthope shows a set of typical adaptations and regressive characters present in other mesopsammic slugs (called ‘meiofaunal syndrome’ herein). The taxonomically important presence of five separate visceral loop ganglia is confirmed, but considerable further detail of the complex nervous system are corrected and revealed. The digestive and reproductive systems are simple and modified to the thread-like morphology of the animal; the anus is far posterior. There is no heart; the kidney resembles a protonephridium. Data on all organ systems are compiled and compared to Rhodope. Conclusions Helminthope is related to Rhodope sharing unique apomorphies

  1. Three-dimensional inelastic analysis for hot section components, BEST 3D code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Raymond B.; Banerjee, Prasanta K.

    1987-01-01

    The goal is the development of an alternative stress analysis tool, distinct from the finite element method, applicable to the engineering analysis of gas turbine engine structures. The boundary element method was selected for this development effort on the basis of its already demonstrated applicability to a variety of geometries and problem types characteristic of gas turbine engine components. Major features of the BEST3D computer program are described, and some of the significant developments carried out as part of the Inelastic Methods Contract are outlined.

  2. 3D-FT thin sections MRI of prolactin-secreting pituitary microadenomas.

    PubMed

    Girard, N; Brue, T; Chabert-Orsini, V; Raybaud, C; Jaquet, P; Poncet, M; Grisoli, F; Cahen, S

    1994-07-01

    We studied 76 patients with endocrinological features of prolactin-secreting microadenoma by MRI, using three dimensional (3D) gradient echo acquisition (FLASH) sequences. MRI revealed a focal signal abnormality in the pituitary in all 37 patients who had not previously taken bromocriptine. However, focal abnormality was shown in only half the patients had been on dopamine agonist therapy; the MRI findings in these 39 patients were not affected by the duration and dosage bromocriptine, nor by the time elapsed since its discontinuation. The microadenoma gave spontaneous high signal on the unenhanced T1-weighted images in 8 cases; it was not seen on unenhanced images in 25 cases. It appeared as low signal within the enhancing gland in 51 cases but enhanced in 7 cases. The 3D technique gives thin (1 mm) slices and therefore facilitates detection of small focal abnormalities in the pituitary gland (2 x 2 mm). In the 19 previously treated patients in whom MRI did not demonstrate a focal abnormality, it showed localised atrophy of the gland in 3, a large, round gland with homogeneous signal in 1, and a heterogeneous appearance in 11; it was normal in 4 cases.

  3. Point scanning confocal microscopy facilitates 3D human hair follicle imaging in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Jennifer E; Bíró, Tamás; Paus, Ralf; Cseresnyés, Zoltán

    2010-07-01

    Efficiency is a key factor in determining whether a scientific method becomes widely accepted in practical applications. In dermatology, morphological characterisation of intact hair follicles by traditional methods can be rather inefficient. Samples are embedded, sliced, imaged and digitally reconstructed, which can be time-consuming. Confocal microscopy, on the other hand, is more efficient and readily applicable to study intact hair follicles. Modern confocal microscopes deliver and collect light very efficiently and thus allow high spatial resolution imaging of relatively thick samples. In this letter, we report that we successfully imaged entire intact human hair follicles using point scanning confocal microscopy. Light delivery and light-collection were further improved by preparing the samples in 2,2'-Thiodiethanol (TDE), thus reducing refractive index gradients. The relatively short total scan times and the high quality of the acquired 3D images make confocal microscopy a desirable method for studying intact hair follicles under normal and pathological conditions.

  4. Visualizing 3D objects from 2D cross sectional images displayed in-situ versus ex-situ.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L; Stetten, George

    2010-03-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people's ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images in order to visualize an object posed in 3D space. Participants used a hand-held tool to reveal a virtual rod as a sequence of cross-sectional images, which were displayed either directly in the space of exploration (in-situ) or displaced to a remote screen (ex-situ). They manipulated a response stylus to match the virtual rod's pitch (vertical slant), yaw (horizontal slant), or both. Consistent with the hypothesis that spatial colocation of image and source object facilitates mental visualization, we found that although single dimensions of slant were judged accurately with both displays, judging pitch and yaw simultaneously produced differences in systematic error between in-situ and ex-situ displays. Ex-situ imaging also exhibited errors such that the magnitude of the response was approximately correct but the direction was reversed. Regression analysis indicated that the in-situ judgments were primarily based on spatiotemporal visualization, while the ex-situ judgments relied on an ad hoc, screen-based heuristic. These findings suggest that in-situ displays may be useful in clinical practice by reducing error and facilitating the ability of radiologists to visualize 3D anatomy from cross sectional images.

  5. Confocal microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D visualizaiton of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  6. Confocal Microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D Visualization of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  7. Confocal Microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D Visualization of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  8. Confocal microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D visualizaiton of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  9. Serial sectioning method in the construction of 3-d microstructures for particle-reinforced MMCs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Ghosh, S.; Rouns, T.N.; Weiland, H.; Richmond, O.; Hunt, W.

    1998-08-01

    A serial-sectioning technique is described for obtaining detailed three-dimensional microstructural images from two-dimensional sections of Si-reinforced Al-Si-Mg alloys. Optical micrographs of a series of microstructural sections were generated by the gradual removal of material layers. These micrographs were then enhanced and digitized in a quantitative image analysis system. Three-dimensional microstructure models were then computationally constructed by assembling the digitally acquired two-dimensional micrographs. Serial sectioning was found to be an inexpensive and effective means of accurately depicting heterogeneous microstructures at high resolution. A few relevant observations on material properties also were made during sectioning. Particle cracking was found to occur in larger particles that are located in clustered areas and have their longest dimension aligned with the tensile axis.

  10. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  11. Exploring for the optimal structural design for the 3D-printing technology for cranial reconstruction: a biomechanical and histological study comparison of solid vs. porous structure.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Young; Kim, Namhyun; Park, Jong-Chul; Yoo, Sun K; Shin, Dong Ah; Shim, Kyu-Won

    2017-06-16

    Cranioplasty for recovering skull defects carries the risk for a number of complications. Various materials are used, including autologous bone graft, metallic materials, and non-metallic materials, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. If the use of autologous bone is not feasible, those artificial materials also have constraints in the case of complex anatomy and/or irregular defects. This study used metal 3D-printing technology to overcome these existing drawbacks and analyze the clinical and mechanical performance requirements. To find an optimal structure that satisfied the structural and mechanical stability requirements, we evaluated biomechanical stability using finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical testing. To ensure clinical applicability, the model was subjected to histological evaluation. Each specimen was implanted in the femur of a rabbit and was evaluated using histological measurements and push-out test. We believe that our data will provide the basis for future applications of a variety of unit structures and further clinical trials and research, as well as the direction for the study of other patient-specific implants.

  12. geomIO: A tool for geodynamicists to turn 2D cross-sections into 3D geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Tobias; Bauville, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    In numerical deformation models, material properties are usually defined on elements (e.g., in body-fitted finite elements), or on a set of Lagrangian markers (Eulerian, ALE or mesh-free methods). In any case, geometrical constraints are needed to assign different material properties to the model domain. Whereas simple geometries such as spheres, layers or cuboids can easily be programmed, it quickly gets complex and time-consuming to create more complicated geometries for numerical model setups, especially in three dimensions. geomIO (geometry I/O, http://geomio.bitbucket.org/) is a MATLAB-based library that has two main functionalities. First, it can be used to create 3D volumes based on series of 2D vector drawings similar to a CAD program; and second, it uses these 3D volumes to assign material properties to the numerical model domain. The drawings can conveniently be created using the open-source vector graphics software Inkscape. Adobe Illustrator is also partially supported. The drawings represent a series of cross-sections in the 3D model domain, for example, cross-sectional interpretations of seismic tomography. geomIO is then used to read the drawings and to create 3D volumes by interpolating between the cross-sections. In the second part, the volumes are used to assign material phases to markers inside the volumes. Multiple volumes can be created at the same time and, depending on the order of assignment, unions or intersections can be built to assign additional material phases. geomIO also offers the possibility to create 3D temperature structures for geodynamic models based on depth dependent parameterisations, for example the half space cooling model. In particular, this can be applied to geometries of subducting slabs of arbitrary shape. Yet, geomIO is held very general, and can be used for a variety of applications. We present examples of setup generation from pictures of micro-scale tectonics and lithospheric scale setups of 3D present-day model

  13. Differential axial contrast of optical sections: laser microtomography and quantitative 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelova, M. A.; Golichenkov, V. A.; Pogorelov, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    Specific features of the quantitative laser microtomography of biological samples are discussed. The method exhibits the main advantages of a confocal microscope (rapid measurement of a stack of parallel optical cross sections and accurate displacement of an object along the optical axis). A relatively high contrast is reached owing to the superposition of pairwise complementary images on neighboring cross sections. A simple and convenient algorithm for image processing does not require additional software and can be computerized using a conventional graphic editor. The applicability of the method is illustrated using volume measurements of a single cell of an early mouse embryo.

  14. Inferring Cross Sections of 3D Objects: A New Spatial Thinking Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Cheryl A.; Hegarty, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A new spatial ability test was administered online to 223 undergraduate students enrolled in introductory science courses. The 30-item multiple choice test measures individual differences in ability to identify the two-dimensional cross section of a three-dimensional geometric solid, a skill that has been identified as important in science,…

  15. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program). [turbine blades, turbine vanes, and combustor liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    A 3-D inelastic analysis methods program consists of a series of computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain) and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. These models are used to solve 3-D inelastic problems using linear approximations in the sense that stresses/strains and temperatures in generic modeling regions are linear functions of the spatial coordinates, and solution increments for load, temperature and/or time are extrapolated linearly from previous information. Three linear formulation computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (MARC-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), were developed and are described.

  16. Aorta cross-section calculation and 3D visualization from CT or MRT data using VRML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabner, Guenther; Modritsch, Robert; Stiegmaier, Wolfgang; Grasser, Simon; Klinger, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Quantification of vessel diameters of artherosclerotic or congenital stenosis is very important for the diagnosis of vascular diseases. The aorta extraction and cross-section calculation is a software-based application that offers a three-dimensional, platform-independent, colorized visualization of the extracted aorta with augmented reality information of MRT or CT datasets. This project is based on different types of specialized image processing algorithms, dynamical particle filtering and complex mathematical equations. From this three-dimensional model a calculation of minimal cross sections is performed. In user specified distances, the aorta is cut in differently defined directions which are created through vectors with varying length. The extracted aorta and the derived minimal cross-sections are then rendered with the marching cube algorithm and represented together in a three-dimensional virtual reality with a very high degree of immersion. The aim of this study was to develop an imaging software that delivers cardiologists the possibility of (i) furnishing fast vascular diagnosis, (ii) getting precise diameter information, (iii) being able to process exact, local stenosis detection (iv) having permanent data storing and easy access to former datasets, and (v) reliable documentation of results in form of tables and graphical printouts.

  17. 3D image reconstruction using optical sectioning in confocal scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jungwoo; Kang, Dong Kyun; Park, Sunglim; Gweon, Dae gab

    2001-10-01

    Confocal scanning microscopy (CSM) has been used in biological application, materials science, semiconductor quality measurement and other non-destructive microscopic application. Small spot of light illuminates a sample, and a small detector that is ideally a point detector collects the reflected or transmitted light having the information of specimen. An image distribution can be reconstructed by a correlation analysis of spots with the high bandwidth. The mechanism for two-dimensional beam scanning and optical sectioning has an important role in CSM as the three-dimensional profiler. The parasitic motion of focus on the detector gives rise to the fatal distortion of an image profile named the extinction effect while using acousto-optical (AO) deflector. The intensity profile for the open loop scanning should be matched with its response for the standard. The non-linearity can be minimized with the optical sectioning or the optical probe of the closed loop control. This paper shows the mathematical expression of the light such as the extinction curve in the optical fields of system using AO deflector, the axial/lateral response experimentally when the error sources change, and the methods of optical sectioning. We propose the progressive methods for the high quality image as the following. At first, for having the corrected image, small spot and long scan range, this paper shows that the optimal design having the multi-objects can be used by choosing the unitary lens device in CSM. At second, in order to compensate for the intensity cancellation at the end profile that may be the cause of waviness for the optical image, this paper shows that it is efficient to schedule the frequency of scan. According to characteristics of the extinction curve and axial/lateral response having the error property, we can define the frequency and sensitivity of as their robustness. Finally, the axial response gives an important motive for the optical section, and the limit of

  18. NEUREC - a program package for 3D-reconstruction from serial sections using a microcomputer.

    PubMed

    Gras, H; Killmann, F

    1983-01-01

    A software package is described to reconstruct three-dimensional pictures in true perspective from a series of parallel sections using a low-cost computer system (Apple II plus). Data sampling via a graphic tablet and graphical output on the monitor screen or a digital plotter are assigned to different programs under control of a menu program. The number of data representing the object under study is unlimited. Originally written in BASIC, the programs were translated to machine language. As an application of the package, reconstructions of an identified large interneuron of the locust brain are presented.

  19. Visualizing 3D objects from 2D cross sectional images displayed in-situ versus ex-situ

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Stetten, George

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people’s ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images, in order to visualize an object posed in 3D space. Participants used a hand-held tool to reveal a virtual rod as a sequence of cross-sectional images, which were displayed either directly in the space of exploration (in-situ) or displaced to a remote screen (ex-situ). They manipulated a response stylus to match the virtual rod’s pitch (vertical slant), yaw (horizontal slant), or both. Consistent with the hypothesis that spatial co-location of image and source object facilitates mental visualization, we found that although single dimensions of slant were judged accurately with both displays, judging pitch and yaw simultaneously produced differences in systematic error between in-situ and ex-situ displays. Ex-situ imaging also exhibited errors such that the magnitude of the response was approximately correct but the direction was reversed. Regression analysis indicated that the in-situ judgments were primarily based on spatio-temporal visualization, while the ex-situ judgments relied on an ad hoc, screen-based heuristic. These findings suggest that in-situ displays may be useful in clinical practice by reducing error and facilitating the ability of radiologists to visualize 3D anatomy from cross sectional images. PMID:20350043

  20. Polarimetric characterisation of histological section of skin with pathological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovira, Ronald H.; Tuzhanskyy, Stanislav Ye.; Pavlov, Sergii V.; Savenkov, Sergii N.; Kolomiets, Ivan S.; Stasenko, Vladyslav A.; Bayas, Marsia M.; Omiotek, Zbigniew; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; DzierŻak, RóŻa

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the further development of the optical methods based on polarization detection to improve the reliability of the results of evaluation of structural changes in biological tissues. The paper presents an experimental study of tissues with pathological alterations to assess the capacity of differentiation of pathological conditions when using averaged local Mueller matrix elements. Experiments were carried out in direct scattering mode in histological samples of human epidermis. The practical significance of the results is the widespread application of the methodology for laser polarimetric analysis of structural changes in anisotropic tissues to identify and assess the degree of pathology in medical diagnosis of skin diseases.

  1. Heterogeneity assessment of histological tissue sections in whole slide images.

    PubMed

    Belhomme, Philippe; Toralba, Simon; Plancoulaine, Benoît; Oger, Myriam; Gurcan, Metin N; Bor-Angelier, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Computerized image analysis (IA) can provide quantitative and repeatable object measurements by means of methods such as segmentation, indexation, classification, etc. Embedded in reliable automated systems, IA could help pathologists in their daily work and thus contribute to more accurate determination of prognostic histological factors on whole slide images. One of the key concept pathologists want to dispose of now is a numerical estimation of heterogeneity. In this study, the objective is to propose a general framework based on the diffusion maps technique for measuring tissue heterogeneity in whole slide images and to apply this methodology on breast cancer histopathology digital images.

  2. Characterizing 3D grain size distributions from 2D sections in mylonites using a modified version of the Saltykov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Marco; Llana-Fúnez, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of creep behaviour in rocks requires knowledge of 3D grain size distributions (GSD) that result from dynamic recrystallization processes during deformation. The methods to estimate directly the 3D grain size distribution -serial sectioning, synchrotron or X-ray-based tomography- are expensive, time-consuming and, in most cases and at best, challenging. This means that in practice grain size distributions are mostly derived from 2D sections. Although there are a number of methods in the literature to derive the actual 3D grain size distributions from 2D sections, the most popular in highly deformed rocks is the so-called Saltykov method. It has though two major drawbacks: the method assumes no interaction between grains, which is not true in the case of recrystallised mylonites; and uses histograms to describe distributions, which limits the quantification of the GSD. The first aim of this contribution is to test whether the interaction between grains in mylonites, i.e. random grain packing, affects significantly the GSDs estimated by the Saltykov method. We test this using the random resampling technique in a large data set (n = 12298). The full data set is built from several parallel thin sections that cut a completely dynamically recrystallized quartz aggregate in a rock sample from a Variscan shear zone in NW Spain. The results proved that the Saltykov method is reliable as long as the number of grains is large (n > 1000). Assuming that a lognormal distribution is an optimal approximation for the GSD in a completely dynamically recrystallized rock, we introduce an additional step to the Saltykov method, which allows estimating a continuous probability distribution function of the 3D grain size population. The additional step takes the midpoints of the classes obtained by the Saltykov method and fits a lognormal distribution with a trust region using a non-linear least squares algorithm. The new protocol is named the two-step method. The

  3. Phylogenetic implications of sperm storage in Podotremata: Histology and 3D-reconstructions of spermathecae and gonopores in female carrier crabs (Decapoda: Brachyura: Homoloidea).

    PubMed

    Becker, Carola; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Female reproductive systems are important characters for understanding the evolution of Brachyura and resolving its phylogenetic relationships. We herein investigate a podotreme brachyuran reproductive system comprehensively for the first time studying spermathecae and gonopores of Homoloidea with histological methods, micro-computer tomography and scanning electron microscopy. Our results show that spermathecal apertures are species-specific and their shape corresponds closely to that of male copulatory organs. Apertures were either enclosed by membranous cuticle areas or otherwise occluded preventing direct access into spermathecae. 3D-reconstructions reveal that spermathecae differ between the species Paromola cuvieri and Homola barbata with regard to the involvement of sternite 7 and 8, respectively, in forming the sperm storage chamber. The cuticle epithelium that lines the spermathecal chamber is irregular and distinct from the remaining cylindrical cuticle epithelium. A first uniramous pleopod was present in all homoloids studied and always held in a position to cover spermathecal apertures. Specific pulvinated cuticle structures present on both sides of the first pleopod are herein interpreted as adhesive structures functioning in reproductive processes. The coxal gonopores were enclosed by a laterally arising muscular mobile operculum that resembles opercula described in eubrachyuran vaginae, which raises the question whether these two structures are homologous. Our results are compared with data available for other brachyuran groups and discussed in terms of phylogenetic relationships within the Brachyura and possible functions in insemination and fertilization in Podotremata. J. Morphol. 278:89-105, 2017. ©© 2016 Wiley Periodicals,Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Automation of 3D reconstruction of neural tissue from large volume of conventional Serial Section Transmission Electron Micrographs

    PubMed Central

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2010-01-01

    We describe an approach for automation of the process of reconstruction of neural tissue from serial section transmission electron micrographs. Such reconstructions require 3D segmentation of individual neuronal processes (axons and dendrites) performed in densely packed neuropil. We first detect neuronal cell profiles in each image in a stack of serial micrographs with multi-scale ridge detector. Short breaks in detected boundaries are interpolated using anisotropic contour completion formulated in fuzzy-logic framework. Detected profiles from adjacent sections are linked together based on cues such as shape similarity and image texture. Thus obtained 3D segmentation is validated by human operators in computer-guided proofreading process. Our approach makes possible reconstructions of neural tissue at final rate of about 5µm3/man-hour, as determined primarily by the speed of proofreading. To date we have applied this approach to reconstruct few blocks of neural tissue from different regions of rat brain totaling over 1000µm3, and used these to evaluate reconstruction speed, quality, error rates, and presence of ambiguous locations in neuropil ssTEM imaging data. PMID:18834903

  5. MR Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Diffusion Weighted Imaging and (3D) Hydrogen 1 (1H) MR Spectroscopy in Comparison with Histology

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, J.; Salomon, G.; Buchert, R.; Hohenstein, A.; Graessner, J.; Huland, H.; Graefen, M.; Adam, G.; Wedegaetner, U.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate retrospectively the impact of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and (3D) hydrogen 1 (1H) MR-spectroscopy (MRS) on the detection of prostatic cancer in comparison to histological examinations. Materials and Methods: 50 patients with suspicion of prostate cancer underwent a MRI examination at a 1.5T scanner. The prostate was divided into sextants. Regions of interest were placed in each sextant to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)-values. The results of the DWI as well as MRS were compared retrospectively with the findings of the histological examination. Sensitivity and specificity of ADC and metabolic ratio (MET)—both separately and in combination—for identification of tumor tissue was computed for variable discrimination thresholds to evaluate its receiver operator characteristic (ROC). An association between ADC, MET and Gleason score was tested by the non-parametric Spearman ρ-test. Results. The average ADC-value was 1.65 ± 0.32mm2/s × 10−3 in normal tissue and 0.96±0.24 mm2/s × 10−3 in tumor tissue (mean ± 1 SD). MET was 0.418 ± 0.431 in normal tissue and 2.010 ± 1.649 in tumor tissue. The area under the ROC curve was 0.966 (95%-confidence interval 0.941–0.991) and 0.943 (0.918–0.968) for DWI and MRS, respectively. There was a highly significant negative correlation between ADC-value and the Gleason score in the tumor-positive tissue probes (n = 62, ρ = −0.405, P = .001). MRS did not show a significant correlation with the Gleason score (ρ = 0.117, P = .366). By using both the DWI and MRS, the regression model provided sensitivity and specificity for detection of tumor of 91.9% and 98.3%, respectively. Conclusion. The results of our study showed that both DWI and MRS should be considered as an additional and complementary tool to the T2-weighted MRI for detecting prostate cancer. PMID:22091382

  6. Estimating Podocyte Number and Density Using a Single Histologic Section

    PubMed Central

    Venkatareddy, Madhusudan; Wang, Su; Yang, Yan; Patel, Sanjeevkumar; Wickman, Larysa; Nishizono, Ryuzoh; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Hodgin, Jeffrey; Wiggins, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The reduction in podocyte density to levels below a threshold value drives glomerulosclerosis and progression to ESRD. However, technical demands prohibit high-throughput application of conventional morphometry for estimating podocyte density. We evaluated a method for estimating podocyte density using single paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed sections. Podocyte nuclei were imaged using indirect immunofluorescence detection of antibodies against Wilms’ tumor-1 or transducin-like enhancer of split 4. To account for the large size of podocyte nuclei in relation to section thickness, we derived a correction factor given by the equation CF=1/(D/T+1), where T is the tissue section thickness and D is the mean caliper diameter of podocyte nuclei. Normal values for D were directly measured in thick tissue sections and in 3- to 5-μm sections using calibrated imaging software. D values were larger for human podocyte nuclei than for rat or mouse nuclei (P<0.01). In addition, D did not vary significantly between human kidney biopsies at the time of transplantation, 3–6 months after transplantation, or with podocyte depletion associated with transplant glomerulopathy. In rat models, D values also did not vary with podocyte depletion, but increased approximately 10% with old age and in postnephrectomy kidney hypertrophy. A spreadsheet with embedded formulas was created to facilitate individualized podocyte density estimation upon input of measured values. The correction factor method was validated by comparison with other methods, and provided data comparable with prior data for normal human kidney transplant donors. This method for estimating podocyte density is applicable to high-throughput laboratory and clinical use. PMID:24357669

  7. Estimating podocyte number and density using a single histologic section.

    PubMed

    Venkatareddy, Madhusudan; Wang, Su; Yang, Yan; Patel, Sanjeevkumar; Wickman, Larysa; Nishizono, Ryuzoh; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Hodgin, Jeffrey; Wiggins, Paul A; Wiggins, Roger C

    2014-05-01

    The reduction in podocyte density to levels below a threshold value drives glomerulosclerosis and progression to ESRD. However, technical demands prohibit high-throughput application of conventional morphometry for estimating podocyte density. We evaluated a method for estimating podocyte density using single paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed sections. Podocyte nuclei were imaged using indirect immunofluorescence detection of antibodies against Wilms' tumor-1 or transducin-like enhancer of split 4. To account for the large size of podocyte nuclei in relation to section thickness, we derived a correction factor given by the equation CF=1/(D/T+1), where T is the tissue section thickness and D is the mean caliper diameter of podocyte nuclei. Normal values for D were directly measured in thick tissue sections and in 3- to 5-μm sections using calibrated imaging software. D values were larger for human podocyte nuclei than for rat or mouse nuclei (P<0.01). In addition, D did not vary significantly between human kidney biopsies at the time of transplantation, 3-6 months after transplantation, or with podocyte depletion associated with transplant glomerulopathy. In rat models, D values also did not vary with podocyte depletion, but increased approximately 10% with old age and in postnephrectomy kidney hypertrophy. A spreadsheet with embedded formulas was created to facilitate individualized podocyte density estimation upon input of measured values. The correction factor method was validated by comparison with other methods, and provided data comparable with prior data for normal human kidney transplant donors. This method for estimating podocyte density is applicable to high-throughput laboratory and clinical use.

  8. Study of 3D metrology techniques as an alternative to cross-sectional analysis at the R&D level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, Johann; Miller, Kirk

    2004-05-01

    The decrease in critical dimension (CD) of integrated circuits (IC) always challenges metrology tools capabilities. In less than ten years we will reach the limit of CMOS technology with typical printed gate length less than 20 nm and physical gate length of less than 15nm. Advanced R&D departments must already address today all the issues related to so small devices otherwise the roadmap requirements would not be fulfilled. Indeed most of the issues are directly related to metrology capabilities such as precise control of the shape of etched features, sidewall roughness, wafer CD uniformity, and mask inspection (. . .). All these parameters will represent a bottleneck for advanced patterning if metrology tools are unable to measure them with a precision better than few nanometers. In this paper we show that 3D metrology is mandatory to succeed in reaching future roadmap requirements. We address in details the CD AFM technique capabilities which is a potential candidate for advanced patterning metrology. The experimental data are compared with today"s reference: cross-sectional analysis (X-SEM). We also discuss on other techniques such as scatterometry and top view CD-SEM which are also candidates for 3D metrology.

  9. Integrated monolithic 3D MEMS scanner for switchable real time vertical/horizontal cross-sectional imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Haijun; Duan, Xiyu; Qiu, Zhen; Zhou, Quan; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Oldham, Kenn R; Wang, Thomas D

    2016-02-08

    We present an integrated monolithic, electrostatic 3D MEMS scanner with a compact chip size of 3.2 × 2.9 mm(2). Use of parametric excitation near resonance frequencies produced large optical deflection angles up to ± 27° and ± 28.5° in the X- and Y-axes and displacements up to 510 μm in the Z-axis with low drive voltages at atmospheric pressure. When packaged in a dual axes confocal endomicroscope, horizontal and vertical cross-sectional images can be collected seamlessly in tissue with a large field-of-view of >1 × 1 mm(2) and 1 × 0.41 mm(2), respectively, at 5 frames/sec.

  10. Minimum cross-sectional stream power as the criteria of shaping 3-D network-scale landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, K.

    2008-12-01

    It has been widely accepted that the minimum total energy expenditure (MTEE) [Rodríguez-Iturbe et al., 1992] is the important tendency in the formation of self-similar tree river networks. However, this formulation has simplified the 3-D nature of landscape adaptation as a 2-D network connectivity problem. As a result, MTEE cannot capture other signatures of landform such as meandering. This leads to an idea that there could be another optimality condition which can better represent landscape evolution than MTEE. In this study, I focused on the theory of minimum cross-sectional stream power (MCSP) [Chang and Hill, 1977] which has been successfully used in channel-scale problems. I investigated the applicability of this rule of MCSP to the network-scale landscape formation. To test this idea, I devised a dynamic 2-D genetic algorithm which can handle the adaptation of 3-D landscape over time. The result shows that the landscape formed under the criteria of both MCSP and MTEE exhibit self-similar tree structure of natural river networks. However, the landscape formed by MCSP criteria also exhibits the meandering pattern of natural streams, which cannot be captured by MTEE. Chang, H. H., and J. C. Hill (1977), Minimum stream power for rivers and deltas, Journal of the Hydraulics Division (ASCE), 103, 1375--1389. Rodríguez-Iturbe, I., A. Rinaldo, R. Rigon, R. L. Bras, A. Marani, and E. J. Ijjasz-Váquez (1992), Energy dissipation, runoff production, and the three-dimensional structure of river basins, Water Resour. Res., 28, 1095--1103.

  11. Oblique section 3-D reconstruction of relaxed insect flight muscle reveals the cross-bridge lattice in helical registration.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, H; Lucaveche, C; Reedy, M K; Taylor, K A

    1994-01-01

    In this work we examined the arrangement of cross-bridges on the surface of myosin filaments in the A-band of Lethocerus flight muscle. Muscle fibers were fixed using the tannic-acid-uranyl-acetate, ("TAURAC") procedure. This new procedure provides remarkably good preservation of native features in relaxed insect flight muscle. We computed 3-D reconstructions from single images of oblique transverse sections. The reconstructions reveal a square profile of the averaged myosin filaments in cross section view, resulting from the symmetrical arrangement of four pairs of myosin heads in each 14.5-nm repeat along the filament. The square profiles form a very regular right-handed helical arrangement along the surface of the myosin filament. Furthermore, TAURAC fixation traps a near complete 38.7 nm labeling of the thin filaments in relaxed muscle marking the left-handed helix of actin targets surrounding the thick filaments. These features observed in an averaged reconstruction encompassing nearly an entire myofibril indicate that the myosin heads, even in relaxed muscle, are in excellent helical register in the A-band. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:7819494

  12. Quantification of telomere features in tumor tissue sections by an automated 3D imaging-based workflow.

    PubMed

    Gunkel, Manuel; Chung, Inn; Wörz, Stefan; Deeg, Katharina I; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Jones, David T W; Korshunov, Andrey; Rohr, Karl; Erfle, Holger; Rippe, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    The microscopic analysis of telomere features provides a wealth of information on the mechanism by which tumor cells maintain their unlimited proliferative potential. Accordingly, the analysis of telomeres in tissue sections of patient tumor samples can be exploited to obtain diagnostic information and to define tumor subgroups. In many instances, however, analysis of the image data is conducted by manual inspection of 2D images at relatively low resolution for only a small part of the sample. As the telomere feature signal distribution is frequently heterogeneous, this approach is prone to a biased selection of the information present in the image and lacks subcellular details. Here we address these issues by using an automated high-resolution imaging and analysis workflow that quantifies individual telomere features on tissue sections for a large number of cells. The approach is particularly suited to assess telomere heterogeneity and low abundant cellular subpopulations with distinct telomere characteristics in a reproducible manner. It comprises the integration of multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunofluorescence and DNA staining with targeted automated 3D fluorescence microscopy and image analysis. We apply our method to telomeres in glioblastoma and prostate cancer samples, and describe how the imaging data can be used to derive statistically reliable information on telomere length distribution or colocalization with PML nuclear bodies. We anticipate that relating this approach to clinical outcome data will prove to be valuable for pretherapeutic patient stratification.

  13. Two- and three-dimensional quantitative image analysis of coronary arteries from high-resolution histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    The study of coronary arteries has evolved from examining gross anatomy and morphology to scrutinizing micro-anatomy and cellular composition. Technological advances such as high-powered digital microscopes and high precision cutting devices have allowed clinicians to examine coronary artery morphology and pathology at micron resolution. Our work explores the composition of normal coronary arteries in order to provide the foundation for further study of remodeled tissue. The first of two coronary arteries was sliced into 442 sections with 4 micron inter-slice spacing. Each slice was stained for elastin and collagen. The second coronary artery was sectioned into 283 slices, also with 4 micron resolution. These slices were stained for cellular nuclei and smooth muscle. High sectioned into 283 slices, also with 4 micron resolution. These slices were stained for cellular nuclei and smooth muscle. High resolution light microscopy was used to image the sections. The data was analyzed for collagen/elastin content and nuclei density, respectively. Processing of this type of data is challenging in the areas of segmentation, visualization and quantification. Segmentation was confounded by variation in image quality as well as complexity of the coronary tissue. These problems were overcome by the development of 'smart' thresholding algorithms for segmentation. In addition, morphology and image statistics were used to further refine the result of the segmentation. Specificity/sensitivity analysis suggests that automatic segmentation can be very effective. 3D visualization of coronary arteries is challenging due to multiple tissue layers. Method such as summed voxel projection and maximum intensity projection appear to be effective. Shading methods also provide adequate visualization, however it is important to incorporate combined 2D and 3D displays. Surface rendering techniques are useful tools for visualizing parametric data. Quantification in 3D is simple in practice but

  14. Comparison of Virtual Dental Implant Planning Using the Full Cross-Sectional and Transaxial Capabilities of Cone Beam Computed Tomography vs Reformatted Panoramic Imaging and 3D Modeling.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moiz; Elathamna, Eiad N; Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Farman, Allan G; Scheetz, James P; Morton, Dean; Scarfe, William C

    2015-01-01

    To compare the choice and placement of virtual dental implants in the posterior edentulous bounded regions using the full cross-sectional and transaxial capabilities of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) vs reformatted panoramic images and three-dimensional (3D) virtual models. Fifty-two cases with posterior bounded edentulous regions (61 dental implant sites) were identified from a retrospective audit of 4,014 radiographic volumes. Two image sets were created from selected CBCT data: (1) a combination of reformatted panoramic imaging and a 3D model (PIref/3D), and (2) the full 3D power in CBCT image volume analyses (XS). One virtual implant was placed by consensus of three prosthodontists in each image set: PIref/3D and XS. The choice of implant length and the perceived need for ridge augmentation were recorded for implant placement in both test situations. All the virtual implant placements from both PIref/3D and XS image sets were inspected retrospectively using virtual 3D models, and the number of exposed threads on both the buccal and lingual/palatal aspects of the virtual dental implant was evaluated. The chi-square and paired t tests were used with the level of significance set at α = .05. Shorter implants were chosen more often using XS than PIref/3D (P = .001). Fewer threads were exposed when placed with XS than with PIref/3D (P = .001). The use of XS reduced the perceived need for ridge augmentation compared with PIref/3D (P = .001). The use of the full 3D power of CBCT (including cross-sectional images in all three orthagonal planes and transaxially) provides supplemental information that significantly changes the choice of virtual implant length and vertical position of the implant, and reduces the frequency of perceived need for ridge augmentation before implant placement.

  15. Histological Analysis and 3D Reconstruction of Winter Cereal Crowns Recovering from Freezing: A Unique Response in Oat (Avena sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, David P.; Henson, Cynthia A.; Tuong, Tan D.; Wise, Mitchell L.; Tallury, Shyamalrau P.; Duke, Stanley H.

    2013-01-01

    The crown is the below ground portion of the stem of a grass which contains meristematic cells that give rise to new shoots and roots following winter. To better understand mechanisms of survival from freezing, a histological analysis was performed on rye, wheat, barley and oat plants that had been frozen, thawed and allowed to resume growth under controlled conditions. Extensive tissue disruption and abnormal cell structure was noticed in the center of the crown of all 4 species with relatively normal cells on the outside edge of the crown. A unique visual response was found in oat in the shape of a ring of cells that stained red with Safranin. A tetrazolium analysis indicated that tissues immediately inside this ring were dead and those outside were alive. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the barrier fluoresced with excitation between 405 and 445 nm. Three dimensional reconstruction of a cross sectional series of images indicated that the red staining cells took on a somewhat spherical shape with regions of no staining where roots entered the crown. Characterizing changes in plants recovering from freezing will help determine the genetic basis for mechanisms involved in this important aspect of winter hardiness. PMID:23341944

  16. Histological analysis and 3D reconstruction of winter cereal crowns recovering from freezing: a unique response in oat (Avena sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Livingston, David P; Henson, Cynthia A; Tuong, Tan D; Wise, Mitchell L; Tallury, Shyamalrau P; Duke, Stanley H

    2013-01-01

    The crown is the below ground portion of the stem of a grass which contains meristematic cells that give rise to new shoots and roots following winter. To better understand mechanisms of survival from freezing, a histological analysis was performed on rye, wheat, barley and oat plants that had been frozen, thawed and allowed to resume growth under controlled conditions. Extensive tissue disruption and abnormal cell structure was noticed in the center of the crown of all 4 species with relatively normal cells on the outside edge of the crown. A unique visual response was found in oat in the shape of a ring of cells that stained red with Safranin. A tetrazolium analysis indicated that tissues immediately inside this ring were dead and those outside were alive. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the barrier fluoresced with excitation between 405 and 445 nm. Three dimensional reconstruction of a cross sectional series of images indicated that the red staining cells took on a somewhat spherical shape with regions of no staining where roots entered the crown. Characterizing changes in plants recovering from freezing will help determine the genetic basis for mechanisms involved in this important aspect of winter hardiness.

  17. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, S M; Stoker, J; Zwamborn, A W; Den Hollander, J C; Kuiper, J W; Entius, C A; Laméris, J S

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing abdominoperineal resection. In addition, 12 cadavers were used to obtain cross-sectional anatomical sections. The images were correlated with the histology and anatomy of the resected rectal specimens as well as with the cross-sectional anatomical sections of the 12 cadavers. The findings in 8 patients, 11 rectal preparations, and 10 cadavers, could be compared. In these cases, there was an excellent correlation between endoanal MRI and the cross-sectional cadaver anatomy and histology. With endoanal MRI, all muscle layers of the anal canal wall, comprising the internal anal sphincter, longitudinal muscle, the external anal sphincter and the puborectalis muscle were clearly visible. The levator ani muscle and ligamentous attachments were also well demonstrated. The perianal anatomical spaces, containing multiple septae, were clearly visible. In conclusion, endoanal MRI is excellent for visualising the anal sphincter complex and the findings show a good correlation with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8982844

  18. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  19. Rate and mode of screw misplacements after 3D-fluoroscopy navigation-assisted insertion and 3D-imaging control of 1547 pedicle screws in spinal levels T10-S1 related to vertebrae and spinal sections.

    PubMed

    Balling, Horst; Blattert, Thomas R

    2017-05-27

    In the field of spinal surgery, 3D-fluoroscopy navigation-assisted pedicle screw (PS) insertion with intra-operative 3D-image control represents a modern application of contemporary navigation technology. In literature, sectional or vertebral accuracy limitations of this image-guidance approach are not profoundly specified. This observational study explicitly differentiates accuracy rates and misplacement mode between spinal sections and single vertebrae from T10 to S1 using a navigation-assisted approach. From February 2011 through July 2015, all 3D-fluoroscopy navigation-assisted, 3D-image controlled PS insertions from T10 to S1 were prospectively recorded and evaluated for PS insertion depth, angulation, and entering-point modifications after intraoperative O-arm control scanning. Major complications requiring revision surgery for neurological damage/major bleedings, and procedure-related unintended violations of anatomical structures were recorded. In 1547 navigation-assisted PS insertions, thoracolumbar accuracy (96.4%) was significantly higher than sacral accuracy (92.6%, p ≈ 0.007) due to special requirements to exact PS (insertion depth) in S1 (p < 0.001). Vertebrae with modification rates above average were identified (T10, L5-S1) (p < 0.001). Major complications did not occur, anatomical structures were violated in 1.2% (19/1547 PS insertions). In navigation-assisted O-arm-controlled PS placements, correct PS insertion depths are less easily to achieve than correct trajectory or entering-points, which is important for bicortical PS anchorage in S1. Therefore, post-instrumentation PS control by 3D-imaging or at least intraoperative fluoroscopy is recommended for levels with special requirements to exact PS insertion depths (e.g. S1).

  20. 3D Buried Utility Location Using A Marching-Cross-Section Algorithm for Multi-Sensor Data Fusion.

    PubMed

    Dou, Qingxu; Wei, Lijun; Magee, Derek R; Atkins, Phil R; Chapman, David N; Curioni, Giulio; Goddard, Kevin F; Hayati, Farzad; Jenks, Hugo; Metje, Nicole; Muggleton, Jennifer; Pennock, Steve R; Rustighi, Emiliano; Swingler, Steven G; Rogers, Christopher D F; Cohn, Anthony G

    2016-11-02

    We address the problem of accurately locating buried utility segments by fusing data from multiple sensors using a novel Marching-Cross-Section (MCS) algorithm. Five types of sensors are used in this work: Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Passive Magnetic Fields (PMF), Magnetic Gradiometer (MG), Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (LFEM) and Vibro-Acoustics (VA). As part of the MCS algorithm, a novel formulation of the extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is proposed for marching existing utility tracks from a scan cross-section (scs) to the next one; novel rules for initializing utilities based on hypothesized detections on the first scs and for associating predicted utility tracks with hypothesized detections in the following scss are introduced. Algorithms are proposed for generating virtual scan lines based on given hypothesized detections when different sensors do not share common scan lines, or when only the coordinates of the hypothesized detections are provided without any information of the actual survey scan lines. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated with both synthetic data and real data. The experimental results in this work demonstrate that the proposed MCS algorithm can locate multiple buried utility segments simultaneously, including both straight and curved utilities, and can separate intersecting segments. By using the probabilities of a hypothesized detection being a pipe or a cable together with its 3D coordinates, the MCS algorithm is able to discriminate a pipe and a cable close to each other. The MCS algorithm can be used for both post- and on-site processing. When it is used on site, the detected tracks on the current scs can help to determine the location and direction of the next scan line. The proposed "multi-utility multi-sensor" system has no limit to the number of buried utilities or the number of sensors, and the more sensor data used, the more buried utility segments can be detected with more accurate location and orientation.

  1. 3D Buried Utility Location Using A Marching-Cross-Section Algorithm for Multi-Sensor Data Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Qingxu; Wei, Lijun; Magee, Derek R.; Atkins, Phil R.; Chapman, David N.; Curioni, Giulio; Goddard, Kevin F.; Hayati, Farzad; Jenks, Hugo; Metje, Nicole; Muggleton, Jennifer; Pennock, Steve R.; Rustighi, Emiliano; Swingler, Steven G.; Rogers, Christopher D. F.; Cohn, Anthony G.

    2016-01-01

    We address the problem of accurately locating buried utility segments by fusing data from multiple sensors using a novel Marching-Cross-Section (MCS) algorithm. Five types of sensors are used in this work: Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Passive Magnetic Fields (PMF), Magnetic Gradiometer (MG), Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (LFEM) and Vibro-Acoustics (VA). As part of the MCS algorithm, a novel formulation of the extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is proposed for marching existing utility tracks from a scan cross-section (scs) to the next one; novel rules for initializing utilities based on hypothesized detections on the first scs and for associating predicted utility tracks with hypothesized detections in the following scss are introduced. Algorithms are proposed for generating virtual scan lines based on given hypothesized detections when different sensors do not share common scan lines, or when only the coordinates of the hypothesized detections are provided without any information of the actual survey scan lines. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated with both synthetic data and real data. The experimental results in this work demonstrate that the proposed MCS algorithm can locate multiple buried utility segments simultaneously, including both straight and curved utilities, and can separate intersecting segments. By using the probabilities of a hypothesized detection being a pipe or a cable together with its 3D coordinates, the MCS algorithm is able to discriminate a pipe and a cable close to each other. The MCS algorithm can be used for both post- and on-site processing. When it is used on site, the detected tracks on the current scs can help to determine the location and direction of the next scan line. The proposed “multi-utility multi-sensor” system has no limit to the number of buried utilities or the number of sensors, and the more sensor data used, the more buried utility segments can be detected with more accurate location and

  2. Continuous section extraction and over-underbreak detection of tunnel based on 3D laser technology and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weixing; Wang, Zhiwei; Han, Ya; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Over Underbreak detection of road and solve the problemof the roadway data collection difficulties, this paper presents a new method of continuous section extraction and Over Underbreak detection of road based on 3D laser scanning technology and image processing, the method is divided into the following three steps: based on Canny edge detection, local axis fitting, continuous extraction section and Over Underbreak detection of section. First, after Canny edge detection, take the least-squares curve fitting method to achieve partial fitting in axis. Then adjust the attitude of local roadway that makes the axis of the roadway be consistent with the direction of the extraction reference, and extract section along the reference direction. Finally, we compare the actual cross-sectional view and the cross-sectional design to complete Overbreak detected. Experimental results show that the proposed method have a great advantage in computing costs and ensure cross-section orthogonal intercept terms compared with traditional detection methods.

  3. Intercomparison of modal and sectional aerosol microphysics representations within the same 3-D global chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Ridley, D. A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pringle, K. J.; Merikanto, J.; Korhonen, H.; Schwarz, J. P.; Lee, L. A.; Manktelow, P. T.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Schmidt, A.; Breider, T. J.; Emmerson, K. M.; Reddington, C. L.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Pickering, S. J.

    2012-05-01

    In the most advanced aerosol-climate models it is common to represent the aerosol particle size distribution in terms of several log-normal modes. This approach, motivated by computational efficiency, makes assumptions about the shape of the particle distribution that may not always capture the properties of global aerosol. Here, a global modal aerosol microphysics module (GLOMAP-mode) is evaluated and improved by comparing against a sectional version (GLOMAP-bin) and observations in the same 3-D global offline chemistry transport model. With both schemes, the model captures the main features of the global particle size distribution, with sub-micron aerosol approximately unimodal in continental regions and bi-modal in marine regions. Initial bin-mode comparisons showed that the current values for two size distribution parameter settings in the modal scheme (mode widths and inter-modal separation sizes) resulted in clear biases compared to the sectional scheme. By adjusting these parameters in the modal scheme, much better agreement is achieved against the bin scheme and observations. Annual mean surface-level mass of sulphate, sea-salt, black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) are within 25% in the two schemes in nearly all regions. Surface level concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), surface area density and condensation sink also compare within 25% in most regions. However, marine CCN concentrations between 30° N and 30° S are systematically 25-60% higher in the modal model, which we attribute to differences in size-resolved particle growth or cloud-processing. Larger differences also exist in regions or seasons dominated by biomass burning and in free-troposphere and high-latitude regions. Indeed, in the free-troposphere, GLOMAP-mode BC is a factor 2-4 higher than GLOMAP-bin, likely due to differences in size-resolved scavenging. Nevertheless, in most parts of the atmosphere, we conclude that bin-mode differences are much

  4. Intercomparison of modal and sectional aerosol microphysics representations within the same 3-D global chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Ridley, D. A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pringle, K. J.; Merikanto, J.; Korhonen, H.; Schwarz, J. P.; Lee, L. A.; Manktelow, P. T.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Schmidt, A.; Breider, T. J.; Emmerson, K. M.; Reddington, C. L.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Pickering, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    A global modal aerosol microphysics module (GLOMAP-mode) is evaluated and improved by comparing against a sectional version (GLOMAP-bin) and observations in the same 3-D global offline chemistry transport model. With both schemes, the model captures the main features of the global particle size distribution, with sub-micron aerosol approximately unimodal in continental regions and bi-modal in marine regions. Initial bin-mode comparisons showed that various size distribution parameter settings (mode widths and inter-modal separation sizes) resulted in clear biases compared to the sectional scheme. By adjusting these parameters in the modal scheme, much better agreement is achieved against the bin scheme and observations. Surface mass of sulphate, sea-salt, black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) are, on the annual mean, within 25 % in the two schemes in nearly all regions. On the annual mean, surface level concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), surface area density and condensation sink also compare within 25 % in most regions. However, marine CCN concentrations between 30° N and 30° S are systematically higher in the modal scheme, by 25-60 %, which we attribute to differences in size-resolved particle growth or cloud-processing. Larger differences also exist in regions or seasons dominated by biomass burning and in free-troposphere and high-latitude regions. Indeed, in the free-troposphere, GLOMAP-mode BC is a factor 2-4 higher than GLOMAP-bin, likely due to differences in size-resolved scavenging. Nevertheless, in most parts of the atmosphere, we conclude that bin-mode differences are much less than model-observation differences, although some processes are missing in these runs which may pose a bigger challenge to modal schemes (e.g. boundary layer nucleation, ultra-fine sea-spray). The findings here underline the need for a spectrum of complexity in global models, with size-resolved aerosol properties predicted by modal

  5. The Role of Faulting on the Growth of a Carbonate Platform: Evidence from 3D Seismic Analysis and Section Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Fathiyah Jamaludin, Siti; Pubellier, Manuel; Prasad Ghosh, Deva; Menier, David; Pierson, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Tectonics in addition to other environmental factors impacts the growth of carbonate platforms and plays an important role in shaping the internal architecture of the platforms. Detailed of faults and fractures development and healing in carbonate environment have not been explored sufficiently. Using 3D seismic and well data, we attempt to reconstruct the structural evolution of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia Province, offshore Malaysia. Luconia Province is located in the NW coast of Borneo and has become one of the largest carbonate factories in SE Asia. Seismic interpretations including seismic attribute analysis are applied to the carbonate platform to discern its sedimentology and structural details. Detailed seismic interpretations highlight the relationships of carbonate deposition with syn-depositional faulting. Branching conjugate faults are common in this carbonate platform and have become a template for reef growth, attesting lateral facies changes within the carbonate environments. Structural restoration was then appropriately performed on the interpreted seismic sections based on sequential restoration techniques, and provided images different from those of horizon flattening methods. This permits us to compensate faults' displacement, remove recent sediment layers and finally restore the older rock units prior to the fault motions. It allows prediction of platform evolution as a response to faulting before and after carbonate deposition and also enhances the pitfalls of interpretation. Once updated, the reconstructions allow unravelling of the un-seen geological features underneath the carbonate platform, such as paleo-structures and paleo-topography which in turn reflects the paleo-environment before deformations took place. Interestingly, sections balancing and restoration revealed the late-phase (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene) rifting of South China Sea, otherwise difficult to visualize on seismic sections. Later it is shown that

  6. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA (the limitations on bonus payments)? 30.10 Section 30.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a...

  7. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA (the limitations on bonus payments)? 30.10 Section 30.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a...

  8. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA (the limitations on bonus payments)? 30.10 Section 30.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a...

  9. 3D modelling and construction of a standard cross section of the Euganean Hydrothermal circuit - NE Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Marco; Zampieri, Dario; Fabbri, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    software uses 2D model sections, therefore the standard cross section will be useful as starting point for the hydrothermal model and to test its parameters sensitivity. The analysis of some available unpublished seismic lines, located few kilometres to the southeast of the EGF, has permitted to construct a 3D model of the subsurface, performed by gOcad. In the north-western part, including the EGF, the main constraint is given by the stratigraphies of deep wells penetrating the bedrock for few kilometres. Therefore, this work confirms the idea that the outflow of the thermal waters, in the area near the Euganei Hills, is caused by the local extensional regime related to the strike-slip kinematics of the Schio - Vicenza fault system.

  10. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  11. Radioautographic localization of prolactin messenger RNA on histological sections by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pochet, R; Brocas, H; Vassart, G; Toubeau, G; Seo, H; Refetoff, S; Dumont, J E; Pasteels, J L

    1981-05-04

    In situ hybridization of complementary [H3]DNA ([H3]cDNA) synthetized from purified rat prolactin messenger RNA (rPRL mRNA) was performed to specifically identify on histologic sections of rat hypophysis cells expressing the PRL gene. Radioautographic labelling occurred over weakly acidophilic cells, while other acidophils, with darker cytoplasm did not contain more silver grains than blood vessels.

  12. [A histological study of hard dental tissues in nondecalcified sections using the cutting-grinding technic].

    PubMed

    Trisi, P; Scogna, G; Piattelli, M; Romasco, N; Figliolia, A

    1991-01-01

    With the cutting-grinding technique (Exakt System) it is possible to obtain sections with a width of less than 10 microns of specimens such as teeth, crowns, bridges, implants, mineralized structures, which cannot be cut with routine histological techniques. In the present paper the authors study the efficacy of this technique in hard dental tissues.

  13. Construction and histological analysis of a 3D human arterial wall model containing vasa vasorum using a layer-by-layer technique.

    PubMed

    Shima, Fumiaki; Narita, Hirokazu; Hiura, Ayami; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-03-01

    There is considerable global demand for three-dimensional (3D) functional tissues which mimic our native organs and tissues for use as in vitro drug screening systems and in regenerative medicine. In particular, there has been an increasing number of patients who suffer from arterial diseases such as arteriosclerosis. As such, in vitro 3D arterial wall models that can evaluate the effects of novel medicines and a novel artificial graft for the treatment are required. In our previous study, we reported the rapid construction of 3D tissues by employing a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique and revealed their potential applications in the pharmaceutical fields and tissue engineering. In this study, we successfully constructed a 3D arterial wall model containing vasa vasorum by employing a LbL technique for the first time. The cells were coated with extracellular matrix nanofilms and seeded into a culture insert using a cell accumulation method. This model had a three-layered hierarchical structure: a fibroblast layer, a smooth muscle layer, and an endothelial layer, which resembled the native arterial wall. Our method could introduce vasa vasorum into a fibroblast layer in vitro and the 3D arterial wall model showed barrier function which was evaluated by immunostaining and transendothelial electrical resistance measurement. Furthermore, electron microscopy observations revealed that the vasa vasorum was composed of single-layered endothelial cells, and the endothelial tubes were surrounded by the basal lamina, which are known to promote maturation and stabilization in native blood capillaries. These models should be useful for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 814-823, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Histological analysis and 3D reconstruction of winter cereal crowns recovering from freezing: a unique response in oat (Avena sativa L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The crown is the below ground portion of the stem of a grass which contains meristematic cells that give rise to new shoots and roots following winter. To better understand mechanisms of survival from freezing, histological analysis was performed on rye, wheat, barley and oat plants that had been fr...

  15. Number and density of equine preantral follicles in different ovarian histological section thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Alves, K A; Alves, B G; Rocha, C D; Visonná, M; Mohallem, R F F; Gastal, M O; Jacomini, J O; Beletti, M E; Figueiredo, J R; Gambarini, M L; Gastal, E L

    2015-04-01

    Regardless of species, advances in preantral follicle culture and cryopreservation and transplant of ovarian tissue techniques are dependent on the number and density of preantral follicles in the ovary. This study tested the effect of different histological section thicknesses on number, classification, and density of equine preantral follicles. An ovarian fragment was obtained from 5- to 10-year-old mares (n = 14) after slaughter, and each fragment was submitted to three histological section thickness treatments: 3, 5, and 7 μm. The area (cm(2)) of each ovarian fragment was measured, and the sections were evaluated by light microscopy. The percentage of morphologically normal follicles (89%) was similar (P > 0.05) among primordial, transitional, and primary follicles and also among histological section thicknesses. A greater (P < 0.05) number of preantral follicles per histological section were seen in the 7-μm (8.0 ± 2.2) than that in the 3-μm (3.4 ± 0.7) treatment. Furthermore, a linear regression analysis reported that the number of preantral follicles increased (P < 0.05) when a thicker section treatment was used. However, no association (P > 0.05) between follicular density and treatment was observed. The mean number of preantral follicles per fragment (45.3 ± 18.8) and the follicular density (3.0 ± 0.5 follicles per cm(2)) were different (P < 0.05) among mares. In conclusion, this study on equine preantral follicles reported that (1) a 7-μm histological section thickness might be recommended because it allowed identification of a greater number of preantral follicles per sample, (2) a large individual variation in follicle population and density was detected regardless of histological section thickness, and (3) mares have a low number and density of preantral follicles when compared with those reported for other species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  17. Optical diagnosis of gallbladder cancers via two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of unstained histological sections.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, based on signal from cells, can provide detailed information on tissue architecture and cellular morphology in unstained histological sections to generate subcellular-resolution images from tissue directly. In this paper, we used TPEF microscopy to image microstructure of human normal gallbladder and three types of differentiated carcinomas in order to investigate the morphological changes of tissue structure, cell, cytoplasm, and nucleus without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. It displayed that TPEF microscopy can well image the stratified normal gallbladder tissue, including the mucosa, the muscularis, and the serosa. The typical cancer cell, characterized by cellular and nuclear pleomorphism, enlarged nuclei, and augmented nucleolus, can be identified in histological sections without H-E staining as well. The quantitative results showed that the areas of the nucleus and the nucleolus in three types of cancerous cells were all significantly greater than those in normal gallbladder columnar epithelial cells derived from TPEF microscopic images. The studies demonstrated that TPEF microscopy has the ability to characterize tissue structures and cell morphology of gallbladder cancers differentiated from a normal gallbladder in a manner similar to traditional histological analysis. As a novel tool, it has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging and migration by utilizing histological section specimens without H-E staining.

  18. Automated image analysis of placental villi and syncytial knots in histological sections.

    PubMed

    Kidron, Debora; Vainer, Ifat; Fisher, Yael; Sharony, Reuven

    2017-05-01

    Delayed villous maturation and accelerated villous maturation diagnosed in histologic sections are morphologic manifestations of pathophysiological conditions. The inter-observer agreement among pathologists in assessing these conditions is moderate at best. We investigated whether automated image analysis of placental villi and syncytial knots could improve standardization in diagnosing these conditions. Placentas of antepartum fetal death at or near term were diagnosed as normal, delayed or accelerated villous maturation. Histologic sections of 5 cases per group were photographed at ×10 magnification. Automated image analysis of villi and syncytial knots was performed, using ImageJ public domain software. Analysis of hundreds of histologic images was carried out within minutes on a personal computer, using macro commands. Compared to normal placentas, villi from delayed maturation were larger and fewer, with fewer and smaller syncytial knots. Villi from accelerated maturation were smaller. The data were further analyzed according to horizontal placental zones and groups of villous size. Normal placentas can be discriminated from placentas of delayed or accelerated villous maturation using automated image analysis. Automated image analysis of villi and syncytial knots is not equivalent to interpretation by the human eye. Each method has advantages and disadvantages in assessing the 2-dimensional histologic sections representing the complex, 3-dimensional villous tree. Image analysis of placentas provides quantitative data that might help in standardizing and grading of placentas for diagnostic and research purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlation among ultrasound, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the sciatic nerve: a review.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Nizar; van Geffen, Geert J; Bruhn, Jörgen; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2010-01-01

    Efficient identification of the sciatic nerve (SN) requires a thorough knowledge of its topography in relation to the surrounding structures. Anatomic cross sections in similar oblique planes as observed during SN ultrasonography are lacking. A survey of sonoanatomy matched with ultrasound views of the major SN block sites will be helpful in pattern recognition, especially when combined with images that show the internal architecture of the nerve. From 1 cadaver, consecutive parts of the upper leg corresponding to the 4 major blocks sites were sectioned and deeply frozen. Using cryomicrotomy, consecutive transverse sections were acquired and photographed at 78-microm intervals, along with histologic sections at 5-mm intervals. Multiplanar reformatting was done to reconstruct the optimal planes for an accurate comparison of ultrasonography and gross anatomy. The anatomic and histologic images were matched with ultrasound images that were obtained from 2 healthy volunteers. By simulating the exact position and angulation as in the ultrasonographic images, detailed anatomic overviews of SN and adjacent structures were reconstructed in the gluteal, subgluteal, midfemoral, and popliteal regions. Throughout its trajectory, SN contains numerous fascicles with connective and adipose tissues. In this study, we provide an optimal matching between histology, anatomic cross sections, and short-axis ultrasound images of SN. Reconstructing ultrasonographic planes with this high-resolution digitized anatomy not only enables an overview but also shows detailed views of the architecture of internal SN. The undulating course of the nerve fascicles within SN may explain its varying echogenic appearance during probe manipulation.

  20. Enhancement of third harmonic contrast with harmonophores in multimodal non-linear microscopy of histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuer, Adam; Bakueva, Ludmilla; Cisek, Richard; Alami, Jennifer; Dumont, Daniel J.; Rowlands, John; Barzda, Virginijus

    2008-02-01

    Histological investigations of biological tissue benefited tremendously from staining different cellular structures with various organic dyes. With the introduction of new imaging modalities such as second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy, the demand for novel dyes that enhance the harmonic signals has arisen. The new labels with high molecular hyperpolarizability have recently been termed harmonophores. In this study, we demonstrate that hematoxylin, the standard histological stain used in H&E (hematoxylin and eosin) staining, enhances the microscopic THG signal. Hematoxylin has an affinity for basophilic structures such as the cell nucleus, ribosomes and mitochondria, while eosin stains structures such as the cytoplasm, collagen and red blood cells. The histological sections of H&E stained cancerous prostate tissue found in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) have been investigated with the multimodal SHG, THG and multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPF) microscope. Strong THG signal revealed intracellular structures originating where the hematoxylin stain resides, while SHG imaging of the tissue showed the presence of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix. The MPF was mostly present in the extracellular matrix. The spectrally and temporally resolved MPF revealed that most of the fluorescence originates from the eosin. The THG image did not correlate with MPF confirming that the harmonic signal originates from hematoxylin. Multimodal nonlinear microscopy adds invaluable information about cellular structures to the widely used bright field investigations of H&E stained histological sections, and can be efficiently used for morphological studies as well as cancer diagnostics.

  1. Deep learning of the sectional appearances of 3D CT images for anatomical structure segmentation based on an FCN voting method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Takayama, Ryosuke; Wang, Song; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-07-21

    issue of anatomical structure segmentation in 3D CT cases. The novelty of this work is the policy of deep learning of the different 2D sectional appearances of 3D anatomical structures for CT cases and the majority voting of the 3D segmentation results from multiple crossed 2D sections to achieve availability and reliability with better efficiency, generality, and flexibility than conventional segmentation methods, which must be guided by human expertise. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Applying microCT and 3D visualization to Jurassic silicified conifer seed cones: A virtual advantage over thin-sectioning1

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Carole T.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As an alternative to conventional thin-sectioning, which destroys fossil material, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (also called microtomography or microCT) integrated with scientific visualization, three-dimensional (3D) image segmentation, size analysis, and computer animation is explored as a nondestructive method of imaging the internal anatomy of 150-million-year-old conifer seed cones from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation, USA, and of recent and other fossil cones. • Methods: MicroCT was carried out on cones using a General Electric phoenix v|tome|x s 240D, and resulting projections were processed with visualization software to produce image stacks of serial single sections for two-dimensional (2D) visualization, 3D segmented reconstructions with targeted structures in color, and computer animations. • Results: If preserved in differing densities, microCT produced images of internal fossil tissues that showed important characters such as seed phyllotaxy or number of seeds per cone scale. Color segmentation of deeply embedded seeds highlighted the arrangement of seeds in spirals. MicroCT of recent cones was even more effective. • Conclusions: This is the first paper on microCT integrated with 3D segmentation and computer animation applied to silicified seed cones, which resulted in excellent 2D serial sections and segmented 3D reconstructions, revealing features requisite to cone identification and understanding of strobilus construction. PMID:25202495

  3. 3D analysis of synaptic vesicle density and distribution after acute foot-shock stress by using serial section transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, M; Darkner, S; Nava, N; Nyengaard, J R; Wegener, G; Popoli, M; Sporring, J

    2017-01-01

    Behavioural stress has shown to strongly affect neurotransmission within the neocortex. In this study, we analysed the effect of an acute stress model on density and distribution of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles within medial prefrontal cortex. Serial section transmission electron microscopy was employed to compare two groups of male rats: (1) rats subjected to foot-shock stress and (2) rats with sham stress as control group. Two-dimensional (2D) density measures are common in microscopic images and are estimated by following a 2D path in-section. However, this method ignores the slant of the active zone and thickness of the section. In fact, the active zone is a surface in three-dimension (3D) and the 2D measures do not accurately reflect the geometric configuration unless the active zone is perpendicular to the sectioning angle. We investigated synaptic vesicle density as a function of distance from the active zone in 3D. We reconstructed a 3D dataset by estimating the thickness of all sections and by registering all the image sections into a common coordinate system. Finally, we estimated the density as the average number of vesicles per area and volume and modelled the synaptic vesicle distribution by fitting a one-dimensional parametrized distribution that took into account the location uncertainty due to section thickness. Our results showed a clear structural difference in synaptic vesicle density and distribution between stressed and control group with improved separation by 3D measures in comparison to the 2D measures. Our results showed that acute foot-shock stress exposure significantly affected both the spatial distribution and density of the synaptic vesicles within the presynaptic terminal.

  4. Removal of histological sections from glass for electron microscopy - Use of Quetol 651 resin and heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Joyce, K.; Dantoni Damelio, E.

    1983-01-01

    A number of approaches have been used to separate stained conventional histological sections from glass slides in preparation for a study with the electron microscope. However, in each reported case some problems were encountered with respect to the separation process. The present investigation is concerned with the use of the epoxy resin Quetol 651 as an embedding medium for this procedure, taking into account the simple application of heat (62-64 C) for performing the separation step. After the tissue has been removed from the glass by the considered technique, it is thin sectioned, and stained with uranyl acetate-lead citrate.

  5. Removal of histological sections from glass for electron microscopy - Use of Quetol 651 resin and heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Joyce, K.; Dantoni Damelio, E.

    1983-01-01

    A number of approaches have been used to separate stained conventional histological sections from glass slides in preparation for a study with the electron microscope. However, in each reported case some problems were encountered with respect to the separation process. The present investigation is concerned with the use of the epoxy resin Quetol 651 as an embedding medium for this procedure, taking into account the simple application of heat (62-64 C) for performing the separation step. After the tissue has been removed from the glass by the considered technique, it is thin sectioned, and stained with uranyl acetate-lead citrate.

  6. Bone micro-architectural analysis of mandible and tibia in ovariectomised rats: A quantitative structural comparison between undecalcified histological sections and micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Li, W; Liu, Y S; Zhou, Y S

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate if micro-CT can work as a method for the 3D assessment and analysis of cancellous bone by comparing micro-CT with undecalcified histological sections in OVX rats. The mandible and tibia of sham, ovariectomised (OVX) and zoledronate-injected ovariectomised (OVX-ZOL) rats were assessed morphometrically. Specimens were scanned by micro-CT. Undecalcified histological sections were manufactured from the specimen scanned by micro-CT and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Bivariate linear regressions and one-way analysis of variance were undertaken for statistics using SPSS 16.0.1 software. There were highly significant correlations between undecalcified histological sections and micro-CT for all parameters (bone volume density (BV/TV), bone surface density (BS/BV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular number (Tb.N), and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp))in the mandible and tibia. Bone histomorphometric parameters analysed by both methods exhibited significant differences among sham, OVX, and OVX-ZOL groups. There were significant correlations between mandible and tibia in BV/TV, BS/BV, and Tb.Sp. Micro-CT is a complementary tool to histological sections in basic research that could improve our understanding of bone histomorphometry. The mandible can be used as an effective site to assess bone morphometry of OVX or metabolic bone disease rat models.Cite this article: H. Liu, W. Li, Y. S. Liu, Y. S. Zhou. Bone micro-architectural analysis of mandible and tibia in ovariectomised rats: A quantitative structural comparison between undecalcified histological sections and micro-CT. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:253-262. © 2016 Liu et al.

  7. [Autogenous bone versus beta-tricalcium phosphate graft alone for bilateral sinus elevations (2-3D CT, histologic and histomorphometric evaluations)].

    PubMed

    Németh, Zsolt; Suba, Zsuzsanna; Hrabák, Károly; Barabás, József; Szabó, György

    2002-06-23

    When the maxilla is edentulous and the alveolar process is extensively absorbed, a dental root can be implanted only after the implantation of bone or a bone-substitute. Only in this way can the subjective and objective negative features associated with a removable prosthesis be avoided. Many forms of bone-substitutes are known. Freely taken bone from the patient generally serves as the gold standard for the classification of bone-substitutes. The aim of our work was to compare two materials (the patient's own bone and beta-tricalcium phosphate) in the same patient. Ten patients were selected who for some reason did not want or could not wear a removable prosthesis. The maxilla was so atrophied that bone or bone-substitute implantation was necessary before the dental root could be implanted. The maxilla had to be elevated from inside (sinus elevation) and thickened from outside (onlay-plasty). Bone was taken in the usual manner from the hipbone. For the internal elevation, such autogenous bone was utilized on one side, and beta-tricalcium phosphate granulate on the other. The formation of new bone and the rate of bone formation were followed by clinical methods and by radiological, histological, and histomorphometric examinations. The implantation succeeded clinically in all ten patients: one year later they all received a fixed bridge. The radiological and histological examinations demonstrated good bone formation on both sides. As concerns the rate of formation of new bone, there was practically no difference after the implantation of autogenous bone or beta-tricalcium phosphate. This study has therefore provided further evidence that, when certain bone deficiencies are to be eliminated, the unpleasant phenomena accompanying the removal of the patient's own bone can be avoided through the use of new synthetic materials. Accordingly, when comparing the present results with the findings of other authors, beta-tricalcium phosphate may be considered a good graft

  8. Automatic calculation and visualization of nuclear density in whole slide images of hepatic histological sections.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Akito; Takahashi, Masanobu; Nakano, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    An automatic method for estimating the density of cell nuclei in whole slide images (WSI's) of hepatic histological sections is presented. The method can be applied to hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stained sections with slight histological atypism, such as early well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (ewHCC). It is shown that measured nuclear density is affected by the nuclear size due to fragments of nuclei. This size-dependent problem has been solved by estimating the standard nuclear area for each image patch. The method extracts typical nuclei, which are used to automatically adjust the parameters, including the standard nuclear area. The method is robust for variations in contrast, color, and nuclear size. 40 image patches sampled from 20 WSI's of surgical sections were used for accuracy evaluation. The mean absolute percentage error of estimated nuclear densities was 8.2%. It was also confirmed that the distributions of nuclear density were successfully estimated and visualized for all 20 WSI's. The computation time for a WSI of typical surgical section (754 mm2, about 1,280,000 nuclei) was about 57 minutes on a PC.

  9. Identifying Clinically Significant Prostate Cancers using 3-D In Vivo Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging with Whole-Mount Histology Validation.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Mark L; Glass, Tyler J; Miller, Zachary A; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Buck, Andrew; Polascik, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajan T; Brown, Alison F; Madden, John; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-06-01

    Overly aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) treatment adversely affects patients and places an unnecessary burden on our health care system. The inability to identify and grade clinically significant PCa lesions is a factor contributing to excessively aggressive PCa treatment, such as radical prostatectomy, instead of more focal, prostate-sparing procedures such as cryotherapy and high-dose radiation therapy. We have performed 3-D in vivo B-mode and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using a mechanically rotated, side-fire endorectal imaging array to identify regions suspicious for PCa in 29 patients being treated with radical prostatectomies for biopsy-confirmed PCa. Whole-mount histopathology analyses were performed to identify regions of clinically significant/insignificant PCa lesions, atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Regions of suspicion for PCa were reader-identified in ARFI images based on boundary delineation, contrast, texture and location. These regions of suspicion were compared with histopathology identified lesions using a nearest-neighbor regional localization approach. Of all clinically significant lesions identified on histopathology, 71.4% were also identified using ARFI imaging, including 79.3% of posterior and 33.3% of anterior lesions. Among the ARFI-identified lesions, 79.3% corresponded to clinically significant PCa lesions, with these lesions having higher indices of suspicion than clinically insignificant PCa. ARFI imaging had greater sensitivity for posterior versus anterior lesions because of greater displacement signal-to-noise ratio and finer spatial sampling. Atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia can cause appreciable prostate anatomy distortion and heterogeneity that confounds ARFI PCa lesion identification; however, in general, ARFI regions of suspicion did not coincide with these benign pathologies.

  10. 3-D EM exploration of the hepatic microarchitecture – lessons learned from large-volume in situ serial sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Shami, Gerald John; Cheng, Delfine; Huynh, Minh; Vreuls, Celien; Wisse, Eddie; Braet, Filip

    2016-01-01

    To-date serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) dominates as the premier technique for generating three-dimensional (3-D) data of resin-embedded biological samples at an unprecedented depth volume. Given the infancy of the technique, limited literature is currently available regarding the applicability of SBF-SEM for the ultrastructural investigation of tissues. Herein, we provide a comprehensive and rigorous appraisal of five different SBF-SEM sample preparation protocols for the large-volume exploration of the hepatic microarchitecture at an unparalleled X, Y and Z resolution. In so doing, we qualitatively and quantitatively validate the use of a comprehensive SBF-SEM sample preparation protocol, based on the application of heavy metal fixatives, stains and mordanting agents. Employing the best-tested SBF-SEM approach, enabled us to assess large-volume morphometric data on murine parenchymal cells, sinusoids and bile canaliculi. Finally, we integrated the validated SBF-SEM protocol with a correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) approach. The combination of confocal scanning laser microscopy and SBF-SEM provided a novel way to picture subcellular detail. We appreciate that this multidimensional approach will aid the subsequent research of liver tissue under relevant experimental and disease conditions. PMID:27834401

  11. 3-D EM exploration of the hepatic microarchitecture - lessons learned from large-volume in situ serial sectioning.

    PubMed

    Shami, Gerald John; Cheng, Delfine; Huynh, Minh; Vreuls, Celien; Wisse, Eddie; Braet, Filip

    2016-11-11

    To-date serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) dominates as the premier technique for generating three-dimensional (3-D) data of resin-embedded biological samples at an unprecedented depth volume. Given the infancy of the technique, limited literature is currently available regarding the applicability of SBF-SEM for the ultrastructural investigation of tissues. Herein, we provide a comprehensive and rigorous appraisal of five different SBF-SEM sample preparation protocols for the large-volume exploration of the hepatic microarchitecture at an unparalleled X, Y and Z resolution. In so doing, we qualitatively and quantitatively validate the use of a comprehensive SBF-SEM sample preparation protocol, based on the application of heavy metal fixatives, stains and mordanting agents. Employing the best-tested SBF-SEM approach, enabled us to assess large-volume morphometric data on murine parenchymal cells, sinusoids and bile canaliculi. Finally, we integrated the validated SBF-SEM protocol with a correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) approach. The combination of confocal scanning laser microscopy and SBF-SEM provided a novel way to picture subcellular detail. We appreciate that this multidimensional approach will aid the subsequent research of liver tissue under relevant experimental and disease conditions.

  12. Comparison of pump-probe and hyperspectral imaging in unstained histology sections of pigmented lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Deb, Sanghamitra; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin C.

    2017-01-01

    Microscopic variations in melanin composition can be mapped through linear and nonlinear optical responses. Though instrumentation to measure linear attenuation is simple and inexpensive, the nonlinear response provides more degrees of freedom with which to spectroscopically resolve pigments. The objective of this study is to assess differences in imaging melanin contrast by comparing hyperspectral (linear) versus pump-probe (nonlinear) microscopy of unstained histology sections of pigmented lesions. The images and analysis we have presented here show that pump-probe uncovers a greater variation in pigment composition, compared with hyperspectral microscopy, and that the two methods yield complimentary biochemical information. PMID:28856057

  13. A microcomputer based system for quantifying the spatial distribution of inhaled particles in histological lung sections.

    PubMed

    Birchall, A; Hodgson, A

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for quantifying the spatial distribution of inhaled particles in complete lobar histological sections of rodent lung. It is based on a semi-automatic image analyser, linked to a readily available microcomputer. Application of the system to quantify the aggregation of particles, and their distances from airways and lung periphery is described. The observed distributions are compared with the expected distributions from a random set of particles, and the significance of the difference is calculated. Each statistical test is illustrated by an example.

  14. Feature-based analysis of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in histological tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Valkonen, Mira; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes work presented at the Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology 2015, in Linköping, Sweden. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) represents premalignant tissue involving epithelial growth confined in the lumen of prostatic acini. In the attempts to understand oncogenesis in the human prostate, early neoplastic changes can be modeled in the mouse with genetic manipulation of certain tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. As with many early pathological changes, the PIN lesions in the mouse prostate are macroscopically small, but microscopically spanning areas often larger than single high magnification focus fields in microscopy. This poses a challenge to utilize full potential of the data acquired in histological specimens. We use whole prostates fixed in molecular fixative PAXgene™, embedded in paraffin, sectioned through and stained with H&E. To visualize and analyze the microscopic information spanning whole mouse PIN (mPIN) lesions, we utilize automated whole slide scanning and stacked sections through the tissue. The region of interests is masked, and the masked areas are processed using a cascade of automated image analysis steps. The images are normalized in color space, after which exclusion of secretion areas and feature extraction is performed. Machine learning is utilized to build a model of early PIN lesions for determining the probability for histological changes based on the calculated features. We performed a feature-based analysis to mPIN lesions. First, a quantitative representation of over 100 features was built, including several features representing pathological changes in PIN, especially describing the spatial growth pattern of lesions in the prostate tissue. Furthermore, we built a classification model, which is able to align PIN lesions corresponding to grading by visual inspection to more advanced and mild lesions. The classifier allowed both determining the probability of early histological changes for uncategorized

  15. Automatic segementation of histological structures in normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we present a scheme for real time segmentation of histological structures in microscopic images of normal and neoplastic mammary gland sections. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are sliced, and sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy. The background of the images is corrected by arithmetic manipulation using a "phantom." Then we use the fast marching method with a speed function that depends on the brightness gradient of the image to obtain a preliminary approximation to the boundaries of the structures of interest within a region of interest (ROI) of the entire section manually selected by the user. We use the result of the fast marching method as the initial condition for the level set motion equation. We run this last method for a few steps and obtain the final result of the segmentation. These results can be connected from section to section to build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the entire tissue block that we are studying.

  16. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravi; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2003-01-18

    In this paper we present a scheme for real time segmentation of histological structures in microscopic images of normal and neoplastic mammary gland sections. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are sliced, and sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy. The background of the images is corrected by arithmetic manipulation using a ''phantom.'' Then we use the fast marching method with a speed function that depends on the brightness gradient of the image to obtain a preliminary approximation to the boundaries of the structures of interest within a region of interest (ROI) of the entire section manually selected by the user. We use the result of the fast marching method as the initial condition for the level set motion equation. We run this last method for a few steps and obtain the final result of the segmentation. These results can be connected from section to section to build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the entire tissue block that we are studying.

  17. Adiposoft: automated software for the analysis of white adipose tissue cellularity in histological sections.

    PubMed

    Galarraga, Miguel; Campión, Javier; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Boqué, Noemí; Moreno, Haritz; Martínez, José Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín; Ortiz-de-Solórzano, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    The accurate estimation of the number and size of cells provides relevant information on the kinetics of growth and the physiological status of a given tissue or organ. Here, we present Adiposoft, a fully automated open-source software for the analysis of white adipose tissue cellularity in histological sections. First, we describe the sequence of image analysis routines implemented by the program. Then, we evaluate our software by comparing it with other adipose tissue quantification methods, namely, with the manual analysis of cells in histological sections (used as gold standard) and with the automated analysis of cells in suspension, the most commonly used method. Our results show significant concordance between Adiposoft and the other two methods. We also demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to distinguish the cellular composition of three different rat fat depots. Moreover, we found high correlation and low disagreement between Adiposoft and the manual delineation of cells. We conclude that Adiposoft provides accurate results while considerably reducing the amount of time and effort required for the analysis.

  18. Assessing the histological type and grade of primary parotid carcinoma by fine-needle aspiration and frozen section.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Shuji; Kawata, Ryo; Higashino, Masaaki; Lee, Koutetsu; Terada, Tetsuya; Kurisu, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Motomu

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and intraoperative frozen section (FS) for the correct identification of malignancy, histological grade, and histological type. FNAC was performed on all 105 patients and FS on 71 patients with parotid carcinoma. The rate of correctly determining the histological grade by FNAC and FS was 32% and 73%, respectively. The correct diagnosis rate for both the histological type and grade by FNAC and FS was 20% and 48%, respectively. The correct grading of both high and low/intermediate grade carcinoma is possible in 70-80% of patients by FS. If the histological grade is identified correctly, the extent of resection can usually be decided appropriately. Therefore, we should put emphasis on determining the histological grade. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. P1 adaptation of TRIPOLI-4® code for the use of 3D realistic core multigroup cross section generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li; Pénéliau, Yannick; Diop, Cheikh M.; Malvagi, Fausto

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss some improvements we recently implemented in the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® associated with the homogenization and collapsing of subassemblies cross sections. The improvement offered us another approach to get critical multigroup cross sections with Monte-Carlo method. The new calculation method in TRIPOLI-4® tries to ensure the neutronic balances, the multiplicative factors and the critical flux spectra for some realistic geometries. We make it by at first improving the treatment of the energy transfer probability, the neutron excess weight and the neutron fission spectrum. This step is necessary for infinite geometries. The second step which will be enlarged in this paper is aimed at better dealing with the multigroup anisotropy distribution law for finite geometries. Usually, Monte-Carlo homogenized multi-group cross sections are validated within a core calculation by a deterministic code. Here, the validation of multigroup constants will also be carried out by Monte-Carlo core calculation code. Different subassemblies are tested with the new collapsing method, especially for the fast neutron reactors subassemblies.

  20. Computerized 3-D reconstruction of small blood vessels from high voltage electron-micrographs of thick serial cross sections.

    PubMed

    Horn, L; Krajewski, W S; Paul, P K; Song, M J; Sydor, M J

    1988-01-01

    Morphological analysis of compartments in terms of volumes and the orientation of the cells and their nuclei within very small mesenteric arteries and arterioles is being carried out. Samples were from simultaneously sham operated and instrumented control and one-clip two kidney Goldblatt sustained (30 days) hypertensive dogs. Collection of specimens was standardized, i.e. sampling location, perfusion fixation, embedding, staining, and sectioning by methods proven to preserve in vivo dimensions. Serial thick cross sections (0.5 mu) were subjected to high voltage electromicrography (1.0 MeV) at 2500x and then linearly enlarged 3x photographically. The glossy micrographs (7500x) were made into montages and the contours of the smooth muscle layer (vascular smooth muscle), the endothelium (E), nuclei (N), and the internal lamina (IL) were digitized on a large GTCO digi-pad with input to a microcomputer (PC-Limited, Turbo) equipped with a 20 MB hard disk and coprocessor. Solid and transparent image reconstructions and computerized dissection of cell compartments were performed. Compartment volumes of vascular smooth muscle, IL, E and N, and individual cell and nuclear volumes, as well as nuclear/cytoplasmic ratios were calculated. Image reconstructions are presented. The emphasis is on methods and these are discussed in terms of useability for determining accurate microvessel morphology in health and disease, with particular emphasis on assessment of hypertrophy and hyperplasia in experimental hypertension, and architectural angiogenesis in general.

  1. 3D imaging of cement-based materials at submicron resolution by combining laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning.

    PubMed

    Yio, M H N; Mac, M J; Wong, H S; Buenfeld, N R

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to reconstruct large volumes of nontransparent porous materials at submicron resolution. The proposed method combines fluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning to produce a series of overlapping confocal z-stacks, which are then aligned and stitched based on phase correlation. The method can be extended in the XY plane to further increase the overall image volume. Resolution of the reconstructed image volume does not degrade with increase in sample size. We have used the method to image cementitious materials, hardened cement paste and concrete and the results obtained show that the method is reliable. Possible applications of the method such as three-dimensional characterization of the pores and microcracks in hardened concrete, three-dimensional particle shape characterization of cementitious materials and three-dimensional characterization of other porous materials such as rocks and bioceramics are discussed.

  2. Calculation of 3-D free electron laser gain: Comparison with simulation and generalization to elliptical cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho; Kim, Kwang-Je; Xie, Ming.

    1992-08-01

    In the previous paper, we have derived a dispersion relation for the free electron laser (FEL) gain in the exponential regime taking account the diffraction and electron's betatron oscillation. Here, we compare the growth rates obtained by solving the dispersion relation with those obtained by simulation calculation for the waterbag and the Gaussian models for the electron's transverse phase space distribution. The agreement is found to be good except for the limiting case where the Rayleigh length is much longer than the gain length (1-D limit). We also generalize the analysis to the case where the electron beam cross section is elliptical as is usually the case in storage rings, and derive the first-order dispersion relation.

  3. Calculation of 3-D free electron laser gain: Comparison with simulation and generalization to elliptical cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho; Kim, Kwang-Je; Xie, Ming

    1992-08-01

    In the previous paper, we have derived a dispersion relation for the free electron laser (FEL) gain in the exponential regime taking account the diffraction and electron`s betatron oscillation. Here, we compare the growth rates obtained by solving the dispersion relation with those obtained by simulation calculation for the waterbag and the Gaussian models for the electron`s transverse phase space distribution. The agreement is found to be good except for the limiting case where the Rayleigh length is much longer than the gain length (1-D limit). We also generalize the analysis to the case where the electron beam cross section is elliptical as is usually the case in storage rings, and derive the first-order dispersion relation.

  4. An optimized workflow for building 3D models from balanced sections and potential field geophysics: a study case in NE Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Conxi; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Pueyo, Emilio Luis; Rubio, Félix; Rodríguez-Pintó, Adriana; María Casas, Antonio; Oliva-Urcía, Belén; Rey-Moral, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining an accurate 3D image of the geometry and physical properties of geological structures in depth is a challenge regardless the scale and the aim of the investigation. In this framework, assessing the origin of the uncertainties and reducing them is a key issue when building a 3D reconstruction of a target area. Usually, this process involves an interdisciplinary approach and also the use of different software whose inputs and outputs have to be interoperable. We have designed a new workflow for 2.5D and 3D geological and potential field modelling, especially useful in areas where no seismic data is available. The final aim is to obtain a 3D geological model, at a regional or local scale, with the smaller uncertainty as possible. Once the study area and the working scale are is decided, the first obvious step is to compile all preexisting data and to determine its uncertainties. If necessary, a survey will be carried out to acquire additional data (e.g., gravity, magnetic or petrophysical data) to have an appropriated coverage of information and rock samples. A thorough study of the petrophysical properties is made to determine the density, magnetic susceptibility and remanence that will be assigned to each lithology, together with its corresponding uncertainty. Finally, the modelling process is started, and it includes a feedback between geology and potential fields in order to progressively refine the model until it fits all the existing data. The procedure starts with the construction of balanced geological cross sections from field work, available geological maps as well as data from stratigraphic columns, boreholes, etc. These geological cross sections are exported and imported in GMSYS software to carry out the 2.5D potential field modelling. The model improves and its uncertainty is reduced through the feedback between the geologists and the geophysicists. Once the potential field anomalies are well adjusted, the cross sections are exported into 3

  5. Breaking the Crowther limit: combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Ercius, Peter; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D; Elser, Veit; Muller, David A

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability.

  6. 3D Non-Woven Polyvinylidene Fluoride Scaffolds: Fibre Cross Section and Texturizing Patterns Have Impact on Growth of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, Anne; Ross, Robin; Abagnale, Giulio; Joussen, Sylvia; Schuster, Philipp; Arshi, Annahit; Pallua, Norbert; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Gries, Thomas; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Several applications in tissue engineering require transplantation of cells embedded in appropriate biomaterial scaffolds. Such structures may consist of 3D non-woven fibrous materials whereas little is known about the impact of mesh size, pore architecture and fibre morphology on cellular behavior. In this study, we have developed polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) non-woven scaffolds with round, trilobal, or snowflake fibre cross section and different fibre crimp patterns (10, 16, or 28 needles per inch). Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue were seeded in parallel on these scaffolds and their growth was compared. Initial cell adhesion during the seeding procedure was higher on non-wovens with round fibres than on those with snowflake or trilobal cross sections. All PVDF non-woven fabrics facilitated cell growth over a time course of 15 days. Interestingly, proliferation was significantly higher on non-wovens with round or trilobal fibres as compared to those with snowflake profile. Furthermore, proliferation increased in a wider, less dense network. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the MSCs aligned along the fibres and formed cellular layers spanning over the pores. 3D PVDF non-woven scaffolds support growth of MSCs, however fibre morphology and mesh size are relevant: proliferation is enhanced by round fibre cross sections and in rather wide-meshed scaffolds. PMID:24728045

  7. 3D non-woven polyvinylidene fluoride scaffolds: fibre cross section and texturizing patterns have impact on growth of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Anne; Ross, Robin; Abagnale, Giulio; Joussen, Sylvia; Schuster, Philipp; Arshi, Annahit; Pallua, Norbert; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Gries, Thomas; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Several applications in tissue engineering require transplantation of cells embedded in appropriate biomaterial scaffolds. Such structures may consist of 3D non-woven fibrous materials whereas little is known about the impact of mesh size, pore architecture and fibre morphology on cellular behavior. In this study, we have developed polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) non-woven scaffolds with round, trilobal, or snowflake fibre cross section and different fibre crimp patterns (10, 16, or 28 needles per inch). Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue were seeded in parallel on these scaffolds and their growth was compared. Initial cell adhesion during the seeding procedure was higher on non-wovens with round fibres than on those with snowflake or trilobal cross sections. All PVDF non-woven fabrics facilitated cell growth over a time course of 15 days. Interestingly, proliferation was significantly higher on non-wovens with round or trilobal fibres as compared to those with snowflake profile. Furthermore, proliferation increased in a wider, less dense network. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the MSCs aligned along the fibres and formed cellular layers spanning over the pores. 3D PVDF non-woven scaffolds support growth of MSCs, however fibre morphology and mesh size are relevant: proliferation is enhanced by round fibre cross sections and in rather wide-meshed scaffolds.

  8. 3D reconstruction of VZV infected cell nuclei and PML nuclear cages by serial section array scanning electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Mike; Joubert, Lydia; Perrino, John; Koh, Ai Leen; Phanwar, Ibanri; Arvin, Ann M

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM) and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity), what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency) and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the single cell

  9. 3D Reconstruction of VZV Infected Cell Nuclei and PML Nuclear Cages by Serial Section Array Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Mike; Joubert, Lydia; Perrino, John; Koh, Ai Leen; Phanwar, Ibanri; Arvin, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM) and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity), what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency) and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the single cell

  10. Cost-benefit analysis of using large-format histology sections in routine diagnostic breast care.

    PubMed

    Tot, Tibor

    2010-08-01

    Large-format histopathology allows correct documentation of tumor size, lesion distribution, disease extent, and surgical margins, and facilitates better understanding of the complex morphology of breast carcinoma. Large-format histology slides are optimal tools for radiology-pathology correlations. Adapted to the needs of diagnostic routine, this method has the advantages of the conventional small block techniques while being able to analyze large contiguous pieces of breast tissue. The costs connected to implementing and utilizing this technique, analyzed in detail in this paper, exceed those of conventional histopathology only if the conventional sampling is limited and specimen work-up is insufficient. Documenting equally large tissue surfaces with thorough conventional sampling is much more expensive and laborious than when using large-format sections. Thus, large-format histopathology is the only cost-effective histotechnology method that meets the needs of modern multidisciplinary diagnostic breast care. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Visualization of nerve fiber orientation in gross histological sections of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Axer, H; Berks, G; Keyserlingk, D G

    2000-12-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) allows visualization of the orientation of the nervous fibers in the living brain. For comparison, a method was developed to examine the orientation of fibers in histological sections of the human brain. Serial sections through the entire human brain were analyzed regarding fiber orientation using polarized light. Direction of fibers in the cutting plane was obtained by measuring the azimuth with the lowest intensity value at each point, and inclination of fibers in the section was evaluated using fuzzy logic approximations. Direction and inclination of fibers revealing their three-dimensional orientation were visualized by colored arrows mapped into the images. Using this procedure, various fiber tracts were identified (pyramidal tract, radiatio optica, radiatio acustica, arcuate fascicle, and 11 more). Intermingled fibers could be separated from each other. The orientation of the fiber tracts derived from polarized light microscopy was validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy in a defined volume of the internal capsule, where the fiber orientation was studied in four human brains. The polarization method visualizes the high degree of intermingled fiber bundles in the brain, so that distinct fiber pathways cannot be understood as solid, compact tracts: Neighbouring bundles of fibers can belong to different systems of fibers distinguishable by their orientation.

  12. A Comparison of Vertical and Transverse Sections in the Histological Diagnosis of Alopecia Areata Scalp Biopsy Specimens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kanika; Sharma, Sonal; Singh, Usha Rani; Bhattacharya, Sambit Nath

    2016-01-01

    Both vertical and transverse sections are used for the diagnosis of alopecia areata. However when a single biopsy is submitted the pathologist has to decide which type is better. To compare the diagnostic histological features in vertical and transverse sections in alopecia areata scalp biopsy specimens. Tertiary Care Hospital. Comparative Study. A total of 30 patients were enrolled in the study. Two four mm punch biopsy were taken. One was used to take vertical sections and the other for transverse section and histological features of alopecia areata noted in both. Chi-square test, percentage. Diagnosis of alopecia areata could be made in 30 (100%) cases in transverse sections and 28 cases (93.3%) in vertical sections. The number of hair follicles available for evaluation was more in the transverse section. Nanogen follicles and miniaturization of follicles were better visualized in the transverse sections. However the catagen and telogen follicles were noted in both vertical and transverse sections but the number and the ratio of anagen and telogen hair follicles could be better assessed in the transverse sections. Presence of peribulbar lymphocytic infiltrate, eosinophils and pigment casts were noted in both transverse and vertical sections. Transverse sections provide a better assessment of the histological features of alopecia areata than vertical sections and thus should be preferred.

  13. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin staining differentiates carcinoma in situ lesion from normal oesophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2013-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a powerful, important tool for tissues imaging at the molecular level. In this paper, this technique was extended to histological investigations, differentiating carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesion from normal oesophagus by imaging histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The results show that the histology procedures of dehydration, paraffin embedding, and de-paraffinizing highlighted two photon excited fluorescence of cytoplasm and nucleolus of epithelial cell and collagen in stroma. MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of CIS lesion including changes of squamous cells and full epithelium, identification of basement membrane, especially prominent nucleolus. The studies described here show that MPM has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging by employing on histological section specimens without H&E staining.

  14. [Quantitative polarization microscopy demonstration of collagen type I and type III in histologic paraffin sections].

    PubMed

    Ogbuihi, S; Müller, Z; Zink, P

    1988-01-01

    The industrial dye Solophenyl Red 3 BL (Ciba-Geigy) dissolved in a saturated aquaeous solution of picric acid has proved suitable for differentiating between collagen types I and III in histological sections. When examined under polarization microscopy, type I fibers are radiant orange while type III fibers are green. Using 5 micron paraffin sections, an optimal staining procedure was determined: sections were first stained with Resorcin Fuchsin for elastic fibers and with Celestin Blue/Mayer's Hematoxylin for nuclear structures. The staining was then completed with 0.1 g Solophenyl Red/100 ml saturated aqueous solution of picric acid for 60 min at a pH value of 1.25. It was shown that the dye stained collagen selectively. With the aid of a photomultiplier, the spectral distribution of a series of lung sections adequately stained according to the optimized procedure was carried out using a monochromator and an interference filter, respectively. Both methods yielded identical peaks at 590 nm for the orange colored light of collagen type I and 490 nm for the green light of collagen type III. Application of appropriate filters permitted the intensity of the orange and green light at 590 nm and 490 nm to be measured. Long postmortem intervals did not affect the measured values. Quantitative inferences on the ratio of collagen I to collagen III could then be deduced from the ratio of the intensity of orange to green light. This index I/III is often applied in the diagnosis of discrete fibrotic changes in various organs.

  15. Evaluating a technology supported interactive response system during the laboratory section of a histology course.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Vera D; Lorr, Nancy A; Williams, Kimberly

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring of student learning through systematic formative assessment is important for adjusting pedagogical strategies. However, traditional formative assessments, such as quizzes and written assignments, may not be sufficiently timely for making adjustments to a learning process. Technology supported formative assessment tools assess student knowledge, allow for immediate feedback, facilitate classroom dialogues, and have the potential to modify student learning strategies. As an attempt to integrate technology supported formative assessment in the laboratory section of an upper-level histology course, the interactive application Learning Catalytics(TM) , a cloud-based assessment system, was used. This study conducted during the 2015 Histology courses at Cornell University concluded that this application is helpful for identifying student misconceptions "on-the-go," engaging otherwise marginalized students, and forming a new communication venue between students and instructors. There was no overall difference between grades from topics that used the application and grades from those that did not, and students reported that it only slightly helped improve their understanding of the topic (3.8 ± 0.99 on a five-point Likert scale). However, they highly recommended using it (4.2 ± 0.71). The major limitation was regarding the image display and graphical resolution of this application. Even though students embrace the use of technology, 39% reported benefits of having the traditional light microscope available. This cohort of students led instructors to conclude that the newest tools are not always better, but rather can complement traditional instruction methods. Anat Sci Educ 10: 328-338. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  16. Luna stain, an improved selective stain for detection of microsporidian spores in histologic sections.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Tracy S; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Feist, Stephen W; Kent, Michael L

    2011-06-16

    Microsporidia in histologic sections are most often diagnosed by observing spores in host tissues. Spores are easy to identify if they occur in large aggregates or xenomas when sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). However, individual spores are not frequently detected in host tissues with conventional H&E staining, particularly if spores are scattered within the tissues, areas of inflammation, or small spores in nuclei (i.e. Nucleospora salmonis). Hence, a variety of selective stains that enhance visualization of spores is recommended. We discovered that the Luna stain, used to highlight eosinophils, red blood cells, and chitin in arthropods and other invertebrates, also stains spores of Pseudoloma neurophilia. We compared this stain to the Gram, Fite's acid fast, Giemsa, and H&E stains on 8 aquatic microsporidian organisms that were readily available in our 2 laboratories: Loma salmonae, Glugea anomala, Pseudoloma neurophilia, Pleistophora hyphessobryconis, Pleistophora vermiformis, Glugea sp., Steinhausia mytilovum, and an unidentified microsporidian from UK mitten crabs Eriocheir sinensis. Based on tinctorial properties and background staining, the Luna stain performed better for detection of 6 of the 8 microsporidia. Gram stain was superior for the 2 microsporidia from invertebrates: S. mytilovum and the unidentified microsporidian from E. sinensis.

  17. The Luna stain, an improved selective stain for detection of microsporidian spores in histologic sections

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Feist, Stephen W.; Kent, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia in histologic sections are most often diagnosed by observing spores in host tissues. Spores are easy to identify if they occur in large aggregates or xenomas when sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). However, individual spores are not frequently detected in host tissues with conventional H&E staining, particularly if spores are scattered within the tissues, areas of inflammation or small spores in nuclei (i.e., Nucleospora salmonis). Hence, a variety of selective stains that enhance visualization of spores are recommended. We discovered that the Luna stain, used to highlight eosinophils, red blood cells and chitin in arthropods and other invertebrates, also stains spores of Pseudoloma neurophilia. We compared this stain to the Gram, Fite’s acid fast, Giemsa, and H&E stains on eight aquatic microsporidian organisms that were readily available in our two laboratories: Loma salmonae, Glugea anomala, Pseudoloma neurophilia, Pleistophora hyphessobryconis, Pleistophora vermiformis, Glugea sp., Steinhausia mytilovum and an unidentified microsporidian from E. sinensis, UK. Based on tinctorial properties and background staining, the Luna stain performed better for detection of 6 of the 8 microsporidia. Gram stain was superior for the two microsporidia from invertebrates, Steinhausia mytilovum and the unidentified microsporidian from E. sinensis. PMID:21848126

  18. HistoStitcher(©): an interactive program for accurate and rapid reconstruction of digitized whole histological sections from tissue fragments.

    PubMed

    Chappelow, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E; Feldman, Michael; Shih, Natalie; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    We present an interactive program called HistoStitcher(©) for accurate and rapid reassembly of histology fragments into a pseudo-whole digitized histological section. HistoStitcher(©) provides both an intuitive graphical interface to assist the operator in performing the stitch of adjacent histology fragments by selecting pairs of anatomical landmarks, and a set of computational routines for determining and applying an optimal linear transformation to generate the stitched image. Reconstruction of whole histological sections from images of slides containing smaller fragments is required in applications where preparation of whole sections of large tissue specimens is not feasible or efficient, and such whole mounts are required to facilitate (a) disease annotation and (b) image registration with radiological images. Unlike manual reassembly of image fragments in a general purpose image editing program (such as Photoshop), HistoStitcher(©) provides memory efficient operation on high resolution digitized histology images and a highly flexible stitching process capable of producing more accurate results in less time. Further, by parameterizing the series of transformations determined by the stitching process, the stitching parameters can be saved, loaded at a later time, refined, or reapplied to multi-resolution scans, or quickly transmitted to another site. In this paper, we describe in detail the design of HistoStitcher(©) and the mathematical routines used for calculating the optimal image transformation, and demonstrate its operation for stitching high resolution histology quadrants of a prostate specimen to form a digitally reassembled whole histology section, for 8 different patient studies. To evaluate stitching quality, a 6 point scoring scheme, which assesses the alignment and continuity of anatomical structures important for disease annotation, is employed by three independent expert pathologists. For 6 studies compared with this scheme, reconstructed

  19. Geometry and kinematics of accretionary wedge faults inherited from the structure and rheology of the incoming sedimentary section; insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Orme, Haydn; Lenette, Kathryn; Jackson, Christopher; Fitch, Peter; Phillips, Thomas; Moore, Gregory

    2017-04-01

    -circular seamounts. The youngest, most basinward thrusts in the wedge strike NW-SE; however, 17 km landward, towards the wedge core, they strike NE-SW. The orientation of the more landward faults correlates with the trend of linear basement relief, whereas thrust fault orientations close to the deformation front are perpendicular to the convergence direction. We notice that oceanic crust that has been subducted is characterised by NE-SW striking, now-inverted normal faults, with some faults extending up through the entire sedimentary section. We suggest that the NE-SW orientation of thrust faults has been inherited from linear basement ridges. In contrast, basement currently subducting beneath the deformation front is dominated by seamounts and is devoid of more linear features. Here, there are no pre-existing normal faults available for reactivation and thrust faults develop perpendicular to the convergence direction. We show that the incoming plate properties have a profound effect on the geometry of accretionary wedges; it would be difficult to elucidate this without 3D seismic data. Our insights provide new hypotheses that can be tested with numerical and laboratory models.

  20. Test of high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model of Poland by back-azimuthal sections of teleseismic receiver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2015-04-01

    Geological and seismic structure under area of Poland is well studied by over one hundred thousand boreholes, over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles and by vertical seismic profiling, magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods. Compilation of these studies allowed to create a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Polkowski et al. 2014). Model also provides details about the geometry of main layers of sediments (Tertiary and Quaternary, Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic, Permian, old Paleozoic), consolidated/crystalline crust (upper, middle and lower) and uppermost mantle. This model gives an unique opportunity for calculation synthetic receiver function and compering it with observed receiver function calculated for permanent and temporary seismic stations. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) can be used directly to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. So, 3D P-wave velocity model has been interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and back-azimuthal sections of components of receiver function have been calculated. Vp/Vs ratio is assumed to be 1.8, 1.67, 1.73, 1.77 and 1.8 in the sediments, upper/middle/lower consolidated/crystalline crust and uppermost mantle, respectively. Densities were calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Additionally, to test a visibility of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary phases at receiver function sections models have been extended to 250 km depth based on P4-mantle model (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2010). National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284 and by NCN grant UMO-2011/01/B/ST10/06653.

  1. Virtual tissue alignment and cutting plane definition – a new method to obtain optimal longitudinal histological sections

    PubMed Central

    Danz, J C; Habegger, M; Bosshardt, D D; Katsaros, C; Stavropoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Histomorphometric evaluation of the buccal aspects of periodontal tissues in rodents requires reproducible alignment of maxillae and highly precise sections containing central sections of buccal roots; this is a cumbersome and technically sensitive process due to the small specimen size. The aim of the present report is to describe and analyze a method to transfer virtual sections of micro-computer tomographic (CT)-generated image stacks to the microtome for undecalcified histological processing and to describe the anatomy of the periodontium in rat molars. A total of 84 undecalcified sections of all buccal roots of seven untreated rats was analyzed. The accuracy of section coordinate transfer from virtual micro-CT slice to the histological slice, right–left side differences and the measurement error for linear and angular measurements on micro-CT and on histological micrographs were calculated using the Bland–Altman method, interclass correlation coefficient and the method of moments estimator. Also, manual alignment of the micro-CT-scanned rat maxilla was compared with multiplanar computer-reconstructed alignment. The supra alveolar rat anatomy is rather similar to human anatomy, whereas the alveolar bone is of compact type and the keratinized gingival epithelium bends apical to join the junctional epithelium. The high methodological standardization presented herein ensures retrieval of histological slices with excellent display of anatomical microstructures, in a reproducible manner, minimizes random errors, and thereby may contribute to the reduction of number of animals needed. PMID:24266502

  2. Virtual tissue alignment and cutting plane definition--a new method to obtain optimal longitudinal histological sections.

    PubMed

    Danz, J C; Habegger, M; Bosshardt, D D; Katsaros, C; Stavropoulos, A

    2014-02-01

    Histomorphometric evaluation of the buccal aspects of periodontal tissues in rodents requires reproducible alignment of maxillae and highly precise sections containing central sections of buccal roots; this is a cumbersome and technically sensitive process due to the small specimen size. The aim of the present report is to describe and analyze a method to transfer virtual sections of micro-computer tomographic (CT)-generated image stacks to the microtome for undecalcified histological processing and to describe the anatomy of the periodontium in rat molars. A total of 84 undecalcified sections of all buccal roots of seven untreated rats was analyzed. The accuracy of section coordinate transfer from virtual micro-CT slice to the histological slice, right-left side differences and the measurement error for linear and angular measurements on micro-CT and on histological micrographs were calculated using the Bland-Altman method, interclass correlation coefficient and the method of moments estimator. Also, manual alignment of the micro-CT-scanned rat maxilla was compared with multiplanar computer-reconstructed alignment. The supra alveolar rat anatomy is rather similar to human anatomy, whereas the alveolar bone is of compact type and the keratinized gingival epithelium bends apical to join the junctional epithelium. The high methodological standardization presented herein ensures retrieval of histological slices with excellent display of anatomical microstructures, in a reproducible manner, minimizes random errors, and thereby may contribute to the reduction of number of animals needed.

  3. US-CT 3D dual imaging by mutual display of the same sections for depicting minor changes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Ito, Ryu; Ohto, Masao; Sakamoto, Akio; Otsuka, Masayuki; Togawa, Akira; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yamagata, Hitoshi

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound-computed tomography (US-CT) 3D dual imaging for the detection of small extranodular growths of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological profiles of 10 patients with single nodular type HCC with extranodular growth (extranodular growth) who underwent a hepatectomy were evaluated using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography (US), three-dimensional (3D) US, 3D computed tomography (CT) and 3D US-CT dual images. Raw 3D data was converted to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) data using Echo to CT (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and the 3D DICOM data was directly transferred to the image analysis system (ZioM900, ZIOSOFT Inc., Tokyo, Japan). By inputting the angle number (x, y, z) of the 3D CT volume data into the ZioM900, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images of the 3D CT data were displayed in a manner such that they resembled the conventional US images. Eleven extranodular growths were detected pathologically in 10 cases. 2D US was capable of depicting only 2 of the 11 extranodular growths. 3D CT was capable of depicting 4 of the 11 extranodular growths. On the other hand, 3D US was capable of depicting 10 of the 11 extranodular growths, and 3D US-CT dual images, which enable the dual analysis of the CT and US planes, revealed all 11 extranodular growths. In conclusion, US-CT 3D dual imaging may be useful for the detection of small extranodular growths.

  4. Single-stage application of a novel decellularized dermis for treatment-resistant lower limb ulcers: positive outcomes assessed by SIAscopy, laser perfusion, and 3D imaging, with sequential timed histological analysis.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Benatar, Brian; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    We present results of an original clinical study investigating efficacy of a decellularized dermal skin substitute (DCD) as part of a one-stage therapeutic strategy for recalcitrant leg ulcers. Twenty patients with treatment-resistant ulcers underwent hydrosurgical debridement, after which DCD was applied and covered with negative pressure dressings for 1 week. Participants were reviewed on seven occasions over 6 months. 3D photography, full-field laser perfusion imaging, spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis, and sequential biopsies were used to monitor healing. Mean ulcer duration and surface area prior to DCD placement were 4.76 years (range 0.25-40 years) and 13.11 cm(2) (range 1.06-40.75 cm(2)), respectively. Seventy percent of ulcers were venous. Surface area decreased in all patients after treatment (range 23-100%). Mean reduction was 87% after 6 months, and 60% of patients healed completely. Wound bed hemoglobin flux increased significantly 6 weeks after treatment (p = 0.005). Histological and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed progressive DCD integration with colonization by host fibroblasts, lymphocytes, and neutrophils, resulting in fibroplasia, reepithelialisation, and angiogenesis, with correlating raised CD31, collagen I, and collagen III levels. Subgroup analysis showed differing cellular behavior depending on wound duration, with delayed angiogenesis, reduced collagen deposition, and smaller reductions in surface area in ulcers present for over 1 year. The stain intensities of immunohistochemical markers including fibronectin, collagen, and CD31 differed depending on depth from the wound surface and presence of intact epithelium. DCD safely produced significant improvement in treatment-resistant leg ulcers. With no requirement for hospital admission, anesthetic, or autogenic skin grafting, this treatment could be administered in hospital and community settings. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  5. Analysis of 3D branching pattern: hematoxylin and eosin method.

    PubMed

    Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2012-01-01

    Accurate analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of developing organs is critical to understanding how developmental defects can be linked with structural abnormalities. Here, we describe a 3D reconstruction technique of the developing kidney including the outer kidney capsule, ureteric epithelium, and developing nephrons. This 3D reconstructive process involves generating serial sections of the developing kidney, followed by histological staining. Each serial image is projected on the monitor and each tissue lineage or structure is traced. The kidney tracings are aligned and a 3D image is rendered. Each reconstructed tissue/lineage can then be subjected to quantitative analysis (e.g., surface area or volume). The reconstructed ureteric epithelium can be skeletonized to determine the branching architecture.

  6. Spatial mapping of metals in tissue-sections using combination of mass-spectrometry and histology through image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyz, Jiri; Vyslouzilova, Lenka; Vaculovic, Tomas; Tvrdonova, Michaela; Kanicky, Viktor; Haase, Hajo; Horak, Vratislav; Stepankova, Olga; Heger, Zbynek; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    We describe a new procedure for the parallel mapping of selected metals in histologically characterized tissue samples. Mapping is achieved via image registration of digital data obtained from two neighbouring cryosections by scanning the first as a histological sample and subjecting the second to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This computer supported procedure enables determination of the distribution and content of metals of interest directly in the chosen histological zones and represents a substantial improvement over the standard approach, which determines these values in tissue homogenates or whole tissue sections. The potential of the described procedure was demonstrated in a pilot study that analysed Zn and Cu levels in successive development stages of pig melanoma tissue using MeLiM (Melanoma-bearing-Libechov-Minipig) model. We anticipate that the procedure could be useful for a complex understanding of the role that the spatial distribution of metals plays within tissues affected by pathological states including cancer.

  7. Spatial mapping of metals in tissue-sections using combination of mass-spectrometry and histology through image registration

    PubMed Central

    Anyz, Jiri; Vyslouzilova, Lenka; Vaculovic, Tomas; Tvrdonova, Michaela; Kanicky, Viktor; Haase, Hajo; Horak, Vratislav; Stepankova, Olga; Heger, Zbynek; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    We describe a new procedure for the parallel mapping of selected metals in histologically characterized tissue samples. Mapping is achieved via image registration of digital data obtained from two neighbouring cryosections by scanning the first as a histological sample and subjecting the second to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This computer supported procedure enables determination of the distribution and content of metals of interest directly in the chosen histological zones and represents a substantial improvement over the standard approach, which determines these values in tissue homogenates or whole tissue sections. The potential of the described procedure was demonstrated in a pilot study that analysed Zn and Cu levels in successive development stages of pig melanoma tissue using MeLiM (Melanoma-bearing-Libechov-Minipig) model. We anticipate that the procedure could be useful for a complex understanding of the role that the spatial distribution of metals plays within tissues affected by pathological states including cancer. PMID:28071735

  8. Diattenuation of brain tissue and its impact on 3D polarized light imaging.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Miriam; Reckfort, Julia; Weigand, Daniel; Köse, Hasan; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2017-07-01

    3D-polarized light imaging (3D-PLI) reconstructs nerve fibers in histological brain sections by measuring their birefringence. This study investigates another effect caused by the optical anisotropy of brain tissue - diattenuation. Based on numerical and experimental studies and a complete analytical description of the optical system, the diattenuation was determined to be below 4 % in rat brain tissue. It was demonstrated that the diattenuation effect has negligible impact on the fiber orientations derived by 3D-PLI. The diattenuation signal, however, was found to highlight different anatomical structures that cannot be distinguished with current imaging techniques, which makes Diattenuation Imaging a promising extension to 3D-PLI.

  9. ANIMATED SERIAL SECTIONS, A TEACHING AID FOR ORAL HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAYDEN, JESS; AND OTHERS

    THE RELATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO TYPES OF VISUAL MEDIA FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONCEPT OF A GIVEN ANATOMICAL REGION WAS INVESTIGATED. EXPERIMENTAL AND CONTROL GROUPS WERE RANDOMLY SELECTED FROM 119 FIRST-YEAR MEDICAL AND DENTAL STUDENTS IN AN HISTOLOGY CLASS. BOTH GROUPS ATTENDED THE SAME ONE-HOUR LECTURE. FOLLOWING THE LECTURE…

  10. EFFECT OF THE GRAFTING SECTION AREA ON ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY – HISTOLOGICAL STUDY ON DOGS

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ricardo Violante; Müller, Sérgio Swain; Vannini, Rodrigo; Felisbino, Sérgio Luiz; Curcelli, Emilio Carlos; Pereira, Gilberto José Caçdo; de Almeida Silvares, Paulo Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To correlate the initial grafting section area with the outcomes from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Eight dogs underwent operations, divided into two groups according to graft size: Group A, 25% and Group B, 40% of the patellar ligament (PL) width. Methods: After eight months, the dogs were sacrificed for macroscopic and histological analysis on the reconstructed ligaments. Each dog's contralateral knee was used as a control. Results: In both groups, all the reconstructed ligaments were seen to be viable and hypertrophied. The morphology of the PL grafting had changed, which was observed by measuring the crimp and cellularity, and it resembled that of the ACL. Conclusion: The grafting section area did not influence the histological outcomes from ACL reconstruction surgery in dogs. PMID:27047857

  11. Correlative 3D-imaging of Pipistrellus penis micromorphology: Validating quantitative microCT images with undecalcified serial ground section histomorphology.

    PubMed

    Herdina, Anna Nele; Plenk, Hanns; Benda, Petr; Lina, Peter H C; Herzig-Straschil, Barbara; Hilgers, Helge; Metscher, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Detailed knowledge of histomorphology is a prerequisite for the understanding of function, variation, and development. In bats, as in other mammals, penis and baculum morphology are important in species discrimination and phylogenetic studies. In this study, nondestructive 3D-microtomographic (microCT, µCT) images of bacula and iodine-stained penes of Pipistrellus pipistrellus were correlated with light microscopic images from undecalcified surface-stained ground sections of three of these penes of P. pipistrellus (1 juvenile). The results were then compared with µCT-images of bacula of P. pygmaeus, P. hanaki, and P. nathusii. The Y-shaped baculum in all studied Pipistrellus species has a proximal base with two club-shaped branches, a long slender shaft, and a forked distal tip. The branches contain a medullary cavity of variable size, which tapers into a central canal of variable length in the proximal baculum shaft. Both are surrounded by a lamellar and a woven bone layer and contain fatty marrow and blood vessels. The distal shaft consists of woven bone only, without a vascular canal. The proximal ends of the branches are connected with the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa via entheses. In the penis shaft, the corpus spongiosum-surrounded urethra lies in a ventral grove of the corpora cavernosa, and continues in the glans under the baculum. The glans penis predominantly comprises an enlarged corpus spongiosum, which surrounds urethra and baculum. In the 12 studied juvenile and subadult P. pipistrellus specimens the proximal branches of the baculum were shorter and without marrow cavity, while shaft and distal tip appeared already fully developed. The present combination with light microscopic images from one species enabled a more reliable interpretation of histomorphological structures in the µCT-images from all four Pipistrellus species. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Changing prevalence patterns in endoscopic and histological diagnosis of gastritis? Data from a cross-sectional Central European multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eva-Maria; Plieschnegger, Wolfgang; Geppert, Michael; Wigginghaus, Bernd; Höss, Gabriele M; Eherer, Andreas; Schneider, Nora I; Hauer, Almuthe; Rehak, Peter; Vieth, Michael; Langner, Cord

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, Helicobacter infection is considered to be the most common cause of gastritis. In the cross-sectional Central European histoGERD trial, we assessed the prevalence of different types of gastritis, correlating histological and endoscopic diagnoses. A total of 1123 individuals participated in an observational multicentre study. Endoscopists classified individuals as positive or negative for gastritis and rendered the putative cause. Pathologists evaluated biopsy specimens based upon the Updated Sydney System. Histological diagnosis of gastritis was made in 639 (56.9%) participants. In all, 210 (18.7%) individuals were diagnosed with Helicobacter gastritis, 215 (19.1%) with post Helicobacter gastritis, 234 (20.8%) with reactive gastropathy, 26 (2.3%) with autoimmune gastritis, and 6 (0.5%) with focally enhanced gastritis related to Crohn's disease. In 46 out of 639 (7.2%) individuals diagnosed with gastritis, combinations of different histological subtypes were noted the most common being reactive gastropathy and post Helicobacter gastritis. Endoscopic diagnosis of gastritis was made in 534 (47.6%) individuals. Reactive gastropathy was more common than active Helicobacter gastritis, and the majority of cases attributable to Helicobacter infection were no longer ongoing, i.e. post Helicobacter gastritis. Agreement between histological and endoscopic diagnoses was better in reactive gastropathy than in Helicobacter gastritis. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of spondylotic myelopathy on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Abdulhadi, Mike A; Perno, Joseph R; Melhem, Elias R; Nucifora, Paolo G P

    2014-01-01

    In patients with spinal stenosis, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine can be improved by using 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences to provide a high-resolution assessment of osseous and ligamentous structures. However, it is not yet clear whether 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences adequately evaluate the spinal cord itself. As a result, they are generally supplemented by additional 2D fast spin echo sequences, adding time to the examination and potential discomfort to the patient. Here we investigate the hypothesis that in patients with spinal stenosis and spondylotic myelopathy, 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences can characterize cord lesions equally well as 2D fast spin echo sequences. We performed a retrospective analysis of 30 adult patients with spondylotic myelopathy who had been examined with both 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences and 2D fast spin echo sequences at the same scanning session. The two sequences were inspected separately for each patient, and visible cord lesions were manually traced. We found no significant differences between 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo sequences in the mean number, mean area, or mean transverse dimensions of spondylotic cord lesions. Nevertheless, the mean contrast-to-noise ratio of cord lesions was decreased on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences compared to 2D fast spin echo sequences. These findings suggest that 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences do not need supplemental 2D fast spin echo sequences for the diagnosis of spondylotic myelopathy, but they may be less well suited for quantitative signal measurements in the spinal cord.

  14. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  15. The tectonostratigraphic evolution of the offshore Gippsland Basin, Victoria, Australia---results from 3D seismic interpretation and 2D section restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Mitchell

    The Gippsland Basin is located primarily offshore Victoria, Australia (between the Australian mainland and Tasmania) approximately 200 km east of Melbourne. The formation of the east-west trending Gippsland Basin is associated with the break-up of Gondwana during the late Jurassic/early Cretaceous and the basin has endured multiple rifting and inversion events. Strong tectonic control on the sedimentary development of the basin is reflected in the deposition of several major, basin scale sequences ranging in age from the early Cretaceous to Neogene, which are usually bounded by angular unconformities. Schlumberger's Petrel software package has been used to structurally and stratigraphically interpret a basin-wide 3D seismic data set provided by the Australian Government (Geoscience Australia) and four 2D kinematic reconstruction/restorations through the basin have been completed with Midland Valley's Move software to achieve a better understanding of the structural evolution of the Gippsland Basin. Rift phase extension calculated from the restorations (5.0--10.5%) appears anomalously low to accommodate the amount of sediment that has been deposited in the basin (>10km). Distributed extension on small faults and subsidence history from backstripping are employed to answer this anomaly. The 2D restorations completed illustrate structural time relationships across the basin and allow for a minimum estimate of erosion that has occurred along the inverted northern basin margin. Differences between previous work completed by Power et al. (2001) and this study as well as several extension models and associated implications are discussed as they relate to the interpretation carried out in this study. Extension calculated from section restorations ranged from approximately 5.0--10.5%. These measured extensional values appear too low to wholly accommodate the accumulated sediment thickness in the basin. Subsidence modelling and backstripping estimates approximately 50

  16. A 3d-3d appetizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-01

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 "Lens space theory" T [ L( p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L( p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S 3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[ L( p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[ L( p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere S b 3 . This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G ℂ complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  17. Enabling Multiphoton and Second Harmonic Generation Imaging in Paraffin-Embedded and Histologically Stained Sections

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael G.; Kroll, Sebastian; Brucker, Sara Y.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopy, namely multiphoton imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG), is an established noninvasive technique useful for the imaging of extracellular matrix (ECM). Typically, measurements are performed in vivo on freshly excised tissues or biopsies. In this article, we describe the effect of rehydrating paraffin-embedded sections on multiphoton and SHG emission signals and the acquisition of nonlinear images from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections before and after a destaining protocol. Our results reveal that bringing tissue sections to a physiological state yields a significant improvement in nonlinear signals, particularly in SHG. Additionally, the destaining of sections previously processed with H&E staining significantly improves their SHG emission signals during imaging, thereby allowing sufficient analysis of collagen in these sections. These results are important for researchers and pathologists to obtain additional information from paraffin-embedded tissues and archived samples to perform retrospective analysis of the ECM or gain additional information from rare samples. PMID:27018844

  18. Enabling Multiphoton and Second Harmonic Generation Imaging in Paraffin-Embedded and Histologically Stained Sections.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Michael G; Kroll, Sebastian; Brucker, Sara Y; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2016-06-01

    Nonlinear microscopy, namely multiphoton imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG), is an established noninvasive technique useful for the imaging of extracellular matrix (ECM). Typically, measurements are performed in vivo on freshly excised tissues or biopsies. In this article, we describe the effect of rehydrating paraffin-embedded sections on multiphoton and SHG emission signals and the acquisition of nonlinear images from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections before and after a destaining protocol. Our results reveal that bringing tissue sections to a physiological state yields a significant improvement in nonlinear signals, particularly in SHG. Additionally, the destaining of sections previously processed with H&E staining significantly improves their SHG emission signals during imaging, thereby allowing sufficient analysis of collagen in these sections. These results are important for researchers and pathologists to obtain additional information from paraffin-embedded tissues and archived samples to perform retrospective analysis of the ECM or gain additional information from rare samples.

  19. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  20. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of morphologic identification of filamentous fungi in paraffin embedded tissue sections: correlation of histological and culture diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Challa, Sundaram; Pamidi, Umabala; Uppin, Shantveer G; Uppin, Megha S; Vemu, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the correlation between histological and culture diagnosis of filamentous fungi. Tissue sections from biopsy samples stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin and special stains from samples of chronic invasive/noninvasive sinusitis and intracranial space occupying lesions during 2005-2011 diagnosed to have infection due to filamentous fungi were reviewed. The histopathology and culture diagnoses were analyzed for correlation and discrepancy. There were 125 samples positive for filamentous fungi on biopsy. Of these 76 (60.8%) were submitted for culture and fungi grew in 30 (39.97%) samples. There was a positive correlation between histological and culture diagnosis in 25 (83.33%) samples that included Aspergillus species (16/19), Zygomycetes species (8/10) and dematiaceous fungi (1/1). The negative yield of fungi was more in Zygomycetes species (20/30) when compared to Aspergillus species (25/44). There was a discrepancy in diagnosis in 5/30 (16.67%) samples which included probable dual infection in two, and dematiaceous fungi being interpreted as Aspergillus species in three samples. Histopathology plays a major role in the diagnosis of infection due to filamentous fungi, especially when cultures are not submitted or negative. The discrepancy between histological and culture diagnosis was either due to dematiaceous fungi being interpreted as Aspergillus species or probable dual infection.

  2. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  3. Automatic segmentation of cell nuclei in Feulgen-stained histological sections of prostate cancer and quantitative evaluation of segmentation results.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Birgitte; Albregtsen, Fritz; Danielsen, Håvard E

    2012-07-01

    Digital image analysis of cell nuclei is useful to obtain quantitative information for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. However, the lack of a reliable automatic nuclear segmentation is a limiting factor for high-throughput nuclear image analysis. We have developed a method for automatic segmentation of nuclei in Feulgen-stained histological sections of prostate cancer. A local adaptive thresholding with an object perimeter gradient verification step detected the nuclei and was combined with an active contour model that featured an optimized initialization and worked within a restricted region to improve convergence of the segmentation of each nucleus. The method was tested on 30 randomly selected image frames from three cases, comparing the results from the automatic algorithm to a manual delineation of 924 nuclei. The automatic method segmented a few more nuclei compared to the manual method, and about 73% of the manually segmented nuclei were also segmented by the automatic method. For each nucleus segmented both manually and automatically, the accuracy (i.e., agreement with manual delineation) was estimated. The mean segmentation sensitivity/specificity were 95%/96%. The results from the automatic method were not significantly different from the ground truth provided by manual segmentation. This opens the possibility for large-scale nuclear analysis based on automatic segmentation of nuclei in Feulgen-stained histological sections. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; van Loon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N = 2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N = 2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N = 2∗ theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-'t Hooft loops in the 4d N = 2∗ theory. In the presence of a mass parameter cfor the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  5. Epidemic typhus fever and hearing loss: a histological study (Hallpike collection of temporal bone sections).

    PubMed

    Friedmann, I; Frohlich, A; Wright, A

    1993-04-01

    Hearing loss as a frequent complication of louse-borne epidemic typhus fever has been well documented in the reports of ENT specialists serving in both the Allied and the German armies in the last war. The present paper describes the characteristic histopathological features as noted in sections of the temporal bones from five British soldiers who died in 1944 of typhus fever during the last war in Eastern Asia. The VIIIth nerve showed multiple 'typhus nodules' and there was extensive interstitial neuritis of the VIIIth nerve and demyelination of the nerve fibres. There were also widely scattered aggregations of mononuclear cells in the inner ear. This unique study was based on the Hallpike collection of temporal bone sections.

  6. A 3d-3d appetizer

    DOE PAGES

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere Sb3. This enables us tomore » see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent GC complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.« less

  7. A 3d-3d appetizer

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere Sb3. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent GC complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  8. Correlating 3D morphology with molecular pathology: fibrotic remodelling in human lung biopsies.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Manuela; Wehling, Judith; Warnecke, Gregor; Heidrich, Marko; Izykowski, Nicole; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Antonopoulos, Georgios; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Grothausmann, Roman; Knudsen, Lars; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kreipe, Hans; Ochs, Matthias; Jonigk, Danny; Kühnel, Mark Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Assessing alterations of the parenchymal architecture is essential in understanding fibrosing interstitial lung diseases. Here, we present a novel method to visualise fibrotic remodelling in human lungs and correlate morphological three-dimensional (3D) data with gene and protein expression in the very same sample. The key to our approach is a novel embedding resin that clears samples to full optical transparency and simultaneously allows 3D laser tomography and preparation of sections for histology, immunohistochemistry and RNA isolation. Correlating 3D laser tomography with molecular diagnostic techniques enables new insights into lung diseases. This approach has great potential to become an essential tool in pulmonary research.

  9. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  10. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  11. Diamond in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-20

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called Diamond Jenness was taken after NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time. 3D glasses are necessary.

  12. Histology to microCT data matching using landmarks and a density biased RANSAC.

    PubMed

    Chicherova, Natalia; Fundana, Ketut; Müller, Bert; Cattin, Philippe C

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of information from different medical imaging techniques plays an important role in data analysis. Despite the many proposed registration algorithms the problem of registering 2D histological images to 3D CT or MR imaging data is still largely unsolved. In this paper we propose a computationally efficient automatic approach to match 2D histological images to 3D micro Computed Tomography data. The landmark-based approach in combination with a density-driven RANSAC plane-fitting allows efficient localization of the histology images in the 3D data within less than four minutes (single-threaded MATLAB code) with an average accuracy of 0.25 mm for orrect and 2.21mm for mismatched slices. The approach managed to uccessfully localize 75% of the histology images in our database. The proposed algorithm is an important step towards solving the problem of registering 2D histology sections to 3D data fully automatically.

  13. Optical-sectioning microscopy of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in human gliomas: standardization and quantitative comparison with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Linpeng; Chen, Ye; Yin, Chengbo; Borwege, Sabine; Sanai, Nader; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2017-04-01

    Systemic delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid leads to enhanced fluorescence image contrast in many tumors due to the increased accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a fluorescent porphyrin that is associated with tumor burden and proliferation. The value of PpIX-guided resection of malignant gliomas has been demonstrated in prospective randomized clinical studies in which a twofold greater extent of resection and improved progression-free survival have been observed. In low-grade gliomas and at the diffuse infiltrative margins of all gliomas, PpIX fluorescence is often too weak to be detected with current low-resolution surgical microscopes that are used in operating rooms. However, it has been demonstrated that high-resolution optical-sectioning microscopes are capable of detecting the sparse and punctate accumulations of PpIX that are undetectable via conventional low-power surgical fluorescence microscopes. To standardize the performance of high-resolution optical-sectioning devices for future clinical use, we have developed an imaging phantom and methods to ensure that the imaging of PpIX-expressing brain tissues can be performed reproducibly. Ex vivo imaging studies with a dual-axis confocal microscope demonstrate that these methods enable the acquisition of images from unsectioned human brain tissues that quantitatively and consistently correlate with images of histologically processed tissue sections.

  14. AutoStitcher: An Automated Program for Efficient and Robust Reconstruction of Digitized Whole Histological Sections from Tissue Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzias, Gregory; Janowczyk, Andrew; Singanamalli, Asha; Rusu, Mirabela; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Michael; Stricker, Phillip D.; Delprado, Warick; Tiwari, Sarita; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Ponsky, Lee; Viswanath, Satish; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-07-01

    In applications involving large tissue specimens that have been sectioned into smaller tissue fragments, manual reconstruction of a “pseudo whole-mount” histological section (PWMHS) can facilitate (a) pathological disease annotation, and (b) image registration and correlation with radiological images. We have previously presented a program called HistoStitcher, which allows for more efficient manual reconstruction than general purpose image editing tools (such as Photoshop). However HistoStitcher is still manual and hence can be laborious and subjective, especially when doing large cohort studies. In this work we present AutoStitcher, a novel automated algorithm for reconstructing PWMHSs from digitized tissue fragments. AutoStitcher reconstructs (“stitches”) a PWMHS from a set of 4 fragments by optimizing a novel cost function that is domain-inspired to ensure (i) alignment of similar tissue regions, and (ii) contiguity of the prostate boundary. The algorithm achieves computational efficiency by performing reconstruction in a multi-resolution hierarchy. Automated PWMHS reconstruction results (via AutoStitcher) were quantitatively and qualitatively compared to manual reconstructions obtained via HistoStitcher for 113 prostate pathology sections. Distances between corresponding fiducials placed on each of the automated and manual reconstruction results were between 2.7%-3.2%, reflecting their excellent visual similarity.

  15. AutoStitcher: An Automated Program for Efficient and Robust Reconstruction of Digitized Whole Histological Sections from Tissue Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Penzias, Gregory; Janowczyk, Andrew; Singanamalli, Asha; Rusu, Mirabela; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Michael; Stricker, Phillip D.; Delprado, Warick; Tiwari, Sarita; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Ponsky, Lee; Viswanath, Satish; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-01-01

    In applications involving large tissue specimens that have been sectioned into smaller tissue fragments, manual reconstruction of a “pseudo whole-mount” histological section (PWMHS) can facilitate (a) pathological disease annotation, and (b) image registration and correlation with radiological images. We have previously presented a program called HistoStitcher, which allows for more efficient manual reconstruction than general purpose image editing tools (such as Photoshop). However HistoStitcher is still manual and hence can be laborious and subjective, especially when doing large cohort studies. In this work we present AutoStitcher, a novel automated algorithm for reconstructing PWMHSs from digitized tissue fragments. AutoStitcher reconstructs (“stitches”) a PWMHS from a set of 4 fragments by optimizing a novel cost function that is domain-inspired to ensure (i) alignment of similar tissue regions, and (ii) contiguity of the prostate boundary. The algorithm achieves computational efficiency by performing reconstruction in a multi-resolution hierarchy. Automated PWMHS reconstruction results (via AutoStitcher) were quantitatively and qualitatively compared to manual reconstructions obtained via HistoStitcher for 113 prostate pathology sections. Distances between corresponding fiducials placed on each of the automated and manual reconstruction results were between 2.7%–3.2%, reflecting their excellent visual similarity. PMID:27457670

  16. The properties of SIRT, TVM, and DART for 3D imaging of tubular domains in nanocomposite thin-films and sections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Delei; Goris, Bart; Bleichrodt, Folkert; Mezerji, Hamed Heidari; Bals, Sara; Batenburg, Kees Joost; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2014-12-01

    In electron tomography, the fidelity of the 3D reconstruction strongly depends on the employed reconstruction algorithm. In this paper, the properties of SIRT, TVM and DART reconstructions are studied with respect to having only a limited number of electrons available for imaging and applying different angular sampling schemes. A well-defined realistic model is generated, which consists of tubular domains within a matrix having slab-geometry. Subsequently, the electron tomography workflow is simulated from calculated tilt-series over experimental effects to reconstruction. In comparison with the model, the fidelity of each reconstruction method is evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively based on global and local edge profiles and resolvable distance between particles. Results show that the performance of all reconstruction methods declines with the total electron dose. Overall, SIRT algorithm is the most stable method and insensitive to changes in angular sampling. TVM algorithm yields significantly sharper edges in the reconstruction, but the edge positions are strongly influenced by the tilt scheme and the tubular objects become thinned. The DART algorithm markedly suppresses the elongation artifacts along the beam direction and moreover segments the reconstruction which can be considered a significant advantage for quantification. Finally, no advantage of TVM and DART to deal better with fewer projections was observed.

  17. 3D Plasmon Ruler

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    In this animation of a 3D plasmon ruler, the plasmonic assembly acts as a transducer to deliver optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein. (courtesy of Paul Alivisatos group)

  18. Prominent Rocks - 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-13

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image from NASA Mars Pathfinder. Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

  19. 3D Laser System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-16

    NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel 3D Laser System used for digitizing ice shapes created in the wind tunnel. The ice shapes are later utilized for characterization, analysis, and software development.

  20. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  1. Clinical and histological characterization of oral pemphigus lesions in patients with skin diseases: a cross sectional study from Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pemphigus is a rare group of life-threatening mucocutaneous autoimmune blistering diseases. Frequently, oral lesions precede the cutaneous ones. This study aimed to describe clinical and histological features of oral pemphigus lesions in patients with skin disease has been canceled aged 18 years and above, attending outpatient’s facility of Khartoum Teaching Hospital - Dermatology Clinic, Sudan. In addition, the study aimed to assess the diagnostic significance of routine histolopathology along with immunohistochemical (IHC) examination of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens in patients with oral pemphigus. Methods A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted from October 2008 to January 2009. A total of 588 patients with confirmed skin has been canceled disease diagnosis completed an oral examination and a personal interview. Clinical evaluations supported with histopathology were the methods of diagnosis. IHC was used to confirm the diagnosis. Location, size, and pain of oral lesions were used to measure the oral disease activity. Results Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), 19 of them (mean age: 43.0; range: 20–72 yrs) presented with oral manifestations. Pemphigus foliaceus was diagnosed in one patient. In PV, female: male ratio was 1.1:1.0. Buccal mucosa was the most commonly affected site. Exclusive oral lesions were detected in 14.2% (3/21). In patients who experienced both skin and oral lesion during their life time, 50.0% (9/18) had oral mucosa as the initial site of involvement, 33.3% (6/18) had skin as the primary site, and simultaneous involvement of both skin and oral mucosa was reported by 5.5% (1/18). Two patients did not provide information regarding the initial site of involvement. Oral lesion activity score was higher in those who reported to live outside Khartoum state, were outdoor workers, had lower education and belonged to Central and Western tribes compared with their

  2. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-10: What actions are necessary for....10 Section 30.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP...

  3. Accuracy of frozen section, imprint cytology, and permanent histology of sub-nipple tissue for predicting occult nipple involvement in patients with breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Giuliano M; Tomazini, Maria Virginia; Oliveira, André; Moreira, Luciana; Tocchet, Fernando; Worschech, Adriana; Torresan, Renato Z

    2015-10-01

    The sub-nipple tissue (SNT) examination has been used by surgeons to preserve, or not, the nipple in nipple-sparing mastectomy. However, it is uncertain whether SNT evaluation can predict nipple involvement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the intraoperative frozen section and imprint cytology, and permanent histology of SNT to predict the involvement of the nipple in breast carcinoma and to compare the three exams. A prospective study was performed with 68 consecutive breast carcinoma women who had undergone mastectomy or central segmentectomy (removing nipple-areolar complex). After surgery, the nipple-areolar complex was dissected simulating a nipple-sparing flap (ex vivo). The SNT was subsequently removed and submitted to frozen section, imprint cytology, and permanent histology. The nipple was examined separately by paraffin histopathology and was considered the gold standard. The occult nipple involvement rate was 11.7 %. The frozen section, cytology, and permanent histology of SNT presented accuracy 86.8, 76.5, and 86.8 %; sensitivity 50, 37.5, and 62.5 %; specificity 91.7, 81.7, and 90 %; PPV 44.4, 21.4, and 45.5 %; and NPV 93.2, 90.7, and 94.7 %, respectively. The accuracy of the frozen section was similar to that of permanent histology (p = 0.77) and both were better than cytology (p = 0.01). False negative rates were 6.8 % for frozen section, 9.3 % for cytology and 5.3 % for paraffin. SNT evaluation is a good method for predicting occult nipple involvement; the outcomes showed a good accuracy and low false negative rate for the frozen section, cytology, and permanent histology exams. When we compared the exams, the frozen section was similar to permanent histology and more accurate than imprint cytology.

  4. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  5. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  6. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  7. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  8. Medical 3-D Printing.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional printing is used in the manufacturing industry, medical and pharmaceutical research, drug production, clinical medicine, and dentistry, with implications for precision and personalized medicine. This technology is advancing the development of patient-specific prosthetics, stents, splints, and fixation devices and is changing medical education, treatment decision making, and surgical planning. Diagnostic imaging modalities play a fundamental role in the creation of 3-D printed models. Although most 3-D printed objects are rigid, flexible soft-tissue-like prosthetics also can be produced. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  9. Recent improvement of a FIB-SEM serial-sectioning method for precise 3D image reconstruction - application of the orthogonally-arranged FIB-SEM.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru

    2014-11-01

    IntroductionWe installed the first "orthogonally-arranged" FIB-SEM in 2011. The most characteristic point of this instrument is that the FIB and SEM columns are perpendicularly mounted; this is specially designed to obtain a serial-sectioning dataset more accurately and precisely with higher contrast and higher spatial resolution compare to other current FIB-SEMs [1]. Since the installation in 2011, we have developed the hardware and methodology of the serial-sectioning based on this orthogonal FIB-SEM. In order to develop this technique, we have widely opened this instrument to every researcher of all fields. In the presentation, I would like to introduce some of application results that are obtained by users of this instrument. The characteristic points of the orthogonal systemFigure 1 shows a difference between the standard and the orthogonal FIB-SEM systems: In the standard system, shown in Fig.1(a), optical axes of a FIB and a SEM crosses around 60deg., while in the orthogonal system (Fig.1(b)), they are perpendicular to each other. The standard arrangement (a) is certainly suitable for TEM lamellae preparation etc. because the FIB and the SEM can see the same position simultaneously. However, for a serial-sectioning, it is not to say the best arrangement. One of the reasons is that the sliced plane by the FIB is not perpendicular to the electron beam so that the background contrast is not uniform and observed plane is distorted. On the other hand, in case of the orthogonally-arranged system,(b), these problems are resolved. In addition, spatial resolution can keep high enough even in a low accelerating voltage (e.g. 500V) because a working distance is set very small, 2mm. From these special design, we can obtain the serial-sectioning dataset from rather wide area (∼100um) with high spatial resolution (Max. 2×2×2nm). As this system has many kinds of detectors: SE, ET, Backscatter Electron(Energy-selective), EDS, EBSD, STEM(BF&ADF), with Ar+ ion-gun and a

  10. Benchmarking of calculated projectile fragmentation cross-sections using the 3-D, MC codes PHITS, FLUKA, HETC-HEDS, MCNPX_HI, and NUCFRG2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihver, L.; Mancusi, D.; Niita, K.; Sato, T.; Townsend, L.; Farmer, C.; Pinsky, L.; Ferrari, A.; Cerutti, F.; Gomes, I.

    several particle and heavy-ion MC transport codes exist, e.g. Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), High Energy Transport Code-Human Exploration and Development of Space (HETC-HEDS), SHIELD-HIT, GEANT4, FLUKA, MARS, and MCNPX. In this paper, we present an extensive benchmarking of the calculated projectile fragmentation cross-sections from the reactions of 300-1000MeV/u28Si, 40Ar, and 56Fe on polyethylene, carbon, aluminum, and copper targets (relevant to space radioprotection) using PHITS, FLUKA, HETC-HEDS, and MCNPX, against measurements. The influence of the different models used in the different transport codes on the calculated results is also discussed. Some measured cross-sections are also compared to the calculated cross-sections using NUCFRG2, which are incorporated in the 1-dimensional, deterministic radiation transport code HZETRN.

  11. Staining histological lung sections with Sudan Black B or Sudan III for automated identification of alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Pedersen, Lars; Mühlfeld, Christian; Ochs, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells produce, store and secrete pulmonary surfactant and serve as progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium. They are thus an interesting target in wide fields of pulmonary research. Stereological methods allow their quantification based on measurements on histological sections. A proper AE2 cell quantification, however, requires a method of tissue processing that results in little tissue shrinkage during processing. It was recently shown that a primary fixation with a mixture of glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde, postfixation with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate and embedding in glycol methacrylate fulfills this requirement. However, a proper quantification, furthermore, requires a secure identification of the cells under the microscope. Classical approaches using routine stainings, high magnifications and systematic uniform random sampling can result in a tedious counting procedure. In this article we show that Sudan Black B and Sudan III staining in combination with the previously described "low shrinkage method" of tissue processing result in good staining of lamellar bodies of AE2 cells (their storing organelles of surfactant) and thus provide a good signal of AE2 cells, which allows their easy and secure identification even at rather low magnifications. We further show that this signal enables automated detection of AE2 cells by image analysis, which should make this method a suitable staining method for the recently developed and more efficient proportionator sampling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  13. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  14. 3D Medical Volume Reconstruction Using Web Services

    PubMed Central

    Kooper, Rob; Shirk, Andrew; Lee, Sang-Chul; Lin, Amy; Folberg, Robert; Bajcsy, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of 3D medical volume reconstruction using web services. The use of proposed web services is motivated by the fact that the problem of 3D medical volume reconstruction requires significant computer resources and human expertise in medical and computer science areas. Web services are implemented as an additional layer to a dataflow framework called Data to Knowledge. In the collaboration between UIC and NCSA, pre-processed input images at NCSA are made accessible to medical collaborators for registration. Every time UIC medical collaborators inspected images and selected corresponding features for registration, the web service at NCSA is contacted and the registration processing query is executed using the Image to Knowledge library of registration methods. Co-registered frames are returned for verification by medical collaborators in a new window. In this paper, we present 3D volume reconstruction problem requirements and the architecture of the developed prototype system at http://isda.ncsa.uiuc.edu/MedVolume. We also explain the tradeoffs of our system design and provide experimental data to support our system implementation. The prototype system has been used for multiple 3D volume reconstructions of blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry patterns in histological sections of uveal melanoma studied by fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscope. PMID:18336808

  15. Embedding 3D models of biological specimens in PDF publications.

    PubMed

    Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Hess, Martin

    2008-11-01

    By providing two examples, the option for embedding 3D models in electronic versions of life science publications is presented. These examples, presumably representing the first such models published, are developmental stages of an evertebrate (Patella caerulea, Mollusca) and a vertebrate species (Psetta maxima, Teleostei) obtained from histological section series reconstruction processed with the software package Amira. These surface rendering models are particularly suitable for a PDF file because they can easily be transformed to a file format required and components may be conveniently combined and hierarchically arranged. All methodological steps starting from specimen preparation until embedding of resulting models in PDF files with emphasis on conversion of Amira data to the appropriate 3D file format are explained. Usability of 3D models in PDF documents is exemplified and advantages over 2D illustrations are discussed, including better explanation capabilities for spatial arrangements, higher information contents, and limiting options for disguising results by authors. Possibilities for additional applications reaching far beyond the examples presented are suggested. Problems such as long-term compatibility of file format and hardware plus software, editing and embedding of files, file size and differences in information contents between printed and electronic version will likely be overcome by technical development and increasing tendency toward electronic at the cost of printed publications. Since 3D visualization plays an increasing role in manifold disciplines of science and appropriate tools for the popular PDF format are readily available, we propose routine application of this way of illustration in electronic life science papers.

  16. 3-D Grab!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    Modern technologies in imaging greatly extend the potential to present visual information. With recently developed software tools, the perception of the third dimension can not only dramatically enhance presentation, but also allow spatial data to be better encoded. 3-D images can be taken for many subjects with only one camera, carefully moved to generate a stereo pair. Color anaglyph viewing now can be very effective using computer screens, and active filter technologies can enhance visual effects with ever-decreasing cost. We will present various novel results of 3-D imaging, including those from the auroral observations of the new twinned Athabasca University Geophysical Observatories.; Single camera stereo image for viewing with red/cyan glasses.

  17. A Method for 3D Histopathology Reconstruction Supporting Mouse Microvasculature Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Nong, Zengxuan; Gibson, Eli; Arpino, John-Michael; Yin, Hao; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-01-01

    Structural abnormalities of the microvasculature can impair perfusion and function. Conventional histology provides good spatial resolution with which to evaluate the microvascular structure but affords no 3-dimensional information; this limitation could lead to misinterpretations of the complex microvessel network in health and disease. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate an accurate, fully automated 3D histology reconstruction method to visualize the arterioles and venules within the mouse hind-limb. Sections of the tibialis anterior muscle from C57BL/J6 mice (both normal and subjected to femoral artery excision) were reconstructed using pairwise rigid and affine registrations of 5 µm-thick, paraffin-embedded serial sections digitized at 0.25 µm/pixel. Low-resolution intensity-based rigid registration was used to initialize the nucleus landmark-based registration, and conventional high-resolution intensity-based registration method. The affine nucleus landmark-based registration was developed in this work and was compared to the conventional affine high-resolution intensity-based registration method. Target registration errors were measured between adjacent tissue sections (pairwise error), as well as with respect to a 3D reference reconstruction (accumulated error, to capture propagation of error through the stack of sections). Accumulated error measures were lower (p<0.01) for the nucleus landmark technique and superior vasculature continuity was observed. These findings indicate that registration based on automatic extraction and correspondence of small, homologous landmarks may support accurate 3D histology reconstruction. This technique avoids the otherwise problematic “banana-into-cylinder” effect observed using conventional methods that optimize the pairwise alignment of salient structures, forcing them to be section-orthogonal. This approach will provide a valuable tool for high-accuracy 3D histology tissue reconstructions for

  18. Diattenuation of brain tissue and its impact on 3D polarized light imaging

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Miriam; Reckfort, Julia; Weigand, Daniel; Köse, Hasan; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2017-01-01

    3D-polarized light imaging (3D-PLI) reconstructs nerve fibers in histological brain sections by measuring their birefringence. This study investigates another effect caused by the optical anisotropy of brain tissue – diattenuation. Based on numerical and experimental studies and a complete analytical description of the optical system, the diattenuation was determined to be below 4 % in rat brain tissue. It was demonstrated that the diattenuation effect has negligible impact on the fiber orientations derived by 3D-PLI. The diattenuation signal, however, was found to highlight different anatomical structures that cannot be distinguished with current imaging techniques, which makes Diattenuation Imaging a promising extension to 3D-PLI. PMID:28717561

  19. An interactive program to conceptualize the anatomy of the internal brainstem in 3D.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kelly; Wilson, Timothy D; De Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is a complex sub-discipline of anatomy requiring abstract visualization and strong spatial reasoning. Traditional methods of learning neuroanatomy include investigation using dissection, light microscopy and histology. Often, this pedagogical approach requires students to formulate three-dimensional (3D) mental images from sequential two-dimensional (2D) cross-sections, which can be difficult for many students to conceptualize. The goal of this study is to develop an interactive 3D learning tool of the internal brainstem anatomy and assess its efficacy on student learning against the classical methods of learning neuroanatomy. Results reveal that students the amount of learning was equal between both experimental groups. Qualitative results show that students enjoyed interactive learning and warmly welcomed the 3D program. Future neuroanatomy laboratories may include a 3D component to aid in student conceptualization of internal brainstem anatomy.

  20. Unoriented 3d TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Lakshya

    2017-05-01

    This paper generalizes two facts about oriented 3d TFTs to the unoriented case. On one hand, it is known that oriented 3d TFTs having a topological boundary condition admit a state-sum construction known as the Turaev-Viro construction. This is related to the string-net construction of fermionic phases of matter. We show how Turaev-Viro construction can be generalized to unoriented 3d TFTs. On the other hand, it is known that the "fermionic" versions of oriented TFTs, known as Spin-TFTs, can be constructed in terms of "shadow" TFTs which are ordinary oriented TFTs with an anomalous ℤ 2 1-form symmetry. We generalize this correspondence to Pin+-TFTs by showing that they can be constructed in terms of ordinary unoriented TFTs with anomalous ℤ 2 1-form symmetry having a mixed anomaly with time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding Pin+-TFT does not have any anomaly for time-reversal symmetry however and hence it can be unambiguously defined on a non-orientable manifold. In case a Pin+-TFT admits a topological boundary condition, one can combine the above two statements to obtain a Turaev-Viro-like construction of Pin+-TFTs. As an application of these ideas, we construct a large class of Pin+-SPT phases.

  1. Automated Reconstruction Algorithm for Identification of 3D Architectures of Cribriform Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Kerri-Ann; Namazi, Sameera; Barnard, Nicola; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Bhanot, Gyan; Ganesan, Shridar; Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Shinbrot, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a pre-invasive carcinoma of the breast that exhibits several distinct morphologies but the link between morphology and patient outcome is not clear. We hypothesize that different mechanisms of growth may still result in similar 2D morphologies, which may look different in 3D. To elucidate the connection between growth and 3D morphology, we reconstruct the 3D architecture of cribriform DCIS from resected patient material. We produce a fully automated algorithm that aligns, segments, and reconstructs 3D architectures from microscopy images of 2D serial sections from human specimens. The alignment algorithm is based on normalized cross correlation, the segmentation algorithm uses histogram equilization, Otsu's thresholding, and morphology techniques to segment the duct and cribra. The reconstruction method combines these images in 3D. We show that two distinct 3D architectures are indeed found in samples whose 2D histological sections are similarly identified as cribriform DCIS. These differences in architecture support the hypothesis that luminal spaces may form due to different mechanisms, either isolated cell death or merging fronds, leading to the different architectures. We find that out of 15 samples, 6 were found to have ‘bubble-like’ cribra, 6 were found to have ‘tube-like’ criba and 3 were ‘unknown.’ We propose that the 3D architectures found, ‘bubbles’ and ‘tubes’, account for some of the heterogeneity of the disease and may be prognostic indicators of different patient outcomes. PMID:22970156

  2. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  3. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  4. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  5. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  6. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  7. Reconstruction of 3-dimensional histology volume and its application to study mouse mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Shojaii, Rushin; Bacopulos, Stephanie; Yang, Wenyi; Karavardanyan, Tigran; Spyropoulos, Demetri; Raouf, Afshin; Martel, Anne; Seth, Arun

    2014-07-26

    Histology volume reconstruction facilitates the study of 3D shape and volume change of an organ at the level of macrostructures made up of cells. It can also be used to investigate and validate novel techniques and algorithms in volumetric medical imaging and therapies. Creating 3D high-resolution atlases of different organs(1,2,3) is another application of histology volume reconstruction. This provides a resource for investigating tissue structures and the spatial relationship between various cellular features. We present an image registration approach for histology volume reconstruction, which uses a set of optical blockface images. The reconstructed histology volume represents a reliable shape of the processed specimen with no propagated post-processing registration error. The Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained sections of two mouse mammary glands were registered to their corresponding blockface images using boundary points extracted from the edges of the specimen in histology and blockface images. The accuracy of the registration was visually evaluated. The alignment of the macrostructures of the mammary glands was also visually assessed at high resolution. This study delineates the different steps of this image registration pipeline, ranging from excision of the mammary gland through to 3D histology volume reconstruction. While 2D histology images reveal the structural differences between pairs of sections, 3D histology volume provides the ability to visualize the differences in shape and volume of the mammary glands.

  8. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  9. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  12. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  13. 2D and 3D modelling of the Linking Zone between the Iberian and the Catalan Coastal Ranges (NE Spain): Characterizing basement and cover deformation from geological and geophysical cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Ayala, Concepción; Rubio, Félix Manuel; Pueyo, Emilio; Casas, Antonio; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Rodríguez-Pintó, Adriana; Rey-Moral, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    New geological, geophysical and petrophysical information is presented in this work in order to improve the understanding of the Linking Zone, an E-W-trending fold and thrust system that connects the northeastern part of the Iberian Range (WNW-ESE-striking) and the Catalan Coastal Ranges (NNE-SSW-striking). It was formed during the Alpine Orogeny and it is characterized by (1) thick-skinned tectonics, partly controlled by reactivation of faults inherited from Mesozoic times and (2) thin-skinned tectonics, affecting the cover sequences above the regional detachment levels (Triassic gypsum and shales). The present study aims to obtain a 3D image of the structure of this area through the construction of balanced geological and geophysical cross sections. In the Linking Zone scarce subsurface information is available. Therefore, we have conducted data acquisition campaigns to improve this knowledge: A) about 3000 gravity stations distributed along 8 main profiles were measured, and these new stations were complemented with gravity data from IGME databases. These data were analyzed and processed to obtain a Bouguer anomaly map and a residual gravity map with reasonably good coverage; B) a petrophysical survey was also carried out; rock samples were acquired and analyzed obtaining density and susceptibility values of the main lithologies. The statistics of these physical properties is of key importance during the combined geophysical/geological modelling. Petrophysical data indicate a weak, progressive increase of density mean values from the top to the base of the stratigraphic pile with the exception of Triassic gypsum and shales, where the lowest density was obtained. The modelling has been made in three steps: First, a set of eight geological cross-sections based on surface geology and structural information were built, controlled and improved through gravity modelling and balanced to make them geometrically correct, consistent throughout the sections and closer to

  14. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. Pluto in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-23

    Global stereo mapping of Pluto surface is now possible, as images taken from multiple directions are downlinked from NASA New Horizons spacecraft. Stereo images will eventually provide an accurate topographic map of most of the hemisphere of Pluto seen by New Horizons during the July 14 flyby, which will be key to understanding Pluto's geological history. This example, which requires red/blue stereo glasses for viewing, shows a region 180 miles (300 kilometers) across, centered near longitude 130 E, latitude 20 N (the red square in the global context image). North is to the upper left. The image shows an ancient, heavily cratered region of Pluto, dotted with low hills and cut by deep fractures, which indicate extension of Pluto's crust. Analysis of these stereo images shows that the steep fracture in the upper left of the image is about 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) deep, and the craters in the lower right part of the image are up to 1.3 miles (2.1 km) deep. Smallest visible details are about 0.4 miles (0.6 kilometers) across. You will need 3D glasses to view this image showing an ancient, heavily cratered region of Pluto. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20032

  16. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  17. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  18. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  19. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics. PMID:28952542

  20. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  1. A computational method for three-dimensional reconstruction of the microarchitecture of myometrial smooth muscle from histological sections.

    PubMed

    Lutton, E Josiah; Lammers, Wim J E P; James, Sean; van den Berg, Hugo A; Blanks, Andrew M

    2017-01-01

    The fibrous structure of the myometrium has previously been characterised at high resolutions in small tissue samples (< 100 mm3) and at low resolutions (∼500 μm per voxel edge) in whole-organ reconstructions. However, no high-resolution visualisation of the myometrium at the organ level has previously been attained. We have developed a technique to reconstruct the whole myometrium from serial histological slides, at a resolution of approximately 50 μm per voxel edge. Reconstructions of samples taken from human and rat uteri are presented here, along with histological verification of the reconstructions and detailed investigation of the fibrous structure of these uteri, using a range of tools specifically developed for this analysis. These reconstruction techniques enable the high-resolution rendering of global structure previously observed at lower resolution. Moreover, structures observed previously in small portions of the myometrium can be observed in the context of the whole organ. The reconstructions are in direct correspondence with the original histological slides, which allows the inspection of the anatomical context of any features identified in the three-dimensional reconstructions. The methods presented here have been used to generate a faithful representation of myometrial smooth muscle at a resolution of ∼50 μm per voxel edge. Characterisation of the smooth muscle structure of the myometrium by means of this technique revealed a detailed view of previously identified global structures in addition to a global view of the microarchitecture. A suite of visualisation tools allows researchers to interrogate the histological microarchitecture. These methods will be applicable to other smooth muscle tissues to analyse fibrous microarchitecture.

  2. A computational method for three-dimensional reconstruction of the microarchitecture of myometrial smooth muscle from histological sections

    PubMed Central

    Lutton, E. Josiah; Lammers, Wim J. E. P.; James, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Background The fibrous structure of the myometrium has previously been characterised at high resolutions in small tissue samples (< 100 mm3) and at low resolutions (∼500 μm per voxel edge) in whole-organ reconstructions. However, no high-resolution visualisation of the myometrium at the organ level has previously been attained. Methods and results We have developed a technique to reconstruct the whole myometrium from serial histological slides, at a resolution of approximately 50 μm per voxel edge. Reconstructions of samples taken from human and rat uteri are presented here, along with histological verification of the reconstructions and detailed investigation of the fibrous structure of these uteri, using a range of tools specifically developed for this analysis. These reconstruction techniques enable the high-resolution rendering of global structure previously observed at lower resolution. Moreover, structures observed previously in small portions of the myometrium can be observed in the context of the whole organ. The reconstructions are in direct correspondence with the original histological slides, which allows the inspection of the anatomical context of any features identified in the three-dimensional reconstructions. Conclusions and significance The methods presented here have been used to generate a faithful representation of myometrial smooth muscle at a resolution of ∼50 μm per voxel edge. Characterisation of the smooth muscle structure of the myometrium by means of this technique revealed a detailed view of previously identified global structures in addition to a global view of the microarchitecture. A suite of visualisation tools allows researchers to interrogate the histological microarchitecture. These methods will be applicable to other smooth muscle tissues to analyse fibrous microarchitecture. PMID:28301486

  3. 2D and 3D MALDI-imaging: conceptual strategies for visualization and data mining.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Herbert; Heldmann, Stefan; Trede, Dennis; Strehlow, Jan; Wirtz, Stefan; Dreher, Wolfgang; Berger, Judith; Oetjen, Janina; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Fischer, Bernd; Maass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    3D imaging has a significant impact on many challenges in life sciences, because biology is a 3-dimensional phenomenon. Current 3D imaging-technologies (various types MRI, PET, SPECT) are labeled, i.e. they trace the localization of a specific compound in the body. In contrast, 3D MALDI mass spectrometry-imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a label-free method imaging the spatial distribution of molecular compounds. It complements 3D imaging labeled methods, immunohistochemistry, and genetics-based methods. However, 3D MALDI-MSI cannot tap its full potential due to the lack of statistical methods for analysis and interpretation of large and complex 3D datasets. To overcome this, we established a complete and robust 3D MALDI-MSI pipeline combined with efficient computational data analysis methods for 3D edge preserving image denoising, 3D spatial segmentation as well as finding colocalized m/z values, which will be reviewed here in detail. Furthermore, we explain, why the integration and correlation of the MALDI imaging data with other imaging modalities allows to enhance the interpretation of the molecular data and provides visualization of molecular patterns that may otherwise not be apparent. Therefore, a 3D data acquisition workflow is described generating a set of 3 different dimensional images representing the same anatomies. First, an in-vitro MRI measurement is performed which results in a three-dimensional image modality representing the 3D structure of the measured object. After sectioning the 3D object into N consecutive slices, all N slices are scanned using an optical digital scanner, enabling for performing the MS measurements. Scanning the individual sections results into low-resolution images, which define the base coordinate system for the whole pipeline. The scanned images conclude the information from the spatial (MRI) and the mass spectrometric (MALDI-MSI) dimension and are used for the spatial three-dimensional reconstruction of the object performed by image

  4. Can the sensitivity of the histopathological diagnosis of coeliac disease be increased and can treatment progression be monitored using mathematical modelling of histological sections? - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Richard P G; Andronicos, Nicholas M; Scott, David R; McFarlane, James R; Agnew, Linda L

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to attempt to define a set of equations from histological observations of tissue affected with coeliac disease (CD) to predict Marsh score. Tissue from 15 patients with untreated CD, 6 patients with treated CD and 9 healthy control patients were stained using the standard H&E, Giemsa's staining for tissue sections and Alcian Blue protocols. A number of histological measures were then taken from each section and the data was used to ultimately design a set of linear predictive algorithms to calculate Marsh score. Using MANOVA and discriminant analysis, two linear functions were defined which could accurately predict the Marsh score of patients 62.5% (full Marsh score) to 79.2% (simplified Marsh score) of the time. This pilot study has shown that a set of objective histological measures can be used to define algorithms to predict Marsh score in CD patients and also monitor treatment compliance and progression. Copyright © 2016 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid and Easy Histological Evaluation of Alveolar Human Bone Quality at Dental Implant Sites Using a Nondecalcified Frozen Cryofilm Section Technique: A Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kanou, Miwa; Takahashi-Nakagawa, Yasuko; Nakajima, Yoichiro; Sunano, Akihiro; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Takaaki

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of bone quality at the site of the alveolar bone for a dental implant is very important. This study presents an easy technique for direct evaluation of alveolar bone quality using nondecalcified cryofilm frozen sections on human alveolar bone core samples. Core samples harvested from alveolar bone were immediately frozen in cooled hexanen and slowly cut using a disposable tungsten carbide blade; the sliced sections were collected with adhesive cryofilms. Staining was performed using von toluidine blue and von Kossa for microscopic observations. All core samples clearly showed bone structure components of cortical bone, trabecular bone, bone marrow, blood vessels, and bone-related cells. These results suggest the efficacy of a nondecalcified cryofilm frozen section technique for histological observation of surgical implant sites.

  6. Comparison of 3D Orientation Distribution Functions Measured with Confocal Microscopy and Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Kurt; Janve, Vaibhav; Gao, Yurui; Stepniewska, Iwona; Landman, Bennett A; Anderson, Adam W

    2016-01-01

    The ability of diffusion MRI (dMRI) fiber tractography to non-invasively map three-dimensional (3D) anatomical networks in the human brain has made it a valuable tool in both clinical and research settings. However, there are many assumptions inherent to any tractography algorithm that can limit the accuracy of the reconstructed fiber tracts. Among them is the assumption that the diffusion-weighted images accurately reflect the underlying fiber orientation distribution (FOD) in the MRI voxel. Consequently, validating dMRI’s ability to assess the underlying fiber orientation in each voxel is critical for its use as a biomedical tool. Here, using post-mortem histology and confocal microscopy, we present a method to perform histological validation of orientation functions in 3D, which has previously been limited to two-dimensional analysis of tissue sections. We demonstrate the ability to extract the 3D FOD from confocal z-stacks, and quantify the agreement between the MRI estimates of orientation information obtained using constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) and the true geometry of the fibers. We find an orientation error of approximately 6° in voxels containing nearly parallel fibers, and 10-11° in crossing fiber regions, and note that CSD was unable to resolve fibers crossing at angles below 60° in our dataset. This is the first time the 3D white matter orientation distribution is calculated from histology and compared to dMRI. Thus, this technique serves as a gold standard for dMRI validation studies - providing the ability to determine the extent to which the dMRI signal is consistent with the histological FOD, and to establish how well different dMRI models can predict the ground truth FOD. PMID:26804781

  7. Supporting registration decisions during 3D medical volume reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajcsy, Peter; Lee, Sang-Chul; Clutter, David

    2006-03-01

    We propose a methodology for making optimal registration decisions during 3D volume reconstruction in terms of (a) anticipated accuracy of aligned images, (b) uncertainty of obtained results during the registration process, (c) algorithmic repeatability of alignment procedure, and (d) computational requirements. We researched and developed a web-enabled, web services based, data-driven, registration decision support system. The registration decisions include (1) image spatial size (image sub-area or entire image), (2) transformation model (e.g., rigid, affine or elastic), (3) invariant registration feature (intensity, morphology or a sequential combination of the two), (4) automation level (manual, semi-automated, or fully-automated), (5) evaluations of registration results (multiple metrics and methods for establishing ground truth), and (6) assessment of resources (computational resources and human expertise, geographically local or distributed). Our goal is to provide mechanisms for evaluating the tradeoffs of each registration decision in terms of the aforementioned impacts. First, we present a medical registration methodology for making registration decisions that lead to registration results with well-understood accuracy, uncertainty, consistency and computational complexity characteristics. Second, we have built software tools that enable geographically distributed researchers to optimize their data-driven registration decisions by using web services and supercomputing resources. The support developed for registration decisions about 3D volume reconstruction is available to the general community with the access to the NCSA supercomputing resources. We illustrate performance by considering 3D volume reconstruction of blood vessels in histological sections of uveal melanoma from serial fluorescent labeled paraffin sections labeled with antibodies to CD34 and laminin. The specimens are studied by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images.

  8. Re-purposing of histological tissue sections for corroborative western blot analysis of hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression following delineation of transactivated structures by Fos immuno-mapping.

    PubMed

    Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Ibrahim, Baher A; Briski, Karen P

    2015-04-01

    Fos immunocytochemistry is a valuable anatomical mapping tool for distinguishing cells within complex tissues that undergo genomic activation, but it is seldom paired with corroborative molecular analytical techniques. Due to preparatory requirements that include protein cross-linking for specimen sectioning, histological tissue sections are regarded as unsuitable for those methods. Our studies show that pharmacological activation of the hindbrain energy sensor AMPK by AICAR elicits estradiol (E)-dependent patterns of Fos immunolabeling of hypothalamic metabolic loci. Here, Western blotting was applied to hypothalamic tissue removed from histological sections of E- versus oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) female rat brain to measure levels of metabolic transmitters associated with Fos-positive structures. In both E and O rats, AICAR treatment elicited alterations in pro-opiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, SF-1, and orexin-A neuropeptide expression that coincided with patterns of Fos labeling of structures containing neurons that synthesize these neurotransmitters, e.g. arcuate and ventromedial nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area. O, but not E animals also exhibited parallel augmentation of tissue corticotropin-releasing hormone neuropeptide levels and paraventricular nucleus Fos staining. Data demonstrate the utility of immunoblot analysis as a follow-through technique to capitalize on Fos mapping of transactivation sites in the brain. Findings that induction of Fos immunoreactivity coincides with adjustments in hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression affirms that this functional indicator reflects changes in neurotransmission in pathways governing metabolic outflow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Numerical integration of structural elements in NIKE3D and DYNA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maker, B. N.; Whirley, R. G.; Engelmann, B. E.

    1992-08-01

    The beam and shell elements found in many linear elastic finite element codes accept integrated cross sectional properties as input, and produce solutions using classical beam and shell theory. These theories are built upon the equation of resultant forces and moments with integrals of assumed stress distributions over the cross section. In contrast, the structural elements in NIKE3D and DYNA3D are formulated to represent nonlinear geometric and material behavior. Thus stress distributions may not necessarily be representable by simple functions of cross section variables. In NIKE3D and DYNA3D, the Hughes-Liu beam element and all shell elements accommodate these more general stress distributions by computing stresses at various points in the cross section. The integration of stresses within each element is then performed numerically, using a variety of methods. This report describes these numerical integration procedures in detail, and highlights their application to engineering problems. Several other features of the structural elements are also described, including force and moment resultants, user-defined reference surfaces, and user-defined integration rules. Finally, the shear correction factor is described in a section which relates results from NIKE3D and DYNA3D to those obtained from classical beam theory.

  10. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  11. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  12. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  13. Smoothing 3-D Data for Torpedo Paths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    parametric estimation , consider data collected at 200 sequential observation times (e.g., 800 to 1,000 for the 3-D data used in this section). Samples...sample when the fitted curve is a straight line (refer to Appendix B). (e) Parametric estimation could also be modified to delete some samples (e.g

  14. Sextant localization of prostate cancer: comparison of sextant biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with step section histology.

    PubMed

    Wefer, A E; Hricak, H; Vigneron, D B; Coakley, F V; Lu, Y; Wefer, J; Mueller-Lisse, U; Carroll, P R; Kurhanewicz, J

    2000-08-01

    We compared the accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with that of sextant biopsy for the sextant localization of prostate cancer. Sextant biopsy, MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and radical prostatectomy with step section histology were done in 47 patients with prostate cancer. For each sextant we categorized biopsy and imaging results as positive or negative for cancer. Step section histology was used as the standard of reference. For sextant localization of prostate cancer MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging were more sensitive but less specific than biopsy (67% and 76% versus 50%, and 69% and 68% versus 82%, respectively). The sensitivity of sextant biopsy was significantly less in the prostate apex than in the mid prostate or prostate base (38% versus 52% and 62%, respectively). MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging had similar efficacy throughout the prostate compared with biopsy only as well as better sensitivity and specificity in the prostate apex (60% and 75%, and 86% and 68%, respectively). A positive biopsy or imaging result had 94% sensitivity for cancer and concordant positivity by all 3 tests was highly specific at 98%. Overall MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging have accuracy similar to biopsy for intraprostatic localization of cancer and they are more accurate than biopsy in the prostate apex. These 2 imaging modalities may supplement biopsy results by increasing physician confidence when evaluating intraprostatic tumor location, which may be important for planning disease targeted therapy.

  15. Perception of 3D spatial relations for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Paul; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Hoffmann, Christoph; Popescu, Voicu S.

    2004-05-01

    We test perception of 3D spatial relations in 3D images rendered by a 3D display (Perspecta from Actuality Systems) and compare it to that of a high-resolution flat panel display. 3D images provide the observer with such depth cues as motion parallax and binocular disparity. Our 3D display is a device that renders a 3D image by displaying, in rapid succession, radial slices through the scene on a rotating screen. The image is contained in a glass globe and can be viewed from virtually any direction. In the psychophysical experiment several families of 3D objects are used as stimuli: primitive shapes (cylinders and cuboids), and complex objects (multi-story buildings, cars, and pieces of furniture). Each object has at least one plane of symmetry. On each trial an object or its "distorted" version is shown at an arbitrary orientation. The distortion is produced by stretching an object in a random direction by 40%. This distortion must eliminate the symmetry of an object. The subject's task is to decide whether or not the presented object is distorted under several viewing conditions (monocular/binocular, with/without motion parallax, and near/far). The subject's performance is measured by the discriminability d', which is a conventional dependent variable in signal detection experiments.

  16. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  17. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  18. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  19. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  20. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  1. How well can pelvic floor muscles with major defects contract? A cross-sectional comparative study 6 weeks after delivery using transperineal 3D/4D ultrasound and manometer.

    PubMed

    Hilde, G; Staer-Jensen, J; Siafarikas, F; Gjestland, K; Ellström Engh, M; Bø, K

    2013-10-01

    To investigate ability to contract, vaginal resting pressure (VRP), pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and PFM endurance 6 weeks after vaginal delivery in primiparous women, with and without major defects of the levator ani (LA) muscle. Cross-sectional comparative study. Akershus University Hospital, Norway. A cohort of 175 singleton primiparous women delivering vaginally after more than 32 weeks of gestation. Major LA defects were assessed by 3D/4D transperineal ultrasound at maximal PFM contraction, using tomographic imaging. VRP, PFM strength and PFM endurance were measured vaginally by manometer. Data were analysed by independent-samples Student's t test, chi-square test, and standard multiple and simple linear regression. VRP, PFM strength and PFM endurance. Of the women included in the study, 4% were not able to contract their PFM 6 weeks after delivery. Women with major LA defects (n = 55) had 47% lower PFM strength and 47% lower endurance when compared with women without major LA defects (n = 120). Mean differences were 7.5 cmH2O (95% CI 5.1-9.9, P < 0.001) and 51.2 cmH2O seconds (95% CI 32.8-69.6, P < 0.001), respectively. These estimates were unchanged by adjustment in multivariable linear regression for potentially confounding demographic and obstetric factors. No difference was found regarding VRP (P = 0.670). Women with major LA defects after vaginal delivery had pronounced lower PFM strength and endurance than women without such defects; however, most women with major LA defects were able to contract the PFM. This indicates a potential capacity by non-injured muscle fibres to compensate for loss in muscle strength, even at an early stage after delivery. © 2013 RCOG.

  2. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  3. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  4. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  5. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  6. Histological analysis of cross-sectional area of quadruple hamstring tendons and patellar ligament samples in relation to age and gender.

    PubMed

    Biuk, Egon; Zelić, Zoran; Rapan, Saša; Lovric, Ivan; Biuk, Dubravka; Radic, Radivoje

    2015-11-01

    The middle of the patellar ligament and the quadruple hamstring tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) are two types of graft predominantly used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The aim of this study was to determine the morphometric characteristics of patellar ligament grafts and hamstring tendon grafts and to compare the results according to subject age and gender. The study was conducted on a total of 120 samples: 40 of gracilis tendon, 40 of semitendinosus tendon and 40 of patellar ligament, distributed equally according to gender, age (50-75 years) and the side of the body from which the sample was harvested. Morphometric and histological analyses showed that patellar ligament samples had less cross-sectional area than quadruple tendon samples (49.29 mm(2) compared with 51.46 mm(2), respectively). Sexual dimorphism was noticed in distal cross-sections of gracilis tendons (p=0.09), cross-sections of quadruple tendons (p=0.07) and patellar ligament samples (p=0.01) because of different muscular build. All samples obtained from male subjects had larger cross-sectional areas compared with the samples taken from females. Furthermore, samples obtained from subjects aged 60 years or under had larger cross-sectional areas than samples obtained from subjects aged at least 61 years for all types of graft. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 3D Microstructural Architecture of Muscle Attachments in Extant and Fossil Vertebrates Revealed by Synchrotron Microtomography

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Sophie; Dupret, Vincent; Tafforeau, Paul; Trinajstic, Katherine M.; Ryll, Bettina; Gouttenoire, Pierre-Jean; Wretman, Lovisa; Zylberberg, Louise; Peyrin, Françoise; Ahlberg, Per E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Firm attachments binding muscles to skeleton are crucial mechanical components of the vertebrate body. These attachments (entheses) are complex three-dimensional structures, containing distinctive arrangements of cells and fibre systems embedded in the bone, which can be modified during ontogeny. Until recently it has only been possible to obtain 2D surface and thin section images of entheses, leaving their 3D histology largely unstudied except by extrapolation from 2D data. Entheses are frequently preserved in fossil bones, but sectioning is inappropriate for rare or unique fossil material. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present the first non-destructive 3D investigation, by propagation phase contrast synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SRµCT), of enthesis histology in extant and fossil vertebrates. We are able to identify entheses in the humerus of the salamander Desmognathus from the organization of bone-cell lacunae and extrinsic fibres. Statistical analysis of the lacunae differentiates types of attachments, and the orientation of the fibres, reflect the approximate alignment of the muscle. Similar histological structures, including ontogenetically related pattern changes, are perfectly preserved in two 380 million year old fossil vertebrates, the placoderm Compagopiscis croucheri and the sarcopterygian fish Eusthenopteron foordi. Conclusions/Significance We are able to determine the position of entheses in fossil vertebrates, the approximate orientation of the attached muscles, and aspects of their ontogenetic histories, from PPC-SRµCT data. Sub-micron microtomography thus provides a powerful tool for studying the structure, development, evolution and palaeobiology of muscle attachments. PMID:23468901

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  12. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  13. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-07

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models.

  14. Fusion of autoradiographs with an MR volume using 2-D and 3-D linear transformations.

    PubMed

    Malandain, Grégoire; Bardinet, Eric; Nelissen, Koen; Vanduffel, Wim

    2004-09-01

    In the past years, the development of 3-D medical imaging has enabled the 3-D imaging of in vivo tissues, from an anatomical (MR, CT) or even functional (fMRI, PET, SPECT) point of view. However, despite immense technological progress, the resolution of these images is still short of the level of anatomical or functional details that in vitro imaging (e.g., histology, autoradiography) permits. The motivation of this work is to compare fMRI activations to activations observed in autoradiographic images from the same animals. We aim to fuse post-mortem autoradiographic data with a pre-mortem anatomical MR image. We first reconstruct a 3-D volume from the 2-D autoradiographic sections, coherent both in geometry and intensity. Then, this volume is fused with the MR image. This way, we ensure that the reconstructed 3-D volume can be superimposed onto the MR image that represents the reference anatomy. We demonstrate that this fusion can be achieved by using only simple global transformations (rigid and/or affine, 2-D and 3-D), while yielding very satisfactory results.

  15. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  16. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  17. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  18. Multimodal evaluation of 2-D and 3-D ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in measurements of the thyroid volume using universally applicable cross-sectional imaging software: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Freesmeyer, Martin; Wiegand, Steffen; Schierz, Jan-Henning; Winkens, Thomas; Licht, Katharina

    2014-07-01

    A precise estimate of thyroid volume is necessary for making adequate therapeutic decisions and planning, as well as for monitoring therapy response. The goal of this study was to compare the precision of different volumetry methods. Thyroid-shaped phantoms were subjected to volumetry via 2-D and 3-D ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 3-D US scans were performed using sensor navigation and mechanical sweeping methods. Volumetry calculation ensued with the conventional ellipsoid model and the manual tracing method. The study confirmed the superiority of manual tracing with CT and MRI volumetry of the thyroid, but extended this knowledge also to the superiority of the 3-D US method, regardless of whether sensor navigation or mechanical sweeping is used. A novel aspect was successful use of the same universally applicable cross-imaging software for all modalities.

  19. ASI/MET - 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-13

    The Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package ASI/MET is the mast and windsocks at the center of this stereo image from NASA Mars Pathfinder. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

  20. 3D Models of Immunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    This collaborative grant is developing 3D models of both mouse and human biology to investigate aspects of therapeutic vaccination in order to answer key questions relevant to human cancer immunotherapy.

  1. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  2. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  3. [Tridimensional (3D) endoscopic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, M J; Muñoz Agel, F; Abad Belando, R

    2007-01-01

    A review and update on 3D endoscopic ultrasonography is included regarding all of this technique s aspects, technical details, and current indications. Images from our own clinical experience are presented.

  4. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  5. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-09-30

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development.

  6. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  7. 3-D imaging of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M; Gelblum, D Y; Wood, M L

    1990-01-01

    3-D gradient echo techniques, and in particular FLASH, represent a significant advance in MR imaging strategy allowing thin section, high resolution imaging through a large region of interest. Anatomical areas of application include the brain, spine, and extremities, although the majority of work to date has been performed in the brain. Superior T1 contrast and thus sensitivity to the presence of GdDTPA is achieved with 3-D FLASH when compared to 2-D spin echo technique. There is marked arterial and venous enhancement following Gd DTPA administration on 3-D FLASH, a less common finding with 2-D spin echo. Enhancement of the falx and tentorium is also more prominent. From a single data acquisition, requiring less than 11 min of scan time, high resolution reformatted sagittal, coronal, and axial images can obtained in addition to sections in any arbitrary plane. Tissue segmentation techniques can be applied and lesions displayed in three dimensions. These results may lead to the replacement of 2-D spin echo with 3-D FLASH for high resolution T1-weighted MR imaging of the CNS, particularly in the study of mass lesions and structural anomalies. The application of similar T2-weighted gradient echo techniques may follow, however the signal-to-noise ratio which can be achieved remains a potential limitation.

  8. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  9. 3-D threat image projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Yesna O.; Abraham, Douglas Q.; Agaian, Sos; Panetta, Karen

    2008-02-01

    Automated Explosive Detection Systems utilizing Computed Tomography perform a series X-ray scans of passenger bags being checked in at the airport, and produce various 2-D projection images and 3-D volumetric images of the bag. The determination as to whether the passenger bag contains an explosive and needs to be searched manually is performed through trained Transportation Security Administration screeners following an approved protocol. In order to keep the screeners vigilant with regards to screening quality, the Transportation Security Administration has mandated the use of Threat Image Projection on 2-D projection X-ray screening equipment used at all US airports. These algorithms insert visual artificial threats into images of the normal passenger bags in order to test the screeners with regards to their screening efficiency and their screening quality at determining threats. This technology for 2-D X-ray system is proven and is widespread amongst multiple manufacturers of X-ray projection systems. Until now, Threat Image Projection has been unsuccessful at being introduced into 3-D Automated Explosive Detection Systems for numerous reasons. The failure of these prior attempts are mainly due to imaging queues that the screeners pickup on, and therefore make it easy for the screeners to discern the presence of the threat image and thus defeating the intended purpose. This paper presents a novel approach for 3-D Threat Image Projection for 3-D Automated Explosive Detection Systems. The method presented here is a projection based approach where both the threat object and the bag remain in projection sinogram space. Novel approaches have been developed for projection based object segmentation, projection based streak reduction used for threat object isolation along with scan orientation independence and projection based streak generation for an overall realistic 3-D image. The algorithms are prototyped in MatLab and C++ and demonstrate non discernible 3-D threat

  10. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  11. Sensing and compressing 3-D models

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, J.

    1998-02-01

    The goal of this research project was to create a passive and robust computer vision system for producing 3-D computer models of arbitrary scenes. Although the authors were unsuccessful in achieving the overall goal, several components of this research have shown significant potential. Of particular interest is the application of parametric eigenspace methods for planar pose measurement of partially occluded objects in gray-level images. The techniques presented provide a simple, accurate, and robust solution to the planar pose measurement problem. In addition, the representational efficiency of eigenspace methods used with gray-level features were successfully extended to binary features, which are less sensitive to illumination changes. The results of this research are presented in two papers that were written during the course of this project. The papers are included in sections 2 and 3. The first section of this report summarizes the 3-D modeling efforts.

  12. 3-D seismic data for geohazards assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gafford, W.T.

    1996-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data, acquired for oil and gas exploration purposes, is now being used to supplement, or in some cases, even replace conventional high resolution geohazard surveys in the Gulf of Mexico. The use of 3-D seismic data has improved the identification and understanding of some types of geohazards and has resulted in a more thorough interpretation of the shallow geologic section. The use of seismic interpretation workstations has allowed the geohazard interpreter to apply new tools in geohazard analysis. Some of the newer geohazard analysis. Some of the newer geophysical technologies used for exploration purposes are now being adapted for use in the identification and assessment of drilling hazards in the near-seafloor sedimentary section.

  13. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  14. Visualization of 3D Geological Data using COLLADA and KML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yosoon; Um, Jeong-Gi; Park, Myong-Ho

    2013-04-01

    This study presents a method to visualize 3D geological data using COLLAborative Design Activity(COLLADA, an open standard XML schema for establishing interactive 3D applications) and Keyhole Markup Language(KML, the XML-based scripting language of Google Earth).We used COLLADA files to represent different 3D geological data such as borehole, fence section, surface-based 3D volume and 3D grid by triangle meshes(a set of triangles connected by their common edges or corners). The COLLADA files were imported into the 3D render window of Google Earth using KML codes. An application to the Grosmont formation in Alberta, Canada showed that the combination of COLLADA and KML enables Google Earth to visualize 3D geological structures and properties.

  15. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  16. 3D seismic imaging, example of 3D area in the middle of Banat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antic, S.

    2009-04-01

    3D seismic imaging was carried out in the 3D seismic volume situated in the middle of Banat region in Serbia. The 3D area is about 300 km square. The aim of 3D investigation was defining geology structures and techtonics especially in Mesozoik complex. The investigation objects are located in depth from 2000 to 3000 m. There are number of wells in this area but they are not enough deep to help in the interpretation. It was necessary to get better seismic image in deeper area. Acquisition parameters were satisfactory (good quality of input parameters, length of input data was 5 s, fold was up to 4000 %) and preprocessed data was satisfied. GeoDepth is an integrated system for 3D velocity model building and for 3D seismic imaging. Input data for 3D seismic imaging consist of preprocessing data sorted to CMP gathers and RMS stacking velocity functions. Other type of input data are geological information derived from well data, time migrated images and time migrated maps. Workflow for this job was: loading and quality control the input data (CMP gathers and velocity), creating initial RMS Velocity Volume, PSTM, updating the RMS Velocity Volume, PSTM, building the Initial Interval Velocity Model, PSDM, updating the Interval Velocity Model, PSDM. In the first stage the attempt is to derive initial velocity model as simple as possible as.The higher frequency velocity changes are obtained in the updating stage. The next step, after running PSTM, is the time to depth conversion. After the model is built, we generate a 3D interval velocity volume and run 3D pre-stack depth migration. The main method for updating velocities is 3D tomography. The criteria used in velocity model determination are based on the flatness of pre-stack migrated gathers or the quality of the stacked image. The standard processing ended with poststack 3D time migration. Prestack depth migration is one of the powerful tool available to the interpretator to develop an accurate velocity model and get

  17. GEN3D Ver. 1.37

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-04

    GEN3D is a three-dimensional mesh generation program. The three-dimensional mesh is generated by mapping a two-dimensional mesh into threedimensions according to one of four types of transformations: translating, rotating, mapping onto a spherical surface, and mapping onto a cylindrical surface. The generated three-dimensional mesh can then be reoriented by offsetting, reflecting about an axis, and revolving about an axis. GEN3D can be used to mesh geometries that are axisymmetric or planar, but, due to three-dimensional loading or boundary conditions, require a three-dimensional finite element mesh and analysis. More importantly, it can be used to mesh complex three-dimensional geometries composed of several sections when the sections can be defined in terms of transformations of two dimensional geometries. The code GJOIN is then used to join the separate sections into a single body. GEN3D reads and writes twodimensional and threedimensional mesh databases in the GENESIS database format; therefore, it is compatible with the preprocessing, postprocessing, and analysis codes used by the Engineering Analysis Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  18. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  19. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  20. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  1. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  2. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  3. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  4. Counter-sniper 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Orr; LePage, Andrew J.; Wijntjes, Geert J.; Zehnpfennig, Theodore F.; Sackos, John T.; Nellums, Robert O.

    1999-01-01

    Visidyne, Inc., teaming with Sandia National Laboratories, has developed the preliminary design for an innovative scannerless 3-D laser radar capable of acquiring, tracking, and determining the coordinates of small caliber projectiles in flight with sufficient precision, so their origin can be established by back projecting their tracks to their source. The design takes advantage of the relatively large effective cross-section of a bullet at optical wavelengths. Kay to its implementation is the use of efficient, high- power laser diode arrays for illuminators and an imaging laser receiver using a unique CCD imager design, that acquires the information to establish x, y (angle-angle) and range coordinates for each bullet at very high frame rates. The detection process achieves a high degree of discrimination by using the optical signature of the bullet, solar background mitigation, and track detection. Field measurements and computer simulations have been used to provide the basis for a preliminary design of a robust bullet tracker, the Counter Sniper 3-D Laser Radar. Experimental data showing 3-D test imagery acquired by a lidar with architecture similar to that of the proposed Counter Sniper 3-D Lidar are presented. A proposed Phase II development would yield an innovative, compact, and highly efficient bullet-tracking laser radar. Such a device would meet the needs of not only the military, but also federal, state, and local law enforcement organizations.

  5. 3D Imaging by Mass Spectrometry: A New Frontier

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Erin H.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Imaging mass spectrometry can generate three-dimensional volumes showing molecular distributions in an entire organ or animal through registration and stacking of serial tissue sections. Here we review the current state of 3D imaging mass spectrometry as well as provide insights and perspectives on the process of generating 3D mass spectral data along with a discussion of the process necessary to generate a 3D image volume. PMID:22276611

  6. Visualization of 3D Geological Models on Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Um, J.; Park, M.

    2013-05-01

    Google Earth combines satellite imagery, aerial photography, thematic maps and various data sets to make a three-dimensional (3D) interactive image of the world. Currently, Google Earth is a popular visualization tool in a variety of fields and plays an increasingly important role not only for private users in daily life, but also for scientists, practitioners, policymakers and stakeholders in research and application. In this study, a method to visualize 3D geological models on Google Earth is presented. COLLAborative Design Activity (COLLADA, an open standard XML schema for establishing interactive 3D applications) was used to represent different 3D geological models such as borehole, fence section, surface-based 3D volume and 3D grid by triangle meshes (a set of triangles connected by their common edges or corners). In addition, we designed Keyhole Markup Language (KML, the XML-based scripting language of Google Earth) codes to import the COLLADA files into the 3D render window of Google Earth. The method was applied to the Grosmont formation in Alberta, Canada. The application showed that the combination of COLLADA and KML enables Google Earth to effectively visualize 3D geological structures and properties.; Visualization of the (a) boreholes, (b) fence sections, (c) 3D volume model and (d) 3D grid model of Grossmont formation on Google Earth

  7. 3D cartography of the Alpine Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vouillamoz, N.; Sue, C.; Champagnac, J. D.; Calcagno, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present a 3D cartography of the alpine arc, a highly non-cylindrical mountain belt, built using the 3D GeoModeller of the BRGM (French geological survey). The model allows to handle the large-scale 3D structure of seventeen major crustal units of the belt (from the lower crust to the sedimentary cover nappes), and two main discontinuities (the Insubric line and the Crustal Penninic Front). It provides a unique document to better understand their structural relationships and to produce new sections. The study area comprises the western alpine arc, from the Jura to the Northwest, up to the Bergell granite intrusion and the Lepontine Dome to the East, and is limited to the South by the Ligurian basin. The model is limited vertically 10 km above sea level at the top, and the moho interface at the bottom. We discarded the structural relationships between the Alps sensus stricto and the surrounding geodynamic systems such as the Rhine graben or the connection with the Apennines. The 3D-model is based on the global integration of various data such as the DEM of the Alps, the moho isobaths, the simplified geological and tectonic maps of the belt, the crustal cross-sections ECORS-CROP and NFP-20, and complementary cross-sections specifically built to precise local complexities. The database has first been integrated in a GIS-project to prepare their implementation in the GeoModeller, by homogenizing the different spatial referencing systems. The global model is finally interpolated from all these data, using the potential field method. The final document is a new tri-dimentional cartography that would be used as input for further alpine studies.

  8. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  9. Baghdad Sulcus in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-23

    This anaglyph from images captured by NASA Cassini spacecraft shows a dramatic, 3-D view of one of the deep fractures nicknamed tiger stripes on Saturn moon Enceladus which are located near the moon south pole, spray jets of water ice.

  10. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  11. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  12. Ganges Chasma in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-25

    Ganges Chasma is part of the Valles Marineris trough system that stretches nearly 5,000 kilometers 3,000 miles across the western equatorial region of Mars. This stereo anaglyph is from NASA Mars Global Surveyor. 3D glasses are necessary.

  13. Opportunity Stretches Out 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-02

    This is a three-dimensional stereo anaglyph of an image taken by the front hazard-identification camera onboard NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, showing the rover arm in its extended position. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  14. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  15. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  16. Rosetta Comet in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-21

    A 3D image shows what it would look like to fly over the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image was generated by data collected by ESA Philae spacecraft during the decent to the spacecraft initial touchdown on the comet Nov. 12, 2014.

  17. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  18. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  19. Array servo scanning micro EDM of 3D micro cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao; Li, Yong; Yi, Futing

    2010-12-01

    Micro electro discharge machining (Micro EDM) is a non-traditional processing technology with the special advantages of low set-up cost and few cutting force in machining any conductive materials regardless of their hardness. As well known, die-sinking EDM is unsuitable for machining the complex 3D micro cavity less than 1mm due to the high-priced fabrication of 3D microelectrode itself and its serous wear during EDM process. In our former study, a servo scanning 3D micro-EDM (3D SSMEDM) method was put forward, and our experiments showed it was available to fabricate complex 3D micro-cavities. In this study, in order to improve machining efficiency and consistency accuracy for array 3D micro-cavities, an array-servo-scanning 3D micro EDM (3D ASSMEDM) method is presented considering the complementary advantages of the 3D SSMEDM and the array micro electrodes with simple cross-section. During 3D ASSMEDM process, the array cavities designed by CAD / CAM system can be batch-manufactured by servo scanning layer by layer using array-rod-like micro tool electrodes, and the axial wear of the array electrodes is compensated in real time by keeping discharge gap. To verify the effectiveness of the 3D ASSMEDM, the array-triangle-micro cavities (side length 630 μm) are batch-manufactured on P-doped silicon by applying the array-micro-electrodes with square-cross-section fabricated by LIGA process. Our exploratory experiment shows that the 3D ASSMEDM provides a feasible approach for the batch-manufacture of 3D array-micro-cavities of conductive materials.

  20. Array servo scanning micro EDM of 3D micro cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao; Li, Yong; Yi, Futing

    2011-05-01

    Micro electro discharge machining (Micro EDM) is a non-traditional processing technology with the special advantages of low set-up cost and few cutting force in machining any conductive materials regardless of their hardness. As well known, die-sinking EDM is unsuitable for machining the complex 3D micro cavity less than 1mm due to the high-priced fabrication of 3D microelectrode itself and its serous wear during EDM process. In our former study, a servo scanning 3D micro-EDM (3D SSMEDM) method was put forward, and our experiments showed it was available to fabricate complex 3D micro-cavities. In this study, in order to improve machining efficiency and consistency accuracy for array 3D micro-cavities, an array-servo-scanning 3D micro EDM (3D ASSMEDM) method is presented considering the complementary advantages of the 3D SSMEDM and the array micro electrodes with simple cross-section. During 3D ASSMEDM process, the array cavities designed by CAD / CAM system can be batch-manufactured by servo scanning layer by layer using array-rod-like micro tool electrodes, and the axial wear of the array electrodes is compensated in real time by keeping discharge gap. To verify the effectiveness of the 3D ASSMEDM, the array-triangle-micro cavities (side length 630 μm) are batch-manufactured on P-doped silicon by applying the array-micro-electrodes with square-cross-section fabricated by LIGA process. Our exploratory experiment shows that the 3D ASSMEDM provides a feasible approach for the batch-manufacture of 3D array-micro-cavities of conductive materials.

  1. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  2. Vision models for 3D surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sunanda

    1992-11-01

    Different approaches to computational stereo to represent human stereo vision have been developed over the past two decades. The Marr-Poggio theory of human stereo vision is probably the most widely accepted model of the human stereo vision. However, recently developed motion stereo models which use a sequence of images taken by either a moving camera or a moving object provide an alternative method of achieving multi-resolution matching without the use of Laplacian of Gaussian operators. While using image sequences, the baseline between two camera positions for a image pair is changed for the subsequent image pair so as to achieve different resolution for each image pair. Having different baselines also avoids the inherent occlusion problem in stereo vision models. The advantage of using multi-resolution images acquired by camera positioned at different baselines over those acquired by LOG operators is that one does not have to encounter spurious edges often created by zero-crossings in the LOG operated images. Therefore in designing a computer vision system, a motion stereo model is more appropriate than a stereo vision model. However, in some applications where only a stereo pair of images are available, recovery of 3D surfaces of natural scenes are possible in a computationally efficient manner by using cepstrum matching and regularization techniques. Section 2 of this paper describes a motion stereo model using multi-scale cepstrum matching for the detection of disparity between image pairs in a sequence of images and subsequent recovery of 3D surfaces from depth-map obtained by a non convergent triangulation technique. Section 3 presents a 3D surface recovery technique from a stereo pair using cepstrum matching for disparity detection and cubic B-splines for surface smoothing. Section 4 contains the results of 3D surface recovery using both of the techniques mentioned above. Section 5 discusses the merit of 2D cepstrum matching and cubic B

  3. Molecular imaging of the embryonic heart: Fables and facts on 3D imaging of gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, Jan M; Soufan, Alexandre T; Hagoort, Jaco; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2004-09-01

    Molecular imaging, which is the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of gene expression patterns, is indispensable for the study of the function of genes in cardiac development. The instrumentation, as well as the development of specific contrast agents for molecular imaging, has shown spectacular advances in the last decade. In this review, the spatial resolutions, contrast agents, and applications of these imaging methods in the field of cardiac embryology are discussed. Apart from 3D reconstructions from histological sections, not many of these methods have been applied in embryological research. This review shows that, for most methods, neither the spatial resolutions nor the specificity and applicability of the contrast agents are adequate for the reliable imaging of specific gene expression at the microscopic resolution required for embryological studies of small organs like the developing heart. Although a 3D reconstruction from sections will always suffer from imperfections, the resulting reconstructions meet the aim of most biological studies, especially since the original microscopic images are linked. With respect to imaging of gene expression, only histological sections and laser scanning microscopy provide the required resolution and specificity at the tissue and cellular level. Episcopic fluorescence image capturing and optical projection tomography are being used for microscopic phenotyping and lineage analysis, and both show potential for detailed molecular imaging. Other methods can be used very efficiently in rapid evaluation of biological experiments and high-throughput screens of large-scale gene expression profiling efforts when high spatial resolution is not required. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  5. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  6. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  7. 3-D sprag ratcheting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Michael O. (Inventor); Poland, Jr., James W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A ratcheting device comprising a driver head assembly which includes at least two 3-D sprag elements positioned within a first groove within the driver head assembly such that at least one of the 3-D sprag elements may lockingly engage the driver head assembly and a mating hub assembly to allow for rotation of the hub assembly in one direction with respect to the driver head assembly. This arrangement allows the ratcheting tool to impart torque in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction without having to first rotate the ratcheting tool in the direction opposite the direction in which the torque is applied. This arrangement also allows the ratcheting tool to impart torque in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction while in the neutral position.

  8. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  9. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  10. Nuclear morphometry in epidermal changes due to electrical current and thermal energy: trial for usage of image analysis in histological sections.

    PubMed

    Toygar, Mehmet; Demirel, Birol; Karslioglu, Yildirim; Tugcu, Harun; Safali, Mukerrem; Senol, Ender

    2010-09-01

    Distinguishing between injuries resulted from electrical current versus thermal energy is not only a difficult, but also a controversial issue in forensic medicine practice.In this study, an electrical current and a cautery were applied to dorsal skins of 10 rats and biopsies were taken from the injured sites as well as normal skin. In the histologic sections; some planimetric variables such as the perimeter, area, diameter equivalent circle, minimum feret, maximum feret, and the circular form factor of the nuclei located in normal and injured epidermis were measured with the aid of the computer-assisted image analysis.When compared with normal skin, all of the variables -nuclear area, perimeter, diameter equivalent circle, minimum feret, maximum feret, and circular form factor seemed to be decreased both in the electrical current- and cautery-applied skin samples.The differences between the variables measured in normal skin and in electrical- or cautery-applied skin samples were statistically significant (P < 0.05). However none of the variables showed any meaningful differences between the electrical- and cautery-applied areas.It was concluded that the nuclear changes due to electrical current and thermal injury are identical and morphometric analysis seems not to make any further contributions in the differentiating from each other. Therefore, conventional and more established methods for detection of metallization would be more effective.

  11. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  12. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  13. Histological skin morphology enhancement base on molecular hyperspectral imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Sun, Z; Wang, Y; Liu, H; Guo, F; Zhu, J

    2014-08-01

    Most traditional skin histological analysis methods are based on the light microscopy images, which can only provide limited information and low contrast results for pathology evaluation. Molecular hyperspectral imaging technology can provide both spatial and spectral information of skin sections, which is a new method for histological skin analysis. The molecular hyperspectral imaging system was developed by coupling an acousto-optic tunable filters adapter to microscopy and the molecular hyperspectral images were analyzed by home-written software with image processing algorithms. Then, the histological structures in skin sections were investigated in several locations to evaluate the potential application of the molecular hyperspectral imaging technique to dermatology. Molecular hyperspectral images of skin sections were obtained. Single-band images, false color images, virtual 3D surface view images, and color-coded spectral clustering results were produced to highlight the skin structures for histological evaluation. Unlike traditional histological analysis with light microscopy, the molecular hyperspectral imaging technology can enhance the visualization of skin structures using their spectral signatures and their gray values. This technology has potential for the diagnosis and histopathologic characterization of different kind of skin cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  15. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  16. An integrated 3D log processing optimization system for small sawmills in central Appalachia

    Treesearch

    Wenshu Lin; Jingxin. Wang

    2013-01-01

    An integrated 3D log processing optimization system was developed to perform 3D log generation, opening face determination, headrig log sawing simulation, fl itch edging and trimming simulation, cant resawing, and lumber grading. A circular cross-section model, together with 3D modeling techniques, was used to reconstruct 3D virtual logs. Internal log defects (knots)...

  17. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  18. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  19. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  20. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  1. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  2. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  3. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  4. Early detection of liver fibrosis in rats using 3-D ultrasound Nakagami imaging: a feasibility evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lee, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Yung-Sheng; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lin, Jen-Jen; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using 3-D ultrasound Nakagami imaging to detect the early stages of liver fibrosis in rats. Fibrosis was induced in livers of rats (n = 60) by intraperitoneal injection of 0.5% dimethylnitrosamine (DMN). Group 1 was the control group, and rats in groups 2-6 received DMN injections for 1-5 weeks, respectively. Each rat was sacrificed to perform 3-D ultrasound scanning of the liver in vitro using a single-element transducer of 6.5 MHz. The 3-D raw data acquired at a sampling rate of 50 MHz were used to construct 3-D Nakagami images. The liver specimen was further used for histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson staining to score the degree of liver fibrosis. The results indicate that the Metavir scores of the hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections in Groups 1-4 were 0 (defined as early liver fibrosis in this study), and those in groups 5 and 6 ranged from 1 to 2 and 2 to 3, respectively. To quantify the degree of early liver fibrosis, the histologic sections with Masson stain were analyzed to calculate the number of fiber-related blue pixels. The number of blue pixels increased from (2.36 ± 0.79) × 10(4) (group 1) to (7.68 ± 2.62) × 10(4) (group 4) after DMN injections for 3 weeks, indicating that early stages of liver fibrosis were successfully induced in rats. The Nakagami parameter increased from 0.36 ± 0.02 (group 1) to 0.55 ± 0.03 (group 4), with increasing numbers of blue pixels in the Masson-stained sections (p-value < 0.05, t-test). We concluded that 3-D Nakagami imaging has potential in the early detection of liver fibrosis in rats and may serve as an image-based pathologic model to visually track fibrosis formation and growth.

  5. Three-dimensional reconstruction of light microscopy image sections: present and future.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhen; Xu, Rui; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction technologies can reveal previously hidden microstructures in human tissue. However, the lack of ideal, non-destructive cross-sectional imaging techniques is still a problem. Despite some drawbacks, histological sectioning remains one of the most powerful methods for accurate high-resolution representation of tissue structures. Computer technologies can produce 3D representations of interesting human tissue and organs that have been serial-sectioned, dyed or stained, imaged, and segmented for 3D visualization. 3D reconstruction also has great potential in the fields of tissue engineering and 3D printing. This article outlines the most common methods for 3D tissue section reconstruction. We describe the most important academic concepts in this field, and provide critical explanations and comparisons. We also note key steps in the reconstruction procedures, and highlight recent progress in the development of new reconstruction methods.

  6. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  7. Light field display and 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwane, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Light field optics and its applications become rather popular in these days. With light field optics or light field thesis, real 3D space can be described in 2D plane as 4D data, which we call as light field data. This process can be divided in two procedures. First, real3D scene is optically reduced with imaging lens. Second, this optically reduced 3D image is encoded into light field data. In later procedure we can say that 3D information is encoded onto a plane as 2D data by lens array plate. This transformation is reversible and acquired light field data can be decoded again into 3D image with the arrayed lens plate. "Refocusing" (focusing image on your favorite point after taking a picture), light-field camera's most popular function, is some kind of sectioning process from encoded 3D data (light field data) to 2D image. In this paper at first I show our actual light field camera and our 3D display using acquired and computer-simulated light field data, on which real 3D image is reconstructed. In second I explain our data processing method whose arithmetic operation is performed not in Fourier domain but in real domain. Then our 3D display system is characterized by a few features; reconstructed image is of finer resolutions than density of arrayed lenses and it is not necessary to adjust lens array plate to flat display on which light field data is displayed.

  8. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  9. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  10. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  11. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  12. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  13. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  14. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  15. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  19. Stereological Analysis of Liver Biopsy Histology Sections as a Reference Standard for Validating Non-Invasive Liver Fat Fraction Measurements by MRI

    PubMed Central

    St. Pierre, Tim G.; House, Michael J.; Bangma, Sander J.; Pang, Wenjie; Bathgate, Andrew; Gan, Eng K.; Ayonrinde, Oyekoya T.; Bhathal, Prithi S.; Clouston, Andrew; Olynyk, John K.; Adams, Leon A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Validation of non-invasive methods of liver fat quantification requires a reference standard. However, using standard histopathology assessment of liver biopsies is problematical because of poor repeatability. We aimed to assess a stereological method of measuring volumetric liver fat fraction (VLFF) in liver biopsies and to use the method to validate a magnetic resonance imaging method for measurement of VLFF. Methods VLFFs were measured in 59 subjects (1) by three independent analysts using a stereological point counting technique combined with the Delesse principle on liver biopsy histological sections and (2) by three independent analysts using the HepaFat-Scan® technique on magnetic resonance images of the liver. Bland Altman statistics and intraclass correlation (IC) were used to assess the repeatability of each method and the bias between the methods of liver fat fraction measurement. Results Inter-analyst repeatability coefficients for the stereology and HepaFat-Scan® methods were 8.2 (95% CI 7.7–8.8)% and 2.4 (95% CI 2.2–2.5)% VLFF respectively. IC coefficients were 0.86 (95% CI 0.69–0.93) and 0.990 (95% CI 0.985–0.994) respectively. Small biases (≤3.4%) were observable between two pairs of analysts using stereology while no significant biases were observable between any of the three pairs of analysts using HepaFat-Scan®. A bias of 1.4±0.5% VLFF was observed between the HepaFat-Scan® method and the stereological method. Conclusions Repeatability of the stereological method is superior to the previously reported performance of assessment of hepatic steatosis by histopathologists and is a suitable reference standard for validating non-invasive methods of measurement of VLFF. PMID:27501242

  20. Detection of prostate cancer index lesions with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) using whole-mount histological sections as the reference standard.

    PubMed

    Russo, Filippo; Regge, Daniele; Armando, Enrico; Giannini, Valentina; Vignati, Anna; Mazzetti, Simone; Manfredi, Matteo; Bollito, Enrico; Correale, Loredana; Porpiglia, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) for detecting prostate cancer foci, including the largest (index) lesions. In all, 115 patients with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer underwent mp-MRI before radical prostatectomy. A single expert radiologist recorded all prostate cancer foci including the index lesion 'blinded' to the pathologist's biopsy report. Stained whole-mount histological sections were used as the reference standard. All lesions were contoured by an experienced uropathologist who assessed their volume and pathological Gleason score. All lesions with a volume of >0.5 mL and/or pathological Gleason score of >6 were defined as clinically significant prostate cancer. Multivariate analysis was used to ascertain the characteristics of lesions identified by MRI. In all, 104 of 115 index lesions were correctly diagnosed by mp-MRI (sensitivity 90.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 83.5-95.1%), including 98/105 clinically significant index lesions (93.3%; 95% CI 86.8-97.3%), among which three of three lesions had a volume of <0.5 mL and Gleason score of >6. Overall, mp-MRI detected 131/206 lesions including 13 of 68 'insignificant' prostate cancers. The multivariate logistic regression modelling showed that pathological Gleason score (odds ratio [OR] 11.7, 95% CI 2.3-59.8; P = 0.003) and lesion volume (OR 4.24, 95% CI 1.3-14.7; P = 0.022) were independently associated with the detection of index lesions at MRI. This study shows that mp-MRI has a high sensitivity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer index lesions, while having disappointing results for the detection of small-volume, low Gleason score prostate cancer foci. Thus, mp-MRI could be used to stratify patients according to risk, allowing better treatment selection. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  2. 3D Printing Facilitated Scaffold-free Tissue Unit Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J.; Trusk, Thomas C.; Visconti, Richard P.; Yost, Michael J.; Kindy, Mark S.; Drake, Christopher J.; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R.; Mei, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing micro-droplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit micro-droplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell-cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation. PMID:24717646

  3. 3D printing facilitated scaffold-free tissue unit fabrication.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J; Trusk, Thomas C; Visconti, Richard P; Yost, Michael J; Kindy, Mark S; Drake, Christopher J; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R; Mei, Ying

    2014-06-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing microdroplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit microdroplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell-cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation.

  4. Microbial metabolic exchange in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D; Phelan, Vanessa V; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Moree, Wilna J; Duggan, Brendan M; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2013-01-01

    Mono- and multispecies microbial populations alter the chemistry of their surrounding environments during colony development thereby influencing multicellular behavior and interspecies interactions of neighboring microbes. Here we present a methodology that enables the creation of three-dimensional (3D) models of a microbial chemotype that can be correlated to the colony phenotype through multimodal imaging analysis. These models are generated by performing matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) on serial cross-sections of microbial colonies grown on 8 mm deep agar, registering data sets of each serial section in MATLAB to create a model, and then superimposing the model with a photograph of the colonies themselves. As proof-of-principle, 3D models were used to visualize metabolic exchange during microbial interactions between Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces coelicolor, as well as, Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The resulting models were able to capture the depth profile of secreted metabolites within the agar medium and revealed properties of certain mass signals that were previously not observable using two-dimensional MALDI-TOF IMS. Most significantly, the 3D models were capable of mapping previously unobserved chemical distributions within the array of sub-surface hyphae of C. albicans and how this chemistry is altered by the presence of P. aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen known to alter virulence of C. albicans. It was determined that the presence of C. albicans triggered increased rhamnolipid production by P. aeruginosa, which in turn was capable of inhibiting embedded hyphal growth produced beneath the C. albicans colony at ambient temperature. PMID:23283018

  5. Human Sinoatrial Node Structure: 3D Microanatomy of Sinoatrial Conduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Csepe, Thomas A.; Zhao, Jichao; Hansen, Brian J.; Li, Ning; Sul, Lidiya V.; Lim, Praise; Wang, Yufeng; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul ML.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite a century of extensive study on the human sinoatrial node (SAN), the structure-to-function features of specialized SAN conduction pathways (SACP) are still unknown and debated. We report a new method for direct analysis of the SAN microstructure in optically-mapped human hearts with and without clinical history of SAN dysfunction. Methods Two explanted donor human hearts were coronary-perfused and optically-mapped. Structural analyses of histological sections parallel to epicardium (~13-21μm intervals) were integrated with optical maps to create 3D computational reconstructions of the SAN complex. High-resolution fiber fields were obtained using 3D Eigen-analysis of the structure tensor, and used to analyze SACP microstructure with a fiber-tracking approach. Results Optical mapping revealed normal SAN activation of the atria through a lateral SACP proximal to the crista terminalis in Heart #1 but persistent SAN exit block in diseased Heart #2. 3D structural analysis displayed a functionally-observed SAN border composed of fibrosis, fat, and/or discontinuous fibers between SAN and atria, which was only crossed by several branching myofiber tracts in SACP regions. Computational 3D fiber-tracking revealed that myofiber tracts of SACPs created continuous connections between SAN #1 and atria, but in SAN #2, SACP region myofiber tracts were discontinuous due to fibrosis and fat. Conclusions We developed a new integrative functional, structural and computational approach that allowed for the resolution of the specialized 3D microstructure of human SACPs for the first time. Application of this integrated approach will shed new light on the role of the specialized SAN microanatomy in maintaining sinus rhythm. PMID:26743207

  6. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    ScienceCinema

    Love, Lonnie

    2016-11-02

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  7. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  8. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  9. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  10. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  11. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  12. New software for 3D fracture network analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Noh, Y.; Choi, Y.; Um, J.; Hwang, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents new software to perform analysis and visualization of the fracture network system in 3D. The developed software modules for the analysis and visualization, such as BOUNDARY, DISK3D, FNTWK3D, CSECT and BDM, have been developed using Microsoft Visual Basic.NET and Visualization TookKit (VTK) open-source library. Two case studies revealed that each module plays a role in construction of analysis domain, visualization of fracture geometry in 3D, calculation of equivalent pipes, production of cross-section map and management of borehole data, respectively. The developed software for analysis and visualization of the 3D fractured rock mass can be used to tackle the geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses.

  13. Brain histology.

    PubMed

    Jeans, Alexander; Esiri, Margaret

    2008-10-01

    In this article we summarise nervous system histology in health and disease and acquaint the reader with developments in the staining techniques that are in current use, particularly immunostains. Although clinicians do not need to know the details of stain appearances, some familiarity with these aspects of neuropathology is invaluable in interpreting the reports they receive from the laboratory, as well as reminding them of the amazing beauty of the central nervous system's microscopic structure.

  14. 3D perfusion mapping in the intact mouse heart after myocardial infarction using myocardial contrast echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinbo; Yang, Zequan; French, Brent A.; Hossack, John A.

    2005-04-01

    An intact mouse model of surgically-induced myocardial infarction (MI) caused by permanent occlusion of the Left Anterior Descending (LAD) coronary artery was studied. Normal mice with no occlusion were also studied as controls. For each mouse, contrast enhanced ultrasound images of the heart were acquired in parallel cross-sections perpendicular to the sternum at millimeter increments. For accurate 3D reconstruction, ECG gating and a tri-axial adjustable micromanipulator were used for temporal and spatial registration. Ultrasound images at steady-state of blood refilling were color-coded in each slice to show relative perfusion. Myocardial perfusion defects and necrosis were also examined postmortem by staining with Phthalo blue and TTC red dyes. Good correlation (R>0.93) in perfused area size was observed between in vivo measurements and histological staining. A 3D multi-slice model and a 3D rendering of perfusion distribution were created and showed a promising match with postmortem results, lending further credence to its use as a more comprehensive and more reliable tool for in vivo assessment of myocardial perfusion than 2D tomographic analysis.

  15. A tissue-engineered 3D model of light scattering in atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Ma, Zhenhe; Ishii, Katsu; Tran, Noi; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2007-02-01

    The development of atherosclerotic plaques includes changes in the cellular and extracellular composition of the arterial wall. Although these changes in composition affect the manner in which light scatters in the vessel wall and thus affect any optical signal, experimentally determining how features of atherosclerosis affect optical signals has remained elusive. Using current tissue-engineering methods, we developed a 3D tissue construct model for assessing how certain features of atherosclerosis (the increased concentrations of lipids and macrophages) affect optical signals. The model is based on vascular tissue constructs made of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages (M\\Fgr s) that are co-cultured inside a 3D scaffold matrix of collagen fibers with interspersed lipids. To make the scaffold matrix, powdered collagen was dissolved in acetic acid, homogenized, and neutralized by sequential dialyses to yield a soft gel of 2 μm thick collagen fibers in which cells were seeded. In "normal" constructs, only SMCs were seeded in the collagen gel; in "athero-like" constructs, both SMCs and M\\Fgr s (loaded or unloaded with lipid) were seeded in the gel. To demonstrate the use of this model, sets of slab-shaped normal and athero-like constructs were imaged by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and qualitatively analyzed. 2D frames from 3D OCT image cubes were compared to 2D histology sections. Our results indicate that the cellular composition of the construct affects morphological features of the OCT image.

  16. Understanding Crystal Populations; Looking Towards 3D Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand volcanic systems, the potential record held within crystal populations needs to be revealed. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that the crystal populations that arrive at the surface in volcanic eruptions are commonly mixtures of crystals, which may be representative of simple crystallization, recycling of crystals and incorporation of alien crystals. If we can quantify the true 3D population within a sample then we will be able to separate crystals with different histories and begin to interrogate the true and complex plumbing within the volcanic system. Modeling crystal populations is one area where we can investigate the best methodologies to use when dealing with sections through 3D populations. By producing known 3D shapes and sizes with virtual textures and looking at the statistics of shape and size when such populations are sectioned, we are able to gain confidence about what our 2D information is telling us about the population. We can also use this approach to test the size of population we need to analyze. 3D imaging through serial sectioning or x-ray CT, provides a complete 3D quantification of a rocks texture. Individual phases can be identified and in principle the true 3D statistics of the population can be interrogated. In practice we need to develop strategies (as with 2D-3D transformations), that enable a true characterization of the 3D data, and an understanding of the errors and pitfalls that exist. Ultimately, the reproduction of true 3D textures and the wealth of information they hold, is now within our reach.

  17. The Filament Editor: an interactive software environment for visualization, proof-editing and analysis of 3D neuron morphology.

    PubMed

    Dercksen, Vincent J; Hege, Hans-Christian; Oberlaender, Marcel

    2014-04-01

    Neuroanatomical analysis, such as classification of cell types, depends on reliable reconstruction of large numbers of complete 3D dendrite and axon morphologies. At present, the majority of neuron reconstructions are obtained from preparations in a single tissue slice in vitro, thus suffering from cut off dendrites and, more dramatically, cut off axons. In general, axons can innervate volumes of several cubic millimeters and may reach path lengths of tens of centimeters. Thus, their complete reconstruction requires in vivo labeling, histological sectioning and imaging of large fields of view. Unfortunately, anisotropic background conditions across such large tissue volumes, as well as faintly labeled thin neurites, result in incomplete or erroneous automated tracings and even lead experts to make annotation errors during manual reconstructions. Consequently, tracing reliability renders the major bottleneck for reconstructing complete 3D neuron morphologies. Here, we present a novel set of tools, integrated into a software environment named 'Filament Editor', for creating reliable neuron tracings from sparsely labeled in vivo datasets. The Filament Editor allows for simultaneous visualization of complex neuronal tracings and image data in a 3D viewer, proof-editing of neuronal tracings, alignment and interconnection across sections, and morphometric analysis in relation to 3D anatomical reference structures. We illustrate the functionality of the Filament Editor on the example of in vivo labeled axons and demonstrate that for the exemplary dataset the final tracing results after proof-editing are independent of the expertise of the human operator.

  18. 3-D visualization of geologic structures and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, R.; Klein, H.; Ramshorn, Ch.; Genter, M.; Stärk, A.

    Interactive 3-D computer graphics techniques are used to visualize geologic structures and simulated geologic processes. Geometric models that serve as input to 3-D viewing programs are generated from contour maps, from serial sections, or directly from simulation program output. Choice of viewing parameters strongly affects the perception of irregular surfaces. An interactive 3-D rendering program and its graphical user interface provide visualization tools for structural geology, seismic interpretation, and visual post-processing of simulations. Dynamic display of transient ground-water simulations and sedimentary process simulations can visualize processes developing through time.

  19. 3-D analysis of grain selection process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arao, Tomoka; Esaka, Hisao; Shinozuka, Kei

    2012-07-01

    It is known that the grain selection plays an important role in the manufacturing process for turbine blades. There are some analytical or numerical models to treat the grain selection. However, the detailed mechanism of grain selection in 3-D is still uncertain. Therefore, an experimental research work using Al-Cu alloy has been carried out in order to understand the grain selection in 3-D.A mold made by Al2O3 was heated to 600 °C ( = liquids temperature of the alloy) and was set on a water-colded copper chill plate. Molten Al-20 wt%Cu alloy was cast into the mold and unidirectional solidified ingot was prepared. The size of ingot was approximately phi25×65H mm. To obtain the thermal history, 4 thermocouples were placed in the mold. It is confirmed that the alloy solidified unidirectionally from bottom to top. Solidified structure on a longitudinal cross section was observed and unidirectional solidification up to 40 mm was ensured. EBSD analysis has been performed on horizontal cross section at an interval of ca.200 μm. These observations were carried out 7-5 mm from the bottom surface. Crystallographic orientation of primary Al phase and size of solidified grains were characterized. A large solidified grain, the crystallographic orientation of which is approximately <101> along heat flow direction, is observed near the lowest cross section. The area of <101> grain decreased as solidification proceeded. On the other hand, it is found that the area of <001> grain increased.

  20. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  2. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  3. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  4. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  5. 3D Geomodeling of the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monod, B.; Dhont, D.; Hervouet, Y.; Backé, G.; Klarica, S.; Choy, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    The crustal structure of the Venezuelan Andes is investigated thanks to a geomodel. The method integrates surface structural data, remote sensing imagery, crustal scale balanced cross-sections, earthquake locations and focal mechanism solutions to reconstruct fault surfaces at the scale of the mountain belt into a 3D environment. The model proves to be essential for understanding the basic processes of both the orogenic float and the tectonic escape involved in the Plio-Quaternary evolution of the orogen. The reconstruction of the Bocono and Valera faults reveals the 3D shape of the Trujillo block whose geometry can be compared to a boat bow floating over a mid-crustal detachment horizon emerging at the Bocono-Valera triple junction. Motion of the Trujillo block is accompanied by a generalized extension in the upper crust accommodated by normal faults with listric geometries such as for the Motatan, Momboy and Tuñame faults. Extension may be related to the lateral spreading of the upper crust, suggesting that gravity forces play an important role in the escape process.

  6. DSI3D - RCS user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Steich, D.; Cook, G.

    1995-08-23

    The DSI3D-RCS code is designed to numerically evaluate radar cross sections on complex objects by solving Maxwell`s curl equations in the time-domain and in three space dimensions. The code has been designed to run on the new parallel processing computers as well as on conventional serial computers. The DSI3D-RCS code is unique for the following reasons: Allows the use of unstructured non-orthogonal grids, allows a variety of cell or element types, reduces to be the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method when orthogonal grids are used, preserves charge or divergence locally (and globally), is conditionally stable, is selectively non-dissipative, and is accurate for non-orthogonal grids. This method is derived using a Discrete Surface Integration (DSI) technique. As formulated, the DSI technique can be used with essentially arbitrary unstructured grids composed of convex polyhedral cells. This implementation of the DSI algorithm allows the use of unstructured grids that are composed of combinations of non-orthogonal the use of unstructured grids that are composed of combinations of non-orthogonal hexahedrons, tetrahedrons, triangular prisms and pyramids. This algorithm reduces to the conventional FDTD method when applied on a structured orthogonal hexahedral grid.

  7. Understanding fiber mixture by simulation in 3D Polarized Light Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Melanie; Menzel, Miriam; Wiese, Hendrik; Reckfort, Julia; Hanke, Frederike; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2015-05-01

    3D Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI) is a neuroimaging technique that has opened up new avenues to study the complex architecture of nerve fibers in postmortem brains. The spatial orientations of the fibers are derived from birefringence measurements of unstained histological brain sections that are interpreted by a voxel-based analysis. This, however, implies that a single fiber orientation vector is obtained for each voxel and reflects the net effect of all comprised fibers. The mixture of various fiber orientations within an individual voxel is a priori not accessible by a standard 3D-PLI measurement. In order to better understand the effects of fiber mixture on the measured 3D-PLI signal and to improve the interpretation of real data, we have developed a simulation method referred to as SimPLI. By means of SimPLI, it is possible to reproduce the entire 3D-PLI analysis starting from synthetic fiber models in user-defined arrangements and ending with measurement-like tissue images. For the simulation, each synthetic fiber is considered as an optical retarder, i.e., multiple fibers within one voxel are described by multiple retarder elements. The investigation of different synthetic crossing fiber arrangements generated with SimPLI demonstrated that the derived fiber orientations are strongly influenced by the relative mixture of crossing fibers. In case of perpendicularly crossing fibers, for example, the derived fiber direction corresponds to the predominant fiber direction. The derived fiber inclination turned out to be not only influenced by myelin density but also systematically overestimated due to signal attenuation. Similar observations were made for synthetic models of optic chiasms of a human and a hooded seal which were opposed to experimental 3D-PLI data sets obtained from the chiasms of both species. Our study showed that SimPLI is a powerful method able to test hypotheses on the underlying fiber structure of brain tissue and, therefore, to improve the

  8. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  9. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  10. America's National Parks 3d (4)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-04-11

    article title:  America's National Parks Viewed in 3D by NASA's MISR (Anaglyph 4)   ... four new anaglyphs that showcase 33 of our nation's national parks, monuments, historical sites and recreation areas in glorious 3D.   ...

  11. America's National Parks 3d (3)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-30

    article title:  America's National Parks Viewed in 3D by NASA's MISR (Anaglyph 3)   ... four new anaglyphs that showcase 33 of our nation's national parks, monuments, historical sites and recreation areas in glorious 3D.   ...

  12. America's National Parks 3d (2)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-30

    article title:  America's National Parks Viewed in 3D by NASA's MISR (Anaglyph 2)   ... four new anaglyphs that showcase 33 of our nation's national parks, monuments, historical sites and recreation areas in glorious 3D.   ...

  13. America's National Parks 3d (1)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-30

    article title:  America's National Parks Viewed in 3D by NASA's MISR (Anaglyph 1)   ... four new anaglyphs that showcase 33 of our nation's national parks, monuments, historical sites and recreation areas in glorious 3D.   ...

  14. 3D ultrasound in fetal spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Gloning, K-P; Minderer, S; Tutschek, B

    2008-12-01

    3D ultrasound can be used to study the fetal spine, but skeletal mode can be inconclusive for the diagnosis of fetal spina bifida. We illustrate a diagnostic approach using 2D and 3D ultrasound and indicate possible pitfalls.

  15. An interactive multiview 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Zhang, Mei; Dong, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The progresses in 3D display systems and user interaction technologies will help more effective 3D visualization of 3D information. They yield a realistic representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them. In this paper, we describe an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system with capability of real-time user interaction. Design principle of this autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system is presented, together with the details of its hardware/software architecture. A prototype is built and tested based upon multi-projectors and horizontal optical anisotropic display structure. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of this novel 3D display and user interaction system.

  16. [3D emulation of epicardium dynamic mapping].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Yang, Cui-Wei; Fang, Zu-Xiang

    2005-03-01

    In order to realize epicardium dynamic mapping of the whole atria, 3-D graphics are drawn with OpenGL. Some source codes are introduced in the paper to explain how to produce, read, and manipulate 3-D model data.

  17. Lattice radial quantization: 3D Ising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, R. C.; Fleming, G. T.; Neuberger, H.

    2013-04-01

    Lattice radial quantization is introduced as a nonperturbative method intended to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories that can be realized as fixed points of known Lagrangians. As an example, we employ a lattice shaped as a cylinder with a 2D Icosahedral cross-section to discretize dilatations in the 3D Ising model. Using the integer spacing of the anomalous dimensions of the first two descendants (l = 1, 2), we obtain an estimate for η = 0.034 (10). We also observed small deviations from integer spacing for the 3rd descendant, which suggests that a further improvement of our radial lattice action will be required to guarantee conformal symmetry at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum limit.

  18. Dynamics of 3D isolated thermal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, N. R.; Easy, L.; Militello, F.; Omotani, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations have been carried out to establish how electron thermal physics, introduced in the form of a dynamic electron temperature, affects isolated filament motion and dynamics in 3D. It is found that thermal effects impact filament motion in two major ways when the pressure perturbation within the filament is supported primarily through a temperature increase as opposed to density: they lead to a strong increase in filament propagation in the bi-normal direction and a significant decrease in net radial propagation. Both effects arise from the temperature dependence of the sheath current which leads to a non-uniform floating potential, with the latter effect supplemented by faster pressure loss. The reduction in radial velocity can only occur when the filament cross-section loses angular symmetry. The behaviour is observed across different filament sizes and suggests that filaments with much larger temperature perturbations than density perturbations are more strongly confined to the near SOL region.

  19. 3-D Extensions for Trustworthy Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    modifications to the floor planning stage of the 3-D design flow that are necessary to support our design approach. We strongly recommend that the 3-D EDA ...and we outline problems, challenges, attacks, solutions, and topics for future research. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Requirements for automated 3-D IC design tools for the physical layout of components. Since fully automated Electronic Design Automation ( EDA ) for 3-D

  20. True 3d Images and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; wang@hzgeospace., zheng.

    2012-07-01

    A true 3D image is a geo-referenced image. Besides having its radiometric information, it also has true 3Dground coordinates XYZ for every pixels of it. For a true 3D image, especially a true 3D oblique image, it has true 3D coordinates not only for building roofs and/or open grounds, but also for all other visible objects on the ground, such as visible building walls/windows and even trees. The true 3D image breaks the 2D barrier of the traditional orthophotos by introducing the third dimension (elevation) into the image. From a true 3D image, for example, people will not only be able to read a building's location (XY), but also its height (Z). true 3D images will fundamentally change, if not revolutionize, the way people display, look, extract, use, and represent the geospatial information from imagery. In many areas, true 3D images can make profound impacts on the ways of how geospatial information is represented, how true 3D ground modeling is performed, and how the real world scenes are presented. This paper first gives a definition and description of a true 3D image and followed by a brief review of what key advancements of geospatial technologies have made the creation of true 3D images possible. Next, the paper introduces what a true 3D image is made of. Then, the paper discusses some possible contributions and impacts the true 3D images can make to geospatial information fields. At the end, the paper presents a list of the benefits of having and using true 3D images and the applications of true 3D images in a couple of 3D city modeling projects.

  1. Microfabricating 3D Structures by Laser Origami

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-09

    10.1117/2.1201111.003952 Microfabricating 3D structures by laser origami Alberto Piqué, Scott Mathews, Andrew Birnbaum, and Nicholas Charipar A new...folding known as origami allows the transformation of flat patterns into 3D shapes. A similar approach can be used to generate 3D structures com...materials Figure 1. (A–C) Schematic illustrating the steps in the laser origami process and (D) a resulting folded out-of-plane 3D structure. that can

  2. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  3. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  4. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  5. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  6. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  7. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  8. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  9. Beowulf 3D: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Rob

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the creative and technical challenges encountered during the production of "Beowulf 3D," director Robert Zemeckis' adaptation of the Old English epic poem and the first film to be simultaneously released in IMAX 3D and digital 3D formats.

  10. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  11. 3D Stratigraphic Modeling of Central Aachen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, M.; Neukum, C.; Azzam, R.; Hu, H.

    2010-05-01

    Since 1980s, advanced computer hardware and software technologies, as well as multidisciplinary research have provided possibilities to develop advanced three dimensional (3D) simulation software for geosciences application. Some countries, such as USA1) and Canada2) 3), have built up regional 3D geological models based on archival geological data. Such models have played huge roles in engineering geology2), hydrogeology2) 3), geothermal industry1) and so on. In cooperating with the Municipality of Aachen, the Department of Engineering Geology of RWTH Aachen University have built up a computer-based 3D stratigraphic model of 50 meter' depth for the center of Aachen, which is a 5 km by 7 km geologically complex area. The uncorrelated data from multi-resources, discontinuous nature and unconformable connection of the units are main challenges for geological modeling in this area. The reliability of 3D geological models largely depends on the quality and quantity of data. Existing 1D and 2D geological data were collected, including 1) approximately 6970 borehole data of different depth compiled in Microsoft Access database and MapInfo database; 2) a Digital Elevation Model (DEM); 3) geological cross sections; and 4) stratigraphic maps in 1m, 2m and 5m depth. Since acquired data are of variable origins, they were managed step by step. The main processes are described below: 1) Typing errors of borehole data were identified and the corrected data were exported to Variowin2.2 to distinguish duplicate points; 2) The surface elevation of borehole data was compared to the DEM, and differences larger than 3m were eliminated. Moreover, where elevation data missed, it was read from the DEM; 3) Considerable data were collected from municipal constructions, such as residential buildings, factories, and roads. Therefore, many boreholes are spatially clustered, and only one or two representative points were picked out in such areas; After above procedures, 5839 boreholes with -x

  12. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  13. Building the 3-D jugsaw puzzle: Applications of sequence stratigraphy to 3-D reservoir characterization, Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, S.W.

    1996-04-01

    Reservoir characterization involves the quantification, integration, reduction, and analysis of geological, petrophysical, seismic, and engineering data. This is no small task. A principal goal of reservoir characterization is to derive a spatial understanding of interwell heterogeneity. Traditionally, geologic attempts to characterize interwell heterogeneity have been done using hand-drawn or computer-generated two-dimensional (2-D) maps and cross sections. Results can be improved dramatically using three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation and analysis techniques. Three-dimensional reservoir characterization requires the same input data used in 2-D approaches, and the cost is equal to, and commonly lower than, traditional 2-D methods. The product of 3-D reservoir characterization is a 3-D reservoir model. The language used to communicate the results of a 3-D reservoir model is visualization; i.e., visual images of numerical data. All of the available log and core data in a model area are incorporated in a 3-D model, but the data are depicted as colored cells rather than as log traces. The integrity of the 3-D reservoir model is largely a function of the stratigraphic framework. Interpreting the correct stratigraphic framework for a subsurface reservoir is the most difficult and creative part of the 3-D modeling process. Sequence and seismic stratigraphic interpretation provide the best stratigraphic framework for 3-D reservoir modeling. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the pro- cess of 3-D deterministic reservoir modeling and to illustrate the advantages of using a sequence stratigraphic framework in 3-D modeling. Mixed carbonate and siliciclastic sediment outcrop and subsurface examples from the Permian basin of west Texas and New Mexico will be used as examples, but the concepts and techniques can be applied to reservoirs of any age.

  14. Mapping the nasal airways: using histology to enhance CT-based three-dimensional reconstruction in Nycticebus.

    PubMed

    Deleon, Valerie Burke; Smith, Timothy D

    2014-11-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions of imaging data are an increasingly common approach for studying anatomical structure. However, certain aspects of anatomy, including microscopic structure and differentiating tissue types, continue to benefit from traditional histological analyses. We present here a detailed methodology for combining data from microCT and histological imaging to create 3D virtual reconstructions for visualization and further analyses. We used this approach to study the distribution of olfactory mucosa on ethmoturbinal I of an adult pygmy slow loris, Nycticebus pygmaeus. MicroCT imaging of the specimen was followed by processing, embedding, and sectioning for histological analysis. We identified corresponding features in the CT and histological data, and used these to reconstruct the plane of section in the CT volume. The CT volume was then digitally re-sliced, such that orthogonal sections of the CT image corresponded to histological sections. Histological images were annotated for the features of interest (in this case, the contour of soft tissue on ethmoturbinal I and the extent of olfactory mucosa), and annotations were transferred to binary masks in the CT volume. These masks were combined with density-based surface reconstructions of the skull to create an enhanced 3D virtual reconstruction, in which the bony surfaces are coded for mucosal function. We identified a series of issues that may be raised in this approach, for example, deformation related to histological processing, and we make recommendations for addressing these issues. This method provides an evidence-based approach to 3D visualization and analysis of microscopic features in an anatomic context. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. 3D-spectral CDIs: a fast alternative to 3D inversion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macnae, James

    2015-09-01

    Virtually all airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data is interpreted using stitched 1D conductivity sections, derived from constrained inversion or fast but fairly accurate approximations. A small subset of this AEM data recently has been inverted using either block 3D models or thin plates, which processes have limitations in terms of cost and accuracy, and the results are in general strongly biased by the choice of starting models. Recent developments in spectral modelling have allowed fast 3D approximations of the EM response of both vortex induction and current gathering for simple geological target geometries. Fitting these spectral responses to AEM data should be sufficient to accurately locate current systems within the ground, and the behaviour of these local current systems can in theory approximately define a conductivity structure in 3D. This paper describes the results of initial testing of the algorithm in fitting vortex induction in a small target at the Forrestania test range, Western Australia, using results from a versatile time-domain electromagnetic (VTEM)-Max survey.

  16. Developing 3D SEM in a broad biological context

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, A; Lippens, S; Bartunkova, S; Asselbergh, B; Blanpain, C; Fendrych, M; Goossens, A; Holt, M; Janssens, S; Krols, M; Larsimont, J-C; Mc Guire, C; Nowack, MK; Saelens, X; Schertel, A; Schepens, B; Slezak, M; Timmerman, V; Theunis, C; Van Brempt, R; Visser, Y; GuÉRin, CJ

    2015-01-01

    When electron microscopy (EM) was introduced in the 1930s it gave scientists their first look into the nanoworld of cells. Over the last 80 years EM has vastly increased our understanding of the complex cellular structures that underlie the diverse functions that cells need to maintain life. One drawback that has been difficult to overcome was the inherent lack of volume information, mainly due to the limit on the thickness of sections that could be viewed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). For many years scientists struggled to achieve three-dimensional (3D) EM using serial section reconstructions, TEM tomography, and scanning EM (SEM) techniques such as freeze-fracture. Although each technique yielded some special information, they required a significant amount of time and specialist expertise to obtain even a very small 3D EM dataset. Almost 20 years ago scientists began to exploit SEMs to image blocks of embedded tissues and perform serial sectioning of these tissues inside the SEM chamber. Using first focused ion beams (FIB) and subsequently robotic ultramicrotomes (serial block-face, SBF-SEM) microscopists were able to collect large volumes of 3D EM information at resolutions that could address many important biological questions, and do so in an efficient manner. We present here some examples of 3D EM taken from the many diverse specimens that have been imaged in our core facility. We propose that the next major step forward will be to efficiently correlate functional information obtained using light microscopy (LM) with 3D EM datasets to more completely investigate the important links between cell structures and their functions. Lay Description Life happens in three dimensions. For many years, first light, and then EM struggled to image the smallest parts of cells in 3D. With recent advances in technology and corresponding improvements in computing, scientists can now see the 3D world of the cell at the nanoscale. In this paper we present the

  17. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  18. A multidimensional magnetic resonance histology atlas of the Wistar rat brain.