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Sample records for 3d hybrid kinetic

  1. 3D hybrid wound devices for spatiotemporally controlled release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Koc, Bahattin

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents localized and temporal control of release kinetics over 3-dimensional (3D) hybrid wound devices to improve wound-healing process. Imaging study is performed to extract wound bed geometry in 3D. Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) based surface lofting is applied to generate functionally graded regions. Diffusion-based release kinetics model is developed to predict time-based release of loaded modifiers for functionally graded regions. Multi-chamber single nozzle solid freeform dispensing system is used to fabricate wound devices with controlled dispensing concentration. Spatiotemporal control of biological modifiers thus enables a way to achieve target delivery to improve wound healing. PMID:22672934

  2. Jovian's plasma torus interaction with Europa: 3D hybrid kinetic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Paterson, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    surface of the moon. References [1] Cassidy, T.A., R.E. Johnson, M.A. McGrath, M.C. Wong, J.F. Cooper, The spatial morphology of Europa's near-surface O2 atmosphere, Icarus, 191, 755-764, 2007. [2] Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, J.F. Cooper, M.C. Wong, Surface-bounded atmosphere of Europa, Icarus, 173, 480-498, 2005. [3] Lipatov, A.S. and M.R. Combi, Effects of kinetic processes in shaping Io's global plasma environment: A 3D hybrid model, Icarus, 180, 412-427, 2006. [4] Kabin, K., et al., On Europa's magnetospheric interaction: A MHD simulation of the E4 Flyby, JGR, 104, 19983-19992, 1999. [5] Paterson, W.R. et al., Galileo plasma observations at Europa: Ion energy spectra and moments, JGR, 104, 22779-22791, 1999.

  3. Jovian Plasma Torus Interaction with Europa: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation. First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa-moon-magnetosphere system with respect to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements, (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy etal.,2007;Shematovichetal.,2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyro radius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions).Non-thermal distributions of upstream plasma will be addressed in future work. Photoionization,electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider two models for background plasma:(a) with O(++) ions; (b) with O(++) and S(++) ions. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended cold population (Cassidyetal.,2007). A few first simulations already include an induced magnetic dipole; however, several important effects of induced magnetic fields arising from oceanic shell conductivity will be addressed in later work.

  4. Jovian's plasma torus interaction with Europa. E12 pass: 3D hybrid kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Paterson, W. R.; Hartle, R. E.

    2012-09-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moonmagnetosphere system with respect to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flybymeasurements from Galileo orbital mission and for planning flyby and orbital measurements for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa [1, 2, 3]. The upstream parameters have been chosen from the plasma and magnetic field Galileo E12 observations, [4, 5]. In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along themagnetic field [6]. Photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperature of the background electrons and pickup electrons was also included into the generalized Ohm's law. The background plasma contains heavy (Mi/Qi = 16) and light (Mi/Qi = 1) ions [4]. In our modeling we take into account only O+ ions for magnetospheric plasma. The pickup ions were created from the atmosphere. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population [1]. The moon is modeled in this initial work as a weakly conducting body. The critical point of E12 pass is the extremely high density in upstream plasma, e.g. n0 = 70-571 cm-3 for ions with Mi/Qi ratio equals 16. This density results in to the superAlfvénic flow and it will change the physics of the interaction between Jovianmagnetosphere and Europa. The modeling show the formation of the Mach cone instead of the Alfv'en wing which was observed in hybrid modeling of E4 pass [6]. The modeling shows that the effective size of the

  5. Effects of kinetic processes in shaping Io's global plasma environment: A 3D hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Combi, Michael R.

    2006-02-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral gases in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io. Stationary simulations of this problem have already been done using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and the electrodynamics approaches. One of the major results of recent simplified two-fluid model simulations [Saur, J., Neubauer, F.M., Strobel, D.F., Summers, M.E., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (SMP5), 1-18] was the production of the structure of the double-peak in the magnetic field signature of the I0 flyby. These could not be explained before by standard MHD models. In this paper, we present a hybrid simulation for Io with kinetic ions and fluid electrons. This method employs a fluid description for electrons and neutrals, whereas for ions a particle approach is used. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes and solve self-consistently for electric and magnetic fields. Our model may provide a much more accurate description for the ion dynamics than previous approaches and allows us to account for the realistic anisotropic ion velocity distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations with isotropic temperatures. The first results of such a simulation of the dynamics of ions in Io's environment are discussed in this paper. Comparison with the Galileo I0 flyby results shows that this approach provides an accurate physical basis for the interaction and can therefore naturally reproduce all the observed salient features.

  6. Effects of Kinetic Processes in Shaping Io's Global Plasma Environment: A 3D Hybrid Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Combi, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral gases in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter s corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io. Stationary simulations of this problem have already been done using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and the electrodynamics approaches. One of the major results of recent simplified two-fluid model simulations [Saur, J., Neubauer, F.M., Strobel, D.F., Summers, M.E., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (SMP5), 1-18] was the production of the structure of the double-peak in the magnetic field signature of the Io flyby. These could not be explained before by standard MHD models. In this paper, we present a hybrid simulation for Io with kinetic ions and fluid electrons. This method employs a fluid description for electrons and neutrals, whereas for ions a particle approach is used. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes and solve self-consistently for electric and magnetic fields. Our model may provide a much more accurate description for the ion dynamics than previous approaches and allows us to account for the realistic anisotropic ion velocity distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations with isotropic temperatures. The first results of such a simulation of the dynamics of ions in Io s environment are discussed in this paper. Comparison with the Galileo IO flyby results shows that this approach provides an accurate physical basis for the interaction and can therefore naturally reproduce all the observed salient features.

  7. Effects of Kinetic Processes in Shaping Io's Global Plasma Environment: A 3D Hybrid Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD and the electrodynamics approaches. One of the main significant results from the simplified two-fluid model simulations was a production of the structure of the double-peak in the magnetic field signature of the I0 flyby that could not be explained by standard MHD models. In this paper, we develop a method of kinetic ion simulation. This method employs the fluid description for electrons and neutrals whereas for ions multilevel, drift-kinetic and particle, approaches are used. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. Our model provides much more accurate description for ion dynamics and allows us to take into account the realistic anisotropic ion distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this paper.

  8. Optoplasmonics: hybridization in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, L.; Gervinskas, G.; Žukauskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.; Brasselet, E.; Juodkazis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Femtosecond laser fabrication has been used to make hybrid refractive and di ractive micro-optical elements in photo-polymer SZ2080. For applications in micro- uidics, axicon lenses were fabricated (both single and arrays), for generation of light intensity patterns extending through the entire depth of a typically tens-of-micrometers deep channel. Further hybridisation of an axicon with a plasmonic slot is fabricated and demonstrated nu- merically. Spiralling chiral grooves were inscribed into a 100-nm-thick gold coating sputtered over polymerized micro-axicon lenses, using a focused ion beam. This demonstrates possibility of hybridisation between optical and plasmonic 3D micro-optical elements. Numerical modelling of optical performance by 3D-FDTD method is presented.

  9. 3D electrostatic gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion simulation of lower-hybrid drift instability of Harris current sheet

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2016-07-07

    The eigenmode stability properties of three-dimensional lower-hybrid-drift-instabilities (LHDI) in a Harris current sheet with a small but finite guide magnetic field have been systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model with a realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me. In contrast to the fully kinetic PIC simulation scheme, the fast electron cyclotron motion and plasma oscillations are systematically removed in the GeFi model, and hence one can employ the realistic mi/me. The GeFi simulations are benchmarked against and show excellent agreement with both the fully kinetic PIC simulation and the analytical eigenmode theory. Our studies indicate that, for small wavenumbers, ky, along the current direction, the most unstable eigenmodes are peaked at the location wheremore » $$\\vec{k}$$• $$\\vec{B}$$ =0, consistent with previous analytical and simulation studies. Here, $$\\vec{B}$$ is the equilibrium magnetic field and $$\\vec{k}$$ is the wavevector perpendicular to the nonuniformity direction. As ky increases, however, the most unstable eigenmodes are found to be peaked at $$\\vec{k}$$ •$$\\vec{B}$$ ≠0. Additionally, the simulation results indicate that varying mi/me, the current sheet width, and the guide magnetic field can affect the stability of LHDI. Simulations with the varying mass ratio confirm the lower hybrid frequency and wave number scalings.« less

  10. 3D electrostatic gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion simulation of lower-hybrid drift instability of Harris current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2016-07-01

    The eigenmode stability properties of three-dimensional lower-hybrid-drift-instabilities (LHDI) in a Harris current sheet with a small but finite guide magnetic field have been systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model with a realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me . In contrast to the fully kinetic PIC simulation scheme, the fast electron cyclotron motion and plasma oscillations are systematically removed in the GeFi model, and hence one can employ the realistic mi/me . The GeFi simulations are benchmarked against and show excellent agreement with both the fully kinetic PIC simulation and the analytical eigenmode theory. Our studies indicate that, for small wavenumbers, ky, along the current direction, the most unstable eigenmodes are peaked at the location where k →.B → =0 , consistent with previous analytical and simulation studies. Here, B → is the equilibrium magnetic field and k → is the wavevector perpendicular to the nonuniformity direction. As ky increases, however, the most unstable eigenmodes are found to be peaked at k →.B → ≠0 . In addition, the simulation results indicate that varying mi/me , the current sheet width, and the guide magnetic field can affect the stability of LHDI. Simulations with the varying mass ratio confirm the lower hybrid frequency and wave number scalings.

  11. Global effects of transmitted shock wave propagation through the Earth's inner magnetosphere: First results from 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmaspheric particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that shocks cause strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  12. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive

  13. Dynamics of pickup ion velocity distribution function in Titan's plasma environment (TA encounter): 3D hybrid kinetic modeling and comparison with CAPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a very important role in the plasma dynamics near Titan: mass loading, excitation of the low-frequency waves and the formation of the particle velocity distribution function, e.g. ring/shell-like distributions, etc. The kinetic approach is important for estimation of the collision processes e.g. a charge exchange. The particle velocity distribution function also plays a key role for understanding the observed particle fluxes. In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution function dynamics from 3D hybrid modeling. The modeling is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) ion measurements during the TA flyby. In our model the background ions, all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperatures of the background electrons and pickup electrons were also included into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. We use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components and include a simple ionosphere model with M=28 ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Our modeling shows that interaction between background plasma and pickup ions H+, H2+, CH4+ and N2+ has a more complicated structure than was observed in the T9 flyby and modeling due to the large gyroradius of the background O+ ions [1,2,3,4]. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS TA observations. We also compare our kinetic modeling with other hybrid and MHD modeling of Titan's environment. References [1] Sittler, E.C., et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds

  14. Titan's plasma environment: 3D hybrid kinetic modeling of the TA flyby and comparison with CAPS-ELS and RPWS LP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    In this report we discuss the global plasma environment of the TA flyby from the perspective of 3D hybrid modeling. In our model the background, pickup, and ionospheric ions are considered as particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. Our modeling shows that mass loading of the background plasma (H+, O+) by pickup ions H2+, CH4+ and N2+ differs from the T9 encounter simulations when O+ ions are not introduced into the background plasma. In our hybrid modeling we use Chamberlain profiles for the atmospheric components. We also include a simple ionosphere model with average mass M=28 amu ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. Titan's interior is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention has been paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion density distribution with CAPS-ELS and with RPWS LP observations by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft along the TA trajectory. Our modeling shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of Alfvén wing-like structures.

  15. Effects of H+, He+ ion reflection at the lunar surface and pickup ion dynamics in case of oblique/quasi-parallel magnetic field: 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2013-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. This involves variable upstream magnetic field and solar wind plasma, including energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical to improved interpretation of existing measurements for surface and atmospheric composition from previous missions and planning future missions. Recently, MAP-PAGE-IMA (Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment, and Ion Mass Analyzer) onboard Japanese lunar orbiter SELENE (KAGUYA) detected Moon originating ions at 100 km altitude. Ion species of H+, He++, He+, C+, O+, Na+, K+, and Ar+ were definitively identified. The first portion of our modeling devotes to a study of the H+, H2+, He+, Na+ pickup ion dynamics in cases of flow with a oblique and quasi-parallel magnetic field. In the second series of modeling we also take into account collisions between ions and the surface of the moon and further sputtering of fragments from the surface of the moon. The ion reflection at the lunar surface is also responsible for wave activity in the upstream flow. The solar wind parameters are chosen from ARTEMIS observations. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to estimate correctly the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field. Modeling shows the asymmetric Mach cone, pickup and reflected ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. Our simulation may be also important for the study of the interaction between the solar wind and very weak comets, Mercury and Pluto.

  16. Intermittent dissipation and heating in 3D kinetic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Parashar, T.; Wu, P.; Shay, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of collisionless dissipation has been hotlydebated in recent years, with alternative ideas posed interms of various wave modes, such as kinetic Alfven waves,whistlers, linear Vlasov instabilities, cyclotron resonance,and Landau damping. Here we use large scale, fully kinetic3D simulations of collisionless plasma turbulence which showthe development of turbulence characterized by sheet-likecurrent density structures spanning a range of scales.We present evidence that these structures are sites for heatingand dissipation, and that stronger current structures signifyhigher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J.E, electron and proton temperatures, and PVI of the magnetic field. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma,like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due tocurrent sheet formation, leading to the expectationthat heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmasmay be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previousresults from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequencysolar wind observational data will also be discussed.

  17. Intermittent Dissipation and Heating in 3D Kinetic Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Roytershteyn, V; Karimabadi, H; Parashar, T; Wu, P; Shay, M

    2015-05-01

    High resolution, fully kinetic, three dimensional (3D) simulation of collisionless plasma turbulence shows the development of turbulence characterized by sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales. The nonlinear evolution is initialized with a long wavelength isotropic spectrum of fluctuations having polarizations transverse to an imposed mean magnetic field. We present evidence that these current sheet structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger currents signify higher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J·E, electron, and proton temperatures, and conditional averages of these quantities based on local electric current density. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previous results from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequency solar wind observational data, are discussed. PMID:25978241

  18. Hybrid segmentation framework for 3D medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Metaxas, Dimitri N.

    2003-05-01

    Medical image segmentation is the process that defines the region of interest in the image volume. Classical segmentation methods such as region-based methods and boundary-based methods cannot make full use of the information provided by the image. In this paper we proposed a general hybrid framework for 3D medical image segmentation purposes. In our approach we combine the Gibbs Prior model, and the deformable model. First, Gibbs Prior models are applied onto each slice in a 3D medical image volume and the segmentation results are combined to a 3D binary masks of the object. Then we create a deformable mesh based on this 3D binary mask. The deformable model will be lead to the edge features in the volume with the help of image derived external forces. The deformable model segmentation result can be used to update the parameters for Gibbs Prior models. These methods will then work recursively to reach a global segmentation solution. The hybrid segmentation framework has been applied to images with the objective of lung, heart, colon, jaw, tumor, and brain. The experimental data includes MRI (T1, T2, PD), CT, X-ray, Ultra-Sound images. High quality results are achieved with relatively efficient time cost. We also did validation work using expert manual segmentation as the ground truth. The result shows that the hybrid segmentation may have further clinical use.

  19. A generic 3D kinetic model of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2012-04-01

    Recent experiments show that mRNAs and proteins can be localized both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. To describe such situations, I present a 3D mean-field kinetic model aimed primarily at gene expression in prokaryotic cells, including the formation of mRNA, its translation into protein, and slow diffusion of these species. Under steady-state conditions, the mRNA and protein spatial distribution is described by simple exponential functions. The protein concentration near the gene transcribed into mRNA is shown to depend on the protein and mRNA diffusion coefficients and degradation rate constants.

  20. Towards lysozyme nanotube and 3D hybrid self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Cecile; Handschin, Stephan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-07-01

    We report lysozyme self-assembly into nanotubes, under the effect of hydrolysis at pH 2 and 90 °C. We resolve the final steps of the fibrillation pathway, entailing the closure of multi-stranded helical ribbons into nanotubes, and we provide evidence of β-sheet arrangement within the nanotubes, demonstrating amyloid-like aggregation. Addition of chloroauric acid to the self-assembled structures can lead to generation of either gold single crystal nanoplatelets or gold nanoparticles (when a reducing agent is added) decorating the nanotube and ribbon surfaces. The crystal-based organic-inorganic hybrids further assemble into 3D ``sandwiched'' structures.We report lysozyme self-assembly into nanotubes, under the effect of hydrolysis at pH 2 and 90 °C. We resolve the final steps of the fibrillation pathway, entailing the closure of multi-stranded helical ribbons into nanotubes, and we provide evidence of β-sheet arrangement within the nanotubes, demonstrating amyloid-like aggregation. Addition of chloroauric acid to the self-assembled structures can lead to generation of either gold single crystal nanoplatelets or gold nanoparticles (when a reducing agent is added) decorating the nanotube and ribbon surfaces. The crystal-based organic-inorganic hybrids further assemble into 3D ``sandwiched'' structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, further images and FTIR data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02194g

  1. 3-D Hybrid Simulation of Interaction Between Solar Wind Discontinuity and Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Deng, X.; Wang, X.

    2008-12-01

    Previous simulations and observations indicate that interaction of interplanetary directional tangential discontinuities (TD), across which only the direction of magnetic field changes,with the bow shock may initiate magnetic reconnection as the TD is transmitted into the magnetosheath. We employ a 3-D electromagnetic, hybrid simulation to study such interaction between the TD and the bow shock-magnetosheath-magnetopause system, while the hybrid model treats the ions kinetically via particle-in-cell methods and the electrons as a massless fluid. We present results corresponding to different orientations of the initial IMF, TDs with various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 30 ion skin depths, and polarizations of magnetic field and senses of field rotation across the TD. Our results indicate that the reconnection rate and structure can be influenced by the width and the structure of the TD. The kinetic structure and evolution of FTEs produced by the magnetosheath reconnection, as they propagate to the magnetopause, will be studied.

  2. Kinetic isotope effects of 12CH3D + OH and 13CH3D + OH from 278 to 313 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joelsson, L. M. T.; Schmidt, J. A.; Nilsson, E. J. K.; Blunier, T.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Ono, S.; Johnson, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Methane is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas and plays a central role in the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere. Nonetheless there are significant uncertainties in its source budget. Analysis of the isotopic composition of atmospheric methane, including the doubly substituted species 13CH3D, offers new insight into the methane budget as the sources and sinks have distinct isotopic signatures. The most important sink of atmospheric methane is oxidation by OH in the troposphere, which accounts for around 84 % of all methane removal. Here we present experimentally derived methane + OH kinetic isotope effects and their temperature dependence over the range of 278 to 313 K for CH3D and 13CH3D; the latter is reported here for the first time. We find kCH4/kCH3D = 1.31 ± 0.01 and kCH4/k13CH3D = 1.34 ± 0.03 at room temperature, implying that the methane + OH kinetic isotope effect is multiplicative such that (kCH4/k13CH4)(kCH4/kCH3D) = kCH4/k13CH3D, within the experimental uncertainty, given the literature value of kCH4/k13CH4 = 1.0039 ± 0.0002. In addition, the kinetic isotope effects were characterized using transition state theory with tunneling corrections. Good agreement between the experimental, quantum chemical, and available literature values was obtained. Based on the results we conclude that the OH reaction (the main sink of methane) at steady state can produce an atmospheric clumped isotope signal (Δ(13CH3D) = ln([CH4][13CH3D]/[13CH4][CH3D])) of 0.02 ± 0.02. This implies that the bulk tropospheric Δ(13CH3D) reflects the source signal with relatively small adjustment due to the sink signal (i.e., mainly OH oxidation).

  3. Improved hybrid optimization algorithm for 3D protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    A new improved hybrid optimization algorithm - PGATS algorithm, which is based on toy off-lattice model, is presented for dealing with three-dimensional protein structure prediction problems. The algorithm combines the particle swarm optimization (PSO), genetic algorithm (GA), and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Otherwise, we also take some different improved strategies. The factor of stochastic disturbance is joined in the particle swarm optimization to improve the search ability; the operations of crossover and mutation that are in the genetic algorithm are changed to a kind of random liner method; at last tabu search algorithm is improved by appending a mutation operator. Through the combination of a variety of strategies and algorithms, the protein structure prediction (PSP) in a 3D off-lattice model is achieved. The PSP problem is an NP-hard problem, but the problem can be attributed to a global optimization problem of multi-extremum and multi-parameters. This is the theoretical principle of the hybrid optimization algorithm that is proposed in this paper. The algorithm combines local search and global search, which overcomes the shortcoming of a single algorithm, giving full play to the advantage of each algorithm. In the current universal standard sequences, Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences are certified. Experiments show that the proposed new method outperforms single algorithms on the accuracy of calculating the protein sequence energy value, which is proved to be an effective way to predict the structure of proteins. PMID:25069136

  4. 3D Hybrid Simulation of the Titan's Plasma Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.

    2007-05-01

    Titan plays an important role as a simulation laboratory for multiscale kinetic plasma processes which are key processes in space and laboratory plasmas. A development of multiscale combined numerical methods allows us to use more realistic plasma models at Titan. In this report, we describe a Particle-Ion--Fluid-Ion--Fluid- Electron method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation code (see, e.g. [Lipatov, 2002]). This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The model of atmosphere of Titan was based on a paper by Sittler, Hartle, Vinas et al., [2005]. The background ions H+, O+ and pickup ions H2+, CH4+ and N2+ are described in a kinetic approximation, where the electrons are approximated as a fluid. In this report we study the coupling between background ions and pickup ions on the multiple space scales determined by the ion gyroradiis. The first results of such a simulation of the dynamics of ions near Titan are discussed in this report and compared with recent measurements made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS, [Hartle, Sittler et al., 2006]). E C Sittler Jr., R E Hartle, A F Vinas, R E Johnson, H T Smith and I Mueller-Wodarg, J. Geophys. Res., 110, A09302, 2005. R. E. Hartle, E. C. Sittler, F. M. Neubauer, R. E. Johnson, et al., Planet. Space Sci., 54, 1211, 2006. A S Lipatov, The Hybrid Multiscale Simulation Technology. An Introduction with Application to Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 2002, p.p. 1-403.

  5. Global 3-D Hybrid Simulations of Mars and the Effect of Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, S. H.; Ledvina, S. A.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2001-12-01

    Mars is not protected from the solar wind by a strong intrinsic magnetic field. Further, Mars is a very small planet. These two aspects of Mars mean that the solar wind interaction with the planet is both direct and kinetic in behavior. The large gyroradius of the incoming solar wind and the large gyroradius of the pick up ions make the solar wind interaction with Mars very unique. Over the years the authors using a 3-D kinetic hybrid particle code have studied this planet. Mars Global Surveyor has produced many exciting discoveries. Probably the most significant and unexpected was the presence of the crustal magnetic fields on the surface of the planet. The presence of these strong crustal fields suggests that the solar wind interaction with Mars will be altered. In fact, it suggests that the loss rate of pick up ions and the shape of the Martian magnetosphere will be substantially changed. Results will be presented from our latest 3-D hybrid particle code simulations of Mars where models for the crustal magnetic field have been inserted into the simulations. Particular emphasis will be placed on changes to the magnetic field topology and the change in the rate of pick up ions.

  6. Improving Semantic Updating Method on 3d City Models Using Hybrid Semantic-Geometric 3d Segmentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkawi, K.-H.; Abdul-Rahman, A.

    2013-09-01

    to LoD4. The accuracy and structural complexity of the 3D objects increases with the LoD level where LoD0 is the simplest LoD (2.5D; Digital Terrain Model (DTM) + building or roof print) while LoD4 is the most complex LoD (architectural details with interior structures). Semantic information is one of the main components in CityGML and 3D City Models, and provides important information for any analyses. However, more often than not, the semantic information is not available for the 3D city model due to the unstandardized modelling process. One of the examples is where a building is normally generated as one object (without specific feature layers such as Roof, Ground floor, Level 1, Level 2, Block A, Block B, etc). This research attempts to develop a method to improve the semantic data updating process by segmenting the 3D building into simpler parts which will make it easier for the users to select and update the semantic information. The methodology is implemented for 3D buildings in LoD2 where the buildings are generated without architectural details but with distinct roof structures. This paper also introduces hybrid semantic-geometric 3D segmentation method that deals with hierarchical segmentation of a 3D building based on its semantic value and surface characteristics, fitted by one of the predefined primitives. For future work, the segmentation method will be implemented as part of the change detection module that can detect any changes on the 3D buildings, store and retrieve semantic information of the changed structure, automatically updates the 3D models and visualize the results in a userfriendly graphical user interface (GUI).

  7. 3D hybrid simulations with gyrokinetic particle ions and fluid electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.; Park, W.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The previous hybrid MHD/particle model (MH3D-K code) represented energetic ions as gyrokinetic (or drift-kinetic) particles coupled to MHD equations using the pressure or current coupling scheme. A small energetic to bulk ion density ratio was assumed, n{sub h}/n{sub b} {much_lt} 1, allowing the neglect of the energetic ion perpendicular inertia in the momentum equation and the use of MHD Ohm`s law E = {minus}v{sub b} {times} B. A generalization of this model in which all ions are treated as gyrokinetic/drift-kinetic particles and fluid description is used for the electron dynamics is considered in this paper.

  8. Effects of Na+ and He+ pickup ions on the lunar plasma environment: 3D hybrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2011-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. There is a set of MHD,kinetic, hybrid, drift kinetic, electrostatic and full kinetic modeling of the lunar plasma environment [1]. However, observations show the existence of several species of the neutrals and pickup ions like Na, He, K, O etc., (see e.g., [2,3,4]). The solar wind parameters are chosen from the ARTEMIS observations [5]. The Na+, He+ lunar exosphere's parameters are chosen from [6,7]. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to correctly estimate the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field, and on the lunar surface. Modeling shows the formation of the asymmetric Mach cone, the structuring of the pickup ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. We will compare the results of our modeling with observed distributions. References [1] Lipatov, A.S., and Cooper, J.F., Hybrid kinetic modeling of the Lunar plasma environment: Past, present and future. In: Lunar Dust, Plasma and Atmosphere: The Next Steps, January 27-29, 2010, Boulder, Colorado, Abstracts/lpa2010.colorado.edu/. [2] Potter, A.E., and Morgan, T.H., Discovery of sodium and potassium vapor in the atmosphere of the Moon, Science, 241, 675-680, doi:10.1126/science.241.4866.675, 1988. [3] Tyler, A.L., et al., Observations of sodium in the tenuous lunar atmosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 15(10), 1141-1144, doi:10.1029/GL015i010p01141, 1988. [4] Tanaka, T., et al., First in situ observation of the Moon-originating ions in the Earth's Magnetosphere by MAP-PACE on SELENE (KAGUYA), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L22106, doi:10.1029/2009GL040682, 2009. [5] Wiehle, S., et al., First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations, Planet

  9. 3D kinetic simulations of the global interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, Jorge; Maneva, Yana; Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We performed three dimensional simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere, using the self-consistent fully kinetic code iPic3D. The main objective of our simulations is to link the global interaction phenomena to the local turbulence and reconnection processes in the magnetosphere. Other numerical approaches have been used before to study this problem, including MHD, hybrid and Vlasov codes. However, only particle-in-cell codes offer the possibility to study the kinetic effects of the diffusion regions of the Earth environment that drive the energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. Previous attempts to perform such kinds of simulations were limited to unphysical thermal velocities of the ion and electron species, small simulation boxes or cell sizes that do not capture the local kinetic effects at the magnetopause. Using the implicit moment Particle-in-Cell approach we performed simulations that can capture these small scale effects and, at the same time, allow to study large scale phenomena such as the bow shock and the development of the magnetotail. We expect that these results will be used to maximize the impact of future space missions, such as THOR, MMS and BepiColombo, by improving our understanding of the planetary environment, from the conditions observed in the solar wind to the turbulence and reconnection processes downstream of the bow shock.

  10. 3D magnetospheric parallel hybrid multi-grid method applied to planet-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, L.; Modolo, R.; Leblanc, F.; Hess, S.; Mancini, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method to exploit multiple refinement levels within a 3D parallel hybrid model, developed to study planet-plasma interactions. This model is based on the hybrid formalism: ions are kinetically treated whereas electrons are considered as a inertia-less fluid. Generally, ions are represented by numerical particles whose size equals the volume of the cells. Particles that leave a coarse grid subsequently entering a refined region are split into particles whose volume corresponds to the volume of the refined cells. The number of refined particles created from a coarse particle depends on the grid refinement rate. In order to conserve velocity distribution functions and to avoid calculations of average velocities, particles are not coalesced. Moreover, to ensure the constancy of particles' shape function sizes, the hybrid method is adapted to allow refined particles to move within a coarse region. Another innovation of this approach is the method developed to compute grid moments at interfaces between two refinement levels. Indeed, the hybrid method is adapted to accurately account for the special grid structure at the interfaces, avoiding any overlapping grid considerations. Some fundamental test runs were performed to validate our approach (e.g. quiet plasma flow, Alfven wave propagation). Lastly, we also show a planetary application of the model, simulating the interaction between Jupiter's moon Ganymede and the Jovian plasma.

  11. RETRAN-3D MOD003 Peach Bottom Turbine Trip 2 Multidimensional Kinetics Analysis Models and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Michitsugu; Ogura, Katsunori; Gose, Garry C.; Wu, J.-Y

    2003-04-15

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip Test 2 (PB2/TT2) has been performed using RETRAN-3D MOD003. The purpose of the analysis was to investigate the PB2/TT2 overpressurization transient using the RETRAN-3D multidimensional kinetics model.

  12. Study of Electron Acceleration and Multiple Dipolarization Fronts in 3D kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Walker, Raymond; El-Alaoui, Mostafa

    2014-05-01

    The THEMIS mission encountered a depolarization front (DF) during a magnetotail crossing in the interval 035600 - 035900 UT on February 15, 2008 [1]. We present the results of an innovative investigative approach: we combine a global MHD model of the full Earth environment with a local PIC simulation. The global MHD view is provided on the UCLA model applied to the conditions for the interval of interest on Feb 15, 2008. At the specific time of 034800UT, a reconnection site first appear at about x=-15RE, y=4RE. We then use this specific MHD state as the initial setup for a fully kinetic PIC simulation, performed with the iPic3D code [2]. We consider a one way coupling where the MHD state is used as initial state and boundary conditions for the kinetic study [3]. In the present case, the time span of the kinetic simulation is short form the perspective of the global MHD simulation and does not require a full coupling where the MHD then process the information received back from the kinetic run [4]. The fields and particles are advanced self-consistently from the MHD state using a completely kinetic treatment. Many features missed by the MHD model emerge. Most notably a fast reconnection pattern develops and an unsteady reconnection process develops. The typical signatures of fast kinetic reconnection (Hall field) are observed and particle acceleration is obtained self consistently in the fields generated by the PIC simulation. The focus of the presentation will be the mechanisms of unsteady reconnection leading to multiple DFs. We observe intense wave activity propagating off the separatrices. We conduct a spectral analysis to isolate the different wave components in the lower hybrid and whistler regime. The unsteady reconnection and multiple DFs are also analysed in their impact on the energy transfer. We track the conversion of magnetic energy to particle energy and Poynting flux. The processes observed in the simulation are then compared with in situ THEMIS data

  13. Hybrid 3D printing: a game-changer in personalized cardiac medicine?

    PubMed

    Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Samuel, Bennett P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing in congenital heart disease has the potential to increase procedural efficiency and patient safety by improving interventional and surgical planning and reducing radiation exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are usually the source datasets to derive 3D printing. More recently, 3D echocardiography has been demonstrated to derive 3D-printed models. The integration of multiple imaging modalities for hybrid 3D printing has also been shown to create accurate printed heart models, which may prove to be beneficial for interventional cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and as an educational tool. Further advancements in the integration of different imaging modalities into a single platform for hybrid 3D printing and virtual 3D models will drive the future of personalized cardiac medicine. PMID:26465262

  14. 3D Printed PEG-Based Hybrid Nanocomposites Obtained by Sol-Gel Technique.

    PubMed

    Chiappone, Annalisa; Fantino, Erika; Roppolo, Ignazio; Lorusso, Massimo; Manfredi, Diego; Fino, Paolo; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Calignano, Flaviana

    2016-03-01

    In this work, three-dimensional (3D) structured hybrid materials were fabricated combining 3D printing technology with in situ generation of inorganic nanoparticles by sol-gel technique. Those materials, consisting of silica nanodomains covalently interconnected with organic polymers, were 3D printed in complex multilayered architectures, incorporating liquid silica precursors into a photocurable oligomer in the presence of suitable photoinitiators and exposing them to a digital light system. A post sol-gel treatment in acidic vapors allowed the in situ generation of the inorganic phase in a dedicated step. This method allows to build hybrid structures operating with a full liquid formulation without meeting the drawbacks of incorporating inorganic powders into 3D printable formulations. The influence of the generated silica nanoparticle on the printed objects was deeply investigated at macro- and nanoscale; the resulting light hybrid structures show improved mechanical properties and, thus, have a huge potential for applications in a variety of advanced technologies. PMID:26871993

  15. 3-D Hybrid Kinetic Modeling of the Interaction Between the Solar Wind and Lunar-like Exospheric Pickup Ions in Case of Oblique/ Quasi-Parallel/Parallel Upstream Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Farrell, W. M.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between the solar wind and Moon-sized objects are determined by a set of the solar wind parameters and plasma environment of the space objects. The orientation of upstream magnetic field is one of the key factors which determines the formation and structure of bow shock wave/Mach cone or Alfven wing near the obstacle. The study of effects of the direction of the upstream magnetic field on lunar-like plasma environment is the main subject of our investigation in this paper. Photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our hybrid model. The computational model includes the self-consistent dynamics of the light (hydrogen (+), helium (+)) and heavy (sodium (+)) pickup ions. The lunar interior is considered as a weakly conducting body. Our previous 2013 lunar work, as reported in this journal, found formation of a triple structure of the Mach cone near the Moon in the case of perpendicular upstream magnetic field. Further advances in modeling now reveal the presence of strong wave activity in the upstream solar wind and plasma wake in the cases of quasiparallel and parallel upstream magnetic fields. However, little wave activity is found for the opposite case with a perpendicular upstream magnetic field. The modeling does not show a formation of the Mach cone in the case of theta(Sub B,U) approximately equal to 0 degrees.

  16. Saturn's magnetosphere interaction with Titan for T5 encounter: 3D hybrid modeling. First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a very important role in the plasma dynamics near Titan: mass loading, excitation of low-frequency waves and formation of the particle velocity distribution function (e.g. ring/shell-like distributions, etc.) The kinetic approach is important for estimating collision processes; e.g., charge exchange. In this report we discuss results of 3D hybrid modeling of the interaction between Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's atmosphere/ionosphere. The modeling is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the Cassini Ion, and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements during the T5 flyby through Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere [1,2]. Magnetic field data was used from the MAG instrument [3]. In our model the background ions (O+, H+), all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization (in the dayside ionosphere), electron-impact ionization, and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperature of the background electrons and pickup electrons was also incorporated into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account collisions between ions and neutrals. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention will be paid to comparing the modeling results with a single-fluid multi-species 3D MHD model [4], which included complex chemistry but does not produce finite gyroradius and kinetic effects. References [1] Sittler, E.C., et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton, J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds., Springer, (Dordrecht, Heidelberg, London, New York), pp. 393-455. [2] Agren, K., et al., On magnetosphere electron impact ionization and dynamics in Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere -- a Cassini case study, Ann

  17. Effects of 3-D microwell culture on growth kinetics and metabolism of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Larson, Elise A.; Almodóvar-Cruz, Janice M; de Pablo, Juan J.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold potential in the field of tissue engineering given their capacity for both limitless self-renewal and differentiation to any adult cell type. However, several limitations, including the ability to expand undifferentiated cells and efficiently direct differentiation at scales needed for commercial cell production, prevent realizing the potential of hESCs in tissue engineering. Numerous studies have illustrated that 3-D culture systems provide microenvironmental cues that affect hESC pluripotency and differentiation fates, but little is known about how 3-D culture affects cell expansion. Here we have used a 3-D microwell array to model the differences in hESC growth kinetics and metabolism in 2-D vs. 3-D cultures. Our results demonstrated that 3-D microwell culture reduced hESC size and proliferative capacity, and impacted cell cycle dynamics, lengthening the G1 phase and shortening the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. However, glucose and lactate metabolism were similar in 2-D and 3-D cultures. Elucidating the effects of 3-D culture on growth and metabolism of hESCs may facilitate efforts for developing integrated, scalable cell expansion and differentiation processes with these cells. PMID:23586789

  18. Mobile 3D quality of experience evaluation: a hybrid data collection and analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utriainen, Timo; Häyrynen, Jyrki; Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Boev, Atanas; Gotchev, Atanas; Hannuksela, Miska M.

    2011-02-01

    The paper presents a hybrid approach to study the user's experienced quality of 3D visual content on mobile autostereoscopic displays. It combines extensive subjective tests with collection and objective analysis of eye-tracked data. 3D cues which are significant for mobiles are simulated in the generated 3D test content. The methodology for conducting subjective quality evaluation includes hybrid data-collection of quantitative quality preferences, qualitative impressions, and binocular eye-tracking. We present early results of the subjective tests along with eye movement reaction times, areas of interest and heatmaps obtained from raw eye-tracked data after statistical analysis. The study contributes to the question what is important to be visualized on portable auto-stereoscopic displays and how to maintain and visually enhance the quality of 3D content for such displays.

  19. A hybrid-3D hillslope hydrological model for use in Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Fang, Y.; Broxton, P.; Gochis, D.; Niu, G.-Y.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A.; Zeng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Hillslope-scale rainfall-runoff processes leading to a fast catchment response are not explicitly included in land surface models (LSMs) for use in earth system models (ESMs) due to computational constraints. This study presents a hybrid-3D hillslope hydrological model (h3D) that couples a 1-D vertical soil column model with a lateral pseudo-2D saturated zone and overland flow model for use in ESMs. By representing vertical and lateral responses separately at different spatial resolutions, h3D is computationally efficient. The h3D model was first tested for three different hillslope planforms (uniform, convergent and divergent). We then compared h3D (with single and multiple soil columns) with a complex physically based 3-D model and a simple 1-D soil moisture model coupled with an unconfined aquifer (as typically used in LSMs). It is found that simulations obtained by the simple 1-D model vary considerably from the complex 3-D model and are not able to represent hillslope-scale variations in the lateral flow response. In contrast, the single soil column h3D model shows a much better performance and saves computational time by 2-3 orders of magnitude compared with the complex 3-D model. When multiple vertical soil columns are implemented, the resulting hydrological responses (soil moisture, water table depth, and base flow along the hillslope) from h3D are nearly identical to those predicted by the complex 3-D model, but still saves computational time. As such, the computational efficiency of the h3D model provides a valuable and promising approach to incorporating hillslope-scale hydrological processes into continental and global-scale ESMs.

  20. A Computationally-Efficient Kinetic Approach for Gas/Particle Mass Transfer Treatments: Development, Testing, and 3-D Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast/Chemistry Model (WRF/Chem) that simulates chemistry simultaneously with meteorology has recently been developed for real-time forecasting by the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). As one of the six air quality models, WRF/Chem with a modal aerosol module has been applied for ozone and PM2.5 ensemble forecasts over eastern North America as part of the 2004 New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS) program (NEAQS-2004). Significant differences exist in the partitioning of volatile species (e.g., ammonium and nitrate) simulated by the six models. Model biases are partially attributed to the equilibrium assumption used in the gas/particles mass transfer approach in some models. Development of a more accurate, yet computationally- efficient gas/particle mass transfer approach for three-dimensional (3-D) applications, in particular, real-time forecasting, is therefore warranted. Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution (MADRID) has been implemented into WRF/Chem (referred to as WRF/Chem-MADRID). WRF/Chem-MADRID offers three gas/particle partitioning treatments: equilibrium, kinetic, and hybrid approaches. The equilibrium approach is computationally-efficient and commonly used in 3-D air quality models but less accurate under certain conditions (e.g., in the presence of coarse, reactive particles such as PM containing sea-salts in the coastal areas). The kinetic approach is accurate but computationally-expensive, limiting its 3-D applications. The hybrid approach attempts to provide a compromise between merits and drawbacks of the two approaches by treating fine PM (typically < ~ 1 μm) with the equilibrium approach and coarse PM with the kinetic approach. A computationally-efficient kinetic gas/particle mass transfer approach in MADRID has recently been developed for 3-D applications based on an Analytical Predictor of Condensation (referred

  1. 3D graphene-based hybrid materials: synthesis and applications in energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiurong; Cha, Younghwan; Song, Yang; Lee, Jung-In; Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, Xiaoyu; Song, Min-Kyu; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-08-25

    Porous 3D graphene-based hybrid materials (3D GBHMs) are currently attractive nanomaterials employed in the field of energy. Heteroatom-doped 3D graphene and metal, metal oxide, and polymer-decorated 3D graphene with modified electronic and atomic structures provide promising performance as electrode materials in energy storage and conversion. Numerous synthesis methods such as self-assembly, templating, electrochemical deposition, and supercritical CO2, pave the way to mass production of 3D GBHMs in the commercialization of energy devices. This review summarizes recent advances in the fabrication of 3D GBHMs with well-defined architectures such as finely controlled pore sizes, heteroatom doping types and levels. Moreover, current progress toward applications in fuel cells, supercapacitors and batteries employing 3D GBHMs is also highlighted, along with the detailed mechanisms of the enhanced electrochemical performance. Furthermore, current critical issues, challenges and future prospects with respect to applications of 3D GBHMs in practical devices are discussed at the end of this review. PMID:27531643

  2. Applications of three-dimensional (3D) printing for microswimmers and bio-hybrid robotics.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Trichet-Paredes, C; Sánchez, S

    2015-04-01

    This article will focus on recent reports that have applied three-dimensional (3D) printing for designing millimeter to micrometer architecture for robotic motility. The utilization of 3D printing has rapidly grown in applications for medical prosthetics and scaffolds for organs and tissue, but more recently has been implemented for designing mobile robotics. With an increase in the demand for devices to perform in fragile and confined biological environments, it is crucial to develop new miniaturized, biocompatible 3D systems. Fabrication of materials at different scales with different properties makes 3D printing an ideal system for creating frameworks for small-scale robotics. 3D printing has been applied for the design of externally powered, artificial microswimmers and studying their locomotive capabilities in different fluids. Printed materials have also been incorporated with motile cells for bio-hybrid robots capable of functioning by cell contraction and swimming. These 3D devices offer new methods of robotic motility for biomedical applications requiring miniature structures. Traditional 3D printing methods, where a structure is fabricated in an additive process from a digital design, and non-traditional 3D printing methods, such as lithography and molding, will be discussed. PMID:25632887

  3. Measuring a hidden coordinate: Rate-exchange kinetics from 3D correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Darvin, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Nonexponential kinetics imply the existence of at least one slow variable other than the observable, that is, the system has a "hidden" coordinate. We develop a simple, but general, model that allows multidimensional correlation functions to be calculated for these systems. Homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms are both included, and slow exchange of the rates is allowed. This model shows that 2D and 3D correlation functions of the observable measure the distribution and kinetics of the hidden coordinate controlling the rate exchange. Both the mean exchange time and the shape of the exchange relaxation are measurable. However, complications arise because higher correlation functions are sums of multiple "pathways," each of which measures different dynamics. Only one 3D pathway involves exchange dynamics. Care must be used to extract exchange dynamics without contamination from other processes.

  4. Kinetic turbulence in 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio; Kilian, Patrick; Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The features of kinetic plasma turbulence developed during non-relativistic 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection are still not fully understood. This is specially true under the influence of a strong magnetic guide field, a scenario common in space plasmas such as in the solar corona and also in laboratory experiments such as MRX or VINETA II. Therefore, we study the mechanisms and micro-instabilities leading to the development of turbulence during 3D magnetic reconnection with a fully kinetic PIC code, emphasizing the role of the guide field with an initial setup suitable for the aforementioned environments. We also clarify the relations between these processes and the generation of non-thermal populations and particle acceleration.

  5. A hybrid approach for addressing ring flexibility in 3D database searching.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, J

    1997-01-01

    A hybrid approach for flexible 3D database searching is presented that addresses the problem of ring flexibility. It combines the explicit storage of up to 25 multiple conformations of rings, with up to eight atoms, generated by the 3D structure generator CORINA with the power of a torsional fitting technique implemented in the 3D database system UNITY. A comparison with the original UNITY approach, using a database with about 130,000 entries and five different pharmacophore queries, was performed. The hybrid approach scored, on an average, 10-20% more hits than the reference run. Moreover, specific problems with unrealistic hit geometries produced by the original approach can be excluded. In addition, the influence of the maximum number of ring conformations per molecule was investigated. An optimal number of 10 conformations per molecule is recommended. PMID:9139112

  6. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  7. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  8. Enhanced hybrid search algorithm for protein structure prediction using the 3D-HP lattice model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Xiaopeng

    2013-09-01

    The problem of protein structure prediction in the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model is the prediction of protein tertiary structure. This problem is usually referred to as the protein folding problem. This paper presents a method for the application of an enhanced hybrid search algorithm to the problem of protein folding prediction, using the three dimensional (3D) HP lattice model. The enhanced hybrid search algorithm is a combination of the particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Since the PSO algorithm entraps local minimum in later evolution extremely easily, we combined PSO with the TS algorithm, which has properties of global optimization. Since the technologies of crossover and mutation are applied many times to PSO and TS algorithms, so enhanced hybrid search algorithm is called the MCMPSO-TS (multiple crossover and mutation PSO-TS) algorithm. Experimental results show that the MCMPSO-TS algorithm can find the best solutions so far for the listed benchmarks, which will help comparison with any future paper approach. Moreover, real protein sequences and Fibonacci sequences are verified in the 3D HP lattice model for the first time. Compared with the previous evolutionary algorithms, the new hybrid search algorithm is novel, and can be used effectively to predict 3D protein folding structure. With continuous development and changes in amino acids sequences, the new algorithm will also make a contribution to the study of new protein sequences. PMID:23824509

  9. Development of discrete gas kinetic scheme for simulation of 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The sphere function-based gas kinetic scheme (GKS), which was presented by Shu and his coworkers [23] for simulation of inviscid compressible flows, is extended to simulate 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows in this work. Firstly, we use certain discrete points to represent the spherical surface in the phase velocity space. Then, integrals along the spherical surface for conservation forms of moments, which are needed to recover 3D Navier-Stokes equations, are approximated by integral quadrature. The basic requirement is that these conservation forms of moments can be exactly satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. It was found that the integral quadrature by eight discrete points on the spherical surface, which forms the D3Q8 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integral. In this way, the conservative variables and numerical fluxes can be computed by weighted summation of distribution functions at eight discrete points. That is, the application of complicated formulations resultant from integrals can be replaced by a simple solution process. Several numerical examples including laminar flat plate boundary layer, 3D lid-driven cavity flow, steady flow through a 90° bending square duct, transonic flow around DPW-W1 wing and supersonic flow around NACA0012 airfoil are chosen to validate the proposed scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the present scheme can provide reasonable numerical results for 3D viscous flows.

  10. 3D Kinetic Simulations of Topography-Induced Electric Fields at Itokawa Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Results from a new 3D kinetic simulation code will be presented, showing how Itokawa's interaction with the solar wind plasma creates an ever-evolving electric field structure as the asteroid rotates. The simulations combine (1) a realistic surface shape model of Itokawa, (2) a careful and self-consistent accounting of surface charging processes, and (3) the freely-available FMMLib3d code library implementing the fast multipole method for electric field calculations. Fine details of the surface potential and electric grounding conditions, as revealed by this new code, could provide critical inputs into planning for a future asteroid retrieval mission in which extended, direct contact with the asteroid could occur.

  11. Testing the hybrid-3D Hillslope Hydrological Model in a Real-World Controlled Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Broxton, P. D.; Gochis, D. J.; Niu, G. Y.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A. A.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    Hillslopes play an important role for converting rainfall into runoff, and as such, influence theterrestrial dynamics of the Earth's climate system. Recently, we have developed a hybrid-3D (h3D) hillslope hydrological model that couples a 1D vertical soil column model with a lateral pseudo-2D saturated zone and overland flow model. The h3D model gives similar results as the CATchment HYdrological model (CATHY), which simulates the subsurface movement of water with the 3D Richards equation, though the runtime efficiency of the h3D model is about 2-3 orders of magnitude faster. In the current work, the ability of the h3D model to predict real-world hydrological dynamics is assessed using a number of recharge-drainage experiments within the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at the Biosphere 2 near Tucson, Arizona, USA. LEO offers accurate and high-resolution (both temporally and spatially) observations of the inputs, outputs and storage dynamics of several hillslopes. The level of detail of these observations is generally not possible with real-world hillslope studies. Therefore, LEO offers an optimal environment to test the h3D model. The h3D model captures the observed storage, baseflow, and overland flow dynamics of both a larger and a smaller hillslope. Furthermore, it simulates overland flow better than CATHY. The h3D model has difficulties correctly representing the height of the saturated zone close to the seepage face of the smaller hillslope, though. There is a gravel layer near this seepage face, and the numerical boundary condition of the h3D model is insufficient to capture the hydrological dynamics within this region. In addition, the h3D model is used to test the hypothesis that model parameters change through time due to the migration of soil particles during the recharge-drainage experiments. An in depth calibration of the h3D model parameters reveals that the best results are obtained by applying an event-based optimization procedure as compared

  12. Nanoscale Analysis of a Hierarchical Hybrid Solar Cell in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Divitini, Giorgio; Stenzel, Ole; Ghadirzadeh, Ali; Guarnera, Simone; Russo, Valeria; Casari, Carlo S; Bassi, Andrea Li; Petrozza, Annamaria; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Schmidt, Volker; Ducati, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative method for the characterization of nanoscale 3D morphology is applied to the investigation of a hybrid solar cell based on a novel hierarchical nanostructured photoanode. A cross section of the solar cell device is prepared by focused ion beam milling in a micropillar geometry, which allows a detailed 3D reconstruction of the titania photoanode by electron tomography. It is found that the hierarchical titania nanostructure facilitates polymer infiltration, thus favoring intermixing of the two semiconducting phases, essential for charge separation. The 3D nanoparticle network is analyzed with tools from stochastic geometry to extract information related to the charge transport in the hierarchical solar cell. In particular, the experimental dataset allows direct visualization of the percolation pathways that contribute to the photocurrent. PMID:25834481

  13. Interactive and Stereoscopic Hybrid 3D Viewer of Radar Data with Gesture Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goenetxea, Jon; Moreno, Aitor; Unzueta, Luis; Galdós, Andoni; Segura, Álvaro

    This work presents an interactive and stereoscopic 3D viewer of weather information coming from a Doppler radar. The hybrid system shows a GIS model of the regional zone where the radar is located and the corresponding reconstructed 3D volume weather data. To enhance the immersiveness of the navigation, stereoscopic visualization has been added to the viewer, using a polarized glasses based system. The user can interact with the 3D virtual world using a Nintendo Wiimote for navigating through it and a Nintendo Wii Nunchuk for giving commands by means of hand gestures. We also present a dynamic gesture recognition procedure that measures the temporal advance of the performed gesture postures. Experimental results show how dynamic gestures are effectively recognized so that a more natural interaction and immersive navigation in the virtual world is achieved.

  14. Study of hybrid driven micromirrors for 3-D variable optical attenuator applications.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kah How; Soon, Bo Woon; Tsai, Julius Minglin; Danner, Aaron J; Lee, Chengkuo

    2012-09-10

    Aluminium-coated micromirrors driven by electrothermal and electromagnetic actuations have been demonstrated for 3-D variable optical attenuation applications. Three types of attenuation schemes based on electrothermal, electromagnetic and hybrid, i.e. combination of electrothermal and electromagnetic, actuations have been developed. In addition, two different designs have been fabricated and characterized to investigate the effects of the variations made to both the actuators on the optical attenuation performances of the micromirror. Our unique design of using both ET and EM actuators simultaneously to achieve attenuation is the first demonstration of such hybrid driven CMOS compatible MEMS VOA device. PMID:23037278

  15. Development of hybrid 3-D hydrological modeling for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xubin; Troch, Peter; Pelletier, Jon; Niu, Guo-Yue; Gochis, David

    2015-11-15

    This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM).

  16. Fabrication of 3D high aspect ratio PDMS microfluidic networks with a hybrid stamp.

    PubMed

    Kung, Yu-Chun; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Fan, Yu-Jui; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2015-04-21

    We report a novel methodology for fabricating large-area, multilayer, thin-film, high aspect ratio, 3D microfluidic structures with through-layer vias and open channels that can be bonded between hard substrates. It is realized by utilizing a hybrid stamp with a thin plastic sheet embedded underneath a PDMS surface. This hybrid stamp solves an important edge protrusion issue during PDMS molding while maintaining necessary stamp elasticity to ensure the removal of PDMS residues at through-layer regions. Removing edge protrusion is a significant progress toward fabricating 3D structures since high aspect ratio PDMS structures with flat interfaces can be realized to facilitate multilayer stacking and bonding to hard substrates. Our method also allows for the fabrication of 3D deformable channels, which can lead to profound applications in electrokinetics, optofluidics, inertial microfluidics, and other fields where the shape of the channel cross section plays a key role in device physics. To demonstrate, as an example, we have fabricated a microfluidic channel by sandwiching two 20 μm wide, 80 μm tall PDMS membranes between two featureless ITO glass substrates. By applying electrical bias to the two ITO substrates and pressure to deform the thin membrane sidewalls, strong electric field enhancement can be generated in the center of a channel to enable 3D sheathless dielectrophoretic focusing of biological objects including mammalian cells and bacteria at a flow speed up to 14 cm s(-1). PMID:25710255

  17. Bioactive polymeric-ceramic hybrid 3D scaffold for application in bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Torres, A L; Gaspar, V M; Serra, I R; Diogo, G S; Fradique, R; Silva, A P; Correia, I J

    2013-10-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains a challenging scenario from a therapeutic point of view. In fact, the currently available bone substitutes are often limited by poor tissue integration and severe host inflammatory responses, which eventually lead to surgical removal. In an attempt to address these issues, herein we evaluated the importance of alginate incorporation in the production of improved and tunable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds to be used as temporary templates for bone regeneration. Different bioceramic combinations were tested in order to investigate optimal scaffold architectures. Additionally, 3D β-TCP/HA vacuum-coated with alginate, presented improved compressive strength, fracture toughness and Young's modulus, to values similar to those of native bone. The hybrid 3D polymeric-bioceramic scaffolds also supported osteoblast adhesion, maturation and proliferation, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that a 3D scaffold produced with this combination of biomaterials is described. Altogether, our results emphasize that this hybrid scaffold presents promising characteristics for its future application in bone regeneration. PMID:23910366

  18. Thermal analysis of 3D composites by a new fast multipole hybrid boundary node method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Zhu, Hongping; Li, Yinping

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies the hybrid boundary node method (Hybrid BNM) for the thermal analysis of 3D composites. A new formulation is derived for the inclusion-based composites. In the new formulation, the unknowns of the interfaces are assembled only once in the final system equation, which can reduce nearly one half of degrees of freedom (DOFs) compared with the conventional multi-domain solver when there are lots of inclusions. A new version of the fast multipole method (FMM) is also coupled with the new formulation and the technique is applied to thermal analysis of composites with many inclusions. In the new fast multipole hybrid boundary node method (FM-HBNM), a diagonal form for translation operators is used and the method presented can be applied to the computation of more than 1,000,000 DOFs on a personal computer. Numerical examples are presented to analyze the thermal behavior of composites with many inclusions.

  19. Hybrid C-nanotubes/Si 3D nanostructures by one-step growth in a dual-plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Francesco; Orlanducci, Silvia; Guglielmotti, Valeria; Cianchetta, Ilaria; Magni, Corrado; Terranova, Maria Letizia; Pasquali, Matteo; Tamburri, Emanuela; Matassa, Roberto; Rossi, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Hybrid nanostructures consisting of Si polycrystalline nanocones, with an anemone-like termination coated with C-nanotubes bundles, have been generated on a (1 0 0) Si substrate in a dual mode microwave/radio-frequency plasma reactor. The substrate is both heated and bombarded by energetic H ions during the synthesis process. The nanocones growth is explained considering pull of the growing Si nanocrystalline phase along the lines of the electrical field, likely via a molten/recrystallization mechanism. The one-step building of the achieved complex 3D architectures is described in terms of dynamic competition between Si and C nanotubes growth under the peculiar conditions of kinetically driven processes.

  20. An efficient multimodal 2D-3D hybrid approach to automatic face recognition.

    PubMed

    Mian, Ajmal S; Bennamoun, Mohammed; Owens, Robyn

    2007-11-01

    We present a fully automatic face recognition algorithm and demonstrate its performance on the FRGC v2.0 data. Our algorithm is multimodal (2D and 3D) and performs hybrid (feature-based and holistic) matching in order to achieve efficiency and robustness to facial expressions. The pose of a 3D face along with its texture is automatically corrected using a novel approach based on a single automatically detected point and the Hotelling transform. A novel 3D Spherical Face Representation (SFR) is used in conjunction with the SIFT descriptor to form a rejection classifier which quickly eliminates a large number of candidate faces at an early stage for efficient recognition in case of large galleries. The remaining faces are then verified using a novel region-based matching approach which is robust to facial expressions. This approach automatically segments the eyes-forehead and the nose regions, which are relatively less sensitive to expressions, and matches them separately using a modified ICP algorithm. The results of all the matching engines are fused at the metric level to achieve higher accuracy. We use the FRGC benchmark to compare our results to other algorithms which used the same database. Our multimodal hybrid algorithm performed better than others by achieving 99.74% and 98.31% verification rates at 0.001 FAR and identification rates of 99.02% and 95.37% for probes with neutral and non-neutral expression respectively. PMID:17848775

  1. Study of nonlinear 3-D evolution of kinetic Alfvén wave and fluctuation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Waves and instabilities play a very crucial role in astrophysical plasmas e.g. solar wind, Geospace etc. The main objective of current study is to investigate the importance of nonlinear processes associated with kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in order to understand the physical mechanism behind the magnetopause turbulence. Numerical simulation of the coupled equations guiding the dynamics of three dimensionally propagating kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) and slow magnetosonic wave has been performed for intermediate beta plasma (i.e. me/mi ≪ β < 1, where β is thermal to magnetic pressure ratio) applicable to the magnetopause. A simplified semi-analytical model based on paraxial approach has also been developed. We have examined the field localization and associated power spectrum of 3-D kinetic Alfvén wave for this nonlinear interaction. Governing dynamical equations of KAW and slow magnetosonic wave get coupled when the ponderomotive force arising due to pump KAW is taken into account while studying the slow magnetosonic wave dynamics. The numerical prediction of power law scaling is just consistent with the observation of THEMIS spacecraft in the magnetopause.

  2. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W; Burger, Aaron F; Day, Steven W

    2011-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers' initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  3. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W.; Burger, Aaron F.; Day, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers’ initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  4. Billion-atom synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of critical 3D Ising systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, E.; Monasterio, P.R.; Marian, J.

    2011-02-20

    An extension of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (spkMC) algorithm developed by Martinez et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 227 (2008) 3804] to discrete lattices is presented. The method solves the master equation synchronously by recourse to null events that keep all processors' time clocks current in a global sense. Boundary conflicts are resolved by adopting a chessboard decomposition into non-interacting sublattices. We find that the bias introduced by the spatial correlations attendant to the sublattice decomposition is within the standard deviation of serial calculations, which confirms the statistical validity of our algorithm. We have analyzed the parallel efficiency of spkMC and find that it scales consistently with problem size and sublattice partition. We apply the method to the calculation of scale-dependent critical exponents in billion-atom 3D Ising systems, with very good agreement with state-of-the-art multispin simulations.

  5. Billion-atom synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of critical 3D Ising systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, E.; Monasterio, P. R.; Marian, J.

    2011-02-01

    An extension of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (spkMC) algorithm developed by Martinez et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 227 (2008) 3804] to discrete lattices is presented. The method solves the master equation synchronously by recourse to null events that keep all processors' time clocks current in a global sense. Boundary conflicts are resolved by adopting a chessboard decomposition into non-interacting sublattices. We find that the bias introduced by the spatial correlations attendant to the sublattice decomposition is within the standard deviation of serial calculations, which confirms the statistical validity of our algorithm. We have analyzed the parallel efficiency of spkMC and find that it scales consistently with problem size and sublattice partition. We apply the method to the calculation of scale-dependent critical exponents in billion-atom 3D Ising systems, with very good agreement with state-of-the-art multispin simulations.

  6. Secondary reconnection, energisation and turbulence in dipolarisation fronts: results of a 3D kinetic simulation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DF) are formed by reconnection outflows interacting with the pre-existing environment. These regions are host of important energy exchanges [1], particle acceleration [2] and a complex structure and evolution [3]. Our recent work has investigated these regions via fully kinetic 3D simulations [4]. As reported recently on Nature Physics [3], based on 3D fully kinetic simulations started with a well defined x-line, we observe that in the DF reconnection transitions towards a more chaotic regime. In the fronts an instability devel- ops caused by the local gradients of the density and by the unfavourable acceleration and field line curvature. The consequence is the break up of the fronts in a fashion similar to the classical fluid Rayleigh-Taylor instability with the formation of "fingers" of plasma and embedded magnetic fields. These fingers interact and produce secondary reconnection sites. We present several different diagnostics that prove the existence of these secondary reconnection sites. Each site is surrounded by its own electron diffusion region. At the fronts the ions are generally not magnetized and considerable ion slippage is present. The discovery we present is that electrons are also slipping, forming localized diffusion regions near secondary reconnection sites [1]. The consequence of this discovery is twofold. First, the instability in the fronts has strong energetic implications. We observe that the energy transfer locally is very strong, an order of magnitude stronger than in the "X" line. However, this energy transfer is of both signs as it is natural for a wavy rippling with regions of magnetic to kinetic and regions of kinetic to magnetic energy conversion. Second, and most important for this session, is that MMS should not limit the search for electron diffusion regions to the location marked with X in all reconnection cartoons. Our simulations predict more numerous and perhaps more easily measurable electron diffusion

  7. Hybrid Three-Dimensional (3-D) Woven Thick Composite Architectures in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, Mark; Quabili, Ashiq; Yen, Chian-Fong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, three 3-dimensional (3-D) woven composite materials were examined to determine how yarn tow configurations affect the flexural response of the structure. Woven fabric preforms were manufactured with a Z-fiber architecture in 2-3 in. thicknesses. These preforms contained S-2 Glass (AGY, Aiken, SC, USA), carbon, and Twaron (Teijin Aramid, Arnhem, The Netherlands) yarns in different architectures creating a hybrid material system. Due to the thickness of the material, these samples required a significant span length (30 in.). The results showed a change in the strength and degradation after failure with the addition of carbon layers in tension.

  8. Finite Gyroradius Effects in the Plasma Environment Near Titan: 3D Hybrid Modeling of the T5 Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2012-12-01

    In this report we discuss the results of a 3D hybrid modeling of the interaction between Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's atmosphere/ionosphere for the T5 encounter. The T5 flyby is the only encounter when the two main ionizing sources of Titan's atmosphere, solar radiation and corotating plasma, align quasi-anti-parallel. The model is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements during the T5 flyby through Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere [1,2]. Magnetic field data was used from the MAG instrument [3]. In our model the background ions (O+, H+), all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid (see e.g. [4]). Inhomogeneous photoionization (in the dayside ionosphere), electron-impact ionization, and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperature of the background electrons and pickup electrons was also incorporated into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account collisions between ions and neutrals. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. The first results of our hybrid modeling show a strong asymmetry in the background (H+, O+) and pickup (H2+, N2+, CH4+) ion density profiles. Such strong asymmetry cannot be explained by a single-fluid multi-species 3D MHD model [5], which includes complex chemistry but does not produce finite gyroradius and kinetic effects. References [1] Sittler, et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton, J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds., Springer, (Dordrecht, Heidelberg, London, New York), pp. 393-455, 2010. [2] Agren, K., et al., On magnetosphere electron impact ionization and dynamics in Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere -- a Cassini case study, Ann. Geophys., 25, 2359

  9. Testing the hybrid-3-D hillslope hydrological model in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Broxton, P.; Gochis, D.; Niu, G.-Y.; Pangle, L. A.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A.; Zeng, X.

    2016-02-01

    Hillslopes are important for converting rainfall into runoff, influencing the terrestrial dynamics of the Earth's climate system. Recently, we developed a hybrid-3-D (h3D) hillslope hydrological model that gives similar results as a full 3-D hydrological model but is up to 2-3 orders of magnitude faster computationally. Here h3D is assessed using a number of recharge-drainage experiments within the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) with accurate and high-resolution (both temporally and spatially) observations of the inputs, outputs, and storage dynamics of several hillslopes. Such detailed measurements are generally not available for real-world hillslopes. Results show that the h3D model captures the observed storage, base flow, and overland flow dynamics of both the larger LEO and the smaller miniLEO hillslopes very well. Sensitivity tests are also performed to understand h3Ds difficulty in representing the height of the saturated zone close to the seepage face of the miniLEO hillslope. Results reveal that a temporally constant parameters set is able to simulate the response of the miniLEO for each individual event. However, when one focuses on the saturated zone dynamics at 0.15 m from the seepage face, a stepwise evolution of the optimal model parameter for the saturated lateral conductivity parameter of the gravel layer occurs. This evolution might be related to the migration of soil particles within the hillslope. However, it is currently unclear whether and where this takes place (in the seepage face or within the parts of the loamy sand soil).

  10. Development of a new methane tracer: kinetic isotope effect of 13CH3D + OH from 278 to 313 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joelsson, L. M. T.; Schmidt, J. A.; Nilsson, E. J. K.; Blunier, T.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Ono, S.; Johnson, M. S.

    2015-10-01

    Methane is the second most important long lived greenhouse gas and impacts the oxidative capacity of the Earth's atmosphere. Nontheless there are significant uncertainties in its source budget. Analysis of the isotopic composition of atmospheric methane, including doubly substituted species (e.g. 13CH3D), offers new constraints on the methane source budget as the sources and sinks have distinct isotopic signatures. The most important sink of atmospheric methane is oxidation by OH which accounts for around 90 % of methane removal in the troposphere. Here we present experimentally derived methane + OH kinetic isotope effects and their temperature dependence over the range of 278 to 313 K for CH3D and 13CH3D; the latter is reported here for the first time. We find kCH4/kCH3D=1.31 ± 0.01 and kCH4/k13CH3D = 1.34 ± 0.03 at room temperature, implying that the methane + OH kinetic isotope effect is multiplicative such that (kCH4/k13CH4)(kCH4/kCH3D) = kCH4/k13CH3D to within the experimental uncertainty. In addition the kinetic isotope effect were characterized using transition state theory with tunneling correction. Good agreement between the experimental, quantum chemical and available literature values was obtained. The theoretical calculations show that 13CH3D isotope effects is the product of D- and 13C-isotope effect. Based on the results we conclude that the OH reaction at steady-state can produce an atmospheric clumped isotope signal (Δ(13CH3D) = ln([CH4][13CH3D]/[13CH4][CH3D])) of 0.02 ± 0.02.

  11. Initial Results From the 3D Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System With Pickup Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detman, T. R.; Intriligator, D.; Dryer, M.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C.; Intriligator, J.

    2008-12-01

    Interstellar neutral hydrogen flows into the heliosphere and becomes ionized by photoionization and by charge exchange with solar wind protons. These "pickup" protons cause a slowing and heating of the solar wind flow in the outer heliosphere. We are adding the physics of these processes to our time-dependent 3D Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System. We plan to present initial results for the "Halloween" 2003 events, and to show comparisons with both ACE and Ulysses observations and with our previous results (without pickup protons). This work is sponsored by NASA Grant NNX08AE40G and by Carmel Research Center. Detman et al., 2006, A hybrid heliospheric modeling system: Background solar wind, J. Geophys. Res., V 111, doi:10.1029/2005JA011340

  12. Localizing Protein in 3D Neural Stem Cell Culture: a Hybrid Visualization Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 3-dimensional (3D) topography in influencing neural stem and progenitor cell (NPC) phenotype is widely acknowledged yet challenging to study. When dissociated from embryonic or post-natal brain, single NPCs will proliferate in suspension to form neurospheres. Daughter cells within these cultures spontaneously adopt distinct developmental lineages (neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes) over the course of expansion despite being exposed to the same extracellular milieu. This progression recapitulates many of the stages observed over the course of neurogenesis and gliogenesis in post-natal brain and is often used to study basic NPC biology within a controlled environment. Assessing the full impact of 3D topography and cellular positioning within these cultures on NPC fate is, however, difficult. To localize target proteins and identify NPC lineages by immunocytochemistry, free-floating neurospheres must be plated on a substrate or serially sectioned. This processing is required to ensure equivalent cell permeabilization and antibody access throughout the sphere. As a result, 2D epifluorescent images of cryosections or confocal reconstructions of 3D Z-stacks can only provide spatial information about cell position within discrete physical or digital 3D slices and do not visualize cellular position in the intact sphere. Here, to reiterate the topography of the neurosphere culture and permit spatial analysis of protein expression throughout the entire culture, we present a protocol for isolation, expansion, and serial sectioning of post-natal hippocampal neurospheres suitable for epifluorescent or confocal immunodetection of target proteins. Connexin29 (Cx29) is analyzed as an example. Next, using a hybrid of graphic editing and 3D modelling softwares rigorously applied to maintain biological detail, we describe how to re-assemble the 3D structural positioning of these images and digitally map labelled cells within the complete neurosphere. This

  13. 3-D Full-kinetic Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Particle Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Wang, X.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present three-dimensional full-kinetic electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the full-kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to self-consistently investigate space charge effects, and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general mechanism of the interaction of both a horizontal and vertical dipole model embedded just below the lunar surface focussing on the ion and electron kinetic behaviour of the system. It is shown that the configurations are largely dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyro-radius of the solar wind ions. The formation of mini-magnetospheres is an electrostatic effect. Additionally, we discuss typical particle trajectories as well as complete particle distribution functions covering thermal and suprathermal energies, within the interaction region and on viable spacecraft altitudes. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board

  14. Application of a Hybrid 3D-2D Laser Scanning System to the Characterization of Slate Slabs

    PubMed Central

    López, Marcos; Martínez, Javier; Matías, José María; Vilán, José Antonio; Taboada, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Dimensional control based on 3D laser scanning techniques is widely used in practice. We describe the application of a hybrid 3D-2D laser scanning system to the characterization of slate slabs with structural defects that are difficult for the human eye to characterize objectively. Our study is based on automating the process using a 3D laser scanner and a 2D camera. Our results demonstrate that the application of this hybrid system optimally characterizes slate slabs in terms of the defects described by the Spanish UNE-EN 12326-1 standard. PMID:22219696

  15. Compartment modeling anslysis of C-11 flumazenil kinetics in human brain using dynamic 2D and 3D PET

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y.; Simpson, N.; Townsend, D.W.

    1994-05-01

    We examined the feasibility of compartment modeling analysis and the numerical accuracy of model parameters of radioligand delivery and binding in the brain using 2D and 3D PET. Two subjects were injected with C-11 flumazenil (FMZ) i.v., and imaged over the brain with a dynamic sequence of 6x20 s, 2x30 s, 4x90 s, 4x180 s, 2x300 s, 2x600 s, and 2x1200 s frames. Different scatter correction methods were applied to the 3D data: No scatter correction (NOC), dual-energy window subtraction (DEW) and convolution-subtraction (CON). The kinetic data for regions listed below were fitted to a 2-compartment, 2-parameter model. Both 2D and 3D results are similar and within the expected range. The 3D %SE was less than 2D despite the smaller dose. The effect of the scatter in 3D parameter estimates appears to be small. These preliminary data indicate temporally sufficient kinetic data can be acquired in 3D mode to perform compartmental analysis of C-11 FMZ. Improved sensitivity in 3D may allow more accurate receptor characterization especially in small structures or in low specific binding areas.

  16. Connecting Global Measures of 3D Magnetic Reconnection to Local Kinetic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, William Scott

    2015-07-16

    After giving the motivation for the work, slides present the topic under the following headings: Description of LAPD experiment; Actual simulation setup; Simple kinetic theory of ined-tied tearing; Diagnostics to characterizing 3D reconnection; Example #1 - short-tied system; and Example #2 - long line-tied system. Colorful simulations are shown for quasipotential vs field line exponentiation, field line integrated Ohms Law, and correlation with agyrotopy & energy conversion for example #1; and evolution of current density for largest case, field exponentiation vs quasi-potential, and time evolution of magnetic field lines for example #2. To satisfy line-tied boundary conditions, there is need for superposition of oblique modes--the simple two-mode approximation works surprisingly well. For force-free layers with bg >1, the fastest growing periodic modes are oblique with kxλ ~0.5. This implies a minimum length of Ly > 2πλbg. There are strong correlations between σ → Ξ → A0e (observable with spacecraft). Electron pressure tensor is the dominant non-ideal term.

  17. 3D analysis of bainite morphologies and kinetics in alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hackenberg, R. E.; Nordstrom, D. P.; Shiflet, G. J.

    2002-01-01

    Serial sectioning and 3D reconstruction of austenite decomposition products were undertaken in bay-forming ternary steels to better understand their true morphologies in the bay region of their TTT diagrams. Jagged growth interfaces are revealed in allotriomorphic bainite formed at the bay in Fe-0.24C-4M0, contrasting with the idealized geometries often assumed when formulating growth models. This also has implications for experimental thickening kinetics measurments. Examination of the so-called 'degenerate' ferrite formed below the bay in Fe-Ox-6.3 W reveals that it is not degenerate at all, but rather has a Widmanstatten rod morphology which gives the appearance of degeneracy due to the multiplicity of ways that they can intersect a randomly-oriented plane of polish. Furthermore, these rods are grouped in packets posessing a common elongation direction, highlighting the crystallographic nature of their formation. The impact of these findings on the understanding of austenite decomposition in bayforming steels will be discussed.

  18. QUASI-OPTICAL 3-dB HYBRID FOR FUTURE HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-15

    Phase-controlled wave combiners-commutators and isolators for protecting rf sources against reflection from the accelerating structure can be built using a 3-dB hybrid built around a metallic grating used in a ''magic-Y'' configuration. Models of the magic-Y were designed and tested, both at 34.272 GHz using the Omega-P Ka-band magnicon, and at 11.424 GHz using the Omega-P/NRL X-band magnicon. All elements of the magic-Y were optimized analytically and numerically. A non-vacuum 34 GHz model of the magic Y was built and tested experimentally at a low power. An engineering design for the high power (vacuum) compressor was configured. Similar steps were taken for the 11-GHz version.

  19. Variational formulation of hybrid problems for fully 3-D transonic flow with shocks in rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Gao-Lian

    1991-01-01

    Based on previous research, the unified variable domain variational theory of hybrid problems for rotor flow is extended to fully 3-D transonic rotor flow with shocks, unifying and generalizing the direct and inverse problems. Three variational principles (VP) families were established. All unknown boundaries and flow discontinuities (such as shocks, free trailing vortex sheets) are successfully handled via functional variations with variable domain, converting almost all boundary and interface conditions, including the Rankine Hugoniot shock relations, into natural ones. This theory provides a series of novel ways for blade design or modification and a rigorous theoretical basis for finite element applications and also constitutes an important part of the optimal design theory of rotor bladings. Numerical solutions to subsonic flow by finite elements with self-adapting nodes given in Refs., show good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Supergravity Analysis of Hybrid Inflation Model from D3--D7 System

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Fumikazu; Tachikawa, Yuji; Watari, Taizan

    2003-11-20

    The slow-roll inflation is a beautiful paradigm, yet the inflaton potential can hardly be sufficiently flat when unknown gravitational effects are taken into account. However, the hybrid inflation models constructed in D = 4 N = 1 supergravity can be consistent with N = 2 supersymmetry, and can be naturally embedded into string theory. This article discusses the gravitational effects carefully in the string model, using D = 4 supergravity description. We adopt the D3--D7 system of Type IIB string theory compactified on K3 x T^2/Z_2 orientifold for definiteness. It turns out that the slow-roll parameter can be sufficiently small despite the non-minimal Kahler potential of the model. The conditions for this to happen are clarified in terms of string vacua. We also find that the geometry obtained by blowing up singularity, which is necessary for the positive vacuum energy, is stabilized by introducing certain 3-form fluxes.

  1. Hybrid Reactor Simulation and 3-D Information Display of BWR Out-of-Phase Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Robert; Huang, Zhengyu

    2001-06-17

    The real-time hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability of the Penn State TRIGA reactor has been expanded for boiling water reactor (BWR) out-of-phase behavior. During BWR out-of-phase oscillation half of the core can significantly oscillate out of phase with the other half, while the average power reported by the neutronic instrumentation may show a much lower amplitude for the oscillations. A description of the new HRS is given; three computers are employed to handle all the computations required, including real-time data processing and graph generation. BWR out-of-phase oscillation was successfully simulated. By adjusting the reactivity feedback gains from boiling channels to the TRIGA reactor and to the first harmonic mode power simulation, limit cycle can be generated with both reactor power and the simulated first harmonic power. A 3-D display of spatial power distributions of fundamental mode, first harmonic, and total powers over the reactor cross section is shown.

  2. A hybrid metalloarsenate 3D framework-1D interrupted metal oxide.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert W; Gerrard, Lee A; Price, Daniel J; Weller, Mark T

    2003-06-30

    Complex metal arsenates of the stoichiometry M(1)(-)(x)()M'(6)(OH)(3)(AsO(4)H(2)(x)()(/3))(3)(HAsO(4)), M = M' = Co, Ni, have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The two compounds display a very similar structural topology to that of the mineral dumortierite, an uncommon complex oxyborosilicate of aluminum. The hybrid structures consist of well separated, vacancy interrupted chains of face sharing MO(6) octahedra, with short M.M distances near 2.5 A, embedded in a metalloarsenate 3D framework having the topology of the aluminosilicate cancrinite. The framework also contains a quadruply bridging hydroxide ion. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal a strong antiferromagnetic interaction and magnetic transition to low temperature spin canted phases below 51 K (Co) and 42 K (Ni). The material may be considered as a zeotype framework structure templated by an interrupted one-dimensional metal oxide. PMID:12817976

  3. 3D Ag/ZnO hybrids for sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenyue; Xu, Chunxiang; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Zhengshan

    2016-03-01

    To combine the surface plasma resonance of metal and local field enhancement in metal/semiconductor interface, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on a ZnO nanorod array which was grown by hydrothermally on carbon fibers. The construction of dimensional (3D) Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is used for the sensitive detection of organic pollutants with the advantages such as facile synthesis, short detection time and low cost. The hybrid substrate was manifested a high sensitivity to phenol red at a lower concentration of 1 × 10-9 M and a higher enhancement factor of 3.18 × 109. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures decorated with Ag NPs were demonstrated self-cleaning function under UV irradiation via photocatalytic degradation of the analytic molecules. The fabrication process of the materials and sensors, optimization of the SERS behaviors for different sized Ag NPs, the mechanism of SERS and recovery were presented with a detailed discussion.

  4. Hybrid system of optics and computer for 3-D object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun Z.; Miao, Peng C.; He, Anzhi

    1992-03-01

    In this paper, a hybrid system of optics and computer for 3D object recognition is presented. The system consists of a Twyman-Green interferometer, a He-Ne laser, a computer, a TV camera, and an image processor. The structured light produced by a Twyman-Green interferometer is split in and illuminates objects in two directions at the same time. Moire contour is formed on the surface of object. In order to delete unwanted patterns in moire contour, we don't utilize the moire contour on the surface of object. We place a TV camera in the middle of the angle between two illuminating directions and take two groups of deformed fringes on the surface of objects. Two groups of deformed fringes are processed using the digital image processing system controlled and operated by XOR logic in the computer, moire fringes are then extracted from the complicated environment. 3D coordinates of points of the object are obtained after moire fringe is followed, and points belonging to the same fringe are given the same altitude. The object is described by its projected drawings in three coordinate planes. The projected drawings in three coordinate planes of the known objects are stored in the library of judgment. The object can be recognized by inquiring the library of judgment.

  5. Carbon Nanofiber/3D Nanoporous Silicon Hybrids as High Capacity Lithium Storage Materials.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong-Il; Sohn, Myungbeom; Kim, Dae Sik; Park, Cheolho; Choi, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Hansu

    2016-04-21

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF)/3D nanoporous (3DNP) Si hybrid materials were prepared by chemical etching of melt-spun Si/Al-Cu-Fe alloy nanocomposites, followed by carbonization using a pitch. CNFs were successfully grown on the surface of 3DNP Si particles using residual Fe impurities after acidic etching, which acted as a catalyst for the growth of CNFs. The resulting CNF/3DNP Si hybrid materials showed an enhanced cycle performance up to 100 cycles compared to that of the pristine Si/Al-Cu-Fe alloy nanocomposite as well as that of bare 3DNP Si particles. These results indicate that CNFs and the carbon coating layer have a beneficial effect on the capacity retention characteristics of 3DNP Si particles by providing continuous electron-conduction pathways in the electrode during cycling. The approach presented here provides another way to improve the electrochemical performances of porous Si-based high capacity anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26970098

  6. Earthscape, a Multi-Purpose Interactive 3d Globe Viewer for Hybrid Data Visualization and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarthou, A.; Mas, S.; Jacquin, M.; Moreno, N.; Salamon, A.

    2015-08-01

    The hybrid visualization and interaction tool EarthScape is presented here. The software is able to display simultaneously LiDAR point clouds, draped videos with moving footprint, volume scientific data (using volume rendering, isosurface and slice plane), raster data such as still satellite images, vector data and 3D models such as buildings or vehicles. The application runs on touch screen devices such as tablets. The software is based on open source libraries, such as OpenSceneGraph, osgEarth and OpenCV, and shader programming is used to implement volume rendering of scientific data. The next goal of EarthScape is to perform data analysis using ENVI Services Engine, a cloud data analysis solution. EarthScape is also designed to be a client of Jagwire which provides multisource geo-referenced video fluxes. When all these components will be included, EarthScape will be a multi-purpose platform that will provide at the same time data analysis, hybrid visualization and complex interactions. The software is available on demand for free at france@exelisvis.com.

  7. Fully Kinetic 3D Simulations of the Interaction of the Solar Wind with Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, J.; Deca, J.; Lembege, B.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The planet Mercury has been studied by the space mission Mariner 10, in the 1970's, and by the MESSENGER mission launched in 2004. Interest in the first planet of the Solar System has now been renewed by the launch in 2017 of the BepiColombo mission. MESSENGER and BepiColombo give access to information about the local conditions of the magnetosphere of Mercury. This data must be evaluated in the context of the global interaction between the solar wind and the planet's magnetosphere. Global scale simulations of the planet's environment are necessary to fully understand the data gathered from in-situ measurements. We use three-dimensional simulations to support the scientific goals of the two missions. In contrast with the results based on MHD (Kabin et al., 2000) and hybrid codes (Kallio et Janhumen, 2003; Travnicek et al., 2007, 2010; Richer et al., 2012), the present work is based on the implicit moment Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method, which allows to use large time and space steps, while granting access to the dynamics of the smaller electron scales in the plasma. The purpose of these preliminary PIC simulations is to retrieve the top-level features of Mercury's magnetosphere and its frontiers. We compare the results obtained with the implicit moment PiC method against 3D hybrid simulations. We perform simulations of the global plasma environment of Mercury using the solar wind conditions measured by MESSENGER. We show that complex flows form around the planet, including the development of Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities at the flanks. We evaluate the dynamics of the shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, the reconnection areas, the formation of plasma sheet and magnetotail, and the variation of ion/electron plasma flows when crossing these frontiers. The simulations also give access to detailed information about the particle dynamics and their velocity distribution at locations that can be used for comparison with data from MESSENGER and later on with the forthcoming

  8. Type II solar radio bursts predicted by 3-D MHD CME and kinetic radio emission simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2014-01-01

    Impending space weather events at Earth are often signaled by type II solar radio bursts. These bursts are generated upstream of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that move away from the Sun. We combine elaborate three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic predictions of realistic CMEs near the Sun with a recent analytic kinetic radiation theory in order to simulate two type II bursts. Magnetograms of the Sun are used to reconstruct initial solar magnetic and active region fields for the modeling. STEREO spacecraft data are used to dimension the flux rope of the initial CME, launched into an empirical data-driven corona and solar wind. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for the two type II bursts observed by the Wind spacecraft on 15 February 2011 and 7 March 2012. Propagation of the simulated CME-driven shocks through coronal plasmas containing preexisting density and magnetic field structures that stem from the coronal setup and CME initiation closely reproduce the isolated islands of type II emission observed. These islands form because of a competition between the growth of the radio source due to spherical expansion and a fragmentation of the radio source due to increasingly radial fields in the nose region of the shock and interactions with streamers in the flank regions of the shock. Our study provides strong support for this theory for type II bursts and implies that the physical processes involved are understood. It also supports a near-term capability to predict and track these events for space weather predictions.

  9. A 3-D spectral-element and frequency-wave number hybrid method for high-resolution seismic array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ping; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tseng, Tai-Lin; Hung, Shu-Huei; Chen, Chin-Wu; Basini, Piero; Liu, Qinya

    2014-10-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid method that interfaces the spectral-element method (SEM) with the frequency-wave number (FK) technique to model the propagation of teleseismic plane waves beneath seismic arrays. The accuracy of the resulting 3-D SEM-FK hybrid method is benchmarked against semianalytical FK solutions for 1-D models. The accuracy of 2.5-D modeling based on 2-D SEM-FK hybrid method is also investigated through comparisons to this 3-D hybrid method. Synthetic examples for structural models of the Alaska subduction zone and the central Tibet crust show that this method is capable of accurately capturing interactions between incident plane waves and local heterogeneities. This hybrid method presents an essential tool for the receiver function and scattering imaging community to verify and further improve their techniques. These numerical examples also show the promising future of the 3-D SEM-FK hybrid method in high-resolution regional seismic imaging based on waveform inversions of converted/scattered waves recorded by seismic array.

  10. 13CH3D kinetic isotope effects for methane oxidation by OH - predicting the "clumped" isotopic signature of atmospheric methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehill, A. R.; Joelsson, L. M. T.; Wang, D. T.; Johnson, M. S.; Ono, S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a significant long-lived greenhouse gas, but the tropospheric methane budget is not entirely constrained. "Clumped" isotopologues of methane, including 13CH3D, can provide additional constraints on the atmospheric methane cycle. Interpretation of these novel isotope tracers requires an understanding of the "clumped" isotopic signature of various methane sources, as well as the kinetic isotope effects of the methane sink reactions. We performed a series of photochemical experiments to measure the isotopic fractionation during the CH4+OH reaction. Experiments were carried out in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor. Photolysis of ozone (O3) in the presence of water (H2O) was used to produce OH radicals. Experiments were performed in a helium bath gas. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to monitor reaction progress. At various intervals during the reaction, methane was sampled from the cell and analyzed for isotope ratios by tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS). By simultaneously measuring four different isotopologues of methane (12CH4,12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D), we were able to constrain the kinetic isotope effects for 12CH3D, 13CH4, and the doubly-substitued isotopologue 13CH3D. These results are combined with published clumped isotope data from different methane sources to model the Δ13CH3D (i.e. deviation from "stochastic" distribution of isotopes) of tropospheric methane and its sensitivity to different sources. The Δ13CH3D value of tropospheric methane does not strongly depend upon isotope fractionation during the OH sink reaction. Rather, the Δ13CH3D value of tropospheric methane reflects a mixing of different source signatures. Due to nonlinearity in mixing of Δ13CH3D, the Δ13CH3D value of tropospheric methane will be larger than the weighted average of the Δ13CH3D value of the sources. A first order interpretation of variations in the Δ13CH3D value of tropospheric methane is that it reflects changes

  11. The performance of semilocal and hybrid density functionals in 3d transition-metal chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furche, Filipp; Perdew, John P.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the performance of contemporary semilocal and hybrid density functionals for bond energetics, structures, dipole moments, and harmonic frequencies of 3d transition-metal (TM) compounds by comparison with gas-phase experiments. Special attention is given to the nonempirical metageneralized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) of Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria (TPSS) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 146401 (2003)], which has been implemented in TURBOMOLE for the present work. Trends and error patterns for classes of homologous compounds are analyzed, including dimers, monohydrides, mononitrides, monoxides, monofluorides, polyatomic oxides and halogenides, carbonyls, and complexes with organic π ligands such as benzene and cyclopentadienyl. Weakly bound systems such as Ca2, Mn2, and Zn2 are discussed. We propose a reference set of reaction energies for benchmark purposes. Our all-electron results with quadruple zeta valence basis sets validate semilocal density-functional theory as the workhorse of computational TM chemistry. Typical errors in bond energies are substantially larger than in (organic) main group chemistry, however. The Becke-Perdew'86 [Phys. Rev. A 38, 3098 (1988); Phys. Rev. B 33, 8822 (1986)] GGA and the TPSS meta-GGA have the best price/performance ratio, while the TPSS hybrid functional achieves a slightly lower mean absolute error in bond energies. The popular Becke three-parameter hybrid B3LYP underbinds significantly and tends to overestimate bond distances; we give a possible explanation for this. We further show that hybrid mixing does not reduce the width of the error distribution on our reference set. The error of a functional for the s-d transfer energy of a TM atom does not predict its error for TM bond energies and bond lengths. For semilocal functionals, self-interaction error in one- and three-electron bonds appears to be a major source of error in TM reaction energies. Nevertheless, TPSS predicts the correct ground

  12. A hybrid method for the computation of quasi-3D seismograms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The development of powerful computer clusters and efficient numerical computation methods, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) made possible the computation of seismic wave propagation in a heterogeneous 3D earth. However, the cost of theses computations is still problematic for global scale tomography that requires hundreds of such simulations. Part of the ongoing research effort is dedicated to the development of faster modeling methods based on the spectral element method. Capdeville et al. (2002) proposed to couple SEM simulations with normal modes calculation (C-SEM). Nissen-Meyer et al. (2007) used 2D SEM simulations to compute 3D seismograms in a 1D earth model. Thanks to these developments, and for the first time, Lekic et al. (2011) developed a 3D global model of the upper mantle using SEM simulations. At the local and continental scale, adjoint tomography that is using a lot of SEM simulation can be implemented on current computers (Tape, Liu et al. 2009). Due to their smaller size, these models offer higher resolution. They provide us with images of the crust and the upper part of the mantle. In an attempt to teleport such local adjoint tomographic inversions into the deep earth, we are developing a hybrid method where SEM computation are limited to a region of interest within the earth. That region can have an arbitrary shape and size. Outside this region, the seismic wavefield is extrapolated to obtain synthetic data at the Earth's surface. A key feature of the method is the use of a time reversal mirror to inject the wavefield induced by distant seismic source into the region of interest (Robertsson and Chapman 2000). We compute synthetic seismograms as follow: Inside the region of interest, we are using regional spectral element software RegSEM to compute wave propagation in 3D. Outside this region, the wavefield is extrapolated to the surface by convolution with the Green's functions from the mirror to the seismic stations. For now, these

  13. Global Effects of the Interplanetary Shock Propagation through the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: 3D Hybrid Kinetic ModelingA.S. Lipatov {1}, D.G. Sibeck {2}{1} GPHI UMBC/NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA {2} NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmasphere particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that the shock causes strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us to determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere. We compare our predictions with THEMIS and Van Allen Probes spacecraft observations.

  14. The plasma interaction of Enceladus: 3D hybrid simulations and comparison with Cassini MAG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegel, H.; Simon, S.; Müller, J.; Motschmann, U.; Saur, J.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    We study the interaction of Saturn's small, icy moon Enceladus and its plume with the corotating magnetospheric plasma by means of a 3D hybrid simulation model, which treats the ions as individual particles and the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid. We analyze systematically how Enceladus' internal conductivity and plasma absorption at the surface as well as charge exchange and pick-up in the plume contribute to the overall structure of the interaction region. Furthermore, we provide a comparison of our simulation results to data obtained by the Cassini magnetometer instrument. The major findings of this study are: (1) the magnetic field diffuses through the solid body of Enceladus almost unaffected, whereas plasma absorption gives rise to a symmetric depletion wake downstream of the moon; (2) due to the small gyroradii of the newly generated plume ions, the pick-up tail possesses a 2D structure; (3) the magnetic field lines drape around the plume, which triggers an Alfvén wing system that dominates the structure of Enceladus' plasma environment. Inside the plume itself, a magnetic cavity is formed; (4) besides the reproduction of the key features of the observed magnetic field signatures, evidence for variability in the locations of the active jets and in the total gas content of the plume are shown.

  15. Development of hybrid 3-D hydrological modeling for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xubin; Troch, Peter; Pelletier, Jon; Niu, Guo-Yue; Gochis, David

    2015-11-15

    This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM). We have made substantial progress in model development and evaluation, computational efficiencies and software engineering, and data development and evaluation, as discussed in Sections 2-4. Section 5 presents our success in data dissemination, while Section 6 discusses the scientific impacts of our work. Section 7 discusses education and mentoring success of our project, while Section 8 lists our relevant DOE services. All peer-reviewed papers that acknowledged this project are listed in Section 9. Highlights of our achievements include: • We have finished 20 papers (most published already) on model development and evaluation, computational efficiencies and software engineering, and data development and evaluation • The global datasets developed under this project have been permanently archived and publicly available • Some of our research results have already been implemented in WRF and CLM • Patrick Broxton and Michael Brunke have received their Ph.D. • PI Zeng has served on DOE proposal review panels and DOE lab scientific focus area (SFA) review panels

  16. Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented. The 3D structure of biosamples can be recognized without fluorescence. The cubic platform employs two types of hydrogels that are compatible with conventional culture dishes or well plates, facilitating growth in culture, ease of handling, and viewing at multiple angles. PMID:27128576

  17. Segment-interaction in sprint start: Analysis of 3D angular velocity and kinetic energy in elite sprinters.

    PubMed

    Slawinski, J; Bonnefoy, A; Ontanon, G; Leveque, J M; Miller, C; Riquet, A; Chèze, L; Dumas, R

    2010-05-28

    The aim of the present study was to measure during a sprint start the joint angular velocity and the kinetic energy of the different segments in elite sprinters. This was performed using a 3D kinematic analysis of the whole body. Eight elite sprinters (10.30+/-0.14s 100 m time), equipped with 63 passive reflective markers, realised four maximal 10 m sprints start on an indoor track. An opto-electronic Motion Analysis system consisting of 12 digital cameras (250 Hz) was used to collect the 3D marker trajectories. During the pushing phase on the blocks, the 3D angular velocity vector and its norm were calculated for each joint. The kinetic energy of 16 segments of the lower and upper limbs and of the total body was calculated. The 3D kinematic analysis of the whole body demonstrated that joints such as shoulders, thoracic or hips did not reach their maximal angular velocity with a movement of flexion-extension, but with a combination of flexion-extension, abduction-adduction and internal-external rotation. The maximal kinetic energy of the total body was reached before clearing block (respectively, 537+/-59.3 J vs. 514.9+/-66.0 J; p< or =0.01). These results suggested that a better synchronization between the upper and lower limbs could increase the efficiency of pushing phase on the blocks. Besides, to understand low interindividual variances in the sprint start performance in elite athletes, a 3D complete body kinematic analysis shall be used. PMID:20226465

  18. Analyzing Biological Performance of 3D-Printed, Cell-Impregnated Hybrid Constructs for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chang, Tuanjie; Kulyk, William; Chen, Xiongbiao; Eames, B Frank

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting of hybrid constructs is a promising biofabrication method for cartilage tissue engineering because a synthetic polymer framework and cell-impregnated hydrogel provide structural and biological features of cartilage, respectively. During bioprinting, impregnated cells may be subjected to high temperatures (caused by the adjacent melted polymer) and process-induced mechanical forces, potentially compromising cell function. This study addresses these biofabrication issues, evaluating the heat distribution of printed polycaprolactone (PCL) strands and the rheological property and structural stability of alginate hydrogels at various temperatures and concentrations. The biocompatibility of parameters from these studies was tested by culturing 3D hybrid constructs bioprinted with primary cells from embryonic chick cartilage. During initial two-dimensional culture expansion of these primary cells, two morphologically and molecularly distinct cell populations ("rounded" and "fibroblastic") were isolated. The biological performance of each population was evaluated in 3D hybrid constructs separately. The cell viability, proliferation, and cartilage differentiation were observed at high levels in hybrid constructs of both cell populations, confirming the validity of these 3D bioprinting parameters for effective cartilage tissue engineering. Statistically significant performance variations were observed, however, between the rounded and fibroblastic cell populations. Molecular and morphological data support the notion that such performance differences may be attributed to the relative differentiation state of rounded versus fibroblastic cells (i.e., differentiated chondrocytes vs. chondroprogenitors, respectively), which is a relevant issue for cell-based tissue engineering strategies. Taken together, our study demonstrates that bioprinting 3D hybrid constructs of PCL and cell-impregnated alginate hydrogel is a promising approach for

  19. 3D hybrid-porous carbon derived from carbonization of metal organic frameworks for high performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weizhai; Mondal, Anjon Kumar; Xu, Jing; Wang, Chengyin; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu

    2016-09-01

    We report a rational design and synthesis of 3D hybrid-porous carbon with a hierarchical pore architecture for high performance supercapacitors. It contains micropores (<2 nm diameter) and mesopores (2-4 nm), derived from carbonization of unique porous metal organic frameworks (MOFs). Owning to the synergistic effect of micropores and mesopores, the hybrid-porous carbon has exceptionally high ion-accessible surface area and low ion diffusion resistance, which is desired for supercapacitor applications. When applied as electrode materials in supercapacitors, 3D hybrid-porous carbon demonstrates a specific capacitance of 332 F g-1 at a constant charge/discharge current of 500 mA g-1. The supercapacitors can endure more than 10,000 cycles without degradation of capacitance.

  20. Ultra-fast hybrid CPU-GPU multiple scatter simulation for 3-D PET.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Sang; Son, Young Don; Cho, Zang Hee; Ra, Jong Beom; Ye, Jong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Scatter correction is very important in 3-D PET reconstruction due to a large scatter contribution in measurements. Currently, one of the most popular methods is the so-called single scatter simulation (SSS), which considers single Compton scattering contributions from many randomly distributed scatter points. The SSS enables a fast calculation of scattering with a relatively high accuracy; however, the accuracy of SSS is dependent on the accuracy of tail fitting to find a correct scaling factor, which is often difficult in low photon count measurements. To overcome this drawback as well as to improve accuracy of scatter estimation by incorporating multiple scattering contribution, we propose a multiple scatter simulation (MSS) based on a simplified Monte Carlo (MC) simulation that considers photon migration and interactions due to photoelectric absorption and Compton scattering. Unlike the SSS, the MSS calculates a scaling factor by comparing simulated prompt data with the measured data in the whole volume, which enables a more robust estimation of a scaling factor. Even though the proposed MSS is based on MC, a significant acceleration of the computational time is possible by using a virtual detector array with a larger pitch by exploiting that the scatter distribution varies slowly in spatial domain. Furthermore, our MSS implementation is nicely fit to a parallel implementation using graphic processor unit (GPU). In particular, we exploit a hybrid CPU-GPU technique using the open multiprocessing and the compute unified device architecture, which results in 128.3 times faster than using a single CPU. Overall, the computational time of MSS is 9.4 s for a high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) system. The performance of the proposed MSS is validated through actual experiments using an HRRT. PMID:24403412

  1. 3D hybrid simulations of the interaction of a magnetic cloud with a bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turc, L.; Fontaine, D.; Savoini, P.; Modolo, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the interaction of a magnetic cloud (MC) with a planetary bow shock using hybrid simulations. It is the first time to our knowledge that this interaction is studied using kinetic simulations which include self-consistently both the ion foreshock and the shock wave dynamics. We show that when the shock is in a quasi-perpendicular configuration, the MC's magnetic structure in the magnetosheath remains similar to that in the solar wind, whereas it is strongly altered downstream of a quasi-parallel shock. The latter can result in a reversal of the magnetic field north-south component in some parts of the magnetosheath. We also investigate how the MC affects in turn the outer parts of the planetary environment, i.e., from the foreshock to the magnetopause. We find the following: (i) The decrease of the Alfvén Mach number at the MC's arrival causes an attenuation of the foreshock region because of the weakening of the bow shock. (ii) The foreshock moves along the bow shock's surface, following the rotation of the MC's magnetic field. (iii) Owing to the low plasma beta, asymmetric flows arise inside the magnetosheath, due to the magnetic tension force which accelerates the particles in some parts of the magnetosheath and slows them down in others. (iv) The quasi-parallel region forms a depression in the shock's surface. Other deformations of the magnetopause and the bow shock are also highlighted. All these effects can contribute to significantly modify the solar wind/magnetosphere coupling during MC events.

  2. 3D Tissue Culturing: Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 13/2016).

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented by M. Hagiwara and co-workers on page 1566. 3D recognition of a sample structure can be achieved by facilitating multi-directional views using a standard microscope without a laser system. The cubic platform has the potential to promote 3D culture studies, offering easy handling and compatibility with commercial culture plates at a low price tag. PMID:27384934

  3. Plane shear flows of frictionless spheres: Kinetic theory and 3D soft-sphere discrete element method simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; Richard, P.

    2014-05-15

    We use existing 3D Discrete Element simulations of simple shear flows of spheres to evaluate the radial distribution function at contact that enables kinetic theory to correctly predict the pressure and the shear stress, for different values of the collisional coefficient of restitution. Then, we perform 3D Discrete Element simulations of plane flows of frictionless, inelastic spheres, sheared between walls made bumpy by gluing particles in a regular array, at fixed average volume fraction and distance between the walls. The results of the numerical simulations are used to derive boundary conditions appropriated in the cases of large and small bumpiness. Those boundary conditions are, then, employed to numerically integrate the differential equations of Extended Kinetic Theory, where the breaking of the molecular chaos assumption at volume fraction larger than 0.49 is taken into account in the expression of the dissipation rate. We show that the Extended Kinetic Theory is in very good agreement with the numerical simulations, even for coefficients of restitution as low as 0.50. When the bumpiness is increased, we observe that some of the flowing particles are stuck in the gaps between the wall spheres. As a consequence, the walls are more dissipative than expected, and the flows resemble simple shear flows, i.e., flows of rather constant volume fraction and granular temperature.

  4. Fabrication of chitosan-silver nanoparticle hybrid 3D porous structure as a SERS substrate for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Gyeong-Bok; Kim, Ji-Hye; Burm, Jin Sik; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-05-01

    We propose a simple, low-cost, large-area, and functional surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for biomedical applications. The SERS substrate with chitosan-silver nanoparticles (chitosan-Ag NPs) hybrid 3D porous structure was fabricated simply by a one-step method. The chitosan was used as a template for the Ag NPs deposition. SERS enhancement by the chitosan-Ag NPs substrate was experimentally verified using rhodamine B as an analyte. Thiolated single stranded DNA was also measured for atopic dermatitis genetic markers (chemokines CCL17) at a low concentration of 5 pM. We successfully designed a novel SERS substrate with silver nanoparticle hybridized 3D porous chitosan that has the potential to become a highly sensitive and selective tool for biomedical applications.

  5. Robust 2D/3D registration for fast-flexion motion of the knee joint using hybrid optimization.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takashi; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Naomoto, Shinji; Sukegawa, Tomoyuki; Nawata, Atsushi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we proposed a 2D/3D registration method that uses Powell's algorithm to obtain 3D motion of a knee joint by 3D computed-tomography and bi-plane fluoroscopic images. The 2D/3D registration is performed consecutively and automatically for each frame of the fluoroscopic images. This method starts from the optimum parameters of the previous frame for each frame except for the first one, and it searches for the next set of optimum parameters using Powell's algorithm. However, if the flexion motion of the knee joint is fast, it is likely that Powell's algorithm will provide a mismatch because the initial parameters are far from the correct ones. In this study, we applied a hybrid optimization algorithm (HPS) combining Powell's algorithm with the Nelder-Mead simplex (NM-simplex) algorithm to overcome this problem. The performance of the HPS was compared with the separate performances of Powell's algorithm and the NM-simplex algorithm, the Quasi-Newton algorithm and hybrid optimization algorithm with the Quasi-Newton and NM-simplex algorithms with five patient data sets in terms of the root-mean-square error (RMSE), target registration error (TRE), success rate, and processing time. The RMSE, TRE, and the success rate of the HPS were better than those of the other optimization algorithms, and the processing time was similar to that of Powell's algorithm alone. PMID:23138929

  6. Finite Orbit Width versions of the CQL3D code: Hybrid-FOW and Full-FOW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-10-01

    Finite-Orbit-Width (FOW) effects are being added into the CQL3D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code [1] using two main options. In the Hybrid-FOW option, partial FOW capabilities are implemented which add FOW features into the particle source (NB) operator, RF quasilinear operator, diagnostics, and guiding center orbit losses with gyro-radius correction. Collisions remain Zero-Orbit-Width (ZOW). The Hybrid-FOW version provides a greatly improved agreement with signals measured by the NSTX Fast Ion Diagnostic [2]. The advantage of the Hybrid-FOW version is that run time increases by only a factor of two compared to ZOW runs. The Full-FOW option further adds neoclassical radial transport features into the FP coding. The collisional coefficients are averaged along guiding center orbits, with a proper transformation matrix from local coordinates to the midplane coordinates, where the FP equation is solved. All radial terms are included. The computations are parallelized in velocity-grid index, typically using 128 CPU cores. We emphasize that this theory includes nonthermal and full-orbit, not first order correction, neoclassical theory. [4pt] [1] R.W. Harvey and M. McCoy, ``The CQL3D Fokker Planck Code,'' www.compxco.com/cql3d [0pt] [2] R.W. Harvey, Yu. Petrov, D. Liu, W. Heidbrink, P. Bonoli, this mtg (2012)

  7. Kinetic inductance driven nanoscale 2D and 3D THz transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, S Hossein; Williamson, Ian A D; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    We examine the unusual dispersion and attenuation of transverse electromagnetic waves in the few-THz regime on nanoscale graphene and copper transmission lines. Conventionally, such propagation has been considered to be highly dispersive, due to the RC time constant-driven voltage diffusion below 1 THz and plasmonic effects at higher optical frequencies. Our numerical modeling across the microwave, THz, and optical frequency ranges reveals that the conductor kinetic inductance creates an ultra-broadband linear-dispersion and constant-attenuation region in the THz regime. This so-called LC region is an ideal characteristic that is known to be absent in macro-scale transmission lines. The kinetic-LC frequency range is dictated by the structural dimensionality and the free-carrier scattering rate of the conductor material. Moreover, up to 40x wavelength reduction is observed in graphene transmission lines. PMID:27137628

  8. Kinetic inductance driven nanoscale 2D and 3D THz transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Hossein; Williamson, Ian A. D.; Wang, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    We examine the unusual dispersion and attenuation of transverse electromagnetic waves in the few-THz regime on nanoscale graphene and copper transmission lines. Conventionally, such propagation has been considered to be highly dispersive, due to the RC time constant-driven voltage diffusion below 1 THz and plasmonic effects at higher optical frequencies. Our numerical modeling across the microwave, THz, and optical frequency ranges reveals that the conductor kinetic inductance creates an ultra-broadband linear-dispersion and constant-attenuation region in the THz regime. This so-called LC region is an ideal characteristic that is known to be absent in macro-scale transmission lines. The kinetic-LC frequency range is dictated by the structural dimensionality and the free-carrier scattering rate of the conductor material. Moreover, up to 40x wavelength reduction is observed in graphene transmission lines.

  9. 3-D kinetics simulations of the NRU reactor using the DONJON code

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, T. C.; Atfield, M. D.; Koclas, J.

    2006-07-01

    The NRU reactor is highly heterogeneous, heavy-water cooled and moderated, with online refuelling capability. It is licensed to operate at a maximum power of 135 MW, with a peak thermal flux of approximately 4.0 x 10{sup 18} n.m{sup -2} . s{sup -1}. In support of the safe operation of NRU, three-dimensional kinetics calculations for reactor transients have been performed using the DONJON code. The code was initially designed to perform space-time kinetics calculations for the CANDU{sup R} power reactors. This paper describes how the DONJON code can be applied to perform neutronic simulations for the analysis of reactor transients in NRU, and presents calculation results for some transients. (authors)

  10. Kinetic inductance driven nanoscale 2D and 3D THz transmission lines

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, S. Hossein; Williamson, Ian A. D.; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    We examine the unusual dispersion and attenuation of transverse electromagnetic waves in the few-THz regime on nanoscale graphene and copper transmission lines. Conventionally, such propagation has been considered to be highly dispersive, due to the RC time constant-driven voltage diffusion below 1 THz and plasmonic effects at higher optical frequencies. Our numerical modeling across the microwave, THz, and optical frequency ranges reveals that the conductor kinetic inductance creates an ultra-broadband linear-dispersion and constant-attenuation region in the THz regime. This so-called LC region is an ideal characteristic that is known to be absent in macro-scale transmission lines. The kinetic-LC frequency range is dictated by the structural dimensionality and the free-carrier scattering rate of the conductor material. Moreover, up to 40x wavelength reduction is observed in graphene transmission lines. PMID:27137628

  11. Numerical simulation of 3D Kinetic Alfvén Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qian; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Perez, Jean

    2013-10-01

    In our model for strong kinetic Alfvén plasma turbulence, the spectrum of Kinetic-Alfvén waves was found to scale as k - 8 / 3 at scales smaller than the ion gyroscale. This was close to the recent magnetic fluctuation observation at sub-proton scales. It also showed that the scaling would be changed with different viscosity setup. It suggested that von Kármán similarity is not valid beyond the inertial range. In this region, the dynamic of the outer scale (MHD) and the smaller scale (electron inertial range) may affect the spectrum. Hyperviscosity results showed that the electron Landau damping was not the reason for the steepening of the spectrum. This work was supported by CMSO at U. Wisconsin-Madison.

  12. A hybrid antenna array design for 3-d direction of arrival estimation.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Najam-Us; Khan, Imdad

    2015-01-01

    A 3-D beam scanning antenna array design is proposed that gives a whole 3-D spherical coverage and also suitable for various radar and body-worn devices in the Body Area Networks applications. The Array Factor (AF) of the proposed antenna is derived and its various parameters like directivity, Half Power Beam Width (HPBW) and Side Lobe Level (SLL) are calculated by varying the size of the proposed antenna array. Simulations were carried out in MATLAB 2012b. The radiators are considered isotropic and hence mutual coupling effects are ignored. The proposed array shows a considerable improvement against the existing cylindrical and coaxial cylindrical arrays in terms of 3-D scanning, size, directivity, HPBW and SLL. PMID:25790103

  13. Strontium eluting graphene hybrid nanoparticles augment osteogenesis in a 3D tissue scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to prepare hybrid nanoparticles of graphene sheets decorated with strontium metallic nanoparticles and demonstrate their advantages in bone tissue engineering. Strontium-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO_Sr) hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized by the facile reduction of graphene oxide and strontium nitrate. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy revealed that the hybrid particles were composed of RGO sheets decorated with 200-300 nm metallic strontium particles. Thermal gravimetric analysis further confirmed the composition of the hybrid particles as 22 wt% of strontium. Macroporous tissue scaffolds were prepared by incorporating RGO_Sr particles in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). The PCL/RGO_Sr scaffolds were found to elute strontium ions in aqueous medium. Osteoblast proliferation and differentiation was significantly higher in the PCL scaffolds containing the RGO_Sr particles in contrast to neat PCL and PCL/RGO scaffolds. The increased biological activity can be attributed to the release of strontium ions from the hybrid nanoparticles. This study demonstrates that composites prepared using hybrid nanoparticles that elute strontium ions can be used to prepare multifunctional scaffolds with good mechanical and osteoinductive properties. These findings have important implications for designing the next generation of biomaterials for use in tissue regeneration.The objective of this work was to prepare hybrid nanoparticles of graphene sheets decorated with strontium metallic nanoparticles and demonstrate their advantages in bone tissue engineering. Strontium-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO_Sr) hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized by the facile reduction of graphene oxide and strontium nitrate. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy revealed that the hybrid particles were composed of RGO sheets decorated with 200-300 nm metallic strontium

  14. Code System for 2-Group, 3D Neutronic Kinetics Calculations Coupled to Core Thermal Hydraulics.

    2000-05-12

    Version 00 QUARK is a combined computer program comprising a revised version of the QUANDRY three-dimensional, two-group neutron kinetics code and an upgraded version of the COBRA transient core analysis code (COBRA-EN). Starting from either a critical steady-state (k-effective or critical dilute Boron problem) or a subcritical steady-state (fixed source problem) in a PWR plant, the code allows one to simulate the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic core transient response to reactivity accidents initiated both inside themore » vessel (such as a control rod ejection) and outside the vessel (such as the sudden change of the Boron concentration in the coolant). QUARK output can be used as input to PSR-470/NORMA-FP to perform a subchannel analysis from converged coarse-mesh nodal solutions.« less

  15. Ship-in-a-bottle integration by hybrid femtosecond laser technology for fabrication of true 3D biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Felix; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jian; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Sugioka, Koji

    2015-03-01

    We propose herein the "ship-in-a-bottle" integration of three-dimensional (3D) polymeric sinusoidal ridges inside photosensitive glass microfluidic channel by a hybrid subtractive - additive femtosecond laser processing method. It consists of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Wet Etching (FLAE) of a photosensitive Foturan glass followed by Two-Photon Polymerization (TPP) of a SU-8 negative epoxy-resin. Both subtractive and additive processes are carried out using the same set-up with the change of laser focusing objective only. A 522 nm wavelength of the second harmonic generation from an amplified femtosecond Yb-fiber laser (FCPA µJewel D-400, IMRA America, 1045 nm; pulse width 360 fs, repetition rate 200 kHz) was employed for irradiation. The new method allows lowering the size limit of 3D objects created inside channels to smaller details down to the dimensions of a cell, and improve the structure stability. Sinusoidal periodic patterns and ridges are of great use as base scaffolds for building up new structures on their top or for modulating cell migration, guidance and orientation while created interspaces can be exploited for microfluidic applications. The glass microchannel offers robustness and appropriate dynamic flow conditions for cellular studies while the integrated patterns are reducing the size of structure to the level of cells responsiveness. Taking advantage of the ability to directly fabricate 3D complex shapes, both glass channels and polymeric integrated patterns enable us to 3D spatially design biochips for specific applications.

  16. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  17. 3D printing of high-resolution PLA-based structures by hybrid electrohydrodynamic and fused deposition modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Seong, Baekhoon; Nguyen, VuDat; Byun, Doyoung

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has received much attention for shape forming and manufacturing. The fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer is one of the various 3D printers available and has become widely used due to its simplicity, low-cost, and easy operation. However, the FDM technique has a limitation whereby its patterning resolution is too low at around 200 μm. In this paper, we first present a hybrid mechanism of electrohydrodynamic jet printing with the FDM technique, which we name E-FDM. We then develop a novel high-resolution 3D printer based on the E-FDM process. To determine the optimal condition for structuring, we also investigated the effect of several printing parameters, such as temperature, applied voltage, working height, printing speed, flow-rate, and acceleration on the patterning results. This method was capable of fabricating both high resolution 2D and 3D structures with the use of polylactic acid (PLA). PLA has been used to fabricate scaffold structures for tissue engineering, which has different hierarchical structure sizes. The fabrication speed was up to 40 mm/s and the pattern resolution could be improved to 10 μm.

  18. A 3D µPAD based on a multi-enzyme organic-inorganic hybrid nanoflower reactor.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Avidad, M; Salinas-Castillo, A; Capitán-Vallvey, L F

    2016-03-15

    This work reports on the development of a 3D microfluidic paper-based device (3D µPAD) for glucose detection using organic-inorganic hybrid nanoflower technology to immobilize the bi-enzymatic system (glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase). The system is based on nanoflowerssupported on cellulose paper (the microreactor zone) coupled to 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as the colorimetric probe in the detection zone. We used a digital camera for the quantitative analysis of glucose with the S coordinate of the HSV color space as the analytical parameter. Under optimal operational conditions, linearity was observed for glucose concentrations up to 300 μM, with a detection limit of 15.6 µM. The biosensor is reusable and remains stable for 75 days in conventional storage conditions. PMID:26386331

  19. Benchmark of Lower Hybrid coupling codes (Brambilla, GRILL3D-U, TOPLHA) with the FTU conventional grill experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Maggiora, Riccardo; Milanesio, Daniele; Mirizzi, Francesco; Panaccione, Luigi

    2011-12-01

    The present work compares and experimentally validates the results coming out from the following three Lower Hybrid (LH) coupling codes: Brambilla code (M. Brambilla), GRILL3D-U (Mikhail Irzak, A. F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russia) and TOPLHA (Politecnico di Torino, Italy). The conventional grill antenna, operating in FTU in different scenarios, is used as benchmark. The validation with experimental data is carried out with respect to the average reflection coefficients at the input of a row of the grill, considering two different phasings between adjacent waveguides: -90 ° and -75 °. A comparison between calculated power spectra is also presented. Good agreement can be observed for all the simulated plasma profiles and waveguide phasings between experimental data and codes, in particular for the most recent numerical tools, namely GRILL3D-U and TOPLHA.

  20. Growth and Transfer of Seamless 3D Graphene-Nanotube Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Dong; Li, Yilun; Wang, Gunuk; Fan, Xiujun; Jiang, Jinlong; Li, Lei; Ji, Yongsung; Ruan, Gedeng; Hauge, Robert H; Tour, James M

    2016-02-10

    Seamlessly connected graphene and carbon nanotube hybrids (GCNTs) have great potential as carbon platform structures in electronics due to their high conductivity and high surface area. Here, we introduce a facile method for making patterned GCNTs and their intact transfer onto other substrates. The mechanism for selective growth of vertically aligned CNTs (VA-CNTs) on the patterned graphene is discussed. The complete transfer of the GCNT pattern onto other substrates is possible because of the mechanical strength of the GCNT hybrids. Electrical conductivity measurements of the transferred GCNT structures show Ohmic contact through the VA-CNTs to graphene--evidence of its integrity after the transfer process. PMID:26789079

  1. Hybrid nickel manganese oxide nanosheet-3D metallic dendrite percolation network electrodes for high-rate electrochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuyen; Eugénio, Sónia; Boudard, Michel; Rapenne, Laetitia; Carmezim, M. João; Silva, Teresa M.; Montemor, M. Fátima

    2015-07-01

    This work reports the fabrication, by electrodeposition and post-thermal annealing, of hybrid electrodes for high rate electrochemical energy storage composed of nickel manganese oxide (Ni0.86Mn0.14O) nanosheets over 3D open porous dendritic NiCu foams. The hybrid electrodes are made of two different percolation networks of nanosheets and dendrites, and exhibit a specific capacitance value of 848 F g-1 at 1 A g-1. The electrochemical tests revealed that the electrodes display an excellent rate capability, characterized by capacitance retention of approximately 83% when the applied current density increases from 1 A g-1 to 20 A g-1. The electrodes also evidenced high charge-discharge cycling stability, which attained 103% after 1000 cycles.

  2. Design, synthesis and evaluation of pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-phenylamide hybrids as potent Janus kinase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingfang; Liu, Xiaofei; Hao, Meixi; Qiao, Jianan; Ju, Caoyun; Xue, Lingjing; Zhang, Can

    2016-06-15

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) plays an essential role in the signaling of hormone-like cytokines and growth factors, which has been convinced as an important target of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) therapy. In this study, a series of novel pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-phenylamide hybrids were designed and synthesized as potential JAK2 inhibitors through hybridization strategy. In vitro biological studies showed that most of these compounds exhibited potent activity against JAK2. Especially, compound 16c was identified as a suitable lead compound, which showed favorable pharmacokinetic profiles in rats (F=73.57%), excellent in vitro efficacy against erythroleukemic cells (TF-1, IC50=0.14μM), and high selectivity for JAK2 (IC50=6nM with >97-fold selectivity vs JAK3). PMID:27130359

  3. Hybrid 3D structures of ZnO nanoflowers and PdO nanoparticles as a highly selective methanol sensor.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, D; Huang, K Y; Chattopadhyay, P P; Ho, M S; Fecht, H-J; Bhattacharyya, P

    2016-05-10

    The present study concerns the enhancement of methanol selectivity of three dimensional (3D) nanoflowers (NFs) of ZnO by dispersing nickel oxide (NiO) and palladium oxide (PdO) nanoparticles on the surface of the nanoflowers to form localized hybrid nano-junctions. The nanoflowers were fabricated through a liquid phase deposition technique and the modification was achieved by addition of NiCl and PdCl2 solutions. In addition to the detailed structural (like X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray mapping, XPS) and morphological characterization (by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM)), the existence of different defect states (viz. oxygen vacancy) was also confirmed by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The sensing properties of the pristine and metal oxide nanoparticle (NiO/PdO)-ZnO NF hybrid sensor structures, towards different alcohol vapors (methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol) were investigated in the concentration range of 0.5-700 ppm at 100-350 °C. Methanol selectivity study against other interfering species, viz. ethanol, 2-propanol, acetone, benzene, xylene and toluene was also investigated. It was found that the PdO-ZnO NF hybrid system offered enhanced selectivity towards methanol at low temperature (150 °C) compared to the NiO-ZnO NF and pristine ZnO NF counterparts. The underlying mechanism for such improvement has been discussed with respective energy band diagram and preferential dissociation of target species on such 3D hybrid structures. The corresponding improvement in transient characteristics has also been co-related with the proposed model. PMID:27048794

  4. Advanced 3D electromagnetic and particle-in-cell modeling on structured/unstructured hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D.B.; Pasik, M.F.; Kiefer, M.L.; Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    New techniques have been recently developed that allow unstructured, free meshes to be embedded into standard 3-dimensional, rectilinear, finite-difference time-domain grids. The resulting hybrid-grid modeling capability allows the higher resolution and fidelity of modeling afforded by free meshes to be combined with the simplicity and efficiency of rectilinear techniques. Integration of these new methods into the full-featured, general-purpose QUICKSILVER electromagnetic, Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code provides new modeling capability for a wide variety of electromagnetic and plasma physics problems. To completely exploit the integration of this technology into QUICKSILVER for applications requiring the self-consistent treatment of charged particles, this project has extended existing PIC methods for operation on these hybrid unstructured/rectilinear meshes. Several technical issues had to be addressed in order to accomplish this goal, including the location of particles on the unstructured mesh, adequate conservation of charge, and the proper handling of particles in the transition region between structured and unstructured portions of the hybrid grid.

  5. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  6. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  7. Electrochemically formed 3D hierarchical thin films of cobalt-manganese (Co-Mn) hexacyanoferrate hybrids for electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam Venugopal, Narendra Kumar; Joseph, James

    2016-02-01

    Here we report the feasibility of forming 3D nanostructured hexacyanoferates of Cobalt and Manganese (Co-MnHCF) on GC surface by a facile electrochemical method. This 3D architecture on glassy carbon electrode characterised systematically by voltammetry and other physical characterisation techniques like Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) etc,. Electrochemical Quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) studies helped out to calculate the total mass change during Co-MnHCF formation. Electrochemical studies reveal that the formal redox potentials of both Co and MnHCF films remained close to that of newly formed Co-MnHCF hybrid films. These 3D modified films were successfully applied for two different electrochemical applications i) For pseudocapacitor studies in KNO3 medium ii) Investigated the electrocatalytic behaviour of redox film towards water oxidation reaction in alkaline medium. Electrochemical performances of newly formed Co-MnHCF are compared with their individual transition metal (Co, Mn) hexacyanoferrates. The resulting material shows a specific capacitance of 350 F g-1 through its fast reversible redox reaction of electrochemically formed Co-MnHCF modified film. Interestingly we showed the overpotential of 450 mV (from its thermodynamic voltage 1.2 V) to attain its optimum current density of 10 mA cm-2 for O2 evolution in alkaline medium.

  8. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  9. A hybrid radial basis function-pseudospectral method for thermal convection in a 3-D spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G. B.; Flyer, N.; Yuen, D. A.

    2010-07-01

    A novel hybrid spectral method that combines radial basis function (RBF) and Chebyshev pseudospectral methods in a "2 + 1" approach is presented for numerically simulating thermal convection in a 3-D spherical shell. This is the first study to apply RBFs to a full 3-D physical model in spherical geometry. In addition to being spectrally accurate, RBFs are not defined in terms of any surface-based coordinate system such as spherical coordinates. As a result, when used in the lateral directions, as in this study, they completely circumvent the pole issue with the further advantage that nodes can be "scattered" over the surface of a sphere. In the radial direction, Chebyshev polynomials are used, which are also spectrally accurate and provide the necessary clustering near the boundaries to resolve boundary layers. Applications of this new hybrid methodology are given to the problem of convection in the Earth's mantle, which is modeled by a Boussinesq fluid at infinite Prandtl number. To see whether this numerical technique warrants further investigation, the study limits itself to an isoviscous mantle. Benchmark comparisons are presented with other currently used mantle convection codes for Rayleigh number (Ra) 7 × 103 and 105. Results from a Ra = 106 simulation are also given. The algorithmic simplicity of the code (mostly due to RBFs) allows it to be written in less than 400 lines of MATLAB and run on a single workstation. We find that our method is very competitive with those currently used in the literature.

  10. Curing behavior and reaction kinetics of binder resins for 3D-printing investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möginger, B.; Kehret, L.; Hausnerova, B.; Steinhaus, J.

    2016-05-01

    3D-Printing is an efficient method in the field of additive manufacturing. In order to optimize the properties of manufactured parts it is essential to adapt the curing behavior of the resin systems with respect to the requirements. Thus, effects of resin composition, e.g. due to different additives such as thickener and curing agents, on the curing behavior have to be known. As the resin transfers from a liquid to a solid glass the time dependent ion viscosity was measured using DEA with flat IDEX sensors. This allows for a sensitive measurement of resin changes as the ion viscosity changes two to four decades. The investigated resin systems are based on the monomers styrene and HEMA. To account for the effects of copolymerization in the calculation of the reaction kinetics it was assumed that the reaction can be considered as a homo-polymerization having a reaction order n≠1. Then the measured ion viscosity curves are fitted with the solution of the reactions kinetics - the time dependent degree of conversion (DC-function) - for times exceeding the initiation phase representing the primary curing. The measured ion viscosity curves can nicely be fitted with the DC-function and the determined fit parameters distinguish distinctly between the investigated resin compositions.

  11. Antigenic and 3D structural characterization of soluble X4 and hybrid X4-R5 HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 is decorated with trimeric glycoprotein spikes that enable infection by engaging CD4 and a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. The variable loop 3 (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) is the main determinant for coreceptor usage. The predominant CCR5 using (R5) HIV-1 Env has been intensively studied in function and structure, whereas the trimeric architecture of the less frequent, but more cytopathic CXCR4 using (X4) HIV-1 Env is largely unknown, as are the consequences of sequence changes in and near V3 on antigenicity and trimeric Env structure. Results Soluble trimeric gp140 Env constructs were used as immunogenic mimics of the native spikes to analyze their antigenic properties in the context of their overall 3D structure. We generated soluble, uncleaved, gp140 trimers from a prototypic T-cell line-adapted (TCLA) X4 HIV-1 strain (NL4-3) and a hybrid (NL4-3/ADA), in which the V3 spanning region was substituted with that from the primary R5 isolate ADA. Compared to an ADA (R5) gp140, the NL4-3 (X4) construct revealed an overall higher antibody accessibility, which was most pronounced for the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), but also observed for mAbs against CD4 induced (CD4i) epitopes and gp41 mAbs. V3 mAbs showed significant binding differences to the three constructs, which were refined by SPR analysis. Of interest, the NL4-3/ADA construct with the hybrid NL4-3/ADA CD4bs showed impaired CD4 and CD4bs mAb reactivity despite the presence of the essential elements of the CD4bs epitope. We obtained 3D reconstructions of the NL4-3 and the NL4-3/ADA gp140 trimers via electron microscopy and single particle analysis, which indicates that both constructs inherit a propeller-like architecture. The first 3D reconstruction of an Env construct from an X4 TCLA HIV-1 strain reveals an open conformation, in contrast to recently published more closed structures from R5 Env. Exchanging the X4 V3 spanning region for that of R5 ADA did not alter the open

  12. 3D carbon/cobalt-nickel mixed-oxide hybrid nanostructured arrays for asymmetric supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhui; Jiang, Jian; Sun, Zhipeng; Luo, Jingshan; Fan, Zhanxi; Huang, Xintang; Zhang, Hua; Yu, Ting

    2014-07-23

    The electrochemical performance of supercapacitors relies not only on the exploitation of high-capacity active materials, but also on the rational design of superior electrode architectures. Herein, a novel supercapacitor electrode comprising 3D hierarchical mixed-oxide nanostructured arrays (NAs) of C/CoNi3 O4 is reported. The network-like C/CoNi3 O4 NAs exhibit a relatively high specific surface area; it is fabricated from ultra-robust Co-Ni hydroxide carbonate precursors through glucose-coating and calcination processes. Thanks to their interconnected three-dimensionally arrayed architecture and mesoporous nature, the C/CoNi3 O4 NA electrode exhibits a large specific capacitance of 1299 F/g and a superior rate performance, demonstrating 78% capacity retention even when the discharge current jumps by 100 times. An optimized asymmetric supercapacitor with the C/CoNi3 O4 NAs as the positive electrode is fabricated. This asymmetric supercapacitor can reversibly cycle at a high potential of 1.8 V, showing excellent cycling durability and also enabling a remarkable power density of ∼13 kW/kg with a high energy density of ∼19.2 W·h/kg. Two such supercapacitors linked in series can simultaneously power four distinct light-emitting diode indicators; they can also drive the motor of remote-controlled model planes. This work not only presents the potential of C/CoNi3 O4 NAs in thin-film supercapacitor applications, but it also demonstrates the superiority of electrodes with such a 3D hierarchical architecture. PMID:24643977

  13. Sequence-dependent theory of oligonucleotide hybridization kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-05-07

    A theoretical approach to the prediction of the sequence and temperature-dependent rate constants for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions has been developed based on the theory of relaxation kinetics. One-sided and two-sided melting reaction mechanisms for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions have been considered, analyzed, modified, and compared to select a physically consistent as well as robust model for prediction of the relaxation times of DNA hybridization reactions that agrees with the experimental evidence. The temperature- and sequence-dependent parameters of the proposed model have been estimated using available experimental data. The relaxation time model that we developed has been combined with the nearest neighbor model of hybridization thermodynamics to estimate the temperature- and sequence-dependent rate constants of an oligonucleotide hybridization reaction. The model-predicted rate constants are compared to experimentally determined rate constants for the same oligonucleotide hybridization reactions. Finally, we consider a few important applications of kinetically controlled DNA hybridization reactions.

  14. Development and testing of stable, invariant, isoparametric curvilinear 2- and 3-D hybrid-stress elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Punch, E. F.; Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Linear and quadratic Serendipity hybrid-stress elements are examined in respect of stability, coordinate invariance, and optimality. A formulation based upon symmetry group theory successfully addresses these issues in undistorted geometries and is fully detailed for plane elements. The resulting least-order stable invariant stress polynomials can be applied as astute approximations in distorted cases through a variety of tensor components and variational principles. A distortion sensitivity study for two- and three-dimensional elements provides favorable numerical comparisons with the assumed displacement method.

  15. Titan's plasma environment: 3D hybrid simulation and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    A multiscale combined (fluid--kinetic) numerical method allows us to use more realistic plasma models at Titan. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. We study the Titan's plasma environment in case of high, intermediate and low exosphere density in Chamberlain models. The background ions H+, O+ and pickup ions H2+, CH4+ and N2+ are described in a kinetic approximation, where the electrons are approximated as a fluid. We also include an immobile ionosphere at the height 1300km. In this report we consider the multiscale spatial structure for plasma and electromagnetic field, and the velocity distribution of ions that results from the coupling between background ions and pickup ions. Special attention will be paid for the comparisons our numerical results with Voyager and Cassini observations (see e.g. [Sittler, Hartle, et al., 2005; Hartle, Sittler et al., 2006]). We shall estimate of mass loading rate for Ta, energy input to upper atmosphere from ambient +pickup ions, and the T9 encounter with two crossings. \

  16. Crystalline Hybrid Polyphenylene Macromolecules from Octaalkynylsilsesquioxanes, Crystal Structures, and a Potential Route to 3-D Graphenes

    SciTech Connect

    Roll, Mark F.; Kampf, Jeffrey W.; Laine, Richard M.

    2011-05-10

    We report here the Diels–Alder reaction of octa(diphenylacetylene)silsesquioxane [DPA₈OS] with tetraphenylcyclopentadienone or tetra(p-tolyl)cyclopentadienone to form octa(hexaphenylbenzene)octasilsesquioxane, (Ph₆C₆)₈OS, or octa(tetratolyldiphenylbenzene)octasilsesquioxane, (p-Tolyl₄Ph₂C₆)₈OS. Likewise, tetra(p-tolyl)cyclopentadienone reacts with octa(p-tolylethynylphenyl)OS to form octa(pentatolylphenylbenzene)octasilsesquioxane (p-Tolyl₅PhC₆)₈OS. These compounds, with molecular weights of 4685–5245 Da, were isolated and characterized using a variety of analytical methods. The crystal structure of DPA₈OS offers a 3 nm³ unit cell with Z = 1. The crystal structure of (Ph₆C₆)₈OS was determined to have a triclinic unit cell of 11 nm³ with Z = 1. The latter structure is believed to be the largest discrete molecular structure reported with 330 carbons. Efforts to dehydrogenatively cyclize (Scholl reaction) the hexaarylbenzene groups to form 3-D octgraphene compounds are described.

  17. Fabrication of 3D porous SF/β-TCP hybrid scaffolds for bone tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jung; Min, Kyung Dan; Lee, Min Chae; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Lee, Jung Min; Park, Ye Ri; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Ju Yeon; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-07-01

    Bio-ceramic is a biomaterial actively studied in the field of bone tissue engineering. But, only certain ceramic materials can resolve the corrosion problem and possess the biological affinity of conventional metal biomaterials. Therefore, the recent development of composites of hybrid composites and polymers has been widely studied. In this study, we aimed to select the best scaffold of silk fibroin and β-TCP hybrid for bone tissue engineering. We fabricated three groups of scaffold such as SF (silk fibroin scaffold), GS (silk fibroin/small granule size of β-TCP scaffold) and GM (silk fibroin/medium granule size of β-TCP scaffold), and we compared the characteristics of each group. During characterization of the scaffold, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for structural analysis. We compared the physiological properties of the scaffold regarding the swelling ratio, water uptake and porosity. To evaluate the mechanical properties, we examined the compressive strength of the scaffold. During in vitro testing, we evaluated cell attachment and cell proliferation (CCK-8). Finally, we confirmed in vivo new bone regeneration from the implanted scaffolds using histological staining and micro-CT. From these evaluations, the fabricated scaffold demonstrated high porosity with good inter-pore connectivity, showed good biocompatibility and high compressive strength and modulus. In particular, the present study indicates that the GM scaffold using β-TCP accelerates new bone regeneration of implanted scaffolds. Accordingly, our scaffold is expected to act a useful application in the field of bone tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1779-1787, 2016. PMID:26999521

  18. 3D Bridged Carbon Nanoring/Graphene Hybrid Paper as a High-Performance Lateral Heat Spreader.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianwei; Shi, Gang; Jiang, Cai; Ju, Su; Jiang, Dazhi

    2015-12-01

    Graphene paper (GP) has attracted great attention as a heat dissipation material due to its unique thermal transfer property exceeding the limit of graphite. However, the relatively poor thermal transfer properties in the normal direction of GP restricts its wider applications in thermal management. In this work, a 3D bridged carbon nanoring (CNR)/graphene hybrid paper is constructed by the intercalation of polymer carbon source and metal catalyst particles, and the subsequent in situ growth of CNRs in the confined intergallery spaces between graphene sheets through thermal annealing. Further investigation demonstrates that the CNRs are covalently bonded to the graphene sheets and highly improve the thermal transport in the normal direction of the CNR/graphene hybrid paper. This full-carbon architecture shows excellent heat dissipation ability and is much more efficient in removing hot spots than the reduced GP without CNR bridges. This highly thermally conductive CNR/graphene hybrid paper can be easily integrated into next generation commercial high-power electronics and stretchable/foldable devices as high-performance lateral heat spreader materials. This full-carbon architecture also has a great potential in acting as electrodes in supercapacitors or hydrogen storage devices due to the high surface area. PMID:26476622

  19. 1D-3D hybrid modeling—from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time

    PubMed Central

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M.; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator—which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to

  20. Hybrid (Kinetic Ion/Fluid Electron) Simulations of Reconnection Including Electron Pressure Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, A.; Daughton, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Fully kinetic simulations have shown that the structure of the thin current sheets that form during collisionless reconnection can fall into a variety of regimes depending on the electron pressure anisotropy [1]. Furthermore, recent two-fluid simulations with anisotropic electron equations of state appropriate for reconnection confirm that the electron pressure anisotropy may drive highly elongated current sheets in the reconnection exhaust [2]. While fully kinetic simulations are useful to model small regions of the Earth's magnetosphere, they are still far too expensive for global modeling. Thus, we have implemented the electron equations of state in the hybrid (kinetic ions and fluid electrons) code H3D [3], and initial 2D hybrid simulations of reconnection agree well with fully kinetic simulations. The updated hybrid code is a first step towards including electron anisotropy and full ion kinetics in global simulations of Earth's magnetosphere and laboratory experiments. [1] Le et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 135004 (2013)[2] Ohia et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 115004 (2012) [3] Karimabadi et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 062308 (2014)

  1. In vitro characterization of design and compressive properties of 3D-biofabricated/decellularized hybrid grafts for tracheal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher; Sheshadri, Priyanka; Ketchum, Jessica M; Narayanan, Lokesh K; Weinberger, Paul M; Shirwaiker, Rohan A

    2016-06-01

    Infection or damage to the trachea, a thin walled and cartilage reinforced conduit that connects the pharynx and larynx to the lungs, leads to serious respiratory medical conditions which can often prove fatal. Current clinical strategies for complex tracheal reconstruction are of limited availability and efficacy, but tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches may provide viable alternatives. In this study, we have developed a new "hybrid graft" approach that utilizes decellularized tracheal tissue along with a resorbable polymer scaffold, and holds promise for potential clinical applications. First, we evaluated the effect of our decellularization process on the compression properties of porcine tracheal segments, and noted approximately 63% decrease in resistance to compression following decellularization. Next we developed four C-shape scaffold designs by varying the base geometry and thickness, and fabricated polycaprolactone scaffolds using a combination of 3D-Bioplotting and thermally-assisted forming. All scaffolds designs were evaluated in vitro under three different environmental testing conditions to determine the design that offered the best resistance to compression. These were further studied to determine the effect of gamma radiation sterilization and cyclic compression loading. Finally, hybrid grafts were developed by securing these optimal design scaffolds to decellularized tracheal segments and evaluated in vitro under physiological testing conditions. Results show that the resistance to compression offered by the hybrid grafts created using gamma radiation sterilized scaffolds was comparable to that of fresh tracheal segments. Given that current clinical attempts at tracheal transplantation using decellularized tissue have been fraught with luminal collapse and complications, our data support the possibility that future embodiments using a hybrid graft approach may reduce the need for intraluminal stenting in tracheal transplant

  2. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  3. Piezoresistive Sensor with High Elasticity Based on 3D Hybrid Network of Sponge@CNTs@Ag NPs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Nishuang; Shi, Yuling; Liu, Weijie; Yue, Yang; Wang, Siliang; Ma, Yanan; Wen, Li; Li, Luying; Long, Fei; Zou, Zhengguang; Gao, Yihua

    2016-08-31

    Pressure sensors with high elasticity are in great demand for the realization of intelligent sensing, but there is a need to develope a simple, inexpensive, and scalable method for the manufacture of the sensors. Here, we reported an efficient, simple, facile, and repeatable "dipping and coating" process to manufacture a piezoresistive sensor with high elasticity, based on homogeneous 3D hybrid network of carbon nanotubes@silver nanoparticles (CNTs@Ag NPs) anchored on a skeleton sponge. Highly elastic, sensitive, and wearable sensors are obtained using the porous structure of sponge and the synergy effect of CNTs/Ag NPs. Our sensor was also tested for over 2000 compression-release cycles, exhibiting excellent elasticity and cycling stability. Sensors with high performance and a simple fabrication process are promising devices for commercial production in various electronic devices, for example, sport performance monitoring and man-machine interfaces. PMID:27482721

  4. Thiol–ene-based biological/synthetic hybrid biomatrix for 3-D living cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kedi; Fu, Yao; Chung, WeiJu; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Cui, Yujia; Hsu, Ian C.; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2013-01-01

    Although various cell encapsulation materials are available commercially for a wide range of potential therapeutic cells, their combined clinical impact remains inconsistent. Synthetic materials such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels are mechanically robust and have been extensively explored but lack natural biofunctionality. Naturally derived materials including collagen, fibrin and alginate-chitosan are often labile and mechanically weak. In this paper we report the development of a hybrid biomatrix based on the thiol-ene reaction of PEG diacrylate (PEGdA) and cysteine/PEG-modified gelatin (gel-PEG-Cys). We hypothesized that covalent crosslinking decreases gelatin dissolution thus increasing gelatin resident time within the matrix and the duration of its biofunctionality; at the same time the relative ratio of PEGdA to gel-PEG-Cys in the matrix formulation directly affects hydrogel bulk and local microenvironment properties. Bulk viscoelastic properties were highly dependent on PEGdA concentration and total water content, while gel-PEG-Cys concentration was more critical to swelling profiles. Microviscoelastic properties were related to polymer concentration. The covalently crosslinked gel-PEG-Cys with PEGdA decreased gelatin dissolution out of the matrix and collagenase-mediated degradation. Fibroblasts and keratinocyte increased adhesion density and formed intercellular connections on stiffer hydrogel surfaces, while cells exhibited more cytoplasmic spreading and proliferation when entrapped within softer hydrogels. Hence, this material system contains multiparametric factors that can easily be controlled to modulate the chemical, physical and biological properties of the biomatrix for soft tissue scaffolding and cell presentation to reconstruct lost tissue architecture and physical functionality. PMID:22484717

  5. Hybrid Metrology and 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.

    2011-11-10

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R and D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials...). Therefore, time for R and D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam.In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R and D and production. The final goal for 'chip makers' is to improve yield and save R and D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2{sup nd} part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  6. Hybrid Metrology & 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.; Irmer, B.; Penzkofer, C.

    2011-11-01

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R&D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials…). Therefore, time for R&D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam. In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R&D and production. The final goal for "chip makers" is to improve yield and save R&D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2nd part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  7. Study of human body: Kinematics and kinetics of a martial arts (Silat) performers using 3D-motion capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Ahmad Afiq Sabqi Awang; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Azraai, Nur Zaidi

    2015-04-01

    The Interest in this studies of human kinematics goes back very far in human history drove by curiosity or need for the understanding the complexity of human body motion. To find new and accurate information about the human movement as the advance computing technology became available for human movement that can perform. Martial arts (silat) were chose and multiple type of movement was studied. This project has done by using cutting-edge technology which is 3D motion capture to characterize and to measure the motion done by the performers of martial arts (silat). The camera will detect the markers (infrared reflection by the marker) around the performer body (total of 24 markers) and will show as dot in the computer software. The markers detected were analyzing using kinematic kinetic approach and time as reference. A graph of velocity, acceleration and position at time,t (seconds) of each marker was plot. Then from the information obtain, more parameters were determined such as work done, momentum, center of mass of a body using mathematical approach. This data can be used for development of the effectiveness movement in martial arts which is contributed to the people in arts. More future works can be implemented from this project such as analysis of a martial arts competition.

  8. CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW modeling of the temporal dynamics of NSTX NBI+HHFW discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu. V.; Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Taylor, G.; Bonoli, P. T.

    2014-02-12

    The CQL3D Fokker-Planck code[1] has been upgraded to include physics of finite-orbit-width (FOW) guiding-center orbits[2,3], as compared with the previous zero-orbit-width (ZOW) model, and a recent first-order orbit calculation[2]. The Fast Ion Diagnostic FIDA[4,5] signal resulting from neutral beam (NBI) and high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) RF power injected into the NSTX spherical tokamak can now be modeled quite accurately, using ion distributions from the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW code, a rapidly executing variant that includes FOW+gyro-orbit losses to the plasma edge, FOW effects on NBI injection and HHFW diffusion, but does not include neoclassical radial diffusion. Accurate simulation of prompt fast ion (FI) losses is a key feature of the marked modeling improvement relative to previous ZOW results. By comparing NBI-only and NBI+HHFW shots, independent confirmation of the usual 35% edge loss of HHFW in NSTX is obtained. Further, HHFW prompt losses from the plasma core are shown to be 3X as large (>25%) as the NBI-only case. The modulated NBI and time-dependent background plasma variations and charge exchange losses of fast ions are accounted for, and the temporal neutron variation is in approximate agreement with NSTX observations.

  9. Near field 3D displacement of El Mayor-Cupapah Earthquake: A hybrid approach. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Limon, F. J.; Nissen, E.; Glennie, C. L.; Krishnan, A.; Oskin, M. E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Leprince, S.; Saripalli, S.; Arregui, S. M.; Borsa, A. A.; Kreylos, O.; Banesh, D.; Fletcher, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The surface rupture produced on April 4th of 2010 by the M 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake is an ideal target to be analyzed by remote sensing techniques. It produced over 100 km of scarps, with vertical and horizontal slip on the order of 2 to 3 m in scarcely vegetated, rugged terrain underlain by mostly igneous rocks. A 3D displacement field (DF) was calculated by matching pre- to post-event airborne LiDAR point clouds through the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which first segments the point clouds into discrete windows, and for each, iteratively converges on a rigid body transformation comprising a translation and a rotation that best aligns the pre- to post-event point clouds. After testing different window sizes, we used a square window 100m a side. The El Mayor-Cucapah LiDAR data sets present special challenges for the ICP technique. The point clouds differ considerably in point density, by ~1:700. This, and the lower precision of the pre-earthquake data, limit the accuracy of the DF results. Despite these issues, the vertical and East-West (E-W) components of the DF from ICP very clearly delineate the trace of the surface rupture, showing east-side down dextral-normal motion in agreement with field measurements and the focal mechanism reported for this event. A systematic error in the LiDAR instrument used for the pre-event survey caused severe distortion of the North-South (N-S) component of the LiDAR returns. After reprocessing the source pre-event point cloud in various ways to correct for the systematic error, a more plausible pattern for the N-S component was obtained for the DF. To have another perspective for the horizontal DF, a subpixel correlation analysis of optical satellite images (SPOT 2.5 m panchromatic images) before and after the earthquake, was performed using the COSI-Corr software. We combined the N-S component from this analysis with the E-W and vertical components of the ICP results, and present the analysis of the resulting

  10. Multi-sensor super-resolution for hybrid range imaging with application to 3-D endoscopy and open surgery.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Thomas; Haase, Sven; Bauer, Sebastian; Wasza, Jakob; Kilgus, Thomas; Maier-Hein, Lena; Stock, Christian; Hornegger, Joachim; Feußner, Hubertus

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-sensor super-resolution framework for hybrid imaging to super-resolve data from one modality by taking advantage of additional guidance images of a complementary modality. This concept is applied to hybrid 3-D range imaging in image-guided surgery, where high-quality photometric data is exploited to enhance range images of low spatial resolution. We formulate super-resolution based on the maximum a-posteriori (MAP) principle and reconstruct high-resolution range data from multiple low-resolution frames and complementary photometric information. Robust motion estimation as required for super-resolution is performed on photometric data to derive displacement fields of subpixel accuracy for the associated range images. For improved reconstruction of depth discontinuities, a novel adaptive regularizer exploiting correlations between both modalities is embedded to MAP estimation. We evaluated our method on synthetic data as well as ex-vivo images in open surgery and endoscopy. The proposed multi-sensor framework improves the peak signal-to-noise ratio by 2 dB and structural similarity by 0.03 on average compared to conventional single-sensor approaches. In ex-vivo experiments on porcine organs, our method achieves substantial improvements in terms of depth discontinuity reconstruction. PMID:26201876

  11. 3D Interdigital Au/MnO2 /Au Stacked Hybrid Electrodes for On-Chip Microsupercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haibo; Pei, Zhibin; Fan, Hongjin; Ye, Changhui

    2016-06-01

    On-chip microsupercapacitors (MSCs) have application in powering microelectronic devices. Most of previous MSCs are made from carbon materials, which have high power but low energy density. In this work, 3D interdigital Au/MnO2 /Au stacked MSCs have been fabricated based on laser printed flexible templates. This vertical-stacked electrode configuration can effectively increase the contact area between MnO2 active layer and Au conductive layer, and thus improve the electron transport and electrolyte ion diffusion, resulting in enhanced pseudocapacitive performance of MnO2 . The stacked electrode can achieve an areal capacitance up to 11.9 mF cm(-2) . Flexible and all-solid-state MSCs are assembled based on the sandwich hybrid electrodes and PVA/LiClO4 gel electrolyte and show outstanding high-rate capacity and mechanical flexibility. The laser printing technique in this work combined with the physical sputtering and electrodeposition allows fabrication of MSC array with random sizes and patterns, making them promising power sources for small-scale flexible microelectronic energy storage systems (e.g., next-generation smart phones). PMID:27116677

  12. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  13. First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mueller, J.; Kriegel, H.; Georgescu, E.; Halekas, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The spacecraft P1 of the new ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission passed the lunar wake for the first time on February 13, 2010. We present magnetic field and plasma data of this event and results of 3D hybrid simulations. As the solar wind magnetic field was highly dynamic during the passage, a simulation with stationary solar wind input cannot distinguish whether distortions were caused by these solar wind variations or by the lunar wake; therefore, a dynamic real-time simulation of the flyby has been performed. The input values of this simulation are taken from NASA OMNI data and adapted to the P1 data, resulting in a good agreement between simulation and measurements. Combined with the stationary simulation showing non-transient lunar wake structures, a separation of solar wind and wake effects is achieved. An anisotropy in the magnitude of the plasma bulk flow velocity caused by a non-vanishing magnetic field component parallel to the solar wind flow and perturbations created by counterstreaming ions in the lunar wake are observed in data and simulations. The simulations help to interpret the data granting us the opportunity to examine the entire lunar plasma environment and, thus, extending the possibilities of measurements alone: A comparison of a simulation cross section to theoretical predictions of MHD wave propagation shows that all three basic MHD modes are present in the lunar wake and that their expansion governs the lunar wake refilling process.

  14. Unsteady Analysis of Particle Transport and Deposition in the Human Lung: A Hybrid 3D/0D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Daniel C.; Kunz, Robert F.; Leemhuis, Laura S.; Banks, Syreeta S.; Kriete, Andres

    2003-11-01

    Three-dimensional CFD meshes including up the sixteenth generation of branching in a human tracheo-bronchial tree have been generated from surface data extracted using novel high-resolution bio-medical imaging and rendering methods. A zero-dimensional model for the deeper generations has been coupled with the three-dimensional model at each of the truncated branches. The 0D model imposes a time-varying volume to simulate realistic breathing cycles; it also includes a simple model for particle deposition. The resulting hybrid 3D/0D model has been exercised to compute the transport and deposition rates of particles of different sizes through full breathing cycles. Results are compared to earlier steady-flow CFD results, to results obtained using one-dimensional functional models of the human lung, and to experimental and modeling results for idealized branching-duct configurations. The aim of the research is to develop a virtual human respiratory system that can be used to address issues in pulmonary health in

  15. A Web 2.0/Web3D Hybrid Platform for Engaging Students in e-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Byl, Penny; Taylor, Janet

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the Web 2.0 ethos with respect to the application of pedagogy within 3D online virtual environments. 3D worlds can create a synthetic experience capturing the essence of "being" in a particular world or context. The AliveX3D platform adopts the Web 2.0 ethos and applies it to online 3D virtual environment forming a Web…

  16. A hybrid 3D-Var data assimilation scheme for joint state and parameter estimation: application to morphodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P.; Nichols, N. K.; Dance, S.

    2011-12-01

    Data assimilation is typically used to provide initial conditions for state estimation; combining model predictions with observational data to produce an updated model state that most accurately characterises the true system state whilst keeping the model parameters fixed. This updated model state is then used to initiate the next model forecast. However, even with perfect initial data, inaccurate representation of model parameters will lead to the growth of model error and therefore affect the ability of our model to accurately predict the true system state. A key question in model development is how to estimate parameters a priori. In most cases, parameter estimation is addressed as a separate issue to state estimation and model calibration is performed offline in a separate calculation. Here we demonstrate how, by employing the technique of state augmentation, it is possible to use data assimilation to estimate uncertain model parameters concurrently with the model state as part of the assimilation process. We present a novel hybrid data assimilation algorithm developed for application to parameter estimation in morphodynamic models. The new approach is based on a computationally inexpensive 3D-Var scheme, where the specification of the covariance matrices is crucial for success. For combined state-parameter estimation, it is particularly important that the cross-covariances between the parameters and the state are given a good a priori specification. Early experiments indicated that in order to yield reliable estimates of the true parameters, a flow dependent representation of the state-parameter cross covariances is required. By combining ideas from 3D-Var and the extended Kalman filter we have developed a novel hybrid assimilation scheme that captures the flow dependent nature of the state-parameter cross covariances without the computational expense of explicitly propagating the full system covariance matrix. We will give details of the formulation of this

  17. Kinetic Mechanisms in Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or “probe”, species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e. duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes, and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  18. Kinetic mechanisms in morpholino-DNA surface hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao; Levicky, Rastislav

    2011-08-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or "probe", species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e., duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  19. A hybrid Cartesian/immersed boundary method for simulating flows with 3D, geometrically complex, moving bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2005-08-01

    A numerical method is developed for solving the 3D, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian domains containing immersed boundaries of arbitrary geometrical complexity moving with prescribed kinematics. The governing equations are discretized on a hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout using second-order accurate finite-difference formulas. The discrete equations are integrated in time via a second-order accurate dual-time-stepping, artificial compressibility iteration scheme. Unstructured, triangular meshes are employed to discretize complex immersed boundaries. The nodes of the surface mesh constitute a set of Lagrangian control points used to track the motion of the flexible body. At every instant in time, the influence of the body on the flow is accounted for by applying boundary conditions at Cartesian grid nodes located in the exterior but in the immediate vicinity of the body by reconstructing the solution along the local normal to the body surface. Grid convergence tests are carried out for the flow induced by an oscillating sphere in a cubic cavity, which show that the method is second-order accurate. The method is validated by applying it to calculate flow in a Cartesian domain containing a rigid sphere rotating at constant angular velocity as well as flow induced by a flapping wing. The ability of the method to simulate flows in domains with arbitrarily complex moving bodies is demonstrated by applying to simulate flow past an undulating fish-like body and flow past an anatomically realistic planktonic copepod performing an escape-like maneuver.

  20. A 3D hybrid praseodymium-antimony-oxochloride compound: single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation and photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Gui-Gang; Hu, Bing; Li, Jian-Rong; Feng, Mei-Ling; Wang, Xin-Chen; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2013-11-01

    A 3D organic-inorganic hybrid compound, (2-MepyH)3[{Fe(1,10-phen)3}3][{Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(11.5)}(TDC)(4.5)({Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(9.5)} Cl)]·3(2-Mepy)·28H2O (1; 2-Mepy=2-methylpyridine, 1,10-phen=1,10-phenanthroline, H2TDC=thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid), was hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Unusually, two kinds of high-nuclearity clusters, namely [(Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl11)(COO)5](5-) and [(Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl9)Cl(COO)5](4-), coexist in the structure of compound 1; two of the latter clusters are doubly bridged by two μ2-Cl(-) moieties to form a new centrosymmetric dimeric cluster. An unprecedented spontaneous and reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation was observed, which simultaneously involved a notable organic-ligand movement between the metal ions and an alteration of the bridging ion in the dimeric cluster, induced by guest-release/re-adsorption, thereby giving rise to the interconversion between compound 1 and the compound (2-MepyH)3[{Fe(1,10-phen)3}3][{Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(11.5)}(TDC)4({Pr4Sb12O18Cl(10.5)(TDC)(0.5)(H2O)(1.5)}O(0.5))]·25H2O (1'). The mechanism of this transformation has also been discussed in great detail. Photocatalytic H2-evolution activity was observed for compound 1' under UV light with Pt as a co-catalyst and MeOH as a sacrificial electron donor. PMID:24114981

  1. SnS 3D Flowers with Superb Kinetic Properties for Anodic Use in Next-Generation Sodium Rechargeable Batteries.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunbi; Song, Kyeongse; Park, Mi Hui; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2016-05-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS) 3D flowers containing hierarchical nanosheet subunits are synthesized using a simple polyol process. The Li ion cells incorporating SnS 3D flowers exhibit an excellent rate capability, as well as good cycling stability, compared to SnS bulks and Sn nanoparticles. These desirable properties can be attributed to their unique morphology having not only large surface reaction area but also enough space between individual 2D nanosheets, which alleviates the pulverization of SnS. PMID:27008436

  2. HyFinBall: a two-handed, hybrid 2D/3D desktop VR interface for multi-dimensional visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Isaac; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wartell, Zachary J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the concept, working prototype and design space of a two-handed, hybrid spatial user interface for minimally immersive desktop VR targeted at multi-dimensional visualizations. The user interface supports dual button balls (6DOF isotonic controllers with multiple buttons) which automatically switch between 6DOF mode (xyz + yaw,pitch,roll) and planar-3DOF mode (xy + yaw) upon contacting the desktop. The mode switch automatically switches a button ball's visual representation between a 3D cursor and a mouse-like 2D cursor while also switching the available user interaction techniques (ITs) between 3D and 2D ITs. Further, the small form factor of the button ball allows the user to engage in 2D multi-touch or 3D gestures without releasing and re-acquiring the device. We call the device and hybrid interface the HyFinBall interface which is an abbreviation for `Hybrid Finger Ball.' We describe the user interface (hardware and software), the design space, as well as preliminary results of a formal user study. This is done in the context of a rich, visual analytics interface containing coordinated views with 2D and 3D visualizations and interactions

  3. Local hybrid functionals: An assessment for thermochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupp, Martin; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.

    2007-11-21

    Local hybrid functionals with position-dependent exact-exchange admixture are a new class of exchange-correlation functionals in density functional theory that promise to advance the available accuracy in many areas of application. Local hybrids with different local mixing functions (LMFs) governing the position dependence are validated for the heats of formation of the extended G3/99 set, and for two sets of barriers of hydrogen-transfer and heavy-atom transfer reactions (HTBH38 and NHTBH38 databases). A simple local hybrid Lh-SVWN with only Slater and exact exchange plus local correlation and a one-parameter LMF, g(r)=b({tau}{sub W}(r)/{tau}(r)), performs best and provides overall mean absolute errors for thermochemistry and kinetics that are a significant improvement over standard state-of-the-art global hybrid functionals. In particular, this local hybrid functional does not suffer from the systematic deterioration that standard functionals exhibit for larger molecules. In contrast, local hybrids based on generalized gradient approximation exchange tend to give rise to nonintuitive LMFs, and no improved functionals have been obtained along this route. The LMF is a real-space function and thus can be analyzed in detail. We use, in particular, graphical analyses to rationalize the performance of different local hybrids for thermochemistry and reaction barriers.

  4. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  5. Two highly connected POM-based hybrids varying from 2D to 3D: The use of the isomeric ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chunjing; Pang Haijun; Hu Mixia; Li Jia; Chen Yaguang

    2009-07-15

    Through employing two isomeric ligands, isonicotinic acid (HINA) and nicotinic acid (HNA), with different electron delocalization nature, two high-dimensional hybrids based on highly connected alpha-metatungstate clusters, [Na{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}Ag{sub 2}(HINA){sub 3}(INA)][Na(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}Ag{sub 2}(HINA){sub 4}(H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40})].2H{sub 2}O (1) and [Na{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}Ag{sub 6}(HNA){sub 2}(NA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40})].8H{sub 2}O (2), have been conventionally synthesized and structurally characterized. 1 exhibits an unusual 1D-in-2D pseudo-polyrotaxane entangled structure, namely, the 2D sheets [Na(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}Ag{sub 2}(HINA){sub 4}(H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40})]{sub n}{sup 3n-} are penetrated by enantiomorphous meso-helical chains [Na{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}Ag{sub 2}(HINA){sub 3}(INA)]{sub n}{sup 3n+}. In the 2D sheets, each [H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 6-} cluster is surrounded by six Ag and two Na atoms. 2 exhibits a 3D (4, 6)-net structure with (3{sup 2}6{sup 2}7{sup 2})(3{sup 2}4{sup 4}5{sup 4}6{sup 4}7)(3{sup 2}4{sup 4}6{sup 8}7) topology, in which each [H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 6-} cluster is connected with ten Ag atoms. These facts indicate that the isomeric ligands play a key role in the formation of final structures. From 1 to 2, the connection number of the [H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 6-} cluster changes from 8 to 10 and the dimensionality increases from 2 to 3. Moreover, 1 and 2 display photoluminescent properties in the blue range at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Two high-dimensional and highly connected alpha-metatungstate-compounds modified by Ag{sup I}-HINA/HNA TMCs were successful obtained and the effect of isomeric organic ligands on the structures was systematically elucidated.

  6. 3D porous and ultralight carbon hybrid nanostructure fabricated from carbon foam covered by monolayer of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for high performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuijian; Hou, Haoqing; Chen, Wei

    2015-04-01

    3D porous and self-supported carbon hybrids are promising electrode materials for supercapacitor application attributed to their prominent properties such as binder-free electrode fabrication process, excellent electric conductivity and high power density etc. We present here a facile chemical vapor deposition method to fabricate a novel 3D flexible carbon hybrid nanostructure by growing a monolayer of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes on the skeleton of carbon foam (N-CNTs/CF) with Fe nanoparticle as catalyst. With such 3D porous, flexible and ultralight carbon nanostructure as binder-free electrode material, large surface area is available and fast ionic transport is facilitated. Moreover, the carbon-based network can provide excellent electronic conductivity. The electrochemical studies demonstrate that the supercapacitor constructed from the N-CNTs/CF hybrid exhibit high power density of 69.3 kW kg-1 and good stability with capacitance retention ration above 95% after cycled at 50 A g-1 for 5000 cycles. Therefore, the prepared porous N-CNTs/CF nanostructure is expected to be a type of excellent electrode material for electrical double layer capacitors.

  7. Three 3D hybrid networks based on octamolybdates and different Cu I/Cu II-bis(triazole) motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Jing; Pang, Hai-Jun; Tang, Qun; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Chen, Ya-Guang

    2010-12-01

    Three 3D compounds based on octamolybdate clusters and various Cu I/Cu II-bis(triazole) motifs, [Cu I2btb][ β-Mo 8O 26] 0.5 ( 1), [Cu I2btpe][ β-Mo 8O 26] 0.5 ( 2), and [Cu II(btpe) 2][ β-Mo 8O 26] 0.5 ( 3) [btb=1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane, btpe=1,5-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pentane], were isolated via tuning flexible ligand spacer length and metal coordination preferences. In 1, the copper(I)-btb motif is a one-dimensional (1D) chain which is further linked by hexadentate β-[Mo 8O 26] 4- clusters via coordinating to Cu I cations giving a 3D structure. In 2, the copper(I)-btpe motif exhibits a "stairs"-like [Cu I2btpe] 2+ sheet, and the tetradentate β-[Mo 8O 26] 4- clusters interact with two neighboring [Cu I2btpe] 2+ sheets constructing a 3D framework. In 3, the copper(II)-btpe motif possesses a novel (2D→3D) interdigitated structure, which is further connected by the tetradentate β-[Mo 8O 26] 4- clusters forming a 3D framework. The thermal stability and luminescent properties of 1- 3 are investigated in the solid state.

  8. A hybrid 3D spatial access method based on quadtrees and R-trees for globe data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jun; Ke, Shengnan; Li, Xiaomin; Qi, Shuhua

    2009-10-01

    3D spatial access method for globe data is very crucial technique for virtual earth. This paper presents a brand-new maintenance method to index 3d objects distributed on the whole surface of the earth, which integrates the 1:1,000,000- scale topographic map tiles, Quad-tree and R-tree. Furthermore, when traditional methods are extended into 3d space, the performance of spatial index deteriorates badly, for example 3D R-tree. In order to effectively solve this difficult problem, a new algorithm of dynamic R-tree is put forward, which includes two sub-procedures, namely node-choosing and node-split. In the node-choosing algorithm, a new strategy is adopted, not like the traditional mode which is from top to bottom, but firstly from bottom to top then from top to bottom. This strategy can effectively solve the negative influence of node overlap. In the node-split algorithm, 2-to-3 split mode substitutes the traditional 1-to-2 mode, which can better concern the shape and size of nodes. Because of the rational tree shape, this R-tree method can easily integrate the concept of LOD. Therefore, it will be later implemented in commercial DBMS and adopted in time-crucial 3d GIS system.

  9. Integrated modelling of toroidal rotation with the 3D non-local drift-kinetic code and boundary models for JT-60U analyses and predictive simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Satake, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashi, N.; Kamiya, K.; Matsuyama, A.; Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Nakata, M.; Ide, S.; Urano, H.

    2015-07-01

    The integrated simulation framework for toroidal momentum transport is developed, which self-consistently calculates the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), the radial electric field {{E}r} and the resultant toroidal rotation {{V}φ} together with the scrape-off-layer (SOL) physics-based boundary model. The coupling of three codes, the 1.5D transport code TOPICS, the three-dimensional (3D) equilibrium code VMEC and the 3D δ f drift-kinetic equation solver FORTEC-3D, makes it possible to calculate the NTV due to the non-axisymmetric perturbed magnetic field caused by toroidal field coils. Analyses reveal that the NTV significantly influences {{V}φ} in JT-60U and {{E}r} holds the key to determine the NTV profile. The sensitivity of the {{V}φ} profile to the boundary rotation necessitates a boundary condition modelling for toroidal momentum. Owing to the high-resolution measurement system in JT-60U, the {{E}r} gradient is found to be virtually zero at the separatrix regardless of toroidal rotation velocities. Focusing on {{E}r} , the boundary model of toroidal momentum is developed in conjunction with the SOL/divertor plasma code D5PM. This modelling realizes self-consistent predictive simulations for operation scenario development in ITER.

  10. A hybrid framework of multiple active appearance models and global registration for 3D prostate segmentation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Lladó, Xavier; Freixenet, Jordi; Mitra, Jhimli; Vilanova, Joan C.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2012-02-01

    Real-time fusion of Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Trans Rectal Ultra Sound (TRUS) images aid in the localization of malignant tissues in TRUS guided prostate biopsy. Registration performed on segmented contours of the prostate reduces computational complexity and improves the multimodal registration accuracy. However, accurate and computationally efficient 3D segmentation of the prostate in MR images could be a challenging task due to inter-patient shape and intensity variability of the prostate gland. In this work, we propose to use multiple statistical shape and appearance models to segment the prostate in 2D and a global registration framework to impose shape restriction in 3D. Multiple mean parametric models of the shape and appearance corresponding to the apex, central and base regions of the prostate gland are derived from principal component analysis (PCA) of prior shape and intensity information of the prostate from the training data. The estimated parameters are then modified with the prior knowledge of the optimization space to achieve segmentation in 2D. The 2D segmented slices are then rigidly registered with the average 3D model produced by affine registration of the ground truth of the training datasets to minimize pose variations and impose 3D shape restriction. The proposed method achieves a mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) value of 0.88+/-0.11, and mean Hausdorff distance (HD) of 3.38+/-2.81 mm when validated with 15 prostate volumes of a public dataset in leave-one-out validation framework. The results achieved are better compared to some of the works in the literature.

  11. Ideal and non-ideal MHD regimes of wire array implosion obtained in 3D hybrid simulations and observed during experiments at NTF.

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, Vladimir Isaakovich; Fiala, V.; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Ivanov, Vladimir V.; LePell, Paul David; Fedin, Dmitry; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Travnicek, P.; Hellinger, P.; Deeney, Christopher; Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S.; Leboeuf, J. N.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    2004-11-01

    Recent 3D hybrid simulation of a plasma current-carrying column revealed two regimes of sausage and kink instability development. In the first regime, with small Hall parameter, development of instabilities leads to appearance of large-scale axial perturbations and eventually to the bending of the plasma column. In the second regime, with five times larger Hall parameter, small-scale perturbations dominated and no bending of the plasma column was observed. Simulation results are compared to recent experimental data, including laser probing, x-ray spectroscopy and time-gated x-ray imaging during wire array implosions at NTF.

  12. Strong and fast-recovery organic/inorganic hybrid AuNPs-supramolecular gels based on loofah-like 3D networks.

    PubMed

    He, Huiwen; Chen, Si; Tong, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yining; Wu, Bozhen; Ma, Meng; Wang, Xiaosong; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-21

    Super strong and fast-recovery organic/inorganic hybrid gold nanoparticle (AuNPs)-supramolecular gels based on a three-dimensional loofah-like nanoscale network self-assembled by polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) core supramolecular gelators are reported for the first time. Two series of POSS core organic/inorganic hybrid gelators, POSS-BOC-l-Homophenylalanine (POSS-Hpy) and POSS-Boc-Cys(Bzl)-OH (POSS-Cys), with two types of peripherals having different abilities for driving the self-assembly of AuNPs in gels were designed and synthesized, both of which self-assembled into three-dimensional loofah-like nanoscale gel networks producing hybrid physical gels with fast-recovery behaviors. The mechanical properties of the resultant hybrid gels were dramatically increased by as much as 100 times in the system of sulfur containing POSS-Cys gelators without destroying the fast-recovery behaviors, with the addition of AuNPs, which had direct interaction with AuNPs to give S-Au non-covalent driving force to lead AuNPs self-assemble onto the 3D loofah-like network nanofibres in the supramolecular hybrid gel system. However, in the POSS-Hpy gelator system without sulfur, no strong interaction with AuNPs existed and the POSS-Hpy nanocomposites showed no clear changes in morphology, thermal stability or rheological properties, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), tube-inversion and rotational rheometer measurements. This indicated that the organic/inorganic hybrid gelator POSS-Cys could be applied to the formation of soft materials in which AuNPs were self-assembled and closely arranged into three-dimensional nanoscale networks. This hybrid material has great potential for applications in self-recovery, nano- and micron-scale electronic devices, because it has both a large mechanical strength and a fast-recovery capability. PMID:26568047

  13. Facile Self-Cross-Linking Synthesis of 3D Nanoporous Co3O4/Carbon Hybrid Electrode Materials for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Qinglei; Kang, Danmiao; Gu, Jiajun; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di

    2016-06-29

    A hybrid electrode material with ultrafine Co3O4 nanoparticles embedded throughout a hierarchically nanoporous graphitic carbon matrix has been obtained via a facile self-cross-linking route. Sodium alginate, a biopolymer with an ability of cross-linking with multivalent cobalt cations to form ordered microcrystalline zones, is used as a carbon source to produce nanoporous carbon frameworks of the hybrids. Ultrafine Co3O4 nanoparticles with tunable particle size (3-30 nm) are in situ grown within the nanoporous graphitic carbon frameworks by a simple carbonization of Co-cross-linked alginate. The obtained hybrid electrodes exhibit high specific capacitance of 645, 548, 486, and 347 F/g at scan rates of 5, 10, 20, and 50 mV/s, respectively, and excellent cycle performance with only 1% fading in capacitance after 10 000 cycles at a high current density of 20 A/g. Such excellent capacitive performance is ascribed to the collaborative contributions of well-dispersed ultrafine Co3O4 nanoparticles and conductive nanoporous carbon frameworks. PMID:27266717

  14. Neutron powder diffraction study of the layer organic-inorganic hybrid iron(II) methylphosphonate-hydrate, Fe[(CD 3PO 3)(D 2O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léone, Philippe; Bellitto, Carlo; Bauer, Elvira M.; Righini, Guido; André, Gilles; Bourée, Françoise

    2008-11-01

    The crystal and magnetic structures of the hybrid organic-inorganic layer compound Fe[(CD 3PO 3)(D 2O)] have been studied by neutron powder diffraction as a function of temperature down to 1.5 K. The neutron diffraction pattern recorded at 200 K shows that the fully deuterated compound crystallizes in one of the two known forms of the undeuterated Fe[(CH 3PO 3)(H 2O)]. The crystal structure is orthorhombic, space group Pmn2 1, with the following unit-cell parameters: a=5.7095(1) Å, b=8.8053(3) Å and c=4.7987(1) Å; Z=2. The crystal structure remains unchanged on cooling from 200 to 1.5 K. Moreover, at low temperature, Fe[(CD 3PO 3)(D 2O)] shows a commensurate magnetic structure ( k=(0,0,0)). As revealed by bulk susceptibility measurements on Fe[(CH 3PO 3)(H 2O)], the magnetic structure corresponds to a canted antiferromagnet with a critical temperature TN=25 K. Neutron powder diffraction reveals that below TN=23.5 K the iron magnetic moments in Fe[(CD 3PO 3)(D 2O)] are antiferromagnetically coupled and oriented along the b-axis, perpendicular to the inorganic layers. No ferromagnetic component is observable in the neutron powder diffraction experiment, due to its too small value (<0.1 μB).

  15. Saturn's Magnetosphere Interaction with Titan for T9 Encounter: 3D Hybrid Modeling and Comparison with CAPS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Global dynamics of ionized and neutral gases in the environment of Titan plays an important role in the interaction of Saturn s magnetosphere with Titan. Several hybrid simulations of this problem have already been done (Brecht et al., 2000; Kallio et al., 2004; Modolo et al., 2007a; Simon et al., 2007a, 2007b; Modolo and Chanteur, 2008). Observational data from CAPS for the T9 encounter (Sittler et al., 2009) indicates an absence of O(+) heavy ions in the upstream that change the models of interaction which were discussed in current publications (Kallio et al., 2004; Modolo et al., 2007a; Simon et al., 2007a, 2007b; Ma et al., 2007; Szego et al., 2007). Further analysis of the CAPS data shows very low density or even an absence of H(+) ions in upstream. In this paper we discuss two models of the interaction of Saturn s magnetosphere with Titan: (A) high density of H(+) ions in the upstream flow (0.1/cu cm), and (B) low density of H(+) ions in the upstream flow (0.02/cu cm). The hybrid model employs a fluid description for electrons and neutrals, whereas a particle approach is used for ions. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes and solve self-consistently for electric and magnetic fields. The model atmosphere includes exospheric H(+), H(2+), N(2+)and CH(4+) pickup ion production as well as an immobile background ionosphere and a shell distribution for active ionospheric ions (M(sub i)=28 amu). The hybrid model allows us to account for the realistic anisotropic ion velocity distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations with isotropic temperatures. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of Alfven wing-like structures. The results of the ion dynamics in Titan s environment are compared with Cassini T9 encounter data (CAPS).

  16. Saturn's magnetosphere interaction with Titan for T9 encounter: 3D hybrid modeling and comparison with CAPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2012-02-01

    Global dynamics of ionized and neutral gases in the environment of Titan plays an important role in the interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with Titan. Several hybrid simulations of this problem have already been done (Brecht et al., 2000; Kallio et al., 2004; Modolo et al., 2007a; Simon et al., 2007a, 2007b; Modolo and Chanteur, 2008). Observational data from CAPS for the T9 encounter (Sittler et al., 2009) indicates an absence of O+ heavy ions in the upstream that change the models of interaction which were discussed in current publications (Kallio et al., 2004; Modolo et al., 2007a; Simon et al., 2007a, 2007b; Ma et al., 2007; Szego et al., 2007). Further analysis of the CAPS data shows very low density or even an absence of H+ ions in upstream. In this paper we discuss two models of the interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with Titan: (A) high density of H+ ions in the upstream flow (0.1 cm-3), and (B) low density of H+ ions in the upstream flow (0.02 cm-3). The hybrid model employs a fluid description for electrons and neutrals, whereas a particle approach is used for ions. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes and solve self-consistently for electric and magnetic fields. The model atmosphere includes exospheric H+, H2+, N2+ and CH4+ pickup ion production as well as an immobile background ionosphere and a shell distribution for active ionospheric ions (Mi=28 amu). The hybrid model allows us to account for the realistic anisotropic ion velocity distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations with isotropic temperatures. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of Alfvén wing-like structures. The results of the ion dynamics in Titan's environment are compared with Cassini T9 encounter data (CAPS).

  17. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  18. 3D hybrid tectono-stochastic modeling of naturally fractured reservoir: Application of finite element method and stochastic simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholizadeh Doonechaly, N.; Rahman, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs offers significant challenges due to the lack of a methodology that can utilize field data. To date several methods have been proposed by authors to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Among them is the unfolding/folding method which offers some degree of accuracy in estimating the probability of the existence of fractures in a reservoir. Also there are statistical approaches which integrate all levels of field data to simulate the fracture network. This approach, however, is dependent on the availability of data sources, such as seismic attributes, core descriptions, well logs, etc. which often make it difficult to obtain field wide. In this study a hybrid tectono-stochastic simulation is proposed to characterize a naturally fractured reservoir. A finite element based model is used to simulate the tectonic event of folding and unfolding of a geological structure. A nested neuro-stochastic technique is used to develop the inter-relationship between the data and at the same time it utilizes the sequential Gaussian approach to analyze field data along with fracture probability data. This approach has the ability to overcome commonly experienced discontinuity of the data in both horizontal and vertical directions. This hybrid technique is used to generate a discrete fracture network of a specific Australian gas reservoir, Palm Valley in the Northern Territory. Results of this study have significant benefit in accurately describing fluid flow simulation and well placement for maximal hydrocarbon recovery.

  19. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-28

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. PMID:26750302

  20. Global magnetosphere-like 3D structure formation in kinetics by hot magnetized plasma flow characterized by shape of the particle distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, Vladimir

    The task was to provide an analytical elementary magnetosphere-like model in kinetics for verification of the 3D EM PIC codes created for space/aerospace and HED plasmas applications. Kinetic approach versus cold MHD approach takes into account different behavior in the EM fields of resonant and non resonant particles in the velocity phase space, which appears via shape characteristics of the particle velocity distribution function (PVDF) and via the spatial dispersion effect forming the collisionless dissipation in the EM fields. The external flow is a hot collisionless plasma characterized by the particle velocity distribution function (PVDF) with different shapes: Maxwellian, kappa, etc. The flow is in a “hot regime”: it can be supersonic but its velocity remains less the thermal velocity of the electrons. The “internal” part of the magnetosphere formed by trapped particles is the prescribed 3D stationary magnetization considered as a spherical “quasiparticle” with internal magnetodipole and toroidal moments represented as a broadband EM driver. We obtain after the linearization of Vlasov/Maxwell equations a self-consistent 3D large scale kinetic solution of the classic problem. Namely, we: model the “outer” part of the magnetosphere formed by external hot plasma flow of the flyby particles. Solution of the Vlasov equation expressed via a tensor of dielectric permittivity of nonmagnetized and magnetized flowing plasma. Here, we obtain the direct kinetic dissipative effect of the magnetotail formation and the opposite diamagnetic effect of the magnetosphere “dipolization”. We get MHD wave cone in flow magnetized by external guiding magnetic (GM) field. Magnetosphere in our consideration is a 3D dissipative “wave” package structure of the skinned EM fields formed by the “waves” excited at frequency bands where we obtain negative values and singularities (resonances) of squared EM refractive index of the cold plasma. The hot regime

  1. Strongly Coupled 3D Hybrids of N-doped Porous Carbon Nanosheet/CoNi Alloy-Encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes for Enhanced Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yang; Cui, Shumao; Wen, Zhenhai; Guo, Xiaoru; Feng, Xinliang; Chen, Junhong

    2015-11-25

    A novel 3D nanoarchitecture comprising in situ-formed N-doped CoNi alloy-encapsulated carbon nanotubes (CoNi-NCNTs) grown on N-doped porous carbon nanosheets (NPCNs) is designed and constructed for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). When evaluated as an electrocatalyst for ORR, the hybrid shows efficient catalytic activity, high selectivity, superior durability, and strong tolerance against methanol crossover compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Such good oxygen reduction reaction performance is comparable to most of the previously reported results and the synergistic effect is found to boost the catalytic performance. Moreover, the constructed hybrid exhibits an excellent ORR activity with a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at 1.59 V and an onset potential of 1.57 V, even beyond the state-of-the-art Ir/C catalyst in alkaline media. The enhancement in electrochemical performance can be attributed to the unique morphology and defect structures, high porosity, good conductive networks, and strongly interacting CoNi-NCNT and NPCN in the hybrid. These results suggest the possibility for the development of effective nanocarbon electrocatalysts to replace commercial noble metal catalysts for direct use in fuel cells and water splitting devices. PMID:26449376

  2. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications.Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to

  3. Representing surface and subsurface hydrology at hyperresolution for Earth system models: Development of a hybrid 3-D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Broxton, P. D.; Brunke, M.; Gochis, D. J.; Lawrence, D. M.; Niu, G. Y.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A. A.; Zeng, X.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally, LSMs for use in Earth system models (ESMs) only account for one-dimensional (1-D) vertical hydrological processes at very coarse resolutions (~100 km). Recently, there has been interest in simulating lateral exchange of surface and subsurface water, as the grid resolution of ESMs increases (currently towards ~20 km) due to advances in computational power.In the current work, we present a new physically-based hydrological model capable of simulating lateral flow at a hyperresolution (1 km pixels) coupled with the vertical soil column of the Community Land Model (CLM), which has a much coarser resolution. Our new approach also uses sub-pixel topographic information to represent small scale lateral-flow processes. As input to our model, we use 1 km data of required surface and subsurface information, such depth to bedrock, hillslope width functions, fractional coverage of hillslopes/wetlands/riparian zones within each 1 km pixel, and a river network. Such data are largely derived from higher-resolution (30 m) topographic data, and will be made available to the community as global products.We have tested our model against measurements over a well instrumented, artificial hillslope at the University of Arizona's Biosphere 2 and found that both our approach and a full 3-D physically-based hydrological model can realistically simulate hydrological states and fluxes. However, computationally, our approach is 2 - 3 orders of magnitude faster than the latter. We are currently testing it for an ESM grid box that covers much of southeastern New York State, which includes the headwaters of the Delaware River, the Susquehana River, and parts of the Mohawk River Basin. Our approach improves upon the 1-D hydrological representation in CLM by representing the subgrid topographic and geomorphological variability in the grid box. The impact of representing such subgrid variability on surface water and energy fluxes will be discussed in our presentation.

  4. Development of a hybrid 3-D hydrological model to simulate hillslopes and the regional unconfined aquifer system in Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Broxton, P. D.; Brunke, M.; Gochis, D.; Niu, G. Y.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A. A.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    The terrestrial hydrological system, including surface and subsurface water, is an essential component of the Earth's climate system. Over the past few decades, land surface modelers have built one-dimensional (1D) models resolving the vertical flow of water through the soil column for use in Earth system models (ESMs). These models generally have a relatively coarse model grid size (~25-100 km) and only account for sub-grid lateral hydrological variations using simple parameterization schemes. At the same time, hydrologists have developed detailed high-resolution (~0.1-10 km grid size) three dimensional (3D) models and showed the importance of accounting for the vertical and lateral redistribution of surface and subsurface water on soil moisture, the surface energy balance and ecosystem dynamics on these smaller scales. However, computational constraints have limited the implementation of the high-resolution models for continental and global scale applications. The current work presents a hybrid-3D hydrological approach is presented, where the 1D vertical soil column model (available in many ESMs) is coupled with a high-resolution lateral flow model (h2D) to simulate subsurface flow and overland flow. H2D accounts for both local-scale hillslope and regional-scale unconfined aquifer responses (i.e. riparian zone and wetlands). This approach was shown to give comparable results as those obtained by an explicit 3D Richards model for the subsurface, but improves runtime efficiency considerably. The h3D approach is implemented for the Delaware river basin, where Noah-MP land surface model (LSM) is used to calculated vertical energy and water exchanges with the atmosphere using a 10km grid resolution. Noah-MP was coupled within the WRF-Hydro infrastructure with the lateral 1km grid resolution h2D model, for which the average depth-to-bedrock, hillslope width function and soil parameters were estimated from digital datasets. The ability of this h3D approach to simulate

  5. A 3D Hybrid Model for Tissue Growth: The Interplay between Cell Population and Mass Transport Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Markenscoff, Pauline; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To provide theoretical guidance for the design and in vitro cultivation of bioartificial tissues, we have developed a multiscale computational model that can describe the complex interplay between cell population and mass transport dynamics that governs the growth of tissues in three-dimensional scaffolds. The model has three components: a transient partial differential equation for the simultaneous diffusion and consumption of a limiting nutrient; a cellular automaton describing cell migration, proliferation, and collision; and equations that quantify how the varying nutrient concentration modulates cell division and migration. The hybrid discrete-continuous model was parallelized and solved on a distributed-memory multicomputer to study how transport limitations affect tissue regeneration rates under conditions encountered in typical bioreactors. Simulation results show that the severity of transport limitations can be estimated by the magnitude of two dimensionless groups: the Thiele modulus and the Biot number. Key parameters including the initial seeding mode, cell migration speed, and the hydrodynamic conditions in the bioreactor are shown to affect not only the overall rate, but also the pattern of tissue growth. This study lays the groundwork for more comprehensive models that can handle mixed cell cultures, multiple nutrients and growth factors, and other cellular processes, such as cell death. PMID:19619455

  6. Comparative study of gyrokinetic, hybrid-kinetic and fully kinetic wave physics for space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Told, D.; Cookmeyer, J.; Muller, F.; Astfalk, P.; Jenko, F.

    2016-06-01

    A set of numerical solvers for the linear dispersion relations of the gyrokinetic (GK), the hybrid-kinetic (HK), and the fully kinetic (FK) model is employed to study the physics of the KAW and the fast magnetosonic mode in these models. In particular, we focus on parameters that are relevant for solar wind oriented applications (using a homogeneous, isotropic background), which are characterized by wave propagation angles averaging close to 90°. It is found that the GK model, while lacking high-frequency solutions and cyclotron effects, faithfully reproduces the FK {{Alfv\\acute{e}n}} wave physics close to, and sometimes significantly beyond, the boundaries of its range of validity. The HK model, on the other hand, is much more complete in terms of high-frequency waves, but owing to its simple electron model it is found to severely underpredict wave damping rates even on ion spatial scales across a large range of parameters, despite containing full kinetic ion physics.

  7. Prediction of the effect of an extreme solar event on the Martian environment using a 3-D, self consistent hybrid model supplemented by test particle simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Kallio, Esa; Dyadechkin, Sergey; Jarvinen, Riku; Janhunen, Pekka

    2010-05-01

    Energetic particle data recorded by the SLED and LET instruments aboard the Phobos-2 spacecraft while in circular orbit about Mars showed the presence from 6 > 26 March, 1989, in association with an extreme solar event, of intense ambient particle radiation (> 30 MeV) punctuated by traveling interplanetary shocks. The response of the Martian environment to the March 1989 solar disturbances is modeled using a 3-D, self-consistent, hybrid model (HYB-Mars) supplemented by test particle simulations. In HYB-Mars ions are modeled as particles while electrons form a massless, charge neutralizing, fluid. The magnetic and electric fields present during the March 1989 activity are each derived from HYB- Mars while the high energy ion populations are analyzed using test particle simulations. Finally, the predictions of the model are validated by comparing the simulated properties of the disturbed Martian environment with the in situ observations.

  8. Origin of Mercury’s double magnetopause: 3D hybrid simulation study with A.I.K.E.F.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Joachim; Simon, Sven; Wang, Yung-Ching; Motschmann, Uwe; Heyner, Daniel; Schüle, Josef; Ip, Wing-Huen; Kleindienst, Gero; Pringle, Gavin J.

    2012-03-01

    During the first and second Mercury flyby the MESSENGER spacecraft detected a dawn side double-current sheet inside the Hermean magnetosphere that was labeled the “double magnetopause” (Slavin, J.A. et al. [2008]. Science 321, 85). This double current sheet confines a region of decreased magnetic field that is referred to as Mercury’s “dayside boundary layer” (Anderson, M., Slavin, J., Horth, H. [2011]. Planet. Space Sci.). Up to the present day the double current sheet, the boundary layer and the key processes leading to their formation are not well understood. In order to advance the understanding of this region we have carried out self-consistent plasma simulations of the Hermean magnetosphere by means of the hybrid simulation code A.I.K.E.F. (Müller, J., Simon, S., Motschmann, U., Schüle, J., Glassmeier, K., Pringle, G.J. [2011]. Comput. Phys. Commun. 182, 946-966). Magnetic field and plasma results are in excellent agreement with the MESSENGER observations. In contrast to former speculations our results prove this double current sheet may exist in a pure solar wind hydrogen plasma, i.e. in the absence of any exospheric ions like sodium. Both currents are similar in orientation but the outer is stronger in intensity. While the outer current sheet can be considered the “classical” magnetopause, the inner current sheet between the magnetopause and Mercury’s surface reveals to be sustained by a diamagnetic current that originates from proton pressure gradients at Mercury’s inner magnetosphere. The pressure gradients in turn exist due to protons that are trapped on closed magnetic field lines and mirrored between north and south pole. Both, the dayside and nightside diamagnetic decreases that have been observed during the MESSENGER mission show to be direct consequences of this diamagnetic current that we label Mercury’s “boundary-layer-current“.

  9. Syntheses, structures and properties of 3D inorganic-organic hybrid frameworks constructed from lanthanide polymer and Keggin-type tungstosilicate

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yuanzhe; Xu Yanqing; Han Zhangang; Li Chunhong; Cui, Fengyun; Chi Yingnan; Hu Changwen

    2010-05-15

    Inorganic-organic hybrid frameworks, namely [Ce(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}(pdc)]{sub 4}[SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}].6H{sub 2}O 1, [M(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(pdc)]{sub 4}[SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}].2H{sub 2}O (M=Ce for 2a, La for 2b, Nd for 2c; H{sub 2}pdc=pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid) were assembled through incorporation of Keggin-type heteropolyanion [SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4-} within the voids of lanthanides-pdc network as pillars or guests under hydrothermal condition. Single-crystal X-ray analyses of these crystals reveal that compound 1 presents 3D pillar-layered framework with the [SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4-} anions located on the square voids of the two-dimensional Ce-pdc bilayer. Compounds 2a-c are isostructural and constructed from 3D Ln-pdc-based metal-organic framework (MOF) incorporating noncoordinating guests Keggin structure [SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4-}. Solid-state properties of compounds 1 and 2a-c such as thermal stability and photoluminescence have been further investigated. - Graphical abstract: Two types of new inorganic-organic hybrid frameworks through incorporation of Keggin-type heteropolyanion [SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4-} within the voids of lanthanides-pdc network as pillars or guests under hydrothermal condition were successfully assembled. Solid-state properties of compounds 1 and 2a such as thermal stability and photoluminescence have been further investigated.

  10. Accurate and Fully Automatic Hippocampus Segmentation Using Subject-Specific 3D Optimal Local Maps Into a Hybrid Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Gkontra, Polyxeni; Daras, Petros; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of the hippocampus (HC) is an essential step toward prevention, diagnosis, and follow-up of various brain disorders due to the implication of the structural changes of the HC in those disorders. In this respect, the development of automatic segmentation methods that can accurately, reliably, and reproducibly segment the HC has attracted considerable attention over the past decades. This paper presents an innovative 3-D fully automatic method to be used on top of the multiatlas concept for the HC segmentation. The method is based on a subject-specific set of 3-D optimal local maps (OLMs) that locally control the influence of each energy term of a hybrid active contour model (ACM). The complete set of the OLMs for a set of training images is defined simultaneously via an optimization scheme. At the same time, the optimal ACM parameters are also calculated. Therefore, heuristic parameter fine-tuning is not required. Training OLMs are subsequently combined, by applying an extended multiatlas concept, to produce the OLMs that are anatomically more suitable to the test image. The proposed algorithm was tested on three different and publicly available data sets. Its accuracy was compared with that of state-of-the-art methods demonstrating the efficacy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:27170866

  11. Time-Dependent Distribution Functions in C-Mod Calculated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA Full-Wave, and DC Lorentz Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W. (Bob); Petrov, Yu. V.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.

    2015-11-01

    A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed ICRF power is made calculating minority hydrogen ion distribution functions with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. ICRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full wave code, and RF diffusion coefficients are obtained from these fields using the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL3D/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, in general agreement with experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these effects on the the NPA synthetic diagnostic time-dependence. The new NPA results give increased agreement with experiment, particularly in the ramp-down time after the ICRF pulse. Funded, through subcontract with Massachusetts Institute of Technology, by USDOE sponsored SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions.

  12. Accurate and Fully Automatic Hippocampus Segmentation Using Subject-Specific 3D Optimal Local Maps Into a Hybrid Active Contour Model.

    PubMed

    Zarpalas, Dimitrios; Gkontra, Polyxeni; Daras, Petros; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of the hippocampus (HC) is an essential step toward prevention, diagnosis, and follow-up of various brain disorders due to the implication of the structural changes of the HC in those disorders. In this respect, the development of automatic segmentation methods that can accurately, reliably, and reproducibly segment the HC has attracted considerable attention over the past decades. This paper presents an innovative 3-D fully automatic method to be used on top of the multiatlas concept for the HC segmentation. The method is based on a subject-specific set of 3-D optimal local maps (OLMs) that locally control the influence of each energy term of a hybrid active contour model (ACM). The complete set of the OLMs for a set of training images is defined simultaneously via an optimization scheme. At the same time, the optimal ACM parameters are also calculated. Therefore, heuristic parameter fine-tuning is not required. Training OLMs are subsequently combined, by applying an extended multiatlas concept, to produce the OLMs that are anatomically more suitable to the test image. The proposed algorithm was tested on three different and publicly available data sets. Its accuracy was compared with that of state-of-the-art methods demonstrating the efficacy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:27170866

  13. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-21

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A 'stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications. PMID:25474162

  14. Left-ventricle segmentation in real-time 3D echocardiography using a hybrid active shape model and optimal graph search approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Abiose, Ademola K.; Campbell, Dwayne N.; Sonka, Milan; Martins, James B.; Wahle, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of the left ventricular shape and motion patterns associated with left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is essential for diagnosis and treatment planning in congestive heart failure. Real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) used for LVMD analysis is frequently limited by heavy speckle noise or partially incomplete data, thus a segmentation method utilizing learned global shape knowledge is beneficial. In this study, the endocardial surface of the left ventricle (LV) is segmented using a hybrid approach combining active shape model (ASM) with optimal graph search. The latter is used to achieve landmark refinement in the ASM framework. Optimal graph search translates the 3D segmentation into the detection of a minimum-cost closed set in a graph and can produce a globally optimal result. Various information-gradient, intensity distributions, and regional-property terms-are used to define the costs for the graph search. The developed method was tested on 44 RT3DE datasets acquired from 26 LVMD patients. The segmentation accuracy was assessed by surface positioning error and volume overlap measured for the whole LV as well as 16 standard LV regions. The segmentation produced very good results that were not achievable using ASM or graph search alone.

  15. Hybrid Macro-Porous Titanium Ornamented by Degradable 3D Gel/nHA Micro-Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bo; Ma, Pei; Chen, Jun; Wang, Hai; Wu, Gui; Li, Bo; Li, Qiang; Huang, Zhifeng; Qiu, Guixing; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Porous titanium is a kind of promising material for bone substitution, while its bio-inert property results in demand of modifications to improve the osteointegration capacity. In this study, gelatin (Gel) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to construct 3D micro-scaffolds in the pores of porous titanium in the ratios of Gel:nHA = 1:0, Gel:nHA = 1:1, and Gel:nHA = 1:3, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation, and gene and protein expression levels of osteogenic markers were evaluated in MC3T3-E1 cells, followed by bone regeneration assessment in a rabbit radius defect model. All hybrid scaffolds with different composition ratio were found to have significant promotional effects in cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, in which the group with Gel:nHA = 1:1 showed the best performance in vitro, as well as the most bone regeneration volume in vivo. This 3D micro-scaffolds modification may be an innovative method for porous titanium ornamentation and shows potential application values in clinic. PMID:27092492

  16. Background and pickup ion velocity distribution dynamics in Titan's plasma environment: 3D hybrid simulation and comparison with CAPS T9 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-09-01

    In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution dynamics from the 3D hybrid simulation. In our model the background, pickup, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. The current simulation shows that mass loading by pickup ions H,H2+, CH4+ and N2+ is stronger than in the previous simulations when O + ions are introduced into the background plasma. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the atmospheric components. We also include a simple ionosphere model with average mass M = 28 amu ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS T9 observations. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of the Alfvén wing-like structures. The simulation also shows that the ring-like velocity distribution for pickup ions relaxes to a Maxwellian core and a shell-like halo.

  17. Background and Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Dynamics in Titan's Plasma Environment: 3D Hybrid Simulation and Comparison with CAPS T9 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution dynamics from the 3D hybrid simulation. In our model the background, pickup, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. The current simulation shows that mass loading by pickup ions H(+); H2(+), CH4(+) and N2(+) is stronger than in the previous simulations when O+ ions are introduced into the background plasma. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the atmospheric components. We also include a simple ionosphere model with average mass M = 28 amu ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS T9 observations. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of the Alfve n wing-like structures. The simulation also shows that the ring-like velocity distribution for pickup ions relaxes to a Maxwellian core and a shell-like halo.

  18. Results of the implementation on a mock-up of the full 3dB hybrid matching option of the ITER ICRH system

    SciTech Connect

    Grine, D.; Vervier, M.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.

    2011-12-23

    Each of the two ICRH antennas for ITER must couple 20MW to the plasma in the 40-55MHz band via an array of 24 radiating shorted straps fed by four generators. The matching system must provide automatic matching control on the mean load provided by the plasma and be resilient (parallel {Gamma}{sub G} parallel <0.2) to a wide range of fast antenna load excursions occurring in ELMy plasmas. Furthermore, good control of the current distribution in the strap array must be possible for the various heating and current drive scenarios. Two load resilient matching options have been considered for ITER: the 4 'Conjugate-T'(CT) and the 4 hybrids ones, the first being presently considered as a back-up option. Automatic control of these 2 options has been developed, and tested for optimization on a low-powered scaled mock-up. Successful implementation of the simultaneous feedback control of 11 actuators for the matching of the 4 CT and for the control of the toroidal phasing has already been achieved. The matching and the array current control of the 3dB hybrid option are provided by simultaneous feedback control of the decouplers and double stub tuners (in total 23 actuators) and this has also been successfully achieved for the full array. The paper discusses the circuit implementation and presents the obtained results.

  19. Results of the implementation on a mock-up of the full 3dB hybrid matching option of the ITER ICRH system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grine, D.; Vervier, M.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.

    2011-12-01

    Each of the two ICRH antennas for ITER must couple 20MW to the plasma in the 40-55MHz band via an array of 24 radiating shorted straps fed by four generators. The matching system must provide automatic matching control on the mean load provided by the plasma and be resilient (‖ΓG‖<0.2) to a wide range of fast antenna load excursions occurring in ELMy plasmas. Furthermore, good control of the current distribution in the strap array must be possible for the various heating and current drive scenarios. Two load resilient matching options have been considered for ITER: the 4 `Conjugate-T' (CT) and the 4 hybrids ones, the first being presently considered as a back-up option [1]. Automatic control of these 2 options has been developed, and tested for optimization on a low-powered scaled mock-up. Successful implementation of the simultaneous feedback control of 11 actuators for the matching of the 4 CT and for the control of the toroidal phasing has already been achieved [2]. The matching and the array current control of the 3dB hybrid option are provided by simultaneous feedback control of the decouplers and double stub tuners (in total 23 actuators) and this has also been successfully achieved for the full array. The paper discusses the circuit implementation and presents the obtained results.

  20. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  1. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The SPP model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  2. Study of morphology effects on magnetic interactions and band gap variations for 3d late transition metal bi-doped ZnO nanostructures by hybrid DFT calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Soumendu Baral, Sayan; Mookerjee, Abhijit; Kaphle, Gopi Chandra

    2015-08-28

    Using density functional theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculations, the effects of morphology of semiconducting nanostructures on the magnetic interaction between two magnetic dopant atoms as well as a possibility of tuning band gaps have been studied in the case of the bi-doped (ZnO){sub 24} nanostructures with the impurity dopant atoms of the 3d late transition metals—Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. To explore the morphology effect, three different structures of the host (ZnO){sub 24} nano-system, having different degrees of spatial confinement, have been considered: a two dimensional nanosheet, a one dimensional nanotube, and a finite cage-shaped nanocluster. The present study employs hybrid density functional theory to accurately describe the electronic structure of all the systems. It is shown here that the magnetic coupling between the two dopant atoms remains mostly anti-ferromagnetic in the course of changing the morphology from the sheet geometry to the cage-shaped geometry of the host systems, except for the case of energetically most stable bi-Mn doping, which shows a transition from ferromagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic coupling with decreasing aspect ratio of the host system. The effect of the shape change, however, has a significant effect on the overall band gap variations of both the pristine as well as all the bi-doped systems, irrespective of the nature of the dopant atoms and provides a means for easy tunability of their optoelectronic properties.

  3. High-performance hybrid supercapacitor with 3D hierarchical porous flower-like layered double hydroxide grown on nickel foam as binder-free electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Luojiang; Hui, Kwun Nam; San Hui, Kwan; Lee, Haiwon

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis of layered double hydroxide (LDH) as electroactive material has been well reported; however, fabricating an LDH electrode with excellent electrochemical performance at high current density remains a challenge. In this paper, we report a 3D hierarchical porous flower-like NiAl-LDH grown on nickel foam (NF) through a liquid-phase deposition method as a high-performance binder-free electrode for energy storage. With large ion-accessible surface area as well as efficient electron and ion transport pathways, the prepared LDH-NF electrode achieves high specific capacity (1250 C g-1 at 2 A g-1 and 401 C g-1 at 50 A g-1) after 5000 cycles of activation at 20 A g-1 and high cycling stability (76.7% retention after another 5000 cycles at 50 A g-1), which is higher than those of most previously reported NiAl-LDH-based materials. Moreover, a hybrid supercapacitor with LDH-NF as the positive electrode and porous graphene nanosheet coated on NF (GNS-NF) as the negative electrode, delivers high energy density (30.2 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 800 W kg-1) and long cycle life, which outperforms the other devices reported in the literature. This study shows that the prepared LDH-NF electrode offers great potential in energy storage device applications.

  4. Functionalized phosphonates as building units for multi-dimensional homo- and heterometallic 3d-4f inorganic-organic hybrid-materials.

    PubMed

    Köhler, C; Rentschler, E

    2016-08-01

    Using the multifunctional ligand H4L (2,2'-bipyridinyl-5,5'-diphosphonic acid), a new family of inorganic-organic hybrid-materials was prepared. The ligand shows a very high flexibility regarding the coordination mode, leading to a large structural diversity. The compounds 1a, 1b ([M(H2L)(H2O)4]·2.5H2O; M = Co(2+) (a), Ni(2+) (b)), 2 ([Gd2(H2H'L)2(H2H'2L)(H2O)6]Cl4·14H2O), 3a, 3b, 3c ([MCo(iii)(H2L)3(H2O)2]·6.5H2O; M = Gd(3+) (a), Dy(3+) (b) and Tb(3+) (c)), and 4 ([GdNi(ii)(H2L)3(H2O)3]NaCl·6H2O) were isolated and characterized with single crystal X-ray diffraction. Depending on the used metal ions and on the stoichiometry, either discrete entities (0D), extended 2D layers or 3D frameworks were obtained. In contrast to the general approach in phosphonate chemistry, the compounds were prepared without hydrothermal synthesis, but under ambient pressure. Variable temperature magnetic measurements were carried out to determine the magnetic properties. PMID:27472248

  5. Verification of electromagnetic fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model in global gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holod, I.; Lin, Z.

    2013-03-15

    The fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model is verified in global gyrokinetic particle simulation of linear electromagnetic drift-Alfvenic instabilities in tokamak. In particular, we have recovered the {beta}-stabilization of the ion temperature gradient mode, transition to collisionless trapped electron mode, and the onset of kinetic ballooning mode as {beta}{sub e} (ratio of electron kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure) increases.

  6. From the Kinetic Energy Recovery System to the Thermo-Hydraulic Hybrid Motor Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, Corneliu; Drumea, Petrin; Guta, Dragos; Dumitrescu, Catalin

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents some theoretical and experimental results obtained by the Hydraulics and Pneumatics Research Institute INOE 2000-IHP with its partners, regarding the creating of one hydraulic system able to recovering the kinetic energy of the motor vehicles, in the braking phases, and use this recovered energy in the starting and accelerating phases. Also, in the article is presented a testing stand, which was especially designed for testing the hydraulic system for recovery the kinetic energy. Through mounting of the kinetic energy recovering hydraulic system, on one motor vehicle, this vehicle became a thermo-hydraulic hybrid vehicle. Therefore, the dynamic behavior was analyzed for the whole hybrid motor vehicle, which includes the energy recovery system. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the possible performances of the hybrid vehicle and that the kinetic energy recovery hydraulic systems are good means to increase energy efficiency of the road motor vehicles and to decrease of the fuel consumption.

  7. Kinetic analysis of the interactions of complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) with its ligands C3d, iC3b, and the EBV glycoprotein gp350/220.

    PubMed

    Sarrias, M R; Franchini, S; Canziani, G; Argyropoulos, E; Moore, W T; Sahu, A; Lambris, J D

    2001-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of complement receptor 2 (CR2) with its natural ligands iC3b and C3d are still not well understood. In addition, studies regarding the binding site(s) of the receptor on C3 as well as the affinities of the C3 fragments for CR2 have produced contradictory results. In the present study, we have used surface plasmon resonance technology to study the interaction of CR2 with its ligands C3d, iC3b, and the EBV surface glycoprotein gp350/220. We measured the kinetics of binding of the receptor to its ligands, examined the influence of ionic contacts on these interactions, and assessed whether immobilized and soluble iC3b bound with similar kinetics to CR2. Our results indicate that 1) gp350 binding to CR2 follows a simple 1:1 interaction, whereas that of the C3 fragments is more complex and involves more than one intramolecular component; 2) kinetic differences exist between the binding of C3d and iC3b to CR2, which may be due to an additional binding site found on the C3c region of iC3b; and 3) iC3b binds to CR2 with different kinetics, depending on whether the iC3b is in solution or immobilized on the surface. These findings suggest that binding of CR2 to iC3b and C3d is more complex than previously thought. PMID:11466369

  8. Hybrid fluid/kinetic model for parallel heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.; Held, E.D.

    1998-12-31

    It is argued that in order to use fluid-like equations to model low frequency ({omega} < {nu}) phenomena such as neoclassical tearing modes in low collisionality ({nu} < {omega}{sub b}) tokamak plasmas, a Chapman-Enskog-like approach is most appropriate for developing an equation for the kinetic distortion (F) of the distribution function whose velocity-space moments lead to the needed fluid moment closure relations. Further, parallel heat conduction in a long collision mean free path regime can be described through a combination of a reduced phase space Chapman-Enskog-like approach for the kinetics and a multiple-time-scale analysis for the fluid and kinetic equations.

  9. Towards 3D multi-scale teleseismic and gravity data inversion using hybrid DSM/SPECFEM technique : application to the Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien; Wang, Yi; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Dufréchou, Grégory

    2015-04-01

    We describe here a method of inversion applied to seismic data sets constrained by gravity data at the regional scale. This will allow us to obtain robust models of P and S wave velocities but also of density, providing key constraints on the composition and thermal state of the lithosphere. Our approach relies on teleseimic waves, which illuminate the medium from below. We have developped a hybrid method in which a wave propagation method at the global scale (DSM/Direct solution method) is coupled with a spectral element method at the regional scale (Monteiller et al. 2013). With the spectral element method, we are able to model the 3D wave propagation effects in a computational domain of 400km long x 400km wide and 200 km deep, for an incident teleseismic wavefront introduced at the boundaries of this domain with periods as short as 2 s. The DSM global method allows to compute this incident field for a spherical Earth model. We use a multi-scale joint inversion of both gravity and seismic waveform data, accounting for the long wavelengths of the gravity field taken from a global model. In terms of inversion technique, we have validated an adjoint method for the inversion of seismic waveforms. An optimized BFGS inversion technique is used to minimize the difference between observed and computed full waveforms. The gradient of the misfit function gives the direction over which the model must be perturbed to minimize this difference. At each step of the inversion procedure we choose an optimal step length that accelerates the minimization. This is the crucial ingredient that allows us to build an efficient iterative full waveform inversion. We have extended this method by incorporating gravity data provided by the BGI/Bureau Gravimétrique International into the inversion. If the waveforms allow us to constrain the seismic velocities, they are less sensitive to the structure in density, which gives independent and crucial information to constrain the nature of rocks

  10. Hybrid simulations of magnetic reconnection with kinetic ions and fluid electron pressure anisotropy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Le, A.; Daughton, W.; Karimabadi, H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-03-16

    We present the first hybrid simulations with kinetic ions and recently developed equations of state for the electron fluid appropriate for reconnection with a guide field. The equations of state account for the main anisotropy of the electron pressure tensor.Magnetic reconnection is studied in two systems, an initially force-free current sheet and a Harris sheet. The hybrid model with the equations of state is compared to two other models, hybrid simulations with isothermal electrons and fully kinetic simulations. Including the anisotropicequations of state in the hybrid model provides a better match to the fully kinetic model. In agreement with fullymore » kinetic results, the main feature captured is the formation of an electron current sheet that extends several ion inertial lengths. This electron current sheet modifies the Hall magnetic field structure near the X-line, and it is not observed in the standard hybrid model with isotropic electrons. The saturated reconnection rate in this regime nevertheless remains similar in all three models. Here, implications for global modeling are discussed.« less

  11. One-dimensional hybrid-direct kinetic simulation of the discharge plasma in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Kentaro; Boyd, Iain D.; Kolobov, Vladimir I.

    2012-11-15

    In order to model the non-equilibrium plasma within the discharge region of a Hall thruster, the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) must be obtained accurately. A direct kinetic (DK) simulation method that directly solves the plasma Boltzmann equation can achieve better resolution of VDFs in comparison to particle simulations, such as the particle-in-cell (PIC) method that inherently include statistical noise. In this paper, a one-dimensional hybrid-DK simulation, which uses a DK simulation for heavy species and a fluid model for electrons, is developed and compared to a hybrid-PIC simulation. Time-averaged results obtained from the hybrid-DK simulation are in good agreement with hybrid-PIC results and experimental data. It is shown from a comparison of using a kinetic simulation and solving the continuity equation that modeling of the neutral atoms plays an important role for simulations of the Hall thruster discharge plasma. In addition, low and high frequency plasma oscillations are observed. Although the kinetic nature of electrons is not resolved due to the use of a fluid model, the hybrid-DK model provides spatially and temporally well-resolved plasma properties and an improved resolution of VDFs for heavy species with less statistical noise in comparison to the hybrid-PIC method.

  12. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  13. Alternation of adriamycin penetration kinetics in MCF-7 cells from 2D to 3D culture based on P-gp expression through the Chk2/p53/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng; Zhou, Fang; Hao, Kun; Liu, Jiali; Chen, Qianying; Ni, Ping; Zhou, Honghao; Wang, Guangji; Zhang, Jingwei

    2015-01-15

    Monolayer cells are largely different from tumor masses, and might misguide drug screenings. 3D in vitro cell culture models simulate the characteristics of tumor masses in vivo and have recently been used in many studies of anti-cancer drugs. Among various 3D cell culture models, multi-cellular layer (MCL) models allow for the direct quantitative assessment of the penetration of chemotherapeutic agents through solid tissue environments without requiring the use of fluorescently labeled drugs or imaging molecules. Therefore, in our present study, a 3D-no base and embedded MCF-7 MCL model was successfully developed for a 14-day culture. Over time, its thickness and cell layers increased and exhibited highly proliferative properties and drug resistance to adriamycin (ADR) with markedly elevated IC50 values. Meanwhile, G2/M stage cycle arrest was also observed, which likely up-regulated P-gp expression through the Chk2/p53/NF-κB pathway. The elevated P-gp expression altered the ADR penetration kinetics in MCF-7 MCLs in vitro by accelerating the apparent penetration of ADR through the intercellular spaces of the MCLs. Additionally, a decreased ADR retention within tumor cells was observed, but could be significantly reversed by a P-gp inhibitor. The attenuated ADR retention in the deeper cells of tumor masses was confirmed in xenografted mice in vivo. This phenomenon could be elucidated by the mathematical modeling of penetration kinetics parameters. Our study provided a new model that evaluated and improved the quantification of the drug penetration kinetics, revealed the relationship between P-gp and drug penetration through tumor masses, and suggested the potential molecular mechanisms. PMID:25478729

  14. Solar-wind turbulence at kinetic wavelengths: hybrid-Vlasov simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, F.; Califano, F.; Veltri, P.

    2010-12-01

    The cooling of the expanding solar wind is less efficient than expected. Scientists pointed out that the reason of this empirical evidence is related to the turbulent character of the solar wind plasma. The identification of the physical mechanism replacing "energy dissipation" in a collisionless magnetized plasma and establishing the link between macroscopic and microscopic scales would open a new scenario of broad importance in the field of turbulence and would have far-reaching implications in the problem of space plasma heating. Turbulent heating consists both in a progressive energy degradation and disorder increasing, going from large to small scales. The increase of disorder results into the production, through nonlinear interaction, of small-scale fluctuations involving not only the kinetic energy, as in the case of heat, but also the potential energy associated with electric and magnetic field fluctuations. To numerically analyze the kinetic effects on the evolution of the turbulent spectra in the solar wind, we make use of a recently developed numerical hybrid-Vlasov code [1], where the Vlasov equation is solved for the proton distribution function, while the electron response is taken into account through a generalized Ohm law that retains Hall effects and electron inertia terms. By performing multi-dimensional phase space simulations (1D or 2D in space and 3D in velocity) [2-5] on the last generation of supercomputers, we show that newly identified electrostatic (acoustic-like) modes, in longitudinal propagation with respect to the average magnetic field and driven by particle distribution functions far from local thermodynamic equilibrium, represent a privileged channel for turbulence to carry the energy towards small disordered scales. The system dynamics is analyzed for different electron to ion temperature ratios. Our numerical results provide a qualitative interpretation of a complex phenomenology ubiquitously recovered in many solar

  15. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  16. ARTEMIS observations of lunar wake structure compared with hybrid ­kinetic simulations and an analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaee, H.; Rankin, R.; Marchand, R.; Paral, J.

    2014-12-01

    The ARTEMIS mission has made extensive measurements on the density and magnetic field structure of the lunar wake under different solar wind and magnetosphere conditions. Hybrid-kinetic simulations of the lunar wake have been found to be generally in good agreement with observations [Wiehle, S., et al., Planet. Space Sci., 2011], but are not readily available as they require access to large computers and human resources with expertise using this technology. It would be very useful to have an analytic model of the lunar wake, and one such model will be presented. It is based on an approach outlined by Hutchinson [Hutchinson, I., Physics Of Plasmas, 2008], and makes assumptions of cylindrical geometry, a strong and constant magnetic field, and fixed transverse velocity and temperature. Under these approximations the ion fluid equations (with massless electrons assumed) can be solved analytically by the method of characteristics. This paper demonstrates that the analytic model under these assumptions provides excellent agreement with observations and hybrid-kinetic simulations of the lunar wake. The approach outlined by Hutchinson is generalized to include an arbitrary angle between the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind flow. This results in two angle-dependent characteristics for the fluid flow that can be solved for the density inside the wake region. The Density profiles for different orientations of magnetic field with respect to solar wind flow are in a good qualitative agreement with 2D Hybrid simulation results of the model developed by [Paral and Rankin, Nature Comms, 2012], and with ARTEMIS observations. Refrences, -Wiehle, S., et al. (2011), First Lunar wake passage of Artemis: Discrimination of wake effects and solar wind flactuations by 3D hybrid simulations, Planet. Space Sci., 59, 661-671, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2011.01.012. -Hutchinson, I. (2008),Oblique ion collection in the drift approximation:How magnetized Mach probes really work, Physics Of

  17. Comparison of 3D kinetic and hydrodynamic models to ROSINA-COPS measurements of the neutral coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, Andre; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; De Keyser, Johan; Fiethe, Björn; Fougere, Nicolas; Fuselier, Stephen; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, Tamas; Hansen, Kenneth; Hässig, Myrtha; Huang, Zhenguang; Jäckel, Annette; Jia, Xianzhe; Le Roy, Lena; Mall, Urs A.; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy; Tóth, Gábor; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Wurz, Peter

    2015-11-01

    67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is a Jupiter-family comet and the object of investigation of the European Space Agency mission Rosetta. This report presents the first full 3D simulation results of 67P's neutral gas coma. In this study we include results from a direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a hydrodynamic code, and a purely geometric calculation which computes the total illuminated surface area on the nucleus. All models include the triangulated 3D shape model of 67P as well as realistic illumination and shadowing conditions. The basic concept is the assumption that these illumination conditions on the nucleus are the main driver for the gas activity of the comet. As a consequence, the total production rate of 67P varies as a function of solar insolation. The best agreement between the model and the data is achieved when gas fluxes on the night side are in the range of 7% to 10% of the maximum flux, accounting for contributions from the most volatile components. To validate the output of our numerical simulations we compare the results of all three models to in situ gas number density measurements from the ROSINA COPS instrument. We are able to reproduce the overall features of these local neutral number density measurements of ROSINA COPS for the time period between early August 2014 and January 1 2015 with all three models. Some details in the measurements are not reproduced and warrant further investigation and refinement of the models. However, the overall assumption that illumination conditions on the nucleus are at least an important driver of the gas activity is validated by the models. According to our simulation results we find the total production rate of 67P to be constant between August and November 2014 with a value of about 1 × 1026 molecules s-1.

  18. A hybrid model describing ion induced kinetic electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, S.; Duvenbeck, A.; Heuser, C.; Weidtmann, B.; Wucher, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present a model to describe the kinetic internal and external electron emission from an ion bombarded metal target. The model is based upon a molecular dynamics treatment of the nuclear degree of freedom, the electronic system is assumed as a quasi-free electron gas characterized by its Fermi energy, electron temperature and a characteristic attenuation length. In a series of previous works we have employed this model, which includes the local kinetic excitation as well as the rapid spread of the generated excitation energy, in order to calculate internal and external electron emission yields within the framework of a Richardson-Dushman-like thermionic emission model. However, this kind of treatment turned out to fail in the realistic prediction of experimentally measured internal electron yields mainly due to the restriction of the treatment of electronic transport to a diffusive manner. Here, we propose a slightly modified approach additionally incorporating the contribution of hot electrons which are generated in the bulk material and undergo ballistic transport towards the emitting interface.

  19. Quantifying floral shape variation in 3D using microcomputed tomography: a case study of a hybrid line between actinomorphic and zygomorphic flowers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Neng; Hsu, Hao-Chun; Wang, Cheng-Chun; Lee, Tzu-Kuei; Kuo, Yan-Fu

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of floral shape variations is difficult because flower structures are both diverse and complex. Traditionally, floral shape variations are quantified using the qualitative and linear measurements of two-dimensional (2D) images. The 2D images cannot adequately describe flower structures, and thus lead to unsatisfactory discrimination of the flower shape. This study aimed to acquire three-dimensional (3D) images by using microcomputed tomography (μCT) and to examine the floral shape variations by using geometric morphometrics (GM). To demonstrate the advantages of the 3D-μCT-GM approach, we applied the approach to a second-generation population of florist's gloxinia (Sinningia speciosa) crossed from parents of zygomorphic and actinomorphic flowers. The flowers in the population considerably vary in size and shape, thereby served as good materials to test the applicability of the proposed phenotyping approach. Procedures were developed to acquire 3D volumetric flower images using a μCT scanner, to segment the flower regions from the background, and to select homologous characteristic points (i.e., landmarks) from the flower images for the subsequent GM analysis. The procedures identified 95 landmarks for each flower and thus improved the capability of describing and illustrating the flower shapes, compared with typically lower number of landmarks in 2D analyses. The GM analysis demonstrated that flower opening and dorsoventral symmetry were the principal shape variations of the flowers. The degrees of flower opening and corolla asymmetry were then subsequently quantified directly from the 3D flower images. The 3D-μCT-GM approach revealed shape variations that could not be identified using typical 2D approaches and accurately quantified the flower traits that presented a challenge in 2D images. The approach opens new avenues to investigate floral shape variations. PMID:26442038

  20. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  1. Three 3D hybrid networks based on octamolybdates and different Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chun-Jing; Pang, Hai-Jun; Tang, Qun; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Chen, Ya-Guang

    2010-12-15

    Three 3D compounds based on octamolybdate clusters and various Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs, [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btb][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (1), [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (2), and [Cu{sup II}(btpe){sub 2}][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (3) [btb=1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane, btpe=1,5-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pentane], were isolated via tuning flexible ligand spacer length and metal coordination preferences. In 1, the copper(I)-btb motif is a one-dimensional (1D) chain which is further linked by hexadentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters via coordinating to Cu{sup I} cations giving a 3D structure. In 2, the copper(I)-btpe motif exhibits a 'stairs'-like [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe]{sup 2+} sheet, and the tetradentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters interact with two neighboring [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe]{sup 2+} sheets constructing a 3D framework. In 3, the copper(II)-btpe motif possesses a novel (2D{yields}3D) interdigitated structure, which is further connected by the tetradentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters forming a 3D framework. The thermal stability and luminescent properties of 1-3 are investigated in the solid state. -- Graphical abstract: Three 3D compounds based on {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters with different Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs were synthesized by regularly tuning flexible ligand spacer length and metal coordination preferences. Display Omitted

  2. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  3. Quaternary structure dynamics and carbon monoxide binding kinetics of hemoglobin valency hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Philo, J S; Dreyer, U; Lary, J W

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of CO binding and changes in quaternary structure for symmetric valency hybrids of human hemoglobin have been extensively studied by laser photolysis techniques. Both alpha+beta and alpha beta+ hybrids were studied with five different ferric ligands, over a broad range of CO concentrations and photolysis levels. After full CO photolysis, the hybrid tetramers switch extensively and rapidly (< 200 microseconds) to the T quaternary structure. Both R --> T and T --> R transition rates for valency hybrid tetramers with 0 and 1 bound CO have been obtained, as well as the CO association rates for alpha and beta subunits in the R and T states. The results reveal submillisecond R reversible T interconversion, and, for the first time, the changes in quaternary rates and equilibria due to binding a single CO per tetramer have been resolved. The data also show significant alpha-beta differences in quaternary dynamics and equilibria. The allosteric constants do not vary with the spin states of the ferric subunits as predicted by the Perutz stereochemical model. For the alpha beta+CN hybrid the kinetics are heterogeneous and imply partial conversion to a T-like state with very low (seconds) R reversible T interconversion. PMID:8785354

  4. Hybrid 3-D rocket trajectory program. Part 1: Formulation and analysis. Part 2: Computer programming and user's instruction. [computerized simulation using three dimensional motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, L. C. P.; Cook, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Models utilizing various sub-sets of the six degrees of freedom are used in trajectory simulation. A 3-D model with only linear degrees of freedom is especially attractive, since the coefficients for the angular degrees of freedom are the most difficult to determine and the angular equations are the most time consuming for the computer to evaluate. A computer program is developed that uses three separate subsections to predict trajectories. A launch rail subsection is used until the rocket has left its launcher. The program then switches to a special 3-D section which computes motions in two linear and one angular degrees of freedom. When the rocket trims out, the program switches to the standard, three linear degrees of freedom model.

  5. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper.

  6. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S V

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper. PMID:26827337

  7. Strong light scattering and broadband (UV to IR) photoabsorption in stretchable 3D hybrid architectures based on Aerographite decorated by ZnO nanocrystallites.

    PubMed

    Tiginyanu, Ion; Ghimpu, Lidia; Gröttrup, Jorit; Postolache, Vitalie; Mecklenburg, Matthias; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Payami, Nader; Feidenhansl, Robert; Schulte, Karl; Adelung, Rainer; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In present work, the nano- and microscale tetrapods from zinc oxide were integrated on the surface of Aerographite material (as backbone) in carbon-metal oxide hybrid hierarchical network via a simple and single step magnetron sputtering process. The fabricated hybrid networks are characterized for morphology, microstructural and optical properties. The cathodoluminescence investigations revealed interesting luminescence features related to carbon impurities and inherent host defects in zinc oxide. Because of the wide bandgap of zinc oxide and its intrinsic defects, the hybrid network absorbs light in the UV and visible regions, however, this broadband photoabsorption behavior extends to the infrared (IR) region due to the dependence of the optical properties of ZnO architectures upon size and shape of constituent nanostructures and their doping by carbon impurities. Such a phenomenon of broadband photoabsorption ranging from UV to IR for zinc oxide based hybrid materials is novel. Additionally, the fabricated network exhibits strong visible light scattering behavior. The developed Aerographite/nanocrystalline ZnO hybrid network materials, equipped with broadband photoabsorption and strong light scattering, are very promising candidates for optoelectronic technologies. PMID:27616632

  8. 3D-full wave and kinetics numerical modelling of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources plasma: steps towards self-consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Neri, Lorenzo; Sorbello, Gino; Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Gammino, Santo

    2015-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion Sources are the most performing machines for the production of intense beams of multi-charged ions in fundamental science, applied physics and industry. Investigation of plasma dynamics in ECRIS still remains a challenge. A better comprehension of electron heating, ionization and diffusion processes, ion confinement and ion beam formation is mandatory in order to increase ECRIS performances both in terms of output beams currents, charge states, beam quality (emittance minimization, beam halos suppression, etc.). Numerical solution of Vlasov equation via kinetic codes coupled to FEM solvers is ongoing at INFN-LNS, based on a PIC strategy. Preliminary results of the modeling will be shown about wave-plasma interaction and electron-ion confinement: the obtained results are very helpful to better understand the influence of the different parameters (especially RF frequency and power) on the ion beam formation mechanism.

  9. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater. PMID:25405224

  10. Continuous decoding of intended movements with a hybrid kinetic and kinematic brain machine interface.

    PubMed

    Suminski, Aaron J; Willett, Francis R; Fagg, Andrew H; Bodenhamer, Matthew; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G

    2011-01-01

    Although most brain-machine interface (BMI) studies have focused on decoding kinematic parameters of motion, it is known that motor cortical activity also correlates with kinetic signals, including hand force and joint torque. In this experiment, a monkey used a cortically-controlled BMI to move a visual cursor and hit a sequence of randomly placed targets. By varying the contributions of separate kinetic and kinematic decoders to the movement of a virtual arm, we evaluated the hypothesis that a BMI incorporating both signals (Hybrid BMI) would outperform a BMI decoding kinematic information alone (Position BMI). We show that the trajectories generated by the Hybrid BMI during real-time decoding were straighter and smoother than those of the Position BMI. These results may have important implications for BMI applications that require controlling devices with inherent, physical dynamics or applying forces to the environment. PMID:22255659

  11. Hybrid 3D laser sensor based on a high-performance long-range wide-field-of-view laser scanner and a calibrated high-resolution digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Andreas; Studnicka, Nikolaus; Riegl, Johannes

    2004-09-01

    We present a hybrid sensor consisting of a high-performance 3D imaging laser sensor and a high-resolution digital camera. The laser sensor uses the time-of-flight principle based on near-infrared pulses. We demonstrate the performance capabilities of the system by presenting example data and we describe the software package used for data acquisition, data merging and visualization. The advantages of using both, near range photogrammetry and laser scanning, for data registration and data extraction are discussed.

  12. Label-free field-effect-based single-molecule detection of DNA hybridization kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Sorgenfrei, Sebastian; Chiu, Chien-yang; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Philip; Nuckolls, Colin; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    Probing biomolecules at the single-molecule level can provide useful information about molecular interactions, kinetics and motions that is usually hidden in ensemble measurements. Techniques with improved sensitivity and time resolution are required to explore fast biomolecular dynamics. Here, we report the first observation of DNA hybridization at the single-molecule level using a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. By covalently attaching a single-stranded probe DNA sequence to a point defect in a carbon nanotube, we are able to measure two-level fluctuations in the nanotube conductance due to reversible hybridizing and melting of a complementary DNA target. The kinetics are studied as a function of temperature, allowing the measurement of rate constants, melting curves and activation energies for different sequences and target concentrations. The kinetics show non-Arrhenius behavior, in agreement with DNA hybridization experiments using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This technique is label-free and has the potential for studying single-molecule dynamics at sub-microsecond time-scales. PMID:21258331

  13. Gait strategy in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type: a kinematic and kinetic evaluation using 3D gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the gait patterns of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT) hypermobility type, using Gait Analysis. We quantified the gait strategy in 12 JHS/EDS-HT adults individuals (age: 43.08+6.78 years) compared to 20 healthy controls (age: 37.23±8.91 years), in terms of kinematics and kinetics. JHS/EDS-HT individuals were characterized by a non-physiological gait pattern. In particular, spatio-temporal parameters evidenced lower anterior step length and higher stance phase duration in JHS/EDS-HT than controls. In term of kinematics, in JHS/EDS-HT patients the main gait limitations involved pelvis, distal joints and ankle joint. Conversely, hip and knee joint showed physiological values. Ankle moment and power revealed reduced peak values during terminal stance. Differences in stiffness at hip and ankle joints were found between JHS/EDS-HT and controls. JHS/EDS-HT patients showed significant decreased of Kh and Ka parameters very probably due to congenital hypotonia and ligament laxity. These findings help to elucidate the complex biomechanical changes in JHS/EDS-HT and may have a major role in the multidimensional evaluation and tailored management of these patients. PMID:21420276

  14. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  15. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  16. Bifurcation of resistive wall mode dynamics predicted by magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, S.; Hao, G. Z. Song, X. M.; Wang, A. K.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2015-09-15

    The magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory has been extensively and successfully applied for interpreting experimental observations of macroscopic, low frequency instabilities, such as the resistive wall mode, in fusion plasmas. In this work, it is discovered that an analytic version of the hybrid formulation predicts a bifurcation of the mode dynamics while varying certain physical parameters of the plasma, such as the thermal particle collisionality or the ratio of the thermal ion to electron temperatures. This bifurcation can robustly occur under reasonably large parameter spaces as well as with different assumptions, for instance, on the particle collision model. Qualitatively similar bifurcation features are also observed in full toroidal computations presented in this work, based on a non-perturbative hybrid formulation.

  17. Novel utilization of 3D technology and the hybrid operating theatre: Peri-operative assessment of posterior sterno-clavicular dislocation using cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun

    2013-06-01

    A patient with a medial and posterior dislocation of the right sterno-clavicular (SC) joint and displacement of the trachea and brachiocephalic artery by the medial head of the clavicle underwent general anaesthetic in the operating theatre for an open reduction procedure. The surgeon initially attempted a closed reduction, but this required imaging to check SC alignment. The patient was transferred to an adjacent hybrid operating theatre for imaging. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed, which successfully demonstrated a significant reduction in the dislocation of the SC joint. The trachea and brachiocephalic artery were no longer compressed or displaced. This case study demonstrates an alternative to the patient being transferred to the medical imaging department for multi-slice CT. It also describes a novel use of the hybrid operating theatre and its CBCT capabilities. PMID:26229610

  18. Novel utilization of 3D technology and the hybrid operating theatre: Peri-operative assessment of posterior sterno-clavicular dislocation using cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun

    2013-01-01

    A patient with a medial and posterior dislocation of the right sterno-clavicular (SC) joint and displacement of the trachea and brachiocephalic artery by the medial head of the clavicle underwent general anaesthetic in the operating theatre for an open reduction procedure. The surgeon initially attempted a closed reduction, but this required imaging to check SC alignment. The patient was transferred to an adjacent hybrid operating theatre for imaging. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed, which successfully demonstrated a significant reduction in the dislocation of the SC joint. The trachea and brachiocephalic artery were no longer compressed or displaced. This case study demonstrates an alternative to the patient being transferred to the medical imaging department for multi-slice CT. It also describes a novel use of the hybrid operating theatre and its CBCT capabilities. PMID:26229610

  19. Novel utilization of 3D technology and the hybrid operating theatre: Peri-operative assessment of posterior sterno-clavicular dislocation using cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun

    2013-06-15

    A patient with a medial and posterior dislocation of the right sterno-clavicular (SC) joint and displacement of the trachea and brachiocephalic artery by the medial head of the clavicle underwent general anaesthetic in the operating theatre for an open reduction procedure. The surgeon initially attempted a closed reduction, but this required imaging to check SC alignment. The patient was transferred to an adjacent hybrid operating theatre for imaging. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed, which successfully demonstrated a significant reduction in the dislocation of the SC joint. The trachea and brachiocephalic artery were no longer compressed or displaced. This case study demonstrates an alternative to the patient being transferred to the medical imaging department for multi-slice CT. It also describes a novel use of the hybrid operating theatre and its CBCT capabilities.

  20. Ultra-long Pt nanolawns supported on TiO2-coated carbon fibers as 3D hybrid catalyst for methanol oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study, TiO2 thin film photocatalyst on carbon fibers was used to synthesize ultra-long single crystalline Pt nanowires via a simple photoreduction route (thermally activated photoreduction). It also acted as a co-catalytic material with Pt. Taking advantage of the high-aspect ratio of the Pt nanostructure as well as the excellent catalytic activity of TiO2, this hybrid structure has the great potential as the active anode in direct methanol fuel cells. The electrochemical results indicate that TiO2 is capable of transforming CO-like poisoning species on the Pt surface during methanol oxidation and contributes to a high CO tolerance of this Pt nanowire/TiO2 hybrid structure. PMID:22546416

  1. 3D TiO2@Ni(OH)2 Core-shell Arrays with Tunable Nanostructure for Hybrid Supercapacitor Application

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Qingqing; Zheng, Minrui; Liu, Huajun; Guan, Cao; Mao, Lu; Wang, John

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional hierarchical nanostructures have attracted great attention for electrochemical energy storage applications. In this work, self-supported TiO2@Ni(OH)2 core-shell nanowire arrays are prepared on carbon fiber paper via the combination of hydrothermal synthesis and chemical bath deposition. In this core-shell hybrid, the morphology and wall size of the interconnected nanoflake shell of Ni(OH)2 can be tuned through adjusting the concentration of ammonia solution. Heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent oriented crystal growth are identified to be the synthesis mechanism affecting the nanostructure of the shell material, which consequently determines the electrochemical performance in both energy storage and charge transfer. Superior capabilities of 264 mAhg−1 at 1 A g−1 and 178 mAh g−1 at 10 A g−1 are achieved with the core-shell hybrids of the optimized structure. The asymmetric supercapacitor prototype, comprising of TiO2@Ni(OH)2 as the anode and mesoporous carbons (MCs) as the cathode, is shown to exhibit superior electrochemical performance with high energy and power densities. The present work provides a clear illustration of the structure-property relationship in nanocrystal synthesis and offers a potential strategy to enhance the battery type Ni(OH)2 electrode in a hybrid supercapacitor device. PMID:26353970

  2. 3D TiO2@Ni(OH)2 Core-shell Arrays with Tunable Nanostructure for Hybrid Supercapacitor Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Qingqing; Zheng, Minrui; Liu, Huajun; Guan, Cao; Mao, Lu; Wang, John

    2015-09-01

    Three dimensional hierarchical nanostructures have attracted great attention for electrochemical energy storage applications. In this work, self-supported TiO2@Ni(OH)2 core-shell nanowire arrays are prepared on carbon fiber paper via the combination of hydrothermal synthesis and chemical bath deposition. In this core-shell hybrid, the morphology and wall size of the interconnected nanoflake shell of Ni(OH)2 can be tuned through adjusting the concentration of ammonia solution. Heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent oriented crystal growth are identified to be the synthesis mechanism affecting the nanostructure of the shell material, which consequently determines the electrochemical performance in both energy storage and charge transfer. Superior capabilities of 264 mAhg-1 at 1 A g-1 and 178 mAh g-1 at 10 A g-1 are achieved with the core-shell hybrids of the optimized structure. The asymmetric supercapacitor prototype, comprising of TiO2@Ni(OH)2 as the anode and mesoporous carbons (MCs) as the cathode, is shown to exhibit superior electrochemical performance with high energy and power densities. The present work provides a clear illustration of the structure-property relationship in nanocrystal synthesis and offers a potential strategy to enhance the battery type Ni(OH)2 electrode in a hybrid supercapacitor device.

  3. 3D TiO2@Ni(OH)2 Core-shell Arrays with Tunable Nanostructure for Hybrid Supercapacitor Application.

    PubMed

    Ke, Qingqing; Zheng, Minrui; Liu, Huajun; Guan, Cao; Mao, Lu; Wang, John

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional hierarchical nanostructures have attracted great attention for electrochemical energy storage applications. In this work, self-supported TiO2@Ni(OH)2 core-shell nanowire arrays are prepared on carbon fiber paper via the combination of hydrothermal synthesis and chemical bath deposition. In this core-shell hybrid, the morphology and wall size of the interconnected nanoflake shell of Ni(OH)2 can be tuned through adjusting the concentration of ammonia solution. Heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent oriented crystal growth are identified to be the synthesis mechanism affecting the nanostructure of the shell material, which consequently determines the electrochemical performance in both energy storage and charge transfer. Superior capabilities of 264 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and 178 mAh g(-1) at 10 A g(-1) are achieved with the core-shell hybrids of the optimized structure. The asymmetric supercapacitor prototype, comprising of TiO2@Ni(OH)2 as the anode and mesoporous carbons (MCs) as the cathode, is shown to exhibit superior electrochemical performance with high energy and power densities. The present work provides a clear illustration of the structure-property relationship in nanocrystal synthesis and offers a potential strategy to enhance the battery type Ni(OH)2 electrode in a hybrid supercapacitor device. PMID:26353970

  4. Interfacial micropore defect formation in PEDOT:PSS-Si hybrid solar cells probed by TOF-SIMS 3D chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joseph P; Zhao, Liyan; Abd-Ellah, Marwa; Heinig, Nina F; Leung, K T

    2013-07-16

    Conducting p-type polymer layers on n-type Si have been widely studied for the fabrication of cost-effective hybrid solar cells. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is used to provide three-dimensional chemical imaging of the interface between poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and SiOx/Si in a hybrid solar cell. To minimize structural damage to the polymer layer, an Ar cluster sputtering source is used for depth profiling. The present result shows the formation of micropore defects in the interface region of the PEDOT:PSS layer on the SiOx/Si substrate. This interfacial micropore defect formation becomes more prominent with increasing thickness of the native oxide layer, which is a key device parameter that greatly affects the hybrid solar cell performance. Three-dimensional chemical imaging coupled with Ar cluster ion sputtering has therefore been demonstrated as an emerging technique for probing the interface of this and other polymer-inorganic systems. PMID:23745755

  5. Time-dependent distribution functions and resulting synthetic NPA spectra in C-Mod calculated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA full-wave, and DC Lorentz codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.

    2015-12-01

    A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed TCRF power is made obtaining minority hydrogen ion distributions with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. Cyclotron-resonant TCRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full wave code. The RF diffusion coefficients used in CQL3D are obtained with the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code for perturbed particle trajectories in the combined equilibrium and TCRF electromagnetic fields. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL3D/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, and this substantially increased the rampup rate of the observed vertically-viewed neutral particle analyzer (NPA) flux, in general agreement with experiment. However, ramp down of the NPA flux after the pulse, remained long compared to the experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these new effects on the the NPA time-dependence.

  6. Imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase alpha (PI3Kα): 3D-QSAR analysis utilizing the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm to refine receptor-ligand complexes for molecular alignment.

    PubMed

    Chadha, N; Jasuja, H; Kaur, M; Singh Bahia, M; Silakari, O

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase alpha (PI3Kα) is a lipid kinase involved in several cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival, and its anomalous regulation leads to cancerous conditions. PI3Kα inhibition completely blocks the cancer signalling pathway, hence it can be explored as an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In the present study, docking analysis of 49 selective imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine inhibitors of PI3Kα was carried out using the QM-Polarized ligand docking (QPLD) program of the Schrödinger software, followed by the refinement of receptor-ligand conformations using the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm in the Liaison program, and alignment of refined conformations of inhibitors was utilized for the development of an atom-based 3D-QSAR model in the PHASE program. Among the five generated models, the best model was selected corresponding to PLS factor 2, displaying the highest value of Q(2)test (0.650). The selected model also displayed high values of r(2)train (0.917), F-value (166.5) and Pearson-r (0.877) and a low value of SD (0.265). The contour plots generated for the selected 3D-QSAR model were correlated with the results of docking simulations. Finally, this combined information generated from 3D-QSAR and docking analysis was used to design new congeners. PMID:24601789

  7. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 2: The Study for the Distance 9.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our paper is a 2.5D and 3D numerical plasma models of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft (SPPSC). These results should be interpreted as a basic plasma model for which the derived SW interaction with spacecraft (SC) could have consequences for both plasma wave and electron plasma measurements on board SC in the inner heliosphere. We observe an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of the electromagnetic field oscillation about of (0.015-0.06) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about 1.5 V/m and (12-18) V/m were also observed. The observed strong electromagnetic perturbations may be a crucial point in the electromagnetic measurements, which were planned in future Solar Probe Plus mission.

  8. Hybrid grid-particle methods and Penalization: A Sherman-Morrison-Woodbury approach to compute 3D viscous flows using FFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelin, Robin; Poncet, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Particle methods are very convenient to compute transport equations in fluid mechanics as their computational cost is linear and they are not limited by convection stability conditions. To achieve large 3D computations the method must be coupled to efficient algorithms for velocity computations, including a good treatment of non-homogeneities and complex moving geometries. The Penalization method enables to consider moving bodies interaction by adding a term in the conservation of momentum equation. This work introduces a new computational algorithm to solve implicitly in the same step the Penalization term and the Laplace operators, since explicit computations are limited by stability issues, especially at low Reynolds number. This computational algorithm is based on the Sherman-Morrison-Woodbury formula coupled to a GMRES iterative method to reduce the computations to a sequence of Poisson problems: this allows to formulate a penalized Poisson equation as a large perturbation of a standard Poisson, by means of algebraic relations. A direct consequence is the possibility to use fast solvers based on Fast Fourier Transforms for this problem with good efficiency from both the computational and the memory consumption point of views, since these solvers are recursive and they do not perform any matrix assembling. The resulting fluid mechanics computations are very fast and they consume a small amount of memory, compared to a reference solver or a linear system resolution. The present applications focus mainly on a coupling between transport equation and 3D Stokes equations, for studying biological organisms motion in a highly viscous flows with variable viscosity.

  9. Nano-spatial parameters from 3D to 2D lattice dimensionality by organic variant in [ZnCl4]- [R]+ hybrid materials: Structure, architecture-lattice dimensionality, microscopy, optical Eg and PL correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajit; Verma, Sanjay K.; Alvi, P. A.; Jasrotia, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    The nanospatial morphological features of [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ hybrid derivative depicts 28 nm granular size and 3D spreader shape packing pattern as analyzed by FESEM and single crystal XRD structural studies. The organic moiety connect the inorganic components through N-H+…Cl- hydrogen bond to form a hybrid composite, the replacement of organic derivatives from 2-methylpyridine to 2-Amino-5-choloropyridine results the increase in granular size from 28nm to 60nm and unit cell packing pattern from 3D-2D lattice dimensionality along ac plane. The change in optical energy direct band gap value from 3.01eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ (HM1) to 3.42eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H5ClN2]+ (HM2) indicates the role of organic moiety in optical properties of hybrid materials. The photoluminescence emission spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 370 to 600 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.66a.u. at 438 nm for (HM1) and 370 to 600 nm with max peak intensity of 9.91 a.u. at 442 nm for (HM2), indicating that the emission spectra lies in visible range. PL excitation spectra depicts the maximum excitation intensity [9.8] at 245.5 nm for (HM1) and its value of 9.9 a.u. at 294 nm, specify the excitation spectra lies in UV range. Photoluminescence excitation spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 280 to 350 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.4 a.u. at 285.5 nm and 9.9 a.u. at 294 and 297 nm, indicating excitation in the UV spectrum. Single crystal growth process and detailed physiochemical characterization such as XRD, FESEM image analysis photoluminescence property reveals the structure stability with non-covalent interactions, lattice dimensionality (3D-2D) correlations interweaving into the design of inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

  10. A new hybrid kinetic electron model for full-f gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idomura, Y.

    2016-05-01

    A new hybrid kinetic electron model is developed for electrostatic full-f gyrokinetic simulations of the ion temperature gradient driven trapped electron mode (ITG-TEM) turbulence at the ion scale. In the model, a full kinetic electron model is applied to the full-f gyrokinetic equation, the multi-species linear Fokker-Planck collision operator, and an axisymmetric part of the gyrokinetic Poisson equation, while in a non-axisymmetric part of the gyrokinetic Poisson equation, turbulent fluctuations are determined only by kinetic trapped electrons responses. By using this approach, the so-called ωH mode is avoided with keeping important physics such as the ITG-TEM, the neoclassical transport, the ambipolar condition, and particle trapping and detrapping processes. The model enables full-f gyrokinetic simulations of ITG-TEM turbulence with a reasonable computational cost. Comparisons between flux driven ITG turbulence simulations with kinetic and adiabatic electrons are presented. Although the similar ion temperature gradients with nonlinear upshift from linear critical gradients are sustained in quasi-steady states, parallel flows and radial electric fields are qualitatively different with kinetic electrons.

  11. Neutron powder diffraction study of the layer organic-inorganic hybrid iron(II) methylphosphonate-hydrate, Fe[(CD{sub 3}PO{sub 3})(D{sub 2}O)

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Philippe Bellitto, Carlo; Bauer, Elvira M.; Righini, Guido; Andre, Gilles; Bouree, Francoise

    2008-11-15

    The crystal and magnetic structures of the hybrid organic-inorganic layer compound Fe[(CD{sub 3}PO{sub 3})(D{sub 2}O)] have been studied by neutron powder diffraction as a function of temperature down to 1.5 K. The neutron diffraction pattern recorded at 200 K shows that the fully deuterated compound crystallizes in one of the two known forms of the undeuterated Fe[(CH{sub 3}PO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O)]. The crystal structure is orthorhombic, space group Pmn2{sub 1}, with the following unit-cell parameters: a=5.7095(1) A, b=8.8053(3) A and c=4.7987(1) A; Z=2. The crystal structure remains unchanged on cooling from 200 to 1.5 K. Moreover, at low temperature, Fe[(CD{sub 3}PO{sub 3})(D{sub 2}O)] shows a commensurate magnetic structure (k=(0,0,0)). As revealed by bulk susceptibility measurements on Fe[(CH{sub 3}PO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O)], the magnetic structure corresponds to a canted antiferromagnet with a critical temperature T{sub N}=25 K. Neutron powder diffraction reveals that below T{sub N}=23.5 K the iron magnetic moments in Fe[(CD{sub 3}PO{sub 3})(D{sub 2}O)] are antiferromagnetically coupled and oriented along the b-axis, perpendicular to the inorganic layers. No ferromagnetic component is observable in the neutron powder diffraction experiment, due to its too small value (<0.1{mu}{sub B}). - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and magnetic structure of Fe[(CD{sub 3}PO{sub 3})(D{sub 2}O)].

  12. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  13. Free standing SnS2 nanosheets on 3D graphene foam: an outstanding hybrid nanostructure anode for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi Xiang; Wang, Ye; Wong, Jen It; Yang, Hui Ying

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are attracting increased research interest due to their unique physical properties and potential for application in various electronic devices. Herein, the combination of 2D materials consisting of vertical aligned tin sulfide (SnS2) nanosheets and three-dimensional graphene (3DG) are designed as a superior functional anode material for energy storage devices using the merits of the two materials. The SnS2/3DG hybrid nanostructure was synthesized via a single-step solvothermal method and further used as a binder-free anode in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The binder-free SnS2/3DG electrode shows excellent electrochemical performance including superior specific capacity, enhanced rate capability and outstanding cycling stability compared to pure SnS2 and 3DG. SnS2/3DG hybrid nanocomposite electrodes are able to deliver high reversible capacities of 771.2 mAh g-1 and 433.3 mAh g-1 at the current densities of 200 and 1000 mA g-1, respectively. The excellent electrochemical performance of SnS2/3DG nanocomposite is attributed to the synergistic effect between SnS2 and 3DG. These results demonstrate SnS2/3DG nanocomposites as a highly promising anode material for future generation LIBs.

  14. An efficient hybrid MLFMA-FFT solver for the volume integral equation in case of sparse 3D inhomogeneous dielectric scatterers

    SciTech Connect

    Zaeytijd, J. de Bogaert, I.; Franchois, A.

    2008-07-01

    Electromagnetic scattering problems involving inhomogeneous objects can be numerically solved by applying a Method of Moments discretization to the volume integral equation. For electrically large problems, the iterative solution of the resulting linear system is expensive, both computationally and in memory use. In this paper, a hybrid MLFMA-FFT method is presented, which combines the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method and the High Frequency Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) in order to reduce the cost of the matrix-vector multiplications needed in the iterative solver. The method represents the scatterers within a set of possibly disjoint identical cubic subdomains, which are meshed using a uniform cubic grid. This specific mesh allows for the application of FFTs to calculate the near interactions in the MLFMA and reduces the memory cost considerably, since the aggregation and disaggregation matrices of the MLFMA can be reused. Additional improvements to the general MLFMA framework, such as an extention of the FFT interpolation scheme of Sarvas et al. from the scalar to the vectorial case in combination with a more economical representation of the radiation patterns on the lowest level in vector spherical harmonics, are proposed and the choice of the subdomain size is discussed. The hybrid method performs better in terms of speed and memory use on large sparse configurations than both the FFT method and the HF MLFMA separately and it has lower memory requirements on general large problems. This is illustrated on a number of representative numerical test cases.

  15. 3D acoustic wave modelling with time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite-difference schemes and hybrid absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2011-09-01

    Most conventional finite-difference methods adopt second-order temporal and (2M)th-order spatial finite-difference stencils to solve the 3D acoustic wave equation. When spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the time-space domain dispersion relation are used to replace these conventional spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the space domain dispersion relation, the accuracy of modelling can be increased from second-order along any directions to (2M)th-order along 48 directions. In addition, the conventional high-order spatial finite-difference modelling accuracy can be improved by using a truncated finite-difference scheme. In this paper, we combine the time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme and the truncated finite-difference scheme to obtain optimised spatial finite-difference coefficients and thus to significantly improve the modelling accuracy without increasing computational cost, compared with the conventional space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme. We developed absorbing boundary conditions for the 3D acoustic wave equation, based on predicting wavefield values in a transition area by weighing wavefield values from wave equations and one-way wave equations. Dispersion analyses demonstrate that high-order spatial finite-difference stencils have greater accuracy than low-order spatial finite-difference stencils for high frequency components of wavefields, and spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have greater precision than those devised in the space domain under the same discretisation. The modelling accuracy can be improved further by using the truncated spatial finite-difference stencils. Stability analyses show that spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have better stability condition. Numerical modelling experiments for homogeneous, horizontally layered and Society of Exploration Geophysicists/European Association of

  16. Decoding 3D reach and grasp from hybrid signals in motor and premotor cortices: spikes, multiunit activity, and local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Truccolo, Wilson; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E.; Donoghue, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Neural activity in motor cortex during reach and grasp movements shows modulations in a broad range of signals from single-neuron spiking activity (SA) to various frequency bands in broadband local field potentials (LFPs). In particular, spatiotemporal patterns in multiband LFPs are thought to reflect dendritic integration of local and interareal synaptic inputs, attentional and preparatory processes, and multiunit activity (MUA) related to movement representation in the local motor area. Nevertheless, the relationship between multiband LFPs and SA, and their relationship to movement parameters and their relative value as brain-computer interface (BCI) control signals, remain poorly understood. Also, although this broad range of signals may provide complementary information channels in primary (MI) and ventral premotor (PMv) areas, areal differences in information have not been systematically examined. Here, for the first time, the amount of information in SA and multiband LFPs was compared for MI and PMv by recording from dual 96-multielectrode arrays while monkeys made naturalistic reach and grasp actions. Information was assessed as decoding accuracy for 3D arm end point and grip aperture kinematics based on SA or LFPs in MI and PMv, or combinations of signal types across areas. In contrast with previous studies with ≤16 simultaneous electrodes, here ensembles of >16 units (on average) carried more information than multiband, multichannel LFPs. Furthermore, reach and grasp information added by various LFP frequency bands was not independent from that in SA ensembles but rather typically less than and primarily contained within the latter. Notably, MI and PMv did not show a particular bias toward reach or grasp for this task or for a broad range of signal types. For BCIs, our results indicate that neuronal ensemble spiking is the preferred signal for decoding, while LFPs and combined signals from PMv and MI can add robustness to BCI control. PMID:22157115

  17. A linear dispersion relation for the hybrid kinetic-ion/fluid-electron model of plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Told, D.; Cookmeyer, J.; Astfalk, P.; Jenko, F.

    2016-07-01

    A dispersion relation for a commonly used hybrid model of plasma physics is developed, which combines fully kinetic ions and a massless-electron fluid description. Although this model and variations of it have been used to describe plasma phenomena for about 40 years, to date there exists no general dispersion relation to describe the linear wave physics contained in the model. Previous efforts along these lines are extended here to retain arbitrary wave propagation angles, temperature anisotropy effects, as well as additional terms in the generalized Ohm’s law which determines the electric field. A numerical solver for the dispersion relation is developed, and linear wave physics is benchmarked against solutions of a full Vlasov–Maxwell dispersion relation solver. This work opens the door to a more accurate interpretation of existing and future wave and turbulence simulations using this type of hybrid model.

  18. An evaluation of hybridization kinetics in biosensors using a single-fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Vontel, S; Ramakrishnan, A; Sadana, A

    2000-04-01

    The diffusion-limited hybridization kinetics of analyte in solution to receptor immobilized on a biosensor or immunosensor surface is analysed within a fractal framework. The data may be analysed by a single-fractal analysis. This was indicated by the regression analysis provided by Sigmaplot [Sigmaplot Users Manual (1993) Jandel Scientific, San Rafael, CA]. It is of interest to note that the binding-rate coefficient and the fractal dimension both exhibit changes in the same and in the opposite directions for the single example presented in each case. The binding-rate coefficient(s) expressions developed as a function of the analyte (DNA) concentration in solution and the fractal dimension are of particular value, since they provide a means to better control biosensor or immunosensor performance and provide physical insights into the hybridization process. PMID:10744961

  19. A hybrid model for coupling kinetic corrections of fusion reactivity to hydrodynamic implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, C. J.; Guo, Zehua; Berk, H. L.

    2014-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion requires an imploded target in which a central hot spot is surrounded by a cold and dense pusher. The hot spot/pusher interface can take complicated shape in three dimensions due to hydrodynamic mix. It is also a transition region where the Knudsen and inverse Knudsen layer effect can significantly modify the fusion reactivity in comparison with the commonly used value evaluated with background Maxwellians. Here, we describe a hybrid model that couples the kinetic correction of fusion reactivity to global hydrodynamic implosion simulations. The key ingredient is a non-perturbative treatment of the tail ions in the interface region where the Gamow ion Knudsen number approaches or surpasses order unity. The accuracy of the coupling scheme is controlled by the precise criteria for matching the non-perturbative kinetic model to perturbative solutions in both configuration space and velocity space.

  20. A high throughput method to investigate oligodeoxyribonucleotide hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, A; Majlessi, M; Becker, M M

    1998-01-01

    We describe a high throughput microtiter-based assay to measure binding of oligodeoxyribonucleotides to nucleic acid targets. The assay utilizes oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes labeled with a highly chemiluminescent acridinium ester (AE). Reaction of AE with sodium sulfite renders it non-chemiluminescent. When an AE-labeled probe hybridizes to a target nucleic acid AE is protected from reaction with sodium sulfite and thus remains chemiluminescent. In contrast, unhybridized probe readily reacts with sodium sulfite and is rendered non-chemiluminescent. Hybridization of an AE-labeled probe to a target nucleic acid can therefore be detected without physical separation of unhybridized probe by treatment of the hybridization reaction with sodium sulfite and measurement of the remaining chemiluminescence. Using this method we measured hybridization rate constants and thermodynamic affinities of oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes binding to simple synthetic targets as well as large complex biological targets. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were measured with a high degree of accuracy and were in excellent agreement with values measured by other established techniques. PMID:9518495

  1. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  2. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  3. Construction and characterization of hybrid nanoparticles via block copolymer blends and kinetic control of solution assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingchao

    Amphiphilic block copolymers are able to self-assemble into well-defined nanostructures in aqueous solutions or aqueous/miscible organic solutions. These structures include traditional spheres, cylinders and vesicles, which mimic nanostructures formed by small molecule analogs like lipids and surfactants. The large molecular weight and complex macromolecular architectures provide several advantages over small molecule amphiphiles, including the large chemical versatility, control over the size and shape of the solution assemblies, unique slow chain exchange and exceptional increased versatility in possible nanostructures. These advantages have motivated the noteworthy study of constructing well-defined, controlled and, especially, multicompartment and multigeometry polymeric nanoobjects for potential multiple nanotechnology applications. To reach complexity and well-controlled nanostructures, the facile utility and fundamental understanding of the parameters that influence the effective construction of solution assemblies needs to be continued. Given these motivations, this dissertation demonstrated the design of block copolymers, manipulation of kinetic control parameters of solution assembly, and characterization of hybrid nanostructures with the aim of creating new, well-defined nanostructures. The first objective of this dissertation was to explore the effects of solvent processing rates in influencing multicompartment and multigeometry nanoparticle construction, structure evolution over long-time aging and nanoparticle formation mechanisms. The noticeable effects of water addition rates on the formation of various nanostructures were studied by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, selective staining and small angle scattering. It was revealed that the water addition rate have significant influence over the final assemblies in block copolymer blends. New shapes of multicompartment and multigeometry nanoparticles have been constructed including hybrid

  4. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  5. 3D-catFISH: a system for automated quantitative three-dimensional compartmental analysis of temporal gene transcription activity imaged by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Monica K; Lin, Gang; Olson, Kathy; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Burke, Sara N; McNaughton, Bruce L; Worley, Paul F; Guzowski, John F; Roysam, Badrinath; Barnes, Carol A

    2004-10-15

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of neural activity-regulated, immediate-early gene (IEG) expression provides a method of functional brain imaging with cellular resolution. This enables the identification, in one brain, of which specific principal neurons were active during each of two distinct behavioral epochs. The unprecedented potential of this differential method for large-scale analysis of functional neural circuits is limited, however, by the time-intensive nature of manual image analysis. A comprehensive software tool for processing three-dimensional, multi-spectral confocal image stacks is described which supports the automation of this analysis. Nuclei counterstained with conventional DNA dyes and FISH signals indicating the sub-cellular distribution of specific, IEG RNA species are imaged using different spectral channels. The DNA channel data are segmented into individual nuclei by a three-dimensional multi-step algorithm that corrects for depth-dependent attenuation, non-isotropic voxels, and imaging noise. Intra-nuclear and cytoplasmic FISH signals are associated spatially with the nuclear segmentation results to generate a detailed tabular/database and graphic representation. Here we present a comprehensive validation of data generated by the automated software against manual quantification by human experts on hippocampal and parietal cortical regions (96.5% concordance with multi-expert consensus). The high degree of reliability and accuracy suggests that the software will generalize well to multiple brain areas and eventually to large-scale brain analysis. PMID:15351517

  6. Segmentation of 3D microPET images of the rat brain via the hybrid gaussian mixture method with kernel density estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Been; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2012-01-01

    Segmentation of positron emission tomography (PET) is typically achieved using the K-Means method or other approaches. In preclinical and clinical applications, the K-Means method needs a prior estimation of parameters such as the number of clusters and appropriate initialized values. This work segments microPET images using a hybrid method combining the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) with kernel density estimation. Segmentation is crucial to registration of disordered 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) accumulation locations with functional diagnosis and to estimate standardized uptake values (SUVs) of region of interests (ROIs) in PET images. Therefore, simulation studies are conducted to apply spherical targets to evaluate segmentation accuracy based on Tanimoto's definition of similarity. The proposed method generates a higher degree of similarity than the K-Means method. The PET images of a rat brain are used to compare the segmented shape and area of the cerebral cortex by the K-Means method and the proposed method by volume rendering. The proposed method provides clearer and more detailed activity structures of an FDG accumulation location in the cerebral cortex than those by the K-Means method. PMID:22948355

  7. Syntheses, structures and photocatalytic properties of five new praseodymium-antimony oxochlorides: from discrete clusters to 3D inorganic-organic hybrid racemic compounds.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guo-Dong; Wang, Ze-Ping; Song, Ying; Hu, Bing; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2014-07-14

    Five novel praseodymium-antimony oxochloride (Pr-Sb-O-Cl) cluster-based compounds, namely (2-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl14.6(OH)2.4(Hsal)]·H2O (1), (2-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]4{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13.5(OH)0.5](bcpb)2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13.5(OH)0.5]}·42H2O (2), (3-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13(H2O)2](bcpb)}·2(3-Mepy)·3H2O (3), [Fe(1,10-phen)3]2{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl10(H2O)2](bcpb)2}·3(3-Mepy)·13H2O (4), and (2-MepyH)6[Fe(1,10-phen)3]10{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13(OH)2]2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl9][Pr4Sb12O18Cl9(OH)2]2(Hpdc)10(pdc)2}·110H2O (5) (2-Mepy = 2-methylpyridine, 3-Mepy = 3-methylpyridine, 1,10-phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, H2sal = salicylic acid, H3bcpb = 3,5-bis(4-carboxyphenoxy)benzoic acid, H3pdc = 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid) have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 1 is the first zero-dimensional (0D) Pr-Sb-O-Cl cluster decorated by an organic ligand. Compounds 2-4 are constructed from the same H3bcpb ligands but adopt different structures: 2 represents a rare example of a one-dimensional (1D) nanotubular structure based on high-nuclearity clusters; 3 exhibits a two-dimensional (2D) mono-layered structure, in which left-handed and right-handed helical chains are alternately arranged, while 4 features a double-layered structure with an unprecedented (3,3,6)-connected 3-nodal topological net. Compound 5 is a unique three-dimensional (3D) 2-fold interpenetrating racemic compound, simultaneously containing three kinds of Pr-Sb-O-Cl-pdc clusters. UV-light photocatalytic H2 evolution activity was observed for compound 3 with Pt as a co-catalyst and MeOH as a sacrificial electron donor. In addition, the magnetic properties of compounds 1 and 5 are also studied. PMID:24869770

  8. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Structures of 3D Lead-Halide Hybrid Perovskites and Pressure Effects on their Electronic and Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Adam; Lin, Yu; Beavers, Christine M; Voss, Johannes; Mao, Wendy L; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2016-04-27

    We report the first high-pressure single-crystal structures of hybrid perovskites. The crystalline semiconductors (MA)PbX3 (MA = CH3NH3 (+), X = Br(-) or I(-)) afford us the rare opportunity of understanding how compression modulates their structures and thereby their optoelectronic properties. Using atomic coordinates obtained from high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction we track the perovskites' precise structural evolution upon compression. These structural changes correlate well with pressure-dependent single-crystal photoluminescence (PL) spectra and high-pressure bandgaps derived from density functional theory. We further observe dramatic piezochromism where the solids become lighter in color and then transition to opaque black with compression. Indeed, electronic conductivity measurements of (MA)PbI3 obtained within a diamond-anvil cell show that the material's resistivity decreases by 3 orders of magnitude between 0 and 51 GPa. The activation energy for conduction at 51 GPa is only 13.2(3) meV, suggesting that the perovskite is approaching a metallic state. Furthermore, the pressure response of mixed-halide perovskites shows new luminescent states that emerge at elevated pressures. We recently reported that the perovskites (MA)Pb(Br x I1-x )3 (0.2 < x < 1) reversibly form light-induced trap states, which pin their PL to a low energy. This may explain the low voltages obtained from solar cells employing these absorbers. Our high-pressure PL data indicate that compression can mitigate this PL redshift and may afford higher steady-state voltages from these absorbers. These studies show that pressure can significantly alter the transport and thermodynamic properties of these technologically important semiconductors. PMID:27163050

  9. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Structures of 3D Lead-Halide Hybrid Perovskites and Pressure Effects on their Electronic and Optical Properties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the first high-pressure single-crystal structures of hybrid perovskites. The crystalline semiconductors (MA)PbX3 (MA = CH3NH3+, X = Br– or I–) afford us the rare opportunity of understanding how compression modulates their structures and thereby their optoelectronic properties. Using atomic coordinates obtained from high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction we track the perovskites’ precise structural evolution upon compression. These structural changes correlate well with pressure-dependent single-crystal photoluminescence (PL) spectra and high-pressure bandgaps derived from density functional theory. We further observe dramatic piezochromism where the solids become lighter in color and then transition to opaque black with compression. Indeed, electronic conductivity measurements of (MA)PbI3 obtained within a diamond-anvil cell show that the material’s resistivity decreases by 3 orders of magnitude between 0 and 51 GPa. The activation energy for conduction at 51 GPa is only 13.2(3) meV, suggesting that the perovskite is approaching a metallic state. Furthermore, the pressure response of mixed-halide perovskites shows new luminescent states that emerge at elevated pressures. We recently reported that the perovskites (MA)Pb(BrxI1–x)3 (0.2 < x < 1) reversibly form light-induced trap states, which pin their PL to a low energy. This may explain the low voltages obtained from solar cells employing these absorbers. Our high-pressure PL data indicate that compression can mitigate this PL redshift and may afford higher steady-state voltages from these absorbers. These studies show that pressure can significantly alter the transport and thermodynamic properties of these technologically important semiconductors. PMID:27163050

  10. Start-up of membrane bioreactor and hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor: kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Díaz, J C; Poyatos, J M

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBR) system was studied as an alternative solution to conventional activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors. This paper shows the results obtained from three laboratory-scale wastewater treatment plants working in parallel in the start-up and steady states. The first wastewater treatment plant was a MBR, the second one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system containing carriers both in anoxic and aerobic zones of the bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBRa), and the last one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system which contained carriers only in the aerobic zone (hybrid MBBR-MBRb). The reactors operated with a hydraulic retention time of 30.40 h. A kinetic study for characterizing heterotrophic biomass was carried out and organic matter and nutrients removals were evaluated. The heterotrophic biomass of the hybrid MBBR-MBRb showed the best kinetic performance in the steady state, with yield coefficient for heterotrophic biomass=0.30246 mg volatile suspended solids per mg chemical oxygen demand, maximum specific growth rate for heterotrophic biomass=0.00308 h(-1) and half-saturation coefficient for organic matter=3.54908 mg O2 L(-1). The removal of organic matter was supported by the kinetic study of heterotrophic biomass. PMID:26606088

  11. An Engineered Kinetic Amplification Mechanism for Single Nucleotide Variant Discrimination by DNA Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Seelig, Georg

    2016-04-20

    Even a single-nucleotide difference between the sequences of two otherwise identical biological nucleic acids can have dramatic functional consequences. Here, we use model-guided reaction pathway engineering to quantitatively improve the performance of selective hybridization probes in recognizing single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Specifically, we build a detection system that combines discrimination by competition with DNA strand displacement-based catalytic amplification. We show, both mathematically and experimentally, that the single nucleotide selectivity of such a system in binding to single-stranded DNA and RNA is quadratically better than discrimination due to competitive hybridization alone. As an additional benefit the integrated circuit inherits the property of amplification and provides at least 10-fold better sensitivity than standard hybridization probes. Moreover, we demonstrate how the detection mechanism can be tuned such that the detection reaction is agnostic to the position of the SNV within the target sequence. in contrast, prior strand displacement-based probes designed for kinetic discrimination are highly sensitive to position effects. We apply our system to reliably discriminate between different members of the let-7 microRNA family that differ in only a single base position. Our results demonstrate the power of systematic reaction network design to quantitatively improve biotechnology. PMID:27010123

  12. Analytical investigations on the effects of substrate kinetics on macromolecular transport and hybridization through microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Subramanian, Kapil; Chakraborty, Suman

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, a generalized surface-kinetics based model is developed to analytically investigate the influences of the substrate types and the buffer compositions on the macromolecular transport and hybridization in microfluidic channels, under electrokinetic influences. For specific illustration, three typical microchannel substrates, namely silanized glass, polycarbonate and PDMS, are considered, in order to obtain analytical expressions for their zeta potentials as a function of the buffer pH and the substrate compositions. The expressions for the zeta potential are subsequently employed to derive the respective velocity distributions, under the application of electric fields of identical strengths in all cases. It is also taken into consideration that the charged macromolecules introduced into these channels are subjected to electrophoretic influences on account of the applied electric fields. Closed form expressions are derived to predict the transport behaviour of the macromolecules and their subsequent hybridization characteristics. From the analysis presented, it is shown that the modification of the channel surface with silane-treatment becomes useful for enhancing the macromolecular transport and surface hybridization, only if the buffer pH permits a large surface charge density. The analytical solutions are also compared with full-scale numerical solutions of the coupled problem of fluid dynamic and macromolecular transport in presence of the pertinent surface reactions, in order to justify the effectiveness of closed-form expressions derived in this study. PMID:17481862

  13. The kinetics of force-dependent hybridization and strand-peeling of short DNA fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, ZhouJie; Yuan, GuoHua; Zhai, WeiLi; Yan, Jie; Chen, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) carries the genetic information in all living organisms. It consists of two interwound single-stranded (ss) strands, forming a double-stranded (ds) DNA with a right-handed double-helical conformation. The two strands are held together by highly specific basepairing interactions and are further stabilized by stacking between adjacent basepairs. A transition from a dsDNA to two separated ssDNA is called melting and the reverse transition is called hybridization. Applying a tensile force to a dsDNA can result in a particular type of DNA melting, during which one ssDNA strand is peeled away from the other. In this work, we studied the kinetics of strand-peeling and hybridization of short DNA under tensile forces. Our results show that the force-dependent strand-peeling and hybridization can be described with a simple two-state model. Importantly, detailed analysis of the force-dependent transition rates revealed that the transition state consists of several basepairs dsDNA.

  14. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  15. Subproton-scale Cascades in Solar Wind Turbulence: Driven Hybrid-kinetic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerri, S. S.; Califano, F.; Jenko, F.; Told, D.; Rincon, F.

    2016-05-01

    A long-lasting debate in space plasma physics concerns the nature of subproton-scale fluctuations in solar wind (SW) turbulence. Over the past decade, a series of theoretical and observational studies were presented in favor of either kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) or whistler turbulence. Here, we investigate numerically the nature of the subproton-scale turbulent cascade for typical SW parameters by means of unprecedented high-resolution simulations of forced hybrid-kinetic turbulence in two real-space and three velocity-space dimensions. Our analysis suggests that small-scale turbulence in this model is dominated by KAWs at β ≳ 1 and by magnetosonic/whistler fluctuations at lower β. The spectral properties of the turbulence appear to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions. A tentative interpretation of this result in terms of relative changes in the damping rates of the different waves is also presented. Overall, the results raise interesting new questions about the properties and variability of subproton-scale turbulence in the SW, including its possible dependence on the plasma β, and call for detailed and extensive parametric explorations of driven kinetic turbulence in three dimensions.

  16. Hydrogel-based reinforcement of 3D bioprinted constructs.

    PubMed

    Melchels, Ferry P W; Blokzijl, Maarten M; Levato, Riccardo; Peiffer, Quentin C; Ruijter, Mylène de; Hennink, Wim E; Vermonden, Tina; Malda, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Progress within the field of biofabrication is hindered by a lack of suitable hydrogel formulations. Here, we present a novel approach based on a hybrid printing technique to create cellularized 3D printed constructs. The hybrid bioprinting strategy combines a reinforcing gel for mechanical support with a bioink to provide a cytocompatible environment. In comparison with thermoplastics such as [Formula: see text]-polycaprolactone, the hydrogel-based reinforcing gel platform enables printing at cell-friendly temperatures, targets the bioprinting of softer tissues and allows for improved control over degradation kinetics. We prepared amphiphilic macromonomers based on poloxamer that form hydrolysable, covalently cross-linked polymer networks. Dissolved at a concentration of 28.6%w/w in water, it functions as reinforcing gel, while a 5%w/w gelatin-methacryloyl based gel is utilized as bioink. This strategy allows for the creation of complex structures, where the bioink provides a cytocompatible environment for encapsulated cells. Cell viability of equine chondrocytes encapsulated within printed constructs remained largely unaffected by the printing process. The versatility of the system is further demonstrated by the ability to tune the stiffness of printed constructs between 138 and 263 kPa, as well as to tailor the degradation kinetics of the reinforcing gel from several weeks up to more than a year. PMID:27431861

  17. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  18. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  19. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  20. A Fractal Analysis Approach for the Evaluation of Hybridization Kinetics in Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sadana, Ajit; Ramakrishnan, Anand

    2001-02-01

    The diffusion-limited hybridization kinetics of analyte in solution to a receptor immobilized on a biosensor or immunosensor surface is analyzed within a fractal framework. The data may be analyzed by a single- or a dual-fractal analysis. This was indicated by the regression analysis provided by Sigmaplot (Sigmaplot, Scientific Graphing Software, User's Manual, Jandel Scientific, CA, 1993). It is of interest to note that the binding rate coefficient and the fractal dimension both exhibit changes, in general, in the same direction for both the single-fractal and the dual-fractal analysis examples presented. The binding rate coefficient expression developed as a function of the analyte concentration in solution and the fractal dimension is of particular value since it provides a means to better control biosensor or immunosensor performance. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161484

  1. Hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics simulation for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method and lattice Boltzmann method is presented for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. In this framework, the multicomponent Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model considering both elastic and Coulomb collisions and the multicomponent force model based on the Guo model are introduced, which supply a hyperfine description on the interaction between electromagnetic wave and weakly ionized plasma. Cubic spline interpolation and mean filtering technique are separately introduced to solve the multiscalar problem and enhance the physical quantities, which are polluted by numerical noise. Several simulations have been implemented to validate our model. The numerical results are consistent with a simplified analytical model, which demonstrates that this model can obtain satisfying numerical solutions successfully.

  2. 3D integrated hybrid silicon laser.

    PubMed

    Song, Bowen; Stagarescu, Cristian; Ristic, Sasa; Behfar, Alex; Klamkin, Jonathan

    2016-05-16

    Lasers were realized on silicon by flip-chip bonding of indium phosphide (InP) devices containing total internal reflection turning mirrors for surface emission. Light is coupled to the silicon waveguides through surface grating couplers. With this technique, InP lasers were integrated on silicon. Laser cavities were also formed by coupling InP reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers to microring resonator filters and distributed Bragg reflector mirrors. Single-mode continuous wave lasing was demonstrated with a side mode suppression ratio of 30 dB. Up to 2 mW of optical power was coupled to the silicon waveguide. Thermal simulations were also performed to evaluate the low thermal impedance afforded by this architecture and potential for high wall-plug efficiency. PMID:27409867

  3. Three-Dimensional Kinetic Simulation of the Nonlinear Evolution of Lower-Hybrid Waves in the Auroral Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2000-01-01

    Under this grant we have done research on the following topics. 1) Development of Parallel PIC Codes (PPIC); 2) Evolution of Lower-Hybrid Pump Waves; 3) Electron-beam Driven Plasma Electrodynamics; and 4) Studies on Inertial and Kinetic Alfven Waves. A brief summary of our findings and resulting publications are given.

  4. Physics of the Dayside Magnetosphere: New Results From a Hybrid Kinetic Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebeck, D. G.; Omidi, N.

    2007-01-01

    We use a global hybrid code kinetic model to demonstrate how kinetic processes at the bow shock and within the foreshock can dramatically modify the solar wind just before its interaction with the magnetosphere. During periods of steady radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation, the foreshock fills with a diffuse population of suprathermal ions. The ions generate cavities marked by enhanced temperatures, depressed densities, and diminished magnetic field strengths that convect antisunward into the bow shock with the solar wind flow. Tangential discontinuities marked by inward-pointing electric fields and normals transverse to the Sun-Earth line generate hot flow anomalies marked by hot tenuous plasmas bounded by outward propagating shocks. When the motional electric field in the magnetosheath points inward towards the Earth, a solitary bow shock appears. For typical IMF orientations, the solitary shocks should appear at poorly sampled high latitudes, but for strongly northward or southward IMF orientations the solitary shocks should appear on the flanks of the magnetosphere. Although quasi-perpendicular, solitary shocks should be marked by turbulent magnetosheath flows, often directed towards the Sun-Earth line, and abrupt spike-like enhancements in the density and magnetic field strength at the shock. Finally,we show how flux transfer events generated between parallel subsolar reconnection lines are destroyed upon encountering the magnetopause at latitudes above the cusp.

  5. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  6. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  7. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  8. A hybrid input-output approach to model metabolic systems: an application to intracellular thiamine kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bellazzi, R; Guglielmann, R; Ironi, L; Patrini, C

    2001-08-01

    Models of the dynamics of complex metabolic systems offer potential benefits to the deep comprehension of the system under study as well as for the performance of certain tasks. Unfortunately, dynamic modeling of a great deal of metabolic systems may be problematic due to the incompleteness of the available knowledge about the underlying mechanisms and to the lack of an adequate observational data set. In theory, a valid alternative to classical structural modeling through ordinary differential equations could be represented by input-output approaches. But, in practice, such methods, which learn the nonlinear dynamics of the system from input-output data, fail when the experimental data set is poor either in size or in quality. Such a situation is not rare in the case of metabolic systems. This paper deals with a hybrid approach which aims at overcoming the problems addressed above. More specifically, it allows us to solve the identification problems of the intracellular thiamine kinetics in the intestine tissue. The method, which is half way between the structural and input-output approach, uses the outcomes of the simulation of a qualitative structural model to build a good initialization of a fuzzy system identifier. Such an initialization allows us to efficiently cope with both the incompleteness of knowledge and the inadequacy of the available data set, and to derive an input-output model of the intracellular thiamine kinetics in the intestine tissue. The comparison of the predictions of the intracellular thiamine kinetics obtained by the application of such a model with those obtained by traditional approaches, namely compartmental models, neural networks, and fuzzy systems, highlighted a better performance of our model. As the structural assumptions are relaxed, we obtained a model slightly less informative than a purely structural one but robust enough to be used as a simulator. The paper also discusses the interpretative potential offered by such a model

  9. Single- and dual-fractal analysis of hybridization binding kinetics: biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Sadana, A; Vo-Dinh, T

    1998-01-01

    The diffusion-limited hybridization kinetics of analyte in solution to a receptor immobilized on a biosensor or immunosensor surface is analyzed within a fractal framework. The data may be analyzed by a single- or a dual-fractal analysis. This was indicated by the regression analysis provided by Sigmaplot. It is of interest to note that the binding rate coefficient and the fractal dimension both exhibit changes in the same direction for both the single-fractal and the dual-fractal analysis examples presented. For example, for a single-fractal analysis and for the hybridization of 10 nM 16CFl (oligonucleotide) to 16B immobilized via sulfosuccinimidyl-6-(biotinamido)hexanoate and streptavidin using chemical and thermal regeneration (Abel, A. P.; Weller, M. G.; Duveneck, G. L.; Ehrat, M. Widmer, H. M. Anal. Chem. 1996, 68, 2905-2912), an increase in the fractal dimension, Df from 1.211 (chemical regeneration) to 1.394 (thermal regeneration), leads to an increase in the binding rate coefficient, k, from 86.53 (chemical regeneration) to 100.0 (thermal regeneration). An increase in the degree of heterogeneity on the biosensor surface leads to an increase in the binding rate coefficient. When a dual-fractal analysis was utilized, an increase in the fractal dimension value from Df1 to Df2 leads to an increase in the binding rate coefficient value from k1 to k2. The fractional order of dependence of the binding rate coefficient, k1, on (a) the analyte (rRNA) concentration in solution and (b) on the fractal dimension, Df1, for the hybridization kinetics to detect Listeria species (Fliss, R.; St-Laurent, M.; Emond, E.; Simard, R. E.; Lemieux, R.; Ettriki, A.; Pandian, S. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 1995, 43, 717-724.) further reinforces the fractal nature of the system. The binding rate coefficient(s) expressions developed as a function of the analyte concentration in solution and the fractal dimension are of particular value since they provide a means to better control of

  10. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee; Wey, Ming-Jyh

    Two dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  11. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee; Wey, Ming-Jyh

    1990-01-01

    Two dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  12. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee; Wey, Ming-Jyh

    1990-01-01

    Two-dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  13. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  14. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  15. Particle Acceleration in 3D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, J.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important driver of energetic particles in phenomena such as magnetospheric storms and solar flares. Using kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we show that the stochastic magnetic field structure which develops during 3D reconnection plays a vital role in particle acceleration and transport. In a 2D system, electrons are trapped in magnetic islands which limits their energy gain. In a 3D system, however, the stochastic magnetic field enables the energetic electrons to access volume-filling acceleration regions and therefore gain energy much more efficiently than in the 2D system. We also examine the relative roles of two important acceleration drivers: parallel electric fields and a Fermi mechanism associated with reflection of charged particles from contracting field lines. We find that parallel electric fields are most important for accelerating low energy particles, whereas Fermi reflection dominates energetic particle production. We also find that proton energization is reduced in the 3D system.

  16. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  17. Thermomechanical properties of 3d transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Karaoglu, B.; Rahman, S.M.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-05-15

    The authors have investigated the density variation of the Einstein temperatures and elastic constants of the 3d transition metals. In this respect they have employed the transition metal (TM) pair potentials involving the sp contribution with an appropriate exchange and correlation function, the d-band broadening contribution and the d-band hybridization term. These calculations are aimed at testing the TM pair potentials in generating the quasilocal and local thermomechanical properties.

  18. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  19. 3-D Particle Simulation of Current Sheet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) instabilities of a Harris current sheet are investigated using a 3-D linearized (δf) gyrokinetic (GK) electron and fully kinetic (FK) ion (GeFi) particle simulation code. The equilibrium magnetic field consists of an asymptotic anti-parallel Bx 0 and a guide field BG. The ES simulations show the excitation of lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) at the current sheet edge. The growth rate of the 3-D LHDI is scanned through the (kx ,ky) space. The most unstable modes are found to be at k∥ = 0 for smaller ky. As ky increases, the growth rate shows two peaks at k∥ ≠ 0 , consistent with analytical GK theory. The eigenmode structure and growth rate of LHDI obtained from the GeFi simulation agree well with those obtained from the FK PIC simulation. Decreasing BG, the asymptotic βe 0, or background density can destabilize the LHDI. In the EM simulation, tearing mode instability is dominant in the cases with ky kx , there exist two unstable modes: a kink-like (LHDI) mode at the current sheet edge and a sausage-like mode at the sheet center. The results are compared with the GK eigenmode theory and the FK simulation.

  20. Local Diagnosis of Reconnection in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate (I,II) an approach to find reconnection sites in 3D where there is no flux function for guidance, and where local observational signatures for the ``violation of frozen flux'' are under developed, if not non-existent. We use 2D and 3D PIC simulations of asymmetric guide field reconnection to test our observational hierarchy of single spacecraft kinetic diagnostics - all possible with present state of the art instrumentation. The proliferation of turbulent, electron inertial scale layers in the realistic 3D case demonstrates that electron demagnetization, while necessary, is not sufficient to identify reconnection sites. An excellent local, observable, single spacecraft proxy is demonstrated for the size of the theoretical frozen flux violation. Since even frozen flux violations need not imply reconnection is at hand, a new calibrated dimensionless method is used to determine the importance of such violations. This measure is available in 2D and 3D to help differentiate reconnection layers from weaker frozen flux violating layers. We discuss the possibility that this technique can be implemented on MMS. A technique to highlight flow geometries conducive to reconnection in 3D simulations is also suggested, that may also be implementable with the MMS flotilla. We use local analysis with multiple necessary, but theoretically independent electron kinetic conditions to help reduce the probability of misidentification of any given layer as a reconnection site. Since these local conditions are all necessary for the site, but none is known to be sufficient, the multiple tests help to greatly reduce false positive identifications. The selectivity of the results of this approach using PIC simulations of 3D asymmetric guide field reconnection will be shown using varying numbers of simultaneous conditions. Scudder, J.D., H. Karimabadi, W. Daughton and V. Roytershteyn I, II, submitted Phys. Plasma., 2014

  1. High-resolution Hybrid Simulations of Kinetic Plasma Turbulence at Proton Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franci, Luca; Landi, Simone; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-10-01

    We investigate properties of plasma turbulence from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) to sub-ion scales by means of two-dimensional, high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we add a spectrum of large-scale magnetic and kinetic fluctuations with energy equipartition and vanishing correlation. Once the turbulence is fully developed, we observe an MHD inertial range, where the spectra of the perpendicular magnetic field and the perpendicular proton bulk velocity fluctuations exhibit power-law scaling with spectral indices of -5/3 and -3/2, respectively. This behavior is extended over a full decade in wavevectors and is very stable in time. A transition is observed around proton scales. At sub-ion scales, both spectra steepen, with the former still following a power law with a spectral index of ∼ -3. A -2.8 slope is observed in the density and parallel magnetic fluctuations, highlighting the presence of compressive effects at kinetic scales. The spectrum of the perpendicular electric fluctuations follows that of the proton bulk velocity at MHD scales, and flattens at small scales. All these features, which we carefully tested against variations of many parameters, are in good agreement with solar wind observations. The turbulent cascade leads to on overall proton energization with similar heating rates in the parallel and perpendicular directions. While the parallel proton heating is found to be independent on the resistivity, the number of particles per cell, and the resolution employed, the perpendicular proton temperature strongly depends on these parameters.

  2. A hybrid computer program for rapidly solving flowing or static chemical kinetic problems involving many chemical species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, A. G.; Rao, C. S. R.

    1976-01-01

    A hybrid chemical kinetic computer program was assembled which provides a rapid solution to problems involving flowing or static, chemically reacting, gas mixtures. The computer program uses existing subroutines for problem setup, initialization, and preliminary calculations and incorporates a stiff ordinary differential equation solution technique. A number of check cases were recomputed with the hybrid program and the results were almost identical to those previously obtained. The computational time saving was demonstrated with a propane-oxygen-argon shock tube combustion problem involving 31 chemical species and 64 reactions. Information is presented to enable potential users to prepare an input data deck for the calculation of a problem.

  3. Kinetics of Oligonucleotide Hybridization to DNA Probe Arrays on High-Capacity Porous Silica Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Marc I.; Fidanza, Jacqueline A.; McGall, Glenn H.; Trulson, Mark O.; Forman, Jonathan E.; Frank, Curtis W.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of DNA hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays on high-capacity porous silica films that were deposited by two techniques. Films created by spin coating pure colloidal silica suspensions onto a substrate had pores of ∼23 nm, relatively low porosity (35%), and a surface area of 17 times flat glass (for a 0.3-μm film). In the second method, latex particles were codeposited with the silica by spin coating and then pyrolyzed, which resulted in larger pores (36 nm), higher porosity (65%), and higher surface area (26 times flat glass for a 0.3-μm film). As a result of these favorable properties, the templated silica hybridized more quickly and reached a higher adsorbed target density (11 vs. 8 times flat glass at 22°C) than the pure silica. Adsorption of DNA onto the high-capacity films is controlled by traditional adsorption and desorption coefficients, as well as by morphology factors and transient binding interactions between the target and the probes. To describe these effects, we have developed a model based on the analogy to diffusion of a reactant in a porous catalyst. Adsorption values (ka, kd, and K) measured on planar arrays for the same probe/target system provide the parameters for the model and also provide an internally consistent comparison for the stability of the transient complexes. The interpretation of the model takes into account factors not previously considered for hybridization in three-dimensional films, including the potential effects of heterogeneous probe populations, partial probe/target complexes during diffusion, and non-1:1 binding structures. The transient complexes are much less stable than full duplexes (binding constants for full duplexes higher by three orders of magnitude or more), which may be a result of the unique probe density and distribution that is characteristic of the photolithographically patterned arrays. The behavior at 22°C is described well by the predictive equations for

  4. Benchmarking a hybrid MHD/kinetic code with C-2 experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Richard; Clary, Ryan; Dettrick, Sean; Korepanov, Sergey; Onofri, Marco; Smirnov, Artem; TAE Team

    2013-10-01

    The C-2 device creates field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas via the dynamic merging of two compact toroids and heated with neutral beams. Simulations of these plasmas are performed with Q2D - a hybrid MHD/Monte Carlo code that evolves the plasma according to the resistive MHD equations and treats the neutral beam injected fast ions as a minority kinetic species. Recent Q2D runs have resulted in testable predictions, namely that the axial profile of the fast ions is double-peaked, and charge-exchange neutrals are localized in pitch-angle. In some simulations, the fast particle population can induce magnetic fluctuations. These fluctuations are largest in the radial component, have a characteristic frequency approximately equal to the fast ion bounce frequency (f ~ 150 kHz), and a broad k spectrum. These fluctuations have the beneficial effect of smoothing out the double-peaked axial fast ion density profile, resulting in an increased fast ion density at the mid-plane. We will present results from a benchmarking study to quantitatively compare the results of Q2D runs to existing C-2 experimental data.

  5. Pegasus: A new hybrid-kinetic particle-in-cell code for astrophysical plasma dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Matthew W.; Stone, James M.; Bai, Xue-Ning

    2014-02-01

    We describe Pegasus, a new hybrid-kinetic particle-in-cell code tailored for the study of astrophysical plasma dynamics. The code incorporates an energy-conserving particle integrator into a stable, second-order-accurate, three-stage predictor-predictor-corrector integration algorithm. The constrained transport method is used to enforce the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field. A δf scheme is included to facilitate a reduced-noise study of systems in which only small departures from an initial distribution function are anticipated. The effects of rotation and shear are implemented through the shearing-sheet formalism with orbital advection. These algorithms are embedded within an architecture similar to that used in the popular astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics code Athena, one that is modular, well-documented, easy to use, and efficiently parallelized for use on thousands of processors. We present a series of tests in one, two, and three spatial dimensions that demonstrate the fidelity and versatility of the code.

  6. Quantification of kinetic parameters for heterotrophic bacteria via respirometry in a hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Daniele Di; Mannina, Giorgio; Torregrossa, Michele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade new technologies are emerging even more for wastewater treatment. Among the new technologies, a recent possible solution regards Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBRs) that represent an effective alternative to conventional processes. More specifically such systems consist in the introduction of plastic elements inside the aerobic reactor as carrier material for the growth of attached biomass. Recently, one of the mostly used alternatives is to couple the Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) process with the conventional activated sludge process, and the resulting process is usually called HMBBR (Hybrid MBBR). In the MBBR process the biofilm grows attached on small plastic elements that are kept in constant motion throughout the entire volume of the reactor. Indeed, in such a system, a competition between the two biomasses, suspended and attached, can arise for the availability of the substrates, leading, as a consequence, to a modification in the biokinetic parameters of the two biomasses, compared to that of a pure suspended or attached biomass process. This paper presents the first results of a study aimed at estimating the kinetic heterotrophic constants in a HMBBR pilot plant using respirometric techniques. The pilot plant was built at the Acqua dei Corsari (Palermo) wastewater treatment plant and consisted of two parallel lines realized in a pre-anoxic scheme, in one of which the carrier material was added to the aerobic reactor with a filling ratio of 30%. PMID:20371934

  7. M3D project for simulation studies of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) project carries out simulation studies of plasmas of various regimes using multi-levels of physics, geometry, and mesh schemes in one code package. This paper and papers by Strauss, Sugiyama, and Belova in this workshop describe the project, and present examples of current applications. The currently available physics models of the M3D project are MHD, two-fluids, gyrokinetic hot particle/MHD hybrid, and gyrokinetic particle ion/two-fluid hybrid models. The code can be run with both structured and unstructured meshes.

  8. Equivalence of optical and electrical noise equivalent power of hybrid NbTiN-Al microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, R. M. J.; Endo, A.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2014-11-10

    We have measured and compared the response of hybrid NbTiN-Al Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) to changes in bath temperature and illumination by sub-mm radiation. We show that these two stimulants have an equivalent effect on the resonance feature of hybrid MKIDs. We determine an electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) from the measured temperature responsivity, quasiparticle recombination time, superconducting transition temperature, and noise spectrum, all of which can be measured in a dark environment. For the two hybrid NbTiN-Al MKIDs studied in detail, the electrical NEP is within a factor of two of the optical NEP, which is measured directly using a blackbody source.

  9. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  10. A kinetic study on the potential of a hybrid reaction mechanism for prediction of NOx formation in biomass grate furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirović, Selma; Scharler, Robert; Kilpinen, Pia; Obernberger, Ingwald

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the verification of a hybrid reaction mechanism (28 species, 104 reactions) by means of a kinetic study with a view to its application for the CFD-based prediction of gas phase combustion and NOx formation in biomass grate furnaces. The mechanism is based on a skeletal kinetic scheme that includes the subsets for H2, CO, NH3 and HCN oxidation derived from the detailed Kilpinen 97 reaction mechanism. To account for the CH4 breakdown two related reactions from the 4-step global mechanism for hydrocarbons oxidation by Jones and Lindstedt were adopted. The hybrid mechanism was compared to the global mechanism and validated against the detailed Kilpinen 97 mechanism. For that purpose plug flow reactor simulations at conditions relevant to biomass combustion (atmospheric pressure, 1200-1600 K) for approximations of the flue gases in a grate furnace at fuel lean and fuel rich conditions were carried out. The hybrid reaction mechanism outperformed the global one at all conditions investigated. The most striking differences obtained in predictions by the hybrid and the detailed mechanism at the residence times prior to ignition were attributed to the simplified description of the CH4 oxidation in the case of the former. The overall agreement regarding both combustion and NOx chemistry between the hybrid and the detailed mechanism was better at fuel lean conditions than at fuel rich conditions. However, also at fuel rich conditions, the agreement was improving with increasing temperature. Moreover, it was shown that an improvement in the prediction of NOx formation by the N-subset of the hybrid reaction mechanism can be achieved by replacing its C-H-O subset with that of the detailed one.

  11. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  12. Rubber Impact on 3D Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbs, Sebastian; Van Den Broucke, Björn; Duplessis Kergomard, Yann; Dau, Frederic; Malherbe, Benoit

    2012-06-01

    A low velocity impact study of aircraft tire rubber on 3D textile-reinforced composite plates was performed experimentally and numerically. In contrast to regular unidirectional composite laminates, no delaminations occur in such a 3D textile composite. Yarn decohesions, matrix cracks and yarn ruptures have been identified as the major damage mechanisms under impact load. An increase in the number of 3D warp yarns is proposed to improve the impact damage resistance. The characteristic of a rubber impact is the high amount of elastic energy stored in the impactor during impact, which was more than 90% of the initial kinetic energy. This large geometrical deformation of the rubber during impact leads to a less localised loading of the target structure and poses great challenges for the numerical modelling. A hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin constitutive law was used in Abaqus/Explicit based on a step-by-step validation with static rubber compression tests and low velocity impact tests on aluminium plates. Simulation models of the textile weave were developed on the meso- and macro-scale. The final correlation between impact simulation results on 3D textile-reinforced composite plates and impact test data was promising, highlighting the potential of such numerical simulation tools.

  13. Hybrid materials from agro-waste and nanoparticles: implications on the kinetics of the adsorption of inorganic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Omorogie, Martins O; Babalola, Jonathan O; Unuabonah, Emmanuel I; Gong, Jian R

    2014-01-01

    This study is a first-hand report of the immobilization of Nauclea diderrichii seed waste biomass (ND) (an agro-waste) with eco-friendly mesoporous silica (MS) and graphene oxide-MS (GO + MS) nanoparticles, producing two new hybrid materials namely: MND adsorbent for agro-waste modified with MS and GND adsorbent for agro-waste modified with GO + MS nanoparticles showed improved surface area, pore size and pore volume over those of the agro-waste. The abstractive potential of the new hybrid materials was explored for uptake of Cr(III) and Pb(II) ions. Analysis of experimental data from these new hybrid materials showed increased initial sorption rate of Cr(III) and Pb(II) ions uptake. The amounts of Cr(III) and Pb(II) ions adsorbed by MND and GND adsorbents were greater than those of ND. Modification of N. diderrichii seed waste significantly improved its rate of adsorption and diffusion coefficient for Cr(III) and Pb(II) more than its adsorption capacity. The rate of adsorption of the heavy metal ions was higher with GO + MS nanoparticles than for other adsorbents. Kinetic data were found to fit well the pseudo-second-order and the diffusion-chemisorption kinetic models suggesting that the adsorption of Cr(III) and Pb(II) onto these adsorbents is mainly through chemisorption mechanism. Analysis of kinetic data with the homogeneous particle diffusion kinetic model suggests that particle diffusion (diffusion of ions through the adsorbent) is the rate-limiting step for the adsorption process. PMID:24645440

  14. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  15. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  16. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  17. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  18. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  19. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  20. Generation of ion temperature anisotropy in kinetic hybrid-Vlasov simulations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, D.; Valentini, F.; Servidio, S.; Dalena, S.; Veltri, P.

    2013-12-01

    The interplanetary medium is a multi-component and weakly collisional system generally observed to be in a fully turbulent regime [1,2]. The system dynamics at short spatial scales appears to be dominated by kinetic effects that drive the interstellar gas far from the configuration of thermodynamic equilibrium [3-5]. We present a numerical analysis of a turbulent plasma composed of kinetic ions (protons and alpha particles) and fluid electrons in the typical conditions of the solar-wind environment, developed by using a low-noise hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell code [6,7] in a five dimensional phase space configuration (two dimensions in physical space and three dimensions in velocity space) [8]. The ion dynamics at short spatial scales (shorter than the proton skin depth) display several interesting aspects, mainly consisting in the departure of the distribution functions from the typical Maxwellian configuration, which has been systematically quantified through the evalutation of the temperature anisotropy ratio (perpendicular to parallel temperature ratio) with respect to the local magnetic field. This temperature anisotropy appears to be a direct effect of the turbulent nature of the system dynamics. Moreover, the turbulent activity leads to the generation of coherent structures, such as vortices and current sheets. Conditioned ion temperature distributions suggest heating associated with coherent structures; the distribution of ion temperatures moves towards higher values with increasing PVI threshold for the upper inertial range in the turbulent spectra. This behavior is more evident for alpha particles than for protons. The physical phenomenology recovered in these numerical simulations reproduces very common features recovered in 'in situ' measurements in the turbulent solar wind [9-11], suggesting that the multi-ion Vlasov model represents a valid approach to the understanding of the nature of complex kinetic effects in astrophysical plasmas. [1] R. Bruno and V

  1. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  2. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  3. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  4. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  7. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  8. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  9. Recognition methods for 3D textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Oana G.; Dana, Kristin J.

    2001-06-01

    Texture as a surface representation is the subject of a wide body of computer vision and computer graphics literature. While texture is always associated with a form of repetition in the image, the repeating quantity may vary. The texture may be a color or albedo variation as in a checkerboard, a paisley print or zebra stripes. Very often in real-world scenes, texture is instead due to a surface height variation, e.g. pebbles, gravel, foliage and any rough surface. Such surfaces are referred to here as 3D textured surfaces. Standard texture recognition algorithms are not appropriate for 3D textured surfaces because the appearance of these surfaces changes in a complex manner with viewing direction and illumination direction. Recent methods have been developed for recognition of 3D textured surfaces using a database of surfaces observed under varied imaging parameters. One of these methods is based on 3D textons obtained using K-means clustering of multiscale feature vectors. Another method uses eigen-analysis originally developed for appearance-based object recognition. In this work we develop a hybrid approach that employs both feature grouping and dimensionality reduction. The method is tested using the Columbia-Utrecht texture database and provides excellent recognition rates. The method is compared with existing recognition methods for 3D textured surfaces. A direct comparison is facilitated by empirical recognition rates from the same texture data set. The current method has key advantages over existing methods including requiring less prior information on both the training and novel images.

  10. A hybrid method for hydrodynamic-kinetic flow Part I: A particle-grid method for reducing stochastic noise in kinetic regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Alaia, Alessandro; Puppo, Gabriella

    2011-06-20

    In this work we present a hybrid particle-grid Monte Carlo method for the Boltzmann equation, which is characterized by a significant reduction of the stochastic noise in the kinetic regime. The hybrid method is based on a first order splitting in time to separate the transport from the relaxation step. The transport step is solved by a deterministic scheme, while a hybrid DSMC-based method is used to solve the collision step. Such a hybrid scheme is based on splitting the solution in a collisional and a non-collisional part at the beginning of the collision step, and the DSMC method is used to solve the relaxation step for the collisional part of the solution only. This is accomplished by sampling only the fraction of particles candidate for collisions from the collisional part of the solution, performing collisions as in a standard DSMC method, and then projecting the particles back onto a velocity grid to compute a piecewise constant reconstruction for the collisional part of the solution. The latter is added to a piecewise constant reconstruction of the non-collisional part of the solution, which in fact remains unchanged during the relaxation step. Numerical results show that the stochastic noise is significantly reduced at large Knudsen numbers with respect to the standard DSMC method. Indeed in this algorithm, the particle scheme is applied only on the collisional part of the solution, so only this fraction of the solution is affected by stochastic fluctuations. But since the collisional part of the solution reduces as the Knudsen number increases, stochastic noise reduces as well at large Knudsen numbers.

  11. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  12. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  13. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  14. Kinetic and kinematic responses of post mortem human surrogates and the Hybrid III ATD in high-speed frontal sled tests.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Stephanie M; Kemper, Andrew R; Madigan, Michael L; Duma, Stefan M

    2013-06-01

    Despite improvements in vehicle design and safety technologies, frontal automotive collisions continue to result in a substantial number of injuries and fatalities each year. Although a considerable amount of research has been performed on PMHSs and ATDs, matched dynamic whole-body frontal testing with PMHSs and the current ATD aimed at quantifying both kinetic and kinematic data in a single controlled study is lacking in the literature. Therefore, a total of 4 dynamic matched frontal sled tests were performed with three male PMHSs and a Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD (28.6g, Δv=40 kph). Each subject was restrained using a 4 kN load limiting, driver-side, 3-point seatbelt. Belt force was measured for the lap belt and shoulder belt. Reaction forces were measured at the seat pan, seat back, independent foot plates, and steering column. Linear head acceleration, angular head acceleration, and pelvic acceleration were measured for all subjects. Acceleration of C7, T7, T12, both femurs, and both tibias were also measured for the PMHSs. A Vicon motion analysis system, consisting of 12 MX-T20 2 megapixel cameras, was used to quantify subject 3D motion (±1 mm) at a rate of 1 kHz. Excursions of select anatomical regions were normalized to their respective initial positions and compared by test condition and between subject types. Notable discrepancies were observed in the responses of the PMHSs and the ATD. The reaction forces and belt loading for the ATD, particularly foot plate, seat back, steering column, and lap belt forces, were not in agreement with those of the PMHSs. The forward excursions of the ATD were consistently within those of the PMHSs with the exception of the left upper extremity. This could potentially be due to the known limitations of the Hybrid III ATD shoulder and chest. The results presented herein demonstrate that there are some limitations to the current Hybrid III ATD under the loading conditions evaluated in the current study. Overall

  15. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  16. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  17. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  18. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  19. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  20. Inferential modeling of 3D chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siyu; Xu, Jinbo; Zeng, Jianyang

    2015-01-01

    For eukaryotic cells, the biological processes involving regulatory DNA elements play an important role in cell cycle. Understanding 3D spatial arrangements of chromosomes and revealing long-range chromatin interactions are critical to decipher these biological processes. In recent years, chromosome conformation capture (3C) related techniques have been developed to measure the interaction frequencies between long-range genome loci, which have provided a great opportunity to decode the 3D organization of the genome. In this paper, we develop a new Bayesian framework to derive the 3D architecture of a chromosome from 3C-based data. By modeling each chromosome as a polymer chain, we define the conformational energy based on our current knowledge on polymer physics and use it as prior information in the Bayesian framework. We also propose an expectation-maximization (EM) based algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters of the Bayesian model and infer an ensemble of chromatin structures based on interaction frequency data. We have validated our Bayesian inference approach through cross-validation and verified the computed chromatin conformations using the geometric constraints derived from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. We have further confirmed the inferred chromatin structures using the known genetic interactions derived from other studies in the literature. Our test results have indicated that our Bayesian framework can compute an accurate ensemble of 3D chromatin conformations that best interpret the distance constraints derived from 3C-based data and also agree with other sources of geometric constraints derived from experimental evidence in the previous studies. The source code of our approach can be found in https://github.com/wangsy11/InfMod3DGen. PMID:25690896

  1. Enhanced electron transfer kinetics through hybrid graphene-carbon nanotube films

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Philémon A.; Raut, Akshay S.; Ubnoske, Stephen M.; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first study of the electrochemical reactivity of a graphenated carbon nanotube (g-CNT) film. The electron transfer kinetics of the ferri-ferrocyanide couple were examined for a g-CNT film and compared to the kinetics to standard carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The g-CNT film exhibited much higher catalytic activity, with a heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant, k0, approximately two orders of magnitude higher than for standard CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to correlate the higher electron transfer kinetics with the higher edge-density of the g-CNT film. PMID:25309121

  2. Electromagnetic self-consistent field initialization and fluid advance techniques for hybrid-kinetic PWFA code Architect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimo, F.; Marocchino, A.; Rossi, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    The realization of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments with high quality of the accelerated bunches requires an increasing number of numerical simulations to perform first-order assessments for the experimental design and online-analysis of the experimental results. Particle in Cell codes are the state-of-the-art tools to study the beam-plasma interaction mechanism, but due to their requirements in terms of number of cores and computational time makes them unsuitable for quick parametric scans. Considerable interest has been shown thus in methods which reduce the computational time needed for the simulation of plasma acceleration. Such methods include the use of hybrid kinetic-fluid models, which treat the relativistic bunches as in a PIC code and the background plasma electrons as a fluid. A technique to properly initialize the bunch electromagnetic fields in the time explicit hybrid kinetic-fluid code Architect is presented, as well the implementation of the Flux Corrected Transport scheme for the fluid equations integrated in the code.

  3. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  4. Met.3D - a new open-source tool for interactive 3D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Kern, Michael; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    We introduce Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output -- 3D visualisation, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3D context. It implements methods that address the issue of spatial perception in the 3D view as well as approaches to using the ensemble in order to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to the Met.3D approach. The tool uses modern graphics hardware technology to achieve interactive visualization of present-day numerical weather prediction datasets on standard consumer hardware. Met.3D supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and operates directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the software --illustrated with short video examples--, and give information on its availability.

  5. 3-D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts - Part 1: The visualization tool Met.3D (version 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Kern, M.; Schäfler, A.; Westermann, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3-D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output - 3-D visualization, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2-D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3-D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3-D context. We address the issue of spatial perception in the 3-D view and present approaches to using the ensemble to allow the user to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to our approach. Met.3D uses modern graphics technology to achieve interactive visualization on standard consumer hardware. The tool supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and can operate directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. We describe the employed visualization algorithms, and analyse the impact of the ECMWF grid topology on computing 3-D ensemble statistical quantitites. Our techniques are demonstrated with examples from the T-NAWDEX-Falcon 2012 campaign.

  6. 3D-Pathology: a real-time system for quantitative diagnostic pathology and visualisation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottrup, Christian; Beckett, Mark G.; Hager, Henrik; Locht, Peter

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents the results of the 3D-Pathology project conducted under the European EC Framework 5. The aim of the project was, through the application of 3D image reconstruction and visualization techniques, to improve the diagnostic and prognostic capabilities of medical personnel when analyzing pathological specimens using transmitted light microscopy. A fully automated, computer-controlled microscope system has been developed to capture 3D images of specimen content. 3D image reconstruction algorithms have been implemented and applied to the acquired volume data in order to facilitate the subsequent 3D visualization of the specimen. Three potential application fields, immunohistology, cromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and cytology, have been tested using the prototype system. For both immunohistology and CISH, use of the system furnished significant additional information to the pathologist.

  7. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  8. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2003-05-12

    This project is in its first full year after the combining of two previously funded projects: ''3D Code Development'' and ''Dynamic Material Properties''. The motivation behind this move was to emphasize and strengthen the ties between the experimental work and the computational model development in the materials area. The next year's activities will indicate the merging of the two efforts. The current activity is structured in two tasks. Task A, ''Simulations and Measurements'', combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. Task B, ''ALE3D Development'', is a continuation of the non-materials related activities from the previous project.

  9. Performance of hybrid NbTiN-Al microwave kinetic inductance detectors as direct detectors for sub-millimeter astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R. M. J.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Baryshev, A. M.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    In the next decades millimeter and sub-mm astronomy requires large format imaging arrays and broad-band spectrometers to complement the high spatial and spectral resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The desired sensors for these instruments should have a background limited sensitivity and a high optical efficiency and enable arrays thousands of pixels in size. Hybrid microwave kinetic inductance detectors consisting of NbTiN and Al have shown to satisfy these requirements. We present the second generation hybrid NbTiN-Al MKIDs, which are photon noise limited in both phase and amplitude readout for loading levels P850GHz < 10 fW. Thanks to the increased responsivity, the photon noise level achieved in phase allows us to simultaneously read out approximately 8000 pixels using state-of-the-art electronics. In addition, the choice of superconducting materials and the use of a Si lens in combination with a planar antenna gives these resonators the flexibility to operate within the frequency range 0:09 < v < 1:1 THz. Given these specifications, hybrid NbTiN-Al MKIDs will enable astronomically usable kilopixel arrays for sub-mm imaging and moderate resolution spectroscopy.

  10. Kinetic-MHD hybrid equilibrium model using a Monte-Carlo calculation of runaway electron distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Akinobu; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2015-11-01

    An axisymmetric MHD equilibrium model is studied to allow the inclusion of both beam inertia and energy spectrum for runaway electron beam. Following kinetic-MHD hybrid approach, we evaluate the RE beam current from the integrals of the RE distribution function. The distribution function is here evaluated by a relativistic guiding-center trace code ETC-Rel, where we have implemented the effects of collisions, radiations, and exponential growth into the code. Because to directly treat the Dreicer mechanism in particle simulations is time consuming, the primary RE source is modeled by a Monte-Carlo weighing scheme taking into account the instantaneous generation rate. This paper applies ETC-Rel to the parametric study of the MHD equilibrium with different RE beam parameters. Kinetic effects on the MHD equilibrium appears, e.g., as enhanced Shafranov shifts due to the inertia of highly relativistic electrons. A kinetic modification to the equilibrium becomes significant if the contribution of the beam inertia - being increased with the total electron mass of multi-MeV RE populations - becomes large enough to affect the radial force balance. This work was supported in part by MEXT KAKENHI Grant No. 23561009 and 26820404.

  11. 3-D magnetic field calculations for wiggglers using MAGNUS-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Pissanetzky, S.; Tompkins, P.

    1988-01-01

    The recent but steady trend toward increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of wigglers and undulators, of which tapered wigglers, hybrid structures, laced electromagnetic wigglers, magnetic cladding, twisters and magic structures are examples, has caused a need for reliable 3-D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic systems in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D Group of Programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3-D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of Magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, linear or nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors of any shape in space. The magnetic properties of permanent magnets are described by the complete nonlinear demagnetization curve as provided by the manufacturer, or, at the user's choice, by a simpler approximation involving the coercive force, the residual induction and the direction of magnetization. The ferromagnetic materials are described by a magnetization table and an accurate interpolation relation. An internal library with properties of common industrial steels is available. The conductors are independent of the mesh and are described in terms of conductor elements from an internal library.

  12. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  13. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  14. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  15. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  16. Effect of Nonlinearity in Hybrid Kinetic Monte Carlo-Continuum Models

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Lin, Guang; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2012-04-23

    Recently there has been interest in developing efficient ways to model heterogeneous surface reactions with hybrid computational models that couple a KMC model for a surface to a finite difference model for bulk diffusion in a continuous domain. We consider two representative problems that validate a hybrid method and also show that this method captures the combined effects of nonlinearity and stochasticity. We first validate a simple deposition/dissolution model with a linear rate showing that the KMC-continuum hybrid agrees with both a fully deterministic model and its analytical solution. We then study a deposition/dissolution model including competitive adsorption, which leads to a nonlinear rate, and show that, in this case, the KMC-continuum hybrid and fully deterministic simulations do not agree. However, we are able to identify the difference as a natural result of the stochasticity coming from the KMC surface process. Because KMC captures inherent fluctuations, we consider it to be more realistic than a purely deterministic model. Therefore, we consider the KMC-continuum hybrid to be more representative of a real system.

  17. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  18. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Zirbel, Craig L; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B

    2015-09-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson-Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  19. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  20. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  1. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  2. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  3. 360-degree 3D profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanhe; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wenyi; Tan, Yushan

    1997-12-01

    A new method of 360 degree turning 3D shape measurement in which light sectioning and phase shifting techniques are both used is presented in this paper. A sine light field is applied in the projected light stripe, meanwhile phase shifting technique is used to calculate phases of the light slit. Thereafter wrapped phase distribution of the slit is formed and the unwrapping process is made by means of the height information based on the light sectioning method. Therefore phase measuring results with better precision can be obtained. At last the target 3D shape data can be produced according to geometric relationships between phases and the object heights. The principles of this method are discussed in detail and experimental results are shown in this paper.

  4. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  5. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  6. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  7. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  8. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  9. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  10. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  11. Coumarin-Chalcone Hybrids as Peroxyl Radical Scavengers: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Gloria; Galano, Annia; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan R; Russo, Nino

    2016-04-25

    The primary antioxidant activity of coumarin-chalcone hybrids has been investigated using the density functional and the conventional transition state theories. Their peroxyl radical scavenging ability was studied in solvents of different polarity and taking into account different reaction mechanisms. It was found that the activity of the hybrids increases with the polarity of the environment and the number of phenolic sites. In addition, their peroxyl radical scavenging activity is larger than those of the corresponding nonhybrid coumarin and chalcone molecules. This finding is in line with previous experimental evidence. All the investigated molecules were found to react faster than Trolox with (•)OOH, regardless of the polarity of the environment. The role of deprotonation on the overall activity of the studied compounds was assessed. The rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of all the studied compounds with (•)OOH are reported for the first time. PMID:26998844

  12. From 1D chain to 3D network: a new family of inorganic-organic hybrid semiconductors MO3(L)(x) (M = Mo, W; L = organic linker) built on perovskite-like structure modules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Hejazi, Mehdi; Thiagarajan, Suraj J; Woerner, William R; Banerjee, Debasis; Emge, Thomas J; Xu, Wenqian; Teat, Simon J; Gong, Qihan; Safari, Ahmad; Yang, Ronggui; Parise, John B; Li, Jing

    2013-11-20

    MO3 (M = Mo, W) or VI-VI binary compounds are important semiconducting oxides that show great promise for a variety of applications. In an effort to tune and enhance their properties in a systematic manner we have applied a designing strategy to deliberately introduce organic linker molecules in these perovskite-like crystal lattices. This approach has led to a wealth of new hybrid structures built on one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) VI-VI modules. The hybrid semiconductors exhibit a number of greatly improved properties and new functionality, including broad band gap tunability, negative thermal expansion, largely reduced thermal conductivity, and significantly enhanced dielectric constant compared to their MO3 parent phases. PMID:24152119

  13. Development of a hybrid deterministic/stochastic method for 1D nuclear reactor kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlizzi, Stefano; Rahnema, Farzad; Zhang, Dingkang; Dulla, Sandra; Ravetto, Piero

    2015-12-01

    A new method has been implemented for solving the time-dependent neutron transport equation efficiently and accurately. This is accomplished by coupling the hybrid stochastic-deterministic steady-state coarse-mesh radiation transport (COMET) method [1,2] with the new predictor-corrector quasi-static method (PCQM) developed at Politecnico di Torino [3]. In this paper, the coupled method is implemented and tested in 1D slab geometry.

  14. Development of a hybrid deterministic/stochastic method for 1D nuclear reactor kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Terlizzi, Stefano; Dulla, Sandra; Ravetto, Piero; Rahnema, Farzad; Zhang, Dingkang

    2015-12-31

    A new method has been implemented for solving the time-dependent neutron transport equation efficiently and accurately. This is accomplished by coupling the hybrid stochastic-deterministic steady-state coarse-mesh radiation transport (COMET) method [1,2] with the new predictor-corrector quasi-static method (PCQM) developed at Politecnico di Torino [3]. In this paper, the coupled method is implemented and tested in 1D slab geometry.

  15. Modeling the first stages of Cu precipitation in α-Fe using a hybrid atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castin, N.; Pascuet, M. I.; Malerba, L.

    2011-08-01

    We simulate the coherent stage of Cu precipitation in α-Fe with an atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) model. The vacancy migration energy as a function of the local chemical environment is provided on-the-fly by a neural network, trained with high precision on values calculated with the nudged elastic band method, using a suitable interatomic potential. To speed up the simulation, however, we modify the standard AKMC algorithm by treating large Cu clusters as objects, similarly to object kinetic Monte Carlo approaches. Seamless matching between the fully atomistic and the coarse-grained approach is achieved again by using a neural network, that provides all stability and mobility parameters for large Cu clusters, after training on atomistically informed results. The resulting hybrid algorithm allows long thermal annealing experiments to be simulated, within a reasonable CPU time. The results obtained are in very good agreement with several series of experimental data available from the literature, spanning over different conditions of temperature and alloy composition. We deduce from these results and relevant parametric studies that the mobility of Cu clusters containing one vacancy plays a central role in the precipitation mechanism.

  16. Performance of hybrid, diffraction, and continuously coupled cat-eye resonators with kinetically enhanced copper vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bijendra; Subramaniam, V. V.; Daultabad, Shankar; Ghodke, Dharmraj; Chakraborty, Ashim

    2010-09-01

    New resonators, namely the hybrid cat-eye resonator (HCER), diffraction-coupled cat-eye resonator (DCCER), and continuously coupled cat-eye resonator (CCCER) are demonstrated for the first time here in a kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser with high optical extraction of 70 to 80%, low beam divergence ~0.15 mrad (approximately five times the diffraction limit), and high misalignment tolerance ~5 to 6 mrad achieved simultaneously from each of these configurations. The laser used in the experiment is a 45- to 47-mm bore, 50-W kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser. In the case of HCER, the laser beam divergence reduces to about 0.12 mrad (~30-fold reduction) in an unstable direction and about 0.5 mrad (approximately seven-fold reduction) in a stable direction with average beam power of about 35 W, which is ~70% of 50-W maximum set power of the laser. In the DCCER configuration, laser power achieved is about ~37 W (75% of 50-W laser power) with beam divergence of about 0.17 mrad and misalignment tolerance of ~5 mrad. In CCCER, the output power of about 40 W (80% of 50-W laser power) is achieved with beam divergence of about 0.1 mrad (approximately three to four times the diffraction limit).

  17. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Fu, G. Y.; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  18. M3D-K Simulations of Sawteeth and Energetic Particle Transport in Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Fu, Guoyong; Sheng, Zhengmao; Breslau, Joshua; Wang, Feng

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear simulations of Sawteeth and energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/MHD hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles due to a resistive (1,1) internal kink mode for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in plasma core depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with previous theory. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases as particle energy becomes large.

  19. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  20. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  1. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Conductive Complex Structures with In Situ Generation of Silver Nanoparticles (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Fantino, Erika; Chiappone, Annalisa; Roppolo, Ignazio; Manfredi, Diego; Bongiovanni, Roberta; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Calignano, Flaviana

    2016-05-01

    On page 3712, E. Fantino, A. Chiappone, and co-workers fabricate conductive 3D hybrid structures by coupling the photo-reduction of metal precursors with 3D printing technology. The generated structures consist of metal nanoparticles embedded in a polymer matrix shaped into complex multilayered architectures. 3D conductive structures are fabricated with a digital light-processing printer incorporating silver salt into photocurable formulations. PMID:27167030

  2. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  3. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  4. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  5. Vacant Lander in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rear hazard-identification camera shows the now-empty lander that carried the rover 283 million miles to Meridiani Planum, Mars. Engineers received confirmation that Opportunity's six wheels successfully rolled off the lander and onto martian soil at 3:01 a.m. PST, January 31, 2004, on the seventh martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the lander, facing north.

  6. Teaching Molecular 3-D Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, David C.; Richardson, Jane S.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes how the use of interactive molecular graphics makes a unique and important contribution to student learning of biochemistry and molecular biology at any level. These authors developed the concept of the kinemage (from "kinetic image"), a different way of organizing computer graphics that is aimed explicitly at the…

  7. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  8. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  9. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  10. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  11. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  12. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  13. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  14. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  15. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  16. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  17. Domain topology and domain switching kinetics in a hybrid improper ferroelectric

    PubMed Central

    Huang, F. -T.; Xue, F.; Gao, B.; Wang, L. H.; Luo, X.; Cai, W.; Lu, X. -Z.; Rondinelli, J. M.; Chen, L. Q.; Cheong, S. -W.

    2016-01-01

    Charged polar interfaces such as charged ferroelectric walls or heterostructured interfaces of ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O and LaAlO3/SrTiO3, across which the normal component of electric polarization changes suddenly, can host large two-dimensional conduction. Charged ferroelectric walls, which are energetically unfavourable in general, were found to be mysteriously abundant in hybrid improper ferroelectric (Ca,Sr)3Ti2O7 crystals. From the exploration of antiphase boundaries in bilayer-perovskites, here we discover that each of four polarization-direction states is degenerate with two antiphase domains, and these eight structural variants form a Z4 × Z2 domain structure with Z3 vortices and five distinct types of domain walls, whose topology is directly relevant to the presence of abundant charged walls. We also discover a zipper-like nature of antiphase boundaries, which are the reversible creation/annihilation centres of pairs of two types of ferroelectric walls (and also Z3-vortex pairs) in 90° and 180° polarization switching. Our results demonstrate the unexpectedly rich nature of hybrid improper ferroelectricity. PMID:27215944

  18. Domain topology and domain switching kinetics in a hybrid improper ferroelectric.

    PubMed

    Huang, F-T; Xue, F; Gao, B; Wang, L H; Luo, X; Cai, W; Lu, X-Z; Rondinelli, J M; Chen, L Q; Cheong, S-W

    2016-01-01

    Charged polar interfaces such as charged ferroelectric walls or heterostructured interfaces of ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O and LaAlO3/SrTiO3, across which the normal component of electric polarization changes suddenly, can host large two-dimensional conduction. Charged ferroelectric walls, which are energetically unfavourable in general, were found to be mysteriously abundant in hybrid improper ferroelectric (Ca,Sr)3Ti2O7 crystals. From the exploration of antiphase boundaries in bilayer-perovskites, here we discover that each of four polarization-direction states is degenerate with two antiphase domains, and these eight structural variants form a Z4 × Z2 domain structure with Z3 vortices and five distinct types of domain walls, whose topology is directly relevant to the presence of abundant charged walls. We also discover a zipper-like nature of antiphase boundaries, which are the reversible creation/annihilation centres of pairs of two types of ferroelectric walls (and also Z3-vortex pairs) in 90° and 180° polarization switching. Our results demonstrate the unexpectedly rich nature of hybrid improper ferroelectricity. PMID:27215944

  19. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  20. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  1. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  2. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  3. Adsorption of heavy metal ions using hierarchical CaCO3-maltose meso/macroporous hybrid materials: adsorption isotherms and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoming; Li, Liping; Yang, Lin; Su, Caiyun; Wang, Kui; Yuan, Shibao; Zhou, Jianguo

    2012-03-30

    Highly ordered hierarchical calcium carbonate is an important phase and has technological interest in the development of functional materials. The work describes hierarchical CaCO(3)-maltose meso/macroporous hybrid materials were synthesized using a simple gas-diffusion method. The uniform hexagonal-shaped CaCO(3)-maltose hybrid materials are formed by the hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles. The pore structure analysis indicates that the sample possesses the macroporous structure of mesoporous framework. The distinguishing features of the hierarchical CaCO(3)-maltose materials in water treatment involve not only high removal capacities, but also decontamination of trace metal ions. Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum removal capacity of the CaCO(3)-maltose hybrid materials for Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+) ions was 3242.48, 487.80, 628.93, 393.70, 558.66 and 769.23 mg/g, respectively. Adsorption data were modeled using the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion kinetics equations. The results indicate that pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and intra-particle diffusion model can better describe the adsorption kinetics. The adsorption and precipitation transformation mechanism can be considered due to hierarchical meso/macroporous structure, rich organic ligands of the CaCO(3)-maltose hybrid materials and the larger solubility product of CaCO(3). PMID:22326246

  4. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  5. Two-dimensional hybrid simulations of kinetic plasma turbulence: Current and vorticity vs proton temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franci, Luca; Hellinger, Petr; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone

    2016-03-01

    Proton temperature anisotropies between the directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field are usually observed in the solar wind plasma. Here, we employ a high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulation in order to investigate the relation between spatial properties of the proton temperature and the peaks in the current density and in the flow vorticity. Our results indicate that, although regions where the proton temperature is enhanced and temperature anisotropies are larger correspond approximately to regions where many thin current sheets form, no firm quantitative evidence supports the idea of a direct causality between the two phenomena. On the other hand, quite a clear correlation between the behavior of the proton temperature and the out-of-plane vorticity is obtained.

  6. 3D simulation studies of tokamak plasmas using MHD and extended-MHD models

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) tokamak simulation project aims at the simulation of tokamak plasmas using a multi-level tokamak code package. Several current applications using MHD and Extended-MHD models are presented; high-{beta} disruption studies in reversed shear plasmas using the MHD level MH3D code, {omega}{sub *i} stabilization and nonlinear island saturation of TAE mode using the hybrid particle/MHD level MH3D-K code, and unstructured mesh MH3D{sup ++} code studies. In particular, three internal mode disruption mechanisms are identified from simulation results which agree which agree well with experimental data.

  7. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  8. Generation of kinetic Alfven waves in the high-latitude near-Earth magnetotail: A global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhifang; Hong, Minghua; Lin, Yu; Du, Aimin; Wang, Xueyi; Wu, Mingyu; Lu, Quanming

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, effects of a fast flow in the tail plasma sheet on the generation of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) in the high-latitude of the near-Earth magnetotail are investigated by performing a two-dimensional (2-D) global-scale hybrid simulation, where the plasma flow is initialized by the E ×B drift near the equatorial plane due to the existence of the dawn-dusk convection electric field. It is found that firstly, the plasma sheet becomes thinned and the dipolarization of magnetic field appears around (x ,z ) =(-10.5 RE,0.3 RE) , where RE is the radius of the Earth. Then, shear Alfven waves are excited in the plasma sheet, and the strong earthward flow is braked by the dipole-like magnetic field. These waves propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the polar regions later. Subsequently, KAWs with k⊥≫k∥ are generated in the high-latitude magnetotail due to the existence of the non-uniformity of the magnetic field and density in the polar regions. The ratio of the electric field to the magnetic field in these waves is found to obey the relation (δEz)/(δBy )˜ω/k∥ of KAWs. Our simulation provides a mechanism for the generation of the observed low-frequency shear Alfven waves in the plasma sheet and kinetic Alfven waves in the high-latitude near-Earth magnetotail, whose source is suggested to be the flow braking in the low-latitude plasma sheet.

  9. Generation of kinetic Alfven waves in the high-latitude near-Earth magnetotail: A global hybrid simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhifang; Hong, Minghua; Du, Aimin; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Wu, Mingyu; Lu, Quanming

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, effects of a fast flow in the tail plasma sheet on the generation of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) in the high-latitude of the near-Earth magnetotail are investigated by performing a two-dimensional (2-D) global-scale hybrid simulation, where the plasma flow is initialized by the E×B drift near the equatorial plane due to the existence of the dawn-dusk convection electric field. It is found that firstly, the plasma sheet becomes thinned and the dipolarization of magnetic field appears around (x,z)=(−10.5R{sub E},0.3R{sub E}), where R{sub E} is the radius of the Earth. Then, shear Alfven waves are excited in the plasma sheet, and the strong earthward flow is braked by the dipole-like magnetic field. These waves propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the polar regions later. Subsequently, KAWs with k{sub ⊥}≫k{sub ∥} are generated in the high-latitude magnetotail due to the existence of the non-uniformity of the magnetic field and density in the polar regions. The ratio of the electric field to the magnetic field in these waves is found to obey the relation (δE{sub z})/(δB{sub y} )∼ω/k{sub ∥} of KAWs. Our simulation provides a mechanism for the generation of the observed low-frequency shear Alfven waves in the plasma sheet and kinetic Alfven waves in the high-latitude near-Earth magnetotail, whose source is suggested to be the flow braking in the low-latitude plasma sheet.

  10. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  11. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  12. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  13. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  14. Enabling Breakthrough Kinetic Simulations of the Magnetosphere Using Petascale Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Dorelli, J.

    2009-12-01

    Currently global magnetospheric simulations are predominantly based on single-fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). MHD simulations have proven useful in studies of the global dynamics of the magnetosphere with the goal of predicting eminent features of substorms and other global events. But it is well known that the magnetosphere is dominated by ion kinetic effects, which is ignored in MHD simulations, and many key aspects of the magnetosphere relating to transport and structure of boundaries await global kinetic simulations. We are using our recent innovations in hybrid (electron fluid, kinetic ions) simulations, as being developed in our Hybrid3D (H3D) code, and the power of massively parallel machines to make, breakthrough 3D global kinetic simulations of the magnetosphere. The innovations include (i) multi-zone (asynchronous) algorithm, (ii) dynamic load balancing, and (iii) code adaptation and optimization to large number of processors. In this presentation we will show preliminary results of our progress to date using from 512 to over 8192 cores. In particular, we focus on what we believe to be the first demonstration of the formation of a flux rope in 3D global hybrid simulations. As in the MHD simulations, the resulting flux rope has a very complex structure, wrapping up field lines from different regions and appears to be connected on at least one end to Earth. Magnetic topology of the FTE is examined to reveal the existence of several separators (3D X-lines). The formation and growth of this structure will be discussed and spatial profile of the magnetic and plasma variables will be compared with those from MHD simulations.

  15. Conducting Ferroelectric Walls, Domain Topology, and Domain Switching Kinetics in a Hybrid Improper Ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Sang-Wook; Rutgers Center For Emergent Materials Team

    Charged polar interfaces such as charged ferroelectric domain walls or heterostructured interfaces of ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O and LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 , across which the normal component of electric polarization changes suddenly, can host large two-dimensional conduction. Charged ferroelectric domain walls can be highly conducting but energetically unfavored; however, they were found to be mysteriously abundant in hybrid improper ferroelectric (Ca,Sr) 3 Ti 2 O 7 single crystals. From the exploration of antiphase domain boundaries, which are hidden in piezoresponse force microscopy, using dark-field electron microscopy, we have explored the macroscopic topology of polarization domains and antiphase domains. We found that the macroscopic domain topology is directly responsible for the presence of charged domain walls, and is closely related with the polarization domain switching mechanism in (Ca,Sr) 3 Ti 2 O 7 . Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

  16. Designing 3D Multihierarchical Heteronanostructures for High-Performance On-Chip Hybrid Supercapacitors: Poly(3,4-(ethylenedioxy)thiophene)-Coated Diamond/Silicon Nanowire Electrodes in an Aprotic Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Aradilla, David; Gao, Fang; Lewes-Malandrakis, Georgia; Müller-Sebert, Wolfgang; Gentile, Pascal; Boniface, Maxime; Aldakov, Dmitry; Iliev, Boyan; Schubert, Thomas J S; Nebel, Christoph E; Bidan, Gérard

    2016-07-20

    A versatile and robust hierarchically multifunctionalized nanostructured material made of poly(3,4-(ethylenedioxy)thiophene) (PEDOT)-coated diamond@silicon nanowires has been demonstrated to be an excellent capacitive electrode for supercapacitor devices. Thus, the electrochemical deposition of nanometric PEDOT films on diamond-coated silicon nanowire (SiNW) electrodes using N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide ionic liquid displayed a specific capacitance value of 140 F g(-1) at a scan rate of 1 mV s(-1). The as-grown functionalized electrodes were evaluated in a symmetric planar microsupercapacitor using butyltrimethylammonium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide aprotic ionic liquid as the electrolyte. The device exhibited extraordinary energy and power density values of 26 mJ cm(-2) and 1.3 mW cm(-2) within a large voltage cell of 2.5 V, respectively. In addition, the system was able to retain 80% of its initial capacitance after 15 000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles at a high current density of 1 mA cm(-2) while maintaining a Coulombic efficiency around 100%. Therefore, this multifunctionalized hybrid device represents one of the best electrochemical performances concerning coated SiNW electrodes for a high-energy advanced on-chip supercapacitor. PMID:27348192

  17. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  18. Yogi the rock - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Yogi, a rock taller than rover Sojourner, is the subject of this image, taken in stereo by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The soil in the foreground has been the location of multiple soil mechanics experiments performed by Sojourner's cleated wheels. Pathfinder scientists were able to control the force inflicted on the soil beneath the rover's wheels, giving them insight into the soil's mechanical properties. The soil mechanics experiments were conducted after this image was taken.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  19. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  20. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  1. 3-D Experimental Fracture Analysis at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Jackson; Albert S. Kobayashi

    2001-09-14

    T*e, which is an elastic-plastic fracture parameter based on incremental theory of plasticity, was determined numerically and experimentally. The T*e integral of a tunneling crack in 2024-T3 aluminum, three point bend specimen was obtained through a hybrid analysis of moire interferometry and 3-D elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The results were verified by the good agreement between the experimentally and numerically determined T*e on the specimen surface.

  2. Kinetics of Coloration in Photochromic Tungsten(VI) Oxide/Silicon Oxycarbide/Silica Hybrid Xerogel: Insight into Cation Self-diffusion Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kenta; Tokushige, Masataka; Omata, Kaoru; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Silicon oxycarbide/silica composites with well-dispersed tungsten(VI) oxide (WO3) nanoparticles were obtained as transparent hybrid xerogels via an acid-catalyzed sol-gel process (hydrolysis/condensation polymerization) of 3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TESPMA) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The self-diffusion mechanism of alkali-metal cations and the kinetics of the photochromic coloration process in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel systems have been systematically investigated. Under continuous UV illumination, a gradual color change (colorless → blue) corresponding to the reduction of W(6+) into W(5+) states in WO3 nanoparticles can be confirmed from the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogels containing alkali-metal sulfates, although no coloration of the hybrid xerogel without alkali-metal sulfate was observed. The coloration behavior depended exclusively on a variety of alkali-metal cations present in the hybrid xerogel system. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the self-diffusion mechanism confirmed that the alkali-metal cations electrostatically interact with a layer of unreacted silanol groups on the TESPMA/TEOS matrix surface, and subsequently pass through the interconnected pore network of the hybrid xerogel. More interestingly, in the context of an Arrhenius analysis, we found a good coincidence between the activation energies for alkali-metal cation self-diffusion and UV-induced coloration in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel system containing the corresponding alkali-metal sulfate. It is experimentally obvious that the photochromic properties are dominated by the diffusion process of alkali-metal cations in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel system. Such hybrid materials with cation-controlled photochromic properties will show promising prospects in applications demanding energy-efficient "smart windows" and "smart glasses". PMID:27159661

  3. Integration of real-time 3D capture, reconstruction, and light-field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Pei, Renjing; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Effective integration of 3D acquisition, reconstruction (modeling) and display technologies into a seamless systems provides augmented experience of visualizing and analyzing real objects and scenes with realistic 3D sensation. Applications can be found in medical imaging, gaming, virtual or augmented reality and hybrid simulations. Although 3D acquisition, reconstruction, and display technologies have gained significant momentum in recent years, there seems a lack of attention on synergistically combining these components into a "end-to-end" 3D visualization system. We designed, built and tested an integrated 3D visualization system that is able to capture in real-time 3D light-field images, perform 3D reconstruction to build 3D model of the objects, and display the 3D model on a large autostereoscopic screen. In this article, we will present our system architecture and component designs, hardware/software implementations, and experimental results. We will elaborate on our recent progress on sparse camera array light-field 3D acquisition, real-time dense 3D reconstruction, and autostereoscopic multi-view 3D display. A prototype is finally presented with test results to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed integrated 3D visualization system.

  4. 3D Printing of Conductive Complex Structures with In Situ Generation of Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fantino, Erika; Chiappone, Annalisa; Roppolo, Ignazio; Manfredi, Diego; Bongiovanni, Roberta; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Calignano, Flaviana

    2016-05-01

    Coupling the photoreduction of a metal precursor with 3D-printing technology is shown to allow the fabrication of conductive 3D hybrid structures consisting of metal nanoparticles and organic polymers shaped in complex multilayered architectures. 3D conductive structures are fabricated incorporating silver nitrate into a photocurable oligomer in the presence of suitable photoinitiators and exposing them to a digital light system. PMID:26992060

  5. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  6. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  7. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  8. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  9. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  10. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  11. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  12. 3D analysis of the reactivity insertion accident in VVER-1000

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullayev, A. M.; Zhukov, A. I.; Slyeptsov, S. M.

    2012-07-01

    Fuel parameters such as peak enthalpy and temperature during rod ejection accident are calculated. The calculations are performed by 3D neutron kinetics code NESTLE and 3D thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-W. Both hot zero power and hot full power cases were studied for an equilibrium cycle with Westinghouse hex fuel in VVER-1000. It is shown that the use of 3D methodology can significantly increase safety margins for current criteria and met future criteria. (authors)

  13. Reactor transient analyses with KIN3D/PARTISN

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielli, F.; Rineiski, A.; Maschek, W.; Marchetti, M.

    2013-07-01

    Efforts are going on at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) to extend the kinetics capability of the PARTISN code in order to run in parallel two- and three-dimensional transient analyses with the quasistatic method, while taking into account delayed neutrons. In the original code version, time-dependent transport problems are solved by employing a semi-implicit direct kinetics option, the delayed neutrons being not taken into account. The PARTISN 5.97 code has been extended and then coupled with KIN3D, a time-dependent model embedded in the ERANOS code system. In the coupled code, PARTISN 5.97 is used as neutron transport solver to perform transient analyses while employing direct and quasi-static kinetics options of KIN3D. The coupled code can be also applied for first-order and exact perturbation theory calculations. In the paper, the PARTISN 5.97 extensions and coupling procedure are described and the performances of the KIN3D/PARTISN coupled code are investigated by analyzing transients induced by a source-jerk in a three-dimensional ADS model driven by an external source. (authors)

  14. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  15. The Esri 3D city information model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, T.; Schubiger-Banz, S.

    2014-02-01

    With residential and commercial space becoming increasingly scarce, cities are going vertical. Managing the urban environments in 3D is an increasingly important and complex undertaking. To help solving this problem, Esri has released the ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution. The ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution provides the information model, tools and apps for creating, analyzing and maintaining a 3D city using the ArcGIS platform. This paper presents an overview of the 3D City Information Model and some sample use cases.

  16. Multivariate 3D modelling of Scottish soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Information regarding soil properties across landscapes at national or continental scales is critical for better soil and environmental management and for climate regulation and adaptation policy. The prediction of soil properties variation in space and time and their uncertainty is an important part of environmental modelling. Soil properties, and in particular the 3 fractions of soil texture, exhibit strong co-variation among themselves and therefore taking into account this correlation leads to spatially more accurate results. In this study the continuous vertical and lateral distributions of relevant soil properties in Scottish soils were modelled with a multivariate 3D-GAM+GS approach. The approach used involves 1) modelling the multivariate trend with full 3D spatial correlation, i.e., exploiting the values of the neighbouring pixels in 3D-space, and 2) 3D kriging to interpolate the residuals. The values at each cell for each of the considered depth layers were defined using a hybrid GAM-geostatistical 3D model, combining the fitting of a GAM (generalised Additive Models) to estimate multivariate trend of the variables, using a 3D smoother with related covariates. Gaussian simulations of the model residuals were used as spatial component to account for local details. A dataset of about 26,000 horizons (7,800 profiles) was used for this study. A validation set was randomly selected as 25% of the full dataset. Numerous covariates derived from globally available data, such as MODIS and SRTM, are considered. The results of the 3D-GAM+kriging showed low RMSE values, good R squared and an accurate reproduction of the spatial structure of the data for a range of soil properties. The results have an out-of-sample RMSE between 10 to 15% of the observed range when taking into account the whole profile. The approach followed allows the assessment of the uncertainty of both the trend and the residuals.

  17. Drug Release Kinetics, Cell Uptake, and Tumor Toxicity of Hybrid VVVVVVKK Peptide-Assembled Polylactide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Esmaiel; Yang, Xiaoming; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong

    2013-01-01

    An exciting approach to tumor delivery is encapsulation of the drug in self-assembled polymer-peptide nanoparticles. The objective of this work was to synthesize a conjugate of low molecular weight polylactide (LMW PLA) and V6K2 peptide, and investigate self-assembly, drug release kinetics, cell uptake and toxicity, drug pharmacokinetics, and tumor cell invasion with Doxorubicin (DOX) or paclitaxel (PTX). The results for PLA-V6K2 self-assembled NPs were compared with those of polyethylene glycol stabilized PLA (PLA-EG) NPs. The size of PLA-V6K2 and PLA-EG NPs were 100±20 and 130±50 nm, respectively, with polydispersity index of 1.04 and 1.14. The encapsulation efficiency of DOX in PLA-V6K2 and PLA-EG NPs was 44±9% and 55±5%, respectively, and that of PTX was >90 for both NP types. The release of DOX and PTX from PLA-V6K2 was slower than that of PLA-EG and the release rate was relatively constant with time. Based on molecular dynamic simulation, the less hydrophobic DOX was distributed in the lactide core as well as the peptide shell while the hydrophobic PTX was localized mainly to the lactide core. PLA-V6K2 NPs had significantly higher cell uptake by 4T1 mouse breast carcinoma cells compared to PLA-EG NPs, which was attributed to the electrostatic interactions between the peptide and negatively charged moieties on the cell membrane. PLA-V6K2 NPs showed no toxicity to marrow stromal cells. DOX loaded PLA-V6K2 NPs showed higher toxicity to 4T1 cells and the DNA damage response and apoptosis was delayed compared to the free DOX. DOX or PTX encapsulated in PLA-V6K2 NPs significantly reduced invasion of 4T1 cells compared to those cells treated with the drug in PLA-EG NPs. Invasion of 4T1 cells treated with DOX in PLA-V6K2 and PLA-EG NPs was 5±1% and 30±5%, respectively, and that of PTX was 11±2% and 40±7%. The AUC of DOX in PLA-V6K2 NPs was 67% and 21% higher than those of free DOX and PLA-EG NPs, respectively. DOX loaded PLA-V6K2 NPs injected in C3He

  18. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  19. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  20. Hydrodynamic and kinetic study of a hybrid detoxification process with zero liquid discharge system in an industrial wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Abid, Mohammad Fadhil; Abdulrahman, Amir Aziz; Hamza, Noor Hussein

    2014-01-01

    This work focused on the degradation of toxic organic compounds such as methyl violet dye (MV) in water, using a combined photocatalysis/low pressure reverse osmosis (LPRO) system. The performance of the hybrid system was investigated in terms of the degradation efficiency of MV, COD and membrane separation of TiO2. The aim of the present study was to design a novel solar reactor and analyze its performance for removal of MV from water with titanium dioxide as the photocatalyst. Various operating parameters were studied to investigate the behavior of the designed reactor like initial dye concentration (C = 10-50 mg/L), loading of catalyst (CTiO2 = 200-800 mg/L), suspension flow rate (QL = 0.3-1.5 L/min), pH of suspension (5-10), and H2O2 concentration (CH2O2 = 200-1000 mg/L). The operating parameters were optimized to give higher efficiency to the reactor performance. Optimum parameters of the photocatalysis process were loading of catalyst (400 mg/L), suspension flow rate (0.5 L/min), H2O2 concentration (400 mg/L), and pH = 5. The designed reactor when operating at optimum conditions offered a degradation of MV up to 0.9527 within one hours of operation time, while a conversion of 0.9995 was obtained in three hours. The effluent from the photocatalytic reactor was fed to a LPRO separation system which produced permeate of turbidity value of 0.09 NTU which is closed to that of drinking water (i.e., 0.08 NTU). The product water was analyzed using UV-spectrophotometer and FTIR. The analysis results confirmed that the water from the Hybrid-System could be safely recycled and reuse. It was found that the kinetics of dye degradation was first order with respect to dye concentration and could be well described by Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. A power-law based empirical correlation was developed for the photocatalysis system, related the dye degradation (R) with studied operating conditions. PMID:25648793

  1. Combined Immunofluorescence and DNA FISH on 3D-preserved Interphase Nuclei to Study Changes in 3D Nuclear Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Julie; Micsinai, Mariann; Skok, Jane A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization using DNA probes on 3-dimensionally preserved nuclei followed by 3D confocal microscopy (3D DNA FISH) represents the most direct way to visualize the location of gene loci, chromosomal sub-regions or entire territories in individual cells. This type of analysis provides insight into the global architecture of the nucleus as well as the behavior of specific genomic loci and regions within the nuclear space. Immunofluorescence, on the other hand, permits the detection of nuclear proteins (modified histones, histone variants and modifiers, transcription machinery and factors, nuclear sub-compartments, etc). The major challenge in combining immunofluorescence and 3D DNA FISH is, on the one hand to preserve the epitope detected by the antibody as well as the 3D architecture of the nucleus, and on the other hand, to allow the penetration of the DNA probe to detect gene loci or chromosome territories 1-5. Here we provide a protocol that combines visualization of chromatin modifications with genomic loci in 3D preserved nuclei. PMID:23407477

  2. A Massively Parallel Hybrid Dusty-Gasdynamics and Kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Model for Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important. At the University of Michigan we have an established base of experience and expertise in numerical simulations based on particle codes which address these physical regimes. The Principal Investigator, Dr. Michael Combi, has over 20 years of experience in the development of particle-kinetic and hybrid kinetichydrodynamics models and their direct use in data analysis. He has also worked in ground-based and space-based remote observational work and on spacecraft instrument teams. His research has involved studies of cometary atmospheres and ionospheres and their interaction with the solar wind, the neutral gas clouds escaping from Jupiter s moon Io, the interaction of the atmospheres/ionospheres of Io and Europa with Jupiter s corotating magnetosphere, as well as Earth s ionosphere. This report describes our progress during the year. The contained in section 2 of this report will serve as the basis of a paper describing the method and its application to the cometary coma that will be continued under a research and analysis grant that supports various applications of theoretical comet models to understanding the

  3. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  4. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  5. Minimizing DNA microarrays to a single molecule per spot: using zero-mode waveguide technology to obtain kinetic data for a large number of short oligonucleotide hybridization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Kuhn, Gerrit; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    We have shown recently that the hybridization of short oligonucleotides can be studied in a zero-mode waveguide nanostructure (ZMW) chip using a modified DNA sequencer.[1] Here we present an extension of this method enabling the parallel measurement of kinetic constants of a large number of hybridization reactions on a single chip. This can be achieved by immobilization of a mixture of oligonucleotides, which leads to a statistical and random distribution of single molecules in the 150'000 ZMWs of a SMRT™ cell. This setup is comparable to a classical microarray with ZMWs in place of spots but unknown allocation of probes. The probe surface density is reduced by a factor of ~1010 allowing the study of hybridization in the absence of interactions with neighboring probes. Hybridization with a dye labelled oligonucleotide results in trains of fluorescence pulses from which interpulse durations (IPDs) and pulse widths (PWs) can be extracted. Since the identity of a probe in a ZMW is unknown, the immobilized oligonucleotide is sequenced in a subsequent step. After mapping the fluorescence traces to the sequence, the association and dissociation rate constant for each oligonucleotide can be calculated. By selecting suitable probes, the method can be used to determine rate constants of hybridization for a large number of mismatch oligonucleotides in a single measurement and at single-molecule level.

  6. 3D Dynamic Echocardiography with a Digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Matani, Ayumu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    1998-05-01

    In this paper,a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging system,where a US brightness-mode (B-mode) imagetriggered with an R-wave of electrocardiogram (ECG)was obtained with an ultrasound diagnostic deviceand the location and orientation of the US probewere simultaneously measured with a 3D digitizer, is described.The obtained B-mode imagewas then projected onto a virtual 3D spacewith the proposed interpolation algorithm using a Gaussian operator.Furthermore, a 3D image was presented on a cathode ray tube (CRT)and stored in virtual reality modeling language (VRML).We performed an experimentto reconstruct a 3D heart image in systole using this system.The experimental results indicatethat the system enables the visualization ofthe 3D and internal structure of a heart viewed from any angleand has potential for use in dynamic imaging,intraoperative ultrasonography and tele-medicine.

  7. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    This is the first book written on using Blender for scientific visualization. It is a practical and interesting introduction to Blender for understanding key parts of 3D rendering and animation that pertain to the sciences via step-by-step guided tutorials. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender takes you through an understanding of 3D graphics and modelling for different visualization scenarios in the physical sciences.

  8. Software for 3D radiotherapy dosimetry. Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this work is polyGeVero® software (GeVero Co., Poland), which has been developed to fill the requirements of fast calculations of 3D dosimetry data with the emphasis on polymer gel dosimetry for radiotherapy. This software comprises four workspaces that have been prepared for: (i) calculating calibration curves and calibration equations, (ii) storing the calibration characteristics of the 3D dosimeters, (iii) calculating 3D dose distributions in irradiated 3D dosimeters, and (iv) comparing 3D dose distributions obtained from measurements with the aid of 3D dosimeters and calculated with the aid of treatment planning systems (TPSs). The main features and functions of the software are described in this work. Moreover, the core algorithms were validated and the results are presented. The validation was performed using the data of the new PABIGnx polymer gel dosimeter. The polyGeVero® software simplifies and greatly accelerates the calculations of raw 3D dosimetry data. It is an effective tool for fast verification of TPS-generated plans for tumor irradiation when combined with a 3D dosimeter. Consequently, the software may facilitate calculations by the 3D dosimetry community. In this work, the calibration characteristics of the PABIGnx obtained through four calibration methods: multi vial, cross beam, depth dose, and brachytherapy, are discussed as well.

  9. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  10. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-03-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The current paper describes the modern stereo 3-D technologies that are applicable to various tasks in teaching physics in schools, colleges, and universities. Examples of stereo 3-D simulations developed by the author can be observed on online.

  11. Accuracy in Quantitative 3D Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative 3D imaging is becoming an increasingly popular and powerful approach to investigate plant growth and development. With the increased use of 3D image analysis, standards to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of these data are required. This commentary highlights how image acquisition and postprocessing can introduce artifacts into 3D image data and proposes steps to increase both the accuracy and reproducibility of these analyses. It is intended to aid researchers entering the field of 3D image processing of plant cells and tissues and to help general readers in understanding and evaluating such data. PMID:25804539

  12. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  13. Cooling of 3D Granular Gases: Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; Wegner, Sandra; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    Granular gases are ensembles of macroscopic grains, which move randomly and interact through inelastic collisions. This non-equilibrium statistical system is easy to picture, but still insufficiently understood. Numerous theoretical treatments have been performed, favorably with spherical grains and periodic boundaries, starting from a homogeneous state. Experimentally, such a gas in 3D can only be realized with strong external forcing or in microgravity. We have recently demonstrated that the use of elongated grains facilitates the realization of 3D experiments beyond the Knudsen regime (1). Main findings in a sounding rocket experiment were non-Gaussian velocity distributions and a violation of the equipartition of kinetic energy in the steady state. Rotational degrees of freedom are under-excited. When the excitation is stopped, energy is dissipated, the granular gas is ''cooling''. We present the first quantitative study of the cooling of a granular gas, based on a 3D data evaluation, from drop tower experiments. The evolution of the kinetic energy in translational and rotational degrees of freedom is compared to Haff's law and recent numerical studies. Additionally, we analyze velocity and density distributions.(1) K. Harth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 144102 (2013) This research was funded by German Aerospace Center DLR Grants 50WM1241 and 50WB1344 and by DFG Grant STA-425/34-1.

  14. Turbulence and transport in a 3D magnetic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Matteo; Carraro, Lorella; Ciaccio, Giovanni; de Masi, Gianluca; Rea, Cristina; Scarin, Paolo; Spizzo, Gianluca; Spolaore, Monica; Vianello, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    In present fusion devices the interaction between 3D magnetic field, edge kinetic properties and turbulence is a crucial issue; not only in intrinsically 3D configurations such as the stellarators, but also in tokamaks, where magnetic perturbations are applied to control ELMs and plasma wall interaction. In the RFX-mod reversed field pinch the spontaneous development at high plasma current of a helical magnetic state displays strong analogies with the aforementioned configurations. At the edge the presence of a stochastic layer and magnetic islands with a well-defined helical symmetry leads to a helical pattern of flow, pressure gradients and turbulent fluctuations: larger fluctuations and shorter correlation lengths are observed near the X-point of the magnetic island, where also a flow slowing-down occurs. Aim of this work is to study the effect of edge turbulence on particle transport in a 3D magnetic boundary, characterizing the properties of the edge blobs along the helical deformation. The magnetic topology also modifies kinetic properties, with higher pressure gradients observed close to the O-point of the island. The measurement of the time evolution of pressure gradient and blob characteristics, can clarify the mutual relation between these two quantities.

  15. Hybrid Simulations of Plasma-Neutral-Dust Interactions at Enceladus

    SciTech Connect

    Omidi, N.; Russell, C. T.; Jia, Y. D.; Tokar, R. L.; Farrell, W. M.

    2010-12-30

    Through ejection from its southern hemisphere, Enceladus is a dominant source of neutral gas and dust in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. The interaction of the corotating plasma with the gas and dust modifies the plasma environment around Enceladus. We use 3-D hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations to examine the effects of gas and dust on the nature of the interaction region and use Cassini observations to constrain their properties.

  16. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  17. Iterative Reconstruction of Volumetric Particle Distribution for 3D Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieneke, Bernhard; Neal, Douglas

    2011-11-01

    A number of different volumetric flow measurement techniques exist for following the motion of illuminated particles. For experiments that have lower seeding densities, 3D-PTV uses recorded images from typically 3-4 cameras and then tracks the individual particles in space and time. This technique is effective in flows that have lower seeding densities. For flows that have a higher seeding density, tomographic PIV uses a tomographic reconstruction algorithm (e.g. MART) to reconstruct voxel intensities of the recorded volume followed by the cross-correlation of subvolumes to provide the instantaneous 3D vector fields on a regular grid. A new hybrid algorithm is presented which iteratively reconstructs the 3D-particle distribution directly using particles with certain imaging properties instead of voxels as base functions. It is shown with synthetic data that this method is capable of reconstructing densely seeded flows up to 0.05 particles per pixel (ppp) with the same or higher accuracy than 3D-PTV and tomographic PIV. Finally, this new method is validated using experimental data on a turbulent jet.

  18. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  19. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  20. Topology dictionary for 3D video understanding.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tony; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that achieves 3D video understanding. 3D video consists of a stream of 3D models of subjects in motion. The acquisition of long sequences requires large storage space (2 GB for 1 min). Moreover, it is tedious to browse data sets and extract meaningful information. We propose the topology dictionary to encode and describe 3D video content. The model consists of a topology-based shape descriptor dictionary which can be generated from either extracted patterns or training sequences. The model relies on 1) topology description and classification using Reeb graphs, and 2) a Markov motion graph to represent topology change states. We show that the use of Reeb graphs as the high-level topology descriptor is relevant. It allows the dictionary to automatically model complex sequences, whereas other strategies would require prior knowledge on the shape and topology of the captured subjects. Our approach serves to encode 3D video sequences, and can be applied for content-based description and summarization of 3D video sequences. Furthermore, topology class labeling during a learning process enables the system to perform content-based event recognition. Experiments were carried out on various 3D videos. We showcase an application for 3D video progressive summarization using the topology dictionary. PMID:22745004

  1. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Husseini, M.; Chimblo, R.

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  2. A 3D Geostatistical Mapping Tool

    1999-02-09

    This software provides accurate 3D reservoir modeling tools and high quality 3D graphics for PC platforms enabling engineers and geologists to better comprehend reservoirs and consequently improve their decisions. The mapping algorithms are fractals, kriging, sequential guassian simulation, and three nearest neighbor methods.

  3. 3D, or Not to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Keith

    2012-01-01

    It may be too soon for students to be showing up for class with popcorn and gummy bears, but technology similar to that behind the 3D blockbuster movie "Avatar" is slowly finding its way into college classrooms. 3D classroom projectors are taking students on fantastic voyages inside the human body, to the ruins of ancient Greece--even to faraway…

  4. Stereoscopic Investigations of 3D Coulomb Balls

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeding, Sebastian; Melzer, Andre; Arp, Oliver; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander

    2005-10-31

    In dusty plasmas particles are arranged due to the influence of external forces and the Coulomb interaction. Recently Arp et al. were able to generate 3D spherical dust clouds, so-called Coulomb balls. Here, we present measurements that reveal the full 3D particle trajectories from stereoscopic imaging.

  5. 3-D structures of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, W.

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in the 3-D reconstruction of planetary nebulae are reviewed. We include not only results for 3-D reconstructions, but also the current techniques in terms of general methods and software. In order to obtain more accurate reconstructions, we suggest to extend the widely used assumption of homologous nebula expansion to map spectroscopically measured velocity to position along the line of sight.

  6. Wow! 3D Content Awakens the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2010-01-01

    From her first encounter with stereoscopic 3D technology designed for classroom instruction, Megan Timme, principal at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet School in Dallas, sensed it could be transformative. Last spring, when she began pilot-testing 3D content in her third-, fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, Timme wasn't disappointed. Students…

  7. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  8. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  9. Immersive 3D Geovisualization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how immersive 3D geovisualization can be used in higher education. Based on MacEachren and Kraak's geovisualization cube, we examine the usage of immersive 3D geovisualization and its usefulness in a research-based learning module on flood risk, called GEOSimulator. Results of a survey among participating students…

  10. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  11. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D…

  12. 3D Printing of Biocompatible Supramolecular Polymers and their Composites.

    PubMed

    Hart, Lewis R; Li, Siwei; Sturgess, Craig; Wildman, Ricky; Jones, Julian R; Hayes, Wayne

    2016-02-10

    A series of polymers capable of self-assembling into infinite networks via supramolecular interactions have been designed, synthesized, and characterized for use in 3D printing applications. The biocompatible polymers and their composites with silica nanoparticles were successfully utilized to deposit both simple cubic structures, as well as a more complex twisted pyramidal feature. The polymers were found to be not toxic to a chondrogenic cell line, according to ISO 10993-5 and 10993-12 standard tests and the cells attached to the supramolecular polymers as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Silica nanoparticles were then dispersed within the polymer matrix, yielding a composite material which was optimized for inkjet printing. The hybrid material showed promise in preliminary tests to facilitate the 3D deposition of a more complex structure. PMID:26766139

  13. Clinical applications of 3-D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    Both 3-D gels and radiochromic plastic dosimeters, in conjunction with dose image readout systems (MRI or optical-CT), have been employed to measure 3-D dose distributions in many clinical applications. The 3-D dose maps obtained from these systems can provide a useful tool for clinical dose verification for complex treatment techniques such as IMRT, SRS/SBRT, brachytherapy, and proton beam therapy. These complex treatments present high dose gradient regions in the boundaries between the target and surrounding critical organs. Dose accuracy in these areas can be critical, and may affect treatment outcome. In this review, applications of 3-D gels and PRESAGE dosimeter are reviewed and evaluated in terms of their performance in providing information on clinical dose verification as well as commissioning of various treatment modalities. Future interests and clinical needs on studies of 3-D dosimetry are also discussed.

  14. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26805790

  15. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  16. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  17. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  18. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  19. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.

  20. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  1. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman's rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D surface

  2. Synthesis, molecular structure, and characterization of a new 3D-layered inorganic-organic hybrid material: [D/L-C{sub 6}H{sub 13}O{sub 2}N-H]{sub 3}[(PO{sub 4})W{sub 12}O{sub 36}].4.5H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Mohammad H.; Mirzaei, Masoud; Salimi, Ali R.; Razavi, Hossein

    2009-07-01

    A new 3D-layered inorganic-organic hybrid [D/L-C{sub 6}H{sub 13}O{sub 2}N-H]{sub 3}[(PO{sub 4})W{sub 12}O{sub 36}].4.5H{sub 2}O (1), as racemic material in the solid phase, has been synthesized and fully characterized by elemental microanalysis, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and infrared, Raman, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopes. The most unique structural feature of 1 is its three-dimensional inorganic infinite tunnel-like framework that results in weak van der Waals interactions along the a-axis. A weak interlayer interaction between the titled layers provides a desirable condition to explore its potential as a host in a host-guest complex. The racemization has been observed in the crystal structure with the centric space group (P2{sub 1}/c). The latter consists of {alpha}-[(PO{sub 4})W{sub 12}O{sub 36}]{sup 3-}and [D/L-C{sub 6}H{sub 13}O{sub 2}N-H]{sup +} moieties with water molecules linked together by a complex network of hydrogen bond interactions.

  3. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26562233

  4. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:25093879

  5. Optically rewritable 3D liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Srivastava, A K; Zhang, W; Wang, L; Chigrinov, V G; Kwok, H S

    2014-11-01

    Optically rewritable liquid crystal display (ORWLCD) is a concept based on the optically addressed bi-stable display that does not need any power to hold the image after being uploaded. Recently, the demand for the 3D image display has increased enormously. Several attempts have been made to achieve 3D image on the ORWLCD, but all of them involve high complexity for image processing on both hardware and software levels. In this Letter, we disclose a concept for the 3D-ORWLCD by dividing the given image in three parts with different optic axis. A quarter-wave plate is placed on the top of the ORWLCD to modify the emerging light from different domains of the image in different manner. Thereafter, Polaroid glasses can be used to visualize the 3D image. The 3D image can be refreshed, on the 3D-ORWLCD, in one-step with proper ORWLCD printer and image processing, and therefore, with easy image refreshing and good image quality, such displays can be applied for many applications viz. 3D bi-stable display, security elements, etc. PMID:25361316

  6. Interactive 3D visualisation of ECMWF ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Grams, Christian M.; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the feasibility of interactive 3D visualisation of ensemble weather predictions in a way suited for weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns. The study builds upon our previous work on web-based, 2D visualisation of numerical weather prediction data for the purpose of research flight planning (Rautenhaus et al., Geosci. Model Dev., 5, 55-71, 2012). Now we explore how interactive 3D visualisation of ensemble forecasts can be used to quickly identify atmospheric features relevant to a flight and to assess their uncertainty. We use data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) and present techniques to interactively visualise the forecasts on a commodity desktop PC with a state-of-the-art graphics card. Major objectives of this study are: (1) help the user transition from the ``familiar'' 2D views (horizontal maps and vertical cross-sections) to 3D visualisation by putting interactive 2D views into a 3D context and enriching them with 3D elements, at the same time (2) maintain a high degree of quantitativeness in the visualisation to facilitate easy interpretation; (3) exploitation of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for maximum interactivity; (4) investigation of how visualisation can be performed directly from datasets on ECMWF hybrid model levels; (5) development of a basic forecasting tool that provides synchronized navigation through forecast base and lead times, as well as through the ensemble dimension and (6) interactive computation and visualisation of ensemble-based quantities. A prototype of our tool was used for weather forecasting during the aircraft-based T-NAWDEX-Falcon field campaign, which took place in October 2012 at the German Aerospace Centre's (DLR) Oberpfaffenhofen base. We reconstruct the forecast of a warm conveyor belt situation that occurred during the campaign and discuss challenges and opportunities posed by employing three

  7. Extra Dimensions: 3D in PDF Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) and the ISO PRC file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. Until recently, Adobe's Acrobat software was also capable of incorporating 3D content into PDF files from a variety of 3D file formats, including proprietary CAD formats. However, this functionality is no longer available in Acrobat X, having been spun off to a separate company. Incorporating 3D content now requires the additional purchase of a separate plug-in. In this talk we present alternatives based on open source libraries which allow the programmatic creation of 3D content in PDF format. While not providing the same level of access to CAD files as the commercial software, it does provide physicists with an alternative path to incorporate 3D content into PDF files from such disparate applications as detector geometries from Geant4, 3D data sets, mathematical surfaces or tesselated volumes.

  8. 3D simulation of the Cluster-Cluster Aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Xiong, Hailing

    2014-12-01

    We write a program to implement the Cluster-Cluster Aggregation (CCA) model with java programming language. By using the simulation program, the fractal aggregation growth process can be displayed dynamically in the form of a three-dimensional (3D) figure. Meanwhile, the related kinetics data of aggregation simulation can be also recorded dynamically. Compared to the traditional programs, the program has better real-time performance and is more helpful to observe the fractal growth process, which contributes to the scientific study in fractal aggregation. Besides, because of adopting java programming language, the program has very good cross-platform performance.

  9. FUN3D Manual: 12.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.7, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  10. FUN3D Manual: 12.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.9, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  11. FUN3D Manual: 13.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bill; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.0, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  12. FUN3D Manual: 12.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.8, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  13. 3D packaging for integrated circuit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Palmer, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    A goal was set for high density, high performance microelectronics pursued through a dense 3D packing of integrated circuits. A {open_quotes}tool set{close_quotes} of assembly processes have been developed that enable 3D system designs: 3D thermal analysis, silicon electrical through vias, IC thinning, mounting wells in silicon, adhesives for silicon stacking, pretesting of IC chips before commitment to stacks, and bond pad bumping. Validation of these process developments occurred through both Sandia prototypes and subsequent commercial examples.

  14. A high capacity 3D steganography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-hung; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a very high-capacity and low-distortion 3D steganography scheme. Our steganography approach is based on a novel multilayered embedding scheme to hide secret messages in the vertices of 3D polygon models. Experimental results show that the cover model distortion is very small as the number of hiding layers ranges from 7 to 13 layers. To the best of our knowledge, this novel approach can provide much higher hiding capacity than other state-of-the-art approaches, while obeying the low distortion and security basic requirements for steganography on 3D models. PMID:19147891

  15. New method of 3-D object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, An-Zhi; Li, Qun Z.; Miao, Peng C.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper, a new method of 3-D object recognition using optical techniques and a computer is presented. We perform 3-D object recognition using moire contour to obtain the object's 3- D coordinates, projecting drawings of the object in three coordinate planes to describe it and using a method of inquiring library of judgement to match objects. The recognition of a simple geometrical entity is simulated by computer and studied experimentally. The recognition of an object which is composed of a few simple geometrical entities is discussed.

  16. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, includingmore » frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.« less

  17. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.