Science.gov

Sample records for 3d integration technology

  1. Integrated Avionics System (IAS), Integrating 3-D Technology On A Spacecraft Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Don J.; Halpert, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    As spacecraft designs converge toward miniaturization, and with the volumetric and mass challenges placed on avionics, programs will continue to advance the "state of the art" in spacecraft system development with new challenges to reduce power, mass and volume. Traditionally, the trend is to focus on high-density 3-D packaging technologies. Industry has made significant progress in 3-D technologies, and other related internal and external interconnection schemes. Although new technologies have improved packaging densities, a system packaging architecture is required that not only reduces spacecraft volume and mass budgets, but increase integration efficiencies, provide modularity and flexibility to accommodate multiple missions while maintaining a low recurring cost. With these challenges in mind, a novel system packaging approach incorporates solutions that provide broader environmental applications, more flexible system interconnectivity, scalability, and simplified assembly test and integration schemes. The Integrated Avionics System (IAS) provides for a low-mass, modular distributed or centralized packaging architecture which combines ridged-flex technologies, high-density COTS hardware and a new 3-D mechanical packaging approach, Horizontal Mounted Cube (HMC). This paper will describe the fundamental elements of the IAS, HMC hardware design, system integration and environmental test results.

  2. Integrated Avionics System (IAS), integrating 3-D technology on a spacecraft panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    A novel system packaging approach incorporates solutions that provide broader environmental applications, more flexible system interconnectivity, scalability, and simplified assembly test and integration schemes.

  3. Integration of Petrophysical Methods and 3D Printing Technology to Replicate Reservoir Pore Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishutov, S.; Hasiuk, F.; Gray, J.; Harding, C.

    2014-12-01

    Pore-scale imaging and modeling are becoming routine geoscience techniques of reservoir analysis and simulation in oil and gas industry. Three-dimensional printing may facilitate the transformation of pore-space imagery into rock models, which can be compared to traditional laboratory methods and literature data. Although current methodologies for rapid rock modeling and printing obscure many details of grain geometry, computed tomography data is one route to refine pore networks and experimentally test hypotheses related to rock properties, such as porosity and permeability. This study uses three-dimensional printing as a novel way of interacting with x-ray computed tomography data from reservoir core plugs based on digital modeling of pore systems in coarse-grained sandstones and limestones. The advantages of using artificial rocks as a proxy are to better understand the contributions of pore system characteristics at various scales to petrophysical properties in oil and gas reservoirs. Pore radii of reservoir sandstones used in this study range from 1 to 100s of microns, whereas the pore radii for limestones vary from 0.01 to 10s of microns. The resolution of computed tomography imaging is ~10 microns; the resolution of 3D digital printing used in the study varies from 2.5 to 300 microns. For this technology to be useful, loss of pore network information must be minimized in the course of data acquisition, modeling, and production as well as verified against core-scale measurements. The ultimate goal of this study is to develop a reservoir rock "photocopier" that couples 3D scanning and modeling with 3D printing to reproduce a) petrophyscially accurate copies of reservoir pore systems and b) digitally modified pore systems for testing hypotheses about reservoir flow. By allowing us to build porous media with known properties (porosity, permeability, surface area), technology will also advance our understanding of the tools used to measure these quantities (e

  4. 3D integration technology for sensor application using less than 5μm-pitch gold cone-bump connpdfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyoshi, M.; Miyoshi, T.; Ikebec, M.; Arai, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuit (IC) technology is an effective solution to reduce the manufacturing costs of advanced two-dimensional (2D) large-scale integration (LSI) while ensuring equivalent device performance and functionalities. This technology allows a new device architecture using stacked detector/sensor devices with a small dead sensor area and high-speed operation that facilitates hyper-parallel data processing. In pixel detectors or focal-plane sensor devices, each pixel area must accommodate many transistors without increasing the pixel size. Consequently, many methods to realize 3D-LSI devices have been developed to meet this requirement by focusing on the unit processes of 3D-IC technology, such as through-silicon via formation and electrical and mechanical bonding between tiers of the stack. The bonding process consists of several unit processes such as bump or metal contact formation, chip/wafer alignment, chip/wafer bonding, and underfill formation; many process combinations have been reported. Our research focuses on a versatile bonding technology for silicon LSI, compound semiconductor, and microelectromechanical system devices at temperatures of less than 200oC for heterogeneous integration. A gold (Au) cone bump formed by nanoparticle deposition is one of the promising candidates for this purpose. This paper presents the experimental result of a fabricated prototype with 3-μm-diameter Au cone-bump connections with adhesive injection, and compares it with that of an indium microbump (μ-bump). The resistance of the 3-μm-diameter Au cone bump is approximately 6 Ω. We also investigated the influence of stress caused by the bump junction on the MOS characteristics.

  5. Integration of GIS, Geostatistics, and 3-D Technology to Assess the Spatial Distribution of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, M.; Tsegaye, T.; Tadesse, W.; Coleman, T. L.; Fahsi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of near surface soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many physical, biological, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. However, knowledge of these space-time dynamics and the processes which control them remains unclear. The integration of geographic information systems (GIS) and geostatistics together promise a simple mechanism to evaluate and display the spatial and temporal distribution of this vital hydrologic and physical variable. Therefore, this research demonstrates the use of geostatistics and GIS to predict and display soil moisture distribution under vegetated and non-vegetated plots. The research was conducted at the Winfred Thomas Agricultural Experiment Station (WTAES), Hazel Green, Alabama. Soil moisture measurement were done on a 10 by 10 m grid from tall fescue grass (GR), alfalfa (AA), bare rough (BR), and bare smooth (BS) plots. Results indicated that variance associated with soil moisture was higher for vegetated plots than non-vegetated plots. The presence of vegetation in general contributed to the spatial variability of soil moisture. Integration of geostatistics and GIS can improve the productivity of farm lands and the precision of farming.

  6. Development of 3D integrated circuits for HEP

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    Three dimensional integrated circuits are well suited to improving circuit bandwidth and increasing effective circuit density. Recent advances in industry have made 3D integrated circuits an option for HEP. The 3D technology is discussed in this paper and several examples are shown. Design of a 3D demonstrator chip for the ILC is presented.

  7. 3D Integration for Wireless Multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmich, Georg

    The convergence of mobile phone, internet, mapping, gaming and office automation tools with high quality video and still imaging capture capability is becoming a strong market trend for portable devices. High-density video encode and decode, 3D graphics for gaming, increased application-software complexity and ultra-high-bandwidth 4G modem technologies are driving the CPU performance and memory bandwidth requirements close to the PC segment. These portable multimedia devices are battery operated, which requires the deployment of new low-power-optimized silicon process technologies and ultra-low-power design techniques at system, architecture and device level. Mobile devices also need to comply with stringent silicon-area and package-volume constraints. As for all consumer devices, low production cost and fast time-to-volume production is key for success. This chapter shows how 3D architectures can bring a possible breakthrough to meet the conflicting power, performance and area constraints. Multiple 3D die-stacking partitioning strategies are described and analyzed on their potential to improve the overall system power, performance and cost for specific application scenarios. Requirements and maturity of the basic process-technology bricks including through-silicon via (TSV) and die-to-die attachment techniques are reviewed. Finally, we highlight new challenges which will arise with 3D stacking and an outlook on how they may be addressed: Higher power density will require thermal design considerations, new EDA tools will need to be developed to cope with the integration of heterogeneous technologies and to guarantee signal and power integrity across the die stack. The silicon/wafer test strategies have to be adapted to handle high-density IO arrays, ultra-thin wafers and provide built-in self-test of attached memories. New standards and business models have to be developed to allow cost-efficient assembly and testing of devices from different silicon and technology

  8. Ship-in-a-bottle integration by hybrid femtosecond laser technology for fabrication of true 3D biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Felix; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jian; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Sugioka, Koji

    2015-03-01

    We propose herein the "ship-in-a-bottle" integration of three-dimensional (3D) polymeric sinusoidal ridges inside photosensitive glass microfluidic channel by a hybrid subtractive - additive femtosecond laser processing method. It consists of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Wet Etching (FLAE) of a photosensitive Foturan glass followed by Two-Photon Polymerization (TPP) of a SU-8 negative epoxy-resin. Both subtractive and additive processes are carried out using the same set-up with the change of laser focusing objective only. A 522 nm wavelength of the second harmonic generation from an amplified femtosecond Yb-fiber laser (FCPA µJewel D-400, IMRA America, 1045 nm; pulse width 360 fs, repetition rate 200 kHz) was employed for irradiation. The new method allows lowering the size limit of 3D objects created inside channels to smaller details down to the dimensions of a cell, and improve the structure stability. Sinusoidal periodic patterns and ridges are of great use as base scaffolds for building up new structures on their top or for modulating cell migration, guidance and orientation while created interspaces can be exploited for microfluidic applications. The glass microchannel offers robustness and appropriate dynamic flow conditions for cellular studies while the integrated patterns are reducing the size of structure to the level of cells responsiveness. Taking advantage of the ability to directly fabricate 3D complex shapes, both glass channels and polymeric integrated patterns enable us to 3D spatially design biochips for specific applications.

  9. 3D Technology for intelligent trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    At Super-LHC luminosity it is expected that the standard suite of level 1 triggers for CMS will saturate. Information from the tracker will be needed to reduce trigger rates to satisfy the level 1 bandwidth. Tracking trigger modules which correlate information from closely-spaced sensor layers to form an on-detector momentum filter are being developed by several groups. We report on a trigger module design which utilizes three dimensional integrated circuit technology incorporating chips which are connected both to the top and bottom sensor, providing the ability to filter information locally. A demonstration chip, the VICTR, has been submitted to the Chartered/Tezzaron two-tier 3D run coordinated by Fermilab. We report on the 3D design concept, the status of the VICTR chip and associated sensor integration utilizing oxide bonding.

  10. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  11. Biomaterials for integration with 3-D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Aleksander; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Bioprinting has emerged in recent years as an attractive method for creating 3-D tissues and organs in the laboratory, and therefore is a promising technology in a number of regenerative medicine applications. It has the potential to (i) create fully functional replacements for damaged tissues in patients, and (ii) rapidly fabricate small-sized human-based tissue models, or organoids, for diagnostics, pathology modeling, and drug development. A number of bioprinting modalities have been explored, including cellular inkjet printing, extrusion-based technologies, soft lithography, and laser-induced forward transfer. Despite the innovation of each of these technologies, successful implementation of bioprinting relies heavily on integration with compatible biomaterials that are responsible for supporting the cellular components during and after biofabrication, and that are compatible with the bioprinting device requirements. In this review, we will evaluate a variety of biomaterials, such as curable synthetic polymers, synthetic gels, and naturally derived hydrogels. Specifically we will describe how they are integrated with the bioprinting technologies above to generate bioprinted constructs with practical application in medicine. PMID:25476164

  12. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  13. 3D packaging for integrated circuit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Palmer, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    A goal was set for high density, high performance microelectronics pursued through a dense 3D packing of integrated circuits. A {open_quotes}tool set{close_quotes} of assembly processes have been developed that enable 3D system designs: 3D thermal analysis, silicon electrical through vias, IC thinning, mounting wells in silicon, adhesives for silicon stacking, pretesting of IC chips before commitment to stacks, and bond pad bumping. Validation of these process developments occurred through both Sandia prototypes and subsequent commercial examples.

  14. Integral 3D display using multiple LCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaichi, Naoto; Miura, Masato; Arai, Jun; Mishina, Tomoyuki

    2015-03-01

    The quality of the integral 3D images created by a 3D imaging system was improved by combining multiple LCDs to utilize a greater number of pixels than that possible with one LCD. A prototype of the display device was constructed by using four HD LCDs. An integral photography (IP) image displayed by the prototype is four times larger than that reconstructed by a single display. The pixel pitch of the HD display used is 55.5 μm, and the number of elemental lenses is 212 horizontally and 119 vertically. The 3D image pixel count is 25,228, and the viewing angle is 28°. Since this method is extensible, it is possible to display an integral 3D image of higher quality by increasing the number of LCDs. Using this integral 3D display structure makes it possible to make the whole device thinner than a projector-based display system. It is therefore expected to be applied to the home television in the future.

  15. Wafer-Level 3D Integration for ULSI Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Ronald J.; Lu, Jian-Qiang

    Three-dimensional (3D) integration in a system-in-a-package (SiP) implementation (packaging-based 3D) is becoming increasingly used in consumer, computer, and communication applications where form factor is critical. In particular, the hand-held market for a growing myriad of voice, data, messaging, and imaging products is enabled by packaging-based 3D integration (i.e., stacking and connecting individual chips). The key drivers are for increased memory capacity and for heterogeneous integration of different IC technologies and functions.

  16. 2D and 3D heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    2014-03-01

    Exponential increases in the amount of data that need to be sensed, communicated, and processed are continuing to drive the complexity of our computing, networking, and sensing systems. High degrees of integration is essential in scalable, practical, and cost-effective microsystems. In electronics, high-density 2D integration has naturally evolved towards 3D integration by stacking of memory and processor chips with through-silicon-vias. In photonics, too, we anticipate highdegrees of 3D integration of photonic components to become a prevailing method in realizing future microsystems for information and communication technologies. However, compared to electronics, photonic 3D integration face a number of challenges. This paper will review two methods of 3D photonic integration --- fs laser inscription and layer stacking, and discuss applications and future prospects.

  17. 3D integration approaches for MEMS and CMOS sensors based on a Cu through-silicon-via technology and wafer level bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, L.; Dempwolf, S.; Reuter, D.; Ecke, R.; Gottfried, K.; Schulz, S. E.; Knechtel, R.; Geßner, T.

    2015-05-01

    Technologies for the 3D integration are described within this paper with respect to devices that have to retain a specific minimum wafer thickness for handling purposes (CMOS) and integrity of mechanical elements (MEMS). This implies Through-Silicon Vias (TSVs) with large dimensions and high aspect ratios (HAR). Moreover, as a main objective, the aspired TSV technology had to be universal and scalable with the designated utilization in a MEMS/CMOS foundry. Two TSV approaches are investigated and discussed, in which the TSVs were fabricated either before or after wafer thinning. One distinctive feature is an incomplete TSV Cu-filling, which avoids long processing and complex process control, while minimizing the thermomechanical stress between Cu and Si and related adverse effects in the device. However, the incomplete filling also includes various challenges regarding process integration. A method based on pattern plating is described, in which TSVs are metalized at the same time as the redistribution layer and which eliminates the need for additional planarization and patterning steps. For MEMS, the realization of a protective hermetically sealed capping is crucial, which is addressed in this paper by glass frit wafer level bonding and is discussed for hermetic sealing of MEMS inertial sensors. The TSV based 3D integration technologies are demonstrated on CMOS like test vehicle and on a MEMS device fabricated in Air Gap Insulated Microstructure (AIM) technology.

  18. 3D optical measuring technologies and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.

    2005-02-01

    The results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the 3D optical measuring technologies and systems for noncontact 3D optical dimensional inspection applied to atomic and railway industry safety problems are presented. This activity includes investigations of diffraction phenomena on some 3D objects, using the original constructive calculation method. The efficient algorithms for precise determining the transverse and longitudinal sizes of 3D objects of constant thickness by diffraction method, peculiarities on formation of the shadow and images of the typical elements of the extended objects were suggested. Ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors and running trains as well as their high exploitation reliability requires a 100% noncontact precise inspection of geometrical parameters of their components. To solve this problem we have developed methods and produced the technical vision measuring systems LMM, CONTROL, PROFIL, and technologies for noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of grid spacers and fuel elements for the nuclear reactor VVER-1000 and VVER-440, as well as automatic laser diagnostic COMPLEX for noncontact inspection of geometric parameters of running freight car wheel pairs. The performances of these systems and the results of industrial testing are presented and discussed. The created devices are in pilot operation at Atomic and Railway Companies.

  19. Reduction of Fluoroscopic Exposure Using a New Fluoroscopy Integrating Technology in a 3D-Mapping System During Pulmonary Vein Isolation With a Circular Multipolar Irrigated Catheter.

    PubMed

    Blockhaus, Christian; Schmidt, Jan; Kurt, Muhammed; Clasen, Lukas; Brinkmeyer, Christoph; Katsianos, Efstratios; Müller, Patrick; Gerguri, Shqipe; Kelm, Malte; Shin, Dong-In; Makimoto, Hisaki

    2016-05-25

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a cornerstone therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). With increasing numbers of PVI procedures, demand arises to reduce the cumulative fluoroscopic radiation exposure for both the physician and the patient. New technologies are emerging to address this issue. Here, we report our first experiences with a new fluoroscopy integrating technology in addition to a current 3D-mapping system. The new fluoroscopy integrating system (FIS) with 3D-mapping was used prospectively in 15 patients with AF. Control PVI cases (n = 37) were collected retrospectively as a complete series. Total procedure time (skin to skin), fluoroscopic time, and dose-area-product (DAP) data were analyzed. All PVI procedures were performed by one experienced physician using a commercially available circular multipolar irrigated ablation catheter. All PVI procedures were successfully undertaken without major complications. Baseline characteristics of the two groups showed no significant differences. In the group using the FIS, the fluoroscopic time and DAP were significantly reduced from 571 ± 187 seconds versus 1011 ± 527 seconds (P = 0.0029) and 4342 ± 2073 cGycm(2) versus 6208 ± 3314 cGycm(2) (P = 0.049), respectively. Mean procedure time was not significantly affected and was 114 ± 31 minutes versus 104 ± 24 minutes (P = 0.23) by the FIS.The use of the new FIS with the current 3D-mapping system enables a significant reduction of the total fluoroscopy time and DAP compared to the previous combination of 3D-mapping system plus normal fluoroscopy during PVI utilizing a circular multipolar irrigated ablation catheter. However, the concomitant total procedure time is not affected. Thus, the new system reduces the radiation exposure for both the physicians and patients. PMID:27181037

  20. Distributed 3D Information Visualization - Towards Integration of the Dynamic 3D Graphics and Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucinic, Dean; Deen, Danny; Oanta, Emil; Batarilo, Zvonimir; Lacor, Chris

    This paper focuses on visualization and manipulation of graphical content in distributed network environments. The developed graphical middleware and 3D desktop prototypes were specialized for situational awareness. This research was done in the LArge Scale COllaborative decision support Technology (LASCOT) project, which explored and combined software technologies to support human-centred decision support system for crisis management (earthquake, tsunami, flooding, airplane or oil-tanker incidents, chemical, radio-active or other pollutants spreading, etc.). The performed state-of-the-art review did not identify any publicly available large scale distributed application of this kind. Existing proprietary solutions rely on the conventional technologies and 2D representations. Our challenge was to apply the "latest" available technologies, such Java3D, X3D and SOAP, compatible with average computer graphics hardware. The selected technologies are integrated and we demonstrate: the flow of data, which originates from heterogeneous data sources; interoperability across different operating systems and 3D visual representations to enhance the end-users interactions.

  1. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  2. 3D Integration for Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Danna; Yost, Donna-Ruth; Das, Rabindra; Hover, David; Racz, Livia; Weber, Steven; Yoder, Jonilyn; Kerman, Andrew; Oliver, William

    As the field of superconducting quantum computing advances from the few-qubit stage to large-scale fault-tolerant devices, scalability requirements will necessitate the use of standard 3D packaging and integration processes. While the field of 3D integration is well-developed, relatively little work has been performed to determine the compatibility of the associated processes with superconducting qubits. Qubit coherence time could potentially be affected by required process steps or by the proximity of an interposer that could introduce extra sources of charge or flux noise. As a first step towards a large-scale quantum information processor, we have used a flip-chip process to bond a chip with flux qubits to an interposer containing structures for qubit readout and control. We will present data on the effect of the presence of the interposer on qubit coherence time for various qubit-chip-interposer spacings and discuss the implications for integrated multi-qubit devices. This research was funded by the ODNI and IARPA under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  3. 3D circuit integration for Vertex and other detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Ray; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    High Energy Physics continues to push the technical boundaries for electronics. There is no area where this is truer than for vertex detectors. Lower mass and power along with higher resolution and radiation tolerance are driving forces. New technologies such as SOI CMOS detectors and three dimensional (3D) integrated circuits offer new opportunities to meet these challenges. The fundamentals for SOI CMOS detectors and 3D integrated circuits are discussed. Examples of each approach for physics applications are presented. Cost issues and ways to reduce development costs are discussed.

  4. Recent developments in stereoscopic and holographic 3D display technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri

    2014-06-01

    Currently, there is increasing interest in the development of high performance 3D display technologies to support a variety of applications including medical imaging, scientific visualization, gaming, education, entertainment, air traffic control and remote operations in 3D environments. In this paper we will review the attributes of the various 3D display technologies including stereoscopic and holographic 3D, human factors issues of stereoscopic 3D, the challenges in realizing Holographic 3D displays and the recent progress in these technologies.

  5. Progress in 3D imaging and display by integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Cuenca, R.; Saavedra, G.; Martinez-Corral, M.; Pons, A.; Javidi, B.

    2009-05-01

    Three-dimensionality is currently considered an important added value in imaging devices, and therefore the search for an optimum 3D imaging and display technique is a hot topic that is attracting important research efforts. As main value, 3D monitors should provide the observers with different perspectives of a 3D scene by simply varying the head position. Three-dimensional imaging techniques have the potential to establish a future mass-market in the fields of entertainment and communications. Integral imaging (InI), which can capture true 3D color images, has been seen as the right technology to 3D viewing to audiences of more than one person. Due to the advanced degree of development, InI technology could be ready for commercialization in the coming years. This development is the result of a strong research effort performed along the past few years by many groups. Since Integral Imaging is still an emerging technology, the first aim of the "3D Imaging and Display Laboratory" at the University of Valencia, has been the realization of a thorough study of the principles that govern its operation. Is remarkable that some of these principles have been recognized and characterized by our group. Other contributions of our research have been addressed to overcome some of the classical limitations of InI systems, like the limited depth of field (in pickup and in display), the poor axial and lateral resolution, the pseudoscopic-to-orthoscopic conversion, the production of 3D images with continuous relief, or the limited range of viewing angles of InI monitors.

  6. Multi-scale simulation flow and multi-scale materials characterization for stress management in 3D through-silicon-via integration technologies - Effect of stress on 3D IC interconnect reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Valeriy; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2014-06-01

    The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze any design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-layers implications in 3D IC reliability caused by through-silicon-via (TSV) and chip-package interaction (CPI) induced mechanical stresses. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities of 3D IC stacks and a strict "good die" requirement make this type of analysis really critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation, to assess the mechanical stress across the dies stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology, is proposed. As an example the effect of CPI/TSV induced stresses on stress migration (SM) and electromigration (EM) in the back-end-of-line (BEoL) and backside-redistribution-layer (BRDL) interconnect lines is considered. A strategy for a simulation feeding data generation and a respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. A calibration technique based on fitting the simulation results to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is discussed.

  7. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  8. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D…

  9. Integrated Biogeomorphological Modeling Using Delft3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Q.; Jagers, B.

    2011-12-01

    The skill of numerical morphological models has improved significantly from the early 2D uniform, total load sediment models (with steady state or infrequent wave updates) to recent 3D hydrodynamic models with multiple suspended and bed load sediment fractions and bed stratigraphy (online coupled with waves). Although there remain many open questions within this combined field of hydro- and morphodynamics, we observe an increasing need to include biological processes in the overall dynamics. In riverine and inter-tidal environments, there is often an important influence by riparian vegetation and macrobenthos. Over the past decade more and more researchers have started to extend the simulation environment with wrapper scripts and other quick code hacks to estimate their influence on morphological development in coastal, estuarine and riverine environments. Although one can in this way quickly analyze different approaches, these research tools have generally not been designed with reuse, performance and portability in mind. We have now implemented a reusable, flexible, and efficient two-way link between the Delft3D open source framework for hydrodynamics, waves and morphology, and the water quality and ecology modules. The same link will be used for 1D, 2D and 3D modeling on networks and both structured and unstructured grids. We will describe the concepts of the overall system, and illustrate it with some first results.

  10. 3D integration with coaxial through silicon vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamshick, Stephen

    3D integration using through-silicon-vias (TSVs) is gaining considerable attention due to its superior packaging efficiency resulting in higher functionality, improved performance and a reduction in power consumption. In order to implement 3D chip designs with TSV technology, robust TSV electrical models are required. Specifically, due to the increase of signal speeds into the gigahertz (GHz) spectrum, a high frequency electrical characterization best describes TSV behavior. This thesis focuses on coaxial TSV technology due to its superior performance compared to the current existing TSV technology at high frequencies. By confining signal propagation within the coaxial TSV shield, power losses to the silicon substrate are eliminated and unintentional signal coupling is avoided. To the best of our knowledge, coaxial TSV technology has only been characterized using finite element modeling. The work presented by this thesis focuses on fabricating coaxial TSVs within the confines of standard poly gate CMOS processing. In addition, we perform a high frequency electrical characterization using s-parameters and a thermal stress characterization using micro-Raman Spectroscopy. Furthermore, we investigate applications in SPICE modeling and antenna on chip (AoC) applications utilizing coaxial TSV technology. Our results indicate the coaxial TSV reduces signal attenuation by 35% and time delay by 25% compared to the standard non-shielded TSV technology. Coaxial TSV is consistent with previous TSV results regarding induced silicon stress. Lastly, we propose a 60 GHz antenna design using the coaxial TSV that significantly improves antenna gain compared to previous literature examples.

  11. The 3D visualization technology research of submarine pipeline based Horde3D GameEngine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guanghui; Ma, Xiushui; Chen, Genlang; Ye, Lingjian

    2013-10-01

    With the development of 3D display and virtual reality technology, its application gets more and more widespread. This paper applies 3D display technology to the monitoring of submarine pipeline. We reconstruct the submarine pipeline and its surrounding submarine terrain in computer using Horde3D graphics rendering engine on the foundation database "submarine pipeline and relative landforms landscape synthesis database" so as to display the virtual scene of submarine pipeline based virtual reality and show the relevant data collected from the monitoring of submarine pipeline.

  12. Integration of virtual and real scenes within an integral 3D imaging environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinsong; Aggoun, Amar; McCormick, Malcolm

    2002-11-01

    The Imaging Technologies group at De Montfort University has developed an integral 3D imaging system, which is seen as the most likely vehicle for 3D television avoiding psychological effects. To create real fascinating three-dimensional television programs, a virtual studio that performs the task of generating, editing and integrating the 3D contents involving virtual and real scenes is required. The paper presents, for the first time, the procedures, factors and methods of integrating computer-generated virtual scenes with real objects captured using the 3D integral imaging camera system. The method of computer generation of 3D integral images, where the lens array is modelled instead of the physical camera is described. In the model each micro-lens that captures different elemental images of the virtual scene is treated as an extended pinhole camera. An integration process named integrated rendering is illustrated. Detailed discussion and deep investigation are focused on depth extraction from captured integral 3D images. The depth calculation method from the disparity and the multiple baseline method that is used to improve the precision of depth estimation are also presented. The concept of colour SSD and its further improvement in the precision is proposed and verified.

  13. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome

    PubMed Central

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J.; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. PMID:27185892

  14. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome.

    PubMed

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. PMID:27185892

  15. Integration of real-time 3D capture, reconstruction, and light-field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Pei, Renjing; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Effective integration of 3D acquisition, reconstruction (modeling) and display technologies into a seamless systems provides augmented experience of visualizing and analyzing real objects and scenes with realistic 3D sensation. Applications can be found in medical imaging, gaming, virtual or augmented reality and hybrid simulations. Although 3D acquisition, reconstruction, and display technologies have gained significant momentum in recent years, there seems a lack of attention on synergistically combining these components into a "end-to-end" 3D visualization system. We designed, built and tested an integrated 3D visualization system that is able to capture in real-time 3D light-field images, perform 3D reconstruction to build 3D model of the objects, and display the 3D model on a large autostereoscopic screen. In this article, we will present our system architecture and component designs, hardware/software implementations, and experimental results. We will elaborate on our recent progress on sparse camera array light-field 3D acquisition, real-time dense 3D reconstruction, and autostereoscopic multi-view 3D display. A prototype is finally presented with test results to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed integrated 3D visualization system.

  16. 3D integration of sub-surface photonics with CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Bahram; Indukuri, Tejaswi; Koonath, Prakash

    2006-02-01

    The integration of photonics and electronics on a single silicon substrate requires technologies that can add optical functionalities without significantly sacrificing valuable wafer area. To this end, we have developed an innovative fabrication process, called SIMOX 3-D Sculpting, that enables monolithic optoelectronic integration in a manner that does not compromise the economics of CMOS manufacturing. In this technique, photonic devices are realized in subsurface silicon layers that are separated from the surface silicon layer by an intervening SiO II layer. The surface silicon layer may then be utilized for electronic circuitry. SIMOX 3-D sculpting involves (1) the implantation of oxygen ions into a patterned silicon substrate followed by (2) high temperature anneal to create buried waveguide-based photonic devices. This process has produced subterranean microresonators with unloaded quality factors of 8000 and extinction ratios >20dB. On the surface silicon layers, MOS transistor structures have been fabricated. The small cross-sectional area of the waveguides lends itself to the realization of nonlinear optical devices. We have previously demonstrated spectral broadening and continuum generation in silicon waveguides utilizing Kerr optical nonlinearity. This may be combined with microresonator filters for on-chip supercontiuum generation and spectral carving. The monolithic integration of CMOS circuits and optical modulators with such multi-wavelength sources represent an exciting avenue for silicon photonics.

  17. 3-D Packaging: A Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Mark; Johnson, R. Wayne; Gerke, David

    2005-01-01

    Traditional electronics are assembled as a planar arrangement of components on a printed circuit board (PCB) or other type of substrate. These planar assemblies may then be plugged into a motherboard or card cage creating a volume of electronics. This architecture is common in many military and space electronic systems as well as large computer and telecommunications systems and industrial electronics. The individual PCB assemblies can be replaced if defective or for system upgrade. Some applications are constrained by the volume or the shape of the system and are not compatible with the motherboard or card cage architecture. Examples include missiles, camcorders, and digital cameras. In these systems, planar rigid-flex substrates are folded to create complex 3-D shapes. The flex circuit serves the role of motherboard, providing interconnection between the rigid boards. An example of a planar rigid - flex assembly prior to folding is shown. In both architectures, the interconnection is effectively 2-D.

  18. 3D integrated hybrid silicon laser.

    PubMed

    Song, Bowen; Stagarescu, Cristian; Ristic, Sasa; Behfar, Alex; Klamkin, Jonathan

    2016-05-16

    Lasers were realized on silicon by flip-chip bonding of indium phosphide (InP) devices containing total internal reflection turning mirrors for surface emission. Light is coupled to the silicon waveguides through surface grating couplers. With this technique, InP lasers were integrated on silicon. Laser cavities were also formed by coupling InP reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers to microring resonator filters and distributed Bragg reflector mirrors. Single-mode continuous wave lasing was demonstrated with a side mode suppression ratio of 30 dB. Up to 2 mW of optical power was coupled to the silicon waveguide. Thermal simulations were also performed to evaluate the low thermal impedance afforded by this architecture and potential for high wall-plug efficiency. PMID:27409867

  19. Stereoscopic display technologies for FHD 3D LCD TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Sik; Ko, Young-Ji; Park, Sang-Moo; Jung, Jong-Hoon; Shestak, Sergey

    2010-04-01

    Stereoscopic display technologies have been developed as one of advanced displays, and many TV industrials have been trying commercialization of 3D TV. We have been developing 3D TV based on LCD with LED BLU (backlight unit) since Samsung launched the world's first 3D TV based on PDP. However, the data scanning of panel and LC's response characteristics of LCD TV cause interference among frames (that is crosstalk), and this makes 3D video quality worse. We propose the method to reduce crosstalk by LCD driving and backlight control of FHD 3D LCD TV.

  20. Realistic terrain visualization based on 3D virtual world technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fengru; Lin, Hui; Chen, Bin; Xiao, Cai

    2010-11-01

    The rapid advances in information technologies, e.g., network, graphics processing, and virtual world, have provided challenges and opportunities for new capabilities in information systems, Internet applications, and virtual geographic environments, especially geographic visualization and collaboration. In order to achieve meaningful geographic capabilities, we need to explore and understand how these technologies can be used to construct virtual geographic environments to help to engage geographic research. The generation of three-dimensional (3D) terrain plays an important part in geographical visualization, computer simulation, and virtual geographic environment applications. The paper introduces concepts and technologies of virtual worlds and virtual geographic environments, explores integration of realistic terrain and other geographic objects and phenomena of natural geographic environment based on SL/OpenSim virtual world technologies. Realistic 3D terrain visualization is a foundation of construction of a mirror world or a sand box model of the earth landscape and geographic environment. The capabilities of interaction and collaboration on geographic information are discussed as well. Further virtual geographic applications can be developed based on the foundation work of realistic terrain visualization in virtual environments.

  1. Realistic terrain visualization based on 3D virtual world technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fengru; Lin, Hui; Chen, Bin; Xiao, Cai

    2009-09-01

    The rapid advances in information technologies, e.g., network, graphics processing, and virtual world, have provided challenges and opportunities for new capabilities in information systems, Internet applications, and virtual geographic environments, especially geographic visualization and collaboration. In order to achieve meaningful geographic capabilities, we need to explore and understand how these technologies can be used to construct virtual geographic environments to help to engage geographic research. The generation of three-dimensional (3D) terrain plays an important part in geographical visualization, computer simulation, and virtual geographic environment applications. The paper introduces concepts and technologies of virtual worlds and virtual geographic environments, explores integration of realistic terrain and other geographic objects and phenomena of natural geographic environment based on SL/OpenSim virtual world technologies. Realistic 3D terrain visualization is a foundation of construction of a mirror world or a sand box model of the earth landscape and geographic environment. The capabilities of interaction and collaboration on geographic information are discussed as well. Further virtual geographic applications can be developed based on the foundation work of realistic terrain visualization in virtual environments.

  2. 3D Holographic Technology and Its Educational Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyangsook

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a number of significant developments in 3D holographic technology, its potential to revolutionize aspects of teaching and learning, and challenges of implementing the technology in educational settings.

  3. Integrating visible light 3D scanning into the everyday world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    Visible light 3D scanning offers the potential to non-invasively and nearly non-perceptibly incorporate 3D imaging into the everyday world. This paper considers the various possible uses of visible light 3D scanning technology. It discusses multiple possible usage scenarios including in hospitals, security perimeter settings and retail environments. The paper presents a framework for assessing the efficacy of visible light 3D scanning for a given application (and compares this to other scanning approaches such as those using blue light or lasers). It also discusses ethical and legal considerations relevant to real-world use and concludes by presenting a decision making framework.

  4. Evaluation of 3D technologies in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Gracco, Antonio; Mazzoli, Alida; Raffaeli, Roberto; Germani, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Quality of service, in terms of improvement in patient satisfaction, is an increasingly important objective in all medical fields, and is especially imperative in orthodontics due to the high numbers of patients treated. Information technology can provide a meaningful contribution to bettering treatment processes, and we maintain that systems such as CAD, CAM and CAE, although initially conceived for industrial purposes, should be evaluated, studied and customized with a view to use in medicine. The present study aims to evaluate Reverse Engineering (RE) and Rapid Prototyping (RP) in order to define an ideal chain of advanced technological solutions to support the critical processes of orthodontic activity. PMID:19294238

  5. 3D Laser Scanning in Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser scanner can be used as a tool for design and problem solving in technology education. A hands-on experience can enhance learning by captivating students' interest and empowering them with creative tools. (Author/JOW)

  6. Designing Virtual Museum Using Web3D Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianghai

    VRT was born to have the potentiality of constructing an effective learning environment due to its 3I characteristics: Interaction, Immersion and Imagination. It is now applied in education in a more profound way along with the development of VRT. Virtual Museum is one of the applications. The Virtual Museum is based on the WEB3D technology and extensibility is the most important factor. Considering the advantage and disadvantage of each WEB3D technology, VRML, CULT3D AND VIEWPOINT technologies are chosen. A web chatroom based on flash and ASP technology is also been created in order to make the Virtual Museum an interactive learning environment.

  7. 3D augmented reality with integral imaging display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xin; Hua, Hong; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) integral imaging display for augmented reality is presented. By implementing the pseudoscopic-to-orthoscopic conversion method, elemental image arrays with different capturing parameters can be transferred into the identical format for 3D display. With the proposed merging algorithm, a new set of elemental images for augmented reality display is generated. The newly generated elemental images contain both the virtual objects and real world scene with desired depth information and transparency parameters. The experimental results indicate the feasibility of the proposed 3D augmented reality with integral imaging.

  8. Current status of stereoscopic 3D LCD TV technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hee-Jin

    2011-06-01

    The year 2010 may be recorded as a first year of successful commercial 3D products. Among them, the 3D LCD TVs are expected to be the major one regarding the sales volume. In this paper, the principle of current stereoscopic 3D LCD TV techniques and the required flat panel display (FPD) technologies for the realization of them are reviewed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Polarimetric 3D integral imaging in photon-starved conditions.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, Artur; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-03-01

    We develop a method for obtaining 3D polarimetric integral images from elemental images recorded in low light illumination conditions. Since photon-counting images are very sparse, calculation of the Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization should be handled carefully. In our approach, polarimetric 3D integral images are generated using the Maximum Likelihood Estimation and subsequently reconstructed by means of a Total Variation Denoising filter. In this way, polarimetric results are comparable to those obtained in conventional illumination conditions. We also show that polarimetric information retrieved from photon starved images can be used in 3D object recognition problems. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D polarimetric photon counting integral imaging. PMID:25836861

  10. 3D Printing in Zero-G ISS Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki; Cooper, Kenneth C.; Edmunson, Jennifer E.; Dunn, Jason; Snyder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a long term strategy to fabricate components and equipment on-demand for manned missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. To support this strategy, NASA's Marshall Space Fligth Center (MSFC) and Made in Space, Inc. are developing the 3D Printing In Zero-G payload as a Technology Demonstration for the International Space Station (ISS). The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment ('3D Print') will be the frst machine to perform 3D printing in space.

  11. Compression of 3D integral images using wavelet decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazri, Meriem; Aggoun, Amar

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents a wavelet-based lossy compression technique for unidirectional 3D integral images (UII). The method requires the extraction of different viewpoint images from the integral image. A single viewpoint image is constructed by extracting one pixel from each microlens, then each viewpoint image is decomposed using a Two Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Transform (2D-DWT). The resulting array of coefficients contains several frequency bands. The lower frequency bands of the viewpoint images are assembled and compressed using a 3 Dimensional Discrete Cosine Transform (3D-DCT) followed by Huffman coding. This will achieve decorrelation within and between 2D low frequency bands from the different viewpoint images. The remaining higher frequency bands are Arithmetic coded. After decoding and decompression of the viewpoint images using an inverse 3D-DCT and an inverse 2D-DWT, each pixel from every reconstructed viewpoint image is put back into its original position within the microlens to reconstruct the whole 3D integral image. Simulations were performed on a set of four different grey level 3D UII using a uniform scalar quantizer with deadzone. The results for the average of the four UII intensity distributions are presented and compared with previous use of 3D-DCT scheme. It was found that the algorithm achieves better rate-distortion performance, with respect to compression ratio and image quality at very low bit rates.

  12. Accommodation response measurements for integral 3D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiura, H.; Mishina, T.; Arai, J.; Iwadate, Y.

    2014-03-01

    We measured accommodation responses under integral photography (IP), binocular stereoscopic, and real object display conditions, and viewing conditions of binocular and monocular viewing conditions. The equipment we used was an optometric device and a 3D display. We developed the 3D display for IP and binocular stereoscopic images that comprises a high-resolution liquid crystal display (LCD) and a high-density lens array. The LCD has a resolution of 468 dpi and a diagonal size of 4.8 inches. The high-density lens array comprises 106 x 69 micro lenses that have a focal length of 3 mm and diameter of 1 mm. The lenses are arranged in a honeycomb pattern. The 3D display was positioned 60 cm from an observer under IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. The target was presented at eight depth positions relative to the 3D display: 15, 10, and 5 cm in front of the 3D display, on the 3D display panel, and 5, 10, 15 and 30 cm behind the 3D display under the IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. Under the real object display condition, the target was displayed on the 3D display panel, and the 3D display was placed at the eight positions. The results suggest that the IP image induced more natural accommodation responses compared to the binocular stereoscopic image. The accommodation responses of the IP image were weaker than those of a real object; however, they showed a similar tendency with those of the real object under the two viewing conditions. Therefore, IP can induce accommodation to the depth positions of 3D images.

  13. 3D Printing technologies for drug delivery: a review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; Smyth, Hugh

    2016-07-01

    With the FDA approval of the first 3D printed tablet, Spritam®, there is now precedence set for the utilization of 3D printing for the preparation of drug delivery systems. The capabilities for dispensing low volumes with accuracy, precise spatial control and layer-by-layer assembly allow for the preparation of complex compositions and geometries. The high degree of flexibility and control with 3D printing enables the preparation of dosage forms with multiple active pharmaceutical ingredients with complex and tailored release profiles. A unique opportunity for this technology for the preparation of personalized doses to address individual patient needs. This review will highlight the 3D printing technologies being utilized for the fabrication of drug delivery systems, as well as the formulation and processing parameters for consideration. This article will also summarize the range of dosage forms that have been prepared using these technologies, specifically over the last 10 years. PMID:26625986

  14. 3D-printing technologies for electrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2016-05-21

    Since its conception during the 80s, 3D-printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has been receiving unprecedented levels of attention and interest from industry and research laboratories. This is in addition to end users, who have benefited from the pervasiveness of desktop-size and relatively cheap printing machines available. 3D-printing enables almost infinite possibilities for rapid prototyping. Therefore, it has been considered for applications in numerous research fields, ranging from mechanical engineering, medicine, and materials science to chemistry. Electrochemistry is another branch of science that can certainly benefit from 3D-printing technologies, paving the way for the design and fabrication of cheaper, higher performing, and ubiquitously available electrochemical devices. Here, we aim to provide a general overview of the most commonly available 3D-printing methods along with a review of recent electrochemistry related studies adopting 3D-printing as a possible rapid prototyping fabrication tool. PMID:27048921

  15. Restoring Fort Frontenac in 3D: Effective Usage of 3D Technology for Heritage Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, M.; Goins, E.; Jackson, C.; Halbstein, D.; Foster, S.; Bazely, S.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is composed of three elements: 3D modeling, web design, and heritage visualization. The aim is to use computer graphics design to inform and create an interest in historical visualization by rebuilding Fort Frontenac using 3D modeling and interactive design. The final model will be integr ated into an interactive website to learn more about the fort's historic imp ortance. It is apparent that using computer graphics can save time and money when it comes to historical visualization. Visitors do not have to travel to the actual archaeological buildings. They can simply use the Web in their own home to learn about this information virtually. Meticulously following historical records to create a sophisticated restoration of archaeological buildings will draw viewers into visualizations, such as the historical world of Fort Frontenac. As a result, it allows the viewers to effectively understand the fort's social sy stem, habits, and historical events.

  16. Personalized development of human organs using 3D printing technology.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of organ transplantation created by the lack of organ donors and life-long immunosuppression. We hypothesized a precision medicine approach to human organ fabrication using 3D printed technology, in which the digital volumetric data would be collected by imaging of a patient, i.e. CT or MRI images followed by mathematical modeling to create a digital 3D image. Then a suitable biocompatible material, with an optimal resolution for cells seeding and maintenance of cell viability during the printing process, would be printed with a compatible printer type and finally implanted into the patient. Life-saving operations with 3D printed implants were already performed in patients. However, several issues need to be addressed before translational application of 3D printing into clinical medicine. These are vascularization, innervation, and financial cost of 3D printing and safety of biomaterials used for the construct. PMID:26826637

  17. Analysis of Impact of 3D Printing Technology on Traditional Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Niyan; Chen, Qi; Liao, Linzhi; Wang, Xin

    With quiet rise of 3D printing technology in automobile, aerospace, industry, medical treatment and other fields, many insiders hold different opinions on its development. This paper objectively analyzes impact of 3D printing technology on mold making technology and puts forward the idea of fusion and complementation of 3D printing technology and mold making technology through comparing advantages and disadvantages of 3D printing mold and traditional mold making technology.

  18. 3D Vectorial Time Domain Computational Integrated Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Bond, T C; Koning, J M; Stowell, M L

    2007-02-16

    The design of integrated photonic structures poses considerable challenges. 3D-Time-Domain design tools are fundamental in enabling technologies such as all-optical logic, photonic bandgap sensors, THz imaging, and fast radiation diagnostics. Such technologies are essential to LLNL and WFO sponsors for a broad range of applications: encryption for communications and surveillance sensors (NSA, NAI and IDIV/PAT); high density optical interconnects for high-performance computing (ASCI); high-bandwidth instrumentation for NIF diagnostics; micro-sensor development for weapon miniaturization within the Stockpile Stewardship and DNT programs; and applications within HSO for CBNP detection devices. While there exist a number of photonics simulation tools on the market, they primarily model devices of interest to the communications industry. We saw the need to extend our previous software to match the Laboratory's unique emerging needs. These include modeling novel material effects (such as those of radiation induced carrier concentrations on refractive index) and device configurations (RadTracker bulk optics with radiation induced details, Optical Logic edge emitting lasers with lateral optical inputs). In addition we foresaw significant advantages to expanding our own internal simulation codes: parallel supercomputing could be incorporated from the start, and the simulation source code would be accessible for modification and extension. This work addressed Engineering's Simulation Technology Focus Area, specifically photonics. Problems addressed from the Engineering roadmap of the time included modeling the Auston switch (an important THz source/receiver), modeling Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs, which had been envisioned as part of fast radiation sensors), and multi-scale modeling of optical systems (for a variety of applications). We proposed to develop novel techniques to numerically solve the 3D multi-scale propagation problem for both the microchip

  19. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  20. A monolithic 3D integrated nanomagnetic co-processing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becherer, M.; Breitkreutz-v. Gamm, S.; Eichwald, I.; Žiemys, G.; Kiermaier, J.; Csaba, G.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2016-01-01

    As CMOS scaling becomes more and more challenging there is strong impetus for beyond CMOS device research to add new functionality to ICs. In this article, a promising technology with non-volatile ferromagnetic computing states - the so-called Perpendicular Nanomagnetic Logic (pNML) - is reviewed. After introducing the 2D planar implementation of NML with magnetization perpendicular to the surface, the path to monolithically 3D integrated systems is discussed. Instead of CMOS substitution, additional functionality is added by a co-processor architecture as a prospective back-end-of-line (BEOL) process, where the computing elements are clocked by a soft-magnetic on-chip inductor. The unconventional computation in the ferromagnetic domain can lead to highly dense computing structures without leakage currents, attojoule dissipation per bit operation and data-throughputs comparable to state-of-the-art high-performance CMOS CPUs. In appropriate applications and with specialized computing architectures they might even circumvent the bottleneck of time-consuming memory access, as computation is inherently performed with non-volatile computing states.

  1. 3D-GEM: Geo-technical extension towards an integrated 3D information model for infrastructural development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, W.; Zlatanova, S.; van Oosterom, P. J. M.; Hack, H. R. G. K.

    2014-03-01

    In infrastructural projects, communication as well as information exchange and (re-)use in and between involved parties is difficult. Mainly this is caused by a lack of information harmonisation. Various specialists are working together on the development of an infrastructural project and all use their own specific software and definitions for various information types. In addition, the lack of and/or differences in the use and definition of thematic semantic information regarding the various information types adds to the problem. Realistic 3D models describing and integrating parts of the earth already exist, but are generally neglecting the subsurface, and especially the aspects of geology and geo-technology. This paper summarises the research towards the extension of an existing integrated semantic information model to include surface as well as subsurface objects and in particular, subsurface geological and geotechnical objects. The major contributions of this research are the definition of geotechnical objects and the mechanism to link them with CityGML, GeoSciML and O&M standard models. The model is called 3D-GEM, short for 3D Geotechnical Extension Model.

  2. Output-sensitive 3D line integral convolution.

    PubMed

    Falk, Martin; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We propose an output-sensitive visualization method for 3D line integral convolution (LIC) whose rendering speed is largely independent of the data set size and mostly governed by the complexity of the output on the image plane. Our approach of view-dependent visualization tightly links the LIC generation with the volume rendering of the LIC result in order to avoid the computation of unnecessary LIC points: early-ray termination and empty-space leaping techniques are used to skip the computation of the LIC integral in a lazy-evaluation approach; both ray casting and texture slicing can be used as volume-rendering techniques. The input noise is modeled in object space to allow for temporal coherence under object and camera motion. Different noise models are discussed, covering dense representations based on filtered white noise all the way to sparse representations similar to oriented LIC. Aliasing artifacts are avoided by frequency control over the 3D noise and by employing a 3D variant of MIPmapping. A range of illumination models is applied to the LIC streamlines: different codimension-2 lighting models and a novel gradient-based illumination model that relies on precomputed gradients and does not require any direct calculation of gradients after the LIC integral is evaluated. We discuss the issue of proper sampling of the LIC and volume-rendering integrals by employing a frequency-space analysis of the noise model and the precomputed gradients. Finally, we demonstrate that our visualization approach lends itself to a fast graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation that supports both steady and unsteady flow. Therefore, this 3D LIC method allows users to interactively explore 3D flow by means of high-quality, view-dependent, and adaptive LIC volume visualization. Applications to flow visualization in combination with feature extraction and focus-and-context visualization are described, a comparison to previous methods is provided, and a detailed performance

  3. Integrated optical 3D digital imaging based on DSP scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Peng, Xiang; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2008-03-01

    We present a scheme of integrated optical 3-D digital imaging (IO3DI) based on digital signal processor (DSP), which can acquire range images independently without PC support. This scheme is based on a parallel hardware structure with aid of DSP and field programmable gate array (FPGA) to realize 3-D imaging. In this integrated scheme of 3-D imaging, the phase measurement profilometry is adopted. To realize the pipeline processing of the fringe projection, image acquisition and fringe pattern analysis, we present a multi-threads application program that is developed under the environment of DSP/BIOS RTOS (real-time operating system). Since RTOS provides a preemptive kernel and powerful configuration tool, with which we are able to achieve a real-time scheduling and synchronization. To accelerate automatic fringe analysis and phase unwrapping, we make use of the technique of software optimization. The proposed scheme can reach a performance of 39.5 f/s (frames per second), so it may well fit into real-time fringe-pattern analysis and can implement fast 3-D imaging. Experiment results are also presented to show the validity of proposed scheme.

  4. R3D: Reduction Package for Integral Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Sebastián. F.

    2011-06-01

    R3D was developed to reduce fiber-based integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. The package comprises a set of command-line routines adapted for each of these steps, suitable for creating pipelines. The routines have been tested against simulations, and against real data from various integral field spectrographs (PMAS, PPAK, GMOS, VIMOS and INTEGRAL). Particular attention is paid to the treatment of cross-talk. R3D unifies the reduction techniques for the different IFS instruments to a single one, in order to allow the general public to reduce different instruments data in an homogeneus, consistent and simple way. Although still in its prototyping phase, it has been proved to be useful to reduce PMAS (both in the Larr and the PPAK modes), VIMOS and INTEGRAL data. The current version has been coded in Perl, using PDL, in order to speed-up the algorithm testing phase. Most of the time critical algorithms have been translated to C[float=][/float], and it is our intention to translate all of them. However, even in this phase R3D is fast enough to produce valuable science frames in reasonable time.

  5. Development of 3D in Vitro Technology for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, biomaterials technologies together with significant efforts on developing biology have revolutionized the process of engineered materials. Three dimensional (3D) in vitro technology aims to develop set of tools that are simple, inexpensive, portable and robust that could be commercialized and used in various fields of biomedical sciences such as drug discovery, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine. The proliferation of cells in the 3D scaffold needs an oxygen and nutrition supply. 3D scaffold materials should provide such an environment for cells living in close proximity. 3D scaffolds that are able to regenerate or restore tissue and/or organs have begun to revolutionize medicine and biomedical science. Scaffolds have been used to support and promote the regeneration of tissues. Different processing techniques have been developed to design and fabricate three dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering implants. Throughout the chapters we discuss in this review, we inform the reader about the potential applications of different 3D in vitro systems that can be applied for fabricating a wider range of novel biomaterials for use in tissue engineering. PMID:25299693

  6. 3D Medical Collaboration Technology to Enhance Emergency Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Söderholm, Hanna M.; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Ampalam, Manoj; Krishnan, Srinivas; Noel, Vincent; Noland, Michael; Manning, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15–20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays or with mobile devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs). The remote professionals’ viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically (continuously) via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewers head-slaved or hand-slaved virtual cameras for monoscopic or stereoscopic viewing of the dynamic reconstructions. We call this idea remote 3D medical collaboration. In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical collaboration technology; we describe the relevant computer vision, computer graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare. PMID:19521951

  7. Development of 3D in vitro technology for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, biomaterials technologies together with significant efforts on developing biology have revolutionized the process of engineered materials. Three dimensional (3D) in vitro technology aims to develop set of tools that are simple, inexpensive, portable and robust that could be commercialized and used in various fields of biomedical sciences such as drug discovery, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine. The proliferation of cells in the 3D scaffold needs an oxygen and nutrition supply. 3D scaffold materials should provide such an environment for cells living in close proximity. 3D scaffolds that are able to regenerate or restore tissue and/or organs have begun to revolutionize medicine and biomedical science. Scaffolds have been used to support and promote the regeneration of tissues. Different processing techniques have been developed to design and fabricate three dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering implants. Throughout the chapters we discuss in this review, we inform the reader about the potential applications of different 3D in vitro systems that can be applied for fabricating a wider range of novel biomaterials for use in tissue engineering. PMID:25299693

  8. Experiment for Integrating Dutch 3d Spatial Planning and Bim for Checking Building Permits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Berlo, L.; Dijkmans, T.; Stoter, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a research project in The Netherlands in which several SMEs collaborated to create a 3D model of the National spatial planning information. This 2D information system described in the IMRO data standard holds implicit 3D information that can be used to generate an explicit 3D model. The project realized a proof of concept to generate a 3D spatial planning model. The team used the model to integrate it with several 3D Building Information Models (BIMs) described in the open data standard Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). Goal of the project was (1) to generate a 3D BIM model from spatial planning information to be used by the architect during the early design phase, and (2) allow 3D checking of building permits. The team used several technologies like CityGML, BIM clash detection and GeoBIM to explore the potential of this innovation. Within the project a showcase was created with a part of the spatial plan from the city of The Hague. Several BIM models were integrated in the 3D spatial plan of this area. A workflow has been described that demonstrates the benefits of collaboration between the spatial domain and the AEC industry in 3D. The research results in a showcase with conclusions and considerations for both national and international practice.

  9. 3D Printing in Technology and Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert L.; Bowden, Nicholas S.; Merrill, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In the past five years, there has been tremendous growth in the production and use of desktop 3D printers. This growth has been driven by the increasing availability of inexpensive computing and electronics technologies. The ability to rapidly share ideas and intelligence over the Internet has also played a key role in the growth. Growth is also…

  10. Coherence cube technology adds geologic insight to 3-D data

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.

    1997-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic technology is now widely applied to assess the risk associated with hydrocarbon trap definition, including faulting, stratigraphic features, and reservoir description. Critical new technologies to exploit the wealth of information contained within 3-D seismic have recently begun to emerge; most notably, coherence cube technology, developed by Amoco Production Research and licensed to Coherence Technology Co. (CTC). Coherence cube processing produces interpretable images of faults and subtle stratigraphic features, such as buried deltas, river channels, and beaches, by quantifying seismic coherence attributes. The technique has important implications for geophysical, geological, and reservoir engineering applications. The paper discusses how coherency works, applications, and an example in delineating southern North Sea faulting.

  11. Application of 3D printing technology in aerodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasek, K.; Wiklak, P.

    2014-08-01

    3D printing, as an additive process, offers much more than traditional machining techniques in terms of achievable complexity of a model shape. That fact was a motivation to adapt discussed technology as a method for creating objects purposed for aerodynamic testing. The following paper provides an overview of various 3D printing techniques. Four models of a standard NACA0018 aerofoil were manufactured in different materials and methods: MultiJet Modelling (MJM), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). Various parameters of the models have been included in the analysis: surface roughness, strength, details quality, surface imperfections and irregularities as well as thermal properties.

  12. Overview of 3D surface digitization technologies in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of the different 3D surface digitization technologies commercially available in the European market. The solutions for 3D surface measurement offered by major European companies can be divided into different groups depending on various characteristics, such as technology (e.g. laser scanning, white light projection), system construction (e.g. fix, on CMM/robot/arm) or measurement type (e.g. surface scanning, profile scanning). Crossing between the categories is possible, however, the majority of commercial products can be divided into the following groups: (a) laser profilers mounted on CMM, (b) portable coded light projection systems, (c) desktop solutions with laser profiler or coded light projectin system and multi-axes platform, (d) laser point measurement systems where both sensor and object move, (e) hand operated laser profilers, hand held laser profiler or point measurement systems, (f) dedicated systems. This paper presents the different 3D surface digitization technologies and describes them with their advantages and disadvantages. Various examples of their use are shown for different application fields. A special interest is given to applications regarding the 3D surface measurement of the human body.

  13. Quality of 3D Models Generated by SFM Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčiš, Marián

    2013-12-01

    Using various types of automation in digital photogrammetry is associated with questions such as the accuracy of a 3D model generated on various types of surfaces and textures, the financial costs of the equipment needed, and also the time costs of the processing. This topic deals with the actual technology of computer vision, which allows the automated exterior orientation of images, camera calibration, and the generation of 3D models directly from images of the object itself, based on the automatic detection of significant points. Detailed testing is done using the Agisoft PhotoScan system, and the camera configuration is solved with respect to the accuracy of the 3D model generated and the time consumption of the calculations for the different types of textures and the different settings for the processing.

  14. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications.

    PubMed

    Kuş, Abdil

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering (RE) is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings) model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters. PMID:22573995

  15. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kuş, Abdil

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering (RE) is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings) model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters. PMID:22573995

  16. Possible Applications of 3D Printing Technology on Textile Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korger, M.; Bergschneider, J.; Lutz, M.; Mahltig, B.; Finsterbusch, K.; Rabe, M.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing is a rapidly emerging additive manufacturing technology which can offer cost efficiency and flexibility in product development and production. In textile production 3D printing can also serve as an add-on process to apply 3D structures on textiles. In this study the low-cost fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique was applied using different thermoplastic printing materials available on the market with focus on flexible filaments such as thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) or Soft PLA. Since a good adhesion and stability of the 3D printed structures on textiles are essential, separation force and abrasion resistance tests were conducted with different kinds of printed woven fabrics demonstrating that a sufficient adhesion can be achieved. The main influencing factor can be attributed to the topography of the textile surface affected by the weave, roughness and hairiness offering formlocking connections followed by the wettability of the textile surface by the molten polymer, which depends on the textile surface energy and can be specifically controlled by washing (desizing), finishing or plasma treatment of the textile before the print. These basic adhesion mechanisms can also be considered crucial for 3D printing on knitwear.

  17. Developing novel 3D antennas using advanced additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, Milad

    In today's world of wireless communication systems, antenna engineering is rapidly advancing as the wireless services continue to expand in support of emerging commercial applications. Antennas play a key role in the performance of advanced transceiver systems where they serve to convert electric power to electromagnetic waves and vice versa. Researchers have held significant interest in developing this crucial component for wireless communication systems by employing a variety of design techniques. In the past few years, demands for electrically small antennas continues to increase, particularly among portable and mobile wireless devices, medical electronics and aerospace systems. This trend toward smaller electronic devices makes the three dimensional (3D) antennas very appealing, since they can be designed in a way to use every available space inside the devise. Additive Manufacturing (AM) method could help to find great solutions for the antennas design for next generation of wireless communication systems. In this thesis, the design and fabrication of 3D printed antennas using AM technology is studied. To demonstrate this application of AM, different types of antennas structures have been designed and fabricated using various manufacturing processes. This thesis studies, for the first time, embedded conductive 3D printed antennas using PolyLactic Acid (PLA) and Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) for substrate parts and high temperature carbon paste for conductive parts which can be a good candidate to overcome the limitations of direct printing on 3D surfaces that is the most popular method to fabricate conductive parts of the antennas. This thesis also studies, for the first time, the fabrication of antennas with 3D printed conductive parts which can contribute to the new generation of 3D printed antennas.

  18. 3D Printing In Zero-G ISS Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki; Cooper, Kenneth; Edmunson, Jennifer; Dunn, Jason; Snyder, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a long term strategy to fabricate components and equipment on-demand for manned missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. To support this strategy, NASA and Made in Space, Inc. are developing the 3D Printing In Zero-G payload as a Technology Demonstration for the International Space Station (ISS). The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment ('3D Print') will be the first machine to perform 3D printing in space. The greater the distance from Earth and the longer the mission duration, the more difficult resupply becomes; this requires a change from the current spares, maintenance, repair, and hardware design model that has been used on the International Space Station (ISS) up until now. Given the extension of the ISS Program, which will inevitably result in replacement parts being required, the ISS is an ideal platform to begin changing the current model for resupply and repair to one that is more suitable for all exploration missions. 3D Printing, more formally known as Additive Manufacturing, is the method of building parts/objects/tools layer-by-layer. The 3D Print experiment will use extrusion-based additive manufacturing, which involves building an object out of plastic deposited by a wire-feed via an extruder head. Parts can be printed from data files loaded on the device at launch, as well as additional files uplinked to the device while on-orbit. The plastic extrusion additive manufacturing process is a low-energy, low-mass solution to many common needs on board the ISS. The 3D Print payload will serve as the ideal first step to proving that process in space. It is unreasonable to expect NASA to launch large blocks of material from which parts or tools can be traditionally machined, and even more unreasonable to fly up multiple drill bits that would be required to machine parts from aerospace-grade materials such as titanium 6-4 alloy and Inconel. The technology to produce parts on demand, in space, offers

  19. Demonstration of three gorges archaeological relics based on 3D-visualization technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenli

    2015-12-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the digital demonstration of three gorges archeological relics to exhibit the achievements of the protective measures. A novel and effective method based on 3D-visualization technology, which includes large-scaled landscape reconstruction, virtual studio, and virtual panoramic roaming, etc, is proposed to create a digitized interactive demonstration system. The method contains three stages: pre-processing, 3D modeling and integration. Firstly, abundant archaeological information is classified according to its history and geographical information. Secondly, build up a 3D-model library with the technology of digital images processing and 3D modeling. Thirdly, use virtual reality technology to display the archaeological scenes and cultural relics vividly and realistically. The present work promotes the application of virtual reality to digital projects and enriches the content of digital archaeology.

  20. 3D J-Integral Capability in Grizzly

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Spencer; Marie Backman; Pritam Chakraborty; William Hoffman

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes work done to develop a capability to evaluate fracture contour J-Integrals in 3D in the Grizzly code. In the current fiscal year, a previously-developed 2D implementation of a J-Integral evaluation capability has been extended to work in 3D, and to include terms due both to mechanically-induced strains and due to gradients in thermal strains. This capability has been verified against a benchmark solution on a model of a curved crack front in 3D. The thermal term in this integral has been verified against a benchmark problem with a thermal gradient. These developments are part of a larger effort to develop Grizzly as a tool that can be used to predict the evolution of aging processes in nuclear power plant systems, structures, and components, and assess their capacity after being subjected to those aging processes. The capabilities described here have been developed to enable evaluations of Mode- stress intensity factors on axis-aligned flaws in reactor pressure vessels. These can be compared with the fracture toughness of the material to determine whether a pre-existing flaw would begin to propagate during a pos- tulated pressurized thermal shock accident. This report includes a demonstration calculation to show how Grizzly is used to perform a deterministic assessment of such a flaw propagation in a degraded reactor pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock conditions. The stress intensity is calculated from J, and the toughness is computed using the fracture master curve and the degraded ductile to brittle transition temperature.

  1. Customisable 3D printed microfluidics for integrated analysis and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, T; Harding, M J; Harris, R A; Friel, R J; Christie, S D R

    2016-08-16

    The formation of smart Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices featuring integrated sensing optics is currently hindered by convoluted and expensive manufacturing procedures. In this work, a series of 3D-printed LOC devices were designed and manufactured via stereolithography (SL) in a matter of hours. The spectroscopic performance of a variety of optical fibre combinations were tested, and the optimum path length for performing Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy determined. The information gained in these trials was then used in a reaction optimisation for the formation of carvone semicarbazone. The production of high resolution surface channels (100-500 μm) means that these devices were capable of handling a wide range of concentrations (9 μM-38 mM), and are ideally suited to both analyte detection and process optimisation. This ability to tailor the chip design and its integrated features as a direct result of the reaction being assessed, at such a low time and cost penalty greatly increases the user's ability to optimise both their device and reaction. As a result of the information gained in this investigation, we are able to report the first instance of a 3D-printed LOC device with fully integrated, in-line monitoring capabilities via the use of embedded optical fibres capable of performing UV-vis spectroscopy directly inside micro channels. PMID:27452498

  2. 3-D MAPPING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Marzolf, A.; Folsom, M.

    2010-08-31

    This research investigated four techniques that could be applicable for mapping of solids remaining in radioactive waste tanks at the Savannah River Site: stereo vision, LIDAR, flash LIDAR, and Structure from Motion (SfM). Stereo vision is the least appropriate technique for the solids mapping application. Although the equipment cost is low and repackaging would be fairly simple, the algorithms to create a 3D image from stereo vision would require significant further development and may not even be applicable since stereo vision works by finding disparity in feature point locations from the images taken by the cameras. When minimal variation in visual texture exists for an area of interest, it becomes difficult for the software to detect correspondences for that object. SfM appears to be appropriate for solids mapping in waste tanks. However, equipment development would be required for positioning and movement of the camera in the tank space to enable capturing a sequence of images of the scene. Since SfM requires the identification of distinctive features and associates those features to their corresponding instantiations in the other image frames, mockup testing would be required to determine the applicability of SfM technology for mapping of waste in tanks. There may be too few features to track between image frame sequences to employ the SfM technology since uniform appearance may exist when viewing the remaining solids in the interior of the waste tanks. Although scanning LIDAR appears to be an adequate solution, the expense of the equipment ($80,000-$120,000) and the need for further development to allow tank deployment may prohibit utilizing this technology. The development would include repackaging of equipment to permit deployment through the 4-inch access ports and to keep the equipment relatively uncontaminated to allow use in additional tanks. 3D flash LIDAR has a number of advantages over stereo vision, scanning LIDAR, and SfM, including full frame

  3. 3D Printing in Zero-G ISS Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mallory M.; Werkheiser, Mary J.; Cooper, Kenneth G.; Snyder, Michael P.; Edmunson, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a long term strategy to fabricate components and equipment on-demand for manned missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. To support this strategy, NASA and Made in Space, Inc. are developing the 3D Printing In Zero-G payload as a Technology Demonstration for the International Space Station. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment will be the first machine to perform 3D printing in space. The greater the distance from Earth and the longer the mission duration, the more difficult resupply becomes; this requires a change from the current spares, maintenance, repair, and hardware design model that has been used on the International Space Station up until now. Given the extension of the ISS Program, which will inevitably result in replacement parts being required, the ISS is an ideal platform to begin changing the current model for resupply and repair to one that is more suitable for all exploration missions. 3D Printing, more formally known as Additive Manufacturing, is the method of building parts/ objects/tools layer-by-layer. The 3D Print experiment will use extrusion-based additive manufacturing, which involves building an object out of plastic deposited by a wire-feed via an extruder head. Parts can be printed from data files loaded on the device at launch, as well as additional files uplinked to the device while on-orbit. The plastic extrusion additive manufacturing process is a low-energy, low-mass solution to many common needs on board the ISS. The 3D Print payload will serve as the ideal first step to proving that process in space. It is unreasonable to expect NASA to launch large blocks of material from which parts or tools can be traditionally machined, and even more unreasonable to fly up specialized manufacturing hardware to perform the entire range of function traditionally machining requires. The technology to produce parts on demand, in space, offers unique design options that are not possible

  4. Initiator-integrated 3D printing enables the formation of complex metallic architectures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Guo, Qiuquan; Cai, Xiaobing; Zhou, Shaolin; Kobe, Brad; Yang, Jun

    2014-02-26

    Three-dimensional printing was used to fabricate various metallic structures by directly integrating a Br-containing vinyl-terminated initiator into the 3D resin followed by surface-initiated atomic-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and subsequent electroless plating. Cu- and Ni-coated complex structures, such as microlattices, hollow balls, and even Eiffel towers, were prepared. Moreover, the method is also capable of fabricating ultralight cellular metals with desired structures by simply etching the polymer template away. By combining the merits of 3D printing in structure design with those of ATRP in surface modification and polymer-assisted ELP of metals, this universal, robust, and cost-effective approach has largely extended the capability of 3D printing and will make 3D printing technology more practical in areas of electronics, acoustic absorption, thermal insulation, catalyst supports, and others. PMID:24328276

  5. Double depth-enhanced 3D integral imaging in projection-type system without diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Jiao, Xiao-xue; Sun, Yu; Xie, Yan; Liu, Shao-peng

    2015-05-01

    Integral imaging is a three dimensional (3D) display technology without any additional equipment. A new system is proposed in this paper which consists of the elemental images of real images in real mode (RIRM) and the ones of virtual images in real mode (VIRM). The real images in real mode are the same as the conventional integral images. The virtual images in real mode are obtained by changing the coordinates of the corresponding points in elemental images which can be reconstructed by the lens array in virtual space. In order to reduce the spot size of the reconstructed images, the diffuser in conventional integral imaging is given up in the proposed method. Then the spot size is nearly 1/20 of that in the conventional system. And an optical integral imaging system is constructed to confirm that our proposed method opens a new way for the application of the passive 3D display technology.

  6. Pipe3D, a pipeline to analyze Integral Field Spectroscopy Data: I. New fitting philosophy of FIT3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; González, J. J.; Rosález-Ortega, F. F.; Cano-Dí az, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Mollá, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Ascasibar, Y.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present an improved version of FIT3D, a fitting tool for the analysis of the spectroscopic properties of the stellar populations and the ionized gas derived from moderate resolution spectra of galaxies. This tool was developed to analyze integral field spectroscopy data and it is the basis of Pipe3D, a pipeline used in the analysis of CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI data. We describe the philosophy and each step of the fitting procedure. We present an extensive set of simulations in order to estimate the precision and accuracy of the derived parameters for the stellar populations and the ionized gas. We report on the results of those simulations. Finally, we compare the results of the analysis using FIT3D with those provided by other widely used packages, and we find that the parameters derived by FIT3D are fully compatible with those derived using these other tools.

  7. 3D plasmonic nanoantennas integrated with MEA biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipalo, Michele; Messina, Gabriele C.; Amin, Hayder; La Rocca, Rosanna; Shalabaeva, Victoria; Simi, Alessandro; Maccione, Alessandro; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Berdondini, Luca; de Angelis, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal signaling in brain circuits occurs at multiple scales ranging from molecules and cells to large neuronal assemblies. However, current sensing neurotechnologies are not designed for parallel access of signals at multiple scales. With the aim of combining nanoscale molecular sensing with electrical neural activity recordings within large neuronal assemblies, in this work three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanoantennas are integrated with multielectrode arrays (MEA). Nanoantennas are fabricated by fast ion beam milling on optical resist; gold is deposited on the nanoantennas in order to connect them electrically to the MEA microelectrodes and to obtain plasmonic behavior. The optical properties of these 3D nanostructures are studied through finite elements method (FEM) simulations that show a high electromagnetic field enhancement. This plasmonic enhancement is confirmed by surface enhancement Raman spectroscopy of a dye performed in liquid, which presents an enhancement of almost 100 times the incident field amplitude at resonant excitation. Finally, the reported MEA devices are tested on cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Neurons develop by extending branches on the nanostructured electrodes and extracellular action potentials are recorded over multiple days in vitro. Raman spectra of living neurons cultured on the nanoantennas are also acquired. These results highlight that these nanostructures could be potential candidates for combining electrophysiological measures of large networks with simultaneous spectroscopic investigations at the molecular level.Neuronal signaling in brain circuits occurs at multiple scales ranging from molecules and cells to large neuronal assemblies. However, current sensing neurotechnologies are not designed for parallel access of signals at multiple scales. With the aim of combining nanoscale molecular sensing with electrical neural activity recordings within large neuronal assemblies, in this work three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic

  8. Digital 3D Borobudur - Integration of 3D surveying and modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwardhi, D.; Menna, F.; Remondino, F.; Hanke, K.; Akmalia, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Borobudur temple (Indonesia) is one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world, now listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site. The present state of the temple is the result of restorations after being exposed to natural disasters several times. Today there is still a growing rate of deterioration of the building stones whose causes need further researches. Monitoring programs, supported at institutional level, have been effectively executed to observe the problem. The paper presents the latest efforts to digitally document the Borobudur Temple and its surrounding area in 3D with photogrammetric techniques. UAV and terrestrial images were acquired to completely digitize the temple, produce DEM, orthoimages and maps at 1:100 and 1:1000 scale. The results of the project are now employed by the local government organizations to manage the heritage area and plan new policies for the conservation and preservation of the UNESCO site. In order to help data management and policy makers, a web-based information system of the heritage area was also built to visualize and easily access all the data and achieved 3D results.

  9. Inertial Motion-Tracking Technology for Virtual 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In the 1990s, NASA pioneered virtual reality research. The concept was present long before, but, prior to this, the technology did not exist to make a viable virtual reality system. Scientists had theories and ideas they knew that the concept had potential, but the computers of the 1970s and 1980s were not fast enough, sensors were heavy and cumbersome, and people had difficulty blending fluidly with the machines. Scientists at Ames Research Center built upon the research of previous decades and put the necessary technology behind them, making the theories of virtual reality a reality. Virtual reality systems depend on complex motion-tracking sensors to convey information between the user and the computer to give the user the feeling that he is operating in the real world. These motion-tracking sensors measure and report an object s position and orientation as it changes. A simple example of motion tracking would be the cursor on a computer screen moving in correspondence to the shifting of the mouse. Tracking in 3-D, necessary to create virtual reality, however, is much more complex. To be successful, the perspective of the virtual image seen on the computer must be an accurate representation of what is seen in the real world. As the user s head or camera moves, turns, or tilts, the computer-generated environment must change accordingly with no noticeable lag, jitter, or distortion. Historically, the lack of smooth and rapid tracking of the user s motion has thwarted the widespread use of immersive 3-D computer graphics. NASA uses virtual reality technology for a variety of purposes, mostly training of astronauts. The actual missions are costly and dangerous, so any opportunity the crews have to practice their maneuvering in accurate situations before the mission is valuable and instructive. For that purpose, NASA has funded a great deal of virtual reality research, and benefited from the results.

  10. Flatbed-type 3D display systems using integral imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Yuzo; Nagatani, Hiroyuki; Saishu, Tatsuo; Fukushima, Rieko; Taira, Kazuki

    2006-10-01

    We have developed prototypes of flatbed-type autostereoscopic display systems using one-dimensional integral imaging method. The integral imaging system reproduces light beams similar of those produced by a real object. Our display architecture is suitable for flatbed configurations because it has a large margin for viewing distance and angle and has continuous motion parallax. We have applied our technology to 15.4-inch displays. We realized horizontal resolution of 480 with 12 parallaxes due to adoption of mosaic pixel arrangement of the display panel. It allows viewers to see high quality autostereoscopic images. Viewing the display from angle allows the viewer to experience 3-D images that stand out several centimeters from the surface of the display. Mixed reality of virtual 3-D objects and real objects are also realized on a flatbed display. In seeking reproduction of natural 3-D images on the flatbed display, we developed proprietary software. The fast playback of the CG movie contents and real-time interaction are realized with the aid of a graphics card. Realization of the safety 3-D images to the human beings is very important. Therefore, we have measured the effects on the visual function and evaluated the biological effects. For example, the accommodation and convergence were measured at the same time. The various biological effects are also measured before and after the task of watching 3-D images. We have found that our displays show better results than those to a conventional stereoscopic display. The new technology opens up new areas of application for 3-D displays, including arcade games, e-learning, simulations of buildings and landscapes, and even 3-D menus in restaurants.

  11. Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis by 3D Integrated Micro-solution Plasma in a 3D Printed Artificial Porous Dielectric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotoda, Naoya; Tanaka, Kenji; Shirafuji, Tatsuru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma in contact with HAuCl4 aqueous solution can promote the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. To scale up this process, we have developed 3D integrated micro-solution plasma (3D IMSP). It can generate a large number of argon microplasmas in contact with the aqueous solution flowing in a porous dielectric material. The porous dielectric material in our prototype 3D IMSP reactor, however, consists of non-regularly arranged random-sized pores. These pore parameters may be the parameters for controlling the size and dispersion of synthesized gold nanoparticles. We have hence fabricated a 3D IMSP reactor with an artificial porous dielectric material that has regularly arranged same-sized pores by using a 3D printer. We have applied the reactor to the gold- nanoparticle synthesis. We have confirmed the synthesis of gold nanoparticles through the observation of a plasmon resonance absorption peak at 550 nm in the HAuCl4 aqueous solution treated with 3D IMSP. The size and distribution of the synthesized gold nanoparticles are under investigation. We expect that these characteristics of the gold nanoparticles can be manipulated by changing pore size and their distribution in the porous dielectric material.

  12. Novel interactive virtual showcase based on 3D multitouch technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Yue; Lu, You; Wang, Yongtian

    2009-11-01

    A new interactive virtual showcase is proposed in this paper. With the help of virtual reality technology, the user of the proposed system can watch the virtual objects floating in the air from all four sides and interact with the virtual objects by touching the four surfaces of the virtual showcase. Unlike traditional multitouch system, this system cannot only realize multi-touch on a plane to implement 2D translation, 2D scaling, and 2D rotation of the objects; it can also realize the 3D interaction of the virtual objects by recognizing and analyzing the multi-touch that can be simultaneously captured from the four planes. Experimental results show the potential of the proposed system to be applied in the exhibition of historical relics and other precious goods.

  13. 3D Technology Selection for a Virtual Learning Environment by Blending ISO 9126 Standard and AHP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Aydin; Guler, Inan

    2011-01-01

    Web3D presents many opportunities for learners in a virtual world or virtual environment over the web. This is a great opportunity for open-distance education institutions to benefit from web3d technologies to create courses with interactive 3d materials. There are many open source and commercial products offering 3d technologies over the web…

  14. 3D scanning and 3D printing as innovative technologies for fabricating personalized topical drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Det-Amornrat, Usanee; Wang, Jie; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2016-07-28

    Acne is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease with high prevalence. In this work, the potential of 3D printing to produce flexible personalised-shape anti-acne drug (salicylic acid) loaded devices was demonstrated by two different 3D printing (3DP) technologies: Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA). 3D scanning technology was used to obtain a 3D model of a nose adapted to the morphology of an individual. In FDM 3DP, commercially produced Flex EcoPLA™ (FPLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) filaments were loaded with salicylic acid by hot melt extrusion (HME) (theoretical drug loading - 2% w/w) and used as feedstock material for 3D printing. Drug loading in the FPLA-salicylic acid and PCL-salicylic acid 3D printed patches was 0.4% w/w and 1.2% w/w respectively, indicating significant thermal degradation of drug during HME and 3D printing. Diffusion testing in Franz cells using a synthetic membrane revealed that the drug loaded printed samples released <187μg/cm(2) within 3h. FPLA-salicylic acid filament was successfully printed as a nose-shape mask by FDM 3DP, but the PCL-salicylic acid filament was not. In the SLA printing process, the drug was dissolved in different mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) that were solidified by the action of a laser beam. SLA printing led to 3D printed devices (nose-shape) with higher resolution and higher drug loading (1.9% w/w) than FDM, with no drug degradation. The results of drug diffusion tests revealed that drug diffusion was faster than with the FDM devices, 229 and 291μg/cm(2) within 3h for the two formulations evaluated. In this study, SLA printing was the more appropriate 3D printing technology to manufacture anti-acne devices with salicylic acid. The combination of 3D scanning and 3D printing has the potential to offer solutions to produce personalised drug loaded devices, adapted in shape and size to individual patients. PMID:27189134

  15. Recent development of 3D display technology for new market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Sik

    2003-11-01

    A multi-view 3D video processor was designed and implemented with several FPGAs for real-time applications and a projection-type 3D display was introduced for low-cost commercialization. One high resolution projection panel and only one projection lens is capable of displaying multiview autostereoscopic images. It can cope with various arrangements of 3D camera systems (or pixel arrays) and resolutions of 3D displays. This system shows high 3-D image quality in terms of resolution, brightness, and contrast so it is well suited for the commercialization in the field of game and advertisement market.

  16. Integrating 3D Visualization and GIS in Planning Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Li

    2010-01-01

    Most GIS-related planning practices and education are currently limited to two-dimensional mapping and analysis although 3D GIS is a powerful tool to study the complex urban environment in its full spatial extent. This paper reviews current GIS and 3D visualization uses and development in planning practice and education. Current literature…

  17. Recognition technology research based on 3D fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qianxiao; Huang, Shujun; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-11-01

    Fingerprint has been widely studied and applied to personal recognition in both forensics and civilian. However, the current widespread used fingerprint is identified by 2D (two-dimensional) fingerprint image and the mapping from 3D (three-dimensional) to 2D loses 1D information, which leads to low accurate and even wrong recognition. This paper presents a 3D fingerprint recognition method based on the fringe projection technique. A series of fringe patterns generated by software are projected onto a finger surface through a projecting system. From another viewpoint, the fringe patterns are deformed by the finger surface and captured by a CCD camera. The deformed fringe pattern images give the 3D shape data of the finger and the 3D fingerprint features. Through converting the 3D fingerprints to 2D space, traditional 2D fingerprint recognition method can be used to 3D fingerprints recognition. Experimental results on measuring and recognizing some 3D fingerprints show the accuracy and availability of the developed 3D fingerprint system.

  18. 3D body scanning technology for fashion and apparel industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 3D body scanning technologies with applications to the fashion and apparel industry. Complete systems for the digitization of the human body exist since more than fifteen years. One of the main users of this technology with application in the textile field was the military industry. In fact, body scanning technology is being successfully employed since many years in military bases for a fast selection of the correct size of uniforms for the entire staff. Complete solutions were especially developed for this field of application. Many different research projects were issued for the exploitation of the same technology in the commercial field. Experiments were performed and start-up projects are to time running in different parts of the world by installing full body scanning systems in various locations such as shopping malls, boutiques or dedicated scanning centers. Everything is actually ready to be exploited and all the required hardware, software and solutions are available: full body scanning systems, software for the automatic and reliable extraction of body measurements, e-kiosk and web solutions for the presentation of garments, high-end and low-end virtual-try-on systems. However, complete solutions in this area have still not yet found the expected commercial success. Today, with the on-going large cost reduction given by the appearance of new competitors, methods for digitization of the human body becomes more interesting for the fashion and apparel industry. Therefore, a large expansion of these technologies is expected in the near future. To date, different methods are used commercially for the measurement of the human body. These can be divided into three major distinguished groups: laser-scanning, projection of light patterns, combination modeling and image processing. The different solutions have strengths and weaknesses that profile their suitability for specific applications. This paper gives an overview of their

  19. Femtosecond laser 3D nanofabrication in glass: enabling direct write of integrated micro/nanofluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ya; Liao, Yang; Sugioka, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The creation of complex three-dimensional (3D) fluidic systems composed of hollow micro- and nanostructures embedded in transparent substrates has attracted significant attention from both scientific and applied research communities. However, it is by now still a formidable challenge to build 3D micro- and nanofluidic structures with arbitrary configurations using conventional planar lithographic fabrication methods. As a direct and maskless fabrication technique, femtosecond laser micromachining provides a straightforward approach for high-precision spatial-selective modification inside transparent materials through nonlinear optical absorption. Here, we demonstrate rapid fabrication of high-aspect-ratio micro- and/or nanofluidic structures with various 3D configurations in glass substrates by femtosecond laser direct writing. Based on this approach, we demonstrate several functional micro- and nanofluidic devices including a 3D passive microfluidic mixer, a capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis chip, and an integrated micro-nanofluidic system for single DNA analysis. This technology offers new opportunities to develop novel 3D micro-nanofluidic systems for a variety of lab-on-a-chip applications.

  20. 3D cutting tool inspection system and its key technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X. M.; Chen, T.; Zou, X. J.; Harding, K. G.

    2009-08-01

    Cutting tools are an essential component used in manufacturing parts for different products. Many cutting tools are manufactured with complex geometric shapes and sharp and/or curved edges. As such, maintaining quality control of cutting tools during their fabrication may be essential to controlling the quality of components manufactured using the cutting tools. In this paper, a 3D cutting tool inspection system, is presented. The architecture of the system, the cutter inspection workflow and some key technologies are discussed. The relative key technologies include two aspects. The first aspect is the system extrinsic self-calibration method for ensuring the system accuracy. This paper will elaborate on how to calibrate the orientation and location of the rotary stage in the coordination system, including the relative relationship between the axis of the chuck used to hold the tool and the rotary axis used to position the tool, along with the relative relationship between Z stage and rotary axis. Further, this paper will analyze self-calibration solutions for separately correcting the error of the squareness and optical measuring beam and the error of the alignment between a side scan and a tip scan. The second aspect this paper will address is a method of scan planning for automatic and effective data collection. Tool measurement planning plays a big role in saving tool measurement time, improving data accuracy, as well as ensuring data completeness. Ths paper will present a round-part oriented measurement method that includes coarse/fine section scans that aim at getting 2D section geometry in a progressive manner, covering the key sharp/curved edge areas, and the side helical scan combined with the tip round scan for shape-simulated full geometry capture. Finally, this paper will present experimental results and some field tests data.

  1. Integration of 3D photogrammetric outcrop models in the reservoir modelling workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Remy; Joseph, Philippe; Lerat, Olivier; Schmitz, Julien; Doligez, Brigitte; Jardin, Anne

    2014-05-01

    3D technologies are now widely used in geosciences to reconstruct outcrops in 3D. The technology used for the 3D reconstruction is usually based on Lidar, which provides very precise models. Such datasets offer the possibility to build well-constrained outcrop analogue models for reservoir study purposes. The photogrammetry is an alternate methodology which principles are based in determining the geometric properties of an object from photographic pictures taken from different angles. Outcrop data acquisition is easy, and this methodology allows constructing 3D outcrop models with many advantages such as: - light and fast acquisition, - moderate processing time (depending on the size of the area of interest), - integration of field data and 3D outcrops into the reservoir modelling tools. Whatever the method, the advantages of digital outcrop model are numerous as already highlighted by Hodgetts (2013), McCaffrey et al. (2005) and Pringle et al. (2006): collection of data from otherwise inaccessible areas, access to different angles of view, increase of the possible measurements, attributes analysis, fast rate of data collection, and of course training and communication. This paper proposes a workflow where 3D geocellular models are built by integrating all sources of information from outcrops (surface picking, sedimentological sections, structural and sedimentary dips…). The 3D geomodels that are reconstructed can be used at the reservoir scale, in order to compare the outcrop information with subsurface models: the detailed facies models of the outcrops are transferred into petrophysical and acoustic models, which are used to test different scenarios of seismic and fluid flow modelling. The detailed 3D models are also used to test new techniques of static reservoir modelling, based either on geostatistical approaches or on deterministic (process-based) simulation techniques. A modelling workflow has been designed to model reservoir geometries and properties from

  2. Generation of Multi-Scale Vascular Network System within 3D Hydrogel using 3D Bio-Printing Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian K; Lanzi, Alison M; Haygan, Ngo; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A; Dai, Guohao

    2014-09-01

    Although 3D bio-printing technology has great potential in creating complex tissues with multiple cell types and matrices, maintaining the viability of thick tissue construct for tissue growth and maturation after the printing is challenging due to lack of vascular perfusion. Perfused capillary network can be a solution for this issue; however, construction of a complete capillary network at single cell level using the existing technology is nearly impossible due to limitations in time and spatial resolution of the dispensing technology. To address the vascularization issue, we developed a 3D printing method to construct larger (lumen size of ~1mm) fluidic vascular channels and to create adjacent capillary network through a natural maturation process, thus providing a feasible solution to connect the capillary network to the large perfused vascular channels. In our model, microvascular bed was formed in between two large fluidic vessels, and then connected to the vessels by angiogenic sprouting from the large channel edge. Our bio-printing technology has a great potential in engineering vascularized thick tissues and vascular niches, as the vascular channels are simultaneously created while cells and matrices are printed around the channels in desired 3D patterns. PMID:25484989

  3. Generation of Multi-Scale Vascular Network System within 3D Hydrogel using 3D Bio-Printing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vivian K.; Lanzi, Alison M.; Haygan, Ngo; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A.; Dai, Guohao

    2014-01-01

    Although 3D bio-printing technology has great potential in creating complex tissues with multiple cell types and matrices, maintaining the viability of thick tissue construct for tissue growth and maturation after the printing is challenging due to lack of vascular perfusion. Perfused capillary network can be a solution for this issue; however, construction of a complete capillary network at single cell level using the existing technology is nearly impossible due to limitations in time and spatial resolution of the dispensing technology. To address the vascularization issue, we developed a 3D printing method to construct larger (lumen size of ~1mm) fluidic vascular channels and to create adjacent capillary network through a natural maturation process, thus providing a feasible solution to connect the capillary network to the large perfused vascular channels. In our model, microvascular bed was formed in between two large fluidic vessels, and then connected to the vessels by angiogenic sprouting from the large channel edge. Our bio-printing technology has a great potential in engineering vascularized thick tissues and vascular niches, as the vascular channels are simultaneously created while cells and matrices are printed around the channels in desired 3D patterns. PMID:25484989

  4. Integration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound for enhanced neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Keith D.; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.

    2012-03-01

    True three-dimensional (3D) volumetric ultrasound (US) acquisitions stand to benefit intraoperative neuronavigation on multiple fronts. While traditional two-dimensional (2D) US and its tracked, hand-swept version have been recognized for many years to advantage significantly image-guided neurosurgery, especially when coregistered with preoperative MR scans, its unregulated and incomplete sampling of the surgical volume of interest have limited certain intraoperative uses of the information that are overcome through direct volume acquisition (i.e., through 2D scan-head transducer arrays). In this paper, we illustrate several of these advantages, including image-based intraoperative registration (and reregistration) and automated, volumetric displacement mapping for intraoperative image updating. These applications of 3D US are enabled by algorithmic advances in US image calibration, and volume rasterization and interpolation for multi-acquisition synthesis that will also be highlighted. We expect to demonstrate that coregistered 3D US is well worth incorporating into the standard neurosurgical navigational environment relative to traditional tracked, hand-swept 2D US.

  5. 3D hydrodynamic focusing microfluidics for emerging sensing technologies.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Michael A; Boyd, Darryl A; Mott, David R; Ligler, Frances S

    2015-05-15

    While the physics behind laminar flows has been studied for 200 years, understanding of how to use parallel flows to augment the capabilities of microfluidic systems has been a subject of study primarily over the last decade. The use of one flow to focus another within a microfluidic channel has graduated from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional process and the design principles are only now becoming established. This review explores the underlying principles for hydrodynamic focusing in three dimensions (3D) using miscible fluids and the application of these principles for creation of biosensors, separation of cells and particles for sample manipulation, and fabrication of materials that could be used for biosensors. Where sufficient information is available, the practicality of devices implementing fluid flows directed in 3D is evaluated and the advantages and limitations of 3D hydrodynamic focusing for the particular application are highlighted. PMID:25041926

  6. Improvements of 3-D image quality in integral display by reducing distortion errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakita, Masahiro; Sasaki, Hisayuki; Arai, Jun; Okano, Fumio; Suehiro, Koya; Haino, Yasuyuki; Yoshimura, Makoto; Sato, Masahito

    2008-02-01

    An integral three-dimensional (3-D) system based on the principle of integral photography can display natural 3-D images. We studied ways of improving the resolution and viewing angle of 3-D images by using extremely highresolution (EHR) video in an integral 3-D video system. One of the problems with the EHR projection-type integral 3-D system is that positional errors appear between the elemental image and the elemental lens when there is geometric distortion in the projected image. We analyzed the relationships between the geometric distortion in the elemental images caused by the projection lens and the spatial distortion of the reconstructed 3-D image. As a result, we clarified that 3-D images reconstructed far from the lens array were greatly affected by the distortion of the elemental images, and that the 3-D images were significantly distorted in the depth direction at the corners of the displayed images. Moreover, we developed a video signal processor that electrically compensated the distortion in the elemental images for an EHR projection-type integral 3-D system. Therefore, the distortion in the displayed 3-D image was removed, and the viewing angle of the 3-D image was expanded to nearly double that obtained with the previous prototype system.

  7. Five levels of PACS modularity: integrating 3D and other advanced visualization tools.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kenneth C; Filice, Ross W; Philbin, James F; Siegel, Eliot L; Nagy, Paul G

    2011-12-01

    The current array of PACS products and 3D visualization tools presents a wide range of options for applying advanced visualization methods in clinical radiology. The emergence of server-based rendering techniques creates new opportunities for raising the level of clinical image review. However, best-of-breed implementations of core PACS technology, volumetric image navigation, and application-specific 3D packages will, in general, be supplied by different vendors. Integration issues should be carefully considered before deploying such systems. This work presents a classification scheme describing five tiers of PACS modularity and integration with advanced visualization tools, with the goals of characterizing current options for such integration, providing an approach for evaluating such systems, and discussing possible future architectures. These five levels of increasing PACS modularity begin with what was until recently the dominant model for integrating advanced visualization into the clinical radiologist's workflow, consisting of a dedicated stand-alone post-processing workstation in the reading room. Introduction of context-sharing, thin clients using server-based rendering, archive integration, and user-level application hosting at successive levels of the hierarchy lead to a modularized imaging architecture, which promotes user interface integration, resource efficiency, system performance, supportability, and flexibility. These technical factors and system metrics are discussed in the context of the proposed five-level classification scheme. PMID:21301923

  8. Coarse integral holography approach for real 3D color video displays.

    PubMed

    Chen, J S; Smithwick, Q Y J; Chu, D P

    2016-03-21

    A colour holographic display is considered the ultimate apparatus to provide the most natural 3D viewing experience. It encodes a 3D scene as holographic patterns that then are used to reproduce the optical wavefront. The main challenge at present is for the existing technologies to cope with the full information bandwidth required for the computation and display of holographic video. We have developed a dynamic coarse integral holography approach using opto-mechanical scanning, coarse integral optics and a low space-bandwidth-product high-bandwidth spatial light modulator to display dynamic holograms with a large space-bandwidth-product at video rates, combined with an efficient rendering algorithm to reduce the information content. This makes it possible to realise a full-parallax, colour holographic video display with a bandwidth of 10 billion pixels per second, and an adequate image size and viewing angle, as well as all relevant 3D cues. Our approach is scalable and the prototype can achieve even better performance with continuing advances in hardware components. PMID:27136858

  9. A 3D Model of the Thermoelectric Microwave Power Sensor by MEMS Technology.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhenxiang; Liao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel 3D model is proposed to describe the temperature distribution of the thermoelectric microwave power sensor. In this 3D model, the heat flux density decreases from the upper surface to the lower surface of the GaAs substrate while it was supposed to be a constant in the 2D model. The power sensor is fabricated by a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) process and micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology. The microwave performance experiment shows that the S11 is less than -26 dB over the frequency band of 1-10 GHz. The power response experiment demonstrates that the output voltage increases from 0 mV to 27 mV, while the incident power varies from 1 mW to 100 mW. The measured sensitivity is about 0.27 mV/mW, and the calculated result from the 3D model is 0.28 mV/mW. The relative error has been reduced from 7.5% of the 2D model to 3.7% of the 3D model. PMID:27338395

  10. A 3D Model of the Thermoelectric Microwave Power Sensor by MEMS Technology

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhenxiang; Liao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel 3D model is proposed to describe the temperature distribution of the thermoelectric microwave power sensor. In this 3D model, the heat flux density decreases from the upper surface to the lower surface of the GaAs substrate while it was supposed to be a constant in the 2D model. The power sensor is fabricated by a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) process and micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology. The microwave performance experiment shows that the S11 is less than −26 dB over the frequency band of 1–10 GHz. The power response experiment demonstrates that the output voltage increases from 0 mV to 27 mV, while the incident power varies from 1 mW to 100 mW. The measured sensitivity is about 0.27 mV/mW, and the calculated result from the 3D model is 0.28 mV/mW. The relative error has been reduced from 7.5% of the 2D model to 3.7% of the 3D model. PMID:27338395

  11. Multi Sensor Data Integration for AN Accurate 3d Model Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhatkuli, S.; Satoh, T.; Tachibana, K.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a novel technique of data integration between two different data sets, i.e. laser scanned RGB point cloud and oblique imageries derived 3D model, to create a 3D model with more details and better accuracy. In general, aerial imageries are used to create a 3D city model. Aerial imageries produce an overall decent 3D city models and generally suit to generate 3D model of building roof and some non-complex terrain. However, the automatically generated 3D model, from aerial imageries, generally suffers from the lack of accuracy in deriving the 3D model of road under the bridges, details under tree canopy, isolated trees, etc. Moreover, the automatically generated 3D model from aerial imageries also suffers from undulated road surfaces, non-conforming building shapes, loss of minute details like street furniture, etc. in many cases. On the other hand, laser scanned data and images taken from mobile vehicle platform can produce more detailed 3D road model, street furniture model, 3D model of details under bridge, etc. However, laser scanned data and images from mobile vehicle are not suitable to acquire detailed 3D model of tall buildings, roof tops, and so forth. Our proposed approach to integrate multi sensor data compensated each other's weakness and helped to create a very detailed 3D model with better accuracy. Moreover, the additional details like isolated trees, street furniture, etc. which were missing in the original 3D model derived from aerial imageries could also be integrated in the final model automatically. During the process, the noise in the laser scanned data for example people, vehicles etc. on the road were also automatically removed. Hence, even though the two dataset were acquired in different time period the integrated data set or the final 3D model was generally noise free and without unnecessary details.

  12. Integration of a 3D perspective view in the navigation display: featuring pilot's mental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrecht, L.; Schmerwitz, S.

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic vision systems (SVS) appear as spreading technology in the avionic domain. Several studies prove enhanced situational awareness when using synthetic vision. Since the introduction of synthetic vision a steady change and evolution started concerning the primary flight display (PFD) and the navigation display (ND). The main improvements of the ND comprise the representation of colored ground proximity warning systems (EGPWS), weather radar, and TCAS information. Synthetic vision seems to offer high potential to further enhance cockpit display systems. Especially, concerning the current trend having a 3D perspective view in a SVS-PFD while leaving the navigational content as well as methods of interaction unchanged the question arouses if and how the gap between both displays might evolve to a serious problem. This issue becomes important in relation to the transition and combination of strategic and tactical flight guidance. Hence, pros and cons of 2D and 3D views generally as well as the gap between the egocentric perspective 3D view of the PFD and the exocentric 2D top and side view of the ND will be discussed. Further a concept for the integration of a 3D perspective view, i.e., bird's eye view, in synthetic vision ND will be presented. The combination of 2D and 3D views in the ND enables a better correlation of the ND and the PFD. Additionally, this supports the building of pilot's mental model. The authors believe it will improve the situational and spatial awareness. It might prove to further raise the safety margin when operating in mountainous areas.

  13. 3D probe array integrated with a front-end 100-channel neural recording ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ming-Yuan; Yao, Lei; Tan, Kwan Ling; Lim, Ruiqi; Li, Peng; Chen, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Brain-machine interface technology can improve the lives of spinal cord injury victims and amputees. A neural interface system, consisting of a 3D probe array and a custom low-power (1 mW) 100-channel (100-ch) neural recording application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), was designed and implemented to monitor neural activity. In this study, a microassembly 3D probe array method using a novel lead transfer technique was proposed to overcome the bonding plane mismatch encountered during orthogonal assembly. The proposed lead transfer technique can be completed using standard micromachining and packaging processes. The ASIC can be stacking-integrated with the probe array, minimizing the form factor of the assembled module. To minimize trauma to brain cells, the profile of the integrated probe array was controlled within 730 μm. The average impedance of the assembled probe was approximately 0.55 MΩ at 1 kHz. To verify the functionality of the integrated neural probe array, bench-top signal acquisitions were performed and discussed.

  14. Improvement of integral 3D image quality by compensating for lens position errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okui, Makoto; Arai, Jun; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okano, Fumio

    2004-05-01

    Integral photography (IP) or integral imaging is a way to create natural-looking three-dimensional (3-D) images with full parallax. Integral three-dimensional television (integral 3-D TV) uses a method that electronically presents 3-D images in real time based on this IP method. The key component is a lens array comprising many micro-lenses for shooting and displaying. We have developed a prototype device with about 18,000 lenses using a super-high-definition camera with 2,000 scanning lines. Positional errors of these high-precision lenses as well as the camera's lenses will cause distortions in the elemental image, which directly affect the quality of the 3-D image and the viewing area. We have devised a way to compensate for such geometrical position errors and used it for the integral 3-D TV prototype, resulting in an improvement in both viewing zone and picture quality.

  15. 3D modeling of a dolerite intrusion from the photogrammetric and geophysical data integration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, João; Machadinho, Ana; Figueiredo, Fernando; Mira, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this study is create a methodology based on the integration of data obtained from various available technologies, which allow a credible and complete evaluation of rock masses. In this particular case of a dolerite intrusion, which deployed an exploration of aggregates and belongs to the Jobasaltos - Extracção e Britagem. S.A.. Dolerite intrusion is situated in the volcanic complex of Serra de Todo-o-Mundo, Casais Gaiola, intruded in Jurassic sandstones. The integration of the surface and subsurface mapping, obtained by technology UAVs (Drone) and geophysical surveys (Electromagnetic Method - TEM 48 FAST), allows the construction of 2D and 3D models of the study local. The combination of the 3D point clouds produced from two distinct processes, modeling of photogrammetric and geophysical data, will be the basis for the construction of a single model of set. The rock masses in an integral perspective being visible their development above the surface and subsurface. The presentation of 2D and 3D models will give a perspective of structures, fracturation, lithology and their spatial correlations contributing to a better local knowledge, as well as its potential for the intended purpose. From these local models it will be possible to characterize and quantify the geological structures. These models will have its importance as a tool to assist in the analysis and drafting of regional models. The qualitative improvement in geological/structural modeling, seeks to reduce the value of characterization/cost ratio, in phase of prospecting, improving the investment/benefit ratio. This methodology helps to assess more accurately the economic viability of the projects.

  16. P-Cable: New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Acquisition Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, Sverre; Berndt, Christian; Mienert, Jürgen; Bünz, Stefan; Eriksen, Frode N.; Eriksen, Ola K.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new cost-efficient technology for acquisition of high-resolution 3D seismic data: the P-Cable system. This technology is very well suited for deep water exploration, site surveys, and studies of shallow gas and fluid migration associated with gas hydrates or leaking reservoirs. It delivers unparalleled 3D seismic images of subsurface sediment architectures. The P-Cable system consists of a seismic cable towed perpendicular to a vessel's steaming direction. This configuration allows us to image an up to 150 m wide swath of the sub-surface for each sail line. Conventional 3D seismic technology relies on several very long streamers (up to 10 km long streamers are common), large sources, and costly operations. In contrast, the P-Cable system is light-weight and fast to deploy from small vessels. Only a small source is required as the system is made for relatively shallow imaging, typically above the first water-bottom multiple. The P-Cable system is particularly useful for acquisition of small 3D cubes, 10-50 km2, in focus areas, rather than extensive mapping of large regions. The rapid deployment and recovery of the system makes it possible to acquire several small cubes (10 to 30 km2) with high-resolution (50-250 Hz) seismic data in during one cruise. The first development of the P-Cable system was a cooperative project achieved by Volcanic Basin Petroleum Research (VBPR), University of Tromsø, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, and industry partners. Field trials using a 12-streamer system were conducted on sites with active fluid-leakage systems on the Norwegian-Barents-Svalbard margin, the Gulf of Cadiz, and the Mediterranean. The second phase of the development introduced digital streamers. The new P-Cable2 system also includes integrated tow and cross cables for power and data transmission and improved doors to spread the larger cross cable. This digital system has been successfully used during six cruises by the University of Troms

  17. The Integration of 3-D Cell-Printing and Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography of Vascular Constructs within Thick Hydrogel Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lingling; Lee, Vivian K.; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Dai, Guohao; Intes, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Developing methods that provide adequate vascular perfusion is an important step toward engineering large functional tissues. Meanwhile, an imaging modality to assess the three-dimensional (3-D) structures and functions of the vascular channels is lacking for thick matrices (>2~3mm). Herein, we report on an original approach to construct and image 3-D dynamically perfused vascular structures in thick hydrogel scaffolds. In this work, we integrated a robotic 3-D cell-printing technology with a mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography imaging system, and demonstrated the capability of the platform to construct perfused collagen scaffolds with endothelial lining and to image both the fluid flow and fluorescent-labeled living endothelial cells at high-frame rates, with high sensitivity and accuracy. These results establish the potential of integrating both 3-D cell-printing and fluorescence mesoscopic imaging for functional and molecular studies in complex tissue engineered tissues. PMID:22531221

  18. An object-oriented 3D integral data model for digital city and digital mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lixin; Wang, Yanbing; Che, Defu; Xu, Lei; Chen, Xuexi; Jiang, Yun; Shi, Wenzhong

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of urban, city space extended from surface to subsurface. As the important data source for the representation of city spatial information, 3D city spatial data have the characteristics of multi-object, heterogeneity and multi-structure. It could be classified referring to the geo-surface into three kinds: above-surface data, surface data and subsurface data. The current research on 3D city spatial information system is divided naturally into two different branch, 3D City GIS (3D CGIS) and 3D Geological Modeling (3DGM). The former emphasizes on the 3D visualization of buildings and the terrain of city, while the latter emphasizes on the visualization of geological bodies and structures. Although, it is extremely important for city planning and construction to integrate all the city spatial information including above-surface, surface and subsurface objects to conduct integral analysis and spatial manipulation. However, either 3D CGIS or 3DGM is currently difficult to realize the information integration, integral analysis and spatial manipulation. Considering 3D spatial modeling theory and methodologies, an object-oriented 3D integral spatial data model (OO3D-ISDM) is presented and software realized. The model integrates geographical objects, surface buildings and geological objects together seamlessly with TIN being its coupling interface. This paper introduced the conceptual model of OO3D-ISDM, which is comprised of 4 spatial elements, i.e. point, line, face and body, and 4 geometric primitives, i.e. vertex, segment, triangle and generalized tri-prism (GTP). The spatial model represents the geometry of surface buildings and geographical objects with triangles, and geological objects with GTP. Any of the represented objects, no mater surface buildings, terrain or subsurface objects, could be described with the basic geometry element, i.e. triangle. So the 3D spatial objects, surface buildings, terrain and geological objects can be

  19. Earth Science Research Discovery, Integration, 3D Visualization and Analysis using NASA World Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameh, N.; Hogan, P.

    2008-12-01

    more possible to include virtual globe capability in support of any Earth science objective. 3- With the source code being fully accessible, anyone can advance this technology (including in a commercial or other proprietary manner). Such features enable World Wind to provide easy discovery, access and 3D integration/visualization/analysis of Earth observation data in a flexible, customizable open source tool. This positions World Wind to become a key part of an Advanced Information Systems infrastructure supporting a collaborative decision-making environment for a variety of applications.

  20. On the Implementation of 3D Galerkin Boundary Integral Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain; Gray, Leonard J

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a reverse contribution technique is proposed to accelerate the construction of the dense influence matrices associated with a Galerkin approximation of singular and hypersingular boundary integral equations of mixed-type in potential theory. In addition, a general-purpose sparse preconditioner for boundary element methods has also been developed to successfully deal with ill-conditioned linear systems arising from the discretization of mixed boundary-value problems on non-smooth surfaces. The proposed preconditioner, which originates from the precorrected-FFT method, is sparse, easy to generate and apply in a Krylov subspace iterative solution of discretized boundary integral equations. Moreover, an approximate inverse of the preconditioner is implicitly built by employing an incomplete LU factorization. Numerical experiments involving mixed boundary-value problems for the Laplace equation are included to illustrate the performance and validity of the proposed techniques.

  1. Multiview image integration system for glassless 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahisa; Mashitani, Ken; Higashino, Masahiro; Kanayama, Hideyuki; Murata, Haruhiko; Funazou, Yasuo; Sakamoto, Naohisa; Hazama, Hiroshi; Ebara, Yasuo; Koyamada, Koji

    2005-03-01

    We have developed a multi-view image integration system, which combines seven parallax video images into a single video image so that it fits the parallax barrier. The apertures of this barrier are not stripes but tiny rectangles that are arranged in the shape of stairs. Commodity hardware is used to satisfy a specification which requires that the resolution of each parallax video image is SXGA(1645×800 pixel resolution), the resulting integrated image is QUXGA-W(3840×2400 pixel resolution), and the frame rate is fifteen frames per second. The point is that the system can provide with QUXGA-W video image, which corresponds to 27MB, at 15fps, that is about 2Gbps. Using the integration system and a Liquid Crystal Display with the parallax barrier, we can enjoy an immersive live video image which supports seven viewpoints without special glasses. In addition, since the system can superimpose the CG images of the relevant seven viewpoints into the live video images, it is possible to communicate with remote users by sharing a virtual object.

  2. Distributed network of integrated 3D sensors for transportation security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejmadi, Vic; Garcia, Fred

    2009-05-01

    The US Port Security Agency has strongly emphasized the needs for tighter control at transportation hubs. Distributed arrays of miniature CMOS cameras are providing some solutions today. However, due to the high bandwidth required and the low valued content of such cameras (simple video feed), large computing power and analysis algorithms as well as control software are needed, which makes such an architecture cumbersome, heavy, slow and expensive. We present a novel technique by integrating cheap and mass replicable stealth 3D sensing micro-devices in a distributed network. These micro-sensors are based on conventional structures illumination via successive fringe patterns on the object to be sensed. The communication bandwidth between each sensor remains very small, but is of very high valued content. Key technologies to integrate such a sensor are digital optics and structured laser illumination.

  3. Research on the key technologies of 3D spatial data organization and management for virtual building environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jun; Zhu, Qing

    2006-10-01

    As the special case of VGE in the fields of AEC (architecture, engineering and construction), Virtual Building Environment (VBE) has been broadly concerned. Highly complex, large-scale 3d spatial data is main bottleneck of VBE applications, so 3d spatial data organization and management certainly becomes the core technology for VBE. This paper puts forward 3d spatial data model for VBE, and the performance to implement it is very high. Inherent storage method of CAD data makes data redundant, and doesn't concern efficient visualization, which is a practical bottleneck to integrate CAD model, so An Efficient Method to Integrate CAD Model Data is put forward. Moreover, Since the 3d spatial indices based on R-tree are usually limited by their weakness of low efficiency due to the severe overlap of sibling nodes and the uneven size of nodes, a new node-choosing algorithm of R-tree are proposed.

  4. Display of travelling 3D scenes from single integral-imaging capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Corral, Manuel; Dorado, Adrian; Hong, Seok-Min; Sola-Pikabea, Jorge; Saavedra, Genaro

    2016-06-01

    Integral imaging (InI) is a 3D auto-stereoscopic technique that captures and displays 3D images. We present a method for easily projecting the information recorded with this technique by transforming the integral image into a plenoptic image, as well as choosing, at will, the field of view (FOV) and the focused plane of the displayed plenoptic image. Furthermore, with this method we can generate a sequence of images that simulates a camera travelling through the scene from a single integral image. The application of this method permits to improve the quality of 3D display images and videos.

  5. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liang (Leon); Herman, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems. PMID:26922872

  6. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang Leon; Herman, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems. PMID:26922872

  7. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang (Leon); Herman, Peter R.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems.

  8. Research and Technology Development for Construction of 3d Video Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikova, Tatyana A.

    2016-06-01

    For the last two decades surface information in the form of conventional digital and analogue topographic maps has been being supplemented by new digital geospatial products, also known as 3D models of real objects. It is shown that currently there are no defined standards for 3D scenes construction technologies that could be used by Russian surveying and cartographic enterprises. The issues regarding source data requirements, their capture and transferring to create 3D scenes have not been defined yet. The accuracy issues for 3D video scenes used for measuring purposes can hardly ever be found in publications. Practicability of development, research and implementation of technology for construction of 3D video scenes is substantiated by 3D video scene capability to expand the field of data analysis application for environmental monitoring, urban planning, and managerial decision problems. The technology for construction of 3D video scenes with regard to the specified metric requirements is offered. Technique and methodological background are recommended for this technology used to construct 3D video scenes based on DTM, which were created by satellite and aerial survey data. The results of accuracy estimation of 3D video scenes are presented.

  9. HSA: integrating multi-track Hi-C data for genome-scale reconstruction of 3D chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chenchen; Zhang, Yuping; Ouyang, Zhengqing

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide 3C technologies (Hi-C) are being increasingly employed to study three-dimensional (3D) genome conformations. Existing computational approaches are unable to integrate accumulating data to facilitate studying 3D chromatin structure and function. We present HSA ( http://ouyanglab.jax.org/hsa/ ), a flexible tool that jointly analyzes multiple contact maps to infer 3D chromatin structure at the genome scale. HSA globally searches the latent structure underlying different cleavage footprints. Its robustness and accuracy outperform or rival existing tools on extensive simulations and orthogonal experiment validations. Applying HSA to recent in situ Hi-C data, we found the 3D chromatin structures are highly conserved across various human cell types. PMID:26936376

  10. Pixel detectors in 3D technologies for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, G.; Demarteau, M.; Hoff, J.; Lipton, R.; Shenai, A.; Yarema, R.; Zimmerman, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports on the current status of the development of International Linear Collider vertex detector pixel readout chips based on multi-tier vertically integrated electronics. Initial testing results of the VIP2a prototype are presented. The chip is the second embodiment of the prototype data-pushed readout concept developed at Fermilab. The device was fabricated in the MIT-LL 0.15 {micro}m fully depleted SOI process. The prototype is a three-tier design, featuring 30 x 30 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 48 x 48 pixels.

  11. Application of 3D GPR attribute technology in archaeological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wen-Ke; Tian, Gang; Wang, Bang-Bing; Shi, Zhan-Jie; Lin, Jin-Xin

    2012-06-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) attribute technology has been applied to many aspects in recent years but there are very few examples in the field of archaeology. Especially how can we extract effective attributes from the two- or three-dimensional radar data so that we can map and describe numerous archaeological targets in a large cultural site? In this paper, we applied GPR attribute technology to investigate the ancient Nanzhao castle-site in Tengchong, Yunnan Province. In order to get better archaeological target (the ancient wall, the ancient kiln site, and the ancient tomb) analysis and description, we collated the GPR data by collected standardization and then put them to the seismic data processing and interpretation workstation. The data was processed, including a variety of GPR attribute extraction, analysis, and optimization and combined with the archaeological drilling data. We choose the RMS Amplitude, Average Peak Amplitude, Instantaneous Phase, and Maximum Peak Time to interpret three archaeological targets. By comparative analysis, we have clarified that we should use different attributes to interpret different archaeological targets and the results of attribute analysis after horizon tracking is much better than the results based on a time slice.

  12. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) for the 3D Visualization of Integrated Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, David; Moreland, John; Baru, Chaitan; Crosby, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Data integration is increasingly important as we strive to combine data from disparate sources and assemble better models of the complex processes operating at the Earth's surface and within its interior. These data are often large, multi-dimensional, and subject to differing conventions for data structures, file formats, coordinate spaces, and units of measure. When visualized, these data require differing, and sometimes conflicting, conventions for visual representations, dimensionality, symbology, and interaction. All of this makes the visualization of integrated Earth science data particularly difficult. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) is an open-source data integration and visualization suite of applications and libraries being developed by the GEON project at the University of California, San Diego, USA. Funded by the NSF, the project is leveraging virtual globe technology from NASA's WorldWind to create interactive 3D visualization tools that combine and layer data from a wide variety of sources to create a holistic view of features at, above, and beneath the Earth's surface. The OEF architecture is open, cross-platform, modular, and based upon Java. The OEF's modular approach to software architecture yields an array of mix-and-match software components for assembling custom applications. Available modules support file format handling, web service communications, data management, user interaction, and 3D visualization. File parsers handle a variety of formal and de facto standard file formats used in the field. Each one imports data into a general-purpose common data model supporting multidimensional regular and irregular grids, topography, feature geometry, and more. Data within these data models may be manipulated, combined, reprojected, and visualized. The OEF's visualization features support a variety of conventional and new visualization techniques for looking at topography, tomography, point clouds, imagery, maps, and feature geometry. 3D data such as

  13. The Impact of Web3D Technologies on Medical Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Nigel W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of medical applications that make use of Web3D technologies, covering the period from 1995 to 2005. We assess the impact that Web3D has made on medical education and training during this time and highlight current and future trends. The applications identified are categorized into: general education tools; tools for…

  14. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Feifei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haiping; Zhang, Fuhua; Zheng, Lulu; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-03-01

    The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES) process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  15. From 3D Bioprinters to a fully integrated Organ Biofabrication Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passamai, V. E.; Dernowsek, J. A.; Nogueira, J.; Lara, V.; Vilalba, F.; Mironov, V. A.; Rezende, R. A.; da Silva, J. V.

    2016-04-01

    About 30 years ago, the 3D printing technique appeared. From that time on, engineers in medical science field started to look at 3D printing as a partner. Firstly, biocompatible and biodegradable 3D structures for cell seeding called “scaffolds” were fabricated for in vitro and in vivo animal trials. The advances proved to be of great importance, but, the use of scaffolds faces some limitations, such as low homogeneity and low density of cell aggregates. In the last decade, 3D bioprinting technology emerged as a promising approach to overcome these limitations and as one potential solution to the challenge of organ fabrication, to obtain very similar 3D human tissues, not only for transplantation, but also for drug discovery, disease research and to decrease the usage of animals in laboratory experimentation. 3D bioprinting allowed the fabrication of 3D alive structures with higher and controllable cell density and homogeneity. Other advantage of biofabrication is that the tissue constructs are solid scaffold-free. This paper presents the 3D bioprinting technology; equipment development, stages and components of a complex Organ Bioprinting Line (OBL) and the importance of developing a Virtual OBL.

  16. Integrated Interventional Devices For Real Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Lee, Warren; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Pua, Eric C.; Light, Edward D.

    2006-05-01

    Two recent advances have expanded the potential of medical ultrasound: the introduction of real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging with catheter, transesophageal and laparoscopic probes and the development of interventional ultrasound therapeutic systems for focused ultrasound surgery, ablation and ultrasound enhanced drug delivery. This work describes devices combining both technologies. A series of transducer probes have been designed, fabricated and tested including: 1) a 12 French side scanning catheter incorporating a 64 element matrix array for imaging at 5MHz and a piston ablation transducer operating at 10 MHz. 2) a 14 Fr forward-scanning catheter integrating a 112 element 2-D array for imaging at 5 MHz encircled by an ablation annulus operating at 10 MHz. Finite element modeling was then used to simulate catheter annular and linear phased array transducers for ablation. 3) Linear phased array transducers were built to confirm the finite element analysis at 4 and 8 MHz including a mechanically focused 86 element 9 MHz array which transmits an ISPTA of 29.3 W/cm2 and creates a lesion in 2 minutes. 4) 2-D arrays of 504 channels operating at 5 MHz have been developed for transesophageal and laparascopic 3D imaging as well as therapeutic heating. All the devices image the heart anatomy including atria, valves, septa and en face views of the pulmonary veins.

  17. Scientific Subsurface data for EPOS - integration of 3D and 4D data services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschke, Dorit; Hammitzsch, Martin; Wächter, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    The provision of efficient and easy access to scientific subsurface data sets obtained from field studies and scientific observatories or by geological 3D/4D-modeling is an important contribution to modern research infrastructures as they can facilitate the integrated analysis and evaluation as well as the exchange of scientific data. Within the project EPOS - European Plate Observing System, access to 3D and 4D data sets will be provided by 'WP15 - Geological information and modeling' and include structural geology models as well as numerical models, e.g., temperature, aquifers, and velocity. This also includes validated raw data, e.g., seismic profiles, from which the models where derived. All these datasets are of high quality and of unique scientific value as the process of modeling is time and cost intensive. However, these models are currently not easily accessible for the wider scientific community, much less to the public. For the provision of these data sets a data management platform based on common and standardized data models, protocols, and encodings as well as on a predominant use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) has been devised. The interoperability for disciplinary and domain applications thus highly depends on the adoption of generally agreed technologies and standards (OGC, ISO…) originating from Spatial Data Infrastructure related efforts (e.g., INSPIRE). However, since not many standards for 3D and 4D geological data exists, this work also includes new approaches for project data management, interfaces for tools used by the researchers, and interfaces for the sharing and reusing of data.

  18. The application of digital medical 3D printing technology on tumor operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jimin; Jiang, Yijian; Li, Yangsheng

    2016-04-01

    Digital medical 3D printing technology is a new hi-tech which combines traditional medical and digital design, computer science, bio technology and 3D print technology. At the present time there are four levels application: The printed 3D model is the first and simple application. The surgery makes use of the model to plan the processing before operation. The second is customized operation tools such as implant guide. It helps doctor to operate with special tools rather than the normal medical tools. The third level application of 3D printing in medical area is to print artificial bones or teeth to implant into human body. The big challenge is the fourth level which is to print organs with 3D printing technology. In this paper we introduced an application of 3D printing technology in tumor operation. We use 3D printing to print guide for invasion operation. Puncture needles were guided by printed guide in face tumors operation. It is concluded that this new type guide is dominantly advantageous.

  19. Integration of Jeddah Historical BIM and 3D GIS for Documentation and Restoration of Historical Monument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, A.; Yaagoubi, R.; Boehm, J.

    2015-08-01

    This work outlines a new approach for the integration of 3D Building Information Modelling and the 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) to provide semantically rich models, and to get the benefits from both systems to help document and analyse cultural heritage sites. Our proposed framework is based on the Jeddah Historical Building Information Modelling process (JHBIM). This JHBIM consists of a Hijazi Architectural Objects Library (HAOL) that supports higher level of details (LoD) while decreasing the time of modelling. The Hijazi Architectural Objects Library has been modelled based on the Islamic historical manuscripts and Hijazi architectural pattern books. Moreover, the HAOL is implemented using BIM software called Autodesk Revit. However, it is known that this BIM environment still has some limitations with the non-standard architectural objects. Hence, we propose to integrate the developed 3D JHBIM with 3D GIS for more advanced analysis. To do so, the JHBIM database is exported and semantically enriched with non-architectural information that is necessary for restoration and preservation of historical monuments. After that, this database is integrated with the 3D Model in the 3D GIS solution. At the end of this paper, we'll illustrate our proposed framework by applying it to a Historical Building called Nasif Historical House in Jeddah. First of all, this building is scanned by the use of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and Close Range Photogrammetry. Then, the 3D JHBIM based on the HOAL is designed on Revit Platform. Finally, this model is integrated to a 3D GIS solution through Autodesk InfraWorks. The shown analysis presented in this research highlights the importance of such integration especially for operational decisions and sharing the historical knowledge about Jeddah Historical City. Furthermore, one of the historical buildings in Old Jeddah, Nasif Historical House, was chosen as a test case for the project.

  20. Integrating airborne LiDAR dataset and photographic images towards the construction of 3D building model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, R.; Latif, Z. A.; Hamid, J. R. A.; Jaafar, J.; Ahmad, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    A 3D building model of man-made objects is an important tool for various applications such as urban planning, flood mapping and telecommunication. The reconstruction of 3D building models remains difficult. No universal algorithms exist that can extract all objects in an image successfully. At present, advances in remote sensing such as airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology have changed the conventional method of topographic mapping and increased the interest of these valued datasets towards 3D building model construction. Airborne LiDAR has proven accordingly that it can provide three dimensional (3D) information of the Earth surface with high accuracy. In this study, with the availability of open source software such as Sketch Up, LiDAR datasets and photographic images could be integrated towards the construction of a 3D building model. In order to realize the work an area comprising residential areas situated at Putrajaya in the Klang Valley region, Malaysia, covering an area of two square kilometer was chosen. The accuracy of the derived 3D building model is assessed quantitatively. It is found that the difference between the vertical height (z) of the 3D building models derived from LiDAR dataset and ground survey is approximately ± 0.09 centimeter (cm). For the horizontal component (RMSExy), the accuracy estimates derived for the 3D building models were ± 0.31m. The result also shows that the qualitative assessment of the 3D building models constructed seems feasible for the depiction in the standard of LOD 3 (Level of details).

  1. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; Yarema, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch, yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.

  2. Application to monitoring of tailings dam based on 3D laser scanning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fang; Zhang, Aiwu

    2011-06-01

    This paper presented a new method of monitoring of tailing dam based on 3D laser scanning technology and gave the method flow of acquiring and processing the tailing dam data. Taking the measured data for example, the author analyzed the dam deformation by generating the TIN, DEM and the curvature graph, and proved that it's feasible to global monitor the tailing dam using 3D laser scanning technology from the theory and method.

  3. An architecture for integrating planar and 3D cQED devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axline, C.; Reagor, M.; Heeres, R.; Reinhold, P.; Wang, C.; Shain, K.; Pfaff, W.; Chu, Y.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    Numerous loss mechanisms can limit coherence and scalability of planar and 3D-based circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) devices, particularly due to their packaging. The low loss and natural isolation of 3D enclosures make them good candidates for coherent scaling. We introduce a coaxial transmission line device architecture with coherence similar to traditional 3D cQED systems. Measurements demonstrate well-controlled external and on-chip couplings, a spectrum absent of cross-talk or spurious modes, and excellent resonator and qubit lifetimes. We integrate a resonator-qubit system in this architecture with a seamless 3D cavity, and separately pattern a qubit, readout resonator, Purcell filter, and high-Q stripline resonator on a single chip. Device coherence and its ease of integration make this a promising tool for complex experiments.

  4. A simple method for producing freestanding 3D microstructures by integrated photomask micromolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Freestanding three-dimensional (3D) microstructures are widely used in micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) applications or can function as microdevices themselves. However, microfabrication methods for freestanding 3D microstructures have limitations in shape, size, cost, and mass production, etc. In this work, integrated photomask micromolding is demonstrated, which uses a portable UV light source and chrome glass micromolding to fabricate 3D microstructures without alignment. Specifically, a chrome layer on one side of the glass micromold shields the excess filling SU-8 photoresist from UV exposure and only the SU-8 photoresist in mold cavities is crosslinked. The 3D microstructures produced using this method have very high dimensional accuracy and the profile error is approximately 1.5%. This method can be used with features of virtually any size and shape and can be integrated into highly-parallel micromolding processes and has potential for MEMS applications.

  5. Stress management for 3D through-silicon-via stacking technologies - The next frontier -

    SciTech Connect

    Radojcic, Riko; Nowak, Matt; Nakamoto, Mark

    2014-06-19

    The status of the development of a Design-for-Stress simulation flow that captures the stress effects in packaged 3D-stacked Si products like integrated circuits (ICs) using advanced via-middle Through Si Via technology is outlined. The next set of challenges required to proliferate the methodology and to deploy it for making and dispositioning real Si product decisions are described here. These include the adoption and support of a Process Design Kit (PDK) that includes the relevant material properties, the development of stress simulation methodologies that operate at higher levels of abstraction in a design flow, and the development and adoption of suitable models required to make real product reliability decisions.

  6. On the integrability of the motion of 3D-Swinging Atwood machine and related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmandouh, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    In the present article, we study the problem of the motion of 3D- Swinging Atwood machine. A new integrable case for this problem is announced. We point out a new integrable case describing the motion of a heavy particle on a titled cone.

  7. Design and implementation of Gm-APD array readout integrated circuit for infrared 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-xia; Yang, Jun-hao; Liu, Zhao; Dong, Huai-peng; Wu, Jin; Sun, Wei-feng

    2013-09-01

    A single-photon detecting array of readout integrated circuit (ROIC) capable of infrared 3D imaging by photon detection and time-of-flight measurement is presented in this paper. The InGaAs avalanche photon diodes (APD) dynamic biased under Geiger operation mode by gate controlled active quenching circuit (AQC) are used here. The time-of-flight is accurately measured by a high accurate time-to-digital converter (TDC) integrated in the ROIC. For 3D imaging, frame rate controlling technique is utilized to the pixel's detection, so that the APD related to each pixel should be controlled by individual AQC to sense and quench the avalanche current, providing a digital CMOS-compatible voltage pulse. After each first sense, the detector is reset to wait for next frame operation. We employ counters of a two-segmental coarse-fine architecture, where the coarse conversion is achieved by a 10-bit pseudo-random linear feedback shift register (LFSR) in each pixel and a 3-bit fine conversion is realized by a ring delay line shared by all pixels. The reference clock driving the LFSR counter can be generated within the ring delay line Oscillator or provided by an external clock source. The circuit is designed and implemented by CSMC 0.5μm standard CMOS technology and the total chip area is around 2mm×2mm for 8×8 format ROIC with 150μm pixel pitch. The simulation results indicate that the relative time resolution of the proposed ROIC can achieve less than 1ns, and the preliminary test results show that the circuit function is correct.

  8. Time And Temperature Dependent Micromechanical Properties Of Solder Joints For 3D-Package Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roellig, Mike; Meier, Karsten; Metasch, Rene

    2010-11-01

    The recent development of 3D-integrated electronic packages is characterized by the need to increase the diversity of functions and to miniaturize. Currently many 3D-integration concepts are being developed and all of them demand new materials, new designs and new processing technologies. The combination of simulation and experimental investigation becomes increasingly accepted since simulations help to shorten the R&D cycle time and reduce costs. Numerical calculations like the Finite-Element-Method are strong tools to calculate stress conditions in electronic packages resulting from thermal strains due to the manufacturing process and environmental loads. It is essential for the application of numerical calculations that the material data is accurate and describes sufficiently the physical behaviour. The developed machine allows the measurement of time and temperature dependent micromechanical properties of solder joints. Solder joints, which are used to mechanically and electrically connect different packages, are physically measured as they leave the process. This allows accounting for process influences, which may change material properties. Additionally, joint sizes and metallurgical interactions between solder and under bump metallization can be respected by this particular measurement. The measurement allows the determination of material properties within a temperature range of 20° C-200° C. Further, the time dependent creep deformation can be measured within a strain-rate range of 10-31/s-10-81/s. Solder alloys based on Sn-Ag/Sn-Ag-Cu with additionally impurities and joint sizes down to O/ 200 μm were investigated. To finish the material characterization process the material model coefficient were extracted by FEM-Simulation to increase the accuracy of data.

  9. Integrative multicellular biological modeling: a case study of 3D epidermal development using GPU algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Simulation of sophisticated biological models requires considerable computational power. These models typically integrate together numerous biological phenomena such as spatially-explicit heterogeneous cells, cell-cell interactions, cell-environment interactions and intracellular gene networks. The recent advent of programming for graphical processing units (GPU) opens up the possibility of developing more integrative, detailed and predictive biological models while at the same time decreasing the computational cost to simulate those models. Results We construct a 3D model of epidermal development and provide a set of GPU algorithms that executes significantly faster than sequential central processing unit (CPU) code. We provide a parallel implementation of the subcellular element method for individual cells residing in a lattice-free spatial environment. Each cell in our epidermal model includes an internal gene network, which integrates cellular interaction of Notch signaling together with environmental interaction of basement membrane adhesion, to specify cellular state and behaviors such as growth and division. We take a pedagogical approach to describing how modeling methods are efficiently implemented on the GPU including memory layout of data structures and functional decomposition. We discuss various programmatic issues and provide a set of design guidelines for GPU programming that are instructive to avoid common pitfalls as well as to extract performance from the GPU architecture. Conclusions We demonstrate that GPU algorithms represent a significant technological advance for the simulation of complex biological models. We further demonstrate with our epidermal model that the integration of multiple complex modeling methods for heterogeneous multicellular biological processes is both feasible and computationally tractable using this new technology. We hope that the provided algorithms and source code will be a starting point for modelers to

  10. THREE DIMENSIONAL INTEGRATED CHARACTERIZATION AND ARCHIVING SYSTEM (3D-ICAS)

    SciTech Connect

    George Jarvis

    2001-06-18

    The overall objective of this project is to develop an integrated system that remotely characterizes, maps, and archives measurement data of hazardous decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) areas. The system will generate a detailed 3-dimensional topography of the area as well as real-time quantitative measurements of volatile organics and radionuclides. The system will analyze substrate materials consisting of concrete, asbestos, and transite. The system will permanently archive the data measurements for regulatory and data integrity documentation. Exposure limits, rest breaks, and donning and removal of protective garments generate waste in the form of contaminated protective garments and equipment. Survey times are increased and handling and transporting potentially hazardous materials incur additional costs. Off-site laboratory analysis is expensive and time-consuming, often necessitating delay of further activities until results are received. The Three Dimensional Integrated Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) has been developed to alleviate some of these problems. 3D-ICAS provides a flexible system for physical, chemical and nuclear measurements reduces costs and improves data quality. Operationally, 3D-ICAS performs real-time determinations of hazardous and toxic contamination. A prototype demonstration unit is available for use in early 2000. The tasks in this Phase included: (1) Mobility Platforms: Integrate hardware onto mobility platforms, upgrade surface sensors, develop unit operations and protocol. (2) System Developments: Evaluate metals detection capability using x-ray fluorescence technology. (3) IWOS Upgrades: Upgrade the IWOS software and hardware for compatibility with mobility platform. The system was modified, tested and debugged during 1999 and 2000. The 3D-ICAS was shipped on 11 May 2001 to FIU-HCET for demonstration and validation of the design modifications. These modifications included simplifying the design from a two

  11. Learning from graphically integrated 2D and 3D representations improves retention of neuroanatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaz, Farah

    Visualizations in the form of computer-based learning environments are highly encouraged in science education, especially for teaching spatial material. Some spatial material, such as sectional neuroanatomy, is very challenging to learn. It involves learning the two dimensional (2D) representations that are sampled from the three dimensional (3D) object. In this study, a computer-based learning environment was used to explore the hypothesis that learning sectional neuroanatomy from a graphically integrated 2D and 3D representation will lead to better learning outcomes than learning from a sequential presentation. The integrated representation explicitly demonstrates the 2D-3D transformation and should lead to effective learning. This study was conducted using a computer graphical model of the human brain. There were two learning groups: Whole then Sections, and Integrated 2D3D. Both groups learned whole anatomy (3D neuroanatomy) before learning sectional anatomy (2D neuroanatomy). The Whole then Sections group then learned sectional anatomy using 2D representations only. The Integrated 2D3D group learned sectional anatomy from a graphically integrated 3D and 2D model. A set of tests for generalization of knowledge to interpreting biomedical images was conducted immediately after learning was completed. The order of presentation of the tests of generalization of knowledge was counterbalanced across participants to explore a secondary hypothesis of the study: preparation for future learning. If the computer-based instruction programs used in this study are effective tools for teaching anatomy, the participants should continue learning neuroanatomy with exposure to new representations. A test of long-term retention of sectional anatomy was conducted 4-8 weeks after learning was completed. The Integrated 2D3D group was better than the Whole then Sections

  12. Comparative study on 3D-2D convertible integral imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heejin; Kim, Joohwan; Kim, Yunhee; Lee, Byoungho

    2006-02-01

    In spite of significant improvements in three-dimensional (3D) display fields, the commercialization of a 3D-only display system is not achieved yet. The mainstream of display market is a high performance two-dimensional (2D) flat panel display (FPD) and the beginning of the high-definition (HD) broadcasting accelerates the opening of the golden age of HD FPDs. Therefore, a 3D display system needs to be able to display a 2D image with high quality. In this paper, two different 3D-2D convertible methods based on integral imaging are compared and categorized for its applications. One method uses a point light source array and a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal and one display panel. The other system adopts two display panels and a lens array. The former system is suitable for mobile applications while the latter is for home applications such as monitors and TVs.

  13. Strategies for Effectively Visualizing a 3D Flow Using Volume Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses strategies for effectively portraying 3D flow using volume line integral convolution. Issues include defining an appropriate input texture, clarifying the distinct identities and relative depths of the advected texture elements, and selectively highlighting regions of interest in both the input and output volumes. Apart from offering insights into the greater potential of 3D LIC as a method for effectively representing flow in a volume, a principal contribution of this work is the suggestion of a technique for generating and rendering 3D visibility-impeding 'halos' that can help to intuitively indicate the presence of depth discontinuities between contiguous elements in a projection and thereby clarify the 3D spatial organization of elements in the flow. The proposed techniques are applied to the visualization of a hot, supersonic, laminar jet exiting into a colder, subsonic coflow.

  14. 3D Printed Microfluidic Device with Integrated Biosensors for Online Analysis of Subcutaneous Human Microdialysate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a robust 3D printed microfluidic analysis system that integrates with FDA-approved clinical microdialysis probes for continuous monitoring of human tissue metabolite levels. The microfluidic device incorporates removable needle type integrated biosensors for glucose and lactate, which are optimized for high tissue concentrations, housed in novel 3D printed electrode holders. A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip. Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor. As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime. PMID:26070023

  15. 3D Printed Microfluidic Device with Integrated Biosensors for Online Analysis of Subcutaneous Human Microdialysate.

    PubMed

    Gowers, Sally A N; Curto, Vincenzo F; Seneci, Carlo A; Wang, Chu; Anastasova, Salzitsa; Vadgama, Pankaj; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Boutelle, Martyn G

    2015-08-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a robust 3D printed microfluidic analysis system that integrates with FDA-approved clinical microdialysis probes for continuous monitoring of human tissue metabolite levels. The microfluidic device incorporates removable needle type integrated biosensors for glucose and lactate, which are optimized for high tissue concentrations, housed in novel 3D printed electrode holders. A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip. Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor. As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime. PMID:26070023

  16. Art-Science-Technology collaboration through immersive, interactive 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    At the W. M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES), a group of geoscientists and computer scientists collaborate to develop and use of interactive, immersive, 3D visualization technology to view, manipulate, and interpret data for scientific research. The visual impact of immersion in a CAVE environment can be extremely compelling, and from the outset KeckCAVES scientists have collaborated with artists to bring this technology to creative works, including theater and dance performance, installations, and gamification. The first full-fledged collaboration designed and produced a performance called "Collapse: Suddenly falling down", choreographed by Della Davidson, which investigated the human and cultural response to natural and man-made disasters. Scientific data (lidar scans of disaster sites, such as landslides and mine collapses) were fully integrated into the performance by the Sideshow Physical Theatre. This presentation will discuss both the technological and creative characteristics of, and lessons learned from the collaboration. Many parallels between the artistic and scientific process emerged. We observed that both artists and scientists set out to investigate a topic, solve a problem, or answer a question. Refining that question or problem is an essential part of both the creative and scientific workflow. Both artists and scientists seek understanding (in this case understanding of natural disasters). Differences also emerged; the group noted that the scientists sought clarity (including but not limited to quantitative measurements) as a means to understanding, while the artists embraced ambiguity, also as a means to understanding. Subsequent art-science-technology collaborations have responded to evolving technology for visualization and include gamification as a means to explore data, and use of augmented reality for informal learning in museum settings.

  17. A non-disruptive technology for robust 3D tool tracking for ultrasound-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Mung, Jay; Vignon, Francois; Jain, Ameet

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade ultrasound (US) has become the preferred modality for a number of interventional procedures, offering excellent soft tissue visualization. The main limitation however is limited visualization of surgical tools. A new method is proposed for robust 3D tracking and US image enhancement of surgical tools under US guidance. Small US sensors are mounted on existing surgical tools. As the imager emits acoustic energy, the electrical signal from the sensor is analyzed to reconstruct its 3D coordinates. These coordinates can then be used for 3D surgical navigation, similar to current day tracking systems. A system with real-time 3D tool tracking and image enhancement was implemented on a commercial ultrasound scanner and 3D probe. Extensive water tank experiments with a tracked 0.2mm sensor show robust performance in a wide range of imaging conditions and tool position/orientations. The 3D tracking accuracy was 0.36 +/- 0.16mm throughout the imaging volume of 55 degrees x 27 degrees x 150mm. Additionally, the tool was successfully tracked inside a beating heart phantom. This paper proposes an image enhancement and tool tracking technology with sub-mm accuracy for US-guided interventions. The technology is non-disruptive, both in terms of existing clinical workflow and commercial considerations, showing promise for large scale clinical impact. PMID:22003612

  18. 3D Imaging for hand gesture recognition: Exploring the software-hardware interaction of current technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periverzov, Frol; Ilieş, Horea T.

    2012-09-01

    Interaction with 3D information is one of the fundamental and most familiar tasks in virtually all areas of engineering and science. Several recent technological advances pave the way for developing hand gesture recognition capabilities available to all, which will lead to more intuitive and efficient 3D user interfaces (3DUI). These developments can unlock new levels of expression and productivity in all activities concerned with the creation and manipulation of virtual 3D shapes and, specifically, in engineering design. Building fully automated systems for tracking and interpreting hand gestures requires robust and efficient 3D imaging techniques as well as potent shape classifiers. We survey and explore current and emerging 3D imaging technologies, and focus, in particular, on those that can be used to build interfaces between the users' hands and the machine. The purpose of this paper is to categorize and highlight the relevant differences between these existing 3D imaging approaches in terms of the nature of the information provided, output data format, as well as the specific conditions under which these approaches yield reliable data. Furthermore we explore the impact of each of these approaches on the computational cost and reliability of the required image processing algorithms. Finally we highlight the main challenges and opportunities in developing natural user interfaces based on hand gestures, and conclude with some promising directions for future research. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. BEST3D user's manual: Boundary Element Solution Technology, 3-Dimensional Version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical basis and programming strategy utilized in the construction of the computer program BEST3D (boundary element solution technology - three dimensional) and detailed input instructions are provided for the use of the program. An extensive set of test cases and sample problems is included in the manual and is also available for distribution with the program. The BEST3D program was developed under the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components contract (NAS3-23697). The overall objective of this program was the development of new computer programs allowing more accurate and efficient three-dimensional thermal and stress analysis of hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The BEST3D program allows both linear and nonlinear analysis of static and quasi-static elastic problems and transient dynamic analysis for elastic problems. Calculation of elastic natural frequencies and mode shapes is also provided.

  20. Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

  1. A 3D universal structure based on molecular-QCA and CNT technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    khosroshahy, Milad Bagherian; Daliri, Mahya Sam; Abdoli, Alireza; Navi, Keivan; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel method for design and implementation of three dimensional (3D) two-layer devices with 1/0 logic values. This method uses carbon nanotube (CNT) technology as well as the molecular quantum cellular automata (MQCA) technology on a graphene substrate. The most significant characteristic of the proposed design, which makes the design unique, is the capability of generating functions in 3D; the proposed method would allow implementation of the designs in a single layer which significantly impacts on reducing the chip area and also greatly facilitates the overall synthesis of the design including placement, routing and reducing the critical path length.

  2. Developement of 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Deputch, G.; Hoff, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Olsen, J.; Ramberg, E.; Wu, Jin-Yuan; Yarema, R.; Shochet, M.; Tang, F.; Demarteau, M.; /Argonne /INFN, Padova

    2011-04-13

    Many next-generation physics experiments will be characterized by the collection of large quantities of data, taken in rapid succession, from which scientists will have to unravel the underlying physical processes. In most cases, large backgrounds will overwhelm the physics signal. Since the quantity of data that can be stored for later analysis is limited, real-time event selection is imperative to retain the interesting events while rejecting the background. Scaling of current technologies is unlikely to satisfy the scientific needs of future projects, so investments in transformational new technologies need to be made. For example, future particle physics experiments looking for rare processes will have to address the demanding challenges of fast pattern recognition in triggering as detector hit density becomes significantly higher due to the high luminosity required to produce the rare processes. In this proposal, we intend to develop hardware-based technology that significantly advances the state-of-the-art for fast pattern recognition within and outside HEP using the 3D vertical integration technology that has emerged recently in industry. The ultimate physics reach of the LHC experiments will crucially depend on the tracking trigger's ability to help discriminate between interesting rare events and the background. Hardware-based pattern recognition for fast triggering on particle tracks has been successfully used in high-energy physics experiments for some time. The CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at the Fermilab Tevatron is an excellent example. The method used there, developed in the 1990's, is based on algorithms that use a massively parallel associative memory architecture to identify patterns efficiently at high speed. However, due to much higher occupancy and event rates at the LHC, and the fact that the LHC detectors have a much larger number of channels in their tracking detectors, there is an enormous challenge in implementing pattern recognition

  3. The application of camera calibration in range-gated 3D imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-quan; Wang, Xian-wei; Zhou, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Range-gated laser imaging technology was proposed in 1966 by LF Gillespiethe in U.S. Army Night Vision Laboratory(NVL). Using pulse laser and intensified charge-coupled device(ICCD) as light source and detector respectively, range-gated laser imaging technology can realize space-slice imaging while restraining the atmospheric backs-catter, and in turn detect the target effectively, by controlling the delay between the laser pulse and strobe. Owing to the constraints of the development of key components such as narrow pulse laser and gated imaging devices, the research has been progressed slowly in the next few decades. Until the beginning of this century, as the hardware technology continues to mature, this technology has developed rapidly in fields such as night vision, underwater imaging, biomedical imaging, three-dimensional imaging, especially range-gated three-dimensional(3-D) laser imaging field purposing of access to target spatial information. 3-D reconstruction is the processing of restoration of 3-D objects visible surface geometric structure from three-dimensional(2-D) image. Range-gated laser imaging technology can achieve gated imaging of slice space to form a slice image, and in turn provide the distance information corresponding to the slice image. But to inverse the information of 3-D space, we need to obtain the imaging visual field of system, that is, the focal length of the system. Then based on the distance information of the space slice, the spatial information of each unit space corresponding to each pixel can be inversed. Camera calibration is an indispensable step in 3-D reconstruction, including analysis of the internal structure of camera parameters and the external parameters . In order to meet the technical requirements of the range-gated 3-D imaging, this paper intends to study the calibration of the zoom lens system. After summarizing the camera calibration technique comprehensively, a classic calibration method based on line is

  4. Micromorph silicon tandem solar cells with fully integrated 3D photonic crystal intermediate reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üpping, J.; Bielawny, A.; Fahr, S.; Rockstuhl, C.; Lederer, F.; Steidl, L.; Zentel, R.; Beckers, T.; Lambertz, A.; Carius, R.; Wehrspohn, R. B.

    2010-05-01

    A 3D photonic intermediate reflector for textured micromorph silicon tandem solar cells has been investigated. In thin-film silicon tandem solar cells consisting of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon with two junctions of a-Si/c-Si, efficiency enhancements can be achieved by increasing the current density in the a-Si top cell providing an optimized current matching at high current densities. For an ideal photon-management between top and bottom cell, a spectrally-selective intermediate reflective layer (IRL) is necessary. We present the first fully-integrated 3D photonic thin-film IRL device incorporated on a planar substrate. Using a ZnO inverted opal structure the external quantum efficiency of the top cell in the spectral region of interest could be enhanced. As an outlook we present the design and the preparation of a 3D self organized photonic crystal structure in a textured micromorph tandem solar cell.

  5. Three-Dimensional Integrated Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS). Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    3D-ICAS is being developed to support Decontamination and Decommissioning operations for DOE addressing Research Area 6 (characterization) of the Program Research and Development Announcement. 3D-ICAS provides in-situ 3-dimensional characterization of contaminated DOE facilities. Its multisensor probe contains a GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using noncontact infrared heating) sensor for organics, a molecular vibrational sensor for base material identification, and a radionuclide sensor for radioactive contaminants. It will provide real-time quantitative measurements of volatile organics and radionuclides on bare materials (concrete, asbestos, transite); it will provide 3-D display of the fusion of all measurements; and it will archive the measurements for regulatory documentation. It consists of two robotic mobile platforms that operate in hazardous environments linked to an integrated workstation in a safe environment.

  6. 3D Navigation and Integrated Hazard Display in Advanced Avionics: Workload, Performance, and Situation Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher D.; Alexander, Amy L.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the ability for pilots to estimate traffic location in an Integrated Hazard Display, and how such estimations should be measured. Twelve pilots viewed static images of traffic scenarios and then estimated the outside world locations of queried traffic represented in one of three display types (2D coplanar, 3D exocentric, and split-screen) and in one of four conditions (display present/blank crossed with outside world present/blank). Overall, the 2D coplanar display best supported both vertical (compared to 3D) and lateral (compared to split-screen) traffic position estimation performance. Costs of the 3D display were associated with perceptual ambiguity. Costs of the split screen display were inferred to result from inappropriate attention allocation. Furthermore, although pilots were faster in estimating traffic locations when relying on memory, accuracy was greatest when the display was available.

  7. 3-D electromagnetic modeling for very early time sounding of shallow targets using integral equations

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Z.; Tripp, A.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents an integral equation algorithm for 3D EM modeling at high frequencies for applications in engineering an environmental studies. The integral equation method remains the same for low and high frequencies, but the dominant roles of the displacements currents complicate both numerical treatments and interpretations. With singularity extraction technique they successively extended the application of the Hankel filtering technique to the computation of Hankel integrals occurring in high frequency EM modeling. Time domain results are calculated from frequency domain results via Fourier transforms. While frequency domain data are not obvious for interpretations, time domain data show wave-like pictures that resemble seismograms. Both 1D and 3D numerical results show clearly the layer interfaces.

  8. Integration of geostatistical techniques and intuitive geology in the 3-D modeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, C.J.; Cooper, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The development of 3-D geologic models for reservoir description and simulation has traditionally relied on the computer derived interpolation of well data in a geocelluar stratigraphic framework. The quality of the interpolation has been directly dependent on the nature of the interpolation method, and ability of the interpolation scheme to accurately predict the value of geologic attributes away from the well. Typically, interpolation methods employ deterministic or geostatistical algorithms which offer limited capacity for integrating data derived from secondary analyses. These secondary analyses, which might include the results from 3-D seismic inversion, borehole imagery studies, or deductive reasoning, introduce a subjective component into what would otherwise be restricted to a purely mathematical treatment of geologic data. At Saudi ARAMCO an increased emphasis is being placed on the role of the reservoir geologist in the development of 3-D geologic models. Quantitative results, based on numerical computations, are being enhanced with intuitive geology, derived from years of cumulative professional experience and expertise. Techniques such as template modeling and modified conditional simulation, are yielding 3-D geologic models, which not only more accurately reflect the geology of the reservoir, but also preserve geologic detail throughout the simulation process. This incorporation of secondary data sources and qualitative analysis has been successfully demonstrated in a clastic reservoir environment in Central Saudi Arabia, and serves as a prototype for future 3-D geologic model development.

  9. Integration of geostatistical techniques and intuitive geology in the 3-D modeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, C.J.; Cooper, D.H. )

    1996-01-01

    The development of 3-D geologic models for reservoir description and simulation has traditionally relied on the computer derived interpolation of well data in a geocelluar stratigraphic framework. The quality of the interpolation has been directly dependent on the nature of the interpolation method, and ability of the Interpolation scheme to accurately predict the value of geologic attributes away from the well. Typically, interpolation methods employ deterministic or geostatistical algorithms which offer limited capacity for Integrating data derived from secondary analyses. These secondary analyses, which might include the results from 3-D seismic inversion, borehole imagery studies, or deductive reasoning, introduce a subjective component into what would otherwise be restricted to a purely mathematical treatment of geologic data. At Saudi ARAMCO an increased emphases is being placed on the role of the reservoir geologist in the development of 3-D geologic models. Quantitative results, based on numerical computations, are being enhanced with intuitive geology, derived from years of cumulative professional experience and expertise. Techniques such as template modeling and modified conditional simulation, are yielding 3-D geologic models, which not only more accurately reflect the geology of the reservoir, but also preserve geologic detail throughout the simulation process. This incorporation of secondary data sources and qualitative analysis has been successfully demonstrated in a clastic reservoir environment in Central Saudi Arabia, and serves as a prototype for future 3-D geologic model development.

  10. Integration of geostatistical techniques and intuitive geology in the 3-D modeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, C.J.; Cooper, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    The development of 3-D geologic models for reservoir description and simulation has traditionally relied on the computer derived interpolation of well data in a geocelluar stratigraphic framework. The quality of the interpolation has been directly dependent on the nature of the interpolation method, and ability of the Interpolation scheme to accurately predict the value of geologic attributes away from the well. Typically, interpolation methods employ deterministic or geostatistical algorithms which offer limited capacity for Integrating data derived from secondary analyses. These secondary analyses, which might include the results from 3-D seismic inversion, borehole imagery studies, or deductive reasoning, introduce a subjective component into what would otherwise be restricted to a purely mathematical treatment of geologic data. At Saudi ARAMCO an increased emphases is being placed on the role of the reservoir geologist in the development of 3-D geologic models. Quantitative results, based on numerical computations, are being enhanced with intuitive geology, derived from years of cumulative professional experience and expertise. Techniques such as template modeling and modified conditional simulation, are yielding 3-D geologic models, which not only more accurately reflect the geology of the reservoir, but also preserve geologic detail throughout the simulation process. This incorporation of secondary data sources and qualitative analysis has been successfully demonstrated in a clastic reservoir environment in Central Saudi Arabia, and serves as a prototype for future 3-D geologic model development.

  11. 3D shape shearography with integrated structured light projection for strain inspection of curved objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-05-01

    Shearography (speckle pattern shearing interferometry) is a non-destructive testing technique that provides full-field surface strain characterization. Although real-life objects especially in aerospace, transport or cultural heritage are not flat (e.g. aircraft leading edges or sculptures), their inspection with shearography is of interest for both hidden defect detection and material characterization. Accurate strain measuring of a highly curved or free form surface needs to be performed by combining inline object shape measuring and processing of shearography data in 3D. Previous research has not provided a general solution. This research is devoted to the practical questions of 3D shape shearography system development for surface strain characterization of curved objects. The complete procedure of calibration and data processing of a 3D shape shearography system with integrated structured light projector is presented. This includes an estimation of the actual shear distance and a sensitivity matrix correction within the system field of view. For the experimental part a 3D shape shearography system prototype was developed. It employs three spatially-distributed shearing cameras, with Michelson interferometers acting as the shearing devices, one illumination laser source and a structured light projector. The developed system performance was evaluated with a previously reported cylinder specimen (length 400 mm, external diameter 190 mmm) loaded by internal pressure. Further steps for the 3D shape shearography prototype and the technique development are also proposed.

  12. Attitudes of Patients Toward Adoption of 3D Technology in Pain Assessment: Qualitative Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Past research has revealed that insufficient pain assessment could, and often, has negative implications on the provision of quality health care. While current available clinical approaches have proven to be valid interventions, they are expensive and can often fail in providing efficient pain measurements. The increase in the prevalence of pain calls for more intuitive pain assessment solutions. Computerized alternatives have already been proposed both in the literature and in commerce, but may lack essential qualities such as accuracy of the collected clinical information and effective patient-clinician interaction. In response to this concern, 3-dimensional (3D) technology could become the innovative intervention needed to support and improve the pain assessment process. Objective The purpose of this analysis was to describe qualitative findings from a study which was designed to explore patients’ perceptions of adopting 3D technology in the assessment of their pain experience related to important themes that might positively or negatively influence the quality of the pain assessment process. Methods The perceptions of 60 individuals with some form of pain in the area of Greater London were collected through semi-structured interviews. Of the 60 respondents, 24 (43%) produced usable responses and were analyzed for content using principles of the grounded theory approach and thematic analysis, in order to gain insight into the participants’ beliefs and attitudes towards adopting 3D technology in pain assessment. Results The analysis identified 4 high-level core themes that were representative of the participants’ responses. These themes indicated that most respondents valued “the potential of 3D technology to facilitate better assessment of pain” as the most useful outcome of adopting a 3D approach. Respondents also expressed their opinions on the usability of the 3D approach, with no important concerns reported about its perceived ease of

  13. Laboratory and in-flight experiments to evaluate 3-D audio display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Mark; McKinley, Richard; Kibbe, Marion; Francis, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory and in-flight experiments were conducted to evaluate 3-D audio display technology for cockpit applications. A 3-D audio display generator was developed which digitally encodes naturally occurring direction information onto any audio signal and presents the binaural sound over headphones. The acoustic image is stabilized for head movement by use of an electromagnetic head-tracking device. In the laboratory, a 3-D audio display generator was used to spatially separate competing speech messages to improve the intelligibility of each message. Up to a 25 percent improvement in intelligibility was measured for spatially separated speech at high ambient noise levels (115 dB SPL). During the in-flight experiments, pilots reported that spatial separation of speech communications provided a noticeable improvement in intelligibility. The use of 3-D audio for target acquisition was also investigated. In the laboratory, 3-D audio enabled the acquisition of visual targets in about two seconds average response time at 17 degrees accuracy. During the in-flight experiments, pilots correctly identified ground targets 50, 75, and 100 percent of the time at separation angles of 12, 20, and 35 degrees, respectively. In general, pilot performance in the field with the 3-D audio display generator was as expected, based on data from laboratory experiments.

  14. Integrated Idl Tool For 3d Modeling And Imaging Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Kontar, E. P.

    2012-05-01

    Addressing many key problems in solar physics requires detailed analysis of non-simultaneous imaging data obtained in various wavelength domains with different spatial resolution and their comparison with each other supplied by advanced 3D physical models. To facilitate achieving this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement and improvements of IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The greatly enhanced object-based architecture provides interactive graphic user interface that allows the user i) to import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to almost instantly generate 3D magnetic field models, ii) to investigate the magnetic topology of these models by interactively creating magnetic field lines and associated magnetic field tubes, iii) to populate them with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic nonuniform nonthermal electron distributions; and iv) to calculate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission. The application integrates DLL and Shared Libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes developed in FORTRAN and C++, soft and hard X-ray codes developed in IDL, and a potential field extrapolation DLL produced based on original FORTRAN code developed by V. Abramenko and V. Yurchishin. The interactive interface allows users to add any user-defined IDL or external callable radiation code, as well as user-defined magnetic field extrapolation routines. To illustrate the tool capabilities, we present a step-by-step live computation of microwave and X-ray images from realistic magnetic structures obtained from a magnetic field extrapolation preceding a real event, and compare them with the actual imaging data produced by NORH and RHESSI instruments. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-0961867, AST-0908344, AGS-0969761, and NASA grants NNX10AF27G and NNX11AB49G to New Jersey Institute of Technology, by a UK STFC

  15. Proposal for the development of 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Gregory; Hoff, Jim; Kwan, Simon; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Ted; Ramberg, Erik; Todri, Aida; Yarema, Ray; Demarteua, Marcel,; Drake, Gary; Weerts, Harry; /Argonne /Chicago U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2010-10-01

    Future particle physics experiments looking for rare processes will have no choice but to address the demanding challenges of fast pattern recognition in triggering as detector hit density becomes significantly higher due to the high luminosity required to produce the rare process. The authors propose to develop a 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM) chip for HEP applications, to advance the state-of-the-art for pattern recognition and track reconstruction for fast triggering.

  16. Perceptual integration for qualitatively different 3-D cues in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Dövencioğlu, Dicle; Ban, Hiroshi; Schofield, Andrew J; Welchman, Andrew E

    2013-09-01

    The visual system's flexibility in estimating depth is remarkable: We readily perceive 3-D structure under diverse conditions from the seemingly random dots of a "magic eye" stereogram to the aesthetically beautiful, but obviously flat, canvasses of the Old Masters. Yet, 3-D perception is often enhanced when different cues specify the same depth. This perceptual process is understood as Bayesian inference that improves sensory estimates. Despite considerable behavioral support for this theory, insights into the cortical circuits involved are limited. Moreover, extant work tested quantitatively similar cues, reducing some of the challenges associated with integrating computationally and qualitatively different signals. Here we address this challenge by measuring fMRI responses to depth structures defined by shading, binocular disparity, and their combination. We quantified information about depth configurations (convex "bumps" vs. concave "dimples") in different visual cortical areas using pattern classification analysis. We found that fMRI responses in dorsal visual area V3B/KO were more discriminable when disparity and shading concurrently signaled depth, in line with the predictions of cue integration. Importantly, by relating fMRI and psychophysical tests of integration, we observed a close association between depth judgments and activity in this area. Finally, using a cross-cue transfer test, we found that fMRI responses evoked by one cue afford classification of responses evoked by the other. This reveals a generalized depth representation in dorsal visual cortex that combines qualitatively different information in line with 3-D perception. PMID:23647559

  17. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway. PMID:27286266

  18. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway. PMID:27286266

  19. Development of ceramic-reinforced photopolymers for SLA 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Ji Sun; Park, Tae-Wan; Jeong, Young Hun; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2016-06-01

    Al2O3 ceramic-reinforced photopolymer samples for SLA 3D printing technology were prepared using a silane coupling agent (VTES, vinyltriethoxysilane). Depending on the method used to coat the VTES onto the ceramic surface, the dispersion of ceramic particles in the photopolymer solution was remarkably improved. SEM, TEM and element mapping images showed Al2O3 particles well wrapped with VTES along with well-distributed Al2O3 particles overall on the cross-sectional surfaces of 3D-printed objects. The tensile properties (stress-strain curves) of 3D-printed objects of the ceramic-reinforced photopolymer were investigated as a function of the Al2O3 ceramic content when it ranged from 0 to 20 wt%. The results demonstrate that an Al2O3 ceramic content of 15 wt% resulted in enhanced tensile characteristics.

  20. From Wheatstone to Cameron and beyond: overview in 3-D and 4-D imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbreath, G. Charmaine

    2012-02-01

    This paper reviews three-dimensional (3-D) and four-dimensional (4-D) imaging technology, from Wheatstone through today, with some prognostications for near future applications. This field is rich in variety, subject specialty, and applications. A major trend, multi-view stereoscopy, is moving the field forward to real-time wide-angle 3-D reconstruction as breakthroughs in parallel processing and multi-processor computers enable very fast processing. Real-time holography meets 4-D imaging reconstruction at the goal of achieving real-time, interactive, 3-D imaging. Applications to telesurgery and telemedicine as well as to the needs of the defense and intelligence communities are also discussed.

  1. Increased sensitivity of 3D-Well enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for infectious disease detection using 3D-printing fabrication technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Le Van, An; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay or ELISA -based diagnostics are considered the gold standard in the demonstration of various immunological reaction including in the measurement of antibody response to infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification with application potential in infectious disease outbreaks and individual patients' treatment and clinical care. The rapid prototyping of ELISA-based diagnostics using available 3D printing technologies provides an opportunity for a further exploration of this platform into immunodetection systems. In this study, a '3D-Well' was designed and fabricated using available 3D printing platforms to have an increased surface area of more than 4 times for protein-surface adsorption compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity in designing-product development-feedback cycle offered through 3D printing platforms provided an opportunity for its rapid assessment, in which a chemical etching process was used to make the surface hydrophilic followed by validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA for infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The higher sensitivity of the 3D-Well (3-folds higher) compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for laboratory or field diagnosis of infectious diseases including applications in other disciplines. PMID:26406036

  2. Integrated 3D-printed reactionware for chemical synthesis and analysis.

    PubMed

    Symes, Mark D; Kitson, Philip J; Yan, Jun; Richmond, Craig J; Cooper, Geoffrey J T; Bowman, Richard W; Vilbrandt, Turlif; Cronin, Leroy

    2012-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has the potential to transform science and technology by creating bespoke, low-cost appliances that previously required dedicated facilities to make. An attractive, but unexplored, application is to use a 3D printer to initiate chemical reactions by printing the reagents directly into a 3D reactionware matrix, and so put reactionware design, construction and operation under digital control. Here, using a low-cost 3D printer and open-source design software we produced reactionware for organic and inorganic synthesis, which included printed-in catalysts and other architectures with printed-in components for electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis. This enabled reactions to be monitored in situ so that different reactionware architectures could be screened for their efficacy for a given process, with a digital feedback mechanism for device optimization. Furthermore, solely by modifying reactionware architecture, reaction outcomes can be altered. Taken together, this approach constitutes a relatively cheap, automated and reconfigurable chemical discovery platform that makes techniques from chemical engineering accessible to typical synthetic laboratories. PMID:22522253

  3. Creating Perfused Functional Vascular Channels Using 3D Bio-Printing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vivian K.; Kim, Diana Y.; Ngo, Haygan; Lee, Young; Seo, Lan; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A.; Dai, Guohao

    2014-01-01

    We developed a methodology using 3D bio-printing technology to create a functional in vitro vascular channel with perfused open lumen using only cells and biological matrices. The fabricated vasculature has a tight, confluent endothelium lining, presenting barrier function for both plasma protein and high-molecular weight dextran molecule. The fluidic vascular channel is capable of supporting the viability of tissue up to 5mm in distance at 5 million cells/mL density under the physiological flow condition. In static-cultured vascular channels, active angiogenic sprouting from the vessel surface was observed whereas physiological flow strongly suppressed this process. Gene expression analysis were reported in this study to show the potential of this vessel model in vascular biology research. The methods have great potential in vascularized tissue fabrication using 3D bio-printing technology as the vascular channel is simultaneously created while cells and matrix are printed around the channel in desired 3D patterns. It can also serve as a unique experimental tool for investigating fundamental mechanisms of vascular remodeling with extracellular matrix and maturation process under 3D flow condition. PMID:24965886

  4. Creating perfused functional vascular channels using 3D bio-printing technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian K; Kim, Diana Y; Ngo, Haygan; Lee, Young; Seo, Lan; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A; Dai, Guohao

    2014-09-01

    We developed a methodology using 3D bio-printing technology to create a functional in vitro vascular channel with perfused open lumen using only cells and biological matrices. The fabricated vasculature has a tight, confluent endothelium lining, presenting barrier function for both plasma protein and high-molecular weight dextran molecule. The fluidic vascular channel is capable of supporting the viability of tissue up to 5 mm in distance at 5 million cells/mL density under the physiological flow condition. In static-cultured vascular channels, active angiogenic sprouting from the vessel surface was observed whereas physiological flow strongly suppressed this process. Gene expression analysis was reported in this study to show the potential of this vessel model in vascular biology research. The methods have great potential in vascularized tissue fabrication using 3D bio-printing technology as the vascular channel is simultaneously created while cells and matrix are printed around the channel in desired 3D patterns. It can also serve as a unique experimental tool for investigating fundamental mechanisms of vascular remodeling with extracellular matrix and maturation process under 3D flow condition. PMID:24965886

  5. Integrating Data Clustering and Visualization for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Data Analysis and Visualization and the Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis CA 95616, USA,; nternational Research Training Group ``Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets,'' University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA; Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA,; Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA,; Computer Science Department, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA,; All authors are with the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Huang, Min-Yu; Bethel, E. Wes; Biggin, Mark D.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; Keranen, Soile V. E.; Eisen, Michael B.; Knowles, David W.; Malik, Jitendra; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd

    2008-05-12

    The recent development of methods for extracting precise measurements of spatial gene expression patterns from three-dimensional (3D) image data opens the way for new analyses of the complex gene regulatory networks controlling animal development. We present an integrated visualization and analysis framework that supports user-guided data clustering to aid exploration of these new complex datasets. The interplay of data visualization and clustering-based data classification leads to improved visualization and enables a more detailed analysis than previously possible. We discuss (i) integration of data clustering and visualization into one framework; (ii) application of data clustering to 3D gene expression data; (iii) evaluation of the number of clusters k in the context of 3D gene expression clustering; and (iv) improvement of overall analysis quality via dedicated post-processing of clustering results based on visualization. We discuss the use of this framework to objectively define spatial pattern boundaries and temporal profiles of genes and to analyze how mRNA patterns are controlled by their regulatory transcription factors.

  6. Polymer optical fibers integrated directly into 3D orthogonal woven composites for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Tamer; Seyam, Abdel-Fattah M.; Peters, Kara

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrates that standard polymer optical fibers (POF) can be directly integrated into composites from 3D orthogonal woven preforms during the weaving process and then serve as in-situ sensors to detect damage due to bending or impact loads. Different composite samples with embedded POF were fabricated of 3D orthogonal woven composites with different parameters namely number of y-/x-layers and x-yarn density. The signal of POF was not affected significantly by the preform structure. During application of resin using VARTM technique, significant drop in backscattering level was observed due to pressure caused by vacuum on the embedded POF. Measurements of POF signal while in the final composites after resin cure indicated that the backscattering level almost returned to the original level of un-embedded POF. The POF responded to application of bending and impact loads to the composite with a reduction in the backscattering level. The backscattering level almost returned back to its original level after removing the bending load until damage was present in the composite. Similar behavior occurred due to impact events. As the POF itself is used as the sensor and can be integrated throughout the composite, large sections of future 3D woven composite structures could be monitored without the need for specialized sensors or complex instrumentation.

  7. Norg underground gas storage - an integrated 3-D geological and geophysical reservoir modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Smith, S. ); Huis, R.; Copper, J.; Whyte, S. )

    1993-09-01

    The Netherlands have an extensive gas distribution infrastructure supplying 80 x 10[sup 9] m[sup 3] per annum to the domestic and European market. The capacity requirement exceeds 600 x 10[sup 6] sm[sup 3]/d, of which 430 x 10[sup 6] sm[sup 3]/d is provided by the giant Groningen gas field. The Groningen field will soon reach a pressure at which this capacity can no longer be met without considerable investments. It will also become difficult to maintain the market gas quality, because of the increasing supply from small fields with widely varying gas qualities. Underground Gas Storage (UGS) will satisfy both capacity and gas-quality requirements. This UGS must eventually store 4.5 x 10[sup 9] m[sup 3] with injection/production capacities of 36/80-100 x 10[sup 6] sm[sup 3]/d, making it one of the largest UGS projects in the world. These extremely high-capacity requirements demand both high-matrix permeability and good understanding of vertical and lateral reservoir continuity. Matrix permeability is predictable due to the close relationship with the lithofacies defined within the primary Rotliegende depositional model. Minor faults, identified on three-dimensional (3-D) seismic attribute maps, represent potential transmissibility impairment zones, compartmentalizing the reservoir. This was initially suggested by core fracture studies and confirmed by a subsequent field shut-in and pressure buildup test. Lithofacies and seismic structural data are integrated within a computerized reservoir geological modeling system known as [open quotes]Monarch[close quotes] to provide a highly detailed 3-D permeability model that is then tranformed into a model for dynamic reservoir simulation. The results confirm the required working volume for the UGS operation and provide a basis for the initial field development planning.

  8. The 3-D CFD modeling of gas turbine combustor-integral bleed flow interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. Y.; Reynolds, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was developed to analyze the flow interaction between a gas turbine combustor and an integral bleed plenum. In this model, the elliptic governing equations of continuity, momentum and the k-e turbulence model were solved on a boundary-fitted, curvilinear, orthogonal grid system. The model was first validated against test data from public literature and then applied to a gas turbine combustor with integral bleed. The model predictions agreed well with data from combustor rig testing. The model predictions also indicated strong flow interaction between the combustor and the integral bleed. Integral bleed flow distribution was found to have a great effect on the pressure distribution around the gas turbine combustor.

  9. A new 3-D integral code for computation of accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Kettunen, L.

    1991-01-01

    For computing accelerator magnets, integral codes have several advantages over finite element codes; far-field boundaries are treated automatically, and computed field in the bore region satisfy Maxwell's equations exactly. A new integral code employing edge elements rather than nodal elements has overcome the difficulties associated with earlier integral codes. By the use of field integrals (potential differences) as solution variables, the number of unknowns is reduced to one less than the number of nodes. Two examples, a hollow iron sphere and the dipole magnet of Advanced Photon Source injector synchrotron, show the capability of the code. The CPU time requirements are comparable to those of three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element codes. Experiments show that in practice it can realize much of the potential CPU time saving that parallel processing makes possible. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Uniform integration of gold nanoparticles in PDMS microfluidics with 3D micromixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SadAbadi, H.; Packirisamy, M.; Wuthrich, R.

    2015-09-01

    The integration of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidics for biosensing applications is a challenging task. In this paper we address this issue by integration of pre-synthesized AuNPs (in a microreactor) into a microfluidic system. This method explored the affinity of AuNPs toward the PDMS surface so that the pre-synthesized particles will be adsorbed onto the channel walls. AuNPs were synthesized inside a microreactor before integration. In order to improve the size uniformity of the synthesized AuNPs and also to provide full mixing of reactants, a 3D-micromixer was designed, fabricated and then integrated with the microreactor in a single platform. SEM and UV/Vis spectroscopy were used to characterize the AuNPs on the PDMS surface.

  11. Integration of multiple view plus depth data for free viewpoint 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazuyoshi; Yoshida, Yuko; Kawamoto, Tetsuya; Fujii, Toshiaki; Mase, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a method for constructing a reasonable scale of end-to-end free-viewpoint video system that captures multiple view and depth data, reconstructs three-dimensional polygon models of objects, and display them on virtual 3D CG spaces. This system consists of a desktop PC and four Kinect sensors. First, multiple view plus depth data at four viewpoints are captured by Kinect sensors simultaneously. Then, the captured data are integrated to point cloud data by using camera parameters. The obtained point cloud data are sampled to volume data that consists of voxels. Since volume data that are generated from point cloud data are sparse, those data are made dense by using global optimization algorithm. Final step is to reconstruct surfaces on dense volume data by discrete marching cubes method. Since accuracy of depth maps affects to the quality of 3D polygon model, a simple inpainting method for improving depth maps is also presented.

  12. 3D Porosity Estimation of the Nankai Trough Sediments from Core-log-seismic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough off southwest Japan is one of the best subduction-zone to study megathrust earthquake fault. Historic, great megathrust earthquakes with a recurrence interval of 100-200 yr have generated strong motion and large tsunamis along the Nankai Trough subduction zone. At the Nankai Trough margin, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) is being subducted beneath the Eurasian Plate to the northwest at a convergence rate ~4 cm/yr. The Shikoku Basin, the northern part of the PSP, is estimated to have opened between 25 and 15 Ma by backarc spreading of the Izu-Bonin arc. The >100-km-wide Nankai accretionary wedge, which has developed landward of the trench since the Miocene, mainly consists of offscraped and underplated materials from the trough-fill turbidites and the Shikoku Basin hemipelagic sediments. Particularly, physical properties of the incoming hemipelagic sediments may be critical for seismogenic behavior of the megathrust fault. We have carried out core-log-seismic integration (CLSI) to estimate 3D acoustic impedance and porosity for the incoming sediments in the Nankai Trough. For the CLSI, we used 3D seismic reflection data, P-wave velocity and density data obtained during IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) Expeditions 322 and 333. We computed acoustic impedance depth profiles for the IODP drilling sites from P-wave velocity and density data. We constructed seismic convolution models with the acoustic impedance profiles and a source wavelet which is extracted from the seismic data, adjusting the seismic models to observed seismic traces with inversion method. As a result, we obtained 3D acoustic impedance volume and then converted it to 3D porosity volume. In general, the 3D porosities show decrease with depth. We found a porosity anomaly zone with alteration of high and low porosities seaward of the trough axis. In this talk, we will show detailed 3D porosity of the incoming sediments, and present implications of the porosity anomaly zone for the

  13. Distributed Network, Wireless and Cloud Computing Enabled 3-D Ultrasound; a New Medical Technology Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud) computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people. PMID:19936236

  14. Distributed network, wireless and cloud computing enabled 3-D ultrasound; a new medical technology paradigm.

    PubMed

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud) computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people. PMID:19936236

  15. Assessments for 3d Reconstructions of Cultural Heritage Using Digital Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manferdini, A. M.; Galassi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this contribution is to show the results of evaluations on 3D digitizations performed using different methodologies and technologies. In particular, for surveys conducted at the architectural and urban scale, the recent reduction of costs related to Time of Flight and phase shift laser scanners is actually enhancing the replacement of traditional topographic instruments (i.e. total stations) with range-based technologies for the acquisition of 3D data related to built heritage. If compared to surveys performed using traditional topographic technologies, range-based ones offer a wide range of advantages, but they also require different skills, procedures and times. The present contribution shows the results of a practical application of both approaches on the same case study. Another application was suggested by the recent developments in the photogrammetric field that enhance the improvement of software able to automatically orient uncalibrated cameras and derive dense and accurate 3D point clouds, with evident benefits in reduction of costs required for survey equipment. Therefore, the presented case study constituted the occasion to compare a rangebased survey with a fast 3D acquisition and modelling using a Structure from Motion solution. These survey procedures were adopted at an architectural scale, on a single building, that was surveyed both on the outside and on the inside. Assessments on the quality of the rebuilt information is reported, as far as metric accuracy and reliability is concerned, as well as on time consuming and on skills required during each step of the adopted pipelines. For all approaches, these analysis highlighted advantages and disadvantages that allow to conduct evaluations on the possible convenience of adopting range-based technologies instead of a traditional topographic approach or a photogrammetric one instead of a range based one in case of surveys conducted at an architectural/urban scale.

  16. Characterization of ABS specimens produced via the 3D printing technology for drone structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Carlo Giovanni; Brischetto, Salvatore; Torre, Roberto; Maggiore, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) technology is widely used in rapid prototyping. 3D printers for home desktop applications are usually employed to make non-structural objects. When the mechanical stresses are not excessive, this technology can also be successfully employed to produce structural objects, not only in prototyping stage but also in the realization of series pieces. The innovative idea of the present work is the application of this technology, implemented in a desktop 3D printer, to the realization of components for aeronautical use, especially for unmanned aerial systems. For this purpose, the paper is devoted to the statistical study of the performance of a desktop 3D printer to understand how the process performs and which are the boundary limits of acceptance. Mechanical and geometrical properties of ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) specimens, such as tensile strength and stiffness, have been evaluated. ASTM638 type specimens have been used. A capability analysis has been applied for both mechanical and dimensional performances. Statistically stable limits have been determined using experimentally collected data.

  17. Intracranial Catheter for Integrated 3D Ultrasound Imaging & Hyperthermia: Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herickhoff, Carl D.; Light, Edward D.; Bing, Kristin Frinkley; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Grant, Gerald A.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Dixon-Tulloch, Ellen; Shih, Timothy; Hsu, Stephen J.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of an intracranial catheter transducer capable of real-time 3D (RT3D) imaging and ultrasound hyperthermia, for application in the visualization and treatment of tumors in the brain. We designed and constructed a 12 Fr, integrated matrix and linear array catheter transducer prototype for combined RT3D imaging and heating capability. This dual-mode catheter incorporated 153 matrix array elements and 11 linear array elements, on a 0.2 mm pitch, with a total aperture size of 8.4 mm×2.3 mm. This array achieved a 3.5° C in vitro temperature rise at a 2 cm focal distance in tissue-mimicking material. The dual-mode catheter prototype was compared with a Siemens 10 Fr AcuNav™ catheter as a gold standard in experiments assessing image quality and therapeutic potential, and both probes were used in a canine brain model to image anatomical structures and color Doppler blood flow and to attempt in vivo heating.

  18. Application of CART3D to Complex Propulsion-Airframe Integration with Vehicle Sketch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) is an easy-to-use modeler used to generate aircraft geometries for use in conceptual design and analysis. It has been used in the past to generate metageometries for aerodynamic analyses ranging from handbook methods to Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD). As desirable as it is to bring high order analyses, such as CFD, into the conceptual design process, this has been difficult and time consuming in practice due to the manual nature of both surface and volume grid generation. Over the last couple of years, VSP has had a major upgrade of its surface triangulation and export capability. This has enhanced its ability to work with Cart3D, an inviscid, three dimensional fluid flow toolset. The combination of VSP and Cart3D allows performing inviscid CFD on complex geometries with relatively high productivity. This paper will illustrate the use of VSP with Cart3D through an example case of a complex propulsion-airframe integration (PAI) of an over-wing nacelle (OWN) airliner configuration.

  19. Integration of 3D Structure from Disparity into Biological Motion Perception Independent of Depth Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Images projected onto the retinas of our two eyes come from slightly different directions in the real world, constituting binocular disparity that serves as an important source for depth perception - the ability to see the world in three dimensions. It remains unclear whether the integration of disparity cues into visual perception depends on the conscious representation of stereoscopic depth. Here we report evidence that, even without inducing discernible perceptual representations, the disparity-defined depth information could still modulate the visual processing of 3D objects in depth-irrelevant aspects. Specifically, observers who could not discriminate disparity-defined in-depth facing orientations of biological motions (i.e., approaching vs. receding) due to an excessive perceptual bias nevertheless exhibited a robust perceptual asymmetry in response to the indistinguishable facing orientations, similar to those who could consciously discriminate such 3D information. These results clearly demonstrate that the visual processing of biological motion engages the disparity cues independent of observers’ depth awareness. The extraction and utilization of binocular depth signals thus can be dissociable from the conscious representation of 3D structure in high-level visual perception. PMID:24586622

  20. TIPs for Technology Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Susan; Sorge, Dennis H.; Russell, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of the teacher in effectively using technology in education based on the Technology Integration Project (TIP). Topics include why use technology; types of computer software; how to select software; software integration strategies; and effectively planning lessons that integrate the chosen software and integration strategy. (LRW)

  1. Fully analytical integration over the 3D volume bounded by the β sphere in topological atoms.

    PubMed

    Popelier, Paul L A

    2011-11-17

    Atomic properties of a topological atom are obtained by 3D integration over the volume of its atomic basin. Algorithms that compute atomic properties typically integrate over two subspaces: the volume bounded by the so-called β sphere, which is centered at the nucleus and completely contained within the atomic basin, and the volume of the remaining part of the basin. Here we show how the usual quadrature over the β sphere volume can be replaced by a fully analytical 3D integration leading to the atomic charge (monopole moment) for s, p, and d functions. Spherical tensor multipole moments have also been implemented and tested up to hexadecupole for s functions only, and up to quadrupole for s and p functions. The new algorithm is illustrated by operating on capped glycine (HF/6-31G, 35 molecular orbitals (MOs), 322 Gaussian primitives, 19 nuclei), the protein crambin (HF/3-21G, 1260 MOs, 5922 primitives and 642 nuclei), and tin (Z = 50) in Sn(2)(CH(3))(2) (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ and LANL2DZ, 59 MOs, 1352 primitives). PMID:21978204

  2. Scipion: A software framework toward integration, reproducibility and validation in 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Quintana, A; Del Cano, L; Zaldívar, A; Foche, I; Gutiérrez, J; Gómez-Blanco, J; Burguet-Castell, J; Cuenca-Alba, J; Abrishami, V; Vargas, J; Otón, J; Sharov, G; Vilas, J L; Navas, J; Conesa, P; Kazemi, M; Marabini, R; Sorzano, C O S; Carazo, J M

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) has undergone a revolution in instrumentation and methodology. One of the central players in this wide-reaching change is the continuous development of image processing software. Here we present Scipion, a software framework for integrating several 3DEM software packages through a workflow-based approach. Scipion allows the execution of reusable, standardized, traceable and reproducible image-processing protocols. These protocols incorporate tools from different programs while providing full interoperability among them. Scipion is an open-source project that can be downloaded from http://scipion.cnb.csic.es. PMID:27108186

  3. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation. PMID:26234364

  4. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Nathan J.; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-08-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  5. 220GHz wideband 3D imaging radar for concealed object detection technology development and phenomenology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Macfarlane, David G.; Bryllert, Tomas

    2016-05-01

    We present a 220 GHz 3D imaging `Pathfinder' radar developed within the EU FP7 project CONSORTIS (Concealed Object Stand-Off Real-Time Imaging for Security) which has been built to address two objectives: (i) to de-risk the radar hardware development and (ii) to enable the collection of phenomenology data with ~1 cm3 volumetric resolution. The radar combines a DDS-based chirp generator and self-mixing multiplier technology to achieve a 30 GHz bandwidth chirp with such high linearity that the raw point response is close to ideal and only requires minor nonlinearity compensation. The single transceiver is focused with a 30 cm lens mounted on a gimbal to acquire 3D volumetric images of static test targets and materials.

  6. Integrating 3D seismic curvature and curvature gradient attributes for fracture characterization: Methodologies and interpretational implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Dengliang

    2013-03-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, curvature is a popular attribute that depicts the geometry of seismic reflectors and has been widely used to detect faults in the subsurface; however, it provides only part of the solutions to subsurface structure analysis. This study extends the curvature algorithm to a new curvature gradient algorithm, and integrates both algorithms for fracture detection using a 3D seismic test data set over Teapot Dome (Wyoming). In fractured reservoirs at Teapot Dome known to be formed by tectonic folding and faulting, curvature helps define the crestal portion of the reservoirs that is associated with strong seismic amplitude and high oil productivity. In contrast, curvature gradient helps better define the regional northwest-trending and the cross-regional northeast-trending lineaments that are associated with weak seismic amplitude and low oil productivity. In concert with previous reports from image logs, cores, and outcrops, the current study based on an integrated seismic curvature and curvature gradient analysis suggests that curvature might help define areas of enhanced potential to form tensile fractures, whereas curvature gradient might help define zones of enhanced potential to develop shear fractures. In certain fractured reservoirs such as at Teapot Dome where faulting and fault-related folding contribute dominantly to the formation and evolution of fractures, curvature and curvature gradient attributes can be potentially applied to differentiate fracture mode, to predict fracture intensity and orientation, to detect fracture volume and connectivity, and to model fracture networks.

  7. 3D simulation of integrated multi-coil ICP source with azimuthal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brcka, Jozef

    2015-09-01

    Integrated multi-coil (IMC) planar ICP source with azimuthal motion is presented. Scaling ICP sources to larger substrate size is always complicated due to many technical issues and is challenged by the plasma chemistry. The source described in this work has capability of azimuthally moving plasma and has potential for large area and high density plasma applications. Hence, this system does not have an ideal axial symmetry, the 3D model approach has to be used to assess its transient performance. Moreover, reactor walls are imposing stronger boundary conditions on distribution of the radicals in ``off-axis reactive plasma.'' Intrinsic asymmetry of source and plasma were investigated by 3D fluid model developed under Plasma Module framework and supported by COMSOL Multiphysics solvers. Operation modes have potential to control plasma distribution, reaction chemistry and increase/modulate radicals' production. Simulation confirmed assumption that plasma distribution may essentially change in different gas. Under specific conditions integrated multi-coil ICP source is producing pulsed plasma. Temporal, spatial and population plasma characteristics were investigated in an inert carrier gas (Ar) and reactive plasma consisting of several gases (Ar, H2, CO and CH4).

  8. Active and Passive 3d Imaging Technologies Applied to Waterlogged Wooden Artifacts from Shipwrecks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandiera, A.; Alfonso, C.; Auriemma, R.

    2015-04-01

    The fragility of organic artefacts in presence of water and their volumetric variation caused by the marine life on or surrounding them dictate that their physical dimensions be measured soon after their extraction from the seabed. In an ideal context, it would be appropriate to preserve and restore all the archaeological elements, rapidly and with the latest methods. Unfortunately however, the large number of artefacts makes the cost of such an operation prohibitive for a public institution. For this reason, digital technologies for documentation, restoration, display and conservation are being considered by many institutions working with limited budgets. In this paper, we illustrate the experience of the University of Salento in 3D imaging technology for waterlogged wooden artefacts from shipwrecks. The interest originates from the need to develop a protocol for documentation and digital restoration of archaeological finds discovered along the coast of Torre S. Sabina (BR) Italy. This work has allowed us to explore recent technologies for 3D acquisitions, both underwater and in the laboratory, as well as methods for data processing. These technologies have permitted us to start defining a protocol to follow for all waterlogged wooden artefacts requiring documentation and restoration.

  9. Algorithm development with the integrated vision system to get the 3D location data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-hyeon; Kim, Moo-hyun; Kim, Yeong-kyeong; Park, Mu-hun

    2011-10-01

    This paper introduces an Integrated Vision System that enables us to detect the image of slabs and coils and get the complete three dimensional location data without any other obstacles in the field of unmanned-crane automation system. Existing laser scanner research tends to be easily influenced by the environment of the work place and therefore cannot give the exact location information. Also, CCD cameras have some problems recognizing the pattern because of the illumination intensity caused in an industrial setting. To overcome these two weaknesses, this thesis suggests laser scanners should be combined with a CCD camera named Integrated Vision System. This system can draw clearer pictures and take advanced 3D location information. The suggested system is expected to help improve the unmanned-crane automation system.

  10. CISUS: an integrated 3D ultrasound system for IGT using a modular tracking API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Viswanathan, Anand; Pieper, Steve; Choti, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Kikinis, Ron; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2004-05-01

    Ultrasound has become popular in clinical/surgical applications, both as the primary image guidance modality and also in conjunction with other modalities like CT or MRI. Three dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) systems have also demonstrated usefulness in image-guided therapy (IGT). At the same time, however, current lack of open-source and open-architecture multi-modal medical visualization systems prevents 3DUS from fulfilling its potential. Several stand-alone 3DUS systems, like Stradx or In-Vivo exist today. Although these systems have been found to be useful in real clinical setting, it is difficult to augment their functionality and integrate them in versatile IGT systems. To address these limitations, a robotic/freehand 3DUS open environment (CISUS) is being integrated into the 3D Slicer, an open-source research tool developed for medical image analysis and surgical planning. In addition, the system capitalizes on generic application programming interfaces (APIs) for tracking devices and robotic control. The resulting platform-independent open-source system may serve as a valuable tool to the image guided surgery community. Other researchers could straightforwardly integrate the generic CISUS system along with other functionalities (i.e. dual view visualization, registration, real-time tracking, segmentation, etc) to rapidly create their medical/surgical applications. Our current driving clinical application is robotically assisted and freehand 3DUS-guided liver ablation, which is fully being integrated under the CISUS-3D Slicer. Initial functionality and pre-clinical feasibility are demonstrated on phantom and ex-vivo animal models.

  11. 77 FR 4982 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding the Smith-Lever 3(d) Extension Integrated Pest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ...-Lever 3(d) Extension Integrated Pest Management Competitive Grants Program AGENCY: National Institute of...(d) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. 343(d)) to provide the ] opportunity for 1862 and 1890 Land... agency, CSREES, on October 6, 2008 and March 26, 2009 about the restructuring of the Smith-Lever 3(d)...

  12. Optimizing Computer Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon-Marable, Elizabeth; Valentine, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand what optimal computer technology integration looks like in adult basic skills education (ABSE). One question guided the research: How is computer technology integration best conceptualized and measured? The study used the Delphi method to map the construct of computer technology integration and…

  13. Illustrating Surface Shape in Volume Data via Principal Direction-Driven 3D Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional shape and relative depth of a smoothly curving layered transparent surface may be communicated particularly effectively when the surface is artistically enhanced with sparsely distributed opaque detail. This paper describes how the set of principal directions and principal curvatures specified by local geometric operators can be understood to define a natural 'flow' over the surface of an object, and can be used to guide the placement of the lines of a stroke texture that seeks to represent 3D shape information in a perceptually intuitive way. The driving application for this work is the visualization of layered isovalue surfaces in volume data, where the particular identity of an individual surface is not generally known a priori and observers will typically wish to view a variety of different level surfaces from the same distribution, superimposed over underlying opaque structures. By advecting an evenly distributed set of tiny opaque particles, and the empty space between them, via 3D line integral convolution through the vector field defined by the principal directions and principal curvatures of the level surfaces passing through each gridpoint of a 3D volume, it is possible to generate a single scan-converted solid stroke texture that may intuitively represent the essential shape information of any level surface in the volume. To generate longer strokes over more highly curved areas, where the directional information is both most stable and most relevant, and to simultaneously downplay the visual impact of directional information in the flatter regions, one may dynamically redefine the length of the filter kernel according to the magnitude of the maximum principal curvature of the level surface at the point around which it is applied.

  14. High-temperature compatible 3D-integration processes for a vacuum-sealed CNT-based NEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, R.; Lee, S. W.; Akiyama, T.; Briand, D.; Roman, C.; Hierold, C.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2013-03-01

    A System-in-Package (SiP) concept for the 3D-integration of a Single Wall Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) resonator with its CMOS driving electronics is presented. The key element of this advanced SiP is the monolithic 3D-integration of the MEMS with the CMOS electronics using Through Silicon Vias (TSVs) on an SOI wafer. This SiP includes: A glass cap vacuum-sealed to the main wafer using an eutectic bonding process: a low leak rate of 2.7 10-9 mbar•l/s was obtained; Platinum-TSVs, compatible with the SWCNT growth and release process; The TSVs were developed in a "via first" process and characterized at high-temperature — up to 850 °C. An ohmic contact between the Pt-metallization and the SOI silicon device layer was obtained; The driving CMOS electronic device is assembled to the MEMS using an Au stud bump technology. Keywords: System-in-Package (SiP), vacuum packaging, eutectic bonding, "via-first" TSVs, high-temperature platinum interconnects, ohmic contacts, Au-stud bumps assembly, CMOS electronics.

  15. Low cost 3D-printing used in an undergraduate project: an integrating sphere for measurement of photoluminescence quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomes, John J.; Finlayson, Chris E.

    2016-09-01

    We report upon the exploitation of the latest 3D printing technologies to provide low-cost instrumentation solutions, for use in an undergraduate level final-year project. The project addresses prescient research issues in optoelectronics, which would otherwise be inaccessible to such undergraduate student projects. The experimental use of an integrating sphere in conjunction with a desktop spectrometer presents opportunities to use easily handled, low cost materials as a means to illustrate many areas of physics such as spectroscopy, lasers, optics, simple circuits, black body radiation and data gathering. Presented here is a 3rd year undergraduate physics project which developed a low cost (£25) method to manufacture an experimentally accurate integrating sphere by 3D printing. Details are given of both a homemade internal reflectance coating formulated from readily available materials, and a robust instrument calibration method using a tungsten bulb. The instrument is demonstrated to give accurate and reproducible experimental measurements of luminescence quantum yield of various semiconducting fluorophores, in excellent agreement with literature values.

  16. The Avignon Bridge: a 3d Reconstruction Project Integrating Archaeological, Historical and Gemorphological Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelot, M.; Nony, N.; Gugi, L.; Bishop, A.; De Luca, L.

    2015-02-01

    The history and identity of the Avignon's bridge is inseparable from that of the Rhône river. Therefore, in order to share the history and memory of the Rhône, it is essential to get to know this bridge and especially to identify and make visible the traces of its past, its construction, its interaction with the river dynamics, which greatly influenced his life. These are the objectives of the PAVAGE project that focuses on digitally surveying, modelling and re-visiting a heritage site of primary importance with the aim of virtually restoring the link between the two sides which, after the disappearance of the Roman bridge of Arles, constituted for a long time the only connection between Lyon or Vienna and the sea. Therefore, this project has an important geo-historical dimension for which geo-morphological and paleoenvironmental studies were implemented in connection with the latest digital simulation methods exploiting geographic information systems. By integrating knowledge and reflections of archaeologists, historians, geomorphologists, environmentalists, architects, engineers and computer scientists, the result of this project (which involved 5 laboratories during 4 years) is a 3D digital model covering an extension of 50 km2 achieved by integrating satellite imagery, UAV-based acquisitions, terrestrial laser scanning and photogrammetry, etc. Beyond the actions of scientific valorisation concerning the historical and geomorphological dimensions of the project, the results of this work of this interdisciplinary investigation and interpretation of this site are today integrated within a location-based augmented reality application allowing tourists to exploring the virtual reconstruction of the bridge and its environment through tablets inside the portion of territory covered by this project (between Avignon and Villeneuve-lez-Avignon). This paper presents the main aspects of the 3D virtual reconstruction approach.

  17. Comparative analysis of video processing and 3D rendering for cloud video games using different virtualization technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, Adedayo; Alcaraz-Calero, Jose M.; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive empirical performance evaluation of 3D video processing employing the physical/virtual architecture implemented in a cloud environment. Different virtualization technologies, virtual video cards and various 3D benchmarks tools have been utilized in order to analyse the optimal performance in the context of 3D online gaming applications. This study highlights 3D video rendering performance under each type of hypervisors, and other factors including network I/O, disk I/O and memory usage. Comparisons of these factors under well-known virtual display technologies such as VNC, Spice and Virtual 3D adaptors reveal the strengths and weaknesses of the various hypervisors with respect to 3D video rendering and streaming.

  18. First Steps Towards AN Integrated Citygml-Based 3d Model of Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agugiaro, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents and discusses the results regarding the initial steps (selection, analysis, preparation and eventual integration of a number of datasets) for the creation of an integrated, semantic, three-dimensional, and CityGML-based virtual model of the city of Vienna. CityGML is an international standard conceived specifically as information and data model for semantic city models at urban and territorial scale. It is being adopted by more and more cities all over the world. The work described in this paper is embedded within the European Marie-Curie ITN project "Ci-nergy, Smart cities with sustainable energy systems", which aims, among the rest, at developing urban decision making and operational optimisation software tools to minimise non-renewable energy use in cities. Given the scope and scale of the project, it is therefore vital to set up a common, unique and spatio-semantically coherent urban model to be used as information hub for all applications being developed. This paper reports about the experiences done so far, it describes the test area and the available data sources, it shows and exemplifies the data integration issues, the strategies developed to solve them in order to obtain the integrated 3D city model. The first results as well as some comments about their quality and limitations are presented, together with the discussion regarding the next steps and some planned improvements.

  19. A CNN-based approach to integrate the 3-D turbolent diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunnari, G.

    2003-04-01

    The paper deals with the integration of the 3-D turbulent diffusion equation. This problem is relevant in several application fields including fluid dynamics, air/water pollution, volcanic ash emissions and industrial hazard assessment. As it is well known numerical solution of such a kind of equation is very time consuming even by using modern digital computers and this represents a short-coming for on-line applications. To overcome this drawback a Cellular Neural Network Approach is proposed in this paper. CNN's proposed by Chua and Yang in 1988 are massive parallel analog non-linear circuits with local interconnections between the computing elements that allow very fast distributed computations. Nowadays several producers of semiconductors such as SGS-Thomson are producing on chip CNN's so that their massive use for heavy computing applications is expected in the near future. In the paper the methodological background of the proposed approach will be outlined. Further some results both in terms of accuracy and computation time will be presented also in comparison with traditional three-dimensional computation schemes. Some results obtained to model 3-D pollution problems in the industrial area of Siracusa (Italy), characterised by a large concentration of petrol-chemical plants, will be presented.

  20. The cross-correlation between 3D cosmic shear and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieser, Britta; Merkel, Philipp M.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first calculation of the cross-correlation between 3D cosmic shear and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (iSW) effect. Both signals are combined in a single formalism, which permits the computation of the full covariance matrix. In order to avoid the uncertainties presented by the non-linear evolution of the matter power spectrum and intrinsic alignments of galaxies, our analysis is restricted to large scales, i.e. multipoles below ℓ = 1000. We demonstrate in a Fisher analysis that this reduction compared to other studies of 3D weak lensing extending to smaller scales is compensated by the information that is gained if the additional iSW signal and in particular its cross-correlation with lensing data are considered. Given the observational standards of upcoming weak-lensing surveys like Euclid, marginal errors on cosmological parameters decrease by 10 per cent compared to a cosmic shear experiment if both types of information are combined without a cosmic wave background (CMB) prior. Once the constraining power of CMB data is added, the improvement becomes marginal.

  1. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerfi, Y.; Doucet, J. B.; Larrieu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness.

  2. Multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering simulations using 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Miller, Corey A; Hinders, Mark K

    2012-02-01

    We have implemented three-dimensional (3D) elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations to model Lamb wave scattering for two flaw-types in an aircraft-grade aluminum plate, a rounded rectangle flat-bottom hole and a disbond of the same shape. The plate thickness and flaws explored in this work include frequency-thickness regions where several Lamb wave modes exist and sometimes overlap in phase and/or group velocity. For the case of the flat-bottom hole the depth was incrementally increased to explore progressive changes in multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering due to the damage. The flat-bottom hole simulation results have been compared to experimental data and are shown to provide key insight for this well-defined experimental case by explaining unexpected results in experimental waveforms. For the rounded rectangle disbond flaw, which would be difficult to implement experimentally, we found that Lamb wave behavior differed significantly from the flat-bottom hole flaw. Most of the literature in this field is restricted to low frequency-thickness regions due to difficulties in interpreting data when multiple modes exist. We found that benchmarked 3D EFIT simulations can yield an understanding of scattering behavior for these higher frequency-thickness regions and in cases that would be difficult to set up experimentally. Additionally, our results show that 2D simulations would not have been sufficient for modeling the complicated scattering that occurred. PMID:21908011

  3. Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.

    2009-04-01

    Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology S. Scherer1, E. Cristea1, O. Huber1, A. Krenn1 1 ALICONA GmbH Graz, Austria The need for increasing accuracy is a characteristic of all geo-applications, and hence of the instruments contributing to obtaining relevant data. Small and fine sensors are being developed, measuring different parameters of our geosystem and requiring continuous validation and calibration. These sensors have often very small components (fine sensors able to sense dust, atmospheric water vapour characteristics, pressure change, gravimeters, satellite micro-components), showing complex topographies including steep flanks and having varying reflective properties. In order to get valid and reliable results, quality assurance of these instruments and sensors is required. The optical technology Focus-Variation, developed by Alicona and added in the latest draft of the upcoming ISO standard 25178, provides high resolution 3D surface metrology even at those complex topographies. The technique of Focus-Variation combines the small depth of focus of an optical system with vertical scanning to provide topographical and color information from the variation of focus. It is used for high-resolution optical 3D surface measurements. The traceable and repeatable measurement results are further being used for calibration and validation purposes. Some of the characteristics of the technology are: - Measurement of instruments / samples with steep flanks up to 80° - Measurement of materials with strongly varying reflection properties - Measurement of surfaces presenting fine (from 10nm) or strong roughness Here, we present the operating principle and possible applications of the optical 3D measurement system "InfiniteFocus", which is based on the technology of Focus-Variation and used for quality assurance in the lab and in production. With the vertical resolution of up to 10nm, InfiniteFocus yields meaningful form and

  4. Avionics systems integration technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stech, George; Williams, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A very dramatic and continuing explosion in digital electronics technology has been taking place in the last decade. The prudent and timely application of this technology will provide Army aviation the capability to prevail against a numerically superior enemy threat. The Army and NASA have exploited this technology explosion in the development and application of avionics systems integration technology for new and future aviation systems. A few selected Army avionics integration technology base efforts are discussed. Also discussed is the Avionics Integration Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) that NASA has established at Langley for research into the integration and validation of avionics systems, and evaluation of advanced technology in a total systems context.

  5. Helicopter Flight Test of 3-D Imaging Flash LIDAR Technology for Safe, Autonomous, and Precise Planetary Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, Vincent; Bulyshev, Alexander; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reisse, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Two flash lidars, integrated from a number of cutting-edge components from industry and NASA, are lab characterized and flight tested for determination of maximum operational range under the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project (in its fourth development and field test cycle) which is seeking to develop a guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) and sensing system based on lidar technology capable of enabling safe, precise crewed or robotic landings in challenging terrain on planetary bodies under any ambient lighting conditions. The flash lidars incorporate pioneering 3-D imaging cameras based on Indium-Gallium-Arsenide Avalanche Photo Diode (InGaAs APD) and novel micro-electronic technology for a 128 x 128 pixel array operating at 30 Hz, high pulse-energy 1.06 micrometer Nd:YAG lasers, and high performance transmitter and receiver fixed and zoom optics. The two flash lidars are characterized on the NASA-Langley Research Center (LaRC) Sensor Test Range, integrated with other portions of the ALHAT GN&C system from partner organizations into an instrument pod at NASA-JPL, integrated onto an Erickson Aircrane Helicopter at NASA-Dryden, and flight tested at the Edwards AFB Rogers dry lakebed over a field of human-made geometric hazards during the summer of 2010. Results show that the maximum operational range goal of 1 km is met and exceeded up to a value of 1.2 km. In addition, calibrated 3-D images of several hazards are acquired in real-time for later reconstruction into Digital Elevation Maps (DEM's).

  6. Helicopter flight test of 3D imaging flash LIDAR technology for safe, autonomous, and precise planetary landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roback, Vincent; Bulyshev, Alexander; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reisse, Robert

    2013-05-01

    Two flash lidars, integrated from a number of cutting-edge components from industry and NASA, are lab characterized and flight tested for determination of maximum operational range under the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project (in its fourth development and field test cycle) which is seeking to develop a guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) and sensing system based on lidar technology capable of enabling safe, precise crewed or robotic landings in challenging terrain on planetary bodies under any ambient lighting conditions. The flash lidars incorporate pioneering 3-D imaging cameras based on Indium-Gallium-Arsenide Avalanche Photo Diode (InGaAs APD) and novel micro-electronic technology for a 128 x 128 pixel array operating at 30 Hz, high pulse-energy 1.06 μm Nd:YAG lasers, and high performance transmitter and receiver fixed and zoom optics. The two flash lidars are characterized on the NASA-Langley Research Center (LaRC) Sensor Test Range, integrated with other portions of the ALHAT GNC system from partner organizations into an instrument pod at NASA-JPL, integrated onto an Erickson Aircrane Helicopter at NASA-Dryden, and flight tested at the Edwards AFB Rogers dry lakebed over a field of humanmade geometric hazards during the summer of 2010. Results show that the maximum operational range goal of 1 km is met and exceeded up to a value of 1.2 km. In addition, calibrated 3-D images of several hazards are acquired in realtime for later reconstruction into Digital Elevation Maps (DEM's).

  7. Real-time computer-generated integral imaging and 3D image calibration for augmented reality surgical navigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junchen; Suenaga, Hideyuki; Liao, Hongen; Hoshi, Kazuto; Yang, Liangjing; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Autostereoscopic 3D image overlay for augmented reality (AR) based surgical navigation has been studied and reported many times. For the purpose of surgical overlay, the 3D image is expected to have the same geometric shape as the original organ, and can be transformed to a specified location for image overlay. However, how to generate a 3D image with high geometric fidelity and quantitative evaluation of 3D image's geometric accuracy have not been addressed. This paper proposes a graphics processing unit (GPU) based computer-generated integral imaging pipeline for real-time autostereoscopic 3D display, and an automatic closed-loop 3D image calibration paradigm for displaying undistorted 3D images. Based on the proposed methods, a novel AR device for 3D image surgical overlay is presented, which mainly consists of a 3D display, an AR window, a stereo camera for 3D measurement, and a workstation for information processing. The evaluation on the 3D image rendering performance with 2560×1600 elemental image resolution shows the rendering speeds of 50-60 frames per second (fps) for surface models, and 5-8 fps for large medical volumes. The evaluation of the undistorted 3D image after the calibration yields sub-millimeter geometric accuracy. A phantom experiment simulating oral and maxillofacial surgery was also performed to evaluate the proposed AR overlay device in terms of the image registration accuracy, 3D image overlay accuracy, and the visual effects of the overlay. The experimental results show satisfactory image registration and image overlay accuracy, and confirm the system usability. PMID:25465067

  8. FDSOI bottom MOSFETs stability versus top transistor thermal budget featuring 3D monolithic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenouillet-Beranger, C.; Previtali, B.; Batude, P.; Nemouchi, F.; Cassé, M.; Garros, X.; Tosti, L.; Rambal, N.; Lafond, D.; Dansas, H.; Pasini, L.; Brunet, L.; Deprat, F.; Grégoire, M.; Mellier, M.; Vinet, M.

    2015-11-01

    To set up specification for 3D monolithic integration, for the first time, the thermal stability of state-of-the-art FDSOI (Fully Depleted SOI) transistors electrical performance is quantified. Post fabrication annealings are performed on FDSOI transistors to mimic the thermal budget associated to top layer processing. Degradation of the silicide for thermal treatments beyond 400 °C is identified as the main responsible for performance degradation for PMOS devices. For the NMOS transistors, arsenic (As) and phosphorus (P) dopants deactivation adds up to this effect. By optimizing both the n-type extension implantations and the bottom silicide process, thermal stability of FDSOI can be extended to allow relaxing upwards the thermal budget authorized for top transistors processing.

  9. 3D-NTT: a versatile integral field spectro-imager for the NTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelin, M.; Amram, P.; Balard, P.; Balkowski, C.; Boissin, O.; Boulesteix, J.; Carignan, C.; Daigle, O.; de Denus Baillargeon, M.-M.; Epinat, B.; Gach, J.-L.; Hernandez, O.; Rigaud, F.; Vallée, P.

    2008-07-01

    The 3D-NTT is a visible integral field spectro-imager offering two modes. A low resolution mode (R ~ 300 to 6 000) with a large field of view Tunable Filter (17'x17') and a high resolution mode (R ~ 10 000 to 40 000) with a scanning Fabry-Perot (7'x7'). It will be operated as a visitor instrument on the NTT from 2009. Two large programmes will be led: "Characterizing the interstellar medium of nearby galaxies with 2D maps of extinction and abundances" (PI M. Marcelin) and "Gas accretion and radiative feedback in the early universe" (PI J. Bland Hawthorn). Both will be mainly based on the Tunable Filter mode. This instrument is being built as a collaborative effort between LAM (Marseille), GEPI (Paris) and LAE (Montreal). The website adress of the instrument is : http://www.astro.umontreal.ca/3DNTT

  10. Integration of the virtual 3D model of a control system with the virtual controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbuś, K.; Ociepka, P.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the design process includes simulation analysis of different components of a constructed object. It involves the need for integration of different virtual object to simulate the whole investigated technical system. The paper presents the issues related to the integration of a virtual 3D model of a chosen control system of with a virtual controller. The goal of integration is to verify the operation of an adopted object of in accordance with the established control program. The object of the simulation work is the drive system of a tunneling machine for trenchless work. In the first stage of work was created an interactive visualization of functioning of the 3D virtual model of a tunneling machine. For this purpose, the software of the VR (Virtual Reality) class was applied. In the elaborated interactive application were created adequate procedures allowing controlling the drive system of a translatory motion, a rotary motion and the drive system of a manipulator. Additionally was created the procedure of turning on and off the output crushing head, mounted on the last element of the manipulator. In the elaborated interactive application have been established procedures for receiving input data from external software, on the basis of the dynamic data exchange (DDE), which allow controlling actuators of particular control systems of the considered machine. In the next stage of work, the program on a virtual driver, in the ladder diagram (LD) language, was created. The control program was developed on the basis of the adopted work cycle of the tunneling machine. The element integrating the virtual model of the tunneling machine for trenchless work with the virtual controller is the application written in a high level language (Visual Basic). In the developed application was created procedures responsible for collecting data from the running, in a simulation mode, virtual controller and transferring them to the interactive application, in which is verified the

  11. Integrated gravity and gravity gradient 3D inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Pengbo; Huang, Danian; Yuan, Yuan; Geng, Meixia; Liu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Gravity data, which are critical in mineral, oil, and gas exploration, are obtained from the vertical component of the gravity field, while gravity gradient data are measured from changes in the gravity field in three directions. However, few studies have sought to improve exploration techniques by integrating gravity and gravity gradient data using inversion methods. In this study, we developed a new method to integrate gravity and gravity gradient data in a 3D density inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient (NLCG) method and the minimum gradient support (MGS) functional to regularize the 3D inverse problem and to obtain a clear and accurate image of the anomalous body. The NLCG algorithm, which is suitable for solving large-scale nonlinear optimization problems and requires no memory storage, was compared to the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton algorithm and the results indicated that the convergence rate of NLCG is slower, but that the storage requirement and computation time is lower. To counteract the decay in kernel function, we introduced a depth weighting function for anomalous bodies at the same depth, with information about anomalous body depth obtained from well log and seismic exploration data. For anomalous bodies at different depths, we introduced a spatial gradient weighting function to incorporate additional information obtained in the inversion. We concluded that the spatial gradient weighting function enhanced the spatial resolution of the recovered model. Furthermore, our results showed that including multiple components for inversion increased the resolution of the recovered model. We validated our model by applying our inversion method to survey data from Vinton salt dome, Louisiana, USA. The results showed good agreement with known geologic information; thus confirming the accuracy of this approach.

  12. 3D scintigraphic imaging and navigation in radioguided surgery: freehand SPECT technology and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Christina; Matthies, Philipp; Herrmann, Ken; Povoski, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Freehand SPECT (fhSPECT) is a technology platform for providing 3-dimensional (3D) navigation for radioguided surgical procedures, such as sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy (SLNB). In addition to the information provided by conventional handheld gamma detection probes, fhSPECT allows for direct visualization of the distribution of radioactivity in any given region of interest, allowing for improved navigation to radioactive target lesions and providing accurate lesion depth measurements. Herein, we will review the currently available clinical data on the use of fhSPECT: (i) for SLNB of various malignancies, including difficult-to-detect SLNs, and (ii) for radioguided localization of solid tumors. Moreover, the combination of fhSPECT with other technologies (e.g., small field-of-view gamma cameras, and diagnostic ultrasound) is discussed. These technical advances have the potential to greatly expand the clinical application of radioguided surgery in the future. PMID:26878667

  13. A 3D bioprinting system to produce human-scale tissue constructs with structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Sang Jin; Ko, In Kap; Kengla, Carlos; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    A challenge for tissue engineering is producing three-dimensional (3D), vascularized cellular constructs of clinically relevant size, shape and structural integrity. We present an integrated tissue-organ printer (ITOP) that can fabricate stable, human-scale tissue constructs of any shape. Mechanical stability is achieved by printing cell-laden hydrogels together with biodegradable polymers in integrated patterns and anchored on sacrificial hydrogels. The correct shape of the tissue construct is achieved by representing clinical imaging data as a computer model of the anatomical defect and translating the model into a program that controls the motions of the printer nozzles, which dispense cells to discrete locations. The incorporation of microchannels into the tissue constructs facilitates diffusion of nutrients to printed cells, thereby overcoming the diffusion limit of 100-200 μm for cell survival in engineered tissues. We demonstrate capabilities of the ITOP by fabricating mandible and calvarial bone, cartilage and skeletal muscle. Future development of the ITOP is being directed to the production of tissues for human applications and to the building of more complex tissues and solid organs. PMID:26878319

  14. Challenge for 3D culture technology: Application in carcinogenesis studies with human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emura, M; Aufderheide, M

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is still one of the major intractable diseases and we urgently need more efficient preventive and curative measures. Recent molecular studies have provided strong evidence that allows us to believe that classically well-known early airway lesions such as hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma in situ are really precancerous lesions progressing toward cancer but not necessarily transient and reversible alteration. This suggests that adequate early control of the precancerous lesions may lead to improved prevention of lung cancer. This knowledge is encouraging in view of the imminent necessity for additional experimental systems to investigate the causal mechanisms of cancers directly in human cells and tissues. There are many questions with regard to various precancerous lesions of the airways. For example, should cells, before reaching a stage of invasive carcinoma, undergo all precancerous stages such as hyperplasia or metaplasia and dysplasia, or is there any shortcut to bypass one or more of the precancerous stages? For the study of such questions, the emerging 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture technology appears to provide an effective and valuable tool. Though a great challenge, it is expected that this in vitro technology will be rapidly and reliably improved to enable the cultures to be maintained in an in vivo-mimicking state of differentiation for much longer than a period of at best a few months, as is currently the case. With the help of a "causes recombination-Lox" (Cre-lox) technology, it has been possible to trace cells giving rise to specific lung tumor types. In this short review we have attempted to assess the future role of 3D technology in the study of lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26951634

  15. Using virtual reality technology and hand tracking technology to create software for training surgical skills in 3D game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirova, A. A.; Ganiev, B. A.; Mullin, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The lack of visible and approachable ways of training surgical skills is one of the main problems in medical education. Existing simulation training devices are not designed to teach students, and are not available due to the high cost of the equipment. Using modern technologies such as virtual reality and hands movements fixation technology we want to create innovative method of learning the technics of conducting operations in 3D game format, which can make education process interesting and effective. Creating of 3D format virtual simulator will allow to solve several conceptual problems at once: opportunity of practical skills improvement unlimited by the time without the risk for patient, high realism of environment in operational and anatomic body structures, using of game mechanics for information perception relief and memorization of methods acceleration, accessibility of this program.

  16. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals’ Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs’ behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals’ quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog’s shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  17. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Shanis; Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  18. Methodology for thermal budget reduction of SPER down to 450 °C for 3D sequential integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, F. P.; Pasini, L.; Sklénard, B.; Mathieu, B.; Licitra, C.; Batude, P.; Mazen, F.

    2016-03-01

    3D sequential integration enables the full use of the third dimension thanks to its unique contact density far above the possibilities of 3D packaging solutions. However, as the transistors are sequentially stacked over each other, the thermal budget allowed for the fabrication of the top transistor is limited by the maximal temperature accepted by the already made bottom one. It was previously described that a thermal budget of T > 500 °C is enough to degrade the bottom transistors performance. So the technological challenge is to develop low temperature routines for the fabrication of the top devices. For that, different processes have to be adapted, mainly the dopant activation step, where the T > 1000 °C spike annealing must be replaced. In this contribution, we present the feasibility to dope by solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPER) at 450 °C thin Si films (22 nm) containing high dopant concentration of 5 × 1020 at/cm3. For n- and p-type dopants, the 450 °C SPER rendered low sheet resistance values, as low as the ones obtained with the high temperature activation method.

  19. An integrated statistical model for enhanced murine cardiomyocyte differentiation via optimized engagement of 3D extracellular matrices

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jangwook P.; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) impacts stem cell differentiation, but identifying formulations supportive of differentiation is challenging in 3D models. Prior efforts involving combinatorial ECM arrays seemed intuitively advantageous. We propose an alternative that suggests reducing sample size and technological burden can be beneficial and accessible when coupled to design of experiments approaches. We predict optimized ECM formulations could augment differentiation of cardiomyocytes derived in vitro. We employed native chemical ligation to polymerize 3D poly (ethylene glycol) hydrogels under mild conditions while entrapping various combinations of ECM and murine induced pluripotent stem cells. Systematic optimization for cardiomyocyte differentiation yielded a predicted solution of 61%, 24%, and 15% of collagen type I, laminin-111, and fibronectin, respectively. This solution was confirmed by increased numbers of cardiac troponin T, α-myosin heavy chain and α-sarcomeric actinin-expressing cells relative to suboptimum solutions. Cardiomyocytes of composites exhibited connexin43 expression, appropriate contractile kinetics and intracellular calcium handling. Further, adding a modulator of adhesion, thrombospondin-1, abrogated cardiomyocyte differentiation. Thus, the integrated biomaterial platform statistically identified an ECM formulation best supportive of cardiomyocyte differentiation. In future, this formulation could be coupled with biochemical stimulation to improve functional maturation of cardiomyocytes derived in vitro or transplanted in vivo. PMID:26687770

  20. An integrated statistical model for enhanced murine cardiomyocyte differentiation via optimized engagement of 3D extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jangwook P; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J; Ogle, Brenda M

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) impacts stem cell differentiation, but identifying formulations supportive of differentiation is challenging in 3D models. Prior efforts involving combinatorial ECM arrays seemed intuitively advantageous. We propose an alternative that suggests reducing sample size and technological burden can be beneficial and accessible when coupled to design of experiments approaches. We predict optimized ECM formulations could augment differentiation of cardiomyocytes derived in vitro. We employed native chemical ligation to polymerize 3D poly (ethylene glycol) hydrogels under mild conditions while entrapping various combinations of ECM and murine induced pluripotent stem cells. Systematic optimization for cardiomyocyte differentiation yielded a predicted solution of 61%, 24%, and 15% of collagen type I, laminin-111, and fibronectin, respectively. This solution was confirmed by increased numbers of cardiac troponin T, α-myosin heavy chain and α-sarcomeric actinin-expressing cells relative to suboptimum solutions. Cardiomyocytes of composites exhibited connexin43 expression, appropriate contractile kinetics and intracellular calcium handling. Further, adding a modulator of adhesion, thrombospondin-1, abrogated cardiomyocyte differentiation. Thus, the integrated biomaterial platform statistically identified an ECM formulation best supportive of cardiomyocyte differentiation. In future, this formulation could be coupled with biochemical stimulation to improve functional maturation of cardiomyocytes derived in vitro or transplanted in vivo. PMID:26687770

  1. 3D printed microfluidic devices with integrated versatile and reusable electrodes.

    PubMed

    Erkal, Jayda L; Selimovic, Asmira; Gross, Bethany C; Lockwood, Sarah Y; Walton, Eric L; McNamara, Stephen; Martin, R Scott; Spence, Dana M

    2014-06-21

    We report two 3D printed devices that can be used for electrochemical detection. In both cases, the electrode is housed in commercially available, polymer-based fittings so that the various electrode materials (platinum, platinum black, carbon, gold, silver) can be easily added to a threaded receiving port printed on the device; this enables a module-like approach to the experimental design, where the electrodes are removable and can be easily repolished for reuse after exposure to biological samples. The first printed device represents a microfluidic platform with a 500 × 500 μm channel and a threaded receiving port to allow integration of either polyetheretherketone (PEEK) nut-encased glassy carbon or platinum black (Pt-black) electrodes for dopamine and nitric oxide (NO) detection, respectively. The embedded 1 mm glassy carbon electrode had a limit of detection (LOD) of 500 nM for dopamine and a linear response (R(2) = 0.99) for concentrations between 25-500 μM. When the glassy carbon electrode was coated with 0.05% Nafion, significant exclusion of nitrite was observed when compared to signal obtained from equimolar injections of dopamine. When using flow injection analysis with a Pt/Pt-black electrode and standards derived from NO gas, a linear correlation (R(2) = 0.99) over a wide range of concentrations (7.6-190 μM) was obtained, with the LOD for NO being 1 μM. The second application showcases a 3D printed fluidic device that allows collection of the biologically relevant analyte adenosine triphosphate (ATP) while simultaneously measuring the release stimulus (reduced oxygen concentration). The hypoxic sample (4.8 ± 0.5 ppm oxygen) released 2.4 ± 0.4 times more ATP than the normoxic sample (8.4 ± 0.6 ppm oxygen). Importantly, the results reported here verify the reproducible and transferable nature of using 3D printing as a fabrication technique, as devices and electrodes were moved between labs multiple times during completion of the study. PMID

  2. 3D Printed Microfluidic Devices with Integrated Versatile and Reusable Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Erkal, Jayda L.; Selimovic, Asmira; Gross, Bethany C.; Lockwood, Sarah Y.; Walton, Eric L.; McNamara, Stephen; Martin, R. Scott; Spence, Dana M.

    2014-01-01

    We report two 3D printed devices that can be used for electrochemical detection. In both cases, the electrode is housed in commercially available, polymer-based fittings so that the various electrode materials (platinum, platinum black, carbon, gold, silver) can be easily added to a threaded receiving port printed on the device; this enables a module-like approach to the experimental design, where the electrodes are removable and can be easily repolished for reuse after exposure to biological samples. The first printed device represents a microfluidic platform with a 500 × 500 μm channel and a threaded receiving port to allow integration of either polyetheretherketone (PEEK) nut-encased glassy carbon or platinum black (Pt-black) electrodes for dopamine and nitric oxide (NO) detection, respectively. The embedded 1 mm glassy carbon electrode had a limit of detection (LOD) of 500 nM for dopamine and a linear response (R2= 0.99) for concentrations between 25-500 μM. When the glassy carbon electrode was coated with 0.05% Nafion, significant exclusion of nitrite was observed when compared to signal obtained from equimolar injections of dopamine. When using flow injection analysis with a Pt/Pt-black electrode and standards derived from NO gas, a linear correlation (R2 = 0.99) over a wide range of concentrations (7.6 - 190 μM) was obtained, with the LOD for NO being 1 μM. The second application showcases a 3D printed fluidic device that allows collection of the biologically relevant analyte adenosine triphosphate (ATP) while simultaneously measuring the release stimulus (reduced oxygen concentration). The hypoxic sample (4.76 ± 0.53 ppm oxygen) released 2.37 ± 0.37 times more ATP than the normoxic sample (8.22 ± 0.60 ppm oxygen). Importantly, the results reported here verify the reproducible and transferable nature of using 3D printing as a fabrication technique, as devices and electrodes were moved between labs multiple times during completion of the study. PMID

  3. Availability study of CFD-based Mask3D simulation method for next generation lithography technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kawabata, Y.; Washitani, T.; Tanaka, S.; Maeda, S.; Mimotogi, S.

    2014-03-01

    In progress of lithography technologies, the importance of Mask3D analysis has been emphasized because the influence of mask topography effects is not avoidable to be increased explosively. An electromagnetic filed simulation method, such as FDTD, RCWA and FEM, is applied to analyze those complicated phenomena. We have investigated Constrained Interpolation Profile (CIP) method, which is one of the Method of Characteristics (MoC), for Mask3D analysis in optical lithography. CIP method can reproduce the phase of propagating waves with less numerical error by using high order polynomial function. The restrictions of grid distance are relaxed with spatial grid. Therefore this method reduces the number of grid points in complex structure. In this paper, we study the feasibility of CIP scheme applying a non-uniform and spatial-interpolated grid to practical mask patterns. The number of grid points might be increased in complex layout and topological structure since these structures require a dense grid to remain the fidelity of each design. We propose a spatial interpolation method based on CIP method same as time-domain interpolation to reduce the number of grid points to be computed. The simulation results of two meshing methods with spatial interpolation are shown.

  4. Impact of integrated 3D reservoir modeling/flow simulation on development of deepwater sands, Mars Field, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, C.S.; Johnston, J.R.; Juedeman, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    Prospect Mars is a major Gulf of Mexico deep water oil discovery made under joint partnership between operator Shell Offshore Inc. and partner British Petroleum Inc. The discovery lies in 3000 feet of water, located 130 miles southeast of New Orleans, Louisiana. The field was discovered in 1989 and to date 14 significant reservoir intervals from 10,000 to 19000 feet below sea level have been penetrated. Estimated recoverable reserves for the first phase of field development are in excess of 500 MMBE and development plans include installation of a 24 slot tension leg platform and two subsea wells, with first production in mid-1996. Over a two year period a comprehensive effort was directed at creating a new set of reservoir models utilizing an integrated software package developed at Shell E&P Technology Co. This package is able to incorporate pertinent geological, geophysical, and petrophysical data into 3-D reservoir models which can be used to: (1) estimate reservoir quantity, quality, and continuity, (2) predict reservoir production performance, (3) select development well locations, and (4) facilitate reserve estimation. This software allows interpretations from 3-D seismic, well control, and analog outcrops to be effectively integrated and passed to the reservoir model for flow simulation. This integrated effort at modeling ensured a more realistic reservoir picture upon which to base field development. Almost all the development wells pre-drilled prior to platform installation have been affected or designed based on these reservoir models and well results have been used to keep the models updated and evergreen.

  5. Impact of integrated 3D reservoir modeling/flow simulation on development of deepwater sands, Mars Field, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, C.S.; Johnston, J.R.; Juedeman, M.E. )

    1996-01-01

    Prospect Mars is a major Gulf of Mexico deep water oil discovery made under joint partnership between operator Shell Offshore Inc. and partner British Petroleum Inc. The discovery lies in 3000 feet of water, located 130 miles southeast of New Orleans, Louisiana. The field was discovered in 1989 and to date 14 significant reservoir intervals from 10,000 to 19000 feet below sea level have been penetrated. Estimated recoverable reserves for the first phase of field development are in excess of 500 MMBE and development plans include installation of a 24 slot tension leg platform and two subsea wells, with first production in mid-1996. Over a two year period a comprehensive effort was directed at creating a new set of reservoir models utilizing an integrated software package developed at Shell E P Technology Co. This package is able to incorporate pertinent geological, geophysical, and petrophysical data into 3-D reservoir models which can be used to: (1) estimate reservoir quantity, quality, and continuity, (2) predict reservoir production performance, (3) select development well locations, and (4) facilitate reserve estimation. This software allows interpretations from 3-D seismic, well control, and analog outcrops to be effectively integrated and passed to the reservoir model for flow simulation. This integrated effort at modeling ensured a more realistic reservoir picture upon which to base field development. Almost all the development wells pre-drilled prior to platform installation have been affected or designed based on these reservoir models and well results have been used to keep the models updated and evergreen.

  6. Fully integrated system-on-chip for pixel-based 3D depth and scene mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Martin; De Coi, Beat; Thalmann, Markus; Gancarz, Radoslav; Ferrat, Pascal; Dürmüller, Martin; Britt, Florian; Annese, Marco; Ledergerber, Markus; Catregn, Gion-Pol

    2012-03-01

    We present for the first time a fully integrated system-on-chip (SoC) for pixel-based 3D range detection suited for commercial applications. It is based on the time-of-flight (ToF) principle, i.e. measuring the phase difference of a reflected pulse train. The product epc600 is fabricated using a dedicated process flow, called Espros Photonic CMOS. This integration makes it possible to achieve a Quantum Efficiency (QE) of >80% in the full wavelength band from 520nm up to 900nm as well as very high timing precision in the sub-ns range which is needed for exact detection of the phase delay. The SoC features 8x8 pixels and includes all necessary sub-components such as ToF pixel array, voltage generation and regulation, non-volatile memory for configuration, LED driver for active illumination, digital SPI interface for easy communication, column based 12bit ADC converters, PLL and digital data processing with temporary data storage. The system can be operated at up to 100 frames per second.

  7. Utilization of 3D imaging flash lidar technology for autonomous safe landing on planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Vanek, Michael; Petway, Larry; Pierrottet, Diego; Busch, George; Bulyshev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    NASA considers Flash Lidar a critical technology for enabling autonomous safe landing of future large robotic and crewed vehicles on the surface of the Moon and Mars. Flash Lidar can generate 3-Dimensional images of the terrain to identify hazardous features such as craters, rocks, and steep slopes during the final stages of descent and landing. The onboard flight comptuer can use the 3-D map of terain to guide the vehicle to a safe site. The capabilities of Flash Lidar technology were evaluated through a series of static tests using a calibrated target and through dynamic tests aboard a helicopter and a fixed wing airctarft. The aircraft flight tests were perfomed over Moonlike terrain in the California and Nevada deserts. This paper briefly describes the Flash Lidar static and aircraft flight test results. These test results are analyzed against the landing application requirements to identify the areas of technology improvement. The ongoing technology advancement activities are then explained and their goals are described.

  8. Utilization of 3-D Imaging Flash Lidar Technology for Autonomous Safe Landing on Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Vanek, Michael; Petway, Larry; Pierrotter, Diego; Busch, George; Bulyshev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    NASA considers Flash Lidar a critical technology for enabling autonomous safe landing of future large robotic and crewed vehicles on the surface of the Moon and Mars. Flash Lidar can generate 3-Dimensional images of the terrain to identify hazardous features such as craters, rocks, and steep slopes during the final stages of descent and landing. The onboard flight computer can use the 3-D map of terrain to guide the vehicle to a safe site. The capabilities of Flash Lidar technology were evaluated through a series of static tests using a calibrated target and through dynamic tests aboard a helicopter and a fixed wing aircraft. The aircraft flight tests were performed over Moon-like terrain in the California and Nevada deserts. This paper briefly describes the Flash Lidar static and aircraft flight test results. These test results are analyzed against the landing application requirements to identify the areas of technology improvement. The ongoing technology advancement activities are then explained and their goals are described.

  9. Multimodal, 3D pathology-mimicking bladder phantom for evaluation of cystoscopic technologies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gennifer T.; Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and blue light cystoscopy (BLC) have shown significant potential as complementary technologies to traditional white light cystoscopy (WLC) for early bladder cancer detection. Three-dimensional (3D) organ-mimicking phantoms provide realistic imaging environments for testing new technology designs, the diagnostic potential of systems, and novel image processing algorithms prior to validation in real tissue. Importantly, the phantom should mimic features of healthy and diseased tissue as they appear under WLC, BLC, and OCT, which are sensitive to tissue color and structure, fluorescent contrast, and optical scattering of subsurface layers, respectively. We present a phantom posing the hollow shape of the bladder and fabricated using a combination of 3D-printing and spray-coating with Dragon Skin (DS) (Smooth-On Inc.), a highly elastic polymer to mimic the layered structure of the bladder. Optical scattering of DS was tuned by addition of titanium dioxide, resulting in scattering coefficients sufficient to cover the human bladder range (0.49 to 2.0 mm^-1). Mucosal vasculature and tissue coloration were mimicked with elastic cord and red dye, respectively. Urethral access was provided through a small hole excised from the base of the phantom. Inserted features of bladder pathology included altered tissue color (WLC), fluorescence emission (BLC), and variations in layered structure (OCT). The phantom surface and underlying material were assessed on the basis of elasticity, optical scattering, layer thicknesses, and qualitative image appearance. WLC, BLC, and OCT images of normal and cancerous features in the phantom qualitatively matched corresponding images from human bladders.

  10. NFkB disrupts tissue polarity in 3D by preventing integration of microenvironmental signals.

    PubMed

    Becker-Weimann, Sabine; Xiong, Gaofeng; Furuta, Saori; Han, Ju; Kuhn, Irene; Akavia, Uri-David; Pe'er, Dana; Bissell, Mina J; Xu, Ren

    2013-11-01

    The microenvironment of cells controls their phenotype, and thereby the architecture of the emerging multicellular structure or tissue. We have reported more than a dozen microenvironmental factors whose signaling must be integrated in order to effect an organized, functional tissue morphology. However, the factors that prevent integration of signaling pathways that merge form and function are still largely unknown. We have identified nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) as a transcriptional regulator that disrupts important microenvironmental cues necessary for tissue organization. We compared the gene expression of organized and disorganized epithelial cells of the HMT-3522 breast cancer progression series: the non-malignant S1 cells that form polarized spheres ('acini'), the malignant T4-2 cells that form large tumor-like clusters, and the 'phenotypically reverted' T4-2 cells that polarize as a result of correction of the microenvironmental signaling. We identified 180 genes that display an increased expression in disorganized compared to polarized structures. Network, GSEA and transcription factor binding site analyses suggested that NFkB is a common activator for the 180 genes. NFkB was found to be activated in disorganized breast cancer cells, and inhibition of microenvironmental signaling via EGFR, beta1 integrin, MMPs, or their downstream signals suppressed its activation. The postulated role of NFkB was experimentally verified: Blocking the NFkB pathway with a specific chemical inhibitor or shRNA induced polarization and inhibited invasion of breast cancer cells in 3D cultures. These results may explain why NFkB holds promise as a target for therapeutic intervention: Its inhibition can reverse the oncogenic signaling involved in breast cancer progression and integrate the essential microenvironmental control of tissue architecture. PMID:24243820

  11. Integrating 3D geological information with a national physically-based hydrological modelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Parkin, Geoff; Kessler, Holger; Whiteman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Robust numerical models are an essential tool for informing flood and water management and policy around the world. Physically-based hydrological models have traditionally not been used for such applications due to prohibitively large data, time and computational resource requirements. Given recent advances in computing power and data availability, a robust, physically-based hydrological modelling system for Great Britain using the SHETRAN model and national datasets has been created. Such a model has several advantages over less complex systems. Firstly, compared with conceptual models, a national physically-based model is more readily applicable to ungauged catchments, in which hydrological predictions are also required. Secondly, the results of a physically-based system may be more robust under changing conditions such as climate and land cover, as physical processes and relationships are explicitly accounted for. Finally, a fully integrated surface and subsurface model such as SHETRAN offers a wider range of applications compared with simpler schemes, such as assessments of groundwater resources, sediment and nutrient transport and flooding from multiple sources. As such, SHETRAN provides a robust means of simulating numerous terrestrial system processes which will add physical realism when coupled to the JULES land surface model. 306 catchments spanning Great Britain have been modelled using this system. The standard configuration of this system performs satisfactorily (NSE > 0.5) for 72% of catchments and well (NSE > 0.7) for 48%. Many of the remaining 28% of catchments that performed relatively poorly (NSE < 0.5) are located in the chalk in the south east of England. As such, the British Geological Survey 3D geology model for Great Britain (GB3D) has been incorporated, for the first time in any hydrological model, to pave the way for improvements to be made to simulations of catchments with important groundwater regimes. This coupling has involved

  12. Stereoscopic-3D display design: a new paradigm with Intel Adaptive Stable Image Technology [IA-SIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sunil

    2012-03-01

    Stereoscopic-3D (S3D) proliferation on personal computers (PC) is mired by several technical and business challenges: a) viewing discomfort due to cross-talk amongst stereo images; b) high system cost; and c) restricted content availability. Users expect S3D visual quality to be better than, or at least equal to, what they are used to enjoying on 2D in terms of resolution, pixel density, color, and interactivity. Intel Adaptive Stable Image Technology (IA-SIT) is a foundational technology, successfully developed to resolve S3D system design challenges and deliver high quality 3D visualization at PC price points. Optimizations in display driver, panel timing firmware, backlight hardware, eyewear optical stack, and synch mechanism combined can help accomplish this goal. Agnostic to refresh rate, IA-SIT will scale with shrinking of display transistors and improvements in liquid crystal and LED materials. Industry could profusely benefit from the following calls to action:- 1) Adopt 'IA-SIT S3D Mode' in panel specs (via VESA) to help panel makers monetize S3D; 2) Adopt 'IA-SIT Eyewear Universal Optical Stack' and algorithm (via CEA) to help PC peripheral makers develop stylish glasses; 3) Adopt 'IA-SIT Real Time Profile' for sub-100uS latency control (via BT Sig) to extend BT into S3D; and 4) Adopt 'IA-SIT Architecture' for Monitors and TVs to monetize via PC attach.

  13. Assessing the Applicability of 3D Holographic Technology as an Enhanced Technology for Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalansooriya, Pradeep; Marasinghe, Ashu; Bandara, K. M. D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Distance learning has provided an excellent platform for students in geographically remote locations while enabling them to learn at their own pace and convenience. A number of technologies are currently being utilized to conceptualize, design, enhance and foster distance learning. Teleconferences, electronic field trips, podcasts, webinars, video…

  14. 3D vision based on PMD-technology for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Hubert J.; Schwarte, Rudolf; Ruangpayoongsak, Niramon; Kuhle, Joerg; Albrecht, Martin; Grothof, Markus; Hess, Holger

    2003-09-01

    A series of micro-robots (MERLIN: Mobile Experimental Robots for Locomotion and Intelligent Navigation) has been designed and implemented for a broad spectrum of indoor and outdoor tasks on basis of standardized functional modules like sensors, actuators, communication by radio link. The sensors onboard on the MERLIN robot can be divided into two categories: internal sensors for low-level control and for measuring the state of the robot and external sensors for obstacle detection, modeling of the environment and position estimation and navigation of the robot in a global co-ordinate system. The special emphasis of this paper is to describe the capabilities of MERLIN for obstacle detection, targets detection and for distance measurement. Besides ultrasonic sensors a new camera based on PMD-technology is used. This Photonic Mixer Device (PMD) represents a new electro-optic device that provides a smart interface between the world of incoherent optical signals and the world of their electronic signal processing. This PMD-technology directly enables 3D-imaging by means of the time-of-flight (TOF) principle. It offers an extremely high potential for new solutions in the robotics application field. The PMD-Technology opens up amazing new perspectives for obstacle detection systems, target acquisition as well as mapping of unknown environments.

  15. Stage acoustics for musicians: A multidimensional approach using 3D ambisonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, Anne

    In this research, a method was outlined and tested for the use of 3D Ambisonic technology to inform stage acoustics research and design. Stage acoustics for musicians as a field has yet to benefit from recent advancements in auralization and spatial acoustic analysis. This research attempts to address common issues in stage acoustics: subjective requirements for performers in relation to feelings of support, quality of sound, and ease of ensemble playing in relation to measurable, objective characteristics that can be used to design better stage enclosures. While these issues have been addressed in previous work, this research attempts to use technological advancements to improve the resolution and realism of the testing and analysis procedures. Advancements include measurement of spatial impulse responses using a spherical microphone array, higher-order ambisonic encoding and playback for real-time performer auralization, high-resolution spatial beamforming for analysis of onstage impulse responses, and multidimensional scaling procedures to determine subjective musician preferences. The methodology for implementing these technologies into stage acoustics research is outlined in this document and initial observations regarding implications for stage enclosure design are proposed. This research provides a robust method for measuring and analyzing performer experiences on multiple stages without the costly and time-intensive process of physically surveying orchestras on different stages, with increased repeatability while maintaining a high level of immersive realism and spatial resolution. Along with implications for physical design, this method provides possibilities for virtual teaching and rehearsal, parametric modeling and co-located performance.

  16. Liquid immersion thermal crosslinking of 3D polymer nanopatterns for direct carbonisation with high structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Cheolho; Park, Gyurim; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    The direct pyrolytic carbonisation of polymer patterns has attracted interest for its use in obtaining carbon materials. In the case of carbonisation of nanopatterned polymers, the polymer flow and subsequent pattern change may occur in order to relieve their high surface energies. Here, we demonstrated that liquid immersion thermal crosslinking of polymer nanopatterns effectively enhanced the thermal resistance and maintained the structure integrity during the heat treatment. We employed the liquid immersion thermal crosslinking for 3D porous SU8 photoresist nanopatterns and successfully converted them to carbon nanopatterns while maintaining their porous features. The thermal crosslinking reaction and carbonisation of SU8 nanopatterns were characterised. The micro-crystallinity of the SU8-derived carbon nanopatterns was also characterised. The liquid immersion heat treatment can be extended to the carbonisation of various polymer or photoresist nanopatterns and also provide a facile way to control the surface energy of polymer nanopatterns for various purposes, for example, to block copolymer or surfactant self-assemblies. PMID:26677949

  17. Efficient 3D/1D self-consistent integral-equation analysis of ICRH antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Lancellotti, V.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2004-08-01

    This work presents a comprehensive account of the theory and implementation of a method for the self-consistent numerical analysis of plasma-facing ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna arrays. The method is based on the integral-equation formulation of the boundary-value problem, solved via a weighted-residual scheme. The antenna geometry (including Faraday shield bars and a recess box) is fairly general and three-dimensional (3D), and the plasma is in the one-dimensional (1D) 'slab' approximation; finite-Larmor radius effects, as well as plasma density and temperature gradients, are considered. Feeding via the voltages in the access coaxial lines is self-consistently accounted throughout and the impedance or scattering matrix of the antenna array obtained therefrom. The problem is formulated in both the dual space (physical) and spectral (wavenumber) domains, which allows the extraction and simple handling of the terms that slow the convergence in the spectral domain usually employed. This paper includes validation tests of the developed code against measured data, both in vacuo and in the presence of plasma. An example of application to a complex geometry is also given.

  18. Liquid immersion thermal crosslinking of 3D polymer nanopatterns for direct carbonisation with high structural integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Cheolho; Park, Gyurim; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2015-12-01

    The direct pyrolytic carbonisation of polymer patterns has attracted interest for its use in obtaining carbon materials. In the case of carbonisation of nanopatterned polymers, the polymer flow and subsequent pattern change may occur in order to relieve their high surface energies. Here, we demonstrated that liquid immersion thermal crosslinking of polymer nanopatterns effectively enhanced the thermal resistance and maintained the structure integrity during the heat treatment. We employed the liquid immersion thermal crosslinking for 3D porous SU8 photoresist nanopatterns and successfully converted them to carbon nanopatterns while maintaining their porous features. The thermal crosslinking reaction and carbonisation of SU8 nanopatterns were characterised. The micro-crystallinity of the SU8-derived carbon nanopatterns was also characterised. The liquid immersion heat treatment can be extended to the carbonisation of various polymer or photoresist nanopatterns and also provide a facile way to control the surface energy of polymer nanopatterns for various purposes, for example, to block copolymer or surfactant self-assemblies.

  19. Mercury Lightcraft Project Update: 3-D Modeling, Systems Analysis and Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckton, Thomas W.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2005-04-01

    This paper is a progress report on the laser-propelled Mercury Lightcraft Project at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The laser-propelled, 1-person craft has a diameter of 252-cm, height of 217-cm, internal volume of 3 m3, `dry' mass of 700 kg, and gross liftoff mass of 1 metric ton. Expendable liquids including 70 kg of liquid hydrogen, and an equivalent mass (at least) of de-ionized water serves as open-cycle coolants for the 520 MWe laser/electric power conversion system. Its hyper-energetic airbreathing engine can easily accelerate the vehicle at 10 Gs or more. The tractor-beam lightcraft is intended as a prototype for use in a future global aerospace transportation system based on a constellation of satellite solar power stations in geostationary orbit, with laser relay stations in low Earth orbit. Using SolidWorks® 3-D modeling software, several important features were successfully integrated into the Mercury lightcraft model - principally: a rotating shroud (for spin stabilization) simple actuation system for a new variable-geometry air inlet; refined optical train for the laser-heated H2 plasma generators; pneumatically deployed, robotic quadra-pod landing gear; ejection seat/pod/hatch system; and a more detailed airframe structural concept. The CAD effort has brought the Mercury Lightcraft concept one significant step closer to reality.

  20. Liquid immersion thermal crosslinking of 3D polymer nanopatterns for direct carbonisation with high structural integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Cheolho; Park, Gyurim; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    The direct pyrolytic carbonisation of polymer patterns has attracted interest for its use in obtaining carbon materials. In the case of carbonisation of nanopatterned polymers, the polymer flow and subsequent pattern change may occur in order to relieve their high surface energies. Here, we demonstrated that liquid immersion thermal crosslinking of polymer nanopatterns effectively enhanced the thermal resistance and maintained the structure integrity during the heat treatment. We employed the liquid immersion thermal crosslinking for 3D porous SU8 photoresist nanopatterns and successfully converted them to carbon nanopatterns while maintaining their porous features. The thermal crosslinking reaction and carbonisation of SU8 nanopatterns were characterised. The micro-crystallinity of the SU8-derived carbon nanopatterns was also characterised. The liquid immersion heat treatment can be extended to the carbonisation of various polymer or photoresist nanopatterns and also provide a facile way to control the surface energy of polymer nanopatterns for various purposes, for example, to block copolymer or surfactant self-assemblies. PMID:26677949

  1. Swarm Intelligence Integrated Graph-Cut for Liver Segmentation from 3D-CT Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Maya; Korah, Reeba; Geetha, G.

    2015-01-01

    The segmentation of organs in CT volumes is a prerequisite for diagnosis and treatment planning. In this paper, we focus on liver segmentation from contrast-enhanced abdominal CT volumes, a challenging task due to intensity overlapping, blurred edges, large variability in liver shape, and complex background with cluttered features. The algorithm integrates multidiscriminative cues (i.e., prior domain information, intensity model, and regional characteristics of liver in a graph-cut image segmentation framework). The paper proposes a swarm intelligence inspired edge-adaptive weight function for regulating the energy minimization of the traditional graph-cut model. The model is validated both qualitatively (by clinicians and radiologists) and quantitatively on publically available computed tomography (CT) datasets (MICCAI 2007 liver segmentation challenge, 3D-IRCAD). Quantitative evaluation of segmentation results is performed using liver volume calculations and a mean score of 80.8% and 82.5% on MICCAI and IRCAD dataset, respectively, is obtained. The experimental result illustrates the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26689833

  2. Role of 3D photo-resist simulation for advanced technology nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Samy, Aravind; Seltmann, Rolf; Kahlenberg, Frank; Schramm, Jessy; Küchler, Bernd; Klostermann, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    3D Resist Models are gaining significant interest for advanced technology node development. Correct prediction of resist profiles, resist top-loss and top-rounding are acquiring higher importance in ORC hotspot verification due to impact on etch resistance and post etch results. We would like to highlight the specific calibration procedure to calibrate a rigorous 3D model. Special focus is on the importance of high quality metrology data for both a successful calibration and for allowing a reduction of the number of data points used for calibration [1]. In a productive application the calibration could be performed using a subset of 20 features measured through dose and focus and model validation was done with 500 features through dose and focus. This data reduction minimized the actual calibration effort of the 3D resist model and enabled calibration run times of less than one hour. The successful validation with the complete data set showed that the data reduction did not cause over- fitting of the model. The model is applied and verified at hotspots showing defects such as bottom bridging or top loss that would not be visible in a 2D resist model. The model performance is also evaluated with a conventional CD error metric where CD at Bottom of simulation and measurement are compared. We could achieve excellent results for both metrics using SEM CD, SEM images, AFM measurements and wafer cross sections. Additional modeling criterion is resist model portability. A prerequisite is the separability of resist model and optical model, i.e. the resist model shall characterize the resist only and should not lump characteristics from the optical model. This is a requirement to port the resist model to different optical setups such as another illumination source without the need of re-calibration. Resist model portability is shown by validation and application of the model to a second process with significantly different optical settings. The resist model can predict hot

  3. The numerical integration and 3-D finite element formulation of a viscoelastic model of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.

    1994-08-01

    The use of glasses is widespread in making hermetic, insulating seals for many electronic components. Flat panel displays and fiber optic connectors are other products utilizing glass as a structural element. When glass is cooled from sealing temperatures, residual stresses are generated due to mismatches in thermal shrinkage created by the dissimilar material properties of the adjoining materials. Because glass is such a brittle material at room temperature, tensile residual stresses must be kept small to ensure durability and avoid cracking. Although production designs and the required manufacturing process development can be deduced empirically, this is an expensive and time consuming process that does not necessarily lead to an optimal design. Agile manufacturing demands that analyses be used to reduce development costs and schedules by providing insight and guiding the design process through the development cycle. To make these gains, however, viscoelastic models of glass must be available along with the right tool to use them. A viscoelastic model of glass can be used to simulate the stress and volume relaxation that occurs at elevated temperatures as the molecular structure of the glass seeks to equilibrate to the state of the supercooled liquid. The substance of the numerical treatment needed to support the implementation of the model in a 3-D finite element program is presented herein. An accurate second-order, central difference integrator is proposed for the constitutive equations, and numerical solutions are compared to those obtained with other integrators. Inherent convergence problems are reviewed and fixes are described. The resulting algorithms are generally applicable to the broad class of viscoelastic material models. First-order error estimates are used as a basis for developing a scheme for automatic time step controls, and several demonstration problems are presented to illustrate the performance of the methodology.

  4. A polymer-based Fabry-Perot filter integrated with 3-D MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping (Cerina); Le, Kevin; Malalur-Nagaraja-Rao, Smitha; Hsu, Lun-Chen; Chiao, J.-C.

    2006-01-01

    Polymers have been considered as one of the most versatile materials in making optical devices for communication and sensor applications. They provide good optical transparency to form filters, lenses and many optical components with ease of fabrication. They are scalable and compatible in dimensions with requirements in optics and can be fabricated on inorganic substrates, such as silicon and quartz. Recent polymer synthesis also made great progresses on conductive and nonlinear polymers, opening opportunities for new applications. In this paper, we discussed hybrid-material integration of polymers on silicon-based microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices. The motivation is to combine the advantages of demonstrated silicon-based MEMS actuators and excellent optical performance of polymers. We demonstrated the idea with a polymer-based out-of-plane Fabry-Perot filter that can be self-assembled by scratch drive actuators. We utilized a fabrication foundry service, MUMPS (Multi-User MEMS Process), to demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of integration. The polysilicon, used as the structural material for construction of 3-D framework and actuators, has high absorption in the visible and near infrared ranges. Therefore, previous efforts using a polysilicon layer as optical interfaces suffer from high losses. We applied the organic compound materials on the silicon-based framework within the optical signal propagation path to form the optical interfaces. In this paper, we have shown low losses in the optical signal processing and feasibility of building a thin-film Fabry-Perot filter. We discussed the optical filter designs, mechanical design, actuation mechanism, fabrication issues, optical measurements, and results.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of metal-to-metal interconnect structures for 3-D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Alan; Lannon, John; Lueck, Matthew; Gregory, Christopher; Temple, Dorota

    2009-03-01

    The use of collapsible (solder) bump interconnects in pixel detector hybridization has been shown to be very successful. However, as pixel sizes decrease, the use of non-collapsible metal-to-metal bump bonding methods is needed to push the interconnect dimensions smaller. Furthermore, these interconnects are compatible with 3D intgration technologies which are being considered to increase overall pixel and system performance. These metal-to-metal bonding structures provide robust mechanical and electrical connections and allow for a dramatic increase in pixel density. Of particular interest are Cu-Cu thermocompression bonding and Cu/Sn-Cu solid-liquid diffusion bonding processes. Working with Fermilab, RTI undertook a demonstration to show that these bump structures could be reliably used to interconnect devices designed with 20 micron I/O pitch. Cu and Cu/Sn bump fabrication processes were developed to provide a well-controlled surface topography necessary for the formation of low resistance, high yielding, and reliable interconnects. The electrical resistance and yield has been quantified based on electrical measurements of daisy chain test structures and the mechanical strength of the bonding has been quantified through die shear testing. The reliability has been characterized through studies of the impact of thermal exposure on the mechanical performance of the bonds. Cross-section SEM analysis, coupled with high resolution energy dispersive spectroscopy, has provided insight into the physical and chemical nature of the bonding interfaces and aided in the evaluation of the long-term stability of the bonds.

  6. Development and Calibration of New 3-D Vector VSP Imaging Technology: Vinton Salt Dome, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt J. Marfurt; Hua-Wei Zhou; E. Charlotte Sullivan

    2004-09-01

    Vinton salt dome is located in Southwestern Louisiana, in Calcasieu Parish. Tectonically, the piercement dome is within the salt dome minibasin province. The field has been in production since 1901, with most of the production coming from Miocene and Oligocene sands. The goal of our project was to develop and calibrate new processing and interpretation technology to fully exploit the information available from a simultaneous 3-D surface seismic survey and 3-C, 3-D vertical seismic profile (VSP) survey over the dome. More specifically the goal was to better image salt dome flanks and small, reservoir-compartmentalizing faults. This new technology has application to mature salt-related fields across the Gulf Coast. The primary focus of our effort was to develop, apply, and assess the limitations of new 3-C, 3-D wavefield separation and imaging technology that could be used to image aliased, limited-aperture, vector VSP data. Through 2-D and 3-D full elastic modeling, we verified that salt flank reflections exist in the horizontally-traveling portion of the wavefield rather than up- and down-going portions of the wavefield, thereby explaining why many commercial VSP processing flow failed. Since the P-wave reflections from the salt flank are measured primarily on the horizontal components while P-wave reflections from deeper sedimentary horizons are measured primarily on the vertical component, a true vector VSP analysis was needed. We developed an antialiased discrete Radon transform filter to accurately model P- and S-wave data components measured by the vector VSP. On-the-fly polarization filtering embedded in our Kirchhoff imaging algorithm was effective in separating PP from PS wave images. By the novel application of semblance-weighted filters, we were able to suppress many of the migration artifacts associated with low fold, sparse VSP acquisition geometries. To provide a better velocity/depth model, we applied 3-D prestack depth migration to the surface data

  7. Performance of almost edgeless silicon detectors in CTS and 3D-planar technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagoz, E.; Anelli, G.; Antchev, G.; Avati, V.; Bassetti, V.; Berardi, V.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cuneo, S.; Da Vià, C.; Deile, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Hasi, J.; Haug, F.; Heino, J.; Jarron, P.; Kalliopuska, J.; Kašpar, J.; Kenney, C.; Kok, A.; Kundrát, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajíček, M.; Luntama, T.; Macina, D.; Macrí, M.; Minutoli, S.; Mirabito, L.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Parker, S.; Perrot, A.-L.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Santroni, A.; Sette, G.; Siegrist, P.; Smotlacha, J.; Snoeys, W.; Taylor, C.; Watts, S.; Whitmore, J.

    2013-06-01

    The physics programme of the TOTEM experiment requires the detection of very forward protons scattered by only a few microradians out of the LHC beams. For this purpose, stacks of planar Silicon detectors have been mounted in moveable near-beam telescopes (Roman Pots) located along the beamline on both sides of the interaction point. In order to maximise the proton acceptance close to the beams, the dead space at the detector edge had to be minimised. During the detector prototyping phase, different sensor technologies and designs have been explored. A reduction of the dead space to less than 50 μm has been accomplished with two novel silicon detector technologies: one with the Current Terminating Structure (CTS) design and one based on the 3D edge manufacturing. This paper describes performance studies on prototypes of these detectors, carried out in 2004 in a fixed-target muon beam at CERN's SPS accelerator. In particular, the efficiency and accuracy in the vicinity of the beam-facing edges are discussed.

  8. Integrated infrared array technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Mccreight, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of integrated infrared (IR) array technology is presented. Although the array pixel formats are smaller, and the readout noise of IR arrays is larger, than the corresponding values achieved with optical charge-coupled-device silicon technology, substantial progress is being made in IR technology. Both existing IR arrays and those being developed are described. Examples of astronomical images are given which illustrate the potential of integrated IR arrays for scientific investigations.

  9. Two-photon polymerization microfabrication of hydrogels: an advanced 3D printing technology for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jin-Feng; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2015-08-01

    3D printing technology has attracted much attention due to its high potential in scientific and industrial applications. As an outstanding 3D printing technology, two-photon polymerization (TPP) microfabrication has been applied in the fields of micro/nanophotonics, micro-electromechanical systems, microfluidics, biomedical implants and microdevices. In particular, TPP microfabrication is very useful in tissue engineering and drug delivery due to its powerful fabrication capability for precise microstructures with high spatial resolution on both the microscopic and the nanometric scale. The design and fabrication of 3D hydrogels widely used in tissue engineering and drug delivery has been an important research area of TPP microfabrication. The resolution is a key parameter for 3D hydrogels to simulate the native 3D environment in which the cells reside and the drug is controlled to release with optimal temporal and spatial distribution in vitro and in vivo. The resolution of 3D hydrogels largely depends on the efficiency of TPP initiators. In this paper, we will review the widely used photoresists, the development of TPP photoinitiators, the strategies for improving the resolution and the microfabrication of 3D hydrogels. PMID:25992492

  10. Interferometry based multispectral photon-limited 2D and 3D integral image encryption employing the Hartley transform.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Inbarasan; Guo, Changliang; Lee, Byung-Geun; Sheridan, John T

    2015-06-15

    We present a method of securing multispectral 3D photon-counted integral imaging (PCII) using classical Hartley Transform (HT) based encryption by employing optical interferometry. This method has the simultaneous advantages of minimizing complexity by eliminating the need for holography recording and addresses the phase sensitivity problem encountered when using digital cameras. These together with single-channel multispectral 3D data compactness, the inherent properties of the classical photon counting detection model, i.e. sparse sensing and the capability for nonlinear transformation, permits better authentication of the retrieved 3D scene at various depth cues. Furthermore, the proposed technique works for both spatially and temporally incoherent illumination. To validate the proposed technique simulations were carried out for both the 2D and 3D cases. Experimental data is processed and the results support the feasibility of the encryption method. PMID:26193568

  11. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Findakly, T.; Innarella, R.

    1982-01-01

    The status and near term potential of materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electro-optical components are discussed. Issues discussed are host material and orientation, waveguide formation, optical loss mechanisms, wavelength selection, polarization effects and control, laser to integrated optics coupling fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, sources, and detectors. Recommendations of the best materials, technology, and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are given.

  12. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.

    1982-01-01

    The materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electrooptical components are described. Issues included in the study are: (1) host material and orientation, (2) waveguide formation, (3) optical loss mechanisms, (4) wavelength selection, (5) polarization effects and control, (6) laser to integrated optics coupling,(7) fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, (8) souces, (9) detectors. The best materials, technology and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are recommended.

  13. Application of Cutting-Edge 3D Seismic Attribute Technology to the Assessment of Geological Reservoirs for CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Liner; Jianjun Zeng; Po Geng Heather King Jintan Li; Jennifer Califf; John Seales

    2010-03-31

    The goals of this project were to develop innovative 3D seismic attribute technologies and workflows to assess the structural integrity and heterogeneity of subsurface reservoirs with potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic attributes to aide in quantifying reservoir properies and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. Our study area is the Dickman field in Ness County, Kansas, a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontent to Indiana and beyond. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. Geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We systematically tested over a dozen seismic attributes, finding that curvature, SPICE, and ANT were particularly useful for mapping discontinuities in the data that likely indicated fracture trends. Our simulation results in the deep saline aquifer indicate two effective ways of reducing free CO{sub 2}: (a) injecting CO{sub 2} with brine water, and (b) horizontal well injection. A tuned combination of these methods can reduce the amount of free CO{sub 2} in the aquifer from over 50% to less than 10%.

  14. Dynamic analysis of angiogenesis in transgenic zebrafish embryos using a 3D multilayer chip-based technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Jin; Zhu, Feng; Hall, Chris J.; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Mitchell, Arnan; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-03-01

    Transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) models of human diseases have recently emerged as innovative experimental systems in drug discovery and molecular pathology. None of the currently available technologies, however, allow for automated immobilization and treatment of large numbers of spatially encoded transgenic embryos during real-time developmental analysis. This work describes the proof-of-concept design and validation of an integrated 3D microfluidic chip-based system fabricated directly in the poly(methyl methacrylate) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. At its core, the device utilizes an array of 3D micro-mechanical traps to actively capture and immobilize single embryos using a low-pressure suction. It also features built-in piezoelectric microdiaphragm pumps, embryo trapping suction manifold, drug delivery manifold and optically transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) heating element to provide optimal temperature during embryo development. Furthermore, we present design of the proof-of-concept off-chip electronic interface equipped with robotic servo actuator driven stage, innovative servomotor-actuated pinch valves and miniaturized fluorescent USB microscope. Our results show that the innovative device has 100% embryo trapping efficiency while supporting normal embryo development for up to 72 hours in a confined microfluidic environment. We also present data that this microfluidic system can be readily applied to kinetic analysis of a panel of investigational anti-angiogenic agents in transgenic zebrafish Tg(fli1a:EGFP) line. The optical transparency and embryo immobilization allow for convenient visualization of developing vasculature patterns in response to drug treatment without the need for specimen re-positioning. The integrated electronic interfaces bring the Lab-on-a-Chip systems a step closer to realization of complete analytical automation.

  15. Server-based approach to web visualization of integrated 3-D medical image data.

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, A. V.; Albright, E.; Corina, D.; Ojemann, G.; Martin, R. F.; Brinkley, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    Although computer processing power and network bandwidth are rapidly increasing, the average desktop is still not able to rapidly process large datasets such as 3-D medical image volumes. We have therefore developed a server side approach to this problem, in which a high performance graphics server accepts commands from web clients to load, process and render 3-D image volumes and models. The renderings are saved as 2-D snapshots on the server, where they are uploaded and displayed on the client. User interactions with the graphic interface on the client side are translated into additional commands to manipulate the 3-D scene, after which the server re-renders the scene and sends a new image to the client. Example forms-based and Java-based clients are described for a brain mapping application, but the techniques should be applicable to multiple domains where 3-D medical image visualization is of interest. PMID:11825248

  16. Evaluation of AN Integrated Gis-Based Crime Analysis & 3d Modelling for Izmir-Konak Municipality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarhan, C.; Deniz, D.

    2011-08-01

    GIS integrated 3D modelling is crucial for the city planning and design processes because urban modelling is a tool used in virtual environments, and provides convenience to work. Although, the creation and display of 3D city models for large regions is difficult it is vital for planning and designing safer cities, as well as public places. Today, crime is a significant problem in Turkey. When it was compared by years of crime rates, population growth and urbanization rate, an increasing more than in parallel has been observed. This paper aims to discuss GIS integrated 3D modelling affects in urban planning and design, explaining Turkish planning processes with GIS and 3D modelling. To do that, it presents a case study for Izmir Konak Municipality about GIS integrated crime analysis and 3D models of the crime scenes. Izmir crime records has been obtained from Izmir Police Department belonging to 2003-2004 and 2005 (D. Deniz, 2007) are used for districts' crime map. In the light of these data, the highest rate crime district, Konak, is analyzed between 2001 and 2005 data.

  17. Parallel robot for micro assembly with integrated innovative optical 3D-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbach, Juergen; Ispas, Diana; Pokar, Gero; Soetebier, Sven; Tutsch, Rainer

    2002-10-01

    Recent advances in the fields of MEMS and MOEMS often require precise assembly of very small parts with an accuracy of a few microns. In order to meet this demand, a new approach using a robot based on parallel mechanisms in combination with a novel 3D-vision system has been chosen. The planar parallel robot structure with 2 DOF provides a high resolution in the XY-plane. It carries two additional serial axes for linear and rotational movement in/about z direction. In order to achieve high precision as well as good dynamic capabilities, the drive concept for the parallel (main) axes incorporates air bearings in combination with a linear electric servo motors. High accuracy position feedback is provided by optical encoders with a resolution of 0.1 μm. To allow for visualization and visual control of assembly processes, a camera module fits into the hollow tool head. It consists of a miniature CCD camera and a light source. In addition a modular gripper support is integrated into the tool head. To increase the accuracy a control loop based on an optoelectronic sensor will be implemented. As a result of an in-depth analysis of different approaches a photogrammetric system using one single camera and special beam-splitting optics was chosen. A pattern of elliptical marks is applied to the surfaces of workpiece and gripper. Using a model-based recognition algorithm the image processing software identifies the gripper and the workpiece and determines their relative position. A deviation vector is calculated and fed into the robot control to guide the gripper.

  18. Human-technology Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Katharine M.

    Human-technology integration is the replacement of human parts and extension of human capabilities with engineered devices and substrates. Its result is hybrid biological-artificial systems. We discuss here four categories of products furthering human-technology integration: wearable computers, pervasive computing environments, engineered tissues and organs, and prosthetics, and introduce examples of currently realized systems in each category. We then note that realization of a completely artificial sytem via the path of human-technology integration presents the prospect of empirical confirmation of an aware artificially embodied system.

  19. The Integration of GPR, GIS, and GPS for 3D Soil Morphologic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischler, M.; Collins, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) has become a useful and efficient instrument for gathering information about subsurface diagnostic horizons in Florida soils. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are a popular and valuable tool for spatial data analysis of real world features in a digital environment. Ground-Penetrating Radar can be linked to GIS by using Global Positioning Systems (GPS). By combining GPR, GPS, and GIS technologies, a more detailed geophysical survey can be completed for an area of interest by integratinghydrologic, pedologic, and geologic data. Thus, the objectives of this research were to identify subsurface soil layers using GPR and their geographic position with a highly accurate GPS; to develop a procedure to import GPR data into a popular software package, such as ArcGIS, and; to create 3D subsurface models based on the imported GPR data. The site for this study was the Plant Science Research and Education Center in Marion County, Florida. The soils are characterized by Recent-Pleistocene-age sand over the clayey, marine deposited Plio-Miocene-age Hawthorn Formation which drapes the Eocene-age Ocala Limestone. Consequently, soils in the research area vary from deep quartz sands (Typic Quartzipsamments) to shallow outcrops of the Hawthorn Formation (Arenic Hapludalfs). A GPR survey was performed on a 160 m x 320 m grid to gather data for processing. Four subsurface models estimating the depth to argillic horizon were created using a variety of specialized GPR data filters and geostatistical data analyses. The models were compared with ground-truth points that measured the depth to argillic horizon to validate each model and calculate error metrics. These models may assist research station personnel to determine best management practices (including experimental plot placement, irrigation management, fertilizer treatment, and pesticide applications). In addition, the developed methodology exploits the potential of combining GPR and GIS.

  20. 3D Simulation Technology as an Effective Instructional Tool for Enhancing Spatial Visualization Skills in Apparel Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Juyeon; Kim, Dong-Eun; Sohn, MyungHee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness of 3D simulation technology for enhancing spatial visualization skills in apparel design education and further to suggest an innovative teaching approach using the technology. Apparel design majors in an introductory patternmaking course, at a large Midwestern University in the United…

  1. Estimation of uncertainties in geological 3D raster layer models as integral part of modelling procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljers, Denise; den Dulk, Maryke; ten Veen, Johan; Hummelman, Jan; Gunnink, Jan; van Gessel, Serge

    2016-04-01

    applied for DGM Deep proves to be an effective way to (graphically) represent the reliability of the DGM Deep model, although the relative contribution of the various error sources needs further attention. For the DGM Shallow model a cross-validation procedure in a moving window environment has been used to calculate mean deviations and standard errors on a sub-regional scale. Subsequently, these cross validation standard errors have been rescaled to account for local data configuration and clustering. This resulted in standard deviations expressing both regional and local uncertainties. Both workflows are state-of-the-art, form an integral part of the geological modelling and result in reproducible uncertainty values. They can be considered a good starting point for incorporating other errors that contribute to uncertainties of geological 3D raster layer models. For example, the mis-positioning of data used or the error underlying mis-ties at well locations. An additional, perhaps more easy-to-read, parameter that can be calculated to visualize these uncertainties would be the information entropy, as proposed by Wellmann & Regenauer-Lieb (2012). Where a value of 0 means there is no uncertainty, and a value of 1 means there is a high uncertainty. At the moment depth uncertainty information is disseminated through our webportals (www.dinoloket.nl and www.nlog.nl) in an on-line map viewer and as downloadable GIS products.

  2. Microgravity Characterization of the Hontomín CO2 Storage Site (Spain). Integration with 3D Seismic Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayarza, P.; Andres, J.; Alcalde, J.; Martí, D.; Marzán, I.; Martinez-Catalan, J. R.; Carbonell, R.; García Lobón, J. L.; Pérez Estaún, A.

    2014-12-01

    Hontomín hosts the first Spanish CO2storage Technology Development Plant. The area, located in the southern part of Mesozoic Basque-Cantabrian Basin, presents E-W and ESE-WNW faults formed during a Permian-Triassic extensional event. The latter were reactivated during the opening of the Bay of Biscay, while a new set of NNE-SSW faults developed. Fractures were reactivated again during the Alpine compression. The resulting configuration is a dome-like structure that includes the Mesozoic succession (Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous) and is crowned by Upper Cretaceous and Eocene rocks lying unconformably. The target injection pointis located at 1500 m depth, within a Jurassic carbonate saline formation. Several multidisciplinary studies have been carried out in Hontomín aiming to obtain a thorough geological characterization. Among these, a microgravity survey, acquired under the umbrella of the CIUDEN foundation, has provided us with a complete 3D image of the site. A 4x4 km2area, coincident with that surveyed by 3D seismic reflection, has been sampled using a dense grid with a station spacing of 100 m. The result is a high resolution Bouguer anomaly gravity map capable of offering insights into the subsurface geology down to the depth of the injection point. The application of mathematical procedures to the data has further enhanced its potential for interpretation. The calculated regional anomaly indicates that the dome structure strikes E-W to ENE-WSW, sub-parallel to a major fault: the South Fault, part of the Ubierna fault system. The resulting residual anomaly enhances a number of NW-SE features that have also been interpreted as faults and that can be observed after performing vertical and horizontal derivatives to the data. Calculation of the Euler solutions confirms the previous results and brings out a new NNW-SSE feature, namely the East Fault. Integration with 3D seismic data suggests that faults affect different levels of the sedimentary sequence

  3. Integrated Flywheel Technology, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, C. R. (Editor); Rodriguez, G. E. (Editor); Groom, N. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Topics of discussion included: technology assessment of the integrated flywheel systems, potential of system concepts, identification of critical areas needing development and, to scope and define an appropriate program for coordinated activity.

  4. Augmenting 3d City Model Components by Geodata Joins to Facilitate Ad-Hoc Geometric-Topologically Sound Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, R.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2012-07-01

    Virtual 3D city models are integrated complex compositions of spatial data of different themes, origin, quality, scale, and dimensions. Within this paper, we address the problem of spatial compatibility of geodata aiming to provide support for ad-hoc integration of virtual 3D city models including geodata of different sources and themes like buildings, terrain, and city furniture. In contrast to related work which is dealing with the integration of redundant geodata structured according to different data models and ontologies, we focus on the integration of complex 3D models of the same representation (here: CityGML) but regarding to the geometric-topological consistent matching of non-homologous objects, e.g. a building is connected to a road, and their geometric homogenisation. Therefore, we present an approach including a data model for a Geodata Join and the general concept of an integration procedure using the join information. The Geodata Join aims to bridge the lack of information between fragmented geodata by describing the relationship between adjacent objects from different datasets. The join information includes the geometrical representation of those parts of an object, which have a specific/known topological or geometrical relationship to another object. This part is referred to as a Connector and is either described by points, lines, or surfaces of the existing object geometry or by additional join geometry. In addition, the join information includes the specification of the connected object in the other dataset and the description of the topological and geometrical relationship between both objects, which is used to aid the matching process. Furthermore, the Geodata Join contains object-related information like accuracy values and restrictions of movement and deformation which are used to optimize the integration process. Based on these parameters, a functional model including a matching algorithm, transformation methods, and conditioned adjustment

  5. Comparing and visualizing titanium implant integration in rat bone using 2D and 3D techniques.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Anna; Sarve, Hamid; Johansson, Carina B

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare the osseointegration of grit-blasted implants with and without a hydrogen fluoride treatment in rat tibia and femur, and to visualize bone formation using state-of-the-art 3D visualization techniques. Grit-blasted implants were inserted in femur and tibia of 10 Sprague-Dawley rats (4 implants/rat). Four weeks after insertion, bone implant samples were retrieved. Selected samples were imaged in 3D using Synchrotron Radiation-based μCT (SRμCT). The 3D data was quantified and visualized using two novel visualization techniques, thread fly-through and 2D unfolding. All samples were processed to cut and ground sections and 2D histomorphometrical comparisons of bone implant contact (BIC), bone area (BA), and mirror image area (MI) were performed. BA values were statistically significantly higher for test implants than controls (p < 0.05), but BIC and MI data did not differ significantly. Thus, the results partly indicate improved bone formation at blasted and hydrogen fluoride treated implants, compared to blasted implants. The 3D analysis was a valuable complement to 2D analysis, facilitating improved visualization. However, further studies are required to evaluate aspects of 3D quantitative techniques, with relation to light microscopy that traditionally is used for osseointegration studies. PMID:24711247

  6. MO-H-19A-03: Patient Specific Bolus with 3D Printing Technology for Electron Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, W; Swann, B; Siderits, R; McKenna, M; Khan, A; Yue, N; Zhang, M; Fisher, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Bolus is widely used in electron radiotherapy to achieve desired dose distribution. 3D printing technologies provide clinicians with easy access to fabricate patient specific bolus accommodating patient body surface irregularities and tissue inhomogeneity. This study presents the design and the clinical workflow of 3D printed bolus for patient electron therapy in our clinic. Methods: Patient simulation CT images free of bolus were exported from treatment planning system (TPS) to an in-house developed software package. Bolus with known material properties was designed in the software package and then exported back to the TPS as a structure. Dose calculation was carried out to examine the coverage of the target. After satisfying dose distribution was achieved, the bolus structure was transferred in Standard Tessellation Language (STL) file format for the 3D printer to generate the machine codes for printing. Upon receiving printed bolus, a quick quality assurance was performed with patient resimulated with bolus in place to verify the bolus dosimetric property before treatment started. Results: A patient specific bolus for electron radiotherapy was designed and fabricated in Form 1 3D printer with methacrylate photopolymer resin. Satisfying dose distribution was achieved in patient with bolus setup. Treatment was successfully finished for one patient with the 3D printed bolus. Conclusion: The electron bolus fabrication with 3D printing technology was successfully implemented in clinic practice.

  7. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera

    PubMed Central

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera. PMID:27089344

  8. Large-scale 3D inversion of marine controlled source electromagnetic data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Cuma, M.; Black, N.; Wilson, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    The marine controlled source electromagnetic (MCSEM) method has become widely used in offshore oil and gas exploration. Interpretation of MCSEM data is still a very challenging problem, especially if one would like to take into account the realistic 3D structure of the subsurface. The inversion of MCSEM data is complicated by the fact that the EM response of a hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir is very weak in comparison with the background EM fields generated by an electric dipole transmitter in complex geoelectrical structures formed by a conductive sea-water layer and the terranes beneath it. In this paper, we present a review of the recent developments in the area of large-scale 3D EM forward modeling and inversion. Our approach is based on using a new integral form of Maxwell’s equations allowing for an inhomogeneous background conductivity, which results in a numerically effective integral representation for 3D EM field. This representation provides an efficient tool for the solution of 3D EM inverse problems. To obtain a robust inverse model of the conductivity distribution, we apply regularization based on a focusing stabilizing functional which allows for the recovery of models with both smooth and sharp geoelectrical boundaries. The method is implemented in a fully parallel computer code, which makes it possible to run large-scale 3D inversions on grids with millions of inversion cells. This new technique can be effectively used for active EM detection and monitoring of the subsurface targets.

  9. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera.

    PubMed

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera. PMID:27089344

  10. Applying 3D-printing technology in planning operations of cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashapov, L. N.; N, A. N. Rudyk A.; Kashapov, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this work was creation 3D model of the front part of the skull of the patient and evaluates the effectiveness of its use in the planning of the operation. To achieve this goal was chosen an operation to remove a tumor of the right eyelid, germinate in the zygomatic bone. 3D printing was performed at different peripheral devices using the method of layering creating physical objects by a digital 3D model as well as the recovery model of the skull with the entire right malar bone for fixation on her titanium frame to maintain the eyeball in a fixed state.

  11. Educational Technology: Integration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Dean L.; Tennyson, Robert D.

    This paper presents a perspective of the current state of technology-assisted instruction integrating computer language, artificial intelligence (AI), and a review of cognitive science applied to instruction. The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) the language of instructional technology, i.e., programming languages, including authoring…

  12. Classroom Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miners, Zach

    2009-01-01

    More than 40 states have adopted standards calling for effective professional development for all educators accountable for results in student learning--with "technology integration" often front and center. As educators put such standards into action, they are producing profound technology results for themselves and students. The Teacher…

  13. GammaModeler TM 3-D gamma-ray imaging technology

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    The 3-D GammaModeler{trademark} system was used to survey a portion of the facility and provide 3-D visual and radiation representation of contaminated equipment located within the facility. The 3-D GammaModeler{trademark} system software was used to deconvolve extended sources into a series of point sources, locate the positions of these sources in space and calculate the 30 cm. dose rates for each of these sources. Localization of the sources in three dimensions provides information on source locations interior to the visual objects and provides a better estimate of the source intensities. The three dimensional representation of the objects can be made transparent in order to visualize sources located within the objects. Positional knowledge of all the sources can be used to calculate a map of the radiation in the canyon. The use of 3-D visual and gamma ray information supports improved planning decision-making, and aids in communications with regulators and stakeholders.

  14. The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Holger; Mathers, Steve; Sobisch, Hans-Georg

    2009-06-01

    The Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3 Dimensions (GSI3D) software tool and methodology has been developed over the last 15 years. Since 2001 this has been in cooperation with the British Geological Survey (BGS). To-date over a hundred BGS geologists have learned to use the software that is now routinely deployed in building systematic and commercial 3D geological models. The success of the GSI3D methodology and software is based on its intuitive design and the fact that it utilises exactly the same data and methods, albeit in digital forms, that geologists have been using for two centuries in order to make geological maps and cross-sections. The geologist constructs models based on a career of observation of geological phenomena, thereby incorporating tacit knowledge into the model. This knowledge capture is a key element to the GSI3D approach. In BGS GSI3D is part of a much wider set of systems and work processes that together make up the cyberinfrastructure of a modern geological survey. The GSI3D software is not yet designed to cope with bedrock structures in which individual stratigraphic surfaces are repeated or inverted, but the software is currently being extended by BGS to encompass these more complex geological scenarios. A further challenge for BGS is to enable its 3D geological models to become part of the semantic Web using GML application schema like GeoSciML. The biggest benefits of widely available systematic geological models will be an enhanced public understanding of the sub-surface in 3D, and the teaching of geoscience students.

  15. Enabling Technologies for Entrepreneurial Opportunities in 3D printing of SmallSats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwas, Andrew; MacDonald, Eric; Muse, Dan; Wicker, Ryan; Kief, Craig; Aarestad, Jim; Zemba, Mike; Marshall, Bill; Tolbert, Carol; Connor, Brett

    2014-01-01

    A consortium of innovative experts in additive manufacturing (AM) comprising Northrup Grumman Technical Services, University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), Configurable Space Microsystems Innovations & Applications Center (COSMIAC), NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), and Youngstown State University, have made significant breakthroughs in the goal of creating the first complete 3D printed small satellite. Since AM machines are relatively inexpensive, this should lead to many entrepreneurial opportunities for the small satellite community. Our technology advancements are focused on the challenges of embedding key components within the structure of the article. We have demonstrated, using advanced fused deposition modeling techniques, complex geometric shapes which optimize the spacecraft design. The UTEP Keck Center has developed a method that interrupts the printing process to insert components into specific cavities, resulting in a spacecraft that has minimal internal space allocated for what traditionally were functional purposes. This allows us to increase experiment and instrument capability by provided added volume in a confined small satellite space. Leveraging initial progress made on a NASA contract, the team investigated the potential of new materials that exploit the AM process, producing candidate compositions that exceed the capabilities of traditional materials. These "new materials" being produced and tested include some that have improved radiation shielding, increased permeability, enhanced thermal properties, better conductive properties, and increased structural performance. The team also investigated materials that were previously not possible to be made. Our testing included standard mechanical tests such as vibration, tensile, thermal cycling, and impact resistance as well as radiation and electromagnetic tests. The initial results of these products and their performance will be presented and compared with standard properties. The new materials with

  16. High-κ Al2O3 material in low temperature wafer-level bonding for 3D integration application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Tu, L. C.; Tan, C. S.

    2014-03-01

    This work systematically investigated a high-κ Al2O3 material for low temperature wafer-level bonding for potential applications in 3D microsystems. A clean Si wafer with an Al2O3 layer thickness of 50 nm was applied as our experimental approach. Bonding was initiated in a clean room ambient after surface activation, followed by annealing under inert ambient conditions at 300 °C for 3 h. The investigation consisted of three parts: a mechanical support study using the four-point bending method, hermeticity measurements using the helium bomb test, and thermal conductivity analysis for potential heterogeneous bonding. Compared with samples bonded using a conventional oxide bonding material (SiO2), a higher interfacial adhesion energy (˜11.93 J/m2) and a lower helium leak rate (˜6.84 × 10-10 atm.cm3/sec) were detected for samples bonded using Al2O3. More importantly, due to the excellent thermal conductivity performance of Al2O3, this technology can be used in heterogeneous direct bonding, which has potential applications for enhancing the performance of Si photonic integrated devices.

  17. Integrated endoscope for real-time 3D ultrasound imaging and hyperthermia: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pua, Eric C; Qiu, Yupeng; Smith, S W

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of using a single endoscopic probe for the combined purpose of real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound imaging of a target organ and the delivery of ultrasound therapy to facilitate the absorption of compounds for cancer treatment. Recent research in ultrasound therapy has shown that ultrasound-mediated drug delivery improves absorption of treatments for prostate, cervical and esophageal cancer. The ability to combine ultrasound hyperthermia and 3D imaging could improve visualization and targeting of cancerous tissues. In this study, numerical modeling and experimental measurements were developed to determine the feasibility of combined therapy and imaging with a 1 cm diameter endoscopic RT3D probe with 504 transmitters and 252 receive channels. This device operates at 5 MHz and has a 6.3 mm x 6.3 mm aperture to produce real time 3D pyramidal scans of 60-120 degrees incorporating 64 x 64 = 4096 image lines at 30 volumes/sec interleaved with a 3D steerable therapy beam. A finite-element mesh was constructed with over 128,000 elements in LS-DYNA to simulate the induced temperature rise from our transducer with a 3 cm deep focus in tissue. Quarter-symmetry of the transducer was used to reduce mesh size and computation time. Based on intensity values calculated in Field II using the transducer's array geometry, a minimum I(SPTA) of 3.6 W/cm2 is required from our endoscope probe in order to induce a temperature rise of 4 degrees C within five minutes. Experimental measurements of the array's power output capabilities were conducted using a PVDF hydrophone placed 3 cm away from the face of the transducer in a watertank. Using a PDA14 Signatec data acquisition board to capture full volumes of transmitted ultrasound data, it was determined that the probe can presently maintain intensity values up to 2.4 W/cm2 over indefinite times for therapeutic applications combined with intermittent 3D scanning to maintain targeting

  18. Integrated 3-D Ground-Penetrating Radar, Outcrop, and Borehole Data Applied to Reservoir Characterization and Flow Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    George McMechan; Rucsandra Corbeanu; Craig Forster; Kristian Soegaard; Xiaoxian Zeng; Carlos Aiken; Robert Szerbiak; Janok Bhattacharya; Michael Wizevich; Xueming Xu; Stephen Snelgrove; Karen Roche; Siang Joo Lim; Djuro Navakovic; Christopher White; Laura Crossey; Deming Wang; John Thurmond; William Hammon III; Mamadou BAlde; Ari Menitove

    2001-08-31

    OAK-B135 (IPLD Cleared) Existing reservoir models are based on 2-D outcrop studies; 3-D aspects are inferred from correlation between wells, and so are inadequately constrained for reservoir simulations. To overcome these deficiencies, we initiated a multidimensional characterization of reservoir analogs in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in Utah. The study was conducted at two sites (Corbula Gulch and Coyote Basin); results from both sites are contained in this report. Detailed sedimentary facies maps of cliff faces define the geometry and distribution of potential reservoir flow units, barriers and baffles at the outcrop. High resolution 2-D and 3-D ground-penetrating radar (GPR) images extend these reservoir characteristics into 3-D, to allow development of realistic 3-D reservoir models. Models use geometric information from the mapping and the GPR data, petrophysical data from surface and cliff-face outcrops, lab analyses of outcrop and core samples, and petrography. The measurements are all integrated into a single coordinate system using GPS and laser mapping of the main sedimentological features and boundaries.The final step is analysis of results of 3-D fluid flow modeling to demonstrate applicability of our reservoir analog studies to well siting and reservoir engineering for maximization of hydrocarbon production. The main goals of the project are achieved. These are the construction of a deterministic 3-D reservoir analog model from a variety of geophysical and geologic measurements at the field sites, integrating these into comprehensive petrophysical models, and flow simulations through these models. This unique approach represents a significant advance in characterization and use of reservoir analogs.

  19. The influence of printing parameters on cell survival rate and printability in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Yang; Mao, Shuangshuang; Sun, Wei; Yao, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing technology has provided a versatile methodology to fabricate cell-laden tissue-like constructs and in vitro tissue/pathological models for tissue engineering, drug testing and screening applications. However, it still remains a challenge to print bioinks with high viscoelasticity to achieve long-term stable structure and maintain high cell survival rate after printing at the same time. In this study, we systematically investigated the influence of 3D cell printing parameters, i.e. composition and concentration of bioink, holding temperature and holding time, on the printability and cell survival rate in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology. Rheological measurements were utilized to characterize the viscoelasticity of gelatin-based bioinks. Results demonstrated that the bioink viscoelasticity was increased when increasing the bioink concentration, increasing holding time and decreasing holding temperature below gelation temperature. The decline of cell survival rate after 3D cell printing process was observed when increasing the viscoelasticity of the gelatin-based bioinks. However, different process parameter combinations would result in the similar rheological characteristics and thus showed similar cell survival rate after 3D bioprinting process. On the other hand, bioink viscoelasticity should also reach a certain point to ensure good printability and shape fidelity. At last, we proposed a protocol for 3D bioprinting of temperature-sensitive gelatin-based hydrogel bioinks with both high cell survival rate and good printability. This research would be useful for biofabrication researchers to adjust the 3D bioprinting process parameters quickly and as a referable template for designing new bioinks. PMID:26523399

  20. Automated and integrated mask generation from a CAD constructed 3D model.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2005-03-01

    We have developed and implemented a method which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micromachining. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology to the model. The 3D model is first separated into bodies that are non-intersecting, made from different materials or only linked through a ground plane. Next, for each body unique horizontal cross sections are located and arranged into a tree based on their topological relationship. A branch-wise search of the tree uncovers locations where deposition boundaries must lie and identifies candidate masks creating a generic mask set for the 3D model. Finally, in the last step specific process requirements are considered that may constrain the generic mask set.

  1. DLP-based 3D metrology by structured light or projected fringe technology for life sciences and industrial metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, G.; Hainich, R.

    2009-02-01

    Since the mid-eighties, a fundamental idea for achieving measuring accuracy in projected fringe technology was to consider the projected fringe pattern as an interferogram and evaluate it on the basis of advanced algorithms widely used for phase measuring in real-time interferometry. A fundamental requirement for obtaining a sufficiently high degree of measuring accuracy with this so-called "phase measuring projected fringe technology" is that the projected fringes, analogous to interference fringes, must have a cos2-shaped intensity distribution. Until the mid-nineties, this requirement for the projected fringe pattern measurement technology presented a basic handicap for its wide application in 3D metrology. This situation changed abruptly, when in the nineties Texas Instruments introduced to the market advanced digital light projection on the basis of micro mirror based projection systems, socalled DLP technology, which also facilitated the generation and projection of cos2-shaped intensity and/or fringe patterns. With this DLP technology, which from its original approach was actually oriented towards completely different applications such as multimedia projection, Texas Instruments boosted phase-measuring fringe projection in optical 3D metrology to a worldwide breakthrough both for medical as well as industrial applications. A subject matter of the lecture will be to present the fundamental principles and the resulting advantages of optical 3D metrology based on phase-measuring fringe projection using DLP technology. Further will be presented and discussed applications of the measurement technology in medical engineering and industrial metrology.

  2. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for 3D Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoliang; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yunjia; Zhang, Yanzhe; Tian, Peng; Yang, Huachao

    2015-01-01

    Because of the high calculation cost and poor performance of a traditional planar map when dealing with complicated indoor geographic information, a WiFi fingerprint indoor positioning system cannot be widely employed on a smartphone platform. By making full use of the hardware sensors embedded in the smartphone, this study proposes an integrated approach to a three-dimensional (3D) indoor positioning system. First, an improved K-means clustering method is adopted to reduce the fingerprint database retrieval time and enhance positioning efficiency. Next, with the mobile phone’s acceleration sensor, a new step counting method based on auto-correlation analysis is proposed to achieve cell phone inertial navigation positioning. Furthermore, the integration of WiFi positioning with Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) obtains higher positional accuracy with the help of the Unscented Kalman Filter algorithm. Finally, a hybrid 3D positioning system based on Unity 3D, which can carry out real-time positioning for targets in 3D scenes, is designed for the fluent operation of mobile terminals. PMID:26404314

  3. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for 3D Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoliang; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yunjia; Zhang, Yanzhe; Tian, Peng; Yang, Huachao

    2015-01-01

    Because of the high calculation cost and poor performance of a traditional planar map when dealing with complicated indoor geographic information, a WiFi fingerprint indoor positioning system cannot be widely employed on a smartphone platform. By making full use of the hardware sensors embedded in the smartphone, this study proposes an integrated approach to a three-dimensional (3D) indoor positioning system. First, an improved K-means clustering method is adopted to reduce the fingerprint database retrieval time and enhance positioning efficiency. Next, with the mobile phone's acceleration sensor, a new step counting method based on auto-correlation analysis is proposed to achieve cell phone inertial navigation positioning. Furthermore, the integration of WiFi positioning with Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) obtains higher positional accuracy with the help of the Unscented Kalman Filter algorithm. Finally, a hybrid 3D positioning system based on Unity 3D, which can carry out real-time positioning for targets in 3D scenes, is designed for the fluent operation of mobile terminals. PMID:26404314

  4. Parameterization of training images for aquifer 3-D facies modeling integrating geological interpretations and statistical inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar; Comunian, Alessandro; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Kelly, Bryce F. J.

    2014-10-01

    We develop a stochastic approach to construct channelized 3-D geological models constrained to borehole measurements as well as geological interpretation. The methodology is based on simple 2-D geologist-provided sketches of fluvial depositional elements, which are extruded in the 3rd dimension. Multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) is used to impair horizontal variability to the structures by introducing geometrical transformation parameters. The sketches provided by the geologist are used as elementary training images, whose statistical information is expanded through randomized transformations. We demonstrate the applicability of the approach by applying it to modeling a fluvial valley filling sequence in the Maules Creek catchment, Australia. The facies models are constrained to borehole logs, spatial information borrowed from an analogue and local orientations derived from the present-day stream networks. The connectivity in the 3-D facies models is evaluated using statistical measures and transport simulations. Comparison with a statistically equivalent variogram-based model shows that our approach is more suited for building 3-D facies models that contain structures specific to the channelized environment and which have a significant influence on the transport processes.

  5. Integration of nano-scale components and supports in micromachined 3D silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Azimi, S.; Y Dang, Z.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a process for the three-dimensional (3D) machining of p-type silicon on a micro- and nano-scale using high-energy ion beam irradiation with one or more energies and fluences, followed by electrochemical anodization in hydrofluoric acid. We present a study of the dependence of our fabricated structures on irradiating ion energies, fluences, geometries and wafer resistivity. All these factors determine whether the micro- and nano-scale features are properly connected to the supports in the 3D silicon structures. If wrongly chosen, any of these factors may cause a breakage at the connection through localized over-etching. Under optimum irradiation and anodization conditions, free-standing patterned membranes can be fabricated with feature dimensions of 100 nm over areas of many square millimeters. This investigation is based on silicon structures but is relevant to any electro-assisted etching process for 3D fabrication, paving the way for achieving free-standing silicon photonics, mechanical resonators and micro-/nano-electromechanical systems.

  6. New 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion using global magnetic integral and local differential equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.; Majer, E.; Zuo, D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a new 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic (EM) modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm. The algorithm consists of: (a) a new magnetic integral equation instead of the electric integral equation to solve the electromagnetic forward modeling and inverse problem; (b) a collocation finite element method for solving the magnetic integral and a Galerkin finite element method for the magnetic differential equations; (c) a nonlinear regularizing optimization method to make the inversion stable and of high resolution; and (d) a new parallel 3D modeling and inversion using a global integral and local differential domain decomposition technique (GILD). The new 3D nonlinear electromagnetic inversion has been tested with synthetic data and field data. The authors obtained very good imaging for the synthetic data and reasonable subsurface EM imaging for the field data. The parallel algorithm has high parallel efficiency over 90% and can be a parallel solver for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic modeling and inversion. The parallel GILD algorithm can be extended to develop a high resolution and large scale seismic and hydrology modeling and inversion in the massively parallel computer.

  7. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  8. An Integrated Multi-component Processing and Interpretation Framework for 3D Borehole Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect

    M. Karrenbach

    2004-04-01

    This report covers the October 2003 until March 2004 time period. Work has continued successfully on several tasks 1 through 7. Most of these tasks have been executed independently. Due to availability of manpower during that time period we progressed steadily and completed some of the tasks, while others are still on going. We achieved the goals that we had set up in the task schedule. Reviewing the results of this work period indicates that our plan is on schedule and we did not encounter any unforeseen problems. The work plan will continue as projected. Several independent tasks pursuant the statement of project objectives have been executed simultaneously and are still on-going. This report summarizes the selection, test processing and test flow generation of a relevant 3D borehole seismic high-resolution test dataset. This multi-component data set is suitable for future use in this project due to data quality and unique acquisition characteristics. This report shows initial processing results that supported the data selection scheduled for Task 1. Use of real data is augmented by the creating a 3D layered synthetic geologic model in which multi-component 3D borehole seismic data were generated using 3D ray tracing. A gridded surface representation of the reflection interfaces as well as fully populated velocity grids were generated and archived. The model consists of a moderately dipping geologic setting with horizon undulations. A realistic velocity variation is used in between the three layers. Acquisition was simulated from a set of equidistant source locations at the surface of the model, while a close to vertical VSP well was used to capture the wave field data. The source pattern was close to a staggered grid pattern. Multi-component particle displacements were recorded every 50 ft down with an array length of 4,000 ft. P-P as well as P-S reflections were specified in the resulting wave field. We ensured a large enough aperture with enough fine sampling

  9. IRIS Earthquake Browser with Integration to the GEON IDV for 3-D Visualization of Hypocenters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weertman, B. R.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new generation of web based earthquake query tool - the IRIS Earthquake Browser (IEB). The IEB combines the DMC's large set of earthquake catalogs (provided by USGS/NEIC, ISC and the ANF) with the popular Google Maps web interface. With the IEB you can quickly and easily find earthquakes in any region of the globe. Using Google's detailed satellite images, earthquakes can be easily co-located with natural geographic features such as volcanoes as well as man made features such as commercial mines. A set of controls allow earthquakes to be filtered by time, magnitude, and depth range as well as catalog name, contributor name and magnitude type. Displayed events can be easily exported in NetCDF format into the GEON Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) where hypocenters may be visualized in three dimensions. Looking "under the hood", the IEB is based on AJAX technology and utilizes REST style web services hosted at the IRIS DMC. The IEB is part of a broader effort at the DMC aimed at making our data holdings available via web services. The IEB is useful both educationally and as a research tool.

  10. Exploring 3-D Virtual Reality Technology for Spatial Ability and Chemistry Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merchant, Z.; Goetz, E. T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, W.; Cifuentes, L.; Kwok, O.; Davis, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the potential of Second Life® (SL), a three-dimensional (3-D) virtual world, to enhance undergraduate students' learning of a vital chemistry concept. A quasi-experimental pre-posttest control group design was used to conduct the study. A total of 387 participants completed three assignment activities either in SL or using…

  11. Real-Depth imaging: a new (no glasses) 3D imaging technology with video/data projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgoff, Eugene

    1997-05-01

    Floating Images, Inc. has developed the software and hardware for anew, patent pending, 'floating 3D, off-the- screen-experience' display technology. This technology has the potential to become the next standard for home and arcade video games, computers, corporate presentations, Internet/Intranet viewing, and television. Current '3D Graphics' technologies are actually flat on screen. Floating Images technology actually produce images at different depths from any display, such as CRT and LCD, for television, computer, projection, and other formats. In addition, unlike stereoscopic 3D imaging, no glasses, headgear, or other viewing aids are used. And, unlike current autostereoscopic imaging technologies, there is virtually no restriction on where viewers can sit to view the images, with no 'bad' or 'dead' zones, flipping, or pseudoscopy. In addition to providing traditional depth cues such as perspective and background image occlusion, the new technology also provides both horizontal and vertical binocular parallax and accommodation which coincides with convergence. Since accommodation coincides with convergence, viewing these images doesn't produce headaches, fatigue, or eye-strain, regardless of how long they are viewed. The imagery must either be formatted for the Floating Images platform when written, or existing software can be reformatted without much difficult. The optical hardware system can be made to accommodate virtually any projection system to produce Floating Images for the Boardroom, video arcade, stage shows, or the classroom.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of gels with integrated channels using 3D printing with microfluidic nozzle for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Attalla, R; Ling, C; Selvaganapathy, P

    2016-02-01

    The lack of a simple and effective method to integrate vascular network with engineered scaffolds and tissue constructs remains one of the biggest challenges in true 3D tissue engineering. Here, we detail the use of a commercially available, low-cost, open-source 3D printer modified with a microfluidic print-head in order to develop a method for the generation of instantly perfusable vascular network integrated with gel scaffolds seeded with cells. The print-head features an integrated coaxial nozzle that allows the fabrication of hollow, calcium-polymerized alginate tubes that can be easily patterned using 3D printing techniques. The diameter of the hollow channel can be precisely controlled and varied between 500 μm - 2 mm by changing applied flow rates or print-head speed. These channels are integrated into gel layers with a thickness of 800 μm - 2.5 mm. The structural rigidity of these constructs allows the fabrication of multi-layered structures without causing the collapse of hollow channels in lower layers. The 3D printing method was fully characterized at a range of operating speeds (0-40 m/min) and corresponding flow rates (1-30 mL/min) were identified to produce precise definition. This microfluidic design also allows the incorporation of a wide range of scaffold materials as well as biological constituents such as cells, growth factors, and ECM material. Media perfusion of the channels causes a significant viability increase in the bulk of cell-laden structures over the long-term. With this setup, gel constructs with embedded arrays of hollow channels can be created and used as a potential substitute for blood vessel networks. PMID:26842949

  13. Integration Of 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) For Effective Waste Management Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, G.J.; Hecox, G.R.

    2006-07-01

    Soil remediation in response to the presence of residual radioactivity resulting from past MED/AEC activities is currently in progress under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program near the St. Louis, MO airport. During GY05, approximately 92,000 cubic meters (120,000 cubic yards) of radioactive soil was excavated, packaged and transported via rail for disposal at U.S. Ecology or Envirocare of Utah, LLC. To facilitate the management of excavation/transportation/disposal activities, a 3D GIS was developed for the site that was used to estimate the in-situ radionuclide activities, activities in excavation block areas, and shipping activities using a sum-of ratio (SOR) method for combining various radionuclide compounds into applicable transportation and disposal SOR values. The 3D GIS was developed starting with the SOR values for the approximately 900 samples from 90 borings. These values were processed into a three-dimensional (3D) point grid using kriging with nominal grid spacing of 1.5 by 1.5 meter horizontal by 0.3 meter vertical. The final grid, clipped to the area and soil interval above the planned base of excavation, consisted of 210,000 individual points. Standard GIS volumetric and spatial join procedures were used to calculate the volume of soil represented by each grid point, the base of excavation, depth below ground surface, elevation, surface elevation and SOR values for each point in the final grid. To create the maps needed for management, the point grid results were spatially joined to each excavation area in 0.9 meter (3 foot) depth intervals and the average SOR and total volumes were calculations. The final maps were color-coded for easy identification of areas above the specific transportation or disposal criteria. (authors)

  14. Research on Joint Parameter Inversion for an Integrated Underground Displacement 3D Measuring Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Qiu, Guohua; Li, Qing; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Wang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is a key means to monitor and evaluate geological disasters and geotechnical projects. There exist few practical instruments able to monitor subsurface horizontal and vertical displacements simultaneously due to monitoring invisibility and complexity. A novel underground displacement 3D measuring sensor had been proposed in our previous studies, and great efforts have been taken in the basic theoretical research of underground displacement sensing and measuring characteristics by virtue of modeling, simulation and experiments. This paper presents an innovative underground displacement joint inversion method by mixing a specific forward modeling approach with an approximate optimization inversion procedure. It can realize a joint inversion of underground horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for the proposed 3D sensor. Comparative studies have been conducted between the measured and inversed parameters of underground horizontal and vertical displacements under a variety of experimental and inverse conditions. The results showed that when experimentally measured horizontal displacements and vertical displacements are both varied within 0 ~ 30 mm, horizontal displacement and vertical displacement inversion discrepancies are generally less than 3 mm and 1 mm, respectively, under three kinds of simulated underground displacement monitoring circumstances. This implies that our proposed underground displacement joint inversion method is robust and efficient to predict the measuring values of underground horizontal and vertical displacements for the proposed sensor. PMID:25871714

  15. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  16. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  17. Tightly Coupled Low Cost 3D RISS/GPS Integration Using a Mixture Particle Filter for Vehicular Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2011-01-01

    Satellite navigation systems such as the global positioning system (GPS) are currently the most common technique used for land vehicle positioning. However, in GPS-denied environments, there is an interruption in the positioning information. Low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based inertial sensors can be integrated with GPS and enhance the performance in denied GPS environments. The traditional technique for this integration problem is Kalman filtering (KF). Due to the inherent errors of low-cost MEMS inertial sensors and their large stochastic drifts, KF, with its linearized models, has limited capabilities in providing accurate positioning. Particle filtering (PF) was recently suggested as a nonlinear filtering technique to accommodate for arbitrary inertial sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF called the Mixture PF is utilized in this study to perform tightly coupled integration of a three dimensional (3D) reduced inertial sensors system (RISS) with GPS. In this work, the RISS consists of one single-axis gyroscope and a two-axis accelerometer used together with the vehicle’s odometer to obtain 3D navigation states. These sensors are then integrated with GPS in a tightly coupled scheme. In loosely-coupled integration, at least four satellites are needed to provide acceptable GPS position and velocity updates for the integration filter. The advantage of the tightly-coupled integration is that it can provide GPS measurement update(s) even when the number of visible satellites is three or lower, thereby improving the operation of the navigation system in environments with partial blockages by providing continuous aiding to the inertial sensors even during limited GPS satellite availability. To effectively exploit the capabilities of PF, advanced modeling for the stochastic drift of the vertically aligned gyroscope is used. In order to benefit from measurement updates for such drift, which are

  18. Tightly coupled low cost 3D RISS/GPS integration using a mixture particle filter for vehicular navigation.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2011-01-01

    Satellite navigation systems such as the global positioning system (GPS) are currently the most common technique used for land vehicle positioning. However, in GPS-denied environments, there is an interruption in the positioning information. Low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based inertial sensors can be integrated with GPS and enhance the performance in denied GPS environments. The traditional technique for this integration problem is Kalman filtering (KF). Due to the inherent errors of low-cost MEMS inertial sensors and their large stochastic drifts, KF, with its linearized models, has limited capabilities in providing accurate positioning. Particle filtering (PF) was recently suggested as a nonlinear filtering technique to accommodate for arbitrary inertial sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF called the Mixture PF is utilized in this study to perform tightly coupled integration of a three dimensional (3D) reduced inertial sensors system (RISS) with GPS. In this work, the RISS consists of one single-axis gyroscope and a two-axis accelerometer used together with the vehicle's odometer to obtain 3D navigation states. These sensors are then integrated with GPS in a tightly coupled scheme. In loosely-coupled integration, at least four satellites are needed to provide acceptable GPS position and velocity updates for the integration filter. The advantage of the tightly-coupled integration is that it can provide GPS measurement update(s) even when the number of visible satellites is three or lower, thereby improving the operation of the navigation system in environments with partial blockages by providing continuous aiding to the inertial sensors even during limited GPS satellite availability. To effectively exploit the capabilities of PF, advanced modeling for the stochastic drift of the vertically aligned gyroscope is used. In order to benefit from measurement updates for such drift, which are

  19. The fast and accurate 3D-face scanning technology based on laser triangle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjiang; Chang, Tianyu; Ge, Baozhen; Tian, Qingguo; Chen, Yang; Kong, Bin

    2013-08-01

    A laser triangle scanning method and the structure of 3D-face measurement system were introduced. In presented system, a liner laser source was selected as an optical indicated signal in order to scanning a line one times. The CCD image sensor was used to capture image of the laser line modulated by human face. The system parameters were obtained by system calibrated calculated. The lens parameters of image part of were calibrated with machine visual image method and the triangle structure parameters were calibrated with fine wire paralleled arranged. The CCD image part and line laser indicator were set with a linear motor carry which can achieve the line laser scanning form top of the head to neck. For the nose is ledge part and the eyes are sunk part, one CCD image sensor can not obtain the completed image of laser line. In this system, two CCD image sensors were set symmetric at two sides of the laser indicator. In fact, this structure includes two laser triangle measure units. Another novel design is there laser indicators were arranged in order to reduce the scanning time for it is difficult for human to keep static for longer time. The 3D data were calculated after scanning. And further data processing include 3D coordinate refine, mesh calculate and surface show. Experiments show that this system has simply structure, high scanning speed and accurate. The scanning range covers the whole head of adult, the typical resolution is 0.5mm.

  20. Full-field strain measurements on turbomachinery components using 3D SLDV technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Martyn; Sever, Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    This paper focuses on measurements of 3D Operating Deflection Shapes (ODSs), and subsequently, construction of full-field surface strain maps of a number of turbomachinery components. For this purpose a 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) is used. The ODS measurements are performed for a large number of modes and results obtained are compared with the 1-D shapes that are most commonly measured. It is demonstrated that the 3D measurements are a significant improvement over the 1-D case in terms of independent amount of extra information they provide. This is confirmed through comparisons with FE results. Special tests are carried out to recover the full-field strain on scanned faces of the components used. Visual comparison of these measurements with FE counterparts reveal that strain maps can be successfully measured, not only for low frequency modes but also for highly complex high frequency ones. These maps are measured with different levels of input force to assess the linearity of strain results to varying response amplitudes. Lessons learnt and observations made are summarised in concluding remarks and the scope of future work to take this study into the production environment is discussed. This study constitutes a unique comprehensive investigation into full-field strain measurements using real application hardware and a large frequency range.

  1. The production of anatomical teaching resources using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology.

    PubMed

    McMenamin, Paul G; Quayle, Michelle R; McHenry, Colin R; Adams, Justin W

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of anatomy has consistently been the subject of societal controversy, especially in the context of employing cadaveric materials in professional medical and allied health professional training. The reduction in dissection-based teaching in medical and allied health professional training programs has been in part due to the financial considerations involved in maintaining bequest programs, accessing human cadavers and concerns with health and safety considerations for students and staff exposed to formalin-containing embalming fluids. This report details how additive manufacturing or three-dimensional (3D) printing allows the creation of reproductions of prosected human cadaver and other anatomical specimens that obviates many of the above issues. These 3D prints are high resolution, accurate color reproductions of prosections based on data acquired by surface scanning or CT imaging. The application of 3D printing to produce models of negative spaces, contrast CT radiographic data using segmentation software is illustrated. The accuracy of printed specimens is compared with original specimens. This alternative approach to producing anatomically accurate reproductions offers many advantages over plastination as it allows rapid production of multiple copies of any dissected specimen, at any size scale and should be suitable for any teaching facility in any country, thereby avoiding some of the cultural and ethical issues associated with cadaver specimens either in an embalmed or plastinated form. PMID:24976019

  2. Coupling frontal photopolymerization and surface instabilities for a novel 3D patterning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Alessandra; Hennessy, Matthew; Matar, Omar; Douglas, Jack; Cabral, João

    2015-03-01

    Patterning of soft matter provides an exceptional route for the generation of micro/nanostructured and functional surfaces. We describe a new 3D fabrication process based on coupling frontal photopolymerization (FPP) with precisely controlled, yet spontaneous, interfacial wrinkling. FPP is a complex spatio-temporal process that can lead to well-defined propagating fronts of network formation, both stable and unstable. We investigate this process focusing on the interfacial monomer-to-polymer conversion profile and its wave propagation. A simple coarse-grained model is found to describe remarkably well the planar frontal logarithmic kinetics, capturing the effects of UV light exposure time (or dose) and temperature, as well as the front position. In defined conditions, surface instabilities are introduced and interfere with wave planarity, resulting in the formation of ``minimal'' surfaces with complex 3D geometries. Building on this understanding on the propagation of wavefronts of network formation during photopolymerization, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of 3D patterned polymer materials with tunable shapes with optical and surface functionality.

  3. Novel grinding stone used for polishing 3D plastic replica with rapid prototyping technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wang; Niikura, Yoshihiro; Sato, Toshio; Kawashima, Norimichi

    2006-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) apparatus accepts a specific format translated from CAD data (patient's CT) and "slices" it into two-dimensional cross sections for laser photo curing. Surgeon can conduct safer surgery by reappearing on an actual model using 3D plastic replica in the preoperative. Polishing has to be used to eliminate the marks after removal of supports and the build layer pitches. Complicated and narrow areas of the 3D replica are difficult to be polished with the conventional grinding stone. This study proposes a novel grinding stone and introduces its producing process and characteristics. The novel grinding stone has many advantages as follows; (1) Preparation is possible of grinding stone that follows the complicated shape. (2) Grinding stone with uniformly dispersed abrasive grains can be prepared using magnetic particles and magnetic field. (3) Reshaping of grinding stone by heating is possible since the binder is made of a thermoplastic resin. (4) Every process can easily be carried out. We could polish to eliminate the marks after removal of supports and the build layer pitches on 3D plastic replica surface with the grinding stone.

  4. 3D Integrated geophysical-petrological modelling of the Iranian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Naeim; Ardestani, Vahid E.; Ebbing, Jörg; Fullea, Javier

    2016-04-01

    The present-day Iranian Plateau is the result of complex tectonic processes associated with the Arabia-Eurasia Plate convergence at a lithospheric scale. In spite of previous mostly 2D geophysical studies, fundamental questions regarding the deep lithospheric and sub-lithospheric structure beneath Iran remain open. A robust 3D model of the thermochemical lithospheric structure in Iran is an important step toward a better understanding of the geological history and tectonic events in the area. Here, we apply a combined geophysical-petrological methodology (LitMod3D) to investigate the present-day thermal and compositional structure in the crust and upper mantle beneath the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone using a comprehensive variety of constraining data: elevation, surface heat flow, gravity potential fields, satellite gravity gradients, xenoliths and seismic tomography. Different mantle compositions were tested in our model based on local xenolith samples and global data base averages for different tectonothermal ages. A uniform mantle composition fails to explain the observed gravity field, gravity gradients and surface topography. A tectonically regionalized lithospheric mantle compositional model is able to explain all data sets including seismic tomography models. Our preliminary thermochemical lithospheric study constrains the depth to Moho discontinuity and intra crustal geometries including depth to sediments. We also determine the depth to Curie isotherm which is known as the base of magnetized crustal/uppermost mantle bodies. Discrepancies with respect to previous studies include mantle composition and the geometry of Moho and Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB). Synthetic seismic Vs and Vp velocities match existing seismic tomography models in the area. In this study, depleted mantle compositions are modelled beneath cold and thick lithosphere in Arabian and Turan platforms. A more fertile mantle composition is found in collision zones. Based on our 3

  5. The impact of flattening-filter-free beam technology on 3D conformal RT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The removal of the flattening filter (FF) leads to non-uniform fluence distribution with a considerable increase in dose rate. It is possible to adapt FFF beams (flattening-filter-free) in 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) by using field in field techniques (FiF). The aim of this retrospective study is to clarify whether the quality of 3D CRT plans is influenced by the use of FFF beams. Method This study includes a total of 52 CT studies of RT locations that occur frequently in clinical practice. Dose volume targets were provided for the PTV of breast (n=13), neurocranium (n=11), lung (n=7), bone metastasis (n=10) and prostate (n=11) in line with ICRU report 50/62. 3D CRT planning was carried out using FiF methods. Two clinically utilized photon energies are used for a Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerator in FFF mode at 7MVFFF and 11MVFFF as well as in FF mode at 6MVFF and 10MVFF. The plan quality in relation to the PTV coverage, OAR (organs at risk) and low dose burden as well as the 2D dosimetric verification is compared with FF plans. Results No significant differences were found between FFF and FF plans in the mean dose for the PTV of breast, lung, spine metastasis and prostate. The low dose parameters V5Gy and V10Gy display significant differences for FFF and FF plans in some subgroups. The DVH analysis of the OAR revealed some significant differences. Significantly more fields (1.9 – 4.5) were necessary in the use of FFF beams for each location (p<0.0001) in order to achieve PTV coverage. All the tested groups displayed significant increases (1.3 – 2.2 times) in the average number of necessary MU with the use of FFF beams (p<0.001). Conclusions This study has shown that the exclusive use of a linear accelerator in FFF mode is feasible in 3D CRT. It was possible to realize RT plans in comparable quality in typical cases of clinical radiotherapy. The 2D dosimetric validation of the modulated fields verified the dose calculation and thus the

  6. Virus enabled 3d nano-array electrodes for integrated Lithium/Sodium-ion microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yihang

    Multilayers of functional materials (carbon/electrode/nickel) were hierarchically architectured over tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) templates that were genetically modified to self-assemble in a vertical manner on current-collectors for battery applications. The spaces formed between individual rods effectively accommodated the volume expansion and contraction of electrodes during charge/discharge, while surface carbon coating engineered over these nanorods further enhance the electronic conductivity. The microbattery based on self aligned nanoforests with precise arrangement of various auxiliary material layers including a central nanometric metal core as direct electronic pathway to current collector, can deliver high energy density and stable cycling stability. C/LiFePO4/Ni/TMV nanoforest cathodes for Li-ion batteries and C/Sn/Ni/TMV nanoforest anodes for Na-ion batteries were assembled using physical sputtering deposition. Both 3D nanoforest electrodes show exceptional cycling stability and rate capability.

  7. An Integrated Multi-component Processing and Interpretation Framework for 3D Borehole Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect

    M. Karrenbach

    2004-10-15

    This report covers the April 2004-September 2004 time period. Work has been performed successfully on several tasks 1 through 16. Part of this work has been reported in 15418R03. Most of portions of these tasks have been executed independently. We progressed steadily and completed some of the sub-tasks, while others are still on going. We achieved the goals that we had set up in the task schedule. Reviewing the results of this work period indicates that our plan is solid and we did not encounter any unforeseen problems. The work plan will continue as scheduled. A midyear review will be presented in November or December 2004. Several independent tasks pursuant the statement of project objectives have been executed simultaneously and are still on-going. Use of real seismic test data is augmented by the creation a 3D ray tracing synthetic test data. We used the previously constructed 3D layered model and simulated data acquisition from a set of circular source locations at the surface of the model, while a close to vertical VSP well was used to capture the wave field data. The source pattern was optimized with respect to Fresnel zone width at the target depth. Multi-component particle displacements were recorded every 50 ft down with an array length of 4,000 ft. P-P as well as P-S reflections were specified in the resulting wave field. We ensured a large enough aperture with enough fine sampling to perform advanced processing, imaging and analysis tests in the future during this project. We constantly improved the interfacing of our software libraries with newly designed 3C display classes and mechanisms. We used the previously implemented 3C Work Bench tool as the primary prototyping tool. This work bench allows to load as well as manipulate and display data items in a flexible manner. We continued to demonstrate its basic functionality by loading source maps, horizons, seismic and velocity volumes, well logs into the tool, performing basic QC steps as is necessary

  8. 3D models mapping optimization through an integrated parameterization approach: cases studies from Ravenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, L.; Fantini, F.; Bertacchi, S.

    2014-06-01

    Image-based modelling tools based on SfM algorithms gained great popularity since several software houses provided applications able to achieve 3D textured models easily and automatically. The aim of this paper is to point out the importance of controlling models parameterization process, considering that automatic solutions included in these modelling tools can produce poor results in terms of texture utilization. In order to achieve a better quality of textured models from image-based modelling applications, this research presents a series of practical strategies aimed at providing a better balance between geometric resolution of models from passive sensors and their corresponding (u,v) map reference systems. This aspect is essential for the achievement of a high-quality 3D representation, since "apparent colour" is a fundamental aspect in the field of Cultural Heritage documentation. Complex meshes without native parameterization have to be "flatten" or "unwrapped" in the (u,v) parameter space, with the main objective to be mapped with a single image. This result can be obtained by using two different strategies: the former automatic and faster, while the latter manual and time-consuming. Reverse modelling applications provide automatic solutions based on splitting the models by means of different algorithms, that produce a sort of "atlas" of the original model in the parameter space, in many instances not adequate and negatively affecting the overall quality of representation. Using in synergy different solutions, ranging from semantic aware modelling techniques to quad-dominant meshes achieved using retopology tools, it is possible to obtain a complete control of the parameterization process.

  9. PROBABILISTIC INFORMATION INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    J. BOOKER; M. MEYER; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    The Statistical Sciences Group at Los Alamos has successfully developed a structured, probabilistic, quantitative approach for the evaluation of system performance based on multiple information sources, called Information Integration Technology (IIT). The technology integrates diverse types and sources of data and information (both quantitative and qualitative), and their associated uncertainties, to develop distributions for performance metrics, such as reliability. Applications include predicting complex system performance, where test data are lacking or expensive to obtain, through the integration of expert judgment, historical data, computer/simulation model predictions, and any relevant test/experimental data. The technology is particularly well suited for tracking estimated system performance for systems under change (e.g. development, aging), and can be used at any time during product development, including concept and early design phases, prior to prototyping, testing, or production, and before costly design decisions are made. Techniques from various disciplines (e.g., state-of-the-art expert elicitation, statistical and reliability analysis, design engineering, physics modeling, and knowledge management) are merged and modified to develop formal methods for the data/information integration. The power of this technology, known as PREDICT (Performance and Reliability Evaluation with Diverse Information Combination and Tracking), won a 1999 R and D 100 Award (Meyer, Booker, Bement, Kerscher, 1999). Specifically the PREDICT application is a formal, multidisciplinary process for estimating the performance of a product when test data are sparse or nonexistent. The acronym indicates the purpose of the methodology: to evaluate the performance or reliability of a product/system by combining all available (often diverse) sources of information and then tracking that performance as the product undergoes changes.

  10. Integration of Libration Point Orbit Dynamics into a Universal 3-D Autonomous Formation Flying Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The autonomous formation flying control algorithm developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) mission is investigated for applicability to libration point orbit formations. In the EO-1 formation-flying algorithm, control is accomplished via linearization about a reference transfer orbit with a state transition matrix (STM) computed from state inputs. The effect of libration point orbit dynamics on this algorithm architecture is explored via computation of STMs using the flight proven code, a monodromy matrix developed from a N-body model of a libration orbit, and a standard STM developed from the gravitational and coriolis effects as measured at the libration point. A comparison of formation flying Delta-Vs calculated from these methods is made to a standard linear quadratic regulator (LQR) method. The universal 3-D approach is optimal in the sense that it can be accommodated as an open-loop or closed-loop control using only state information.

  11. Subglacial Landforms and Processes: new Information From 3D Seismic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, K.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic interpretation and imaging techniques provide a unique means of investigating submarine geomorphic features produced by former ice sheets. An extensive two-dimensional (2D) and 3D seismic data base is here used to image the imprints left behind by glaciers that flowed out a major cross-shelf trough (Bjornoyrenna) of the north-Norwegian continental shelf during repeated glacial episodes. Mega-scale glacial lineations characterize the seafloor geomorphology of Bjornoyrenna and smaller, contributing cross-shelf troughs, where they are inferred to represent flow-lines of former ice streams that where active during the most recent (Weichselian) glacial period. Similar features are commonly observed on buried horizons. Large- scale seafloor imprints from an early readvance after the last glacial maximum are especially well preserved. Streamlined landforms and associated lobe-shaped ridges indicate that this major cross-shelf trough hosted six separate ice stream lobes that diverged fan-like at their margins, but were not all active simultaneously. A 300 km wide grounding-zone wedge results from high sediment flux within sub-ice stream deformable beds. A 2 to 3 km thick Pleistocene record is preserved at the mouth of Bjornoyrenna, in the Bjornoya Trough Mouth Fan. The preservation of up to several hundred meters of glacigenic sediments between the buried, glacially eroded surfaces, provides here the opportunity to study the internal structure of till units. 3D seismic attribute maps reveal that megablocks and rafts commonly occur within the till units. The sediments blocks are often aligned in chains that may be up to 2 km wide and over 50 km long. The largest individual megablocks have an areal extent of over 2 km2. The sediment chains are interpreted to have been eroded, transported and deposited by grounded ice, most probably fast-flowing ice streams. This is based on the relationship between the sediment chains and the horizons revealing

  12. The rendering context for stereoscopic 3D web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qinshui; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang

    2014-03-01

    3D technologies on the Web has been studied for many years, but they are basically monoscopic 3D. With the stereoscopic technology gradually maturing, we are researching to integrate the binocular 3D technology into the Web, creating a stereoscopic 3D browser that will provide users with a brand new experience of human-computer interaction. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to apply stereoscopy technologies to the CSS3 3D Transforms. Under our model, each element can create or participate in a stereoscopic 3D rendering context, in which 3D Transforms such as scaling, translation and rotation, can be applied and be perceived in a truly 3D space. We first discuss the underlying principles of stereoscopy. After that we discuss how these principles can be applied to the Web. A stereoscopic 3D browser with backward compatibility is also created for demonstration purposes. We take advantage of the open-source WebKit project, integrating the 3D display ability into the rendering engine of the web browser. For each 3D web page, our 3D browser will create two slightly different images, each representing the left-eye view and right-eye view, both to be combined on the 3D display to generate the illusion of depth. And as the result turns out, elements can be manipulated in a truly 3D space.

  13. Integration of genomic and medical data into a 3D atlas of human anatomy.

    PubMed

    Turinsky, Andrei L; Fanea, Elena; Trinh, Quang; Dong, Xiaoli; Stromer, Julie N; Shu, Xueling; Wat, Stephen; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Hill, Jonathan W; Edwards, Carol; Grosenick, Brenda; Yajima, Masumi; Sensen, Christoph W

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a framework for the visual integration and exploration of multi-scale biomedical data, which includes anatomical and molecular components. We have also created a Java-based software system that integrates molecular information, such as gene expression data, into a three-dimensional digital atlas of the male adult human anatomy. Our atlas is structured according to the Terminologia Anatomica. The underlying data-indexing mechanism uses open standards and semantic ontology-processing tools to establish the associations between heterogeneous data types. The software system makes an extensive use of virtual reality visualization. PMID:18391362

  14. Accurate and efficient Nyström volume integral equation method for the Maxwell equations for multiple 3-D scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duan; Cai, Wei; Zinser, Brian; Cho, Min Hyung

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we develop an accurate and efficient Nyström volume integral equation (VIE) method for the Maxwell equations for a large number of 3-D scatterers. The Cauchy Principal Values that arise from the VIE are computed accurately using a finite size exclusion volume together with explicit correction integrals consisting of removable singularities. Also, the hyper-singular integrals are computed using interpolated quadrature formulae with tensor-product quadrature nodes for cubes, spheres and cylinders, that are frequently encountered in the design of meta-materials. The resulting Nyström VIE method is shown to have high accuracy with a small number of collocation points and demonstrates p-convergence for computing the electromagnetic scattering of these objects. Numerical calculations of multiple scatterers of cubic, spherical, and cylindrical shapes validate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  15. Architectural integration of the components necessary for electrical energy storage on the nanoscale and in 3D.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher P; Long, Jeffrey W; Pettigrew, Katherine A; Stroud, Rhonda M; Rolison, Debra R

    2011-04-01

    We describe fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) multifunctional nanoarchitectures in which the three critical components of a battery--cathode, separator/electrolyte, and anode--are internally assembled as tricontinuous nanoscopic phases. The architecture is initiated using sol-gel chemistry and processing to erect a 3D self-wired nanoparticulate scaffold of manganese oxide (>200 m(2) g(-1)) with a continuous, open, and mesoporous void volume. The integrated 3D system is generated by exhaustive coverage of the oxide network by an ultrathin, conformal layer of insulating polymer that forms via self-limiting electrodeposition of poly(phenylene oxide). The remaining interconnected void volume is then wired with RuO(2) nanowebs using subambient thermal decomposition of RuO(4). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the three nanoscopic charge-transfer functional components--manganese oxide, polymer separator/cation conductor, and RuO(2)--exhibit the stratified, tricontinuous design of the phase-by-phase construction. This architecture contains all three components required for a solid-state energy storage device within a void volume sized at tens of nanometres such that nanometre-thick distances are established between the opposing electrodes. We have now demonstrated the ability to assemble multifunctional energy-storage nanoarchitectures on the nanoscale and in three dimensions. PMID:21327256

  16. Preliminary results of 3D inversion of the EarthScope Oregon MT data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A.; Gribenko, A.; Cuma, M.; Zhdanov, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we apply 3D inversion to MT data collected in Oregon as a part of the EarthScope project. We use the integral equation method as a forward modeling engine. Quasi-analytical approximation with a variable background (QAVB) method of Frechet derivative calculation is applied. This technique allows us to simplify the inversion algorithm and to use just one forward modeling on every iteration step. The receiver footprint approach considerably reduces the computational resources needed to invert the large volumes of data covering vast areas. The data set, which was used in the inversion, was obtained through the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). The long-period MT data was collected in Eastern Oregon in 2006. The inverted electrical conductivity distribution agrees reasonably well with geological features of the region as well as with 3D MT inversion results obtained by other researchers. The geoelectrical model of the Oregon deep interior produced by 3D inversion indicates several lithospheres' electrical conductivity anomalies, including a linear zone marked by low-high conductivity transition along the Klamath Blue Mountain Lineament associated with a linear trend of gravity minima. High electrical conductivity values occur in the upper crust under the accreted terrains in the Blue Mountains region.

  17. Pipe3D, a pipeline to analyze Integral Field Spectroscopy Data: II. Analysis sequence and CALIFA dataproducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; García-Benito, R.; Ibarra-Mede, H. J.; González, J. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bitsakis, T.; Law, D.; Cano-Díaz, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Galbany, L.; Mast, D.; Abril-Melgarejo, V.; Roman-Lopes, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present Pipe3D, an analysis pipeline based on the FIT3D fitting tool, developed to explore the properties of the stellar populations and ionized gas of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Pipe3D was created to provide coherent, simple to distribute, and comparable dataproducts, independently of the origin of the data, focused on the data of the most recent IFU surveys (e.g., CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI), and the last generation IFS instruments (e.g., MUSE). In this article we describe the different steps involved in the analysis of the data, illustrating them by showing the dataproducts derived for NGC 2916, observed by CALIFA and P-MaNGA. As a practical example of the pipeline we present the complete set of dataproducts derived for the 200 datacubes that comprises the V500 setup of the CALIFA Data Release 2 (DR2), making them freely available through the network. Finally, we explore the hypothesis that the properties of the stellar populations and ionized gas of galaxies at the effective radius are representative of the overall average ones, finding that this is indeed the case.

  18. Photonic liquid crystal fibers tuning by four electrode system produced with 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertman, Slawomir; Bednarska, Karolina; Czapla, Aleksandra; Woliński, Tomasz R.

    2015-09-01

    Photonic liquid crystal fiber has been intensively investigated in last few years. It has been proved that guiding properties of such fibers could be tuned with an electric field. In particular efficient tuning could be obtained if multi-electrode system allowing for dynamic change of not only intensity of the electric field, but also its direction. In this work we report a simple to build four electrode system, which is based on a precisely aligned four cylindrical microelectrodes. As an electrodes we use enameled copper wire with diameter adequate to the diameter of the fiber to be tuned. To ensure uniform and parallel alignment of the wires a special micro-profiles has been designed and then produced with filament 3D printer. The possibility of the dynamic change of the electric field direction in such scalable and cost effective electrode assembly has been experimentally confirmed.

  19. Building components for an outpost on the Lunar soil by means of a novel 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaretti, Giovanni; Dini, Enrico; De Kestelier, Xavier; Colla, Valentina; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    3D-printing technologies are receiving an always increasing attention in architecture, due to their potential use for direct construction of buildings and other complex structures, also of considerable dimensions, with virtually any shape. Some of these technologies rely on an agglomeration process of inert materials, e.g. sand, through a special binding liquid and this capability is of interest for the space community for its potential application to space exploration. In fact, it opens the possibility for exploiting in-situ resources for the construction of buildings in harsh spatial environments. The paper presents the results of a study aimed at assessing the concept of 3D printing technology for building habitats on the Moon using lunar soil, also called regolith. A particular patented 3D-printing technology - D-shape - has been applied, which is, among the existing rapid prototyping systems, the closest to achieving full scale construction of buildings and the physical and chemical characteristics of lunar regolith and terrestrial regolith simulants have been assessed with respect to the working principles of such technology. A novel lunar regolith simulant has also been developed, which almost exactly reproduces the characteristics of the JSC-1A simulant produced in the US. Moreover, tests in air and in vacuum have been performed to demonstrate the occurrence of the reticulation reaction with the regolith simulant. The vacuum tests also showed that evaporation or freezing of the binding liquid can be prevented through a proper injection method. The general requirements of a Moon outpost have been specified, and a preliminary design of the habitat has been developed. Based on such design, a section of the outpost wall has been selected and manufactured at full scale using the D-shape printer and regolith simulant. Test pieces have also been manufactured and their mechanical properties have been assessed.

  20. Application of 3D laser scanning technology in historical building preservation: a case study of a Chinese temple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu Min; Lu, Nien Hua; Wu, Tsung Chiang

    2005-06-01

    This study applies 3D Laser scanning technology to develop a high-precision measuring system for digital survey of historical building. It outperformed other methods in obtaining abundant high-precision measuring points and computing data instantly. In this study, the Pei-tien Temple, a Chinese Taoism temple in southern Taiwan famous for its highly intricate architecture and more than 300-year history, was adopted as the target to proof the high accuracy and efficiency of this system. By using French made MENSI GS-100 Laser Scanner, numerous measuring points were precisely plotted to present the plane map, vertical map and 3D map of the property. Accuracies of 0.1-1 mm in the digital data have consistently been achieved for the historical heritage measurement.

  1. Rapid Low-Temperature 3D Integration of Silicon Nanowires on Flexible Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonkap; Kim, Han-Jung; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Dae-Geun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Jung, Joo-Yun; Jeon, Sohee; Lee, Eung-Sug; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jihye

    2015-08-26

    The vertical integration of 1D nanostructures onto the 2D substrates has the potential to offer significant performance gains to flexible electronic devices due to high integration density, large surface area, and improved light absorption and trapping. A simple, rapid, and low temperature transfer bonding method has been developed for this purpose. Ultrasonic vibration is used to achieve a low temperature bonding within a few seconds, resulting in a polymer-matrix-free, electrically conducting vertical assembly of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with a graphene/PET substrate. The microscopic structure, and mechanical and electrical characteristics of the interface between the transferred SiNW array and graphene layer are subsequently investigated, revealing that this creates a mechanically robust and electrically Ohmic contact. This newly developed ultrasonic transfer bonding technique is also found to be readily adaptable for diverse substrates of both metal and polymer. It is therefore considered as a valuable technique for integrating 1D vertical nanostructures onto the 2D flexible substrates for flexible photovoltaics, energy storage, and water splitting systems. PMID:25943430

  2. Conception d'un circuit d'etouffement pour photodiodes a avalanche en mode geiger pour integration heterogene 3d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Alexandre

    Le Groupe de Recherche en Appareillage Medical de Sherbrooke (GRAMS) travaille actuellement sur un programme de recherche portant sur des photodiodes a avalanche mono-photoniques (PAMP) operees en mode Geiger en vue d'une application a la tomographie d'emission par positrons (TEP). Pour operer dans ce mode; la PAMP, ou SPAD selon l'acronyme anglais (Single Photon Avalanche Diode), requiert un circuit d'etouffement (CE) pour, d'une part, arreter l'avalanche pouvant causer sa destruction et, d'autre part. la reinitialiser en mode d'attente d'un nouveau photon. Le role de ce CE comprend egalement une electronique de communication vers les etages de traitement avance de signaux. La performance temporelle optimale du CE est realisee lorsqu'il est juxtapose a la PAMP. Cependant, cela entraine une reduction de la surface photosensible ; un element crucial en imagerie. L'integration 3D, a base d'interconnexions verticales, offre une solution elegante et performante a cette problematique par l'empilement de circuits integres possedant differentes fonctions (PAMP, CE et traitement avance de signaux). Dans l'approche proposee, des circuits d'etouffement de 50 pm x 50 pm realises sur une technologie CMOS 130 mn 3D Tezzaron, contenant chacun 112 transistors, sont matrices afin de correspondre a une matrice de PAMP localisee sur une couche electronique superieure. Chaque circuit d'etouffement possede une gigue temporelle de 7,47 ps RMS selon des simulations faites avec le logiciel Cadence. Le CE a la flexibilite d'ajuster les temps d'etouffement et de recharge pour la PAMP tout en presentant une faible consommation de puissance (~ 0,33 mW a 33 Mcps). La conception du PAMP necessite de supporter des tensions superieures aux 3,3 V de la technologie. Pour repondre a ce probleme, des transistors a drain etendu (DEMOS) ont ete realises. En raison de retards de production par Ies fabricants, les circuits n'ont pu etre testes physiquement par des mesures. Les resultats de ce memoire

  3. Transient 3d contact problems—NTS method: mixed methods and conserving integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesch, Christian; Betsch, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The present work deals with a new formulation for transient large deformation contact problems. It is well known, that one-step implicit time integration schemes for highly non-linear systems fail to conserve the total energy of the system. To deal with this drawback, a mixed method is newly proposed in conjunction with the concept of a discrete gradient. In particular, we reformulate the well known and widely-used node-to-segment methods and establish an energy-momentum scheme. The advocated approach ensures robustness and enhanced numerical stability, demonstrated in several three-dimensional applications of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Uncertainty preserving patch-based online modeling for 3D model acquisition and integration from passive motion imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Chang, Peng; Molina, Edgardo; Zhu, Zhigang

    2012-06-01

    In both military and civilian applications, abundant data from diverse sources captured on airborne platforms are often available for a region attracting interest. Since the data often includes motion imagery streams collected from multiple platforms flying at different altitudes, with sensors of different field of views (FOVs), resolutions, frame rates and spectral bands, it is imperative that a cohesive site model encompassing all the information can be quickly built and presented to the analysts. In this paper, we propose to develop an Uncertainty Preserving Patch-based Online Modeling System (UPPOMS) leading towards the automatic creation and updating of a cohesive, geo-registered, uncertaintypreserving, efficient 3D site terrain model from passive imagery with varying field-of-views and phenomenologies. The proposed UPPOMS has the following technical thrusts that differentiate our approach from others: (1) An uncertaintypreserved, patch-based 3D model is generated, which enables the integration of images captured with a mixture of NFOV and WFOV and/or visible and infrared motion imagery sensors. (2) Patch-based stereo matching and multi-view 3D integration are utilized, which are suitable for scenes with many low texture regions, particularly in mid-wave infrared images. (3) In contrast to the conventional volumetric algorithms, whose computational and storage costs grow exponentially with the amount of input data and the scale of the scene, the proposed UPPOMS system employs an online algorithmic pipeline, and scales well to large amount of input data. Experimental results and discussions of future work will be provided.

  5. 3D spherical microtissues and microfluidic technology for multi-tissue experiments and analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Fluri, David A; Marchan, Rosemarie; Boonen, Kurt; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Singh, Prateek; Hammad, Seddik; Landuyt, Bart; Hengstler, Jan G; Kelm, Jens M; Hierlemann, Andreas; Frey, Olivier

    2015-07-10

    Rational development of more physiologic in vitro models includes the design of robust and flexible 3D-microtissue-based multi-tissue devices, which allow for tissue-tissue interactions. The developed device consists of multiple microchambers interconnected by microchannels. Pre-formed spherical microtissues are loaded into the microchambers and cultured under continuous perfusion. Gravity-driven flow is generated from on-chip reservoirs through automated chip-tilting without any need for additional tubing and external pumps. This tilting concept allows for operating up to 48 devices in parallel in order to test various drug concentrations with a sufficient number of replicates. For a proof of concept, rat liver and colorectal tumor microtissues were interconnected on the chip and cultured during 8 days in the presence of the pro-drug cyclophosphamide. Cyclophosphamide has a significant impact on tumor growth but only after bio-activation by the liver. This effect was only observed in the perfused and interconnected co-cultures of different microtissue types on-chip, whereas the discontinuous transfer of supernatant via pipetting from static liver microtissues that have been treated with cyclophosphamide did not significantly affect tumor growth. The results indicate the utility and multi-tissue functionality of this platform. The importance of continuous medium circulation and tissue interaction is highlighted. PMID:25592049

  6. Revitalizing the Space Shuttle's Thermal Protection System with Reverse Engineering and 3D Vision Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Brad; Galatzer, Yishai

    2008-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is protected by a Thermal Protection System (TPS) made of tens of thousands of individually shaped heat protection tile. With every flight, tiles are damaged on take-off and return to earth. After each mission, the heat tiles must be fixed or replaced depending on the level of damage. As part of the return to flight mission, the TPS requirements are more stringent, leading to a significant increase in heat tile replacements. The replacement operation requires scanning tile cavities, and in some cases the actual tiles. The 3D scan data is used to reverse engineer each tile into a precise CAD model, which in turn, is exported to a CAM system for the manufacture of the heat protection tile. Scanning is performed while other activities are going on in the shuttle processing facility. Many technicians work simultaneously on the space shuttle structure, which results in structural movements and vibrations. This paper will cover a portable, ultra-fast data acquisition approach used to scan surfaces in this unstable environment.

  7. Investigation of thermal degradation with extrusion-based dispensing modules for 3D bioprinting technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungseok; Yoo, James J; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-03-01

    Recently, numerous three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting systems have been introduced for the artificial regeneration of tissues. Among them, the extrusion-based dispensing module is the most widely used because of the processability it gives various biomaterials. The module uses high forces and temperature to dispense materials through a micro-nozzle. Generally, the harsh conditions induce thermal degradation of the material in the dispensing procedure. The thermal degradation affects the properties of the materials, and the change of the properties should be carefully controlled, because it severely affects the regeneration of tissues. Therefore, in this research, the relationship between the dispensing module and the thermal degradation of material was investigated. Extrusion-based dispensing modules can be divided into the syringe type (ST) and filament type (FT) based on working principles. We prepared a poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffold with the two methods at various time points. Then, the characteristics of the printed scaffolds were assessed by measuring molecular weight (M w), glass transition temperature (T g), in vitro degradation, compressive modulus, and cytocompatibility. The results showed that the PLGA scaffold with the FT dispensing module maintained its properties regardless of printing time points. In contrast, severe thermal degradation was observed in the scaffold group prepared by the ST dispensing module. Consequentially, it was obvious that the FT dispensing module was more suitable for producing scaffolds without severe thermal degradation. PMID:26844711

  8. Integrating Sensors into a Marine Drone for Bathymetric 3D Surveys in Shallow Waters.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Francesco; Mattei, Gaia; Parente, Claudio; Peluso, Francesco; Santamaria, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that accurate data concerning bathymetry as well as environmental conditions in shallow waters can be acquired using sensors that are integrated into the same marine vehicle. An open prototype of an unmanned surface vessel (USV) named MicroVeGA is described. The focus is on the main instruments installed on-board: a differential Global Position System (GPS) system and single beam echo sounder; inertial platform for attitude control; ultrasound obstacle-detection system with temperature control system; emerged and submerged video acquisition system. The results of two cases study are presented, both concerning areas (Sorrento Marina Grande and Marechiaro Harbour, both in the Gulf of Naples) characterized by a coastal physiography that impedes the execution of a bathymetric survey with traditional boats. In addition, those areas are critical because of the presence of submerged archaeological remains that produce rapid changes in depth values. The experiments confirm that the integration of the sensors improves the instruments' performance and survey accuracy. PMID:26729117

  9. Integrating Sensors into a Marine Drone for Bathymetric 3D Surveys in Shallow Waters

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Francesco; Mattei, Gaia; Parente, Claudio; Peluso, Francesco; Santamaria, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that accurate data concerning bathymetry as well as environmental conditions in shallow waters can be acquired using sensors that are integrated into the same marine vehicle. An open prototype of an unmanned surface vessel (USV) named MicroVeGA is described. The focus is on the main instruments installed on-board: a differential Global Position System (GPS) system and single beam echo sounder; inertial platform for attitude control; ultrasound obstacle-detection system with temperature control system; emerged and submerged video acquisition system. The results of two cases study are presented, both concerning areas (Sorrento Marina Grande and Marechiaro Harbour, both in the Gulf of Naples) characterized by a coastal physiography that impedes the execution of a bathymetric survey with traditional boats. In addition, those areas are critical because of the presence of submerged archaeological remains that produce rapid changes in depth values. The experiments confirm that the integration of the sensors improves the instruments’ performance and survey accuracy. PMID:26729117

  10. Highly efficient full-wave electromagnetic analysis of 3-D arbitrarily shaped waveguide microwave devices using an integral equation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, A.; San-Blas, A. A.; Quesada-Pereira, F. D.; Pérez-Soler, J.; Gil, J.; Vicente, C.; Gimeno, B.; Boria, V. E.

    2015-07-01

    A novel technique for the full-wave analysis of 3-D complex waveguide devices is presented. This new formulation, based on the Boundary Integral-Resonant Mode Expansion (BI-RME) method, allows the rigorous full-wave electromagnetic characterization of 3-D arbitrarily shaped metallic structures making use of extremely low CPU resources (both time and memory). The unknown electric current density on the surface of the metallic elements is represented by means of Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions, and an algebraic procedure based on a singular value decomposition is applied to transform such functions into the classical solenoidal and nonsolenoidal basis functions needed by the original BI-RME technique. The developed tool also provides an accurate computation of the electromagnetic fields at an arbitrary observation point of the considered device, so it can be used for predicting high-power breakdown phenomena. In order to validate the accuracy and efficiency of this novel approach, several new designs of band-pass waveguides filters are presented. The obtained results (S-parameters and electromagnetic fields) are successfully compared both to experimental data and to numerical simulations provided by a commercial software based on the finite element technique. The results obtained show that the new technique is specially suitable for the efficient full-wave analysis of complex waveguide devices considering an integrated coaxial excitation, where the coaxial probes may be in contact with the metallic insets of the component.

  11. An integrated 3D constant offset GPR and resistivity survey on a sealed landfill — Ilhavo, NW Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermozilha, H.; Grangeia, C.; Matias, M. Senos

    2010-01-01

    Owing to their nature landfills are challenging targets for high resolution Near Surface Geophysics. Herein it is described an integrated high resolution geophysical survey over the Ilhavo landfill sealed about a decade ago. The first aim of the survey is to investigate the time evolution of the contamination plume of the landfill since operations stopped and sealing took place. The second, and main objective, is the study of the landfill itself, that is, to carry out a high resolution 3D geophysical survey over it in order to investigate the thickness and effectiveness of the top cover, the thickness and sealing conditions of the landfill bottom and, finally, to investigate its internal structure. To fulfill these objectives an integrated 3D constant offset GPR and resistivity survey was designed. The interpretation of the geophysical data was carried out together with local borehole and hydrogeological information, so that, the ambiguity and uncertainty of the interpretation was reduced considerably and the usefulness of the methods were assessed.

  12. Classification of Informal Settlements Through the Integration of 2d and 3d Features Extracted from Uav Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, C. M.; Persello, C.; Sliuzas, R.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are capable of providing very high resolution and up-to-date information to support informal settlement upgrading projects. In order to provide accurate basemaps, urban scene understanding through the identification and classification of buildings and terrain is imperative. However, common characteristics of informal settlements such as small, irregular buildings with heterogeneous roof material and large presence of clutter challenge state-of-the-art algorithms. Especially the dense buildings and steeply sloped terrain cause difficulties in identifying elevated objects. This work investigates how 2D radiometric and textural features, 2.5D topographic features, and 3D geometric features obtained from UAV imagery can be integrated to obtain a high classification accuracy in challenging classification problems for the analysis of informal settlements. It compares the utility of pixel-based and segment-based features obtained from an orthomosaic and DSM with point-based and segment-based features extracted from the point cloud to classify an unplanned settlement in Kigali, Rwanda. Findings show that the integration of 2D and 3D features leads to higher classification accuracies.

  13. Applied Mathematics in EM Studies with Special Emphasis on an Uncertainty Quantification and 3-D Integral Equation Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Oleg; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    second part, we summarize modern trends in the development of efficient 3-D EM forward modelling schemes with special emphasis on recent advances in the integral equation approach.

  14. Integrated 3D macro-trapping and light-sheet imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Piksarv, Peeter; Ferrier, David E. K.; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2015-08-01

    Biological research requires high-speed and low-damage imaging techniques for live specimens in areas such as development study in embryos. Light sheet microscopy provides fast imaging speed whilst keeps the photo-damage and photo-blenching to minimum. Conventional sample embedding methods in light sheet imaging involves using agent such as agarose which potentially affects the behavior and the develop pattern of the specimens. Here we demonstrate integrating dual-beam trapping method into light sheet imaging system to confine and translate the specimen whilst light sheet images are taken. Tobacco plant cells as well as Spirobranchus lamarcki larva were trapped solely with optical force and sectional images were acquired. This now approach has the potential to extend the applications of light sheet imaging significantly.

  15. Integration of 3D 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy data into neuronavigation systems for tumor biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanberoglu, Berkay; Moore, Nina Z.; Frakes, David; Karam, Lina J.; Debbins, Josef P.; Preul, Mark C.

    2013-03-01

    Many important applications in clinical medicine can benefit from the fusion of spectroscopy data with anatomical images. For example, the correlation of metabolite profiles with specific regions of interest in anatomical tumor images can be useful in characterizing and treating heterogeneous tumors that appear structurally homogeneous. Such applications can build on the correlation of data from in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (1HMRSI) with data from genetic and ex-vivo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. To establish that correlation, tissue samples must be neurosurgically extracted from specifically identified locations with high accuracy. Toward that end, this paper presents new neuronavigation technology that enhances current clinical capabilities in the context of neurosurgical planning and execution. The proposed methods improve upon the current state-of-the-art in neuronavigation through the use of detailed three dimensional (3D) 1H-MRSI data. MRSI spectra are processed and analyzed, and specific voxels are selected based on their chemical contents. 3D neuronavigation overlays are then generated and applied to anatomical image data in the operating room. Without such technology, neurosurgeons must rely on memory and other qualitative resources alone for guidance in accessing specific MRSI-identified voxels. In contrast, MRSI-based overlays provide quantitative visual cues and location information during neurosurgery. The proposed methods enable a progressive new form of online MRSI-guided neuronavigation that we demonstrate in this study through phantom validation and clinical application.

  16. MetaTracker: integration and abstraction of 3D motion tracking data from multiple hardware systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopecky, Ken; Winer, Eliot

    2014-06-01

    Motion tracking has long been one of the primary challenges in mixed reality (MR), augmented reality (AR), and virtual reality (VR). Military and defense training can provide particularly difficult challenges for motion tracking, such as in the case of Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) and other dismounted, close quarters simulations. These simulations can take place across multiple rooms, with many fast-moving objects that need to be tracked with a high degree of accuracy and low latency. Many tracking technologies exist, such as optical, inertial, ultrasonic, and magnetic. Some tracking systems even combine these technologies to complement each other. However, there are no systems that provide a high-resolution, flexible, wide-area solution that is resistant to occlusion. While frameworks exist that simplify the use of tracking systems and other input devices, none allow data from multiple tracking systems to be combined, as if from a single system. In this paper, we introduce a method for compensating for the weaknesses of individual tracking systems by combining data from multiple sources and presenting it as a single tracking system. Individual tracked objects are identified by name, and their data is provided to simulation applications through a server program. This allows tracked objects to transition seamlessly from the area of one tracking system to another. Furthermore, it abstracts away the individual drivers, APIs, and data formats for each system, providing a simplified API that can be used to receive data from any of the available tracking systems. Finally, when single-piece tracking systems are used, those systems can themselves be tracked, allowing for real-time adjustment of the trackable area. This allows simulation operators to leverage limited resources in more effective ways, improving the quality of training.

  17. DLP technology application: 3D head tracking and motion correction in medical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Oline V.; Wilm, Jakob; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Højgaard, Liselotte; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensing system, robust Near-infrared Structured Light Scanning (NIRSL) for three-dimensional human model scanning application. Human model scanning due to its nature of various hair and dress appearance and body motion has long been a challenging task. Previous structured light scanning methods typically emitted visible coded light patterns onto static and opaque objects to establish correspondence between a projector and a camera for triangulation. In the success of these methods rely on scanning objects with proper reflective surface for visible light, such as plaster, light colored cloth. Whereas for human model scanning application, conventional methods suffer from low signal to noise ratio caused by low contrast of visible light over the human body. The proposed robust NIRSL, as implemented with the near infrared light, is capable of recovering those dark surfaces, such as hair, dark jeans and black shoes under visible illumination. Moreover, successful structured light scan relies on the assumption that the subject is static during scanning. Due to the nature of body motion, it is very time sensitive to keep this assumption in the case of human model scan. The proposed sensing system, by utilizing the new near-infrared capable high speed LightCrafter DLP projector, is robust to motion, provides accurate and high resolution three-dimensional point cloud, making our system more efficient and robust for human model reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that our system is effective and efficient to scan real human models with various dark hair, jeans and shoes, robust to human body motion and produces accurate and high resolution 3D point cloud.

  18. Functional morphology and integration of corvid skulls – a 3D geometric morphometric approach

    PubMed Central

    Kulemeyer, Christoph; Asbahr, Kolja; Gunz, Philipp; Frahnert, Sylke; Bairlein, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Background Sympatric corvid species have evolved differences in nesting, habitat choice, diet and foraging. Differences in the frequency with which corvid species use their repertoire of feeding techniques is expected to covary with bill-shape and with the frontal binocular field. Species that frequently probe are expected to have a relatively longer bill and more sidewise oriented orbits in contrast to species that frequently peck. We tested this prediction by analyzing computed tomography scans of skulls of six corvid species by means of three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. We (1) explored patterns of major variation using principal component analysis, (2) compared within and between species relationships of size and shape and (3) quantitatively compared patterns of morphological integration between bill and cranium by means of partial least squares (singular warp) analysis. Results Major shape variation occurs at the bill, in the orientation of orbits, in the position of the foramen magnum and in the angle between bill and cranium. The first principal component correlated positively with centroid-size, but within-species allometric relationships differed markedly. Major covariation between the bill and cranium lies in the difference in orbit orientation relative to bill-length and in the angle between bill and cranium. Conclusion Corvid species show pronounced differences in skull shape, which covary with foraging mode. Increasing bill-length, bill-curvature and sidewise orientation of the eyes is associated with an increase in the observed frequency in probing (vice versa in pecking). Hence, the frequency of probing, bill-length, bill-curvature and sidewise orientation of the eyes is progressively increased from jackdaw, to Eurasian jay, to black-billed magpie, to hooded crow, to rook and to common raven (when feeding on carcasses is considered as probing). Our results on the morphological integration suggest that most of the covariation between bill and

  19. Numerical Modeling of 3-D Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles Using the Boundary Integral Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael; Manmi, Kawa; Wang, Qianxi

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. The nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, for example, causing the emission of subharmonic frequency components and enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces. A three-dimensional model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is presented. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents to the nonspherical case. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. Numerical analyses for the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The results show that the presence of a coating significantly reduces the oscillation amplitude and period, increases the ultrasound pressure amplitude required to incite jetting, and reduces the jet width and velocity.

  20. Effect of Weaving Direction of Conductive Yarns on Electromagnetic Performance of 3D Integrated Microstrip Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fujun; Yao, Lan; Zhao, Da; Jiang, Muwen; Qiu, Yipping

    2013-10-01

    A three-dimensionally integrated microstrip antenna (3DIMA) is a microstrip antenna woven into the three-dimensional woven composite for load bearing while functioning as an antenna. In this study, the effect of weaving direction of conductive yarns on electromagnetic performance of 3DIMAs are investigated by designing, simulating and experimental testing of two microstrip antennas with different weaving directions of conductive yarns: one has the conductive yarns along the antenna feeding direction (3DIMA-Exp1) and the other has the conductive yarns perpendicular the antenna feeding direction (3DIMA-Exp2). The measured voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) of 3DIMA-Exp1 was 1.4 at the resonant frequencies of 1.39 GHz; while that of 3DIMA-Exp2 was 1.2 at the resonant frequencies of 1.35 GHz. In addition, the measured radiation pattern of the 3DIMA-Exp1 has smaller back lobe and higher gain value than those of the 3DIMA-Exp2. This result indicates that the waving direction of conductive yarns may have a significant impact on electromagnetic performance of textile structural antennas.

  1. 3D transient eddy current fields using the u-v integral-eigenvalue formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Kent R.; Han, Hsiu Chi; Turner, Larry

    1988-02-01

    The three-dimensional eddy current transient field problem is formulated using the u-v method. This method breaks the vector Helmholtz equation into two scalar Helmholtz equations. Null field integral equations and the appropriate boundary conditions are used to set up an identification matrix which is independent of null field point locations. Embedded in the identification matrix are the unknown eigenvalues of the problem representing its impulse response in time. These eigenvalues are found by equating the determinant of the identification matrix to zero. When the initial transient forcing function is Fourier decomposed into its spatial harmonics, each Fourier component can be associated with a unique eigenvalue by this technique. The true transient solution comes through a convolution of the impulse response, so obtained with the particular external field decay governing the problem at hand. The technique is applied to the FELIX (fusion electromagnetic induction experiments) medium cylinder experiment; computed results are compared with data. A pseudoanalytic confirmation of the eigenvalues so obtained is formulated to validate the procedure.

  2. 3D transient eddy current fields using the u-v integral-eigenvalue formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.; Han, H.C.; Turner, L.

    1988-02-15

    The three-dimensional eddy current transient field problem is formulated using the u-v method. This method breaks the vector Helmholtz equation into two scalar Helmholtz equations. Null field integral equations and the appropriate boundary conditions are used to set up an identification matrix which is independent of null field point locations. Embedded in the identification matrix are the unknown eigenvalues of the problem representing its impulse response in time. These eigenvalues are found by equating the determinant of the identification matrix to zero. When the initial transient forcing function is Fourier decomposed into its spatial harmonics, each Fourier component can be associated with a unique eigenvalue by this technique. The true transient solution comes through a convolution of the impulse response, so obtained with the particular external field decay governing the problem at hand. The technique is applied to the FELIX (fusion electromagnetic induction experiments) medium cylinder experiment; computed results are compared with data. A pseudoanalytic confirmation of the eigenvalues so obtained is formulated to validate the procedure.

  3. RELAP5-3D Transient Modelling for NGNP Integrated Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwall, P.; Anderson, N. A.

    2014-06-01

    The High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is designed with outlet temperatures ranging between 750°C and 800°C. These high outlet temperatures enhance the power production efficiency and facilitate a variety of industrial applications. The objective of this study is to understand the response of the primary system to potential transients in the secondary system. For this analysis, the transient condition originates in the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) or Steam Generator (SG) of the HTGR-integrated plant. The transients analysed are: a loss of pressure; loss of feedwater flow; inadvertent closure of main steam valve; decrease in returning gas temperature and heat load step change. The results show a large dependence on the negative reactivity added to the fuel as a function of increased temperature. The returning gas temperature decrease transient resulted in the highest fuel temperature (1361°C). Fuel temperature was shown to be less than the 1600°C fuel limit for each case analysed.

  4. How integrating 3D LiDAR data in the dike surveillance protocol: The French case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretar, F.; Mériaux, P.; Fauchard, C.

    2012-04-01

    carried out. A LiDAR system is able to acquire data on a dike structure of up to 80 km per day, which makes the use of this technique also valuable in case of emergency situations. It provides additional valuable products like precious information on dike slopes and crest or their near environment (river banks, etc.). Moreover, in case of vegetation, LiDAR data makes possible to study hidden structures or defaults from images like the erosion of riverbanks under forestry vegetation. The possibility of studying the vegetation is also of high importance: the development of woody vegetation near or onto the dike is a major risk factor. Surface singularities are often signs of disorder or suspected disorder in the dike itself: for example a subsidence or a sinkhole on a ridge may result from internal erosion collapse. Finally, high resolution topographic data contribute to build specific geomechanical model of the dike that, after incorporating data provided by geophysical and geotechnical surveys, are integrated in the calculations of the structure stability. Integrating the regular use of LiDAR data in the dike surveillance protocol is not yet operational in France. However, the high number of French stakeholders at the national level (on average, there is one stakeholder for only 8-9km of dike !) and the real added value of LiDAR data makes a spatial data infrastructure valuable (webservices for processing the data, consulting and filling the database on the field when performing the local diagnosis)

  5. Progress on a New Integrated 3-D UCG Simulator and its Initial Application

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J J; Camp, D W; Buscheck, T A; White, J A; Burton, G C; Wagoner, J L; Chen, M

    2011-09-22

    A comprehensive simulator is being developed for underground coal gasification (UCG), with the capability to support site selection, design, hazard analyses, operations, and monitoring (Nitao et al., 2010). UCG is computationally challenging because it involves tightly-coupled multi-physical/chemical processes, with vastly different timescales. This new capability will predict cavity growth, product gas composition and rate, and the interaction with the host environment, accounting for site characteristics, injection gas composition and rate, and associated water-well extraction rates. Progress on the new simulator includes completion and system integration of a wall model, a rock spalling model, a cavity boundary tracking model, a one-dimensional cavity gas reactive transport model, a rudimentary rubble heat, mass, and reaction model, and coupling with a pre-existing hydrology simulator. An existing geomechanical simulator was enhanced to model cavity collapse and overburden subsidence. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code is being evaluated to model cavity gas flow and combustion in two and three dimensions. Although the simulator is midway in its development, it was applied to modeling the Hoe Creek III field test (Stephens, 1981) conducted in the 1970s, in order to evaluate and demonstrate the simulator's basic capabilities, gain experience, and guide future development. Furthermore, it is consistent with our philosophy of incremental, spiral software development, which helps in identifying and resolving potential problems early in the process. The simulation accounts for two coal seams, two injection points, and air and oxygen phases. Approximate extent and shape of cavity growth showed reasonable agreement with interpreted field data. Product gas composition and carbon consumed could not be simultaneously matched for a given set of parameter values due to the rudimentary rubble model currently used, although they can be matched using separate

  6. Simulating The Technological Movements Of The Equipment Used For Manufacturing Prosthetic Devices Using 3D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicea, Anca-Lucia

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the process of building geometric and kinematic models of a technological equipment used in the process of manufacturing devices. First, the process of building the model for a six axes industrial robot is presented. In the second part of the paper, the process of building the model for a five-axis CNC milling machining center is also shown. Both models can be used for accurate cutting processes simulation of complex parts, such as prosthetic devices.

  7. Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology in the Micro- and Nanometer Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, O.

    2009-04-01

    Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology in the Micro- and Nanometer Range S. Scherer1, E. Cristea1, O. Huber1, A. Krenn1 1 ALICONA GmbH Graz, Austria The need for increasing accuracy is a characteristic of all geo-applications, and hence of the instruments contributing to obtaining relevant data. Small and fine sensors are being developed, measuring different parameters of our geosystem and requiring continuous validation and calibration. These sensors have often very small components (fine sensors able to sense dust, atmospheric water vapour characteristics, pressure change, gravimeters, satellite micro-components), showing complex topographies including steep flanks and having varying reflective properties. In order to get valid and reliable results, quality assurance of these instruments and sensors is required. The optical technology Focus-Variation, developed by Alicona and added in the latest draft of the upcoming ISO standard 25178, provides high resolution 3D surface metrology even at those complex topographies. The technique of Focus-Variation combines the small depth of focus of an optical system with vertical scanning to provide topographical and color information from the variation of focus. It is used for high-resolution optical 3D surface measurements. The traceable and repeatable measurement results are further being used for e.g. calibration and validation purposes. Some of the characteristics of the technology are: - Measurement of instruments / samples with steep flanks up to 80° - Measurement of materials with strongly varying reflection properties - Measurement of surfaces presenting fine (from 10nm) or strong roughness Here, we present the operating principle and possible applications of the optical 3D measurement system "InfiniteFocus", which is based on the technology of Focus-Variation. With the vertical resolution of up to 10nm, InfiniteFocus yields meaningful form and roughness measurements. The

  8. Integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre for DNA probe immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutowska, Monika S.; Garcia Gunning, Fatima C.; Kivlehan, Francine; Moore, Eric; Brennan, Des; Galvin, Paul; Ellis, Andrew D.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF). In addition, we also show the fluorescence of Cy5-labelled DNA molecules immobilized within the hydrogel formed in two different types of HC-PCF. The 3D hydrogel matrix is designed to bind with the amino groups of biomolecules using an appropriate cross-linker, providing higher sensitivity and selectivity than the standard 2D coverage, enabling a greater number of probe molecules to be available per unit area. The HC-PCFs, on the other hand, can be designed to maximize the capture of fluorescence to improve sensitivity and provide longer interaction lengths. This could enable the development of fibre-based point-of-care and remote systems, where the enhanced sensitivity would relax the constraints placed on sources and detectors. In this paper, we will discuss the formation of such polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels within a HC-PCF, including their optical properties such as light propagation and auto-fluorescence.

  9. Advances in 3D cell culture technologies enabling tissue-like structures to be created in vitro.

    PubMed

    Knight, Eleanor; Przyborski, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Research in mammalian cell biology often relies on developing in vitro models to enable the growth of cells in the laboratory to investigate a specific biological mechanism or process under different test conditions. The quality of such models and how they represent the behavior of cells in real tissues plays a critical role in the value of the data produced and how it is used. It is particularly important to recognize how the structure of a cell influences its function and how co-culture models can be used to more closely represent the structure of real tissue. In recent years, technologies have been developed to enhance the way in which researchers can grow cells and more readily create tissue-like structures. Here we identify the limitations of culturing mammalian cells by conventional methods on two-dimensional (2D) substrates and review the popular approaches currently available that enable the development of three-dimensional (3D) tissue models in vitro. There are now many ways in which the growth environment for cultured cells can be altered to encourage 3D cell growth. Approaches to 3D culture can be broadly categorized into scaffold-free or scaffold-based culture systems, with scaffolds made from either natural or synthetic materials. There is no one particular solution that currently satisfies all requirements and researchers must select the appropriate method in line with their needs. Using such technology in conjunction with other modern resources in cell biology (e.g. human stem cells) will provide new opportunities to create robust human tissue mimetics for use in basic research and drug discovery. Application of such models will contribute to advancing basic research, increasing the predictive accuracy of compounds, and reducing animal usage in biomedical science. PMID:25411113

  10. The 3-D image recognition based on fuzzy neural network technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirota, Kaoru; Yamauchi, Kenichi; Murakami, Jun; Tanaka, Kei

    1993-01-01

    Three dimensional stereoscopic image recognition system based on fuzzy-neural network technology was developed. The system consists of three parts; preprocessing part, feature extraction part, and matching part. Two CCD color camera image are fed to the preprocessing part, where several operations including RGB-HSV transformation are done. A multi-layer perception is used for the line detection in the feature extraction part. Then fuzzy matching technique is introduced in the matching part. The system is realized on SUN spark station and special image input hardware system. An experimental result on bottle images is also presented.

  11. 3D microfluidic chips with integrated functional microelements fabricated by a femtosecond laser for studying the gliding mechanism of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Shihira-Ishikawa, Ikuko; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2011-06-21

    Phormidium, a genus of filamentous cyanobacteria, forms endosymbiotic associations with seedling roots that accelerate the growth of the vegetable seedlings. Understanding the gliding mechanism of Phormidium will facilitate improved formation of this association and increased vegetable production. To observe the gliding movements, we fabricated various microfluidic chips termed nanoaquariums using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Direct fs laser writing, followed by annealing and successive wet etching in dilute hydrofluoric acid solution, can easily produce three-dimensional (3D) microfluidics with different structures embedded in a photostructurable glass. Using the fs laser, optical waveguides and filters were integrated with the microfluidic structures in the microchips, allowing the gliding mechanism to be more easily clarified. Using this apparatus, we found that CO(2) secreted from the seedling root attracts Phormidium in the presence of light, and determined the light intensity and specific wavelength necessary for gliding. PMID:21562650

  12. Evaluating integration of inland bathymetry in the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller-Corbett, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Inland bathymetry survey collections, survey data types, features, sources, availability, and the effort required to integrate inland bathymetric data into the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program are assessed to help determine the feasibility of integrating three-dimensional water feature elevation data into The National Map. Available data from wading, acoustic, light detection and ranging, and combined technique surveys are provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and other sources. Inland bathymetric data accessed through Web-hosted resources or contacts provide useful baseline parameters for evaluating survey types and techniques used for collection and processing, and serve as a basis for comparing survey methods and the quality of results. Historically, boat-mounted acoustic surveys have provided most inland bathymetry data. Light detection and ranging techniques that are beneficial in areas hard to reach by boat, that can collect dense data in shallow water to provide comprehensive coverage, and that can be cost effective for surveying large areas with good water clarity are becoming more common; however, optimal conditions and techniques for collecting and processing light detection and ranging inland bathymetry surveys are not yet well defined.Assessment of site condition parameters important for understanding inland bathymetry survey issues and results, and an evaluation of existing inland bathymetry survey coverage are proposed as steps to develop criteria for implementing a useful and successful inland bathymetry survey plan in the 3D Elevation Program. These survey parameters would also serve as input for an inland bathymetry survey data baseline. Integration and interpolation techniques are important factors to consider in developing a robust plan; however, available survey data are usually in a triangulated irregular network format or other format compatible with

  13. Summary Report on Phase I Results from the 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission, Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Beshears, R. D.; Rolin, T. D.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ryan, R. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been confined to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a unique opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture beyond the Earth/Moon system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from Earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In September 2014, NASA, in partnership with Made In Space, Inc., launched the 3D Printing in Zero-G technology demonstration mission to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on orbit using fused deposition modeling. This Technical Publication summarizes the results of testing to date of the ground control and flight prints from the first phase of this ISS payload.

  14. Fabrication of corner cube array retro-reflective structure with DLP-based 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Mohammadreza

    2016-06-01

    In this article, the fabrication of a corner cube array retro-reflective structure is presented by using DLP-based 3D printing technology. In this additive manufacturing technology a pattern of a cube corner array is designed in a computer and sliced with specific software. The image of each slice is then projected from the bottom side of a reservoir, containing UV cure resin, utilizing a DLP video projector. The projected area is cured and attached to a base plate. This process is repeated until the entire part is made. The best orientation of the printing process and the effect of layer thicknesses on the surface finish of the cube has been investigated. The thermal reflow surface finishing and replication with soft molding has also been presented in this article.

  15. Fabrication of corner cube array retro-reflective structure with DLP-based 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Mohammadreza

    2016-04-01

    In this article, the fabrication of a corner cube array retro-reflective structure is presented by using DLP-based 3D printing technology. In this additive manufacturing technology a pattern of a cube corner array is designed in a computer and sliced with specific software. The image of each slice is then projected from the bottom side of a reservoir, containing UV cure resin, utilizing a DLP video projector. The projected area is cured and attached to a base plate. This process is repeated until the entire part is made. The best orientation of the printing process and the effect of layer thicknesses on the surface finish of the cube has been investigated. The thermal reflow surface finishing and replication with soft molding has also been presented in this article.

  16. Integrating Technology with Architectural Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmasry, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at the Center of High Performance Learning Technologies (CHPLE), Virginia Tech, conducted a study investigating issues related to integration of learning technologies with architectural systems in contemporary learning environments. The study is qualitative in nature, and focuses on integration patterns of learning technologies with…

  17. Evaluation of occlusal rest seats with 3D technology in dental education.

    PubMed

    Sampaio-Fernandes, Manuel António Ferreira; Sampaio-Fernandes, Maria M; Fonseca, Patrícia A; Almeida, Paulo R; Reis-Campos, José C; Figueiral, Maria H

    2015-02-01

    The preparation of rest seats must comply with specific sizes and shapes. Various technological systems such as Kavo PrepAssistant have been used as an auxiliary method to evaluate preclinical preparations more objectively. The aims of this study were to establish an alternative system for evaluating occlusal rest seats and to compare different types of assessment. Seventy-six undergraduate students at Oporto University Faculty of Dental Medicine in Portugal were selected as a convenience sample to prepare two occlusal rest seats in Kavo teeth #45 and #46 (FDI World Dental Federation ISO-3950) and were randomly assigned to two groups. Bearing in mind the ideal characteristics of rest seats, the investigators defined ten assessment parameters, and their evaluation weights were independently estimated by three evaluators. Four of these parameters were measured in Kavo PrepAssistant. The results of the different evaluation methods and evaluators varied considerably. The classical evaluation presented final results worse than those of the evaluations using parameters. In this study, carrying out the assessment with Kavo PrepAssistant helped to achieve a more objective and less evaluator-dependent final evaluation. PMID:25640621

  18. Evolving technologies for growing, imaging and analyzing 3D root system architecture of crop plants.

    PubMed

    Piñeros, Miguel A; Larson, Brandon G; Shaff, Jon E; Schneider, David J; Falcão, Alexandre Xavier; Yuan, Lixing; Clark, Randy T; Craft, Eric J; Davis, Tyler W; Pradier, Pierre-Luc; Shaw, Nathanael M; Assaranurak, Ithipong; McCouch, Susan R; Sturrock, Craig; Bennett, Malcolm; Kochian, Leon V

    2016-03-01

    A plant's ability to maintain or improve its yield under limiting conditions, such as nutrient deficiency or drought, can be strongly influenced by root system architecture (RSA), the three-dimensional distribution of the different root types in the soil. The ability to image, track and quantify these root system attributes in a dynamic fashion is a useful tool in assessing desirable genetic and physiological root traits. Recent advances in imaging technology and phenotyping software have resulted in substantive progress in describing and quantifying RSA. We have designed a hydroponic growth system which retains the three-dimensional RSA of the plant root system, while allowing for aeration, solution replenishment and the imposition of nutrient treatments, as well as high-quality imaging of the root system. The simplicity and flexibility of the system allows for modifications tailored to the RSA of different crop species and improved throughput. This paper details the recent improvements and innovations in our root growth and imaging system which allows for greater image sensitivity (detection of fine roots and other root details), higher efficiency, and a broad array of growing conditions for plants that more closely mimic those found under field conditions. PMID:26683583

  19. Recent developments in multi-layer flat knitting technology for waste free production of complex shaped 3D-reinforcing structures for composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trümper, W.; Lin, H.; Callin, T.; Bollengier, Q.; Cherif, C.; Krzywinski, S.

    2016-07-01

    Constantly increasing prices for raw materials and energy as well as the current discourse on the reduction of CO2-emissions places a special emphasis on the advantages of lightweight constructions and its resource conserving production methods. Fibre-reinforced composites are already seeing a number of applications in automobile, energy and mechanical engineering. Future applications within the named areas require greater material and energy efficiency and therefore manufacturing methods for textile preforms and lightweight constructions enabling an optimal arrangement of the reinforcing fibres while in the same time limiting waste to a minimum. One manufacturing method for textile reinforced preforms fulfilling quite many of the named requirements is the multilayer weft knitting technology. Multilayer weft knitted fabrics containing straight reinforcing yarns at least in two directions. The arrangement of these yarns is fixed by the loop yarn. Used yarn material in each knitting row is adaptable e. g. according to the load requirements or for the local integration of sensors. Draping properties of these fabrics can be varied within a great range and through this enabling draping of very complex shaped 3D-preforms without wrinkles from just one uncut fabric. The latest developments at ITM are concentrating on the development of a full production chain considering the 3D-CAD geometry, the load analysis, the generation of machine control programs as well as the development of technology and machines to enable the manufacturing of innovative net shape 3D-multilayer weft knitted fabrics such as complex shaped spacer fabrics and tubular fabrics with biaxial reinforcement.

  20. An eliminating method of motion-induced vertical parallax for time-division 3D display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyuan; Hou, Chunping

    2015-10-01

    A time difference between the left image and right image of the time-division 3D display makes a person perceive alternating vertical parallax when an object is moving vertically on a fixed depth plane, which causes the left image and right image perceived do not match and makes people more prone to visual fatigue. This mismatch cannot eliminate simply rely on the precise synchronous control of the left image and right image. Based on the principle of time-division 3D display technology and human visual system characteristics, this paper establishes a model of the true vertical motion velocity in reality and vertical motion velocity on the screen, and calculates the amount of the vertical parallax caused by vertical motion, and then puts forward a motion compensation method to eliminate the vertical parallax. Finally, subjective experiments are carried out to analyze how the time difference affects the stereo visual comfort by comparing the comfort values of the stereo image sequences before and after compensating using the eliminating method. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed method is reasonable and efficient.

  1. Compilation of an integrated 3D soil and agrogeological database for the hydrophysical characterization of the unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakacsi, Zsófia; Kuti, László; Pásztor, László; Vatai, József; Szabó, József; Müller, Tamás.

    2010-05-01

    Describing the water movement in the unsaturated zone, numerous soil hydraulic data as input parameter are required concerning the water retention curve and the hydraulic conductivity function as the main hydraulic properties. The direct measurements of the hydraulic parameters are quite difficult and time-consuming; the estimation of them can be an alternative especially for large areas. The most commonly used basis of the estimation is the particle-size distribution (PSD) data or texture class. The aim of our work was to compile an integrated and harmonized 3D pedo- and agrogeological database with the physical properties and stratification of the formations to the depth of the permanent groundwater level, which describes the unsaturated zone in a 690 km2 pilot area. Since the existing pedo- and agrogeological databases are not able to serve separately these 3D model requirements, their integration was necessary. Due to its appropriate spatial and thematic resolution and data processing status, the Digital Kreybig Soil Information System (DKSIS) was chosen as pedological data source of the 3D model. The DKSIS has been compiled in the Research Institute for Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, based on the 1:25,000 scale, national soil mapping program in Hungary. The survey sheets indicate the location of the observation sites. Due to the lack of measured PSD data, the field estimation of the textural classes, and the so-called "capillary rise of water" were used for the definition of the texture classes. The measured water uptake is supposed to have good relation with the textural class of the sample. During the data processing the inconsistent fields vs. capillary data pairs were excluded. In the DKSIS 649 polygons cover the pilot area, 484 soil profiles are occurring and characteristically each profile has two or three horizons. The agrogeological dataset is maintained by the Hungarian Geological Institute and derives

  2. Shifting Sands and Turning Tides: Using 3D Visualization Technology to Shape the Environment for Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, H. S.; Gant, R.; Hopkins, D.

    2014-12-01

    Teaching natural science in a technologically advancing world requires that our methods reach beyond the traditional computer interface. Innovative 3D visualization techniques and real-time augmented user interfaces enable students to create realistic environments to understand the world around them. Here, we present a series of laboratory activities that utilize an Augmented Reality Sandbox to teach basic concepts of hydrology, geology, and geography to undergraduates at Harvard University and the University of Redlands. The Augmented Reality (AR) Sandbox utilizes a real sandbox that is overlain by a digital projection of topography and a color elevation map. A Microsoft Kinect 3D camera feeds altimetry data into a software program that maps this information onto the sand surface using a digital projector. Students can then manipulate the sand and observe as the Sandbox augments their manipulations with projections of contour lines, an elevation color map, and a simulation of water. The idea for the AR Sandbox was conceived at MIT by the Tangible Media Group in 2002 and the simulation software used here was written and developed by Dr. Oliver Kreylos of the University of California - Davis as part of the NSF funded LakeViz3D project. Between 2013 and 2014, we installed AR Sandboxes at Harvard and the University of Redlands, respectively, and developed laboratory exercises to teach flooding hazard, erosion and watershed development in undergraduate earth and environmental science courses. In 2013, we introduced a series of AR Sandbox laboratories in Introductory Geology, Hydrology, and Natural Disasters courses. We found laboratories that utilized the AR Sandbox at both universities allowed students to become quickly immersed in the learning process, enabling a more intuitive understanding of the processes that govern the natural world. The physical interface of the AR Sandbox reduces barriers to learning, can be used to rapidly illustrate basic concepts of geology

  3. 3D Printing, Additive Manufacturing, and Solid Freeform Fabrication: The Technologies of the Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaman, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Starting in the late 1980's, several new technologies were created that have the potential to revolutionize manufacturing. These technologies are, for the most part, additive processes that build up parts layer by layer. In addition, the processes that are being touted for hard-core manufacturing are primarily laser or e-beam based processes. This presentation gives a brief history of Additive Manufacturing and gives an assessment for these technologies. These technologies initially grew out of a commercial need for rapid prototyping. This market has a different requirement for process and quality control than traditional manufacturing. The relatively poor process control of the existing commercial Additive Manufacturing equipment is a vestige of this history. This presentation discusses this history and improvements in quality over time. The emphasis will be on Additive Manufacturing processes that are being considered for direct manufacturing, which is a different market than the 3D Printing ``Makerbot'' market. Topics discussed include past and present machine sensors, materials, and operational methods that were used in the past and those that are used today to create manufactured parts. Finally, a discussion of new methods and future directions of AM is presented.

  4. Integration of 3D Printed and Micropatterned Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Guidance of Oriented Collagenous Tissue Formation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Monje, Alberto; Jiao, Yizu; Hao, Jie; Kruger, Laura; Flanagan, Colleen L; Hollister, Scott J; Giannobile, William V

    2016-03-01

    Scaffold design incorporating multiscale cues for clinically relevant, aligned tissue regeneration has potential to improve structural and functional integrity of multitissue interfaces. The objective of this preclinical study is to develop poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with mesoscale and microscale architectural cues specific to human ligament progenitor cells and assess their ability to form aligned bone-ligament-cementum complexes in vivo. PCL scaffolds are designed to integrate a 3D printed bone region with a micropatterned PCL thin film consisting of grooved pillars. The patterned film region is seeded with human ligament cells, fibroblasts transduced with bone morphogenetic protein-7 genes seeded within the bone region, and a tooth dentin segment positioned on the ligament region prior to subcutaneous implantation into a murine model. Results indicate increased tissue alignment in vivo using micropatterned PCL films, compared to random-porous PCL. At week 6, 30 μm groove depth significantly enhances oriented collagen fiber thickness, overall cell alignment, and nuclear elongation relative to 10 μm groove depth. This study demonstrates for the first time that scaffolds with combined hierarchical mesoscale and microscale features can align cells in vivo for oral tissue repair with potential for improving the regenerative response of other bone-ligament complexes. PMID:26820240

  5. Terrestrial and Aerial Laser Scanning Data Integration Using Wavelet Analysis for the Purpose of 3D Building Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kedzierski, Michal; Fryskowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Visualization techniques have been greatly developed in the past few years. Three-dimensional models based on satellite and aerial imagery are now being enhanced by models generated using Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) data. The most modern of such scanning systems have the ability to acquire over 50 points per square meter and to register a multiple echo, which allows the reconstruction of the terrain together with the terrain cover. However, ALS data accuracy is less than 10 cm and the data is often incomplete: there is no information about ground level (in most scanning systems), and often around the facade or structures which have been covered by other structures. However, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) not only acquires higher accuracy data (1–5 cm) but is also capable of registering those elements which are incomplete or not visible using ALS methods (facades, complicated structures, interiors, etc.). Therefore, to generate a complete 3D model of a building in high Level of Details, integration of TLS and ALS data is necessary. This paper presents the wavelet-based method of processing and integrating data from ALS and TLS. Methods of choosing tie points to combine point clouds in different datum will be analyzed. PMID:25004157

  6. An intelligent recovery progress evaluation system for ACL reconstructed subjects using integrated 3-D kinematics and EMG features.

    PubMed

    Malik, Owais A; Senanayake, S M N Arosha; Zaheer, Dansih

    2015-03-01

    An intelligent recovery evaluation system is presented for objective assessment and performance monitoring of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. The system acquires 3-D kinematics of tibiofemoral joint and electromyography (EMG) data from surrounding muscles during various ambulatory and balance testing activities through wireless body-mounted inertial and EMG sensors, respectively. An integrated feature set is generated based on different features extracted from data collected for each activity. The fuzzy clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference techniques are applied to these integrated feature sets in order to provide different recovery progress assessment indicators (e.g., current stage of recovery, percentage of recovery progress as compared to healthy group, etc.) for ACL-R subjects. The system was trained and tested on data collected from a group of healthy and ACL-R subjects. For recovery stage identification, the average testing accuracy of the system was found above 95% (95-99%) for ambulatory activities and above 80% (80-84%) for balance testing activities. The overall recovery evaluation performed by the proposed system was found consistent with the assessment made by the physiotherapists using standard subjective/objective scores. The validated system can potentially be used as a decision supporting tool by physiatrists, physiotherapists, and clinicians for quantitative rehabilitation analysis of ACL-R subjects in conjunction with the existing recovery monitoring systems. PMID:24801517

  7. GPR simulation based on complex frequency shifted recursive integration PML boundary of 3D high order FDTD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Zeng, Zhaofa; Huang, Ling; Liu, Fengshan

    2012-12-01

    When applying the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) simulation, the absorbing boundary conditions (ABC) are used to mitigate undesired reflection that can arise at the model's truncation boundaries. The classical PML boundary can make spurious reflection for the waves, such as reaching to the PML interface with near-grazing angles, low frequency waves or evanescent waves. The non-split complex frequency shifted PML which base on recursive integration (CFS-RIPML) has a good absorption effect for these interference waves. Meanwhile, the recursive integration, which does not need split field component, can overcome the shortcoming of CFS technique that needs more intermediate variable and large memory. In addition, the high-order FDTD can improve calculation accuracy and reduce the error caused by numerical dispersion effectively. In this paper, we derive the 3D high-order FDTD method with CFS-RIPML boundary and apply it in GPR simulation. The results show that the CFS-RIPML has significantly better absorption effect and lower reflections error than UPML and PML boundary. Compared with the two-order, the high-order FDTD can improve calculation accuracy effectively with the same grid size. Combination with CFS-RIPML boundary and high-order FDTD can improve the reliability and calculation accuracy of GPR and other geophysics numerical simulation.

  8. A Prototype PZT Matrix Transducer With Low-Power Integrated Receive ASIC for 3-D Transesophageal Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Raghunathan, Shreyas B; Yu, Zili; Shabanimotlagh, Maysam; Chen, Zhao; Chang, Zu-yao; Blaak, Sandra; Prins, Christian; Ponte, Jacco; Noothout, Emile; Vos, Hendrik J; Bosch, Johan G; Verweij, Martin D; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel A P

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and experimental evaluation of a prototype lead zirconium titanate (PZT) matrix transducer with an integrated receive ASIC, as a proof of concept for a miniature three-dimensional (3-D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) probe. It consists of an array of 9 ×12 piezoelectric elements mounted on the ASIC via an integration scheme that involves direct electrical connections between a bond-pad array on the ASIC and the transducer elements. The ASIC addresses the critical challenge of reducing cable count, and includes front-end amplifiers with adjustable gains and micro-beamformer circuits that locally process and combine echo signals received by the elements of each 3 ×3 subarray. Thus, an order-of-magnitude reduction in the number of receive channels is achieved. Dedicated circuit techniques are employed to meet the strict space and power constraints of TEE probes. The ASIC has been fabricated in a standard 0.18-μm CMOS process and consumes only 0.44 mW/channel. The prototype has been acoustically characterized in a water tank. The ASIC allows the array to be presteered across ±37° while achieving an overall dynamic range of 77 dB. Both the measured characteristics of the individual transducer elements and the performance of the ASIC are in good agreement with expectations, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed techniques. PMID:26540683

  9. Comparison of 3D Reconstructive Technologies Used for Morphometric Research and the Translation of Knowledge Using a Decision Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Charys M.; Roach, Victoria A.; Nguyen, Ngan; Rice, Charles L.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models for education, pre-operative assessment, presurgical planning, and measurement have become more prevalent. With the increase in prevalence of 3D models there has also been an increase in 3D reconstructive software programs that are used to create these models. These software programs differ in…

  10. Extended depth-of-field 3D endoscopy with synthetic aperture integral imaging using an electrically tunable focal-length liquid-crystal lens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jen; Shen, Xin; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional synthetic-aperture integral imaging uses a lens array to sense the three-dimensional (3D) object or scene that can then be reconstructed digitally or optically. However, integral imaging generally suffers from a fixed and limited range of depth of field (DOF). In this Letter, we experimentally demonstrate a 3D integral-imaging endoscopy with tunable DOF by using a single large-aperture focal-length-tunable liquid crystal (LC) lens. The proposed system can provide high spatial resolution and an extended DOF in synthetic-aperture integral imaging 3D endoscope. In our experiments, the image plane in the integral imaging pickup process can be tuned from 18 to 38 mm continuously using a large-aperture LC lens, and the total DOF is extended from 12 to 51 mm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on synthetic aperture integral imaging 3D endoscopy with a large-aperture LC lens that can provide high spatial resolution 3D imaging with an extend DOF. PMID:26258358

  11. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  12. Direct laser-writing of ferroelectric single-crystal waveguide architectures in glass for 3D integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar; Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Lapointe, Jerome; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Direct three-dimensional laser writing of amorphous waveguides inside glass has been studied intensely as an attractive route for fabricating photonic integrated circuits. However, achieving essential nonlinear-optic functionality in such devices will also require the ability to create high-quality single-crystal waveguides. Femtosecond laser irradiation is capable of crystallizing glass in 3D, but producing optical-quality single-crystal structures suitable for waveguiding poses unique challenges that are unprecedented in the field of crystal growth. In this work, we use a high angular-resolution electron diffraction method to obtain the first conclusive confirmation that uniform single crystals can be grown inside glass by femtosecond laser writing under optimized conditions. We confirm waveguiding capability and present the first quantitative measurement of power transmission through a laser-written crystal-in-glass waveguide, yielding loss of 2.64 dB/cm at 1530 nm. We demonstrate uniformity of the crystal cross-section down the length of the waveguide and quantify its birefringence. Finally, as a proof-of-concept for patterning more complex device geometries, we demonstrate the use of dynamic phase modulation to grow symmetric crystal junctions with single-pass writing. PMID:25988599

  13. Direct laser-writing of ferroelectric single-crystal waveguide architectures in glass for 3D integrated optics

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar; Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Lapointe, Jerome; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Direct three-dimensional laser writing of amorphous waveguides inside glass has been studied intensely as an attractive route for fabricating photonic integrated circuits. However, achieving essential nonlinear-optic functionality in such devices will also require the ability to create high-quality single-crystal waveguides. Femtosecond laser irradiation is capable of crystallizing glass in 3D, but producing optical-quality single-crystal structures suitable for waveguiding poses unique challenges that are unprecedented in the field of crystal growth. In this work, we use a high angular-resolution electron diffraction method to obtain the first conclusive confirmation that uniform single crystals can be grown inside glass by femtosecond laser writing under optimized conditions. We confirm waveguiding capability and present the first quantitative measurement of power transmission through a laser-written crystal-in-glass waveguide, yielding loss of 2.64 dB/cm at 1530 nm. We demonstrate uniformity of the crystal cross-section down the length of the waveguide and quantify its birefringence. Finally, as a proof-of-concept for patterning more complex device geometries, we demonstrate the use of dynamic phase modulation to grow symmetric crystal junctions with single-pass writing. PMID:25988599

  14. Integrated ray tracing simulation of annual variation of spectral bio-signatures from cloud free 3D optical Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongok; Kim, Sug-Whan; Kim, Dae Wook; Lee, Jae-Min; Lee, Hanshin; Park, Won Hyun; Seong, Sehyun; Ham, Sun-Jeong

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the Earth spectral bio-signatures provides an important reference datum for accurate de-convolution of collapsed spectral signals from potential earth-like planets of other star systems. This study presents a new ray tracing computation method including an improved 3D optical earth model constructed with the coastal line and vegetation distribution data from the Global Ecological Zone (GEZ) map. Using non-Lambertian bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF) models, the input earth surface model is characterized with three different scattering properties and their annual variations depending on monthly changes in vegetation distribution, sea ice coverage and illumination angle. The input atmosphere model consists of one layer with Rayleigh scattering model from the sea level to 100 km in altitude and its radiative transfer characteristics is computed for four seasons using the SMART codes. The ocean scattering model is a combination of sun-glint scattering and Lambertian scattering models. The land surface scattering is defined with the semi empirical parametric kernel method used for MODIS and POLDER missions. These three component models were integrated into the final Earth model that was then incorporated into the in-house built integrated ray tracing (IRT) model capable of computing both spectral imaging and radiative transfer performance of a hypothetical space instrument as it observes the Earth from its designated orbit. The IRT model simulation inputs include variation in earth orientation, illuminated phases, and seasonal sea ice and vegetation distribution. The trial simulation runs result in the annual variations in phase dependent disk averaged spectra (DAS) and its associated bio-signatures such as NDVI. The full computational details are presented together with the resulting annual variation in DAS and its associated bio-signatures.

  15. Mobile 3D television: development of core technological elements and user-centered evaluation methods toward an optimized system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, Atanas; Smolic, Aljoscha; Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Strohmeier, Dominik; Bozdagi Akar, Gozde; Merkle, Philipp; Daskalov, Nikolai

    2009-02-01

    A European consortium of six partners has been developing core technological components of a mobile 3D television system over DVB-H channel. In this overview paper, we present our current results on developing optimal methods for stereo-video content creation, coding and transmission and emphasize their significance for the power-constrained mobile platform, equipped with auto-stereoscopic display. We address the user requirements by applying modern usercentered approaches taking into account different user groups and usage contexts in contrast to the laboratory assessment methods which, though standardized, offer limited applicability to real applications. To this end, we have been aiming at developing a methodological framework for the whole system development process. One of our goals has been to further develop the user-centered approach towards experienced quality of critical system components. In this paper, we classify different research methods and technological solutions analyzing their pros and constraints. Based on this analysis we present the user-centered methodological framework being used throughout the whole development process of the system and aimed at achieving the best performance and quality appealing to the end user.

  16. 3D documentation and visualization of external injury findings by integration of simple photography in CT/MRI data sets (IprojeCT).

    PubMed

    Campana, Lorenzo; Breitbeck, Robert; Bauer-Kreuz, Regula; Buck, Ursula

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of documenting patterned injury using three dimensions and true colour photography without complex 3D surface documentation methods. This method is based on a generated 3D surface model using radiologic slice images (CT) while the colour information is derived from photographs taken with commercially available cameras. The external patterned injuries were documented in 16 cases using digital photography as well as highly precise photogrammetry-supported 3D structured light scanning. The internal findings of these deceased were recorded using CT and MRI. For registration of the internal with the external data, two different types of radiographic markers were used and compared. The 3D surface model generated from CT slice images was linked with the photographs, and thereby digital true-colour 3D models of the patterned injuries could be created (Image projection onto CT/IprojeCT). In addition, these external models were merged with the models of the somatic interior. We demonstrated that 3D documentation and visualization of external injury findings by integration of digital photography in CT/MRI data sets is suitable for the 3D documentation of individual patterned injuries to a body. Nevertheless, this documentation method is not a substitution for photogrammetry and surface scanning, especially when the entire bodily surface is to be recorded in three dimensions including all external findings, and when precise data is required for comparing highly detailed injury features with the injury-inflicting tool. PMID:26496803

  17. 3D Numerical Optimization Modelling of Ivancich landslides (Assisi, Italy) via integration of remote sensing and in situ observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, Raffaele; De Novellis, Vincenzo; Lollino, Piernicola; Manunta, Michele; Tizzani, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    The new challenge that the research in slopes instabilities phenomena is going to tackle is the effective integration and joint exploitation of remote sensing measurements with in situ data and observations to study and understand the sub-surface interactions, the triggering causes, and, in general, the long term behaviour of the investigated landslide phenomenon. In this context, a very promising approach is represented by Finite Element (FE) techniques, which allow us to consider the intrinsic complexity of the mass movement phenomena and to effectively benefit from multi source observations and data. In this context, we perform a three dimensional (3D) numerical model of the Ivancich (Assisi, Central Italy) instability phenomenon. In particular, we apply an inverse FE method based on a Genetic Algorithm optimization procedure, benefitting from advanced DInSAR measurements, retrieved through the full resolution Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique, and an inclinometric array distribution. To this purpose we consider the SAR images acquired from descending orbit by the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) X-band radar constellation, from December 2009 to February 2012. Moreover the optimization input dataset is completed by an array of eleven inclinometer measurements, from 1999 to 2006, distributed along the unstable mass. The landslide body is formed of debris material sliding on a arenaceous marl substratum, with a thin shear band detected using borehole and inclinometric data, at depth ranging from 20 to 60 m. Specifically, we consider the active role of this shear band in the control of the landslide evolution process. A large field monitoring dataset of the landslide process, including at-depth piezometric and geological borehole observations, were available. The integration of these datasets allows us to develop a 3D structural geological model of the considered slope. To investigate the dynamic evolution of a landslide, various physical approaches can be considered

  18. Microplasma fabrication: from semiconductor technology for 2D-chips and microfluidic channels to rapid prototyping and 3D-printing of microplasma devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatford, R.; Karanassios, Vassili

    2014-05-01

    Microplasmas are receiving attention in recent conferences and current scientific literature. In our laboratory, microplasmas-on-chips proved to be particularly attractive. The 2D- and 3D-chips we developed became hybrid because they were fitted with a quartz plate (quartz was used due to its transparency to UV). Fabrication of 2D- and 3D-chips for microplasma research is described. The fabrication methods described ranged from semiconductor fabrication technology, to Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining, to 3D-printing. These methods may prove to be useful for those contemplating in entering microplasma research but have no access to expensive semiconductor fabrication equipment.

  19. Controlling Shear Stress in 3D Bioprinting is a Key Factor to Balance Printing Resolution and Stem Cell Integrity.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Andreas; Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Puster, Uta; Richtering, Walter; Stevens, Molly M; Fischer, Horst

    2016-02-01

    A microvalve-based bioprinting system for the manufacturing of high-resolution, multimaterial 3D-structures is reported. Applying a straightforward fluid-dynamics model, the shear stress at the nozzle site can precisely be controlled. Using this system, a broad study on how cell viability and proliferation potential are affected by different levels of shear stress is conducted. Complex, multimaterial 3D structures are printed with high resolution. This work pioneers the investigation of shear stress-induced cell damage in 3D bioprinting and might help to comprehend and improve the outcome of cell-printing studies in the future. PMID:26626828

  20. Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy with integrated dual-axis MEMS scanner for fast 3D imaging and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cogliati, Andrea; Hayes, Adam; Santhanam, Anand P.; Tankam, Patrice; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2015-10-01

    Fast, robust, nondestructive 3D imaging is needed for characterization of microscopic structures in industrial and clinical applications. A custom micro-electromechanical system (MEMS)-based 2D scanner system was developed to achieve 55 kHz A-scan acquisition in a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) instrument with a novel multilevel GPU architecture for high-speed imaging. GD-OCM yields high-definition volumetric imaging with dynamic depth of focusing through a bio-inspired liquid lens-based microscope design, which has no moving parts and is suitable for use in a manufacturing setting or in a medical environment. A dual-axis MEMS mirror was chosen to replace two single-axis galvanometer mirrors; as a result, the astigmatism caused by the mismatch between the optical pupil and the scanning location was eliminated and a 12x reduction in volume of the scanning system was achieved. Imaging at an invariant resolution of 2 μm was demonstrated throughout a volume of 1 × 1 × 0.6 mm3, acquired in less than 2 minutes. The MEMS-based scanner resulted in improved image quality, increased robustness and lighter weight of the system - all factors that are critical for on-field deployment. A custom integrated feedback system consisting of a laser diode and a position-sensing detector was developed to investigate the impact of the resonant frequency of the MEMS and the driving signal of the scanner on the movement of the mirror. Results on the metrology of manufactured materials and characterization of tissue samples with GD-OCM are presented.

  1. 3D printed electromagnetic transmission and electronic structures fabricated on a single platform using advanced process integration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffenbaugh, Paul Issac

    3D printing has garnered immense attention from many fields including in-office rapid prototyping of mechanical parts, outer-space satellite replication, garage functional firearm manufacture, and NASA rocket engine component fabrication. 3D printing allows increased design flexibility in the fabrication of electronics, microwave circuits and wireless antennas and has reached a level of maturity which allows functional parts to be printed. Much more work is necessary in order to perfect the processes of 3D printed electronics especially in the area of automation. Chapter 1 shows several finished prototypes of 3D printed electronics as well as newly developed techniques in fabrication. Little is known about the RF and microwave properties and applications of the standard materials which have been developed for 3D printing. Measurement of a wide variety of materials over a broad spectrum of frequencies up to 10 GHz using a variety of well-established measurement methods is performed throughout chapter 2. Several types of high frequency RF transmission lines are fabricated and valuable model-matched data is gathered and provided in chapter 3 for future designers' use. Of particular note is a fully 3D printed stripline which was automatically fabricated in one process on one machine. Some core advantages of 3D printing RF/microwave components include rapid manufacturing of complex, dimensionally sensitive circuits (such as antennas and filters which are often iteratively tuned) and the ability to create new devices that cannot be made using standard fabrication techniques. Chapter 4 describes an exemplary fully 3D printed curved inverted-F antenna.

  2. Integrating Technology: Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kercher, Lydia

    Developed by participants in an inservice workshop at the University of Wyoming, this manual lists 26 educational strategies that make use of current educational technologies, their corresponding skill development, and the content areas involved. For example, one strategy listed is to have students create their own letterhead to be used throughout…

  3. Integrated technology wing design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, A. P.; Beck, W. E.; Morita, W. H.; Penrose, B. J.; Skarshaug, R. E.; Wainfan, B. S.

    1984-01-01

    The technology development costs and associated benefits in applying advanced technology associated with the design of a new wing for a new or derivative trijet with a capacity for 350 passengers and maximum range of 8519 km, entering service in 1990 were studied. The areas of technology are: (1) airfoil technology; (2) planform parameters; (3) high lift; (4) pitch active control system; (5) all electric systems; (6) E to 3rd power propulsion; (7) airframe/propulsion integration; (8) graphite/epoxy composites; (9) advanced aluminum alloys; (10) titanium alloys; and (11) silicon carbide/aluminum composites. These technologies were applied to the reference aircraft configuration. Payoffs were determined for block fuel reductions and net value of technology. These technologies are ranked for the ratio of net value of technology (NVT) to technology development costs.

  4. Integrate Technology with Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Drew; Lindeman, Patrick; Wolf, Trent; Dunnerstick, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As information technology continues to progress, teaching mathematic with multimedia is becoming a new way of instruction. Integrating technology enables students to become more active in the learning process. When students feel more vested in actual learning, retention of the material tends to rise significantly. This article describes how tools…

  5. 3D holoscopic video imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steurer, Johannes H.; Pesch, Matthias; Hahne, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    Since many years, integral imaging has been discussed as a technique to overcome the limitations of standard still photography imaging systems where a three-dimensional scene is irrevocably projected onto two dimensions. With the success of 3D stereoscopic movies, a huge interest in capturing three-dimensional motion picture scenes has been generated. In this paper, we present a test bench integral imaging camera system aiming to tailor the methods of light field imaging towards capturing integral 3D motion picture content. We estimate the hardware requirements needed to generate high quality 3D holoscopic images and show a prototype camera setup that allows us to study these requirements using existing technology. The necessary steps that are involved in the calibration of the system as well as the technique of generating human readable holoscopic images from the recorded data are discussed.

  6. Field Trial Results of a 14-channel GPR Integrated with a U.S. Program for 3-D Utility Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anspach, James H.

    2013-04-01

    utilities were mostly undetectable. Through a ground-truthing program of test holes to expose utilities, the depth values derived from the enhanced GPR were fairly consistent and within 15 cm of actual depth. The incomplete underground picture determined by the enhanced GPR reinforces previous studies that show that the mapping of existing underground utilities is a multi-tool effort that takes highly trained and skilled field technicians and data interpreters. The addition of a new GPR tool is valuable in determining continuous depth profiles of imaged utilities. A second and significant benefit is the interpretation of other geotechnical data that benefit project designers. This might include showing geometry, location, intensity, and depths of either areas of anomalies, or of known structures, such as paving thickness, substrate thickness, voids, water table, soil lenses, boulders, bedrock, and so forth. The Florida Department of Transportation has decided to take advantage of this new technology and has entered into an experimental contract with Cardno TBE to incorporate several enhanced GPR arrays with traditional utility detection tools. The goal of this contract will be to provide a 3-D model of existing underground utilities for use in automated construction. The GPR 3-D data model will be melded with conventional subsurface utility engineering and mapping practices and will be required to follow the ASCE 38 standard for utility data reliability.

  7. Three-dimensional image technology in forensic anthropology: Assessing the validity of biological profiles derived from CT-3D images of the skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Leon Valenzuela, Maria Julia

    This project explores the reliability of building a biological profile for an unknown individual based on three-dimensional (3D) images of the individual's skeleton. 3D imaging technology has been widely researched for medical and engineering applications, and it is increasingly being used as a tool for anthropological inquiry. While the question of whether a biological profile can be derived from 3D images of a skeleton with the same accuracy as achieved when using dry bones has been explored, bigger sample sizes, a standardized scanning protocol and more interobserver error data are needed before 3D methods can become widely and confidently used in forensic anthropology. 3D images of Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained from 130 innominate bones from Boston University's skeletal collection (School of Medicine). For each bone, both 3D images and original bones were assessed using the Phenice and Suchey-Brooks methods. Statistical analysis was used to determine the agreement between 3D image assessment versus traditional assessment. A pool of six individuals with varying experience in the field of forensic anthropology scored a subsample (n = 20) to explore interobserver error. While a high agreement was found for age and sex estimation for specimens scored by the author, the interobserver study shows that observers found it difficult to apply standard methods to 3D images. Higher levels of experience did not result in higher agreement between observers, as would be expected. Thus, a need for training in 3D visualization before applying anthropological methods to 3D bones is suggested. Future research should explore interobserver error using a larger sample size in order to test the hypothesis that training in 3D visualization will result in a higher agreement between scores. The need for the development of a standard scanning protocol focusing on the optimization of 3D image resolution is highlighted. Applications for this research include the possibility

  8. Integrating structure-from-motion photogrammetry with geospatial software as a novel technique for quantifying 3D ecological characteristics of coral reefs

    PubMed Central

    Delparte, D; Gates, RD; Takabayashi, M

    2015-01-01

    The structural complexity of coral reefs plays a major role in the biodiversity, productivity, and overall functionality of reef ecosystems. Conventional metrics with 2-dimensional properties are inadequate for characterization of reef structural complexity. A 3-dimensional (3D) approach can better quantify topography, rugosity and other structural characteristics that play an important role in the ecology of coral reef communities. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) is an emerging low-cost photogrammetric method for high-resolution 3D topographic reconstruction. This study utilized SfM 3D reconstruction software tools to create textured mesh models of a reef at French Frigate Shoals, an atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The reconstructed orthophoto and digital elevation model were then integrated with geospatial software in order to quantify metrics pertaining to 3D complexity. The resulting data provided high-resolution physical properties of coral colonies that were then combined with live cover to accurately characterize the reef as a living structure. The 3D reconstruction of reef structure and complexity can be integrated with other physiological and ecological parameters in future research to develop reliable ecosystem models and improve capacity to monitor changes in the health and function of coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26207190

  9. Integrating structure-from-motion photogrammetry with geospatial software as a novel technique for quantifying 3D ecological characteristics of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jhr; Delparte, D; Gates, R D; Takabayashi, M

    2015-01-01

    The structural complexity of coral reefs plays a major role in the biodiversity, productivity, and overall functionality of reef ecosystems. Conventional metrics with 2-dimensional properties are inadequate for characterization of reef structural complexity. A 3-dimensional (3D) approach can better quantify topography, rugosity and other structural characteristics that play an important role in the ecology of coral reef communities. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) is an emerging low-cost photogrammetric method for high-resolution 3D topographic reconstruction. This study utilized SfM 3D reconstruction software tools to create textured mesh models of a reef at French Frigate Shoals, an atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The reconstructed orthophoto and digital elevation model were then integrated with geospatial software in order to quantify metrics pertaining to 3D complexity. The resulting data provided high-resolution physical properties of coral colonies that were then combined with live cover to accurately characterize the reef as a living structure. The 3D reconstruction of reef structure and complexity can be integrated with other physiological and ecological parameters in future research to develop reliable ecosystem models and improve capacity to monitor changes in the health and function of coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26207190

  10. Three-Dimensional Integration Technology for Advanced Focal Planes and Integrated Circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Keast, Craig

    2007-02-28

    Over the last five years MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT-LL) has developed a three-dimensional (3D) circuit integration technology that exploits the advantages of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology to enable wafer-level stacking and micrometer-scale electrical interconnection of fully fabricated circuit wafers. Advanced focal plane arrays have been the first applications to exploit the benefits of this 3D integration technology because the massively parallel information flow present in 2D imaging arrays maps very nicely into a 3D computational structure as information flows from circuit-tier to circuit-tier in the z-direction. To date, the MIT-LL 3D integration technology has been used to fabricate four different focal planes including: a 2-tier 64 x 64 imager with fully parallel per-pixel A/D conversion; a 3-tier 640 x 480 imager consisting of an imaging tier, an A/D conversion tier, and a digital signal processing tier; a 2-tier 1024 x 1024 pixel, 4-side-abutable imaging modules for tiling large mosaic focal planes, and a 3-tier Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (APD) 3-D LIDAR array, using a 30 volt APD tier, a 3.3 volt CMOS tier, and a 1.5 volt CMOS tier. Recently, the 3D integration technology has been made available to the circuit design research community through DARPA-sponsored Multiproject fabrication runs. The first Multiproject Run (3DL1) completed fabrication in early 2006 and included over 30 different circuit designs from 21 different research groups. 3D circuit concepts explored in this run included stacked memories, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), and mixed-signal circuits. The second Multiproject Run (3DM2) is currently in fabrication and includes particle detector readouts designed by Fermilab. This talk will provide a brief overview of MIT-LL's 3D-integration process, discuss some of the focal plane applications where the technology is being applied, and provide a summary of some of the Multiproject Run circuit results.

  11. Fast and Broadband Signal Integrity Analysis of Multiple Vias in Heterogeneous 3D IC and Die-Level Packaging by Using Generalized Foldy-Lax Scattering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xin

    This dissertation proposal is concerned with the use of fast and broadband full-wave electromagnetic methods for modeling high speed interconnects (e.g, vertical vias and horizontal traces) and passive components (e.g, decoupling capacitors) for structures of PCB and packages, in 3D IC, Die-level packaging and SIW based devices, to effectively modeling the designs signal integrity (SI) and power integrity (PI) aspects. The main contributions finished in this thesis is to create a novel methodology, which hybridizes the Foldy-Lax multiple scattering equations based fast full wave method, method of moment (MoM) based 1D technology, modes decoupling based geometry decomposition and cavity modes expansions, to model and simulate the electromagnetic scattering effects for the irregular power/ground planes, multiple vias and traces, for fast and accurate analysis of link level simulation on multilayer electronic structures. For the modeling details, the interior massively-coupled multiple vias problem is modeled most-analytically by using the Foldy-Lax multiple scattering equations. The dyadic Green's functions of the magnetic field are expressed in terms of waveguide modes in the vertical direction and vector cylindrical wave expansions or cavity modes expansions in the horizontal direction, combined with 2D MoM realized by 1D technology. For the incident field of the case of vias in the arbitrarily shaped antipad in finite large cavity/waveguide, the exciting and scattering field coefficients are calculated based on the transformation which converts surface integration of magnetic surface currents in antipad into 1D line integration of surface charges on the vias and on the ground plane. Geometry decomposition method is applied to model and integrate both the vertical and horizontal interconnects/traces in arbitrarily shaped power/ground planes. Moreover, a new form of multiple scattering equations is derived for solving coupling effects among mixed metallic

  12. Modeling Cellular Processes in 3-D

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Odde, David

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in photonic imaging and fluorescent protein technology offer unprecedented views of molecular space-time dynamics in living cells. At the same time, advances in computing hardware and software enable modeling of ever more complex systems, from global climate to cell division. As modeling and experiment become more closely integrated, we must address the issue of modeling cellular processes in 3-D. Here, we highlight recent advances related to 3-D modeling in cell biology. While some processes require full 3-D analysis, we suggest that others are more naturally described in 2-D or 1-D. Keeping the dimensionality as low as possible reduces computational time and makes models more intuitively comprehensible; however, the ability to test full 3-D models will build greater confidence in models generally and remains an important emerging area of cell biological modeling. PMID:22036197

  13. Comparison of 3D reconstructive technologies used for morphometric research and the translation of knowledge using a decision matrix.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charys M; Roach, Victoria A; Nguyen, Ngan; Rice, Charles L; Wilson, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models for education, pre-operative assessment, presurgical planning, and measurement have become more prevalent. With the increase in prevalence of 3D models there has also been an increase in 3D reconstructive software programs that are used to create these models. These software programs differ in reconstruction concepts, operating system requirements, user features, cost, and no one program has emerged as the standard. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic comparison of three widely available 3D reconstructive software programs, Amira(®), OsiriX, and Mimics(®) , with respect to the software's ability to be used in two broad themes: morphometric research and education to translate morphological knowledge. Cost, system requirements, and inherent features of each program were compared. A novel concept selection tool, a decision matrix, was used to objectify comparisons of usability of the interface, quality of the output, and efficiency of the tools. Findings indicate that Mimics was the best-suited program for construction of 3D anatomical models and morphometric analysis, but for creating a learning tool the results were less clear. OsiriX was very user-friendly; however, it had limited capabilities. Conversely, although Amira had endless potential and could create complex dynamic videos, it had a challenging interface. These results provide a resource for morphometric researchers and educators to assist the selection of appropriate reconstruction programs when starting a new 3D modeling project. PMID:23633266

  14. Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Shiratori, Tomomi; An, Le Van; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a ‘3D well’ was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines. PMID:26184194

  15. Combining marker-less patient setup and respiratory motion monitoring using low cost 3D camera technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahavori, F.; Adams, E.; Dabbs, M.; Aldridge, L.; Liversidge, N.; Donovan, E.; Jordan, T.; Evans, PM.; Wells, K.

    2015-03-01

    Patient set-up misalignment/motion can be a significant source of error within external beam radiotherapy, leading to unwanted dose to healthy tissues and sub-optimal dose to the target tissue. Such inadvertent displacement or motion of the target volume may be caused by treatment set-up error, respiratory motion or an involuntary movement potentially decreasing therapeutic benefit. The conventional approach to managing abdominal-thoracic patient set-up is via skin markers (tattoos) and laser-based alignment. Alignment of the internal target volume with its position in the treatment plan can be achieved using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) in conjunction with marker-based respiratory motion monitoring. We propose a marker-less single system solution for patient set-up and respiratory motion management based on low cost 3D depth camera technology (such as the Microsoft Kinect). In this new work we assess this approach in a study group of six volunteer subjects. Separate simulated treatment mimic treatment "fractions" or set-ups are compared for each subject, undertaken using conventional laser-based alignment and with intrinsic depth images produced by Kinect. Microsoft Kinect is also compared with the well-known RPM system for respiratory motion management in terms of monitoring free-breathing and DIBH. Preliminary results suggest that Kinect is able to produce mm-level surface alignment and a comparable DIBH respiratory motion management when compared to the popular RPM system. Such an approach may also yield significant benefits in terms of patient throughput as marker alignment and respiratory motion can be automated in a single system.

  16. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best represented the…

  17. Advanced 3-D analysis, client-server systems, and cloud computing—Integration of cardiovascular imaging data into clinical workflows of transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Mathis; Falkner, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is highly prevalent in the aging populations of industrialized countries and is associated with poor prognosis. Surgical valve replacement has been the only established treatment with documented improvement of long-term outcome. However, many of the older patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are high-risk or ineligible for surgery. For these patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a treatment alternative. The TAVR procedure is characterized by a lack of visualization of the operative field. Therefore, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for patient selection, pre-procedural planning, and intra-operative decision-making. Incremental to conventional angiography and 2-D echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has assumed an important role before TAVR. The analysis of 3-D CT data requires extensive post-processing during direct interaction with the dataset, using advance analysis software. Organization and storage of the data according to complex clinical workflows and sharing of image information have become a critical part of these novel treatment approaches. Optimally, the data are integrated into a comprehensive image data file accessible to multiple groups of practitioners across the hospital. This creates new challenges for data management requiring a complex IT infrastructure, spanning across multiple locations, but is increasingly achieved with client-server solutions and private cloud technology. This article describes the challenges and opportunities created by the increased amount of patient-specific imaging data in the context of TAVR. PMID:24282750

  18. High-κ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material in low temperature wafer-level bonding for 3D integration application

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J. Tu, L. C.; Tan, C. S.

    2014-03-15

    This work systematically investigated a high-κ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material for low temperature wafer-level bonding for potential applications in 3D microsystems. A clean Si wafer with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness of 50 nm was applied as our experimental approach. Bonding was initiated in a clean room ambient after surface activation, followed by annealing under inert ambient conditions at 300 °C for 3 h. The investigation consisted of three parts: a mechanical support study using the four-point bending method, hermeticity measurements using the helium bomb test, and thermal conductivity analysis for potential heterogeneous bonding. Compared with samples bonded using a conventional oxide bonding material (SiO{sub 2}), a higher interfacial adhesion energy (∼11.93 J/m{sup 2}) and a lower helium leak rate (∼6.84 × 10{sup −10} atm.cm{sup 3}/sec) were detected for samples bonded using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. More importantly, due to the excellent thermal conductivity performance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, this technology can be used in heterogeneous direct bonding, which has potential applications for enhancing the performance of Si photonic integrated devices.

  19. Advanced 3-D analysis, client-server systems, and cloud computing-Integration of cardiovascular imaging data into clinical workflows of transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Zimmermann, Mathis; Falkner, Juergen

    2013-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is highly prevalent in the aging populations of industrialized countries and is associated with poor prognosis. Surgical valve replacement has been the only established treatment with documented improvement of long-term outcome. However, many of the older patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are high-risk or ineligible for surgery. For these patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a treatment alternative. The TAVR procedure is characterized by a lack of visualization of the operative field. Therefore, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for patient selection, pre-procedural planning, and intra-operative decision-making. Incremental to conventional angiography and 2-D echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has assumed an important role before TAVR. The analysis of 3-D CT data requires extensive post-processing during direct interaction with the dataset, using advance analysis software. Organization and storage of the data according to complex clinical workflows and sharing of image information have become a critical part of these novel treatment approaches. Optimally, the data are integrated into a comprehensive image data file accessible to multiple groups of practitioners across the hospital. This creates new challenges for data management requiring a complex IT infrastructure, spanning across multiple locations, but is increasingly achieved with client-server solutions and private cloud technology. This article describes the challenges and opportunities created by the increased amount of patient-specific imaging data in the context of TAVR. PMID:24282750

  20. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  1. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:25093879

  2. The impact of active versus passive use of 3D technology: a study of dental students at Wuhan University, China.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shengcai; Yan, Yanhong; Li, Rong; Hu, Jian

    2013-11-01

    A variety of computer-based 3D applications are becoming regular tools for dental students for self-learning. This study investigated the learning effectiveness of junior dental students in passively versus actively controlling the 3D virtual scenes of implant dentistry. Participants were randomized into three groups and were exposed to three designs of educational materials: traditional 2D webpages (2D); active-controlling 3D webpages (A3); and passive-controlling 3D webpages (P3). After reviewing the webpages, the participants were asked to complete a posttest to assess the relative quality of information acquisition. Their responses were compared and analyzed. The results indicated that the P3 group received the highest score of 26.4±3.1 on the post-test, significantly better than the A3 group, which had the worst performance with a score of 20.3±4.0. The 2D group received a score of 24.2±4.6. There was a significant correlation between the scores on a mental rotations test and the subjects' performance on the posttest (p<0.001). A serious disadvantage of active control was indicated for individuals with low spatial ability. In 3D virtual reality assisted self-learning, passive control produces higher learning effects compared to active control. Too much active control may generate significantly negative impacts on students, especially for individuals with low spatial ability. PMID:24192420

  3. Inclined nanoimprinting lithography-based 3D nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhan; Bucknall, David G.; Allen, Mark G.

    2011-06-01

    We report a 'top-down' 3D nanofabrication approach combining non-conventional inclined nanoimprint lithography (INIL) with reactive ion etching (RIE), contact molding and 3D metal nanotransfer printing (nTP). This integration of processes enables the production and conformal transfer of 3D polymer nanostructures of varying heights to a variety of other materials including a silicon-based substrate, a silicone stamp and a metal gold (Au) thin film. The process demonstrates the potential of reduced fabrication cost and complexity compared to existing methods. Various 3D nanostructures in technologically useful materials have been fabricated, including symmetric and asymmetric nanolines, nanocircles and nanosquares. Such 3D nanostructures have potential applications such as angle-resolved photonic crystals, plasmonic crystals and biomimicking anisotropic surfaces. This integrated INIL-based strategy shows great promise for 3D nanofabrication in the fields of photonics, plasmonics and surface tribology.

  4. A Learner-Centered Approach for Training Science Teachers through Virtual Reality and 3D Visualization Technologies: Practical Experience for Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Yau-Yuen

    2004-01-01

    This paper presentation will report on how some science educators at the Science Department of The Hong Kong Institute of Education have successfully employed an array of innovative learning media such as three-dimensional (3D) and virtual reality (VR) technologies to create seven sets of resource kits, most of which are being placed on the…

  5. An Examination of the Effects of Collaborative Scientific Visualization via Model-Based Reasoning on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Learning within an Immersive 3D World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soleimani, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Immersive 3D worlds can be designed to effectively engage students in peer-to-peer collaborative learning activities, supported by scientific visualization, to help with understanding complex concepts associated with learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Previous research studies have shown STEM learning benefits…

  6. New Technologies for Acquisition and 3-D Visualization of Geophysical and Other Data Types Combined for Enhanced Understandings and Efficiencies of Oil and Gas Operations, Deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. A.; Gee, L. J.; George, T.

    2002-12-01

    This presentation shows results of a visualization method used to display and analyze multiple data types in a geospatially referenced three-dimensional (3-D) space. The integrated data types include sonar and seismic geophysical data, pipeline and geotechnical engineering data, and 3-D facilities models. Visualization of these data collectively in proper 3-D orientation yields insights and synergistic understandings not previously obtainable. Key technological components of the method are: 1) high-resolution geophysical data obtained using a newly developed autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), 2) 3-D visualization software that delivers correctly positioned display of multiple data types and full 3-D flight navigation within the data space and 3) a highly immersive visualization environment (HIVE) where multidisciplinary teams can work collaboratively to develop enhanced understandings of geospatially complex data relationships. The initial study focused on an active deepwater development area in the Green Canyon protraction area, Gulf of Mexico. Here several planned production facilities required detailed, integrated data analysis for design and installation purposes. To meet the challenges of tight budgets and short timelines, an innovative new method was developed based on the combination of newly developed technologies. Key benefits of the method include enhanced understanding of geologically complex seabed topography and marine soils yielding safer and more efficient pipeline and facilities siting. Environmental benefits include rapid and precise identification of potential locations of protected deepwater biological communities for avoidance and protection during exploration and production operations. In addition, the method allows data presentation and transfer of learnings to an audience outside the scientific and engineering team. This includes regulatory personnel, marine archaeologists, industry partners and others.

  7. Engineering Multi-scale Electrospun Structure for Integration into Architected 3-D Nanofibers for Cimex Annihilation: Fabrication and Mechanism Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Zhang, Linxi; Liu, Ying; Rafailovich, Miriam; Garcia Center for Polymers at Engineered Interfaces Team

    In this study, engineered electrospun scaffolds with fibers oriented with designed curvature in three dimensions (3D) including the looped structure were developed based on the principle of electrostatic repulsion. Here we illustrate that 3D electrospun recycled polystyrene fibers could closely mimic the unique architectures of multi-direction and multi-layer nano-spiderweb. In contrast to virgin PS, the recycled PS (Dart Styrofoam) are known to contain zinc stearate which acts as a surfactant resulting in higher electrical charge and larger fiber curvature, hence, lower modulus. The surfactant, which is known to decrease the surface tension, may have also been effective at decreasing the confinement of the PS, where chain stretching was shown to occur, in response to the high surface tension at the air interface. Three dimensional flexible architecture with complex structures are shown to be necessary in order to block the motion of Cimex lectularius. Here we show how an engineered electrospun network of surfactant modified polymer fibers with calculated dimensions can be used to immobilize the insects. The mechanical response of the fibers has to be specifically tailored so that it is elastically deformed, without fracturing or flowing. Carefully controlling and tailoring the electrospinning parameters we can now utilize architected 3D nanofiber to create an environmental-friendly Cimex immobilization device which can lead to annihilation solution for all the other harmful insects.

  8. Integrating sediment biogeochemistry into 3D oceanic models: A study of benthic-pelagic coupling in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capet, Arthur; Meysman, Filip J. R.; Akoumianaki, Ioanna; Soetaert, Karline; Grégoire, Marilaure

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ecosystem models of shelf environments should properly account for the biogeochemical cycling within the sea floor. However, a full and explicit representation of sediment biogeochemistry into 3D ocean models is computationally demanding. Here, we describe a simplified approach to include benthic processes in 3D ocean models, which includes a parameterization of the different pathways for organic matter mineralization and allows for organic matter remobilization by bottom currents and waves. This efficient approach enables decadal simulations that resolve the inertial contribution of the sea floor to the biogeochemical cycling in shelf environments. The model was implemented to analyze the benthic-pelagic coupling in the northwestern shelf of the Black Sea. Three distinct biogeochemical provinces were identified on the basis of fluxes and rates associated with benthic-pelagic coupling. Our model simulations suitably capture the seasonal variability of in situ flux data as well as their regional variation, which stresses the importance of incorporating temporally varying sediment biogeochemistry and resuspension/redeposition cycles in shelf ecosystem models.

  9. Academic Integrity and Informational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Travis S.

    2000-01-01

    Considers the impact of information technology on academic integrity. Highlights include machines versus man; honor codes and student cheating; copyrights for digital data; authoring versus writing; intuitive software; and an example and analysis of the use of AutoSummary in Microsoft Word 97 to create a summary of a published article. (Contains…

  10. 3D-integration of a log spiral antenna onto a dual grating-gate plasmon-resonant terahertz emitter for high-directivity radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-C.; Nishimura, T.; Komori, T.; Mori, T.; Watanabe, N.; Asano, T.; Otsuji, T.

    2009-11-01

    We report a high-directivity plasmon-resonant terahertz (THz) emitter (PRE) incorporating a 3D-integrated antenna complex. The emitter structure is based on a high electron mobility transistor having unique doubly interdigitated grating gates as a broadband THz antenna that can convert non-radiative plasmons to radiative electromagnetic waves. Due to the sub-wavelength aperture of practical grating-antenna dimension, however, present structure of PRE exhibits undesirable diffraction effect, resulting in poor directivity. We developed a new device structure featuring a 3D-integration of tightly-coupled multiple-antenna complex to improve the directivity. The directivity of a new device was dramatically improved by a factor of 5.7 over the frequencies from 1.8 to 4.0 THz.

  11. Mii School: New 3D Technologies Applied in Education to Detect Drug Abuses and Bullying in Adolescents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, José Alberto; Espínola, Moisés; Cangas, Adolfo J.; Iribarne, Luis

    Mii School is a 3D school simulator developed with Blender and used by psychology researchers for the detection of drugs abuses, bullying and mental disorders in adolescents. The school simulator created is an interactive video game where the players, in this case the students, have to choose, along 17 scenes simulated, the options that better define their personalities. In this paper we present a technical characteristics description and the first results obtained in a real school.

  12. 3D origami-based multifunction-integrated immunodevice: low-cost and multiplexed sandwich chemiluminescence immunoassay on microfluidic paper-based analytical device.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lei; Wang, Shoumei; Song, Xianrang; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2012-09-01

    A novel 3D microfluidic paper-based immunodevice, integrated with blood plasma separation from whole blood samples, automation of rinse steps, and multiplexed CL detections, was developed for the first time based on the principle of origami (denoted as origami-based device). This 3D origami-based device, comprised of one test pad surrounded by four folding tabs, could be patterned and fabricated by wax-printing on paper in bulk. In this work, a sandwich-type chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay was introduced into this 3D origami-based immunodevice, which could separate the operational procedures into several steps including (i) folding pads above/below and (ii) addition of reagent/buffer under a specific sequence. The CL behavior, blood plasma separation, washing protocol, and incubation time were investigated in this work. The developed 3D origami-based CL immunodevice, combined with a typical luminuol-H(2)O(2) CL system and catalyzed by Ag nanoparticles, showed excellent analytical performance for the simultaneous detection of four tumor markers. The whole blood samples were assayed and the results obtained were in agreement with the reference values from the parallel single-analyte test. This paper-based microfluidic origami CL detection system provides a new strategy for a low-cost, sensitive, simultaneous multiplex immunoassay and point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:22763468

  13. Continuous section extraction and over-underbreak detection of tunnel based on 3D laser technology and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weixing; Wang, Zhiwei; Han, Ya; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Over Underbreak detection of road and solve the problemof the roadway data collection difficulties, this paper presents a new method of continuous section extraction and Over Underbreak detection of road based on 3D laser scanning technology and image processing, the method is divided into the following three steps: based on Canny edge detection, local axis fitting, continuous extraction section and Over Underbreak detection of section. First, after Canny edge detection, take the least-squares curve fitting method to achieve partial fitting in axis. Then adjust the attitude of local roadway that makes the axis of the roadway be consistent with the direction of the extraction reference, and extract section along the reference direction. Finally, we compare the actual cross-sectional view and the cross-sectional design to complete Overbreak detected. Experimental results show that the proposed method have a great advantage in computing costs and ensure cross-section orthogonal intercept terms compared with traditional detection methods.

  14. Integrating Technology and Engineering with a Marine Design Contest and 3-D Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammons, John

    2011-01-01

    The Northrop Grumman (now Huntington Ingalls Industries, Incorporated) Apprentice School, in cooperation with several area businesses, sponsors an annual boat-design competition for high school students to increase awareness of the naval architecture profession and the shipbuilding industry. The competition engages students' math, science,…

  15. The lithosphere-asthenosphere system beneath Ireland from integrated geophysical-petrological modeling II: 3D thermal and compositional structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullea, J.; Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.; Afonso, J. C.

    2014-02-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depth represents a fundamental parameter in any quantitative lithospheric model, controlling to a large extent the temperature distribution within the crust and the uppermost mantle. The tectonic history of Ireland includes early Paleozoic closure of the Iapetus Ocean across the Iapetus Suture Zone (ISZ), and in northeastern Ireland late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic crustal extension, during which thick Permo-Triassic sedimentary successions were deposited, followed by early Cenozoic extrusion of large scale flood basalts. Although the crustal structure in Ireland and neighboring offshore areas is fairly well constrained, with the notable exception of the crust beneath Northern Ireland, the Irish uppermost mantle remains to date relatively unknown. In particular, the nature and extent of a hypothetical interaction between a putative proto Icelandic mantle plume and the Irish and Scottish lithosphere during the Tertiary opening of the North Atlantic has long been discussed in the literature with diverging conclusions. In this work, the present-day thermal and compositional structure of the lithosphere in Ireland is modeled based on a geophysical-petrological approach (LitMod3D) that combines comprehensively a large variety of data (namely elevation, surface heat flow, potential fields, xenoliths and seismic tomography models), reducing the inherent uncertainties and trade-offs associated with classical modeling of those individual data sets. The preferred 3D lithospheric models show moderate lateral density variations in Ireland characterized by a slightly thickened lithosphere along the SW-NE trending ISZ, and a progressive lithospheric thinning from southern Ireland towards the north. The mantle composition in the southern half of Ireland (East Avalonia) is relatively and uniformly fertile (i.e., typical Phanerozoic mantle), whereas the lithospheric composition in the northern half of Ireland (Laurentia) seems to vary

  16. Online process monitoring at quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welding using a 3D-scanner with integrated pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmailzl, A.; Steger, S.; Dostalek, M.; Hierl, S.

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welding is a well-known joining technique for thermoplastics and mainly used in the automotive as well as in the medical industry. For process control usually the so called set-path monitoring is used, where the weld is specified as "good" if the irradiation time is inside a defined confidence interval. However, the detection of small-sized gaps or thermal damaged zones is not possible with this technique. The analyzation of the weld seam temperature during welding offers the possibility to overcome this problem. In this approach a 3D-scanner is used instead of a scanner with flat-field optic. By using a pyrometer in combination with a 3D-scanner no color-corrected optic is needed in order to provide that laser- and detection-spot are concentric. Experimental studies on polyethylene T-joints have shown that the quality of the signal is adequate, despite the use of an optical setup with a long working distance and a small optical aperture. The effects on temperature are studied for defects like a gap in the joining zone. Therefore a notch was milled into the absorbent polymer. In case of producing housings for electronic parts the effect of an electrical wire between the joining partners is also investigated. Both defects can be identified by a local temperature deviation even at a feed rate of four meters per second. Furthermore a strategy for signal-processing is demonstrated. By this, remaining defects can be identified. Consequently an online detection of local defects is possible, which makes a dynamic process control feasible.

  17. Development and application of a ray-tracing code integrating with 3D equilibrium mapping in LHD ECH experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, T., Ii; Kubo, S.; Takahashi, H.; Makino, R.; Seki, R.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Ida, K.; Suzuki, C.; Emoto, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Moon, C.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Ejiri, A.; Mutoh, T.

    2015-11-01

    The central electron temperature has successfully reached up to 7.5 keV in large helical device (LHD) plasmas with a central high-ion temperature of 5 keV and a central electron density of 1.3× {{10}19} m-3. This result was obtained by heating with a newly-installed 154 GHz gyrotron and also the optimisation of injection geometry in electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The optimisation was carried out by using the ray-tracing code ‘LHDGauss’, which was upgraded to include the rapid post-processing three-dimensional (3D) equilibrium mapping obtained from experiments. For ray-tracing calculations, LHDGauss can automatically read the relevant data registered in the LHD database after a discharge, such as ECH injection settings (e.g. Gaussian beam parameters, target positions, polarisation and ECH power) and Thomson scattering diagnostic data along with the 3D equilibrium mapping data. The equilibrium map of the electron density and temperature profiles are then extrapolated into the region outside the last closed flux surface. Mode purity, or the ratio between the ordinary mode and the extraordinary mode, is obtained by calculating the 1D full-wave equation along the direction of the rays from the antenna to the absorption target point. Using the virtual magnetic flux surfaces, the effects of the modelled density profiles and the magnetic shear at the peripheral region with a given polarisation are taken into account. Power deposition profiles calculated for each Thomson scattering measurement timing are registered in the LHD database. The adjustment of the injection settings for the desired deposition profile from the feedback provided on a shot-by-shot basis resulted in an effective experimental procedure.

  18. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. PMID:26724184

  19. Differential and integrated cross sections for excitation to the 3s, 3p, and 3d states of atomic hydrogen by electron impact below the n=4 threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris T.; Williams, J. F.; Mikosza, A. G.

    2006-08-15

    Integrated cross sections for the electron-impact excitation of ground-state hydrogen to the 3s, 3p, and 3d final states have been calculated using propagating exterior complex scaling and convergent close-coupling methods at energies between the n=3 and 4 excitation thresholds. The calculations are in excellent agreement and demonstrate that exterior complex scaling methods can accurately reproduce the resonance structure and magnitude of the excitation cross sections below the ionization threshold. Measurements of the separate 3s, 3p, and 3d differential cross sections were made at 12.24 eV, and are consistent with both calculations within a total experimental uncertainty of about 35%.

  20. 3D IC for Future HEP Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, J.; Lipton, R.; Heintz, U.; Johnson, M.; Narain, M.; Badman, R.; Spiegel, L.; Triphati, M.; Deptuch, G.; Kenney, C.; Parker, S.; Ye, Z.; Siddons, D.

    2014-11-07

    Three dimensional integrated circuit technologies offer the possibility of fabricating large area arrays of sensors integrated with complex electronics with minimal dead area, which makes them ideally suited for applications at the LHC upgraded detectors and other future detectors. Here we describe ongoing R&D efforts to demonstrate functionality of components of such detectors. This also includes the study of integrated 3D electronics with active edge sensors to produce "active tiles" which can be tested and assembled into arrays of arbitrary size with high yield.

  1. 3D IC for future HEP detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thom, J.; Lipton, R.; Heintz, U.; Johnson, M.; Narain, M.; Badman, R.; Spiegel, L.; Triphati, M.; Deptuch, G.; Kenney, C.; Parker, S.; Ye, Z.; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-01

    Three dimensional integrated circuit technologies offer the possibility of fabricating large area arrays of sensors integrated with complex electronics with minimal dead area, which makes them ideally suited for applications at the LHC upgraded detectors and other future detectors. We describe ongoing R&D efforts to demonstrate functionality of components of such detectors. This includes the study of integrated 3D electronics with active edge sensors to produce "active tiles" which can be tested and assembled into arrays of arbitrary size with high yield.

  2. Multi-sourced, 3D geometric characterization of volcanogenic karst features: Integrating lidar, sonar, and geophysical datasets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, J. M.; Gary, M. O.; Reyes, R.; Halihan, T.; Fairfield, N.; Stone, W. C.

    2009-12-01

    Karstic aquifers can form very complex hydrogeological systems and 3-D mapping has been difficult, but Lidar, phased array sonar, and improved earth resistivity techniques show promise in this and in linking metadata to models. Zacatón, perhaps the Earth’s deepest cenote, has a sub-aquatic void space exceeding 7.5 x 106 cubic m3. It is the focus of this study which has created detailed 3D maps of the system. These maps include data from above and beneath the the water table and within the rock matrix to document the extent of the immense karst features and to interpret the geologic processes that formed them. Phase 1 used high resolution (20 mm) Lidar scanning of surficial features of four large cenotes. Scan locations, selected to achieve full feature coverage once registered, were established atop surface benchmarks with UTM coordinates established using GPS and Total Stations. The combined datasets form a geo-registered mesh of surface features down to water level in the cenotes. Phase 2 conducted subsurface imaging using Earth Resistivity Imaging (ERI) geophysics. ERI identified void spaces isolated from open flow conduits. A unique travertine morphology exists in which some cenotes are dry or contain shallow lakes with flat travertine floors; some water-filled cenotes have flat floors without the cone of collapse material; and some have collapse cones. We hypothesize that the floors may have large water-filled voids beneath them. Three separate flat travertine caps were imaged: 1) La Pilita, which is partially open, exposing cap structure over a deep water-filled shaft; 2) Poza Seca, which is dry and vegetated; and 3) Tule, which contains a shallow (<1 m) lake. A fourth line was run adjacent to cenote Verde. La Pilita ERI, verified by SCUBA, documented the existence of large water-filled void zones ERI at Poza Seca showed a thin cap overlying a conductive zone extending to at least 25 m depth beneath the cap with no lower boundary of this zone evident

  3. Physics-based Simulation of Human Posture Using 3D Whole Body Scanning Technology for Astronaut Space Suit Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyu-Jung

    2005-01-01

    Over the past few years high precision three-dimensional (3D) full body laser scanners have been developed to be used as a powerful anthropometry tool for quantification of the morphology of the human body. The full body scanner can quickly extract body characteristics in non-contact fashion. It is required for the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) to have capabilities for kinematics simulation of a digital human at various postures whereas the laser scanner only allows capturing a single static posture at each time. During this summer fellowship period a theoretical study has been conducted to estimate an arbitrary posture with a series of example postures through finite element (FE) approximation and found that four-point isoparametric FE approximation would result in reasonable maximum position errors less than 5%. Subsequent pilot scan experiments demonstrated that a bead marker with a nominal size of 6 mm could be used as a marker for digitizing 3-D coordinates of anatomical landmarks for further kinematic analysis. Two sessions of human subject testing were conducted for reconstruction of an arbitrary postures from a set of example postures for each joint motion for the forearm/hand complex and the whole upper extremity.

  4. Feasibility of contactless 3D optical measurement for the analysis of bone and soft tissue lesions: new technologies and perspectives in forensic sciences.

    PubMed

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Cattaneo, Cristina; Trebeschi, Marco; Gibelli, Daniele; Porta, Davide; Picozzi, Massimo

    2009-05-01

    In forensic pathology and anthropology, a correct analysis of lesions on soft tissues and bones is of the utmost importance, in order to verify the cause and manner of death. Photographs, videos, and photogrammetry may be an optimal manner of immortalizing a lesion, both on cadavers and skeletal remains; however, none of these can supply a detailed three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the lesion. Up to now, only the use of casts has given us the possibility of studying deep lesions such as saw marks with an accurate and complete 3D reconstruction of bone structure. The present study aims at verifying the applicability of 3D optical contactless measurement for the accurate recording of soft tissue and bone lesions, in order to develop a unique and precise method of registering and analyzing lesions, both in forensic pathology and anthropology. Three cases were analyzed: the first, a car accident with blunt force skin injuries; the second, a murder with blunt force injury to the head applied with a metal rod; the third, a series of sharp force knife and saw lesions on bone. Results confirm that 3D optical digitizing technology is a crucial tool in the immortalization of wound morphology in the medico-legal context even on "difficult" substrates such as cut marks and saw marks on bone. PMID:19368623

  5. Designing 3D Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Merging Magnetic and Fluorescent Features: When Cell Sheet Technology Meets Image-Guided Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rahmi, Gabriel; Pidial, Laetitia; Silva, Amanda K. A.; Blondiaux, Eléonore; Meresse, Bertrand; Gazeau, Florence; Autret, Gwennhael; Balvay, Daniel; Cuenod, Charles André; Perretta, Silvana; Tavitian, Bertrand; Wilhelm, Claire; Cellier, Christophe; Clément, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell sheet technology opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration therapy by providing readily implantable, scaffold-free 3D tissue constructs. Many studies have focused on the therapeutic effects of cell sheet implantation while relatively little attention has concerned the fate of the implanted cells in vivo. The aim of the present study was to track longitudinally the cells implanted in the cell sheets in vivo in target tissues. To this end we (i) endowed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) with imaging properties by double labeling with fluorescent and magnetic tracers, (ii) applied BMMSC cell sheets to a digestive fistula model in mice, (iii) tracked the BMMSC fate in vivo by MRI and probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), and (iv) quantified healing of the fistula. We show that image-guided longitudinal follow-up can document both the fate of the cell sheet-derived BMMSCs and their healing capacity. Moreover, our theranostic approach informs on the mechanism of action, either directly by integration of cell sheet-derived BMMSCs into the host tissue or indirectly through the release of signaling molecules in the host tissue. Multimodal imaging and clinical evaluation converged to attest that cell sheet grafting resulted in minimal clinical inflammation, improved fistula healing, reduced tissue fibrosis and enhanced microvasculature density. At the molecular level, cell sheet transplantation induced an increase in the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-ß2 and IL-10) and host intestinal growth factors involved in tissue repair (EGF and VEGF). Multimodal imaging is useful for tracking cell sheets and for noninvasive follow-up of their regenerative properties. PMID:27022420

  6. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  7. Real-Depth imaging: a new 3D imaging technology with inexpensive direct-view (no glasses) video and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgoff, Eugene

    1997-05-01

    Floating Images, Inc. has developed the software and hardware for a new, patent pending, 'floating 3-D, off-the-screen- experience' display technology. This technology has the potential to become the next standard for home and arcade video games, computers, corporate presentations, Internet/Intranet viewing, and television. Current '3-D graphics' technologies are actually flat on screen. Floating ImagesTM technology actually produce images at different depths from any display, such as CRT and LCD, for television, computer, projection, and other formats. In addition, unlike stereoscopic 3-D imaging, no glasses, headgear, or other viewing aids are used. And, unlike current autostereoscopic imaging technologies, there is virtually no restriction on where viewers can sit to view the images, with no 'bad' or 'dead' zones, flipping, or pseudoscopy. In addition to providing traditional depth cues such as perspective and background image occlusion, the new technology also provides both horizontal and vertical binocular parallax (the ability to look around foreground objects to see previously hidden background objects, with each eye seeing a different view at all times) and accommodation (the need to re-focus one's eyes when shifting attention from a near object to a distant object) which coincides with convergence (the need to re-aim one's eyes when shifting attention from a near object to a distant object). Since accommodation coincides with convergence, viewing these images doesn't produce headaches, fatigue, or eye-strain, regardless of how long they are viewed (unlike stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays). The imagery (video or computer generated) must either be formatted for the Floating ImagesTM platform when written or existing software can be re-formatted without much difficulty.

  8. Integration of comprehensive 3D microCT and signaling analysis reveals differential regulatory mechanisms of craniofacial bone development.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thach-Vu; Iwata, Junichi; Ho, Hoang Anh; Grimes, Weston C; Park, Shery; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2015-04-15

    Growth factor signaling regulates tissue-tissue interactions to control organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Specifically, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling plays a crucial role in the development of cranial neural crest (CNC) cell-derived bone, and loss of Tgfbr2 in CNC cells results in craniofacial skeletal malformations. Our recent studies indicate that non-canonical TGFβ signaling is activated whereas canonical TGFβ signaling is compromised in the absence of Tgfbr2 (in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice). A haploinsufficiency of Tgfbr1 (aka Alk5) (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+)) largely rescues craniofacial deformities in Tgfbr2 mutant mice by reducing ectopic non-canonical TGFβ signaling. However, the relative involvement of canonical and non-canonical TGFβ signaling in regulating specific craniofacial bone formation remains unclear. We compared the size and volume of CNC-derived craniofacial bones (frontal bone, premaxilla, maxilla, palatine bone, and mandible) from E18.5 control, Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre, and Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+)mice. By analyzing three dimensional (3D) micro-computed tomography (microCT) images, we found that different craniofacial bones were restored to different degrees in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+) mice. Our study provides comprehensive information on anatomical landmarks and the size and volume of each craniofacial bone, as well as insights into the extent that canonical and non-canonical TGFβ signaling cascades contribute to the formation of each CNC-derived bone. Our data will serve as an important resource for developmental biologists who are interested in craniofacial morphogenesis. PMID:25722190

  9. Sleep as spatiotemporal integration of biological processes that evolved to periodically reinforce neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis: The 2m3d paradigm of sleep.

    PubMed

    Mader, Edward Claro; Mader, Annie Cielo Llave

    2016-08-15

    Sleep continues to perplex scientists and researchers. Despite decades of sleep research, we still lack a clear understanding of the biological functions and evolution of sleep. In this review, we will examine sleep from a functional and phylogenetic perspective and describe some important conceptual gaps in understanding sleep. Classical theories of the biology and evolution of sleep emphasize sensory activation, energy balance, and metabolic homeostasis. Advances in electrophysiology, functional neuroimaging, and neuroplasticity allow us to view sleep within the framework of neural dynamics. With this paradigm shift, we have come to realize the importance of neurodynamic homeostasis in shaping the biology of sleep. Evidently, animals sleep to achieve neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis. We are not aware of any framework for understanding sleep where neurodynamic, metabolic, homeostatic, chronophasic, and afferent variables are all taken into account. This motivated us to propose the two-mode three-drive (2m3d) paradigm of sleep. In the 2m3d paradigm, local neurodynamic/metabolic (N/M) processes switch between two modes-m0 and m1-in response to three drives-afferent, chronophasic, and homeostatic. The spatiotemporal integration of local m0/m1 operations gives rise to the global states of sleep and wakefulness. As a framework of evolution, the 2m3d paradigm allows us to view sleep as a robust adaptive strategy that evolved so animals can periodically reinforce neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis while remaining sensitive to their internal and external environment. PMID:27423566

  10. Integrated modelling of toroidal rotation with the 3D non-local drift-kinetic code and boundary models for JT-60U analyses and predictive simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Satake, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashi, N.; Kamiya, K.; Matsuyama, A.; Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Nakata, M.; Ide, S.; Urano, H.

    2015-07-01

    The integrated simulation framework for toroidal momentum transport is developed, which self-consistently calculates the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), the radial electric field {{E}r} and the resultant toroidal rotation {{V}φ} together with the scrape-off-layer (SOL) physics-based boundary model. The coupling of three codes, the 1.5D transport code TOPICS, the three-dimensional (3D) equilibrium code VMEC and the 3D δ f drift-kinetic equation solver FORTEC-3D, makes it possible to calculate the NTV due to the non-axisymmetric perturbed magnetic field caused by toroidal field coils. Analyses reveal that the NTV significantly influences {{V}φ} in JT-60U and {{E}r} holds the key to determine the NTV profile. The sensitivity of the {{V}φ} profile to the boundary rotation necessitates a boundary condition modelling for toroidal momentum. Owing to the high-resolution measurement system in JT-60U, the {{E}r} gradient is found to be virtually zero at the separatrix regardless of toroidal rotation velocities. Focusing on {{E}r} , the boundary model of toroidal momentum is developed in conjunction with the SOL/divertor plasma code D5PM. This modelling realizes self-consistent predictive simulations for operation scenario development in ITER.

  11. A new 3D parallel high resolution electromagnetic nonlinear inversion based on new global magnetic integral and local differential decomposition (GILD)

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new 3D electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm is presented based on global integral and local differential equations decomposition (GILD). The GILD parallel nonlinear inversion algorithm consists of five parts: (1) the domain is decomposed into subdomain SI and subdomain SII; (2) a new global magnetic integral equation in SI and the local magnetic differential equations IN SII will be used together to obtain the magnetic field in the modeling step; (3) the new global magnetic integral Jacobian equation in SI and the local magnetic differential Jacobian equations in SII will be used together to update the electric conductivity and permittivity from the magnetic field data in the inversion step; (4) the subdomain SII can naturally and uniformly be decomposed into 2{sup n} smaller sub-cubic-domains; the sparse matrix in each sub-cubic-domain can be eliminated separately, in parallel; (5) a new parallel multiple hierarchy substructure algorithm will be used to solve the smaller full matrices in SI, in parallel. The applications of the new 3D parallel GILD EM modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm and software are: (1) to create high resolution controlled-source electric conductivity and permittivity imaging for interpreting electromagnetic field data acquired from cross hole, surface to borehole, surface to surface, single hole, and multiple holes; (2) to create the magnetotelluric high resolution imaging from the surface impedance and field data. The new GILD parallel nonlinear inversion will be a 3D/2.5D powerful imaging tool for the oil geophysical exploration and environmental remediation and monitoring.

  12. Technology Integration in the Resource Specialist Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courduff, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Technology tools are not being ubiquitously integrated into instructional practices of special education resource specialist program (RSP) teachers. Although research exists on technology integration in special education, technology integration in RSP environments is overlooked in the literature. The purpose of this mixed methods case study was to…

  13. Switchable pH actuators and 3D integrated salt bridges as new strategies for reconfigurable microfluidic free-flow electrophoretic separation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Jing; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2014-03-01

    We present novel strategies for reconfigurable, high-throughput microfluidic free-flow electrophoretic separation using electrically switchable pH actuators and 3D integrated salt bridges to allow rapid formation of stable pH gradients and efficient electrophoresis. The pH actuator is achieved by microfluidic integration of bipolar membranes which change electrolyte pH by injecting excess H(+) or OH(-) ions produced by a field-enhanced water dissociation phenomenon at the membrane junction upon voltage bias. The technique does not require conventional multiple buffer inflows and leaves no gas production as experienced in electrolysis, thus providing stable pH gradients for isoelectric focusing (IEF) separation. With the pH actuator inactivated, the platform can perform zone electrophoretic (ZE) separation in a medium of constant pH. We also describe the use of 3D integrated ion conductive polymers that serve as salt bridges for improving the voltage efficiency of electrophoresis and to allow high throughput. The proof of concept was successfully demonstrated for free-flow IEF and ZE separation of protein mixtures showing the potential and the simplicity of the platform for high-throughput and high-precision sample separation. PMID:24430103

  14. FIB/SEM technology and high-throughput 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines and synapses in GFP-labeled adult-generated neurons.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Carles; Martínez, Albert; Masachs, Nuria; Teixeira, Cátia M; Fernaud, Isabel; Ulloa, Fausto; Pérez-Martínez, Esther; Lois, Carlos; Comella, Joan X; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The fine analysis of synaptic contacts is usually performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its combination with neuronal labeling techniques. However, the complex 3D architecture of neuronal samples calls for their reconstruction from serial sections. Here we show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) allows efficient, complete, and automatic 3D reconstruction of identified dendrites, including their spines and synapses, from GFP/DAB-labeled neurons, with a resolution comparable to that of TEM. We applied this technology to analyze the synaptogenesis of labeled adult-generated granule cells (GCs) in mice. 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines in GCs aged 3-4 and 8-9 weeks revealed two different stages of dendritic spine development and unexpected features of synapse formation, including vacant and branched dendritic spines and presynaptic terminals establishing synapses with up to 10 dendritic spines. Given the reliability, efficiency, and high resolution of FIB/SEM technology and the wide use of DAB in conventional EM, we consider FIB/SEM fundamental for the detailed characterization of identified synaptic contacts in neurons in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26052271

  15. FIB/SEM technology and high-throughput 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines and synapses in GFP-labeled adult-generated neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Martínez, Albert; Masachs, Nuria; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Ulloa, Fausto; Pérez-Martínez, Esther; Lois, Carlos; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The fine analysis of synaptic contacts is usually performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its combination with neuronal labeling techniques. However, the complex 3D architecture of neuronal samples calls for their reconstruction from serial sections. Here we show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) allows efficient, complete, and automatic 3D reconstruction of identified dendrites, including their spines and synapses, from GFP/DAB-labeled neurons, with a resolution comparable to that of TEM. We applied this technology to analyze the synaptogenesis of labeled adult-generated granule cells (GCs) in mice. 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines in GCs aged 3–4 and 8–9 weeks revealed two different stages of dendritic spine development and unexpected features of synapse formation, including vacant and branched dendritic spines and presynaptic terminals establishing synapses with up to 10 dendritic spines. Given the reliability, efficiency, and high resolution of FIB/SEM technology and the wide use of DAB in conventional EM, we consider FIB/SEM fundamental for the detailed characterization of identified synaptic contacts in neurons in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26052271

  16. Successful integration of 3-D seismic and multidisciplinary approaches in exploring the Zechstein 2 carbonates in northeast Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, N. ); Van Wees, B.; Reijers, T. ); Henk Rebel )

    1993-09-01

    Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij has been actively involved in the exploration of the Zechstein 2 carbonate play for over 40 yr. This exploration effort, concentrated mainly in the Drenthe and Schoonebeek area of northeast Netherlands, has resulted in the discovery of 20 gas fields with cumulative reserves of more than 40 x 10[sup 9] m[sup 3] of gas. The wealth of subsurface data collected in the exploration and development of these fields has lead to the establishment of detailed depositional and diagenetic models of the Zechstein 2 carbonates. More recently, extensive three-dimensional seismic coverage, the integration of lateral prediction techniques, and detailed fracture studies in cores have provided powerful predicting tools in the comprehension and exploitation of the play. Successful integration of the various disciplines now allows exploration of subtle low-relief structures in the mature Zechstein hydrocarbon province and helps target directional exploration and development wells.

  17. Preconditioning techniques for constrained vector potential integral equations, with application to 3-D magnetoquasistatic analysis of electronic packages

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, M.; Phillips, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper techniques are presented for preconditioning equations generated by discretizing constrained vector integral equations associated with magnetoquasistatic analysis. Standard preconditioning approaches often fail on these problems. The authors present a specialized preconditioning technique and prove convergence bounds independent of the constraint equations and electromagnetic excitation frequency. Computational results from analyzing several electronic packaging examples are given to demonstrate that the new preconditioning approach can sometimes reduce the number of GMRES iterations by more than an order of magnitude.

  18. 3D sensors and micro-fabricated detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Vià, Cinzia

    2014-11-01

    Micro-systems based on the Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology have been used in miniaturized low power and low mass smart structures in medicine, biology and space applications. Recently similar features found their way inside high energy physics with applications in vertex detectors for high-luminosity LHC Upgrades, with 3D sensors, 3D integration and efficient power management using silicon micro-channel cooling. This paper reports on the state of this development.

  19. Data Integration Acquired from Micro-Uav and Terrestrial Laser Scanner for the 3d Mapping of Jesuit Ruins of São Miguel das Missões

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, M. L. L.; da Rocha, R. S.; Ferraz, R. S.; Cruz, V. C.; Morador, L. Q.; Yamawaki, M. K.; Rodrigues, E. L. S.; Cole, J. O.; Mezzomo, W.

    2016-06-01

    The Jesuit Missions the Guaranis were one of the great examples of cultural, social, and scientific of the eighteenth century, which had its decline from successive wars that followed the exchange of territories domain occupied by Portugal and Spain with the Madrid Treaty of January 13, 1750. One of the great examples of this development is materialized in the ruins of 30 churches and villages that remain in a territory that now comprises part of Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay. These Churches, São Miguel das Missões is among the Brazilian ruins, the best preserved. The ruins of São Miguel das Missões were declared a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage in 1983 and the Institute of National Historical Heritage (IPHAN) is the Brazilian Federal agency that manages and maintains this heritage. In order to produce a geographic database to assist the IPHAN in the management of the Ruins of São Miguel das Missões it was proposed a three-dimensional mapping of these ruins never performed in this location before. The proposal is integrated data acquired from multiple sensors: two micro-UAV, an Asctec Falcon 8 (rotary wing) and a Sensefly e-Bee (fixed wing); photos from terrestrial cameras; two terrestrial LIDAR sensors, one Faro Focus 3D S-120 and Optec 3D-HD ILRIS. With this abundance of sensors has been possible to perform comparisons and integration of the acquired data, and produce a 3D reconstruction of the church with high completeness and accuracy (better than 25 mm), as can be seen in the presentation of this work.

  20. Data Integration Acquired from Micro-Uav and Terrestrial Laser Scanner for the 3d Mapping of Jesuit Ruins of SÃO Miguel das MISSÕES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, M. L. L.; da Rocha, R. S.; Ferraz, R. S.; Cruz, V. C.; Morador, L. Q.; Yamawaki, M. K.; Rodrigues, E. L. S.; Cole, J. O.; Mezzomo, W.

    2016-06-01

    The Jesuit Missions the Guaranis were one of the great examples of cultural, social, and scientific of the eighteenth century, which had its decline from successive wars that followed the exchange of territories domain occupied by Portugal and Spain with the Madrid Treaty of January 13, 1750. One of the great examples of this development is materialized in the ruins of 30 churches and villages that remain in a territory that now comprises part of Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay. These Churches, São Miguel das Missões is among the Brazilian ruins, the best preserved. The ruins of São Miguel das Missões were declared a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage in 1983 and the Institute of National Historical Heritage (IPHAN) is the Brazilian Federal agency that manages and maintains this heritage. In order to produce a geographic database to assist the IPHAN in the management of the Ruins of São Miguel das Missões it was proposed a three-dimensional mapping of these ruins never performed in this location before. The proposal is integrated data acquired from multiple sensors: two micro-UAV, an Asctec Falcon 8 (rotary wing) and a Sensefly e-Bee (fixed wing); photos from terrestrial cameras; two terrestrial LIDAR sensors, one Faro Focus 3D S-120 and Optec 3D-HD ILRIS. With this abundance of sensors has been possible to perform comparisons and integration of the acquired data, and produce a 3D reconstruction of the church with high completeness and accuracy (better than 25 mm), as can be seen in the presentation of this work.

  1. Monolithically Integrated InGaAs Nanowires on 3D Structured Silicon-on-Insulator as a New Platform for Full Optical Links.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunseok; Farrell, Alan C; Senanayake, Pradeep; Lee, Wook-Jae; Huffaker, Diana L

    2016-03-01

    Monolithically integrated III-V semiconductors on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform can be used as a building block for energy-efficient on-chip optical links. Epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductors on silicon, however, has been challenged by the large mismatches in lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients between epitaxial layers and silicon substrates. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the monolithic integration of InGaAs nanowires on the SOI platform and its feasibility for photonics and optoelectronic applications. InGaAs nanowires are grown not only on a planar SOI layer but also on a 3D structured SOI layer by catalyst-free metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The precise positioning of nanowires on 3D structures, including waveguides and gratings, reveals the versatility and practicality of the proposed platform. Photoluminescence measurements exhibit that the composition of ternary InGaAs nanowires grown on the SOI layer has wide tunability covering all telecommunication wavelengths from 1.2 to 1.8 μm. We also show that the emission from an optically pumped single nanowire is effectively coupled and transmitted through an SOI waveguide, explicitly showing that this work lays the foundation for a new platform toward energy-efficient optical links. PMID:26901448

  2. Deep reflection structure imaged by the 2008 3D seismic reflection Survey at the RIDGE- 2000 East Pacific Rise Integrated Studies Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedimović, M. R.; Carbotte, S. M.; Mutter, J. C.; Canales, P. J.; Carton, H.; Aghaei, O.; Marjanović, M.; Newman, K. R.; Hu, M.; Stowe, L.

    2008-12-01

    The first multi-source and multi-streamer 3D seismic reflection experiment carried out using academic resources was done aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth in Summer 2008 during cruise MGL0812. The targeted area was the RIDGE-2000 Integrated Studies Site at the East Pacific Rise. Our primary 3D survey grid extends from about 9° 57'N to 9° 42'N, with a smaller grid just to the south covering approximately from 9° 40'N to 9° 37.5'N. Additionally, about 1 and 0.5 km wide across-ridge-axis swaths of data were collected at 9° 36'N and 9°30'N respectively, as well as an along-ridge-axis swath about 1 km wide and extending from 10° 05'N to 9° 40'N. We here focus on a preliminary analysis of the reflection structure imaged within the lower crust and uppermost mantle. Moho reflection arrivals are imaged through much of the investigated area. The character of Moho reflection events varies from simple, single reflection wavelet to more complex arrivals indicating spatial changes in structure within the Moho transition zone. Particularly strong Moho reflections are observed in the southern half of the main 3D grid. In places, Moho reflection event appears to extend across the ridge axis potentially suggesting "zero-age" Moho development. Weak Moho arrivals are found at the north end of the main 3D box and within the smaller box to the south. Most notable place lacking Moho reflections is the Lamont seamount area where Moho is not observed on either side of the ridge axis, although the area lacking Moho reflections is wider on the western ridge flank. Further south, along the across-ridge-axis swaths, Moho reflections again become more pronounced. A suit of what mostly appear to be reflection events is recognized between the AMC and Moho. Many of them do not appear to be multiples, and their origin is not well understood. Possible origins for these events include: lower boundary of the AMC, S-converted waves, and lower crustal melt lenses. Along sections of the two 3D

  3. Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches in 3D Printing Technologies for Drug Delivery Challenges.

    PubMed

    Katakam, Prakash; Dey, Baishakhi; Assaleh, Fathi H; Hwisa, Nagiat Tayeb; Adiki, Shanta Kumari; Chandu, Babu Rao; Mitra, Analava

    2015-01-01

    3-Dimensional printing (3DP) constitutes a raft of technologies, based on different physical mechanisms, that generate a 3-dimensional physical object from a digital model. Because of its rapid fabrication and precise geometry, 3DP has gained a prominent focus in biomedical and nanobiomaterials research. Despite advancements in targeted, controlled, and pulsatile drug delivery, the achievement of site-specific and disease-responsive drug release and stringent control over in vivo biodistribution, are still some of the important, challenging areas for pharmaceutical research and development and existing drug delivery techniques. Microelectronic industries are capable of generating nano-/microdrug delivery devices at high throughputs with a highly precise control over design. Successful miniaturizations of micro-pumps with multireservoir architectures for delivery of pharmaceuticals developed by micro-electromechanical systems technology were more acceptable than implantable devices. Inkjet printing technologies, which dispense a precise amount of polymer ink solutions, find applications in controlled drug delivery. Bioelectronic products have revolutionized drug delivery technologies. Designing nanoparticles by nanoimprint lithography showed a controlled drug release pattern, biodistribution, and in vivo transport. This review highlights the "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches of the most promising 3DP technologies and their broader applications in biomedical and therapeutic drug delivery, with critical assessment of its merits, demerits, and intellectual property rights challenges. PMID:25746205

  4. Three-dimensional (3D) coseismic deformation map produced by the 2014 South Napa Earthquake estimated and modeled by SAR and GPS data integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcari, Marco; Albano, Matteo; Fernández, José; Palano, Mimmo; Samsonov, Sergey; Stramondo, Salvatore; Zerbini, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a 3D map of coseismic displacements due to the 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake, California, obtained by integrating displacement information data from SAR Interferometry (InSAR), Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI), Pixel Offset Tracking (POT) and GPS data acquired by both permanent stations and campaigns sites. This seismic event produced significant surface deformation along the 3D components causing several damages to vineyards, roads and houses. The remote sensing results, i.e. InSAR, MAI and POT, were obtained from the pair of SAR images provided by the Sentinel-1 satellite, launched on April 3rd, 2014. They were acquired on August 7th and 31st along descending orbits with an incidence angle of about 23°. The GPS dataset includes measurements from 32 stations belonging to the Bay Area Regional Deformation Network (BARDN), 301 continuous stations available from the UNAVCO and the CDDIS archives, and 13 additional campaign sites from Barnhart et al, 2014 [1]. These data constrain the horizontal and vertical displacement components proving to be helpful for the adopted integration method. We exploit the Bayes theory to search for the 3D coseismic displacement components. In particular, for each point, we construct an energy function and solve the problem to find a global minimum. Experimental results are consistent with a strike-slip fault mechanism with an approximately NW-SE fault plane. Indeed, the 3D displacement map shows a strong North-South (NS) component, peaking at about 15 cm, a few kilometers far from the epicenter. The East-West (EW) displacement component reaches its maximum (~10 cm) south of the city of Napa, whereas the vertical one (UP) is smaller, although a subsidence in the order of 8 cm on the east side of the fault can be observed. A source modelling was performed by inverting the estimated displacement components. The best fitting model is given by a ~N330° E-oriented and ~70° dipping fault with a prevailing

  5. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: 3D bioprinting, surface modification, nano/micro-technology and clinical aspects in tissue engineering of cartilage and bone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cen; Bang, Sumi; Cho, Younghak; Lee, Sahnghoon; Lee, Inseop; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses about biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering of bone and cartilage, after previous scientific commentary of the invitation-based, Korea-China joint symposium on biomimetic medical materials, which was held in Seoul, Korea, from October 22 to 26, 2015. The contents of this review were evolved from the presentations of that symposium. Four topics of biomimetic medical materials were discussed from different research groups here: 1) 3D bioprinting medical materials, 2) nano/micro-technology, 3) surface modification of biomaterials for their interactions with cells and 4) clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage focusing on cells, scaffolds and cytokines. PMID:27148455

  6. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  7. An efficient formulation of the coupled finite element-integral equation technique for solving large 3D scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1993-01-01

    It is often desirable to calculate the electromagnetic fields inside and about a complicated system of scattering bodies, as well as in their far-field region. The finite element method (FE) is well suited to solving the interior problem, but the domain has to be limited to a manageable size. At the truncation of the FE mesh one can either impose approximate (absorbing) boundary conditions or set up an integral equation (IE) for the fields scattered from the bodies. The latter approach is preferable since it results in higher accuracy. Hence, the two techniques can be successfully combined by introducing a surface that encloses the scatterers, applying a FE model to the inner volume and setting up an IE for the tangential fields components on the surface. Here the continuity of the tangential fields is used bo obtain a consistent solution. A few coupled FE-IE methods have recently appeared in the literature. The approach presented here has the advantage of using edge-based finite elements, a type of finite elements with degrees of freedom associated with edges of the mesh. Because of their properties, they are better suited than the conventional node based elements to represent electromagnetic fields, particularly when inhomogeneous regions are modeled, since the node based elements impose an unnatural continuity of all field components across boundaries of mesh elements. Additionally, our approach is well suited to handle large size problems and lends itself to code parallelization. We will discuss the salient features that make our approach very efficient from the standpoint of numerical computation, and the fields and RCS of a few objects are illustrated as examples.

  8. Research Summary of an Additive Manufacturing Technology for the Fabrication of 3D Composites with Tailored Internal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Larry R.; Riddick, Jaret C.

    2014-01-01

    A novel additive manufacturing technology is used to create micro-composites, which can be tailored for specific end-use applications. The Field-Aided Laminar Composite (FALCom) process uses specifically focused electric fields to align nano- to micro-sized particles into chain-like structures, which are referred to as pseudo-fibers. These pseudo-fibers are then immediately frozen into place by incident ultraviolet radiation on the photopolymer matrix. The pseudo-fibers are arranged by design, and they are used to create three-dimensional composite structures. Multiple filler materials have been evaluated for use in the FALCom system; however, this report describes aluminum micro-particles that are aligned and oriented in an acrylic photopolymer matrix. A description of the technology and a review of experimental processing are shown, and conclusions, as well as, future work are discussed.

  9. The GLOBE 3D Genome Platform - towards a novel system-biological paper tool to integrate the huge complexity of genome organization and function.

    PubMed

    Knoch, Tobias A; Lesnussa